Science.gov

Sample records for adjusted effect estimates

  1. Lasso adjustments of treatment effect estimates in randomized experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bloniarz, Adam; Liu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.; Yu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We provide a principled way for investigators to analyze randomized experiments when the number of covariates is large. Investigators often use linear multivariate regression to analyze randomized experiments instead of simply reporting the difference of means between treatment and control groups. Their aim is to reduce the variance of the estimated treatment effect by adjusting for covariates. If there are a large number of covariates relative to the number of observations, regression may perform poorly because of overfitting. In such cases, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) may be helpful. We study the resulting Lasso-based treatment effect estimator under the Neyman–Rubin model of randomized experiments. We present theoretical conditions that guarantee that the estimator is more efficient than the simple difference-of-means estimator, and we provide a conservative estimator of the asymptotic variance, which can yield tighter confidence intervals than the difference-of-means estimator. Simulation and data examples show that Lasso-based adjustment can be advantageous even when the number of covariates is less than the number of observations. Specifically, a variant using Lasso for selection and ordinary least squares (OLS) for estimation performs particularly well, and it chooses a smoothing parameter based on combined performance of Lasso and OLS. PMID:27382153

  2. Lasso adjustments of treatment effect estimates in randomized experiments.

    PubMed

    Bloniarz, Adam; Liu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Sekhon, Jasjeet S; Yu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    We provide a principled way for investigators to analyze randomized experiments when the number of covariates is large. Investigators often use linear multivariate regression to analyze randomized experiments instead of simply reporting the difference of means between treatment and control groups. Their aim is to reduce the variance of the estimated treatment effect by adjusting for covariates. If there are a large number of covariates relative to the number of observations, regression may perform poorly because of overfitting. In such cases, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) may be helpful. We study the resulting Lasso-based treatment effect estimator under the Neyman-Rubin model of randomized experiments. We present theoretical conditions that guarantee that the estimator is more efficient than the simple difference-of-means estimator, and we provide a conservative estimator of the asymptotic variance, which can yield tighter confidence intervals than the difference-of-means estimator. Simulation and data examples show that Lasso-based adjustment can be advantageous even when the number of covariates is less than the number of observations. Specifically, a variant using Lasso for selection and ordinary least squares (OLS) for estimation performs particularly well, and it chooses a smoothing parameter based on combined performance of Lasso and OLS. PMID:27382153

  3. Does exposure prediction bias health effect estimation? The relationship between confounding adjustment and exposure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    In environmental epidemiology, we are often faced with two challenges. First, an exposure prediction model is needed to estimate the exposure to an agent of interest, ideally at the individual level. Second, when estimating the health-effect associated with the exposure, confounding adjustment is needed in the health-effects regression model. The current literature addresses these two challenges separately. That is, methods that account for measurement error in the predicted exposure often fail to acknowledge the possibility of confounding, while methods designed to control confounding often fail to acknowledge that the exposure has been predicted. In this paper, we consider exposure prediction and confounding adjustment in a health-effects regression model simultaneously. By using theoretical arguments and simulation studies, we show that the bias of a health-effect estimate is influenced by the exposure prediction model, the type of confounding adjustment used in the health-effects regression model, and the relationship between these two. Moreover, we argue that even with a health-effects regression model that properly adjusts for confounding, the use of a predicted exposure can bias the health-effect estimate unless all confounders included in the health-effects regression model are also included in the exposure prediction model. While these results of this paper were motivated by studies of environmental contaminants, they apply more broadly to any context where an exposure needs to be predicted. PMID:24815302

  4. Coverage-adjusted entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Vu, Vincent Q; Yu, Bin; Kass, Robert E

    2007-09-20

    Data on 'neural coding' have frequently been analyzed using information-theoretic measures. These formulations involve the fundamental and generally difficult statistical problem of estimating entropy. We review briefly several methods that have been advanced to estimate entropy and highlight a method, the coverage-adjusted entropy estimator (CAE), due to Chao and Shen that appeared recently in the environmental statistics literature. This method begins with the elementary Horvitz-Thompson estimator, developed for sampling from a finite population, and adjusts for the potential new species that have not yet been observed in the sample-these become the new patterns or 'words' in a spike train that have not yet been observed. The adjustment is due to I. J. Good, and is called the Good-Turing coverage estimate. We provide a new empirical regularization derivation of the coverage-adjusted probability estimator, which shrinks the maximum likelihood estimate. We prove that the CAE is consistent and first-order optimal, with rate O(P)(1/log n), in the class of distributions with finite entropy variance and that, within the class of distributions with finite qth moment of the log-likelihood, the Good-Turing coverage estimate and the total probability of unobserved words converge at rate O(P)(1/(log n)(q)). We then provide a simulation study of the estimator with standard distributions and examples from neuronal data, where observations are dependent. The results show that, with a minor modification, the CAE performs much better than the MLE and is better than the best upper bound estimator, due to Paninski, when the number of possible words m is unknown or infinite. PMID:17567838

  5. Risk Prediction for Prostate Cancer Recurrence Through Regularized Estimation with Simultaneous Adjustment for Nonlinear Clinical Effects*

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Chung, Matthias; Moreno, Carlos S.; Johnson, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    In biomedical studies, it is of substantial interest to develop risk prediction scores using high-dimensional data such as gene expression data for clinical endpoints that are subject to censoring. In the presence of well-established clinical risk factors, investigators often prefer a procedure that also adjusts for these clinical variables. While accelerated failure time (AFT) models are a useful tool for the analysis of censored outcome data, it assumes that covariate effects on the logarithm of time-to-event are linear, which is often unrealistic in practice. We propose to build risk prediction scores through regularized rank estimation in partly linear AFT models, where high-dimensional data such as gene expression data are modeled linearly and important clinical variables are modeled nonlinearly using penalized regression splines. We show through simulation studies that our model has better operating characteristics compared to several existing models. In particular, we show that there is a non-negligible effect on prediction as well as feature selection when nonlinear clinical effects are misspecified as linear. This work is motivated by a recent prostate cancer study, where investigators collected gene expression data along with established prognostic clinical variables and the primary endpoint is time to prostate cancer recurrence. We analyzed the prostate cancer data and evaluated prediction performance of several models based on the extended c statistic for censored data, showing that 1) the relationship between the clinical variable, prostate specific antigen, and the prostate cancer recurrence is likely nonlinear, i.e., the time to recurrence decreases as PSA increases and it starts to level off when PSA becomes greater than 11; 2) correct specification of this nonlinear effect improves performance in prediction and feature selection; and 3) addition of gene expression data does not seem to further improve the performance of the resultant risk

  6. Adjustment of Measurements with Multiplicative Errors: Error Analysis, Estimates of the Variance of Unit Weight, and Effect on Volume Estimation from LiDAR-Type Digital Elevation Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  7. Adjustment of measurements with multiplicative errors: error analysis, estimates of the variance of unit weight, and effect on volume estimation from LiDAR-type digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  8. On variance estimate for covariate adjustment by propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Baiming; Zou, Fei; Shuster, Jonathan J; Tighe, Patrick J; Koch, Gary G; Zhou, Haibo

    2016-09-10

    Propensity score (PS) methods have been used extensively to adjust for confounding factors in the statistical analysis of observational data in comparative effectiveness research. There are four major PS-based adjustment approaches: PS matching, PS stratification, covariate adjustment by PS, and PS-based inverse probability weighting. Though covariate adjustment by PS is one of the most frequently used PS-based methods in clinical research, the conventional variance estimation of the treatment effects estimate under covariate adjustment by PS is biased. As Stampf et al. have shown, this bias in variance estimation is likely to lead to invalid statistical inference and could result in erroneous public health conclusions (e.g., food and drug safety and adverse events surveillance). To address this issue, we propose a two-stage analytic procedure to develop a valid variance estimator for the covariate adjustment by PS analysis strategy. We also carry out a simple empirical bootstrap resampling scheme. Both proposed procedures are implemented in an R function for public use. Extensive simulation results demonstrate the bias in the conventional variance estimator and show that both proposed variance estimators offer valid estimates for the true variance, and they are robust to complex confounding structures. The proposed methods are illustrated for a post-surgery pain study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26999553

  9. 28 CFR 100.19 - Adjustments to agreement estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adjustments to agreement estimate. 100.19..., COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.19 Adjustments to agreement estimate. (a... the adjustment results in an increase in the estimated reimbursement, the FBI will review...

  10. 42 CFR 403.750 - Estimate of expenditures and adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Estimate of expenditures and adjustments. 403.750...-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.750 Estimate of expenditures and adjustments. (a) Estimates. CMS estimates the level of expenditures for services provided under this subpart before the...

  11. Model-Based Estimates of the Effects of Efavirenz on Bedaquiline Pharmacokinetics and Suggested Dose Adjustments for Patients Coinfected with HIV and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elin M.; Aweeka, Francesca; Park, Jeong-Gun; Marzan, Florence; Karlsson, Mats O.

    2013-01-01

    Safe, effective concomitant treatment regimens for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection are urgently needed. Bedaquiline (BDQ) is a promising new anti-TB drug, and efavirenz (EFV) is a commonly used antiretroviral. Due to EFV's induction of cytochrome P450 3A4, the metabolic enzyme responsible for BDQ biotransformation, the drugs are expected to interact. Based on data from a phase I, single-dose pharmacokinetic study, a nonlinear mixed-effects model characterizing BDQ pharmacokinetics and interaction with multiple-dose EFV was developed. BDQ pharmacokinetics were best described by a 3-compartment disposition model with absorption through a dynamic transit compartment model. Metabolites M2 and M3 were described by 2-compartment models with clearance of BDQ and M2, respectively, as input. Impact of induction was described as an instantaneous change in clearance 1 week after initialization of EFV treatment and estimated for all compounds. The model predicts average steady-state concentrations of BDQ and M2 to be reduced by 52% (relative standard error [RSE], 3.7%) with chronic coadministration. A range of models with alternative structural assumptions regarding onset of induction effect and fraction metabolized resulted in similar estimates of the typical reduction and did not offer a markedly better fit to data. Simulations to investigate alternative regimens mitigating the estimated interaction effect were performed. The results suggest that simple adjustments of the standard regimen during EFV coadministration can prevent reduced exposure to BDQ without increasing exposures to M2. However, exposure to M3 would increase. Evaluation in clinical trials of adjusted regimens is necessary to ensure appropriate dosing for HIV-infected TB patients on an EFV-based regimen. PMID:23571542

  12. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  13. 28 CFR 100.19 - Adjustments to agreement estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the FBI when any change affecting the level of reimbursement occurs. (2) Upon such notification, if the adjustment results in an increase in the estimated reimbursement, the FBI will review the... expenditure. (3) The FBI will provide the decision as to the acceptability of any increase to the carrier...

  14. 28 CFR 100.19 - Adjustments to agreement estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the FBI when any change affecting the level of reimbursement occurs. (2) Upon such notification, if the adjustment results in an increase in the estimated reimbursement, the FBI will review the... expenditure. (3) The FBI will provide the decision as to the acceptability of any increase to the carrier...

  15. 28 CFR 100.19 - Adjustments to agreement estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the FBI when any change affecting the level of reimbursement occurs. (2) Upon such notification, if the adjustment results in an increase in the estimated reimbursement, the FBI will review the... expenditure. (3) The FBI will provide the decision as to the acceptability of any increase to the carrier...

  16. 28 CFR 100.19 - Adjustments to agreement estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the FBI when any change affecting the level of reimbursement occurs. (2) Upon such notification, if the adjustment results in an increase in the estimated reimbursement, the FBI will review the... expenditure. (3) The FBI will provide the decision as to the acceptability of any increase to the carrier...

  17. Estimation of adjusted rate differences using additive negative binomial regression.

    PubMed

    Donoghoe, Mark W; Marschner, Ian C

    2016-08-15

    Rate differences are an important effect measure in biostatistics and provide an alternative perspective to rate ratios. When the data are event counts observed during an exposure period, adjusted rate differences may be estimated using an identity-link Poisson generalised linear model, also known as additive Poisson regression. A problem with this approach is that the assumption of equality of mean and variance rarely holds in real data, which often show overdispersion. An additive negative binomial model is the natural alternative to account for this; however, standard model-fitting methods are often unable to cope with the constrained parameter space arising from the non-negativity restrictions of the additive model. In this paper, we propose a novel solution to this problem using a variant of the expectation-conditional maximisation-either algorithm. Our method provides a reliable way to fit an additive negative binomial regression model and also permits flexible generalisations using semi-parametric regression functions. We illustrate the method using a placebo-controlled clinical trial of fenofibrate treatment in patients with type II diabetes, where the outcome is the number of laser therapy courses administered to treat diabetic retinopathy. An R package is available that implements the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27073156

  18. Uncertainty-based Estimation of the Secure Range for ISO New England Dynamic Interchange Adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, Xiaochuan; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-04-14

    The paper proposes an approach to estimate the secure range for dynamic interchange adjustment, which assists system operators in scheduling the interchange with neighboring control areas. Uncertainties associated with various sources are incorporated. The proposed method is implemented in the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for ISO New England. Simulation results are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Meaningful QQ adjustment of TRMM/GPM daily rainfall estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegram, Geoff; Bardossy, Andras; Sinclair, Scott

    2016-04-01

    In many parts of the world, particularly in Africa, the daily raingauge networks are sparse. It is therefore sensible to use remote sensing estimates of precipitation to fill the gaps, but readily available products like TRMM and it successor GPM are frequently found to be biased. This presentation describes a method of bias adjustment of TRMM using quantile-quantile (QQ) transforms of the probability distributions of TRMM daily rainfall accumulations over its grid of 0.25 degree pixels/blocks. There are 4 main steps in the procedure. The first is to collect the daily gauge readings in those TRMM pixels containing gauges to obtain useful estimates of spatial rainfall for ground referencing. These estimates need to be adjusted from gauge to areal estimates taking the number of gauges in each pixel into account. We found that the distributions of the areal rainfall estimates are influenced by the number of gauges in each block, so we devised a means of transforming point to areal rainfall meaningfully. The second step is to determine the parameters of the probability distributions of the gauge-based block areal rainfall; we found that the Weibull distribution with 2 parameters is a suitable and useful choice. The pairs of Weibull parameters of rainfall on many blocks are correlated. To enable their interpolation, as an intermediate step, they have to be decorrelated using canonical decomposition. These transformed parameter pairs are then separately interpolated to empty blocks over the region of choice. They are then back-transformed at each TRMM pixel to Weibull parameters to provide gauge referenced daily rainfall distributions. The third step is to determine the Weibull distributions of the TRMM daily rainfall estimates in each block, based on their brief 11-year history. The fourth and last step is to QQ transform the individual daily TRMM rainfall estimates via the interpolated gauge-block rainfall distributions. This procedure achieves the desired corrected

  20. 15 CFR 6.5 - Effective date of adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.5 Effective date of adjustments. The adjustments made by § 6.4 of this part, of... December 11, 2008, and before the effective date of any future inflation adjustment thereto made...

  1. 15 CFR 6.5 - Effective date of adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.5 Effective date of adjustments. The adjustments made by § 6.4 of this part, of... December 7, 2012, and before the effective date of any future inflation adjustment thereto made...

  2. 15 CFR 6.5 - Effective date of adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.5 Effective date of adjustments. The adjustments made by § 6.4 of this part, of... December 11, 2008, and before the effective date of any future inflation adjustment thereto made...

  3. 15 CFR 6.5 - Effective date of adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.5 Effective date of adjustments. The adjustments made by § 6.4 of this part, of... December 11, 2008, and before the effective date of any future inflation adjustment thereto made...

  4. 15 CFR 6.5 - Effective date of adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS § 6.5 Effective date of adjustments. The adjustments made by § 6.4 of this part, of... December 7, 2012, and before the effective date of any future inflation adjustment thereto made...

  5. Bias adjustment of satellite-based precipitation estimation using gauge observations: A case study in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongwen; Hsu, Kuolin; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Xu, Xinyi; Braithwaite, Dan; Verbist, Koen M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates (SPEs) are promising alternative precipitation data for climatic and hydrological applications, especially for regions where ground-based observations are limited. However, existing satellite-based rainfall estimations are subject to systematic biases. This study aims to adjust the biases in the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) rainfall data over Chile, using gauge observations as reference. A novel bias adjustment framework, termed QM-GW, is proposed based on the nonparametric quantile mapping approach and a Gaussian weighting interpolation scheme. The PERSIANN-CCS precipitation estimates (daily, 0.04°×0.04°) over Chile are adjusted for the period of 2009-2014. The historical data (satellite and gauge) for 2009-2013 are used to calibrate the methodology; nonparametric cumulative distribution functions of satellite and gauge observations are estimated at every 1°×1° box region. One year (2014) of gauge data was used for validation. The results show that the biases of the PERSIANN-CCS precipitation data are effectively reduced. The spatial patterns of adjusted satellite rainfall show high consistency to the gauge observations, with reduced root-mean-square errors and mean biases. The systematic biases of the PERSIANN-CCS precipitation time series, at both monthly and daily scales, are removed. The extended validation also verifies that the proposed approach can be applied to adjust SPEs into the future, without further need for ground-based measurements. This study serves as a valuable reference for the bias adjustment of existing SPEs using gauge observations worldwide.

  6. Applying propensity scores estimated in a full cohort to adjust for confounding in subgroup analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rassen, Jeremy A.; Glynn, Robert J.; Rothman, Kenneth J.; Setoguchi, Soko; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    A correctly-specified propensity score (PS) estimated in a cohort (“cohort PS”) should in expectation remain valid in a subgroup population. We sought to determine whether using a cohort PS can be validly applied to subgroup analyses and thus add efficiency to studies with many subgroups or restricted data. In each of 3 cohort studies we estimated a cohort PS, defined 5 subgroups, and then estimated subgroup-specific PSs. We compared difference in treatment effect estimates for subgroup analyses adjusted by cohort PSs versus subgroup-specific PSs. Then, 10M times, we simulated a population with known characteristics of confounding, subgroup size, treatment interactions, and treatment effect, and again assessed difference in point estimates. We observed that point estimates in most subgroups were substantially similar with the two methods of adjustment. In simulations, the effect estimates differed by a median of 3.4% (interquartile [IQ] range 1.3% to 10.0%). The IQ range exceeded 10% only in cases where the subgroup had <1000 patients or few outcome events. Our empirical and simulation results indicated that using a cohort PS in subgroup analyses was a feasible approach, particularly in larger subgroups. PMID:22162077

  7. Effects of Maternal Depression on Youth Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jennifer

    Depressive disorders are chronic illnesses affecting women and their families for extended periods of time. This paper summarizes research related to the effects of maternal depression on children's short and long term adjustment. Children of depressed mothers are at risk for internalizing and externalizing disorders. Genetics account for a small…

  8. Adjustment of Sensor Locations During Thermal Property Parameter Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependent thermal properties of a material may be evaluated from transient temperature histories using nonlinear parameter estimation techniques. The usual approach is to minimize the sum of the squared errors between measured and calculated temperatures at specific locations in the body. Temperature measurements are usually made with thermocouples and it is customary to take thermocouple locations as known and fixed during parameter estimation computations. In fact, thermocouple locations are never known exactly. Location errors on the order of the thermocouple wire diameter are intrinsic to most common instrumentation procedures (e.g., inserting a thermocouple into a drilled hole) and additional errors can be expected for delicate materials, difficult installations, large thermocouple beads, etc.. Thermocouple location errors are especially significant when estimating thermal properties of low diffusively materials which can sustain large temperature gradients during testing. In the present work, a parameter estimation formulation is presented which allows for the direct inclusion of thermocouple positions into the primary parameter estimation procedure. It is straightforward to set bounds on thermocouple locations which exclude non-physical locations and are consistent with installation tolerances. Furthermore, bounds may be tightened to an extent consistent with any independent verification of thermocouple location, such as x-raying, and so the procedure is entirely consonant with experimental information. A mathematical outline of the procedure is given and its implementation is illustrated through numerical examples characteristic of light-weight, high-temperature ceramic insulation during transient heating. The efficacy and the errors associated with the procedure are discussed.

  9. A consistent local linear estimator of the covariate adjusted correlation coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Danh V.; Şentürk, Damla

    2009-01-01

    Consider the correlation between two random variables (X, Y), both not directly observed. One only observes X̃ = φ1(U)X + φ2(U) and Ỹ = ψ1(U)Y + ψ2(U), where all four functions {φl(·),ψl(·), l = 1, 2} are unknown/unspecified smooth functions of an observable covariate U. We consider consistent estimation of the correlation between the unobserved variables X and Y, adjusted for the above general dual additive and multiplicative effects of U, based on the observed data (X̃, Ỹ, U). PMID:21720454

  10. NDVI saturation adjustment: a new approach for improving cropland performance estimates in the Greater Platte River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Daniel M.; Phuyal, Khem P.; Ji, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new approach that adjusted normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) pixel values that were near saturation to better characterize the cropland performance (CP) in the Greater Platte River Basin (GPRB), USA. The relationship between NDVI and the ratio vegetation index (RVI) at high NDVI values was investigated, and an empirical equation for estimating saturation-adjusted NDVI (NDVIsat_adjust) based on RVI was developed. A 10-year (2000–2009) NDVIsat_adjust data set was developed using 250-m 7-day composite historical eMODIS (expedited Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) NDVI data. The growing season averaged NDVI (GSN), which is a proxy for ecosystem performance, was estimated and long-term NDVI non-saturation- and saturation-adjusted cropland performance (CPnon_sat_adjust, CPsat_adjust) maps were produced over the GPRB. The final CP maps were validated using National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) crop yield data. The relationship between CPsat_adjust and the NASS average corn yield data (r = 0.78, 113 samples) is stronger than the relationship between CPnon_sat_adjust and the NASS average corn yield data (r = 0.67, 113 samples), indicating that the new CPsat_adjust map reduces the NDVI saturation effects and is in good agreement with the corn yield ground observations. Results demonstrate that the NDVI saturation adjustment approach improves the quality of the original GSN map and better depicts the actual vegetation conditions of the GPRB cropland systems.

  11. Estimation of Data Uncertainty Adjustment Parameters for Multivariate Earth Rotation Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Li-yu; Steppe, J. Alan

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a maximum likelihood method to estimate a set of data uncertainty adjustment parameters, iccluding scaling factors and additive variances and covariances, for multivariate Earth rotation series.

  12. Covariate-Adjusted Linear Mixed Effects Model with an Application to Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Danh V.; Şentürk, Damla; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Linear mixed effects (LME) models are useful for longitudinal data/repeated measurements. We propose a new class of covariate-adjusted LME models for longitudinal data that nonparametrically adjusts for a normalizing covariate. The proposed approach involves fitting a parametric LME model to the data after adjusting for the nonparametric effects of a baseline confounding covariate. In particular, the effect of the observable covariate on the response and predictors of the LME model is modeled nonparametrically via smooth unknown functions. In addition to covariate-adjusted estimation of fixed/population parameters and random effects, an estimation procedure for the variance components is also developed. Numerical properties of the proposed estimators are investigated with simulation studies. The consistency and convergence rates of the proposed estimators are also established. An application to a longitudinal data set on calcium absorption, accounting for baseline distortion from body mass index, illustrates the proposed methodology. PMID:19266053

  13. Estimating Statistical Power When Making Adjustments for Multiple Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kristin E.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing focus on the issue of multiple hypotheses testing in education evaluation studies. In these studies, researchers are typically interested in testing the effectiveness of an intervention on multiple outcomes, for multiple subgroups, at multiple points in time or across multiple treatment groups. When…

  14. Estimating adjusted prevalence ratio in clustered cross-sectional epidemiological data

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos Antônio ST; Fiaccone, Rosemeire L; Oliveira, Nelson F; Cunha, Sérgio; Barreto, Maurício L; do Carmo, Maria Beatriz B; Moncayo, Ana-Lucia; Rodrigues, Laura C; Cooper, Philip J; Amorim, Leila D

    2008-01-01

    Background Many epidemiologic studies report the odds ratio as a measure of association for cross-sectional studies with common outcomes. In such cases, the prevalence ratios may not be inferred from the estimated odds ratios. This paper overviews the most commonly used procedures to obtain adjusted prevalence ratios and extends the discussion to the analysis of clustered cross-sectional studies. Methods Prevalence ratios(PR) were estimated using logistic models with random effects. Their 95% confidence intervals were obtained using delta method and clustered bootstrap. The performance of these approaches was evaluated through simulation studies. Using data from two studies with health-related outcomes in children, we discuss the interpretation of the measures of association and their implications. Results The results from data analysis highlighted major differences between estimated OR and PR. Results from simulation studies indicate an improved performance of delta method compared to bootstrap when there are small number of clusters. Conclusion We recommend the use of logistic model with random effects for analysis of clustered data. The choice of method to estimate confidence intervals for PR (delta or bootstrap method) should be based on study design. PMID:19087281

  15. A VLBI baseline post-adjustment approach for station velocity estimation in Eurasian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Baseline lengths and their time-derivatives among 58 geodetic VLBI stations were fitted by using 4439 observing sessions from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). First, the velocities of eight stations in Eurasian continent were set as unknown quantities. Then, two standard global solutions from 3523 IVS sessions and 1110 sessions from database code XA, respectively, were applied prior to all-station coordinates and the non-estimated station velocities. Finally, from the relations among the coordinates, velocities, baseline length and its time-derivative, two types of baseline post-adjustment (BPA) were used to estimate the velocities of the eight stations. We discuss the data processing details, including the effect of different prior values for the stations and the optimal solution. The results suggest that the precision of the station velocities based on the proposed approach is comparable to that of the global solution of the XA sessions. The baseline structure and the prior values of the stations affect the velocity estimates. Compared to the standard method of velocity estimation, there are no external constrains and conditions used in the proposed method.

  16. What's the Risk? A Simple Approach for Estimating Adjusted Risk Measures from Nonlinear Models Including Logistic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Lawrence C; Norton, Edward C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a general method (called regression risk analysis) to estimate adjusted risk measures from logistic and other nonlinear multiple regression models. We show how to estimate standard errors for these estimates. These measures could supplant various approximations (e.g., adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) that may diverge, especially when outcomes are common. Study Design Regression risk analysis estimates were compared with internal standards as well as with Mantel–Haenszel estimates, Poisson and log-binomial regressions, and a widely used (but flawed) equation to calculate adjusted risk ratios (ARR) from AOR. Data Collection Data sets produced using Monte Carlo simulations. Principal Findings Regression risk analysis accurately estimates ARR and differences directly from multiple regression models, even when confounders are continuous, distributions are skewed, outcomes are common, and effect size is large. It is statistically sound and intuitive, and has properties favoring it over other methods in many cases. Conclusions Regression risk analysis should be the new standard for presenting findings from multiple regression analysis of dichotomous outcomes for cross-sectional, cohort, and population-based case–control studies, particularly when outcomes are common or effect size is large. PMID:18793213

  17. Confounding in the Estimation of Mediation Effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Bienias, Julia L; Bennett, David A

    2007-03-01

    A mediation effect explains the relationship of a risk factor and an outcome through a mediator variable which is a step in their pathway. Under the assumption of no cycling in the causal relationship, we consider various situations in which a fourth variable may interfere the estimation of a mediation effect as a confounding factor. Our asymptotic results, which are supported by a Monte Carlo study, show that adjusting for confounding factors under certain conditions might lead to biased estimates. A general guideline is provided for when it is appropriate to adjust for confounding factors in estimating a mediation effect. We apply the guideline to the estimation of the mediation effect of Alzheimer's disease pathology in the relationship between the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele and cognitive function among 125 deceased participants from the Religious Orders Study, a longitudinal, clinical-pathologic study of aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:17940582

  18. Confounding in the Estimation of Mediation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Bienias, Julia L.; Bennett, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A mediation effect explains the relationship of a risk factor and an outcome through a mediator variable which is a step in their pathway. Under the assumption of no cycling in the causal relationship, we consider various situations in which a fourth variable may interfere the estimation of a mediation effect as a confounding factor. Our asymptotic results, which are supported by a Monte Carlo study, show that adjusting for confounding factors under certain conditions might lead to biased estimates. A general guideline is provided for when it is appropriate to adjust for confounding factors in estimating a mediation effect. We apply the guideline to the estimation of the mediation effect of Alzheimer’s disease pathology in the relationship between the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele and cognitive function among 125 deceased participants from the Religious Orders Study, a longitudinal, clinical-pathologic study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:17940582

  19. Log Pearson type 3 quantile estimators with regional skew information and low outlier adjustments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffis, V.W.; Stedinger, J.R.; Cohn, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The recently developed expected moments algorithm (EMA) [Cohn et al., 1997] does as well as maximum likelihood estimations at estimating log-Pearson type 3 (LP3) flood quantiles using systematic and historical flood information. Needed extensions include use of a regional skewness estimator and its precision to be consistent with Bulletin 17B. Another issue addressed by Bulletin 17B is the treatment of low outliers. A Monte Carlo study compares the performance of Bulletin 17B using the entire sample with and without regional skew with estimators that use regional skew and censor low outliers, including an extended EMA estimator, the conditional probability adjustment (CPA) from Bulletin 17B, and an estimator that uses probability plot regression (PPR) to compute substitute values for low outliers. Estimators that neglect regional skew information do much worse than estimators that use an informative regional skewness estimator. For LP3 data the low outlier rejection procedure generally results in no loss of overall accuracy, and the differences between the MSEs of the estimators that used an informative regional skew are generally modest in the skewness range of real interest. Samples contaminated to model actual flood data demonstrate that estimators which give special treatment to low outliers significantly outperform estimators that make no such adjustment.

  20. Baseline Estimation Algorithm with Block Adjustment for Multi-Pass Dual-Antenna Insar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guowang; Xiong, Xin; Xu, Qing; Gong, Zhihui; Zhou, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Baseline parameters and interferometric phase offset need to be estimated accurately, for they are key parameters in processing of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar). If adopting baseline estimation algorithm with single pass, it needs large quantities of ground control points to estimate interferometric parameters for mosaicking multiple passes dual-antenna airborne InSAR data that covers large areas. What's more, there will be great difference between heights derived from different passes due to the errors of estimated parameters. So, an estimation algorithm of interferometric parameters with block adjustment for multi-pass dual-antenna InSAR is presented to reduce the needed ground control points and height's difference between different passes. The baseline estimation experiments were done with multi-pass InSAR data obtained by Chinese dual-antenna airborne InSAR system. Although there were less ground control points, the satisfied results were obtained, as validated the proposed baseline estimation algorithm.

  1. Ethnic Differences and the Effects of Racism on College Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeSure, G. Evelyn

    This study investigated ethnic differences and the effects of racism on the college adjustment of African-American, Asian, and Latino students who attended five undergraduate predominantly Anglo-American colleges. Results indicated that social adjustment was better for Anglos than it was for Asians and Latinos. African-Americans reported the most…

  2. Estimating contaminant loads in rivers: An application of adjusted maximum likelihood to type 1 censored data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an adjusted maximum likelihood estimator (AMLE) that can be used to estimate fluvial transport of contaminants, like phosphorus, that are subject to censoring because of analytical detection limits. The AMLE is a generalization of the widely accepted minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE), and Monte Carlo experiments confirm that it shares essentially all of the MVUE's desirable properties, including high efficiency and negligible bias. In particular, the AMLE exhibits substantially less bias than alternative censored-data estimators such as the MLE (Tobit) or the MLE followed by a jackknife. As with the MLE and the MVUE the AMLE comes close to achieving the theoretical Frechet-Crame??r-Rao bounds on its variance. This paper also presents a statistical framework, applicable to both censored and complete data, for understanding and estimating the components of uncertainty associated with load estimates. This can serve to lower the cost and improve the efficiency of both traditional and real-time water quality monitoring.

  3. Estimation and adjustment of self-selection bias in volunteer panel web surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chengying

    2016-06-01

    By using propensity score matching method of random sample, we matched simple random sample units and volunteer panel Web survey sample units based on the equal or similar propensity score. The unbiased estimators of the population parameters are constructed by using the matching simple random sample, and the self-selection bias is estimated. We propose propensity score weighted and matching sample post stratification weighted methods to estimate the population parameters, and the self-selection bias in volunteer panel Web Surveys are adjusted.

  4. Adjusting HIV prevalence estimates for non-participation: an application to demographic surveillance

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Mark E.; Marra, Giampiero; Radice, Rosalba; Canning, David; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV testing is a cornerstone of efforts to combat the HIV epidemic, and testing conducted as part of surveillance provides invaluable data on the spread of infection and the effectiveness of campaigns to reduce the transmission of HIV. However, participation in HIV testing can be low, and if respondents systematically select not to be tested because they know or suspect they are HIV positive (and fear disclosure), standard approaches to deal with missing data will fail to remove selection bias. We implemented Heckman-type selection models, which can be used to adjust for missing data that are not missing at random, and established the extent of selection bias in a population-based HIV survey in an HIV hyperendemic community in rural South Africa. Methods We used data from a population-based HIV survey carried out in 2009 in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In this survey, 5565 women (35%) and 2567 men (27%) provided blood for an HIV test. We accounted for missing data using interviewer identity as a selection variable which predicted consent to HIV testing but was unlikely to be independently associated with HIV status. Our approach involved using this selection variable to examine the HIV status of residents who would ordinarily refuse to test, except that they were allocated a persuasive interviewer. Our copula model allows for flexibility when modelling the dependence structure between HIV survey participation and HIV status. Results For women, our selection model generated an HIV prevalence estimate of 33% (95% CI 27–40) for all people eligible to consent to HIV testing in the survey. This estimate is higher than the estimate of 24% generated when only information from respondents who participated in testing is used in the analysis, and the estimate of 27% when imputation analysis is used to predict missing data on HIV status. For men, we found an HIV prevalence of 25% (95% CI 15–35) using the selection model, compared to 16% among those who

  5. Bias-adjusted satellite-based rainfall estimates for predicting floods: Narayani Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shrestha, M.S.; Artan, G.A.; Bajracharya, S.R.; Gautam, D.K.; Tokar, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In Nepal, as the spatial distribution of rain gauges is not sufficient to provide detailed perspective on the highly varied spatial nature of rainfall, satellite-based rainfall estimates provides the opportunity for timely estimation. This paper presents the flood prediction of Narayani Basin at the Devghat hydrometric station (32000km2) using bias-adjusted satellite rainfall estimates and the Geospatial Stream Flow Model (GeoSFM), a spatially distributed, physically based hydrologic model. The GeoSFM with gridded gauge observed rainfall inputs using kriging interpolation from 2003 was used for calibration and 2004 for validation to simulate stream flow with both having a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency of above 0.7. With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Prediction Centre's rainfall estimates (CPC-RFE2.0), using the same calibrated parameters, for 2003 the model performance deteriorated but improved after recalibration with CPC-RFE2.0 indicating the need to recalibrate the model with satellite-based rainfall estimates. Adjusting the CPC-RFE2.0 by a seasonal, monthly and 7-day moving average ratio, improvement in model performance was achieved. Furthermore, a new gauge-satellite merged rainfall estimates obtained from ingestion of local rain gauge data resulted in significant improvement in flood predictability. The results indicate the applicability of satellite-based rainfall estimates in flood prediction with appropriate bias correction. ?? 2011 The Authors. Journal of Flood Risk Management ?? 2011 The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management.

  6. Bias-adjusted satellite-based rainfall estimates for predicting floods: Narayani Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artan, Guleid A.; Tokar, S.A.; Gautam, D.K.; Bajracharya, S.R.; Shrestha, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    In Nepal, as the spatial distribution of rain gauges is not sufficient to provide detailed perspective on the highly varied spatial nature of rainfall, satellite-based rainfall estimates provides the opportunity for timely estimation. This paper presents the flood prediction of Narayani Basin at the Devghat hydrometric station (32 000 km2) using bias-adjusted satellite rainfall estimates and the Geospatial Stream Flow Model (GeoSFM), a spatially distributed, physically based hydrologic model. The GeoSFM with gridded gauge observed rainfall inputs using kriging interpolation from 2003 was used for calibration and 2004 for validation to simulate stream flow with both having a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency of above 0.7. With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Prediction Centre's rainfall estimates (CPC_RFE2.0), using the same calibrated parameters, for 2003 the model performance deteriorated but improved after recalibration with CPC_RFE2.0 indicating the need to recalibrate the model with satellite-based rainfall estimates. Adjusting the CPC_RFE2.0 by a seasonal, monthly and 7-day moving average ratio, improvement in model performance was achieved. Furthermore, a new gauge-satellite merged rainfall estimates obtained from ingestion of local rain gauge data resulted in significant improvement in flood predictability. The results indicate the applicability of satellite-based rainfall estimates in flood prediction with appropriate bias correction.

  7. Slope Estimation of Covariates that Influence Renal Outcome following Renal Transplant Adjusting for Informative Right Censoring

    PubMed Central

    Jaffa, Miran A.; Jaffa, Ayad A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.

    2015-01-01

    A new statistical model is proposed to estimate population and individual slopes that are adjusted for covariates and informative right censoring. Individual slopes are assumed to have a mean that depends on the population slope for the covariates. The number of observations for each individual is modeled as a truncated discrete distribution with mean dependent on the individual subjects' slopes. Our simulation study results indicated that the associated bias and mean squared errors for the proposed model were comparable to those associated with the model that only adjusts for informative right censoring. The proposed model was illustrated using renal transplant dataset to estimate population slopes for covariates that could impact the outcome of renal function following renal transplantation. PMID:25729124

  8. REFAME: Rain Estimation Using Forward Adjusted-Advection of Microwave Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrangi, Ali; Imam, Bisher; Hsu, Kuolin; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Bellerby, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Sensors flying on satellites provide the only practical means of estimating the precipitation that falls over the entire globe, particularly across the vast unpopulated expanses of Earth s oceans. The sensors that observe the Earth using microwave frequencies provide the best data, but currently these are mounted only on satellites flying in "low Earth orbit". Such satellites constantly move across the Earth s surface, providing snapshots of any given location every 12-36 hours. The entire constellation of low-orbit satellites numbers less than a dozen, and their orbits are not coordinated, so a location will frequently go two or more hours between snapshots. "Geosynchronous Earth orbit" (GEO) satellites continuously observe the same region of the globe, allowing them to provide very frequent pictures. For example, the "satellite movies" shown on television come from GEO satellites. However, the sensors available on GEO satellites cannot match the skill of the low-orbit microwave sensors in estimating precipitation. It is perhaps obvious that scientists should try to combine these very different kinds of data, taking advantage of the strengths of each, but this simple concept has proved to be a huge challenge. The scheme in this paper is "Lagrangian", meaning we follow the storm systems, rather than being tied to a fixed grid of boxes on the Earth s surface. Whenever a microwave snapshot occurs, we gladly use the resulting precipitation estimate. Then at all the times between the microwave snapshots we force the storm system to make a smooth transition from one snapshot s values to the next. We know that a lot more changes occur between the snapshots, but this smooth transition the best we can do with the microwave data alone. The key new contribution in this paper is that we also look at the relative variations in the GEO estimates during these in-between times and force the estimated changes in the precipitation to have similar variations. Preliminary testing

  9. Using sightability-adjusted brood-pair ratios to estimate waterfowl productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pagano, Anthony M.; Amundson, Courtney; Pieron, Matthew R.; Arnold, Todd W.; Kimmel, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, biologists used brood-pair ratios (BPRs) as an index to waterfowl productivity to help guide management decisions and evaluate conservation practices. However, BPRs are biased by imperfect detection probabilities, especially for broods. We conducted roadside surveys for breeding waterfowl pairs on 7–8 study sites in the springs of 2006–2008 in northeastern North Dakota, USA. Later each year, we conducted replicate counts of broods on the same wetlands and used mark–recapture methods to estimate sightability-adjusted BPRs (SA-BPRs). Traditional roadside brood surveys detected only 30–45% of the available broods, depending on species. We explored the potential for using SA-BPRs to measure hen success (i.e., the probability a female hatches ≥1 egg across all nesting attempts) for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and other upland-nesting dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). We found that SA-BPRs explained 40% of the variation in hen success over 5 species of dabbling ducks, and we were able to detect an effect of predator reduction on hen success in combined dabblers, but not in mallards alone. However, we found no relationship between SA-BPRs and mallard fledging rates (hen success × initial brood size × duckling survival). Our results suggest that SA-BPRs can provide a cost-effective alternative to traditional measures of productivity such as nesting success, but not to measures of duckling survival. Nevertheless, SA-BPRs may be useful in areas where traditional measures of waterfowl productivity are logistically or financially challenging.

  10. The Differential Effects of Family Violence on Adolescent Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Maura

    1996-01-01

    Examines the effects of different types of domestic violence on adolescent adjustment. High school students (n=935) participated in this study. Results revealed the amounts of parent-child violence and interparental violence witnessed were significant predictors of both externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. Significant effects were…

  11. Global Burden of Leptospirosis: Estimated in Terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Paul R.; Hagan, José E.; Costa, Federico; Calcagno, Juan; Kane, Michael; Martinez-Silveira, Martha S.; Goris, Marga G. A.; Stein, Claudia; Ko, Albert I.; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonosis, occurs in diverse epidemiological settings and affects vulnerable populations, such as rural subsistence farmers and urban slum dwellers. Although leptospirosis can cause life-threatening disease, there is no global burden of disease estimate in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) available. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilised the results of a parallel publication that reported global estimates of morbidity and mortality due to leptospirosis. We estimated Years of Life Lost (YLLs) from age and gender stratified mortality rates. Years of Life with Disability (YLDs) were developed from a simple disease model indicating likely sequelae. DALYs were estimated from the sum of YLLs and YLDs. The study suggested that globally approximately 2·90 million DALYs are lost per annum (UIs 1·25–4·54 million) from the approximately annual 1·03 million cases reported previously. Males are predominantly affected with an estimated 2·33 million DALYs (UIs 0·98–3·69) or approximately 80% of the total burden. For comparison, this is over 70% of the global burden of cholera estimated by GBD 2010. Tropical regions of South and South-east Asia, Western Pacific, Central and South America, and Africa had the highest estimated leptospirosis disease burden. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis imparts a significant health burden worldwide, which approach or exceed those encountered for a number of other zoonotic and neglected tropical diseases. The study findings indicate that highest burden estimates occur in resource-poor tropical countries, which include regions of Africa where the burden of leptospirosis has been under-appreciated and possibly misallocated to other febrile illnesses such as malaria. PMID:26431366

  12. The Bivalency Effect: Evidence for Flexible Adjustment of Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey-Mermet, Alodie; Meier, Beat

    2012-01-01

    When bivalent stimuli (i.e., stimuli with features for two different tasks) appear occasionally, performance is slower on subsequent univalent stimuli. This "bivalency effect" reflects an adjustment of cognitive control arising from the more demanding context created by bivalent stimuli. So far, it has been investigated only on task switch trials,…

  13. Interval Estimates of Multivariate Effect Sizes: Coverage and Interval Width Estimates under Variance Heterogeneity and Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Melinda R.; Hogarty, Kristine Y.; Ferron, John M.; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods were used to examine techniques for constructing confidence intervals around multivariate effect sizes. Using interval inversion and bootstrapping methods, confidence intervals were constructed around the standard estimate of Mahalanobis distance (D[superscript 2]), two bias-adjusted estimates of D[superscript 2], and Huberty's…

  14. Estimating causal effects for multivalued treatments: a comparison of approaches.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Uysal, S Derya; Ryan, Andrew; Adams, John L

    2016-02-20

    Interventions with multivalued treatments are common in medical and health research, such as when comparing the efficacy of competing drugs or interventions, or comparing between various doses of a particular drug. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development of multivalued treatment effect estimators using observational data. In this paper, we compare the performance of commonly used regression-based methods that estimate multivalued treatment effects based on the unconfoundedness assumption. These estimation methods fall into three general categories: (i) estimators based on a model for the outcome variable using conventional regression adjustment; (ii) weighted estimators based on a model for the treatment assignment; and (iii) 'doubly-robust' estimators that model both the treatment assignment and outcome variable within the same framework. We assess the performance of these models using Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate their application with empirical data. Our results show that (i) when models estimating both the treatment and outcome are correctly specified, all adjustment methods provide similar unbiased estimates; (ii) when the outcome model is misspecified, regression adjustment performs poorly, while all the weighting methods provide unbiased estimates; (iii) when the treatment model is misspecified, methods based solely on modeling the treatment perform poorly, while regression adjustment and the doubly robust models provide unbiased estimates; and (iv) when both the treatment and outcome models are misspecified, all methods perform poorly. Given that researchers will rarely know which of the two models is misspecified, our results support the use of doubly robust estimation. PMID:26482211

  15. Indoor Ultra-Wide Band Network Adjustment using Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppanyi, Z.; Toth, C. K.

    2014-11-01

    This study is the part of our ongoing research on using ultra-wide band (UWB) technology for navigation at the Ohio State University. Our tests have indicated that the UWB two-way time-of-flight ranges under indoor circumstances follow a Gaussian mixture distribution that may be caused by the incompleteness of the functional model. In this case, to adjust the UWB network from the observed ranges, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) may provide a better solution for the node coordinates than the widely-used least squares approach. The prerequisite of the maximum likelihood method is to know the probability density functions. The 30 Hz sampling rate of the UWB sensors enables to estimate these functions between each node from the samples in static positioning mode. In order to prove the MLE hypothesis, an UWB network has been established in a multi-path density environment for test data acquisition. The least squares and maximum likelihood coordinate solutions are determined and compared, and the results indicate that better accuracy can be achieved with maximum likelihood estimation.

  16. MM-Estimator and Adjusted Super Smoother based Simultaneous Prediction Confedenc

    2002-07-19

    A Novel Application of Regression Analysis (MM-Estimator) with Simultaneous Prediction Confidence Intervals are proposed to detect up- or down-regulated genes, which are outliers in scatter plots based on log-transformed red (Cy5 fluorescent dye) versus green (Cy3 fluorescent Dye) intensities. Advantages of the application: 1) Robust and Resistant MM-Estimator is a Reliable Method to Build Linear Regression In the presence of Outliers, 2) Exploratory Data Analysis Tools (Boxplots, Averaged Shifted Histograms, Quantile-Quantile Normal Plots and Scattermore » Plots) are Unsed to Test Visually underlying assumptions of linearity and Contaminated Normality in Microarray data), 3) Simultaneous prediction confidence intervals (SPCIs) Guarantee a desired confidence level across the whole range of the data points used for the scatter plots. Results of the outlier detection procedure is a set of significantly differentially expressed genes extracted from the employed microarray data set. A scatter plot smoother (super smoother or locally weighted regression) is used to quantify heteroscendasticity is residual variance (Commonly takes place in lower and higher intensity areas). The set of differentially expressed genes is quantified using interval estimates for P-values as a probabilistic measure of being outlier by chance. Monte Carlo simultations are used to adjust super smoother-based SPCIs.her.« less

  17. Estimating contribution of anthocyanin pigments to osmotic adjustment during winter leaf reddening.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M; Carpenter, Kaylyn L; Cannon, Jonathan G

    2013-01-15

    The association between plant water stress and synthesis of red, anthocyanin pigments in leaves has led some plant biologists to propose an osmotic function of leaf reddening. According to this hypothesis, anthocyanins function as a solute in osmotic adjustment (OA), contributing to depression of osmotic potential (Ψ(π)) and maintenance of turgor pressure during drought-stressed conditions. Here we calculate the percent contribution of anthocyanin to leaf Ψ(π) during OA in two angiosperm evergreen species, Galax urceolata and Gaultheria procumbens. Both species exhibit dramatic leaf reddening under high light during winter, concomitant with declines in leaf water potential and accumulation of solutes. Data previously published by the authors on osmotic potential at full turgor (Ψ(π,100)) of G. urceolata and G. procumbens leaves before and after leaf reddening were used to estimate OA. In vivo molar concentrations of anthocyanin, glucose, fructose, and sucrose measured from the same individuals were converted to pressure equivalents using the Ideal Gas Law, and percent contribution to OA was estimated. Estimated mean OA during winter was -0.7MPa for G. urceolata and -0.8MPa for G. procumbens. In vivo concentrations of anthocyanin (3-10mM) were estimated to account for ∼2% of OA during winter, and comprised <0.7% of Ψ(π,100) in both species. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose combined accounted for roughly 50 and 80% of OA for G. urceolata and G. procumbens, respectively, and comprised ∼20% of Ψ(π,100). We observed that a co-occurring, acyanic species (Vinca minor) achieved similar OA without synthesizing anthocyanin. We conclude that anthocyanins represent a measurable, albeit meager, component of OA in red-leafed evergreen species during winter. However, due to their low concentrations, metabolic costliness relative to other osmolytes, and striking red color (unnecessary for an osmotic function), it is unlikely that they are synthesized solely for an

  18. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100 nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  19. Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core.

    PubMed

    Gugiu, Daniela; Dumitrache, Ion

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a part of a more complex project related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60Co produced by 59Co irradiation could be used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper will mainly describe some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronic equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and heating of the irradiated cobalt rods, are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 2.1. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. PMID:16604599

  20. Estimating restricted mean treatment effects with stacked survival models.

    PubMed

    Wey, Andrew; Vock, David M; Connett, John; Rudser, Kyle

    2016-08-30

    The difference in restricted mean survival times between two groups is a clinically relevant summary measure. With observational data, there may be imbalances in confounding variables between the two groups. One approach to account for such imbalances is estimating a covariate-adjusted restricted mean difference by modeling the covariate-adjusted survival distribution and then marginalizing over the covariate distribution. Because the estimator for the restricted mean difference is defined by the estimator for the covariate-adjusted survival distribution, it is natural to expect that a better estimator of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution is associated with a better estimator of the restricted mean difference. We therefore propose estimating restricted mean differences with stacked survival models. Stacked survival models estimate a weighted average of several survival models by minimizing predicted error. By including a range of parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric models, stacked survival models can robustly estimate a covariate-adjusted survival distribution and, therefore, the restricted mean treatment effect in a wide range of scenarios. We demonstrate through a simulation study that better performance of the covariate-adjusted survival distribution often leads to better mean squared error of the restricted mean difference although there are notable exceptions. In addition, we demonstrate that the proposed estimator can perform nearly as well as Cox regression when the proportional hazards assumption is satisfied and significantly better when proportional hazards is violated. Finally, the proposed estimator is illustrated with data from the United Network for Organ Sharing to evaluate post-lung transplant survival between large-volume and small-volume centers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26934835

  1. Estimating the Burden of Cancers Attributable to Smoking Using Disability Adjusted Life Years in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kristina, Susi Ari; Endarti, Dwi; Sendjaya, Natalia; Pramestuty, Octy

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use is a well-established risk factor for many types of cancers. Recent data on selected cancer incidence and mortality related to smoking in the Indonesian population are provided in this study. Morbidity and mortality data were derived from GLOBOCAN 2012 and the population attributable fraction (PAF) was estimated using the standard methodology developed by the World Health Organization. Using these data, we calculated disability adjusted life year (DALY) values for smoking-related cancer. The DALY was estimated by summation of the years lived with disability (YLD) and years life lost due to premature death (YLL). The cancer cases related to smoking in Indonesia numbered 45,132, accounting for 35,580 cancer deaths. The morbidity and mortality of lung cancer can be considered as the highest priority in both men and women. Furthermore the greatest YLD due to smoking in Indonesian men and women were from pancreas and lung cancers. For YLL among men, the highest years lost were from lung and liver cancers. On the other hand, among women lung oral cavity and lip were most important. Based on the DALY indicator, burden priorities for Indonesian men were lung cancer (298,980), liver cancer (60,367), and nasopharynx (46,185), while among Indonesian women they were lung cancer (34,119), cervix uteri (9,213) and pancreas cancer (5,433). In total, Indonesian burden of cancers attributed to smoking was 638,682 DALY. This study provides evidence about the burden of cancers caused by smoking as a rational basis for initiating national tobacco control policies in Indonesia. PMID:27039808

  2. Adjusting survival estimates for premature transmitter failure: A case study from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, Christopher M.; Perry, Russell W.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Adams, Noah S.

    2013-01-01

    In telemetry studies, premature tag failure causes negative bias in fish survival estimates because tag failure is interpreted as fish mortality. We used mark-recapture modeling to adjust estimates of fish survival for a previous study where premature tag failure was documented. High rates of tag failure occurred during the Vernalis Adaptive Management Plan’s (VAMP) 2008 study to estimate survival of fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during migration through the San Joaquin River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Due to a high rate of tag failure, the observed travel time distribution was likely negatively biased, resulting in an underestimate of tag survival probability in this study. Consequently, the bias-adjustment method resulted in only a small increase in estimated fish survival when the observed travel time distribution was used to estimate the probability of tag survival. Since the bias-adjustment failed to remove bias, we used historical travel time data and conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine how fish survival might have varied across a range of tag survival probabilities. Our analysis suggested that fish survival estimates were low (95% confidence bounds range from 0.052 to 0.227) over a wide range of plausible tag survival probabilities (0.48–1.00), and this finding is consistent with other studies in this system. When tags fail at a high rate, available methods to adjust for the bias may perform poorly. Our example highlights the importance of evaluating the tag life assumption during survival studies, and presents a simple framework for evaluating adjusted survival estimates when auxiliary travel time data are available.

  3. Effect of Wound Classification on Risk-Adjustment in American College of Surgeons NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Cohen, Mark E.; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Latus, Melissa S.; Scholl, Lisa M.; Schwab, Bradley J.; Byrd, Claudia M.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Hall, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical wound classification has been used in risk-adjustment models. However, it can be subjective and potentially improperly bias hospital quality comparisons. The objective is to examine the effect of wound classification on hospital performance risk-adjustment models. Study Design Retrospective review of the 2011 ACS NSQIP database was conducted for wound classification categories: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. To assess the influence of wound classification on risk-adjustment, two models were developed for each outcome: one including and one excluding wound classification. For each model, hospital postoperative complications were estimated using hierarchical multivariable regression methods. Absolute changes in hospital rank, correlations of odds-ratios, and outlier status agreement between models were examined. Results Of the 442,149 cases performed in 315 hospitals: 53.6% were classified as clean; 34.2% clean/contaminated; 6.7% contaminated; and 5.5% dirty/infected. The surgical site infection (SSI) rate was highest in dirty/infected (8.5%) and lowest in clean (1.8%) cases. For overall SSI, the absolute change in risk-adjusted hospital performance rank between models including vs. excluding wound classification was minimal (mean 4.5 out of 315 positions). The correlations between odds ratios of the two performance models were nearly perfect (R=0.9976, P<0.0001), and outlier status agreement was excellent (Kappa=0.9508, P<0.0001). Similar findings were observed in models of subgroups of SSI and other postoperative outcomes. Conclusions In circumstances where alternate information is available for risk-adjustment, there appear to be minimal differences in performance models that include vs. exclude wound classification. Therefore, ACS NSQIP is critically evaluating the continued use of wound classification in hospital performance risk-adjustment models. PMID:25053222

  4. Effects of early exposure and lifetime exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) on child adjustment.

    PubMed

    Graham-Bermann, Sandra A; Perkins, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Children exposed to overwhelming and potentially traumatic events early in their lives are considered at-risk for problems in adjustment. Yet it is not known whether it is the age of first exposure (AFE) to violence or the amount of violence that the child witnessed in their lifetime that has the greatest impact on adjustment. For a sample of 190 children ages 6 to 12 exposed to intimate partner violence, their mothers reported that the average length of their abusive relationship was 10 years. The majority of children were first exposed to family violence as infants (64%), with only 12% first exposed when school-aged. Both the AFE and an estimate of the cumulative amount of violence were significantly and negatively related to children's behavioral problems. However, in regression analyses controlling for child sex, ethnicity, age, and family environment variables, cumulative violence exposure accounted for greater variance in adjustment than did AFE. Furthermore, cumulative violence exposure mediated the relationship between AFE and externalizing behavior problems, indicating that the cumulative exposure to IPV outweighed the AFE in its effect on child adjustment. PMID:20712143

  5. The acoustic effect of vocal tract adjustments in zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Riede, Tobias; Schilling, Nadja; Goller, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Vocal production in songbirds requires the control of the respiratory system, the syrinx as sound source and the vocal tract as acoustic filter. Vocal tract movements consist of beak, tongue and hyoid movements which change the volume of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC), glottal movements and tracheal length changes. The respective contributions of each movement to filter properties are not completely understood, but the effects of this filtering are thought to be very important for acoustic communication in birds. One of the most striking movements of the upper vocal tract during vocal behavior in songbirds involves the OEC. This study measured the acoustic effect of OEC adjustments in zebra finches by comparing resonance acoustics between an utterance with OEC expansion (calls) and a similar utterance without OEC expansion (respiratory sounds induced by a bilateral syringeal denervation). X-ray cineradiography confirmed the presence of an OEC motor pattern during song and call production, and a custom-built Hall-effect collar system confirmed that OEC expansion movements were not present during respiratory sounds. The spectral emphasis during zebra finch call production ranging between 2.5 and 5 kHz was not present during respiratory sounds, indicating strongly that it can be attributed to the OEC expansion. PMID:23085986

  6. The acoustic effect of vocal tract adjustments in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Riede, Tobias; Schilling, Nadja; Goller, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Vocal production in songbirds requires the control of the respiratory system, the syrinx as sound source and the vocal tract as acoustic filter. Vocal tract movements consist of beak, tongue and hyoid movements, which change the volume of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC), glottal movements and tracheal length changes. The respective contributions of each movement to filter properties are not completely understood, but the effects of this filtering are thought to be very important for acoustic communication in birds. One of the most striking movements of the upper vocal tract during vocal behavior in songbirds involves the OEC. This study measured the acoustic effect of OEC adjustments in zebra finches by comparing resonance acoustics between an utterance with OEC expansion (calls) and a similar utterance without OEC expansion (respiratory sounds induced by a bilateral syringeal denervation). X-ray cineradiography confirmed the presence of an OEC motor pattern during song and call production, and a custom-built Hall-effect collar system confirmed that OEC expansion movements were not present during respiratory sounds. The spectral emphasis during zebra finch call production ranging between 2.5 and 5 kHz was not present during respiratory sounds, indicating strongly that it can be attributed to the OEC expansion. PMID:23085986

  7. The Effect of Articulatory Adjustment on Reducing Hypernasality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rong, Panying; Kuehn, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the goal of using articulatory adjustments to reduce hypernasality, this study utilized an articulatory synthesis model (Childers, 2000) to simulate the adjustment of articulatory configurations with an open velopharynx to achieve the same acoustic goal as normal speech simulated with a closed velopharynx. Method: To examine the…

  8. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueter, Martha A.; Koerner, Ascan F.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208…

  9. Effects of Divorce Counseling Groups on Adjustment and Self Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salts, Connie J.; Zongker, Calvin E.

    1983-01-01

    Tested whether self-concept and adjustment of separated or divorced individuals (N=64) could be enhanced by group counseling. Data showed individuals in either a structured or unstructured group had greater improvement in adjustment than individuals who dropped out. No significant differences in improvement in self-concept were noted. (JAC)

  10. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer to true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.

  11. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore » true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  12. The Effect of Family Communication Patterns on Adopted Adolescent Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Rueter, Martha A.

    2008-01-01

    Adoption and family communication both affect adolescent adjustment. We proposed that adoption status and family communication interact such that adopted adolescents in families with certain communication patterns are at greater risk for adjustment problems. We tested this hypothesis using a community-based sample of 384 adoptive and 208 nonadoptive families. Adolescents in these families were, on average, 16 years of age. The results supported our hypothesis. Adopted adolescents were at significantly greater risk for adjustment problems compared to nonadopted adolescents in families that emphasized conformity orientation without conversation orientation and in families that emphasized neither conformity nor conversation orientation. Adolescents in families emphasizing conversation orientation were at lower risk for adjustment problems, regardless of adoption status. PMID:19649145

  13. Real-time adjustment of satellite-based rainfall estimates using the conditional mean: hydrological validation over French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochart, David; Andréassian, Vazken

    2015-04-01

    Satellite precipitation products are known to be plagued by large biases, which limit their use for operational applications. This communication presents a robust approach to adjust the satellite-based rainfall estimates using an intensity-dependent error correction curve, determined by taking the mean of historic ground measurements given the satellite estimates (conditional mean). We apply the procedure to seven satellite precipitation products over French Guiana and present a double validation, first at the raingage scale, and then at the catchment scale. Over the six catchments used here, the rainfall-runoff simulations are considerably improved when the correction is applied, outperforming the well-established quantile mapping technique.

  14. Beam filling loss adjustments for ASR-9 weather channel reflectivity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engholm, Cynthia D.; Troxel, Seth W.

    1990-10-01

    The FAA is deploying over 100 new airport surveillance radars (ASR-9) across the country. In contrast to earlier ASRs, the ASR-9 utilizes a separate digital weather processing channel to provide air traffic controllers with timely, calibrated displays of precipitation intensity. The ASR-9 utilizes dual selectable fan shaped elevation beams designed to track aircraft over a large volume. As a consequence, weather echoes received from these fan shaped beams represent vertically averaged quantities. If the precipitation only partially or nonuniformly fills the beam, then the vertically integrated reflectivity may underestimate the actual intensity of the storm. The ASR-9 weather channel corrects for this by adjusting the range dependent six level reflectivity thresholds. The appropriateness of the currently implemented correction has not been carefully examined and may require modification to take into account regional and morphological variability in storm structure. The method used to derive new beam filling loss adjustments is discussed. An extensive database of volumetric pencil beam radar data were used in conjunction with the ASR-9 simulation facility to derive adjustments aimed at calibrating the precipitation intensity reports to the maximum perceived hazard. Results from this calibration indicate that a single correction is appropriate for all sites and intensities. The new corrections yield substantially improved results over the current corrections in producing these reflectivity reports.

  15. Individual and Contextual Effects of School Adjustment on Adolescent Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Linda R.; Edwards, Ruth W.; Harkabus, Lindsey C.; Chapin, Laurie A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of a student’s own school adjustment as well as the contextual level of school adjustment (the normative level of school adjustment among students in a school) on student's self-reported use of alcohol. Using a dataset of 43,465 male and female 8th grade students from 349 schools across the contiguous United States who participated in a national study of substance use in rural communities between 1996 and 2000, multilevel latent covariate models were utilized to disentangle the individual-level and contextual effects of three school adjustment variables (i.e., school bonding, behavior at school, and friend’s school bonding) on alcohol use. All three school adjustment factors were significant predictors of alcohol use both within and between schools. Furthermore, this study demonstrated a strong contextual effect; students who attended schools where the overall level of school adjustment was higher reported lower levels of alcohol use even after taking their own school adjustment into account. The results demonstrate the importance of both a student’s own level of school adjustment and the normative level of school adjustment among students in the school on an adolescent’s use of alcohol. Differences in school adjustment across schools were quite strongly related to an adolescent's own alcohol use, indicating that school adjustment is an important aspect of school climate. Initiatives aimed at improving school climate may have beneficial effects on students’ alcohol use. PMID:19242802

  16. Aerial surveys adjusted by ground surveys to estimate area occupied by black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sidle, John G.; Augustine, David J.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Miller, Sterling D.; Cully, Jack F., Jr.; Reading, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Aerial surveys using line-intercept methods are one approach to estimate the extent of prairie dog colonies in a large geographic area. Although black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) construct conspicuous mounds at burrow openings, aerial observers have difficulty discriminating between areas with burrows occupied by prairie dogs (colonies) versus areas of uninhabited burrows (uninhabited colony sites). Consequently, aerial line-intercept surveys may overestimate prairie dog colony extent unless adjusted by an on-the-ground inspection of a sample of intercepts. We compared aerial line-intercept surveys conducted over 2 National Grasslands in Colorado, USA, with independent ground-mapping of known black-tailed prairie dog colonies. Aerial line-intercepts adjusted by ground surveys using a single activity category adjustment overestimated colonies by ≥94% on the Comanche National Grassland and ≥58% on the Pawnee National Grassland. We present a ground-survey technique that involves 1) visiting on the ground a subset of aerial intercepts classified as occupied colonies plus a subset of intercepts classified as uninhabited colony sites, and 2) based on these ground observations, recording the proportion of each aerial intercept that intersects a colony and the proportion that intersects an uninhabited colony site. Where line-intercept techniques are applied to aerial surveys or remotely sensed imagery, this method can provide more accurate estimates of black-tailed prairie dog abundance and trends

  17. Mediating Effects of Relationships with Mentors on College Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student adjustment to college and relational health with peers, mentors, and the community. Data were collected from 80 undergraduate students completing their first semester of course work at a large university in the mid-South. A series of simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that…

  18. Adolescent Leisure Dimensions, Psychosocial Adjustment, and Gender Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Graham L.; Inglis, Brad C.

    2012-01-01

    Leisure provides the context for much of adolescent behaviour and development. While both theory and research point to the benefits of participation in leisure activities that are highly structured, the association between structured leisure and psychosocial adjustment is not uniformly high. This paper presents a model of adolescent leisure…

  19. Effects of Domestic Violence on Children's Adjustment in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawud, Samia; And Others

    This study examined the relationship between children's experiences of domestic violence and their adjustment at school. Sixty-three children (28 girls), in Israel, their classmates and teachers took part in the study. Children were divided into four groups: (1) those who were victims of physical abuse; (2) those who witnessed abuse; (3) those who…

  20. The Effect of Childhood Trauma on Later Psychological Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Caroline; Winkelman, Cecelia

    2007-01-01

    This study examined whether adult attachment and cognitive distortion mediate the relationship between childhood trauma and psychological adjustment. The participants were 219 students (40 men and 117 women) enrolled in a university degree. Participants completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, which assessed retrospective accounts of…

  1. Effects of Relational Authenticity on Adjustment to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Holman, Rachel L.; Lancaster, Chloe; Gotay, Stephanie G.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the association between relational health and student adjustment to college. Data were collected from 138 undergraduate students completing their 1st semester at a large university in the mid-southern United States. Regression analysis indicated that higher levels of relational authenticity were a predictor of success during…

  2. Impact of work-related cancers in Taiwan-Estimation with QALY (quality-adjusted life year) and healthcare costs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lukas Jyuhn-Hsiarn; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Hung, Mei-Chuan; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-12-01

    This study estimates the annual numbers of eight work-related cancers, total losses of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and lifetime healthcare expenditures that possibly could be saved by improving occupational health in Taiwan. Three databases were interlinked: the Taiwan Cancer Registry, the National Mortality Registry, and the National Health Insurance Research Database. Annual numbers of work-related cancers were estimated based on attributable fractions (AFs) abstracted from a literature review. The survival functions for eight cancers were estimated and extrapolated to lifetime using a semi-parametric method. A convenience sample of 8846 measurements of patients' quality of life with EQ-5D was collected for utility values and multiplied by survival functions to estimate quality-adjusted life expectancies (QALEs). The loss-of-QALE was obtained by subtracting the QALE of cancer from age- and sex-matched referents simulated from national vital statistics. The lifetime healthcare expenditures were estimated by multiplying the survival probability with mean monthly costs paid by the National Health Insurance for cancer diagnosis and treatment and summing this for the expected lifetime. A total of 3010 males and 726 females with eight work-related cancers were estimated in 2010. Among them, lung cancer ranked first in terms of QALY loss, with an annual total loss-of-QALE of 28,463 QALYs and total lifetime healthcare expenditures of US$36.6 million. Successful prevention of eight work-related cancers would not only avoid the occurrence of 3736 cases of cancer, but would also save more than US$70 million in healthcare costs and 46,750 QALYs for the Taiwan society in 2010. PMID:27413666

  3. Statistical Aspects of Effect Size Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    When the results of a series of independent studies are combined, it is useful to quantitatively estimate the magnitude of the effects. Several methods for estimating effect size are compared in this paper. Glass' estimator and the uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimator are based on the ratio of the sample mean difference and the pooled…

  4. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure in India: Estimate adjusted for baseline mortality.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sourangsu; Dey, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    In India, more than a billion population is at risk of exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration exceeding World Health Organization air quality guideline, posing a serious threat to health. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure is poorly known for India. Here we develop a non-linear power law (NLP) function to estimate the relative risk associated with ambient PM2.5 exposure using satellite-based PM2.5 concentration (2001-2010) that is bias-corrected against coincident direct measurements. We show that estimate of annual premature death in India is lower by 14.7% (19.2%) using NLP (integrated exposure risk function, IER) for assumption of uniform baseline mortality across India (as considered in the global burden of disease study) relative to the estimate obtained by adjusting for state-specific baseline mortality using GDP as a proxy. 486,100 (811,000) annual premature death in India is estimated using NLP (IER) risk functions after baseline mortality adjustment. 54.5% of premature death estimated using NLP risk function is attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 24.0% to ischemic heart disease (IHD), 18.5% to stroke and the remaining 3.0% to lung cancer (LC). 44,900 (5900-173,300) less premature death is expected annually, if India achieves its present annual air quality target of 40μgm(-3). Our results identify the worst affected districts in terms of ambient PM2.5 exposure and resulting annual premature death and call for initiation of long-term measures through a systematic framework of pollution and health data archive. PMID:27063285

  5. Estimating and validating disability-adjusted life years at the global level: a methodological framework for cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) link data on disease occurrence to health outcomes, and they are a useful aid in establishing country-specific agendas regarding cancer control. The variables required to compute DALYs are however multiple and not readily available in many countries. We propose a methodology that derives global DALYs and validate variables and DALYs based on data from various cancer registries. Methods We estimated DALYs for four countries (Norway, Bulgaria, India and Uganda) within each category of the human development index (HDI). The following sources (indicators) were used: Globocan2008 (incidence and mortality), various cancer registries (proportion cured, proportion treated and duration of disease), treatment guidelines (duration of treatment), specific burden of disease studies (sequelae and disability weights), alongside expert opinion. We obtained country-specific population estimates and identified resource levels using the HDI, DALYs are computed as the sum of years of life lost and years lived with disabilities. Results Using mortality:incidence ratios to estimate country-specific survival, and by applying the human development index we derived country-specific estimates of the proportion cured and the proportion treated. The fit between the estimates and observed data from the cancer registries was relatively good. The final DALY estimates were similar to those computed using observed values in Norway, and in WHO’s earlier global burden of disease study. Marked cross-country differences in the patterns of DALYs by cancer sites were observed. In Norway and Bulgaria, breast, colorectal, prostate and lung cancer were the main contributors to DALYs, representing 54% and 45%, respectively, of the totals. These cancers contributed only 27% and 18%, respectively, of total DALYs in India and Uganda. Conclusions Our approach resulted in a series of variables that can be used to estimate country-specific DALYs, enabling global

  6. Automatic parameter estimation of multicompartmental neuron models via minimization of trace error with control adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Goeritz, Marie L.; Marder, Eve

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique to fit conductance-based neuron models to intracellular voltage traces from isolated biological neurons. The biological neurons are recorded in current-clamp with pink (1/f) noise injected to perturb the activity of the neuron. The new algorithm finds a set of parameters that allows a multicompartmental model neuron to match the recorded voltage trace. Attempting to match a recorded voltage trace directly has a well-known problem: mismatch in the timing of action potentials between biological and model neuron is inevitable and results in poor phenomenological match between the model and data. Our approach avoids this by applying a weak control adjustment to the model to promote alignment during the fitting procedure. This approach is closely related to the control theoretic concept of a Luenberger observer. We tested this approach on synthetic data and on data recorded from an anterior gastric receptor neuron from the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. To test the flexibility of this approach, the synthetic data were constructed with conductance models that were different from the ones used in the fitting model. For both synthetic and biological data, the resultant models had good spike-timing accuracy. PMID:25008414

  7. Using linked birth, notification, hospital and mortality data to examine false-positive meningococcal disease reporting and adjust disease incidence estimates for children in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Jorm, L; McIntyre, P

    2015-09-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rare, rapidly progressing condition which may be difficult to diagnose, disproportionally affects children, and has high morbidity and mortality. Accurate incidence estimates are needed to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination and treatment. We used linked notification, hospital, mortality and birth data for all children of an Australian state (2000-2007) to estimate the incidence of meningococcal disease. A total of 595 cases were notified, 684 cases had a hospital diagnosis, and 26 cases died from meningococcal disease. All deaths were notified, but only 68% (466/684) of hospitalized cases. Of non-notified hospitalized cases with more than one clinical admission, most (90%, 103/114) did not have meningococcal disease recorded as their final diagnosis, consistent with initial 'false-positive' hospital meningococcal disease diagnosis. After adjusting for false-positive rates in hospital data, capture-recapture estimation suggested that up to four cases of meningococcal disease may not have been captured in either notification or hospital records. The estimated incidence of meningococcal disease in NSW-born and -resident children aged 0-14 years was 5·1-5·4 cases/100 000 child-years at risk, comparable to international estimates using similar methods, but lower than estimates based on hospital data. PMID:25573266

  8. Enhancement of radar rainfall estimates for urban hydrology through optical flow temporal interpolation and Bayesian gauge-based adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Pen; Ochoa-Rodríguez, Susana; Van Assel, Johan; Pina, Rui Daniel; Pessemier, Mieke; Kroll, Stefan; Willems, Patrick; Onof, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall estimates of the highest possible accuracy and resolution are required for urban hydrological applications, given the small size and fast response which characterise urban catchments. While radar rainfall estimates have the advantage of well capturing the spatial structure of rainfall fields and its variation in time, the commonly available radar rainfall products (typically at ∼1 km/5-10 min resolution) may still fail to satisfy the accuracy and resolution - in particular temporal resolution - requirements of urban hydrology. A methodology is proposed in this paper, to produce higher temporal resolution, more accurate radar rainfall estimates, suitable for urban hydrological applications. The proposed methodology entails two main steps: (1) Temporal interpolation of radar images from the originally-available temporal resolutions (i.e. 5-10 min) to finer resolutions at which local rain gauge data are commonly available (i.e. 1-2 min). This is done using a novel interpolation technique, based upon the multi-scale variational optical flow technique, and which can well capture the small-scale rainfall structures relevant at urban scales. (2) Local and dynamic gauge-based adjustment of the higher temporal resolution radar rainfall estimates is performed afterwards, by means of the Bayesian data merging method. The proposed methodology is tested using as case study a total of 8 storm events observed in the Cranbrook (UK) and Herent (BE) urban catchments, for which radar rainfall estimates, local rain gauge and depth/flow records, as well as recently calibrated urban drainage models were available. The results suggest that the proposed methodology can provide significantly improved radar rainfall estimates and thereby generate more accurate runoff simulations at urban scales, over and above the benefits derived from the mere application of Bayesian merging at the original temporal resolution at which radar estimates are available. The benefits of the proposed

  9. Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Kiff, Cara J.; Cortes, Rebecca; Lengua, Lilana; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David; Mason, W. Alex

    2012-01-01

    Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment Abstract Exposure to adversity during childhood and adolescence predicts adjustment across development. Further, adolescent adjustment problems persist into young adulthood. This study examined relations of contextual adversity with concurrent adolescent adjustment and prospective mental health and health outcomes in young adulthood. A longitudinal sample (N = 808) was followed from age 10 through 27. Perceptions of neighborhood in childhood predicted depression, alcohol use disorders, and HIV risk in young adulthood. Further, the timing of adversity was important in determining the type of problem experienced in adulthood. Youth adjustment predicted adult outcomes, and in some cases, mediated the relation between adversity and outcomes. These findings support the importance of adversity in predicting adjustment and elucidate factors that affect outcomes into young adulthood. PMID:22754271

  10. Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kiff, Cara J; Cortes, Rebecca; Lengua, Lilana; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J David; Mason, W Alex

    2012-06-01

    Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment Abstract Exposure to adversity during childhood and adolescence predicts adjustment across development. Further, adolescent adjustment problems persist into young adulthood. This study examined relations of contextual adversity with concurrent adolescent adjustment and prospective mental health and health outcomes in young adulthood. A longitudinal sample (N = 808) was followed from age 10 through 27. Perceptions of neighborhood in childhood predicted depression, alcohol use disorders, and HIV risk in young adulthood. Further, the timing of adversity was important in determining the type of problem experienced in adulthood. Youth adjustment predicted adult outcomes, and in some cases, mediated the relation between adversity and outcomes. These findings support the importance of adversity in predicting adjustment and elucidate factors that affect outcomes into young adulthood. PMID:22754271

  11. Tidally Adjusted Estimates of Susceptibility to Sea Level Rise for the Contiguous U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, B.; Ziemlinski, R.; Weiss, J. L.; Overpeck, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    As projections for sea level rise this century increase to 1 m or more, it is becoming increasingly important to understand what communities and assets may be most at risk. Here we present the first analysis of low-lying coastal land, housing and population covering the contiguous U.S. while accounting for local and regional differences in the elevation of mean high tides, which range from ~0-3 m above mean sea level. Previous work at this scale has implicitly equated land elevation with height relative to local high tides, leading to underestimated risk in areas with high-elevation high tides, and compromising comparisons of risk across regions with different tidal levels. Our refinement substantially increases the national estimate of land and population within 1-6 m of high tide; we also rank cities and states by their topographic susceptibility to sea level rise.

  12. The Impact of Statistically Adjusting for Rater Effects on Conditional Standard Errors of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Mark R.; Harik, Polina; Clauser, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research indicates that the overall reliability of performance ratings can be improved by using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to adjust for rater effects. The present investigation extends previous work by evaluating the impact of OLS adjustment on standard errors of measurement ("SEM") at specific score levels. In addition, a…

  13. Effects of Peer Victimization on Psychological and Academic Adjustment in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Jenkins, Lyndsay N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effects of frequency of peer victimization experiences on psychological and academic adjustment during early adolescence, with a focus on testing psychological adjustment as a mediator, as well as differences based on gender and type of victimization. The sample in this short-term longitudinal…

  14. The Moderating Effects of Parenting Stress on Children's Adjustment in Woman-Abusing Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levendosky, Alytia A.; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A.

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes sheltered battered women (n=60) and their 7- to 12-year-old children and nonsheltered women (n=61) and their children, to examine the potential moderating effects of maternal parenting stress on children's adjustment in homes with varying levels of domestic violence. Results indicate that children's adjustment was predicted by parenting…

  15. Adjustment of wind-drift effect for real-time systematic error correction in radar rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiang; Han, Dawei; Zhuo, Lu; Huang, Jing; Islam, Tanvir; Zhang, Shuliang

    An effective bias correction procedure using gauge measurement is a significant step for radar data processing to reduce the systematic error in hydrological applications. In these bias correction methods, the spatial matching of precipitation patterns between radar and gauge networks is an important premise. However, the wind-drift effect on radar measurement induces an inconsistent spatial relationship between radar and gauge measurements as the raindrops observed by radar do not fall vertically to the ground. Consequently, a rain gauge does not correspond to the radar pixel based on the projected location of the radar beam. In this study, we introduce an adjustment method to incorporate the wind-drift effect into a bias correlation scheme. We first simulate the trajectory of raindrops in the air using downscaled three-dimensional wind data from the weather research and forecasting model (WRF) and calculate the final location of raindrops on the ground. The displacement of rainfall is then estimated and a radar-gauge spatial relationship is reconstructed. Based on this, the local real-time biases of the bin-average radar data were estimated for 12 selected events. Then, the reference mean local gauge rainfall, mean local bias, and adjusted radar rainfall calculated with and without consideration of the wind-drift effect are compared for different events and locations. There are considerable differences for three estimators, indicating that wind drift has a considerable impact on the real-time radar bias correction. Based on these facts, we suggest bias correction schemes based on the spatial correlation between radar and gauge measurements should consider the adjustment of the wind-drift effect and the proposed adjustment method is a promising solution to achieve this.

  16. Small-Sample Adjustments for Tests of Moderators and Model Fit Using Robust Variance Estimation in Meta-Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Pustejovsky, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses often include studies that report multiple effect sizes based on a common pool of subjects or that report effect sizes from several samples that were treated with very similar research protocols. The inclusion of such studies introduces dependence among the effect size estimates. When the number of studies is large, robust variance…

  17. Improving daily water yield estimates in the Little River Watershed: SWAT adjustments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers are assessing the beneficial effects of conservation practices on water quality with hydrologic models. The assessments depend heavily on accurate simulation of water yield. This study was conducted to improve Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic model daily water yield est...

  18. Age effects on voluntary and automatic adjustments in anti-pointing tasks.

    PubMed

    Verneau; van der Kamp, John; de Looze, Michiel P; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of age on automatic and voluntary motor adjustments in pointing tasks. To this end, young (20-25 years) and middle-aged adults (48-62 years) were instructed to point at a target that could unexpectedly change its location (to the left or right) or its color (to green or red) during the movement. In the location change conditions, participants were asked to either adjust their pointing movement toward the new location (i.e., normal pointing) or in the opposite direction (i.e., anti-pointing). In the color change conditions, participants were instructed to adjust their movement to the left or right depending on the change in color. The results showed that in a large proportion of the anti-pointing trials, participants made two adjustments: an early initial automatic adjustment in the direction of the target shift followed by a late voluntary adjustment toward the opposite direction. It was found that the late voluntary adjustments were delayed for the middle-aged participants relative to the young participants. There were no age differences for the fast automatic adjustment in normal pointing, but the early adjustment in anti-pointing tended to be later in the middle-aged adults. Finally, the difference in the onset of early and late adjustments in anti-pointing adjustments was greater among the middle-aged adults. Hence, this study is the first to show that aging slows down voluntary goal-directed movement control processes to greater extent than the automatic stimulus-driven processes. PMID:26497989

  19. Evaluating hospital readmission rates in dialysis facilities; adjusting for hospital effects.

    PubMed

    He, Kevin; Kalbfleisch, Jack D; Li, Yijiang; Li, Yi

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by the national evaluation of readmission rates among kidney dialysis facilities in the United States, we evaluate the impact of including discharging hospitals on the estimation of facility-level standardized readmission ratios (SRRs). The estimation of SRRs consists of two steps. First, we model the dependence of readmission events on facilities and patient-level characteristics, with or without an adjustment for discharging hospitals. Second, using results from the models, standardization is achieved by computing the ratio of the number of observed events to the number of expected events assuming a population norm and given the case-mix in that facility. A challenging aspect of our motivating example is that the number of parameters is very large and estimation of high-dimensional parameters is troublesome. To solve this problem, we propose a structured Newton-Raphson algorithm for a logistic fixed effects model and an approximate EM algorithm for the logistic mixed effects model. We consider a re-sampling and simulation technique to obtain p-values for the proposed measures. Finally, our method of identifying outlier facilities involves converting the observed p-values to Z-statistics and using the empirical null distribution, which accounts for overdispersion in the data. The finite-sample properties of proposed measures are examined through simulation studies. The methods developed are applied to national dialysis data. It is our great pleasure to present this paper in honor of Ross Prentice, who has been instrumental in the development of modern methods of modeling and analyzing life history and failure time data, and in the inventive applications of these methods to important national data problem. PMID:23709309

  20. Child effects and child care: Implications for risk and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Snell, Emily K; Hindman, Annemarie H; Belsky, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Evocative effects of child characteristics on the quality and quantity of child care were assessed in two studies using longitudinal data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care. We focus on the influence of child characteristics on two important aspects of the child care experience: language stimulation provided by caregivers and quantity of care. In Study 1, associations between the developmental status of children aged 15 to 54 months and the language stimulation provided by their caregivers were examined using path models, and longitudinal child effects were detected across the earliest time points of the study. In Study 2, the associations among child behavior, temperament, development, and time in care were examined. Little evidence was found for such child effects on time in care. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of child care on child development and implications for developmental processes, particularly for children at greatest risk for developmental delay or psychopathology. PMID:26439062

  1. Regional glacial isostatic adjustment in Antarctica estimated from GRACE, Enivsat/ICESat and GPS observations (ESA-STSE project REGINA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemann, V.; Sasgen, I.; Horwath, M.; Petrie, E. J.; Schoen, N.; Pail, R.; Horvath, A.; Bamber, J. L.; Clarke, P. J.; Konrad, H.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The viscoelastic adjustment of the solid Earth to former glacial loads in Antarctica and the associated gravity-field change and surface displacement is a major uncertainty in determining the mass balance of the ice sheet from satellite gravimetry, and, to a lesser extent, altimetry measurements such as CryoSat-2. On the other hand, measurements of GIA inferred from the geodetic observations provide valuable information on the glacial history and the lithosphere and mantle properties in Antarctica. Here, we present an improved regional GIA estimate based on GRACE, Envisat/ICESat and GPS measurements. Making use of the different sensitivities of the observations to surface-mass and solid Earth processes, we derive an improved GIA field, using an ensemble of viscoelastic response functions to a disc load forcing. The estimated GIA signal is interpreted for recent ice load changes in West Antarctica in the presence of a low-viscous upper mantle, and evaluated for correcting GRACE and CryoSat-2 measurements when determining present-day ice-mass balance in Antarctica. The results are part of the ESA-STSE project REGINA, www.regina-science.eu.

  2. An empirically adjusted approach to reproductive number estimation for stochastic compartmental models: A case study of two Ebola outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Brown, Grant D; Oleson, Jacob J; Porter, Aaron T

    2016-06-01

    The various thresholding quantities grouped under the "Basic Reproductive Number" umbrella are often confused, but represent distinct approaches to estimating epidemic spread potential, and address different modeling needs. Here, we contrast several common reproduction measures applied to stochastic compartmental models, and introduce a new quantity dubbed the "empirically adjusted reproductive number" with several advantages. These include: more complete use of the underlying compartmental dynamics than common alternatives, use as a potential diagnostic tool to detect the presence and causes of intensity process underfitting, and the ability to provide timely feedback on disease spread. Conceptual connections between traditional reproduction measures and our approach are explored, and the behavior of our method is examined under simulation. Two illustrative examples are developed: First, the single location applications of our method are established using data from the 1995 Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and a traditional stochastic SEIR model. Second, a spatial formulation of this technique is explored in the context of the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa with particular emphasis on potential use in model selection, diagnosis, and the resulting applications to estimation and prediction. Both analyses are placed in the context of a newly developed spatial analogue of the traditional SEIR modeling approach. PMID:26574727

  3. Assessing Longitudinal Change: Adjustment for Regression to the Mean Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2009-01-01

    Pascarella (J Coll Stud Dev 47:508-520, 2006) has called for an increase in use of longitudinal data with pretest-posttest design when studying effects on college students. However, such designs that use multiple measures to document change are vulnerable to an important threat to internal validity, regression to the mean. Herein, we discuss a…

  4. The Effects of Grouping Practices and Curricular Adjustments on Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieso, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of curricular (textbook, revised, and differentiated) and grouping (whole, between, and within-class) practices on intermediate students' achievement in mathematics. A pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design using a stratified random sample of 31 teachers and their students (N = 645) was…

  5. Estimating quality adjusted progression free survival of first-line treatments for EGFR mutation positive non small cell lung cancer patients in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is an effective treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with an activating mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Randomised clinical trials showed a benefit in progression free survival for gefitinib versus doublet chemotherapy regimens in patients with an activated EGFR mutation (EGFR M+). From a patient perspective, progression free survival is important, but so is health-related quality of life. Therefore, this analysis evaluates the Quality Adjusted progression free survival of gefitinib versus three relevant doublet chemotherapies (gemcitabine/cisplatin (Gem/Cis); pemetrexed/cisplatin (Pem/Cis); paclitaxel/carboplatin (Pac/Carb)) in a Dutch health care setting in patients with EGFR M+ stage IIIB/IV NSCLC. This study uses progression free survival rather than overall survival for its time frame in order to better compare the treatments and to account for the influence that subsequent treatment lines would have on overall survival analysis. Methods Mean progression free survival for Pac/Carb was obtained by extrapolating the median progression free survival as reported in the Iressa-Pan-Asia Study (IPASS). Data from a network meta-analysis was used to estimate the mean progression free survival for therapies of interest relative to Pac/Carb. Adjustment for health-related quality of life was done by incorporating utilities for the Dutch population, obtained by converting FACT-L data (from IPASS) to utility values and multiplying these with the mean progression free survival for each treatment arm to determine the Quality Adjusted progression free survival. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine 95% credibility intervals. Results The Quality Adjusted progression free survival (PFS) (mean, (95% credibility interval)) was 5.2 months (4.5; 5.8) for Gem/Cis, 5.3 months (4.6; 6.1) for Pem/Cis; 4.9 months (4.4; 5.5) for Pac/Carb and 8.3 (7.0; 9.9) for

  6. BEclear: Batch Effect Detection and Adjustment in DNA Methylation Data

    PubMed Central

    Akulenko, Ruslan; Merl, Markus; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Batch effects describe non-natural variations of, for example, large-scale genomic data sets. If not corrected by suitable numerical algorithms, batch effects may seriously affect the analysis of these datasets. The novel array platform independent software tool BEclear enables researchers to identify those portions of the data that deviate statistically significant from the remaining data and to replace these portions by typical values reconstructed from neighboring data entries based on latent factor models. In contrast to other comparable methods that often use some sort of global normalization of the data, BEclear avoids changing the apparently unaffected parts of the data. We tested the performance of this approach on DNA methylation data for various tumor data sets taken from The Cancer Genome Atlas and compared the results to those obtained with the existing algorithms ComBat, Surrogate Variable Analysis, RUVm and Functional normalization. BEclear constantly performed at par with or better than these methods. BEclear is available as an R package at the Bioconductor project http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/BEclear.html. PMID:27559732

  7. BEclear: Batch Effect Detection and Adjustment in DNA Methylation Data.

    PubMed

    Akulenko, Ruslan; Merl, Markus; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Batch effects describe non-natural variations of, for example, large-scale genomic data sets. If not corrected by suitable numerical algorithms, batch effects may seriously affect the analysis of these datasets. The novel array platform independent software tool BEclear enables researchers to identify those portions of the data that deviate statistically significant from the remaining data and to replace these portions by typical values reconstructed from neighboring data entries based on latent factor models. In contrast to other comparable methods that often use some sort of global normalization of the data, BEclear avoids changing the apparently unaffected parts of the data. We tested the performance of this approach on DNA methylation data for various tumor data sets taken from The Cancer Genome Atlas and compared the results to those obtained with the existing algorithms ComBat, Surrogate Variable Analysis, RUVm and Functional normalization. BEclear constantly performed at par with or better than these methods. BEclear is available as an R package at the Bioconductor project http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/BEclear.html. PMID:27559732

  8. Movement Sonification: Effects on Motor Learning beyond Rhythmic Adjustments.

    PubMed

    Effenberg, Alfred O; Fehse, Ursula; Schmitz, Gerd; Krueger, Bjoern; Mechling, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Motor learning is based on motor perception and emergent perceptual-motor representations. A lot of behavioral research is related to single perceptual modalities but during last two decades the contribution of multimodal perception on motor behavior was discovered more and more. A growing number of studies indicates an enhanced impact of multimodal stimuli on motor perception, motor control and motor learning in terms of better precision and higher reliability of the related actions. Behavioral research is supported by neurophysiological data, revealing that multisensory integration supports motor control and learning. But the overwhelming part of both research lines is dedicated to basic research. Besides research in the domains of music, dance and motor rehabilitation, there is almost no evidence for enhanced effectiveness of multisensory information on learning of gross motor skills. To reduce this gap, movement sonification is used here in applied research on motor learning in sports. Based on the current knowledge on the multimodal organization of the perceptual system, we generate additional real-time movement information being suitable for integration with perceptual feedback streams of visual and proprioceptive modality. With ongoing training, synchronously processed auditory information should be initially integrated into the emerging internal models, enhancing the efficacy of motor learning. This is achieved by a direct mapping of kinematic and dynamic motion parameters to electronic sounds, resulting in continuous auditory and convergent audiovisual or audio-proprioceptive stimulus arrays. In sharp contrast to other approaches using acoustic information as error-feedback in motor learning settings, we try to generate additional movement information suitable for acceleration and enhancement of adequate sensorimotor representations and processible below the level of consciousness. In the experimental setting, participants were asked to learn a closed

  9. Movement Sonification: Effects on Motor Learning beyond Rhythmic Adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Effenberg, Alfred O.; Fehse, Ursula; Schmitz, Gerd; Krueger, Bjoern; Mechling, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Motor learning is based on motor perception and emergent perceptual-motor representations. A lot of behavioral research is related to single perceptual modalities but during last two decades the contribution of multimodal perception on motor behavior was discovered more and more. A growing number of studies indicates an enhanced impact of multimodal stimuli on motor perception, motor control and motor learning in terms of better precision and higher reliability of the related actions. Behavioral research is supported by neurophysiological data, revealing that multisensory integration supports motor control and learning. But the overwhelming part of both research lines is dedicated to basic research. Besides research in the domains of music, dance and motor rehabilitation, there is almost no evidence for enhanced effectiveness of multisensory information on learning of gross motor skills. To reduce this gap, movement sonification is used here in applied research on motor learning in sports. Based on the current knowledge on the multimodal organization of the perceptual system, we generate additional real-time movement information being suitable for integration with perceptual feedback streams of visual and proprioceptive modality. With ongoing training, synchronously processed auditory information should be initially integrated into the emerging internal models, enhancing the efficacy of motor learning. This is achieved by a direct mapping of kinematic and dynamic motion parameters to electronic sounds, resulting in continuous auditory and convergent audiovisual or audio-proprioceptive stimulus arrays. In sharp contrast to other approaches using acoustic information as error-feedback in motor learning settings, we try to generate additional movement information suitable for acceleration and enhancement of adequate sensorimotor representations and processible below the level of consciousness. In the experimental setting, participants were asked to learn a closed

  10. Adjustment of lifetime risks of space radiation-induced cancer by the healthy worker effect and cancer misclassification.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Leif E; Kovyrshina, Tatiana

    2015-12-01

    Background. The healthy worker effect (HWE) is a source of bias in occupational studies of mortality among workers caused by use of comparative disease rates based on public data, which include mortality of unhealthy members of the public who are screened out of the workplace. For the US astronaut corp, the HWE is assumed to be strong due to the rigorous medical selection and surveillance. This investigation focused on the effect of correcting for HWE on projected lifetime risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer mortality and incidence. Methods. We performed radiation-induced cancer risk assessment using Poisson regression of cancer mortality and incidence rates among Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Regression coefficients were used for generating risk coefficients for the excess absolute, transfer, and excess relative models. Excess lifetime risks (ELR) for radiation exposure and baseline lifetime risks (BLR) were adjusted for the HWE using standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for aviators and nuclear workers who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. We also adjusted lifetime risks by cancer mortality misclassification among atomic bomb survivors. Results. For all cancers combined ("Nonleukemia"), the effect of adjusting the all-cause hazard rate by the simulated quantiles of the all-cause SMR resulted in a mean difference (not percent difference) in ELR of 0.65% and mean difference of 4% for mortality BLR, and mean change of 6.2% in BLR for incidence. The effect of adjusting the excess (radiation-induced) cancer rate or baseline cancer hazard rate by simulated quantiles of cancer-specific SMRs resulted in a mean difference of [Formula: see text] in the all-cancer mortality ELR and mean difference of [Formula: see text] in the mortality BLR. Whereas for incidence, the effect of adjusting by cancer-specific SMRs resulted in a mean change of [Formula: see text] for the all-cancer BLR. Only cancer mortality risks were adjusted by

  11. Tidally adjusted estimates of topographic vulnerability to sea level rise and flooding for the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Benjamin H.; Ziemlinski, Remik; Weiss, Jeremy L.; Overpeck, Jonathan T.

    2012-03-01

    Because sea level could rise 1 m or more during the next century, it is important to understand what land, communities and assets may be most at risk from increased flooding and eventual submersion. Employing a recent high-resolution edition of the National Elevation Dataset and using VDatum, a newly available tidal model covering the contiguous US, together with data from the 2010 Census, we quantify low-lying coastal land, housing and population relative to local mean high tide levels, which range from ˜0 to 3 m in elevation (North American Vertical Datum of 1988). Previous work at regional to national scales has sometimes equated elevation with the amount of sea level rise, leading to underestimated risk anywhere where the mean high tide elevation exceeds 0 m, and compromising comparisons across regions with different tidal levels. Using our tidally adjusted approach, we estimate the contiguous US population living on land within 1 m of high tide to be 3.7 million. In 544 municipalities and 38 counties, we find that over 10% of the population lives below this line; all told, some 2150 towns and cities have some degree of exposure. At the state level, Florida, Louisiana, California, New York and New Jersey have the largest sub-meter populations. We assess topographic susceptibility of land, housing and population to sea level rise for all coastal states, counties and municipalities, from 0 to 6 m above mean high tide, and find important threat levels for widely distributed communities of every size. We estimate that over 22.9 million Americans live on land within 6 m of local mean high tide.

  12. Estimation of causal effects of binary treatments in unconfounded studies

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Roee; Rubin, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of causal effects in non-randomized studies comprises two distinct phases: design, without outcome data, and analysis of the outcome data according to a specified protocol. Recently, Gutman and Rubin (2013) proposed a new analysis-phase method for estimating treatment effects when the outcome is binary and there is only one covariate, which viewed causal effect estimation explicitly as a missing data problem. Here, we extend this method to situations with continuous outcomes and multiple covariates and compare it with other commonly used methods (such as matching, subclassification, weighting, and covariance adjustment). We show, using an extensive simulation, that of all methods considered, and in many of the experimental conditions examined, our new ‘multiple-imputation using two subclassification splines’ method appears to be the most efficient and has coverage levels that are closest to nominal. In addition, it can estimate finite population average causal effects as well as non-linear causal estimands. This type of analysis also allows the identification of subgroups of units for which the effect appears to be especially beneficial or harmful. PMID:26013308

  13. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed.

  14. Effects of Forecasts on the Revisions of Concurrent Seasonally Adjusted Data Using the X-11 Seasonal Adjustment Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, Larry; Otto, Mark

    Three Autoregressive Integrated Moving Averages (ARIMA) forecast procedures for Census Bureau X-11 concurrent seasonal adjustment were empirically tested. Forty time series from three Census Bureau economic divisions (business, construction, and industry) were analyzed. Forecasts were obtained from fitted seasonal ARIMA models augmented with…

  15. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. METHODS: This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. RESULTS: The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. CONCLUSION: Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement “gold standard” among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life. PMID:26925384

  16. Tailoring Feedback: Effective Feedback Should Be Adjusted Depending on the Needs of the Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    All students deserve effective feedback. General principles for effective feedback should be adjusted depending on the learner's needs. Feedback to struggling students should include focusing on the process, selecting only one or just a few points, giving self-referenced feedback to describe progress or capability, being very clear, and checking…

  17. The effects of practice on speed of information processing using the Adjusting-Paced Serial Addition Test (Adjusting-PSAT) and the Computerized Tests of Information Processing (CTIP).

    PubMed

    Baird, B J; Tombaugh, Thomas N; Francis, M

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of practice on the Adjusting-Paced Serial Addition Task (Adjusting-PSAT) (Tombaugh, 1999) and the Computerized Tests of Information Processing (CTIP) (Tombaugh & Rees, 2000). The Adjusting-PSAT is a computerized modification of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) (Gronwall, 1977) that makes the interval between digits contingent on the correctness of the response. This titration procedure permits a threshold value to be derived that represents the shortest presentation interval in which a person can process the digits to produce the correct sum. The CTIP consists of three reaction time tests that are progressively more difficult. Results showed that robust practice effects occurred with the Adjusting-PSAT, with the greatest increase in performance occurring on the first retest trial. Practice effects were equally prominent regardless of whether the first retest trial occurred 20A min, 1 week, or 3 months after the first administration. These gains were maintained for periods up to 6 months and were independent of modality of presentation (visual or auditory) and type of number list (easy or hard). In contrast to the findings with the Adjusting-PSAT, only minimal practice effects were observed with the CTIP. The major clinical implication of the study is that the high reliability coefficients for the CTIP, the lack of anxiety associated with its administration, and its insensitivity to variables such as numerical and verbal ability make the CTIP ideally suited for the serial evaluation of cognitive status. These characteristics also make the CTIP a viable alternative to the Adjusting-PSAT or PASAT for measuring speed of information processing. If the Adjusting-PSAT is administered repeatedly in clinical evaluations, a "dual baseline" or "run in" procedure should be used, with the second administration serving as the baseline measurement. PMID:17523883

  18. The effect of acquiring life skills through humor on social adjustment rate of the female students

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Jahangir; sabour, Nazanin Hashemi; Yazdani, Mohsen; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Life skills have different effects on various aspects of the mental health. Social adjustment prepares adolescents for entering to the adulthood. On the other hand, humor and joking in the education is considered as a stress reducer and learning increaser. Therefore, the present study conducted aimed to determine the effect of acquiring life skills through humor on the social adjustment rate of the high school girls. METHODS: This was a two-group semi-experimental study including three phases. The study population included 69 first year high school female students of Isfahan Department of Education district 3 who were selected in simple random sampling. First of all, the social adjustment rate was measured using California Personality Inventory. Thereafter, life skills education was conducted using humor during five sessions. Finally, a test was taken in order to assess the acquisition of the life skills in which passing score was required for re-completing the questionnaire. The data were analyzed using software SPSS10 and independent and paired t-tests. RESULTS: The findings of the study indicated that the mean score of the social adjustment statistically had a significant difference in the intervention group before and after the intervention. Furthermore, statistically, there was a significant difference between mean score of the social adjustment in the control group and test group after conducting the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the study indicated that life skills education has been increased through humor on the social adjustment rate of the high school girl students. Considering the efficacy of learning life skills on the social adjustment and results of the other studies which were in accordance with the present study, implementing such trainings with a new method comprehensively is recommended in the schools. PMID:22049280

  19. Effect of Intervention to Change Life Style to Increase Marital Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Etemadi, Ahmad; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Shokooh, Navabi-Nejad

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the effect of life style changes on marital adjustment. Eighty couples who had the most determined maladjustment were selected and randomly divided to experimental and control groups. Then an intervention method for life style change was administered to the experimental group. The Enrich was questionnaire for pre and post test. The results show that, the method of life style changing was reducing marital maladjustment. The marital adjustment change score between two groups (Experimental and Control) was significantly different (p< 0.001). This effect was for dimensions of marital adjustment such as; personality issues, financial management, conflict resolution and sexual relationships. It was recommended that counselors and psychotherapists select their intervention method according to the maladjustment dimensions to help afflicted couples with maladjustment.

  20. Estimating Teacher Effectiveness from Two-Year Changes in Students' Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Using a dataset covering over 10,000 Australian school teachers and over 90,000 pupils, I estimate how effective teachers are in raising students' test scores. Since the exams are biennial, it is necessary to take account of the teacher's work in the intervening year. Even adjusting for measurement error, the teacher fixed effects are widely…

  1. The effect of adjustable suture (Khaw) trabeculectomy on intraocular pressure: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ahmet; Kocatürk, Tolga; Dayanır, Volkan

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate long-term intraocular pressure (IOP) outcome as well as complications associated with adjustable suture trabeculectomy in glaucoma patients who were uncontrolled under maximum medical therapy. In this retrospective case series, 35 eyes of 30 patients are included in the study. Adjustable suture trabeculectomy with 0.2 mg/cc mitomycin-C for 3 min was performed by the same surgeon. Subconjunctival 5-fluorouracil injection, transconjunctival suture adjustment, digital massage, and/or argon suturolysis were utilized postoperatively as needed. Complete success, qualified success, and failure were defined as IOP ≤ 18 mmHg without medication, IOP ≤ 18 mmHg with one or more medications, and IOP >18 mmHg with medication or need for additional glaucoma surgery, respectively. Of the 35 eyes, 13 had primary open angle, 18 had psuedoexfoliative, 1 had juvenile, 1 had pigmentary, 1 had uveitic, and 1 had chronic angle-closure glaucoma. Mean preoperative IOP of 30.1 ± 10.5 mmHg dropped to 10.8 ± 4.7 mmHg (p < 0.001) after a mean follow-up of 595 ± 435 days. Nine eyes had the desired IOP on first postoperative day where no transconjunctival suture adjustment was performed. Remaining 26 eyes required a mean of two adjustments (range 1-7) during the first postoperative 24 days in order to achieve a desirable IOP. Complete success, qualified success, and failure were observed in 28 (80 %), 5 (14 %), and 2 (6 %) eyes, respectively. There were no serious complications related to adjustable suture trabeculectomy. We believe adjustable suture trabeculectomy to be a safe and effective alternative to standard trabeculectomy where a desirable low IOP can be achieved. PMID:26002838

  2. Surface term effects on mass estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We propose a way of estimating the mass contained in the volume occupied by a sample of galaxies in a virialized system. Aims: We analyze the influence of surface effects and the contribution of the cosmological constant terms on our mass estimations of galaxy systems. Methods: We propose two equations that contain surface terms to estimate galaxy sample masses. When the surface terms are neglected, these equations provide the so-called virial and projected masses. Both equations lead to a single equation that allows sample masses to be estimated without the need for calculating surface terms. Sample masses for some nearest galaxy groups are estimated and compared with virialized masses determined from turn-around radii and results of a spherical infall model. Results: Surface effects have a considerable effect on the mass estimations of the studied galaxy groups. According to our results, they lead sample masses of some groups to being less than half the virial mass estimations and even less than 10% of projected mass estimations. However, the contributions of cosmological constant terms to mass estimations are smaller than 2% for the majority of the virialized groups studied. Our estimations are in agreement with virialized masses calculated from turn-around radii. Virialized masses for complexes were found to be: (8.9 ± 2.8) × 1011 M⊙ for the Milky Way - M 31; (12.5 ± 2.5) × 1011 M⊙ for M 81 - NGC 2403; (21.5 ± 7.7) × 1011 M⊙. for Cantaurs A - M 83; and (7.9 ± 2.6) × 1011 M⊙. for IC 324 - Maffei. Conclusions: The nearest galaxy groups located inside a sphere of 5 Mpc have been addressed to explore the performance of our mass estimator. We have seen that surface effects make mass estimations of galaxy groups rather smaller than both virial and projected masses. In mass calculations, cosmological constant terms can be neglected; nevertheless, the collapse of cold dark matter leading to virialized structures is strongly affected by the

  3. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. PMID:24815335

  4. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on...

  5. "Effect of Anxiety Reduction on Children's School Performance and Social Adjustment": Correction to Wood (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    Reports an error in "Effect of anxiety reduction on children's school performance and social adjustment" by Jeffrey Wood (Developmental Psychology, 2006[Mar], Vol 42[2], 345-349). The byline and author note should have included the author's middle initial, J. Thus, the byline and author note should refer to "Jeffrey J. Wood." The correction is…

  6. School Climate Support for Behavioral and Psychological Adjustment: Testing the Mediating Effect of Social Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te

    2009-01-01

    The present study used an ecological framework to examine the relationships among adolescents' perceptions of school climate, social competence, and behavioral and psychological adjustment in the middle school years. This study improved upon prior studies by using "structural equation modeling" to investigate the hypothesized mediating effect of…

  7. The Effects of Marital Conflict on Korean Children's Appraisal of Conflict and Psychological Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Kyung Ja; Lee, Soojin; Park, Soo Hyun

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of marital conflict on Korean children's psychological adjustment and appraisal of hypothetical marital conflict situations. Children between the ages of 10 and 12 were divided into "high-conflict" (n = 58) and "low-conflict" (n = 58) groups based on their self-reported degree of perceived interparental conflict in…

  8. Parenting and Late Adolescent Emotional Adjustment: Mediating Effects of Discipline and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Cliff; Milone, Mary Catherine; Renk, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that parenting styles are related to the types of discipline parents utilize and that the coupling of parenting styles and discipline techniques are related to child outcomes. Although extant research examines the effects of parenting styles and discipline on child and early adolescent adjustment, less is known about adjustment…

  9. Are Effective Teachers Like Good Parents? Teaching Styles and Student Adjustment in Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentzel, Kathryn R.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the utility of parent socialization models for understanding effects of middle school teachers on student adjustment. Found that five teaching dimensions (modeling of motivation, and parenting dimensions of control, maturity demands, democratic communication, and nurturance) predicted student motivation, social behavior, and achievement.…

  10. Parenting and late adolescent emotional adjustment: mediating effects of discipline and gender.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Cliff; Milone, Mary Catherine; Renk, Kimberly

    2011-08-01

    Research suggests that parenting styles are related to the types of discipline parents utilize and that the coupling of parenting styles and discipline techniques are related to child outcomes. Although extant research examines the effects of parenting styles and discipline on child and early adolescent adjustment, less is known about adjustment in late adolescents, also described as emerging adults. Thus, the current study investigated the relationships among parenting styles (e.g., authoritative, authoritarian, permissive), discipline strategies (e.g., non-violent discipline, psychological aggression, physical assault), and emerging adult emotional adjustment (e.g., self-esteem, depression, and anxiety). The sample consisted of 526 participants ranging in age from 18 to 22 years. Results were analyzed with structural equation modeling and suggest that, although perceived parenting styles and discipline are both correlated with emerging adult emotional adjustment, perceived parenting is associated with emerging adult emotional adjustment for females but not males when examined simultaneously with perceived discipline. This finding demonstrates the importance of examining the direct and indirect relationships in the context of gender dyads. PMID:21479509

  11. Regression Equations for Estimation of Annual Peak-Streamflow Frequency for Undeveloped Watersheds in Texas Using an L-moment-Based, PRESS-Minimized, Residual-Adjusted Approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2009-01-01

    Annual peak-streamflow frequency estimates are needed for flood-plain management; for objective assessment of flood risk; for cost-effective design of dams, levees, and other flood-control structures; and for design of roads, bridges, and culverts. Annual peak-streamflow frequency represents the peak streamflow for nine recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 250, and 500 years. Common methods for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged or unmonitored watersheds are regression equations for each recurrence interval developed for one or more regions; such regional equations are the subject of this report. The method is based on analysis of annual peak-streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations (stations). Beginning in 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation and in partnership with Texas Tech University, began a 3-year investigation concerning the development of regional equations to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for undeveloped watersheds in Texas. The investigation focuses primarily on 638 stations with 8 or more years of data from undeveloped watersheds and other criteria. The general approach is explicitly limited to the use of L-moment statistics, which are used in conjunction with a technique of multi-linear regression referred to as PRESS minimization. The approach used to develop the regional equations, which was refined during the investigation, is referred to as the 'L-moment-based, PRESS-minimized, residual-adjusted approach'. For the approach, seven unique distributions are fit to the sample L-moments of the data for each of 638 stations and trimmed means of the seven results of the distributions for each recurrence interval are used to define the station specific, peak-streamflow frequency. As a first iteration of regression, nine weighted-least-squares, PRESS-minimized, multi-linear regression equations are computed using the watershed

  12. Relations between aggression and adjustment in chinese children: moderating effects of academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to examine the moderating effects of academic achievement on relations between aggressive behavior and social and psychological adjustment in Chinese children. A sample of children (N = 1,171; 591 boys, 580 girls; initial M age = 9 years) in China participated in the study. Two waves of longitudinal data were collected in Grades 3 and 4 from multiple sources including peer nominations, teacher ratings, self-reports, and school records. The results indicated that the main effects of aggression on adjustment were more evident than those of adjustment on aggression. Moreover, aggression was negatively associated with later leadership status and positively associated with later peer victimization, mainly for high-achieving children. The results suggested that consistent with the resource-potentiating model, academic achievement served to enhance the positive development of children with low aggression. On the other hand, although the findings indicated fewer main effects of adjustment on aggression, loneliness, depression, and perceived social incompetence positively predicted later aggression for low-achieving, but not high-achieving, children, which suggested that consistent with the stress-buffering model, academic achievement protected children with psychological difficulties from developing aggressive behavior. The results indicate that academic achievement is involved in behavioral and socioemotional development in different manners in Chinese children. Researchers should consider an integrative approach based on children's behavioral, psychological, and academic functions in designing prevention and intervention programs. PMID:23557214

  13. Enhancing Global Land Surface Hydrology Estimates from the NASA MERRA Reanalysis Using Precipitation Observations and Model Parameter Adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Koster, Randal; DeLannoy, Gabrielle; Forman, Barton; Liu, Qing; Mahanama, Sarith; Toure, Ally

    2011-01-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) is a state-of-the-art reanalysis that provides. in addition to atmospheric fields. global estimates of soil moisture, latent heat flux. snow. and runoff for J 979-present. This study introduces a supplemental and improved set of land surface hydrological fields ('MERRA-Land') generated by replaying a revised version of the land component of the MERRA system. Specifically. the MERRA-Land estimates benefit from corrections to the precipitation forcing with the Global Precipitation Climatology Project pentad product (version 2.1) and from revised parameters in the rainfall interception model, changes that effectively correct for known limitations in the MERRA land surface meteorological forcings. The skill (defined as the correlation coefficient of the anomaly time series) in land surface hydrological fields from MERRA and MERRA-Land is assessed here against observations and compared to the skill of the state-of-the-art ERA-Interim reanalysis. MERRA-Land and ERA-Interim root zone soil moisture skills (against in situ observations at 85 US stations) are comparable and significantly greater than that of MERRA. Throughout the northern hemisphere, MERRA and MERRA-Land agree reasonably well with in situ snow depth measurements (from 583 stations) and with snow water equivalent from an independent analysis. Runoff skill (against naturalized stream flow observations from 15 basins in the western US) of MERRA and MERRA-Land is typically higher than that of ERA-Interim. With a few exceptions. the MERRA-Land data appear more accurate than the original MERRA estimates and are thus recommended for those interested in using '\\-tERRA output for land surface hydrological studies.

  14. Estimating Effective Stream Shade in Riparian Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydow, L.; Link, T. E.; Gravelle, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Concern about the effects of land cover change on stream temperature dynamics necessitates the quantification of effective stream shade for riparian management and water quality modeling. Accurate quantification of stream shade with radiometers is both challenging and expensive over large areas characterized by complex and spatially variable canopies. To address these challenges, a number of shade estimation methods have been developed for rapid stream cover assessments. The main objective of this study was to determine which of four canopy cover estimation methods best characterized effective shade in harvested and unharvested stream reaches. An associated objective was to understand how canopy cover and type affected the accuracy of the methods. The four methods tested were a manual canopy densiometer, analysis of standard imagery from a digital camera, the Solar Pathfinder, and analysis of hemispherical imagery using Hemiview software. These were compared to measurements of percent incoming shortwave radiation quantified with Hukseflux NR-01 radiometers at each location. Four stream reaches in the Mica Creek Experimental Watershed were used to assess the estimation methods under different amounts and types of canopy cover: an unharvested area, a partial cut, an open clear cut, and a clear cut with dense understory. All estimation methods were most accurate in the most shaded location (dense understory clear cut) and least accurate in the open clear cut, the least shaded location. The values estimated by Hemiview proved to be the most accurate in all four areas, differing from the true value by ~5% on average; the Solar Pathfinder was the second most accurate with an error of ~8%. The results from the digital camera and canopy densiometer were comparable, at ~15% difference from the true value. While Hemiview is the most expensive and time consuming of the four methods, it was the most accurate for estimating effective stream shade in this study.

  15. Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of scale effects on blade cavitation require consideration of multiple models for both water flows and cavities. In particular, distinction of laminar and turbulent boundary layers is very important. A qualitative impact of selection of models is manifested for blade sheet cavitation. Its quantitative impact is shown for vortex cavitation inception.

  16. Effects of Structural Errors on Parameter Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, F. Y.; Bekey, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Paper introduces concept of near equivalence in probability between different parameters or mathematical models of physical system. One in series of papers, each establishes different part of rigorous theory of mathematical modeling based on concepts of structural error, identifiability, and equivalence. This installment focuses upon effects of additive structural errors on degree of bias in estimates parameters.

  17. The Intertemporal Variability of Teacher Effect Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Sass, Tim R.; Lockwood, J. R.; Mihaly, Kata

    2009-01-01

    The utility of value-added estimates of teachers' effects on student test scores depends on whether they can distinguish between high- and low-productivity teachers and predict future teacher performance. This article studies the year-to-year variability in value-added measures for elementary and middle school mathematics teachers from five large…

  18. Three Essays on Estimating Causal Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three distinct chapters, each of which addresses issues of estimating treatment effects. The first chapter empirically tests the Value-Added (VA) model using school lotteries. The second chapter, co-authored with Michael Wood, considers properties of inverse probability weighting (IPW) in simple treatment effect…

  19. Adult trauma and HIV status among Latinas: effects upon psychological adjustment and substance use.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Michael D; Carmona, Jennifer Vargas

    2004-12-01

    Latinas have unique cultural factors that can contribute to their health, including recent immigration, documentation status, and language barriers. Additional stressors and experiencing traumatic events can further compromise their psychological adjustment and substance use. This study tests the differential contribution of adult trauma and other life stressors to psychological adjustment and substance use among Latinas who differ in their HIV status and level of acculturation. Baseline and 1-year follow-up data on a community sample of 113 (79 HIV-positive and 34 HIV-negative) 1 to 50 year old Latinas were examined with path analyses to estimate the influence of acculturation, HIV status, and adult trauma, including intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault, on subsequent changes in psychological adjustment (depression) and substance use 1 year later. Age, education, and relationship status were controlled and further analyses examined the interactive influence of HIV status and acculturation and trauma on the outcomes. Findings indicate that both acculturation and HIV status were related to the outcome variables, but did not influence these over time, emphasizing the developmental stability of these processes. Education was the most prominent variable in protecting these women from HIV, depression, and intimate partner violence (IPV), but placed them at greater risk for illicit drug use. The primary predictors of change in the outcome variables were domestic and sexual trauma were exacerbated by HIV positive status. Implications for future research and culturally relevant prevention and intervention programs are discussed. PMID:15690115

  20. Appraisal and coping styles account for the effects of temperament on preadolescent adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Stephanie F.; Zalewski, Maureen; Lengua, Liliana J.

    2014-01-01

    Temperament, appraisal, and coping are known to underlie emotion regulation, yet less is known about how these processes relate to each other across time. We examined temperamental fear, frustration, effortful control, and impulsivity, positive and threat appraisals, and active and avoidant coping as processes underpinning the emotion regulation of pre-adolescent children managing stressful events. Appraisal and coping styles were tested as mediators of the longitudinal effects of temperamental emotionality and self-regulation on adjustment using a community sample (N=316) of preadolescent children (8–12 years at T1) studied across one year. High threat appraisals were concurrently related to high fear and impulsivity, whereas effortful control predicted relative decreases in threat appraisal. High fear was concurrently related to high positive appraisal, and impulsivity predicted increases in positive appraisal. Fear was concurrently related to greater avoidant coping, and impulsivity predicted increases in avoidance. Frustration predicted decreases in active coping. These findings suggest temperament, or dispositional aspects of reactivity and regulation, relates to concurrent appraisal and coping processes and additionally predicts change in these processes. Significant indirect effects indicated that appraisal and coping mediated the effects of temperament on adjustment. Threat appraisal mediated the effects of fear and effortful control on internalizing and externalizing problems, and avoidant coping mediated the effect of impulsivity on internalizing problems. These mediated effects suggest that one pathway through which temperament influences adjustment is pre-adolescents’ appraisal and coping. Findings highlight temperament, appraisal and coping as emotion regulation processes relevant to children’s adjustment in response to stress. PMID:25821237

  1. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, Sarah; Klco, Natalie; Furnstahl, Richard; Phillips, Daniel; Thapilaya, Arbin

    2015-10-01

    We present a procedure based on Bayesian statistics for effective field theory (EFT) parameter estimation from experimental or lattice data. The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by physical principles such as naturalness in a quantifiable way and various sources of uncertainty are included by the specification of Bayesian priors. Special issues for EFT parameter estimation are demonstrated using representative model problems, and a set of diagnostics is developed to isolate and resolve these issues. We apply the framework to the extraction of the LECs of the nucleon mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  2. The effect of somatic cell count data adjustment and interpretation, as outlined in European Union legislation, on herd eligibility to supply raw milk for processing of dairy products.

    PubMed

    More, S J; Clegg, T A; Lynch, P J; O'Grady, L

    2013-06-01

    Somatic cell count (SCC) limits are a key component of national and international regulation for milk quality. As yet, very limited work has been published on SCC regulatory standards, including on the effect of different approaches to SCC data adjustment and interpretation. This study examines the effect of SCC data adjustment and interpretation, as outlined in current European Union (EU) legislation, on herd eligibility to supply raw milk for processing of dairy products for human consumption, using Irish data for illustration. The study used Irish milk-recording data as a proxy for bulk tank SCC (BTSCC) data, to calculate an unadjusted monthly SCC value for each herd during each month of participation. Subsequently, 4 data adjustments were applied, as outlined in EU and national legislation: seasonal adjustment; 3-mo rolling geometric average, without accounting for a break in the supply; 3-mo rolling geometric average, after accounting for a break in the supply; and seasonal adjustment and 3-mo rolling geometric average combined, after accounting for a break in the supply. Analyses were conducted to examine the effect, during the period from 2004 to 2010, of data adjustment on the percentage of herds with herd SCC >400,000 cells/mL. In all, 4 interpretation scenarios, incorporating different data adjustment combinations, were used to estimate herd eligibility (compliant, under warning, or suspended, as defined by legislation) to supply raw milk for processing. The 4 methods of data adjustment each led to a sizable reduction (6.7, 5.0, 5.3, and 11.1 percentage points, respectively, compared with the unadjusted data) in the percentage of herds exceeding a herd SCC of 400,000 cells/mL. Herd eligibility varied by interpretation scenarios, in particular those incorporating seasonal adjustment. The study provides new perspectives on the effect of data adjustment on herd SCC and of interpretation scenarios on herd eligibility. The results provide an illustrative

  3. [Effect of economic structure adjustment on pollution emission: a case study of COD].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Sheng; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Yuan-Hang; Li, Qian; Zhang, Jian-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Economic structure adjustment is an important means to reduce the emissions of pollutants. For quantitative analysis of the effect of economic structure adjustment on the reduction of pollution emission, the country was divided into four sub-regions, eastern, northeastern, central and western, and the industry was divided into 39 sectors. Taking chemical oxygen demand (COD) as an example, the influences of regional structure and industry structure adjustment on total emission reduction and emission intensity were analyzed through building a model. The results showed that, in 2000-2010: (1) COD emissions in China were reduced from 1 445 x 10(4) t to 1 238 x 10(4) t, with a total emission of 14 950 x 10(4) t in 11 years, among which the emissions from eastern area occupied the largest proportion, accounting for 35.6%. (2) In the industrial COD emissions, emission from paper and paper products was the largest, accounting for 35.8% of the industrial COD emissions. (3) The economic structure changes in the four areas reduced the COD emissions by 420 x 10(4) t, resulting in a decrease of 1.29% in COD emission intensity. (4) Industrial internal structure changes reduced the COD emissions by 533 x 10(4) t, leading to a decrease of 3.1% in COD emission intensity. The research results have certain reference value in guiding the Chinese economic structure adjustment and achieving the targets of energy-saving and emission reduction. PMID:25338401

  4. Quality of sexual life and its effect on marital adjustment of Turkish women in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kisa, Sezer; Zeyneloğlu, Simge; Yilmaz, Duygu; Güner, Tuba

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is an important period of a woman's life that can affect marital relationships because of decrease in the sexual function. This study aimed to examine the effect of sexual life on the marital adjustment of 607 healthy, pregnant women using the self-administered Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire-Female and the Marital Adjustment Scale. Results showed that 30% of the pregnant women experienced problems during sexual intercourse and 50% had painful intercourse. The median total score of the Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire-Female for pregnant women was 35.5, and the median total score of the Marital Adjustment Scale was 41.0. The authors found a positive moderate level correlation between the sexual quality of life for women and their marital adjustment for being pregnant (r = 0.468, p =.001). The results imply that the variance in the sexual activity during the childbearing period does occur and pregnant women need to be assessed regularly with regards to their sexuality by health care providers in a professional atmosphere. PMID:24102194

  5. ESTIMATION OF EMISSION ADJUSTMENTS FROM THE APPLICATION OF FOUR-DIMENSIONAL DATA ASSIMILATION TO PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR QUALITY MODELING. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four-dimensional data assimilation applied to photochemical air quality modeling is used to suggest adjustments to the emissions inventory of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. In this approach, a three-dimensional air quality model, coupled with direct sensitivity analys...

  6. Enhanced Estimates of the Influenza Vaccination Effect in Preventing Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Delfrade, Josu; Irisarri, Fátima; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mortality is a major end-point in the evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness. However, this effect is not well known, since most previous studies failed to show good control of biases. We aimed to estimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing all-cause mortality in community-dwelling seniors. Since 2009, a population-based cohort study using healthcare databases has been conducted in Navarra, Spain. In 2 late influenza seasons, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013, all-cause mortality in the period January to May was compared between seniors (65 years or over) who received the trivalent influenza vaccine and those who were unvaccinated, adjusting for demographics, major chronic conditions, dependence, previous hospitalization, and pneumococcal vaccination. The cohort included 103,156 seniors in the 2011/2012 season and 105,140 in the 2012/2013 season (58% vaccinated). Seniors vaccinated in the previous season who discontinued vaccination (6% of the total) had excess mortality and were excluded to prevent frailty bias. The final analysis included 80,730 person-years and 2778 deaths. Vaccinated seniors had 16% less all-cause mortality than those unvaccinated (adjusted rate ratio [RR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.76–0.93). This association disappeared in the post-influenza period (adjusted RR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.85–1.09). A similar comparison did not find an association in January to May of the 2009/2010 pandemic season (adjusted RR = 0.98; 95% confidence interval 0.84–1.14), when no effect of the seasonal vaccine was expected. On average, 1 death was prevented for every 328 seniors vaccinated: 1 for every 649 in the 65 to 74 year age group and 1 for every 251 among those aged 75 and over. These results suggest a moderate preventive effect and a high potential impact of the seasonal influenza vaccine against all-cause mortality. This reinforces the recommendation of annual influenza vaccination in seniors

  7. Improvement of radar quantitative precipitation estimation based on real-time adjustments to Z-R relationships and inverse distance weighting correction schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaili; Liu, Liping; Ding, Yuanyuan

    2012-05-01

    The errors in radar quantitative precipitation estimations consist not only of systematic biases caused by random noises but also spatially nonuniform biases in radar rainfall at individual rain-gauge stations. In this study, a real-time adjustment to the radar reflectivity-rainfall rates ( Z-R) relationship scheme and the gauge-corrected, radar-based, estimation scheme with inverse distance weighting interpolation was developed. Based on the characteristics of the two schemes, the two-step correction technique of radar quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed. To minimize the errors between radar quantitative precipitation estimations and rain gauge observations, a real-time adjustment to the Z-R relationship scheme is used to remove systematic bias on the time-domain. The gauge-corrected, radar-based, estimation scheme is then used to eliminate non-uniform errors in space. Based on radar data and rain gauge observations near the Huaihe River, the two-step correction technique was evaluated using two heavy-precipitation events. The results show that the proposed scheme improved not only in the underestimation of rainfall but also reduced the root-mean-square error and the mean relative error of radar-rain gauge pairs.

  8. Effects of anchoring and adjustment in the evaluation of product pricing.

    PubMed

    Elaad, Eitan; Sayag, Neta; Ezer, Aliya

    2010-08-01

    Anchoring and adjustment comprise a heuristic that creates expectations. Two types of anchors were applied on participants' evaluation of products: the price reference of the product (maximum, minimum, or no price reference) and the context in which the products were evaluated (the prestige of the shopping center). Results showed that both factors anchored evaluations of products' value. Context effects were explained by the different expectations of visitors in prestigious (looking for quality) and less prestigious (seeking a bargain) centers. PMID:20923048

  9. The effects of nationality differences and work stressors on work adjustment for foreign nurse aides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this study was to discuss the nationality differences of foreign nurse aides and the effect of work stressors influencing work adjustment. And of helping them adapt to Taiwanese society, we summarized the difficulties that foreign nurse aides face in Taiwan. Methods The subjects included 80 foreign nurse aides from the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam who worked in long-term care facilities in Tao Yuan County. We recruited volunteers at the participating facilities to complete the anonymous questionnaires. The return rate of the questionnaire was 88.75%. The validated instruments of Hershenson's (1981) and Schaefer and Moos (1993) were adopted to measure work stressors and work adjustment, respectively. A forward-backward translation process was used in this study. Results Indonesian foreign nurse aides respect their work, and are better workers than Vietnamese and Filipino nurse aids in many respects, which shows how the nationality of the foreign nurse aides might affect work adjustment. The stress created from patient care tasks influenced the foreign nurse aides' personal relationships at work and also affected their attitude when they performed their tasks. In addition, pressure from their supervisors might have affected their work skills, work habits, personal relationships, self-concepts or work attitudes. Moreover, a heavy workload and improper scheduling might have affected the personal relationships and work attitudes of the foreign nurse aides. It was found that work stressors had a significant correlation with work adjustment. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that training programs are important factors for work adjustment among foreign nurse aides. Furthermore, celebration and leisure activities could be provided to release them from work stressors. More effort should be put into improving the working environment, namely providing a more supportive and enriching atmosphere. Based on these findings

  10. Double robust estimator of average causal treatment effect for censored medical cost data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Beste, Lauren A; Maier, Marissa M; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-08-15

    In observational studies, estimation of average causal treatment effect on a patient's response should adjust for confounders that are associated with both treatment exposure and response. In addition, the response, such as medical cost, may have incomplete follow-up. In this article, a double robust estimator is proposed for average causal treatment effect for right censored medical cost data. The estimator is double robust in the sense that it remains consistent when either the model for the treatment assignment or the regression model for the response is correctly specified. Double robust estimators increase the likelihood the results will represent a valid inference. Asymptotic normality is obtained for the proposed estimator, and an estimator for the asymptotic variance is also derived. Simulation studies show good finite sample performance of the proposed estimator and a real data analysis using the proposed method is provided as illustration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26818601

  11. Effects of site-specific level adjustments on speech recognition with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    ) required for 50% correct speech recognition, were evaluated for these MAPs using CUNY sentences. The site-specific level-adjusted MAPs were compared to the globally level-adjusted MAP and the MAP without level adjustment. The effects on speech recognition of adjusting the minimal stimulation level settings on the 5 poorest stimulation sites were also compared with effects of removing these sites from the speech-processor MAP. Results The 5% level increase on the 5 electrodes with the worst MDTs resulted in an improvement in the group-mean SRT of 2.36 dB SNR relative to the MAP without level adjustment. The magnitude of level increase that resulted in the greatest SRT improvement for individuals varied across ears. MDTs measured at 20% DR significantly improved on the poor sites after the level adjustment that resulted in the best SRT for that ear was applied. Increasing the minimal stimulation levels on all stimulation sites or removing sites selected for rehabilitation, the parsimonious approaches, did not improve speech reception thresholds. Conclusions The site-specific adjustments of the T level settings improved modulation sensitivity at low levels and significantly improved subjects’ speech reception thresholds. Thus, this site-rehabilitation strategy was an effective alternative to site-selection strategies for improving speech recognition in cochlear implant users. PMID:24225651

  12. Effects of peer victimization on psychological and academic adjustment in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Jenkins, Lyndsay N

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effects of frequency of peer victimization experiences on psychological and academic adjustment during early adolescence, with a focus on testing psychological adjustment as a mediator, as well as differences based on gender and type of victimization. The sample in this short-term longitudinal design study consists of 7th and 8th graders (n = 670, 50% male) from an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse middle school. Victimization was measured using 10 items that assessed frequency of verbal, physical, and relational victimization experiences, and outcomes were assessed with the Behavior Assessment System for Children (2nd ed.) and school records. There was support for gender differences in frequency of peer victimization experiences based on type of victimization. More specifically, boys reported higher levels of physical and verbal victimization, and girls reported higher levels of relational victimization. In addition, there were statistically significant differences between boys and girls on the relation between victimization and anxiety, attendance, and grades, with girls experiencing more maladjustment than boys in response to peer victimization. Finally, results demonstrated no gender differences in indirect effects of psychological adjustment on the relation between peer victimization and academic outcomes, whether victimization was physical, verbal, and relational. These findings highlight the importance of addressing social-emotional functioning as well as peer victimization in the schools for both boys and girls, as both affect students' academic functioning. PMID:24015982

  13. Cyclostrophic adjustment in swirling gas flows and the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnik, M. V.; Visheratin, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A theoretical analysis of cyclostrophic adjustment is presented; i.e., adjustment to balance between pressure gradient and centrifugal force in axisymmetric flow of an inviscid gas is examined. The solution to the problem is represented as the sum of a time-independent (balanced) and time-dependent (wave) components. It is shown that the wave component of the flow in an unbounded domain decays with time, and the corresponding solution reduces to the balanced component. In a bounded domain, the balanced flow component exists against the background of undamped acoustic waves. It is found that the balanced flow is thermally stratified at Mach numbers close to unity, with a substantial decrease in gas temperature (to between -50 and -100°C) in the axial region. This finding, combined with the results of special experiments, is used to explain the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect.

  14. Estimating seroprevalence of vaccine-preventable infections: is it worth standardizing the serological outcomes to adjust for different assays and laboratories?

    PubMed

    Kafatos, G; Andrews, N; McConway, K J; Anastassopoulou, C; Barbara, C; De Ory, F; Johansen, K; Mossong, J; Prosenc, K; Vranckx, R; Nardone, A; Pebody, R; Farrington, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the European Sero-Epidemiology Network 2 (ESEN2) project was to estimate age-specific seroprevalence for a number of vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe. To achieve this serosurveys were collected by 22 national laboratories. To adjust for a variety of laboratory methods and assays, all quantitative results were transformed to a reference laboratory's units and were then classified as positive or negative to obtain age-specific seroprevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the value of standardization by comparing the crude and standardized seroprevalence estimates. Seroprevalence was estimated for measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, varicella zoster and hepatitis A virus (HAV) and compared before and after serological results had been standardized. The results showed that if no such adjustment had taken place, seroprevalence would have differed by an average of 3·2% (95% bootstrap interval 2·9-3·6) although this percentage varied substantially by antigen. These differences were as high as 16% for some serosurveys (HAV) which means that standardization could have a considerable impact on seroprevalence estimates and should be considered when comparing serosurveys performed in different laboratories using different assay methods. PMID:25420586

  15. Adjusting for confounding effects of treatment switching in a randomized phase II study of dabrafenib plus trametinib in BRAF V600+ metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Nicholas R; Amonkar, Mayur M; Stapelkamp, Ceilidh; Sun, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Patients with BRAF V600E mutation-positive melanoma who were assigned to 150 mg dabrafenib twice daily combined with 2 mg trametinib once daily in a phase I/II study showed a median overall survival (OS) of 23.8 months, compared with 20.2 months for patients assigned to dabrafenib alone [hazard ratio (HR)=0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.24; data cutoff March 2013], on the basis of an intention-to-treat analysis. Because patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy were allowed to switch to combination therapy upon disease progression, we attempted to adjust for confounding effects on OS. Randomization-based adjustment methods, Rank Preserving Structural Failure Time Models and the Iterative Parameter Estimation algorithm, were used. Two analyses, 'treatment group' (assumes that treatment effect continues beyond treatment discontinuation) and 'on treatment' (assumes that the treatment effect disappears upon treatment discontinuation), were used to test assumptions on the durability of the treatment effect. A total of 45/54 (83%) patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy switched to the trametinib/dabrafenib combination. Adjusted OS HRs ranged from 0.47 to 0.50, depending on the analysis, compared with the unadjusted OS HR of 0.73. CIs continued to cross 1.00; thus, adjusted estimates did not provide statistically significant evidence of a treatment benefit on survival. Reduction of HRs after adjusting for the effect of treatment switching suggests that the intention-to-treat analysis underestimates the effect of dabrafenib plus trametinib on OS, although several factors, such as small trial size and methodological assumptions, affect the certainty of the conclusions. PMID:26340744

  16. A new Approach to Combine GRACE and ICESat Observations to Estimate Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in East Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenberg, B.; Tregoning, P.; Purcell, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring and understanding ongoing changes in Antarctic mass balance is of great interest, as the melting of the ice sheet would significantly contribute to global sea level changes. While scientists agree that the West Antarctic ice sheet is losing mass, opinions about the East Antarctic ice sheet are more widespread, with some areas showing an increase in mass. In recent years satellite missions have significantly contributed to the understanding of ongoing changes within the polar ice sheets, and became an important tool in detecting variations in ice height, ice mass and bedrock isostasy. The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission detects mass loss in regions where the ice sheet has its bed well below sea level and where warmer ocean water penetrates beneath the ice sheet, melting it from the base. Meanwhile an increase in mass has been observed in regions along the East Antarctic coastline, raising the question whether GRACE detects glacial isostatic adjustment due to ice mass loss or an actual increase in snowfall, contributing positively to surface mass balance. To improve our understanding on the contribution of glacial isostatic adjustment and surface mass balance to mass variations, we developed a new approach on how to subtract elevation changes observed by satellite altimetry from observed mass changes as detected by GRACE. We have established our own firn compaction model that we apply to the altimetry data to subtract changes due to the densification of snow, before using the ICESat observations. We will present results of the firn compaction model and our approach on combining GRACE and ICESat observations to separate the contribution of glacial isostatic adjustment from ongoing surface mass changes in East Antarctica.

  17. Pooled influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for Australia, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, S G; Carville, K S; Chilver, M; Fielding, J E; Grant, K A; Kelly, H; Levy, A; Stocks, N P; Tempone, S S; Regan, A K

    2016-08-01

    Data were pooled from three Australian sentinel general practice influenza surveillance networks to estimate Australia-wide influenza vaccine coverage and effectiveness against community presentations for laboratory-confirmed influenza for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 seasons. Patients presenting with influenza-like illness at participating GP practices were swabbed and tested for influenza. The vaccination odds of patients testing positive were compared with patients testing negative to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) by logistic regression, adjusting for age group, week of presentation and network. Pooling of data across Australia increased the sample size for estimation from a minimum of 684 to 3,683 in 2012, from 314 to 2,042 in 2013 and from 497 to 3,074 in 2014. Overall VE was 38% [95% confidence interval (CI) 24-49] in 2012, 60% (95% CI 45-70) in 2013 and 44% (95% CI 31-55) in 2014. For A(H1N1)pdm09 VE was 54% (95% CI-28 to 83) in 2012, 59% (95% CI 33-74) in 2013 and 55% (95% CI 39-67) in 2014. For A(H3N2), VE was 30% (95% CI 14-44) in 2012, 67% (95% CI 39-82) in 2013 and 26% (95% CI 1-45) in 2014. For influenza B, VE was stable across years at 56% (95% CI 37-70) in 2012, 57% (95% CI 30-73) in 2013 and 54% (95% CI 21-73) in 2014. Overall VE against influenza was low in 2012 and 2014 when A(H3N2) was the dominant strain and the vaccine was poorly matched. In contrast, overall VE was higher in 2013 when A(H1N1)pdm09 dominated and the vaccine was a better match. Pooling data can increase the sample available and enable more precise subtype- and age group-specific estimates, but limitations remain. PMID:27125368

  18. Parallax adjustment for visual comfort enhancement using the effect of parallax distribution and cross talk in parallax-barrier autostereoscopic three-dimensional display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hyoung; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-12-01

    Visual discomfort is a common problem in three-dimensional (3D) videos, and this issue is the subject of many current studies. Among the methods to overcome visual discomfort presented in current research, parallax adjustment methods provide little guidance in determining the condition for parallax control. We propose a parallax adjustment based on the effects of parallax distribution and cross talk on visual comfort, where the visual comfort level is used as the adjustment parameter, in parallax-barrier-type autostereoscopic 3D displays. We use the horizontal image shift method for parallax adjustment to enhance visual comfort. The speeded-up robust feature is used to estimate the parallax distribution of 3D sequences, and the required amount for parallax control is chosen based on the predefined effect of parallax distribution and cross talk on visual comfort. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we used commercial 3D equipment with various intrinsic cross-talk levels. Subjective tests were conducted at the fixed optimal viewing distance for each piece of equipment. The results show that comfortable videos were generated based on the proposed parallax adjustment method.

  19. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesolowski, S.; Klco, N.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Phillips, D. R.; Thapaliya, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for estimating, from data, the parameters of effective field theories (EFTs). The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools is developed that analyzes the fit and ensures that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems, including the extraction of LECs for the nucleon-mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  20. Effect of hemoglobin adjustment on the precision of mercury concentrations in maternal and cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Mi; Choi, Anna L.; Ha, Eun-Hee; Pedersen, Lise; Nielsen, Flemming; Weihe, Pal; Hong, Yun-Chul; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Grandjean, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The cord-blood mercury concentration is usually considered the best biomarker in regard to developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, the mercury concentration may be affected by the binding of methylmercury to hemoglobin and perhaps also selenium. As cord-blood mercury analyses appear to be less precise than suggested by laboratory quality data, we studied the interrelationships of mercury concentrations with hemoglobin in paired maternal and cord blood samples from a Faroese birth cohort (N = 514) and the Mothers and Children’s Environmental Health study in Korea (n=797). Linear regression and structural equation model (SEM) analyses were used to ascertain interrelationships between the exposure biomarkers and the possible impact of hemoglobin as well as selenium. Both methods showed a significant dependence of the cord-blood concentration on hemoglobin, also after adjustment for other exposure biomarkers. In the SEM, the cord blood measurement was a less imprecise indicator of the latent methylmercury exposure variable than other exposure biomarkers available, and the maternal hair concentration had the largest imprecision. Adjustment of mercury concentrations both in maternal and cord blood for hemoglobin improved their precision, while no significant effect of the selenium concentration in maternal blood was found. Adjustment of blood-mercury concentrations for hemoglobin is therefore recommended. PMID:24853977

  1. Effective System for Automatic Bundle Block Adjustment and Ortho Image Generation from Multi Sensor Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akilan, A.; Nagasubramanian, V.; Chaudhry, A.; Reddy, D. Rajesh; Sudheer Reddy, D.; Usha Devi, R.; Tirupati, T.; Radhadevi, P. V.; Varadan, G.

    2014-11-01

    Block Adjustment is a technique for large area mapping for images obtained from different remote sensingsatellites.The challenge in this process is to handle huge number of satellite imageries from different sources with different resolution and accuracies at the system level. This paper explains a system with various tools and techniques to effectively handle the end-to-end chain in large area mapping and production with good level of automation and the provisions for intuitive analysis of final results in 3D and 2D environment. In addition, the interface for using open source ortho and DEM references viz., ETM, SRTM etc. and displaying ESRI shapes for the image foot-prints are explained. Rigorous theory, mathematical modelling, workflow automation and sophisticated software engineering tools are included to ensure high photogrammetric accuracy and productivity. Major building blocks like Georeferencing, Geo-capturing and Geo-Modelling tools included in the block adjustment solution are explained in this paper. To provide optimal bundle block adjustment solution with high precision results, the system has been optimized in many stages to exploit the full utilization of hardware resources. The robustness of the system is ensured by handling failure in automatic procedure and saving the process state in every stage for subsequent restoration from the point of interruption. The results obtained from various stages of the system are presented in the paper.

  2. Internet for the internationals: effects of internet use motivations on international students' college adjustment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Lee, Lu; Jang, Jeongwoo

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon the uses and gratifications approach, the current study examined how international students' Internet use motivations affect their academic, social, and emotional adjustments in the new environment. A total of 166 Chinese students studying in Korea participated in a web-based survey. First, a factor analysis identified four distinct motivations for Internet use: homeland orientation (to stay connected to the home country), local information seeking (to learn about the host society), local social interaction (to form interpersonal relationships locally), and entertainment. After controlling for the effects of sociodemographic variables (i.e., gender, year at school, length of residence, Korean language proficiency) and personality traits (i.e., extraversion, openness to experience, neuroticism), Internet use motivations were found to be significant predictors of international students' social and emotional adjustments. Specifically, those seeking to build a local social network through the Internet reported greater satisfaction with their social life, whereas homeland orientation was associated with poorer emotional adaptation. Various Internet activities, such as e-mail, blogging, and instant messaging, were not significantly related to college adjustments, suggesting the multi-functionality of Internet-based communication channels. PMID:21117984

  3. Teachers and Their International Relocation: The Effect of Self-Esteem and Pay Satisfaction on Adjustment and Outcome Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Warnie; von Kirchenheim, Clement; Richardson, Carole

    2006-01-01

    This is the second of two papers investigating the adjustment process in a designated group of expatriates, (teachers), who have severed ties with their home country and employer. In the first paper we examined the effect of self-efficacy and flexibility within this adjustment process, revealing the significance of self-efficacy but failing to…

  4. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods. PMID:26328545

  5. Observational Constraint of Aerosol Effects on the CMIP5 Inter-model Spread of Adjusted Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Jiang, J. H.; Su, H.; Bordoni, S.

    2013-12-01

    The simulated global-mean temperature (GMT) change over the past 150 years is quite consistent across CMIP5 climate models and also consistent with the observations. However, the predicted future GMT under the identical CO2 forcing is divergent. This paradox is partly due to the errors in the predicted GMT produced by historical greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing being compensated by the parameterization of aerosol cloud radiative forcing. Historical increases in anthropogenic aerosols exert an overall (but highly uncertain) cooling effect in the climate system, which partially offsets the warming due to well mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHGs). Because aerosol concentrations are predicted to eventually decrease in future scenarios, climate change becomes dominated by warming due to the WMGHG. This change in the relative importance of forcing by aerosol versus WMGHG makes apparent the substantial differences in prediction of climate by WMGHG forcing. Here we investigate the role of aerosols in the context of adjusted forcing changes in the historical runs and the effect of aerosols on the cloud feedback. Our preliminary results suggest that models which are more sensitive to the increase in concentration of CO2 have a larger aerosol radiative cooling effect. By comparing the historicalMisc runs and historicalGHG runs, we find that aerosols exert a potential impact on the cloud adjusted forcings, especially shortwave cloud adjusted forcings. We use the CLIPSO, MISR and CERES data as the benchmark to evaluate the present aerosol simulations. Using satellite observations to assess the relative reliability of the different model responses and to constrain the simulated aerosol radiative forcing will contribute significantly to reducing the across model spread in future climate simulations and identifying some missing physical processes.

  6. The effect of case-mix adjustment on admission-based reimbursement.

    PubMed Central

    Kinzer, D; Warner, M

    1983-01-01

    This paper addresses two questions: (1) Does adjusting for case mix have any effect on prospective admission-based reimbursement? and (2) How does the way in which case type is defined (DRG, ICD9CM, Age, etc) affect reimbursement systems? Data from 20 Maryland hospitals provided the basis for analysis, and the results illustrate how hospital reimbursement is affected under alternative definitions of case type (including no case type), showing highly significant variation. Implications for cost control and existing and proposed prospective reimbursement systems are discussed. Images Figure 5 PMID:6409840

  7. Changes in social adjustment with cognitive processing therapy: effects of treatment and association with PTSD symptom change.

    PubMed

    Monson, Candice M; Macdonald, Alexandra; Vorstenbosch, Valerie; Shnaider, Philippe; Goldstein, Elizabeth S R; Ferrier-Auerbach, Amanda G; Mocciola, Katharine E

    2012-10-01

    The current study sought to determine if different spheres of social adjustment, social and leisure, family, and work and income improved immediately following a course of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) when compared with those on a waiting list in a sample of 46 U.S. veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We also sought to determine whether changes in different PTSD symptom clusters were associated with changes in these spheres of social adjustment. Overall social adjustment, extended family relationships, and housework completion significantly improved in the CPT versus waiting-list condition, η(2) = .08 to .11. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that improvements in total clinician-rated PTSD symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social and housework adjustment. When changes in reexperiencing, avoidance, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal were all in the model accounting for changes in total social adjustment, improvements in emotional numbing symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social, extended family, and housework adjustment (β = .38 to .55). In addition, improvements in avoidance symptoms were associated with improvements in housework adjustment (β = .30), but associated with declines in extended family adjustment (β = -.34). Results suggest that it is important to consider the extent to which PTSD treatments effectively reduce specific types of symptoms, particularly emotional numbing and avoidance, to generally improve social adjustment. PMID:23073971

  8. Estimation of trends in rainfall extremes with mixed effects models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, M.; Beecham, S.; Metcalfe, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of seasonal rainfall maxima at durations as short as 6 min are needed for many applications including the design and analysis of urban drainage systems. It is also important to investigate whether or not there is evidence of changes in these extremes, both as an indicator of the sensitivity of rainfall to anthropogenic and natural climate change and as an aid to the calibration of future scenarios. Estimation of trends in extreme values in a region needs to be based on all the available data if precision is to be achieved. However, extremes at different periods of accumulation at neighbouring sites are not independent because there are temporal and spatial correlations, respectively. A linear mixed effects (lme) model allows for this correlation structure, and can be fitted to unequal record lengths at different sites. The modelling technique is demonstrated with an analysis of monthly maximum rainfall, at nine aggregations between 6 min and 24 h, from six sites, with record lengths between 10 and 25 years, from a region in South Australia. In terms of mean value, there is no evidence of a trend or change in the seasonal distribution of the monthly extreme rainfall. However, there is a strong evidence of an increase in variability of monthly extreme rainfall, estimated as a 58% increase in absolute value of deviation from the mean over a 25 year period. Rainfall records are often only available as a daily accumulation. A formula for the ratio of the monthly maxima at durations shorter than 24 h, down to 6 min, to the 24 h monthly maximum, in terms of: duration, month of the year, and a site specific adjustment is estimated. There is a clear seasonal variation in the ratios and there is evidence of a difference between rainfall stations.

  9. Effective Young's modulus estimation of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.; Li, Y.

    1999-09-01

    A two-step analytical procedure is proposed to evaluate the quantitative influence of the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation on the effective Young's modulus of concrete. In the first step, the effective Young's modulus of a specified basic element, which is composed of an aggregate coated with interfacial transition zone and again covered with cement paste, is obtained based on a proposed four-phase sphere model. The theory of elasticity and Eshelby's equivalent medium theory are used to achieve the goal. In the second step, the rule of mixture method is used to estimate the effective Young's modulus of concrete. Following the two-step procedure, the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation are included in the formulations for the effective Young's modulus of concrete. The calculated results are compared with experimental results from the literature. The comparison results show a reasonable agreement when isostrain is assumed for every basic element in the second step. Parameters influencing the effective Young's modulus of concrete are discussed via calculated results.

  10. Utilizing satellite precipitation estimates for streamflow forecasting via adjustment of mean field bias in precipitation data and assimilation of streamflow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haksu; Zhang, Yu; Seo, Dong-Jun; Xie, Pingping

    2015-10-01

    This study explores mitigating bias in satellite quantitative precipitation estimates (SQPE) and improving hydrologic predictions at ungauged locations via adjustment of the mean field bias (MFB) in SQPE and data assimilation (DA) of streamflow observations in a distributed hydrologic model. In this study, a variational procedure is used to adjust MFB in Climate Prediction Center MORPHing (CMORPH) SQPE and assimilate streamflow observations at the outlet of Elk River Basin in Missouri into the distributed Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) and kinematic wave routing models. The benefits of assimilation are assessed by comparing the streamflow predictions with or without DA at both the outlet and an upstream location, and by comparing the soil moisture grids forced by CMORPH SQPE against those forced by higher-quality multisensor quantitative precipitation estimates (MQPE) from National Weather Service. Special attention is given to the dependence of the efficacy of DA on the quality and latency of the SQPE, and the impact of dynamic correction of MFB in the SQPE via DA. The results show that adjusting MFB in CMORPH SQPE in addition to assimilating outlet flow reduces 66% of the bias in the CMORPH SQPE analysis and the RMSE of 12-h streamflow predictions by 81% at the outlet and 34-62% at interior locations of the catchment. Compared to applying a temporally invariant MFB for the entire storm, the DA-based, dynamic MFB correction reduces the RMSE of 6-h streamflow prediction by 63% at the outlet and 39-69% at interior locations. It is also shown that the accuracy of streamflow prediction deteriorates if the delineation of the precipitation area by CMORPH SQPE is significantly different, as measured by the Hausdorff distance, from that by MQPE. When compared with adjusting MFB in the CMORPH SQPE over the entire assimilation window, adjusting the MFB for all but the latest 18 h (i.e., the latency of CMORPH SQPE) within the assimilation window reduces the

  11. Severity of disease estimation and risk-adjustment for comparison of outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients using electronic routine care data.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Maaike S M; Moons, Karel G M; Murphy, Michael V; Bonten, Marc J M; Klompas, Michael

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND Valid comparison between hospitals for benchmarking or pay-for-performance incentives requires accurate correction for underlying disease severity (case-mix). However, existing models are either very simplistic or require extensive manual data collection. OBJECTIVE To develop a disease severity prediction model based solely on data routinely available in electronic health records for risk-adjustment in mechanically ventilated patients. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Mechanically ventilated patients from a single tertiary medical center (2006-2012). METHODS Predictors were extracted from electronic data repositories (demographic characteristics, laboratory tests, medications, microbiology results, procedure codes, and comorbidities) and assessed for feasibility and generalizability of data collection. Models for in-hospital mortality of increasing complexity were built using logistic regression. Estimated disease severity from these models was linked to rates of ventilator-associated events. RESULTS A total of 20,028 patients were initiated on mechanical ventilation, of whom 3,027 deceased in hospital. For models of incremental complexity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.83 to 0.88. A simple model including demographic characteristics, type of intensive care unit, time to intubation, blood culture sampling, 8 common laboratory tests, and surgical status achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.86-0.88) with adequate calibration. The estimated disease severity was associated with occurrence of ventilator-associated events. CONCLUSIONS Accurate estimation of disease severity in ventilated patients using electronic, routine care data was feasible using simple models. These estimates may be useful for risk-adjustment in ventilated patients. Additional research is necessary to validate and refine these models. PMID:25881675

  12. Effects of alignment of adjustable collimator on dosimetric parameters of a telecobalt machine.

    PubMed

    Sahani, G; Sharma, S D; Dash Sharma, P K; Sharma, D N; Hussain, S A

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the most appropriate hinge point for the alignment of adjustable collimators/trimmer bars in a telecobalt machine for obtaining acceptable dosimetric parameters of a telecobalt machine. Variations of relative output of the telecobalt machine with selection of different hinge points were also investigated. MCNP code was used for the present the study. A water phantom of dimension 50 x 50 x 40 cm(3) having voxels each of volume 0.72 cm(3) was used in our study for generating beam profiles and depth dose curves. When hinge points are selected at the periphery of the source bottom and the source top, flatness, symmetry and penumbra were found to be well within the recommended tolerance limits whereas values are far beyond with the hinge points selected at the centre of source bottom or the source top. Moreover, it was observed that the relative output of a telecobalt machine with hinge points at centre of the source bottom and the source top are appreciably lower than that of at periphery of source bottom particularly for smaller field sizes. This effect is due to the blockage of the part of the source volume in the radiation field. Therefore, hinge point for the alignment of adjustable collimators/trimmer bars should be selected either at periphery of source bottom or the source top for obtaining clinically acceptable flatness, symmetry and penumbra. However, selecting hinge point at the periphery of the source bottom for the alignment of the adjustable collimators/trimmer bars would be more appropriate as height of the source will vary depending on activity of the source used in the source capsule for given specific activity. PMID:23098284

  13. The additive and interactive effects of parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems of children of divorce.

    PubMed

    Lengua, L J; Wolchik, S A; Sandler, I N; West, S G

    2000-06-01

    Investigated the interaction between parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems in children of divorce. The study utilized a sample of 231 mothers and children, 9 to 12 years old, who had experienced divorce within the previous 2 years. Both mothers' and children's reports on parenting, temperament, and adjustment variables were obtained and combined to create cross-reporter measures of the variables. Parenting and temperament were directly and independently related to outcomes consistent with an additive model of their effects. Significant interactions indicated that parental rejection was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children low in positive emotionality, and inconsistent discipline was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children high in impulsivity. These findings suggest that children who are high in impulsivity may be at greater risk for developing problems, whereas positive emotionality may operate as a protective factor, decreasing the risk of adjustment problems in response to negative parenting. PMID:10802832

  14. Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiff, Cara J.; Cortes, Rebecca C.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David; Mason, W. Alex

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to adversity during childhood and adolescence predicts adjustment across development. Furthermore, adolescent adjustment problems persist into young adulthood. This study examined relations of contextual adversity with concurrent adolescent adjustment and prospective mental health and health outcomes in young adulthood. A longitudinal…

  15. Relative Age Effects in Athletic Sprinting and Corrective Adjustments as a Solution for Their Removal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Relative Age Effects (RAEs) refer to the selection and performance differentials between children and youth who are categorized in annual-age groups. In the context of Swiss 60m athletic sprinting, 7761 male athletes aged 8 – 15 years were analysed, with this study examining whether: (i) RAE prevalence changed across annual age groups and according to performance level (i.e., all athletes, Top 50%, 25% & 10%); (ii) whether the relationship between relative age and performance could be quantified, and corrective adjustments applied to test if RAEs could be removed. Part one identified that when all athletes were included, typical RAEs were evident, with smaller comparative effect sizes, and progressively reduced with older age groups. However, RAE effect sizes increased linearly according to performance level (i.e., all athletes – Top 10%) regardless of age group. In part two, all athletes born in each quartile, and within each annual age group, were entered into linear regression analyses. Results identified that an almost one year relative age difference resulted in mean expected performance differences of 10.1% at age 8, 8.4% at 9, 6.8% at 10, 6.4% at 11, 6.0% at 12, 6.3% at 13, 6.7% at 14, and 5.3% at 15. Correction adjustments were then calculated according to day, month, quarter, and year, and used to demonstrate that RAEs can be effectively removed from all performance levels, and from Swiss junior sprinting more broadly. Such procedures could hold significant implications for sport participation as well as for performance assessment, evaluation, and selection during athlete development. PMID:25844642

  16. Estimating Interaction Effects With Incomplete Predictor Variables

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Craig K.; Baraldi, Amanda N.; Cham, Heining

    2014-01-01

    The existing missing data literature does not provide a clear prescription for estimating interaction effects with missing data, particularly when the interaction involves a pair of continuous variables. In this article, we describe maximum likelihood and multiple imputation procedures for this common analysis problem. We outline 3 latent variable model specifications for interaction analyses with missing data. These models apply procedures from the latent variable interaction literature to analyses with a single indicator per construct (e.g., a regression analysis with scale scores). We also discuss multiple imputation for interaction effects, emphasizing an approach that applies standard imputation procedures to the product of 2 raw score predictors. We thoroughly describe the process of probing interaction effects with maximum likelihood and multiple imputation. For both missing data handling techniques, we outline centering and transformation strategies that researchers can implement in popular software packages, and we use a series of real data analyses to illustrate these methods. Finally, we use computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed techniques. PMID:24707955

  17. Essays in applied macroeconomics: Asymmetric price adjustment, exchange rate and treatment effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jingping

    This dissertation consists of three essays. Chapter II examines the possible asymmetric response of gasoline prices to crude oil price changes using an error correction model with GARCH errors. Recent papers have looked at this issue. Some of these papers estimate a form of error correction model, but none of them accounts for autoregressive heteroskedasticity in estimation and testing for asymmetry and none of them takes the response of crude oil price into consideration. We find that time-varying volatility of gasoline price disturbances is an important feature of the data, and when we allow for asymmetric GARCH errors and investigate the system wide impulse response function, we find evidence of asymmetric adjustment to crude oil price changes in weekly retail gasoline prices. Chapter III discusses the relationship between fiscal deficit and exchange rate. Economic theory predicts that fiscal deficits can significantly affect real exchange rate movements, but existing empirical evidence reports only a weak impact of fiscal deficits on exchange rates. Based on US dollar-based real exchange rates in G5 countries and a flexible varying coefficient model, we show that the previously documented weak relationship between fiscal deficits and exchange rates may be the result of additive specifications, and that the relationship is stronger if we allow fiscal deficits to impact real exchange rates non-additively as well as nonlinearly. We find that the speed of exchange rate adjustment toward equilibrium depends on the state of the fiscal deficit; a fiscal contraction in the US can lead to less persistence in the deviation of exchange rates from fundamentals, and faster mean reversion to the equilibrium. Chapter IV proposes a kernel method to deal with the nonparametric regression model with only discrete covariates as regressors. This new approach is based on recently developed least squares cross-validation kernel smoothing method. It can not only automatically smooth

  18. Are effective teachers like good parents? Teaching styles and student adjustment in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Kathryn R

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the utility of parent socialization models for understanding teachers' influence on student adjustment in middle school. Teachers were assessed with respect to their modeling of motivation and to Baumrind's parenting dimensions of control, maturity demands, democratic communication, and nurturance. Student adjustment was defined in terms of their social and academic goals and interest in class, classroom behavior, and academic performance. Based on information from 452 sixth graders from two suburban middle schools, results of multiple regressions indicated that the five teaching dimensions explained significant amounts of variance in student motivation, social behavior, and achievement. High expectations (maturity demands) was a consistent positive predictor of students' goals and interests, and negative feedback (lack of nurturance) was the most consistent negative predictor of academic performance and social behavior. The role of motivation in mediating relations between teaching dimensions and social behavior and academic achievement also was examined; evidence for mediation was not found. Relations of teaching dimensions to student outcomes were the same for African American and European American students, and for boys and girls. The implications of parent socialization models for understanding effective teaching are discussed. PMID:14717258

  19. Adjusting for small-sample non-normality of design event estimators under a generalized Pareto distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkar, Fahim; El Adlouni, Salah-Eddine

    2015-11-01

    The generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) is a widely used frequency model for fitting extremes in hydrology, especially to fit exceedances over a threshold in the peaks-over-threshold (POT) modeling of floods or other extreme hydrological phenomena. A key goal in fitting frequency distributions to data is to allow the estimation of distribution quantiles, which in hydrology are often used as "design events". The maximum likelihood (ML) method is a recommended method for fitting the GPD to data. To provide a measure of the statistical error involved in the estimation of design events, confidence intervals for quantiles (CIQs) have to be calculated. Hydrologists have traditionally used large-sample theory to construct such CIQs, but it is shown in the present study that this leads to inaccurate results for quantiles in the right-tail of a GPD. An improvement is therefore proposed for these classically obtained CIQs under a GPD model fitted by ML. The conventional and proposed approaches are compared through Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and the resulting recommendations are put to use in a hydrological application.

  20. Effect of Risk Adjustment Method on Comparisons of Health Care Utilization Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users and Nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Gerkovich, Mary M.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Deyo, Richard A.; Sherman, Karen J.; Lafferty, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers are becoming more integrated into the United States health care system. Because patients self-select CAM use, risk adjustment is needed to make the groups more comparable when analyzing utilization. This study examined how the choice of risk adjustment method affects assessment of CAM use on overall health care utilization. Design and subjects Insurance claims data for 2000–2003 from Washington State, which mandates coverage of CAM providers, were analyzed. Three (3) risk adjustment methods were compared in patients with musculoskeletal conditions: Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACG), Diagnostic Cost Groups (DCG), and the Charlson Index. Relative Value Units (RVUs) were used as a proxy for expenditures. Two (2) sets of median regression models were created: prospective, which used risk adjustments from the previous year to predict RVU in the subsequent year, and concurrent, which used risk adjustment measures to predict RVU in the same year. Results The sample included 92,474 claimants. Prospective models showed little difference in the effect of CAM use on RVU among the three risk adjustment methods, and all models had low predictive power (R2 ≤0.05). In the concurrent models, coefficients were similar in direction and magnitude for all risk adjustment methods, but in some models the predicted effect of CAM use on RVU differed by as much as double between methods. Results of DCG and ACG models were similar and were stronger than Charlson models. Conclusions Choice of risk adjustment method may have a modest effect on the outcome of interest. PMID:23036140

  1. Effects of overlapping generations on linkage disequilibrium estimates of effective population size.

    PubMed

    Waples, Robin S; Antao, Tiago; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Use of single-sample genetic methods to estimate effective population size has skyrocketed in recent years. Although the underlying models assume discrete generations, they are widely applied to age-structured species. We simulated genetic data for 21 iteroparous animal and plant species to evaluate two untested hypotheses regarding performance of the single-sample method based on linkage disequilibrium (LD): (1) estimates based on single-cohort samples reflect the effective number of breeders in one reproductive cycle (Nb), and (2) mixed-age samples reflect the effective size per generation (Ne). We calculated true Ne and Nb, using the model species' vital rates, and verified these with individual-based simulations. We show that single-cohort samples should be equally influenced by Nb and Ne and confirm this with simulated results: [Formula: see text] was a linear (r(2) = 0.98) function of the harmonic mean of Ne and Nb. We provide a quantitative bias correction for raw [Formula: see text] based on the ratio Nb/Ne, which can be estimated from two or three simple life history traits. Bias-adjusted estimates were within 5% of true Nb for all 21 study species and proved robust when challenged with new data. Mixed-age adult samples produced downwardly biased estimates in all species, which we attribute to a two-locus Wahlund effect (mixture LD) caused by combining parents from different cohorts in a single sample. Results from this study will facilitate interpretation of rapidly accumulating genetic estimates in terms of both Ne (which influences long-term evolutionary processes) and Nb (which is more important for understanding eco-evolutionary dynamics and mating systems). PMID:24717176

  2. Effects of Overlapping Generations on Linkage Disequilibrium Estimates of Effective Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Waples, Robin S.; Antao, Tiago; Luikart, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Use of single-sample genetic methods to estimate effective population size has skyrocketed in recent years. Although the underlying models assume discrete generations, they are widely applied to age-structured species. We simulated genetic data for 21 iteroparous animal and plant species to evaluate two untested hypotheses regarding performance of the single-sample method based on linkage disequilibrium (LD): (1) estimates based on single-cohort samples reflect the effective number of breeders in one reproductive cycle (Nb), and (2) mixed-age samples reflect the effective size per generation (Ne). We calculated true Ne and Nb, using the model species’ vital rates, and verified these with individual-based simulations. We show that single-cohort samples should be equally influenced by Nb and Ne and confirm this with simulated results: N^b was a linear (r2 = 0.98) function of the harmonic mean of Ne and Nb. We provide a quantitative bias correction for raw N^b based on the ratio Nb/Ne, which can be estimated from two or three simple life history traits. Bias-adjusted estimates were within 5% of true Nb for all 21 study species and proved robust when challenged with new data. Mixed-age adult samples produced downwardly biased estimates in all species, which we attribute to a two-locus Wahlund effect (mixture LD) caused by combining parents from different cohorts in a single sample. Results from this study will facilitate interpretation of rapidly accumulating genetic estimates in terms of both Ne (which influences long-term evolutionary processes) and Nb (which is more important for understanding eco-evolutionary dynamics and mating systems). PMID:24717176

  3. Convective adjustment in baroclinic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Local convection in planetary atmospheres is generally considered to result from the action of gravity on small regions of anomalous density. That in rotating baroclinic fluids the total potential energy for small scale convection contains a centrifugal as well as a gravitational contribution is shown. Convective adjustment in such an atmosphere results in the establishment of near adiabatic lapse rates of temperature along suitably defined surfaces of constant angular momentum, rather than in the vertical. This leads in general to sub-adiabatic vertical lapse rates. That such an adjustment actually occurs in the earth's atmosphere is shown by example and the magnitude of the effect for several other planetary atmospheres is estimated.

  4. Effects of age, weight, and fat slaughter end points on estimates of breed and retained heterosis effects for carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Utrera, A; Cundiff, L V; Gregory, K E; Koch, R M; Dikeman, M E; Koohmaraie, M; Van Vleck, L D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of different levels of adjusted fat thickness (AFT) and HCW slaughter end points (covariates) on estimates of breed and retained heterosis effects was studied for 14 carcass traits from serially slaughtered purebred and composite steers from the US Meat Animal Research Center (MARC). Contrasts among breed solutions were estimated at 0.7, 1.1, and 1.5 cm of AFT, and at 295.1, 340.5, and 385.9 kg of HCW. For constant slaughter age, contrasts were adjusted to the overall mean (432.5 d). Breed effects for Red Poll, Hereford, Limousin, Braunvieh, Pinzgauer, Gelbvieh, Simmental, Charolais, MARC I, MARC II, and MARC III were estimated as deviations from Angus. In addition, purebreds were pooled into 3 groups based on lean-to-fat ratio, and then differences were estimated among groups. Retention of combined individual and maternal heterosis was estimated for each composite. Mean retained heterosis for the 3 composites also was estimated. Breed rankings and expression of heterosis varied within and among end points. For example, Charolais had greater (P < 0.05) dressing percentages than Angus at the 2 largest levels of AFT and smaller (P < 0.01) percentages at the 2 largest levels of HCW, whereas the 2 breeds did not differ (P > or = 0.05) at a constant age. The MARC III composite produced 9.7 kg more (P < 0.01) fat than Angus at AFT of 0.7 cm, but 7.9 kg less (P < 0.05) at AFT of 1.5 cm. For MARC III, the estimate of retained heterosis for HCW was significant (P < 0.05) at the lowest level of AFT, but at the intermediate and greatest levels estimates were nil. The pattern was the same for MARC I and MARC III for LM area. Adjustment for age resulted in near zero estimates of retained heterosis for AFT, and similarly, adjustment for HCW resulted in nil estimates of retained heterosis for LM area. For actual retail product as a percentage of HCW, the estimate of retained heterosis for MARC III was negative (-1.27%; P < 0.05) at 0.7 cm but was significantly

  5. ESTIMATING THE INFLUENCE OF INDIVIDUAL POVERTY-ADJUSTED EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ON TERM BIRTH WEIGHT USING CONDITIONAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported maternal education is an important predictor of pregnancy outcomes. Like income, it is believed to allow women to locate in more favorable conditions than less educated or affluent peers. We examine the effect of reported educational attainment on term birth weight (birt...

  6. Small-Sample Adjustments for Tests of Moderators and Model Fit in Robust Variance Estimation in Meta-Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Pustejovsky, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized experiments are commonly used to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions. The goal of the present investigation is to develop small-sample corrections for multiple contrast hypothesis tests (i.e., F-tests) such as the omnibus test of meta-regression fit or a test for equality of three or more levels of a categorical…

  7. Ratios as a size adjustment in morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, G H; Gelvin, B R; Hartman, S E

    1993-08-01

    Simple ratios in which a measurement variable is divided by a size variable are commonly used but known to be inadequate for eliminating size correlations from morphometric data. Deficiencies in the simple ratio can be alleviated by incorporating regression coefficients describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables. Recommendations have included: 1) subtracting the regression intercept to force the bivariate relationship through the origin (intercept-adjusted ratios); 2) exponentiating either the measurement or the size variable using an allometry coefficient to achieve linearity (allometrically adjusted ratios); or 3) both subtracting the intercept and exponentiating (fully adjusted ratios). These three strategies for deriving size-adjusted ratios imply different data models for describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables (i.e., the linear, simple allometric, and full allometric models, respectively). Algebraic rearrangement of the equation associated with each data model leads to a correctly formulated adjusted ratio whose expected value is constant (i.e., size correlation is eliminated). Alternatively, simple algebra can be used to derive an expected value function for assessing whether any proposed ratio formula is effective in eliminating size correlations. Some published ratio adjustments were incorrectly formulated as indicated by expected values that remain a function of size after ratio transformation. Regression coefficients incorporated into adjusted ratios must be estimated using least-squares regression of the measurement variable on the size variable. Use of parameters estimated by any other regression technique (e.g., major axis or reduced major axis) results in residual correlations between size and the adjusted measurement variable. Correctly formulated adjusted ratios, whose parameters are estimated by least-squares methods, do control for size correlations. The size-adjusted

  8. Effect of Race and Marital Status on Mothers’ Observed Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mackenzie T.; Gruhn, Meredith A.; Grey, Margaret; Delamater, Alan M.; Jaser, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine demographic differences in parenting behaviors and adjustment in youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods Adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment was assessed via self-reports and parent reports, and clinical data were obtained from adolescents’ medical records. Mother–adolescent dyads (N = 93) engaged in a videotaped discussion task, which was coded for observed parenting behaviors. Results Single and non-White mothers exhibited significantly more overinvolved and less collaborative parenting behaviors. Higher levels of overinvolved parenting and lower levels of collaborative parenting were associated with poorer adolescent adjustment (i.e., higher levels of externalizing problems). Observed parenting was not significantly associated with glycemic control. There was an indirect effect of marital status and race/ethnicity on externalizing behaviors through parenting. Conclusions The current study highlights parenting as a potential target for interventions, especially in single and minority mothers, to improve adjustment in this population. PMID:25248850

  9. Improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments for balance control: effect of a single training session

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans use anticipatory and compensatory postural strategies to maintain and restore balance when perturbed. Inefficient generation and utilization of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) is one of the reasons for postural instability. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session consisting of catches of a medicine ball thrown at the shoulder level. 3-D body kinematics, EMG activity of thirteen trunk and leg muscles, and ground reaction forces were recorded before and immediately after a single training session. Muscle onsets, EMG integrals, center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The effect of a single training session was seen as significantly early muscle onsets and larger anticipatory COP displacements. As a result, significantly smaller peak COM displacements were observed after the perturbation indicating greater postural stability. The outcome of this study provides a background for examining the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on postural stability in individuals in need. PMID:25434280

  10. The effect of alternative case-mix adjustments on mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M F; Park, R E; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study investigated how mortality differences between groups of municipal versus voluntary hospitals are affected by case-mix adjustment methods. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. We sampled about 10,000 random admissions from administrative data for patients hospitalized with each of six conditions in hospitals in New York City during 1984-1987. STUDY DESIGN. We developed logistic regression models adjusting for age and gender, for principal diagnosis, for "limited other diagnoses" (secondary diagnoses that were very unlikely to result from care received), for "full other diagnoses" (all secondary diagnoses irrespective of whether they might have been due to care received), for previous diagnoses, and for other variables. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For five of the six conditions, when the limited other diagnoses adjustment was used there was higher mortality in the municipal hospitals (p < .05), with 3.3 additional deaths/100 admissions for myocardial infarction, 1.2 for pneumonia, 8.3 for stroke, 2.8 for head trauma, and 0.8 for hip repair. However, when the full other diagnoses adjustment was used, differences remained significant only for stroke (4.3 additional deaths/100 admissions) and head trauma (1.3) (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS. Estimates of mortality differences between New York City municipal and voluntary hospitals are substantially affected by which secondary diagnoses are used in case-mix adjustment. Judgments of quality should not be based on administrative data unless models can be developed that validly capture level of sickness at admission. PMID:8163382

  11. Psychological Separation and Adjustment to University: Moderating Effects of Gender, Age, and Perceived Parenting Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Wim; Goossens, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Examined the association between psychological separation and adjustment to university among college students. Found that two dimensions of psychological separation--independence from parents and positive separation feelings--predicted better adjustment to college life. Independence from parents was moderated by grade, gender, and perceived…

  12. Adjusting Teacher Salaries for the Cost of Living: The Effect on Salary Comparisons and Policy Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, C.

    2005-01-01

    Teaching salaries are commonly adjusted for the cost of living, but this incorrectly accounts for welfare differences across states. Adjusting for area amenities and opportunities, however, produces more accurate salary comparisons. Amenities and opportunities can be measured by the wage premium other workers in a state face. The two methods…

  13. Parental Attachment, Separation-Individuation, and College Student Adjustment: A Structural Equation Analysis of Mediational Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattanah, Jonathan F.; Hancock, Gregory R.; Brand, Bethany L.

    2004-01-01

    Secure parental attachment and healthy levels of separation-individuation have been consistently linked to greater college student adjustment. The present study proposes that the relation between parental attachment and college adjustment is mediated by healthy separation-individuation. The authors gathered data on maternal and paternal…

  14. The Effects of Personality and Acculturation on the Adjustment of North American Sojourners in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swagler, Michelle A.; Jome, LaRae M.

    2005-01-01

    As more North Americans sojourn abroad in the emerging global marketplace, it is important to understand the factors related to successful cross-cultural adjustment. This study explores how personality factors and acculturation influence the cross-cultural adjustment process of North Americans sojourning in Taiwan. The results reveal that greater…

  15. The Effects of Coping Humour and Gender on College Adjustment in Turkish Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz-Duran, Nagihan; Yuksel, Asuman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of coping humour and gender in the college adjustment of Turkish freshmen. Considering greater happiness and academic achievement as predictors of initial college adjustment, data were gathered from a sample of 574 students using the Subjective Well-Being Scale (SWS) and the Coping Humour…

  16. The Buffering Effect of Emotional Intelligence on the Adjustment of Secondary School Students in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemo, David Akinlolu

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence and adjustment of students transitioning from primary school to secondary school. Method: The study is a descriptive survey research in which emotional intelligence stands as the independent variable and adjustment as the dependent variable.…

  17. Dose-based duration adjustments for the effects of inhaled trichloroethylene on rat visual function.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Bercegeay, Mark; Ali, Joseph S; Krantz, Todd; McGee, John; Evans, Marina; Raymer, James H; Bushnell, Philip J; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2003-11-01

    Risk assessments often must consider exposures that vary over time or for which the exposure duration of concern differs from the available data, and a variety of extrapolation procedures have been devised accordingly. The present experiments explore the relationship(s) between exposure concentration (C) and time (t) to investigate procedures for assessing the risks of short-term solvent exposures. The first hypothesis tested was that the product of C x t would produce a constant health effect (Haber's rule). The second hypothesis tested was that exposure conditions produce effects in proportion to the tissue concentrations created. Awake, adult, male Long-Evans (LE) rats were exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor in a head-only exposure chamber while pattern onset/offset visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded. Exposure conditions were designed to provide C x t products of 0 ppm/h (0 ppm for 4 h) or 4000 ppm/h created through four exposure scenarios: 1000 ppm for 4 h; 2000 ppm for 2 h; 3000 ppm for 1.3 h; or 4000 ppm for 1h (n = 9-10/concentration). The amplitude of the VEP frequency double component (F2) was decreased significantly by exposure; this decrease was related to C but not to t or to the C x t product, indicating that Haber's rule did not hold. The mean amplitude (+/- SEM in muV) of the F2 component in the control and treatment groups measured 4.4 +/- 0.5 (0 ppm/4 h), 3.1 +/- 0.5 (1000 ppm/4 h), 3.1 +/- 0.4 (2000 ppm/2 h), 2.3 +/- 0.3 (3000 ppm/1.3 h), and 1.9 +/- 0.4 (4000 ppm/1 h). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to estimate the concentrations of TCE in the brain achieved during each exposure condition. The F2 amplitude of the VEP decreased monotonically as a function of the estimated peak brain concentration but was not related to the area under the curve (AUC) of the brain TCE concentration. In comparison to estimates from the PBPK model, extrapolations based on Haber's rule yielded approximately a 6-fold error

  18. Does HPA-Axis Dysregulation Account for the Effects of Income on Effortful Control and Adjustment in Preschool Children?

    PubMed

    Lengua, Liliana J; Zalewski, Maureen; Fisher, Phil; Moran, Lyndsey

    2013-09-01

    The effects of low income on children's adjustment might be accounted for by disruptions to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and to the development of effortful control. Using longitudinal data and a community sample of preschool-age children (N = 306, 36-39 months) and their mothers, recruited to over-represent low-income families, we explored the associations among diurnal cortisol levels and effortful control, and we tested a model in which diurnal cortisol and effortful control account for the effects of family income on child adjustment. Continuous indicators of morning cortisol level and diurnal slope, as well as dichotomous indicators reflecting low morning levels and flat diurnal slope, were examined as predictors of rank-order changes in two dimensions of effortful control, executive control and delay ability. Low income was related to a flat diurnal cortisol slope, and above the effects of family income, a flat diurnal cortisol slope predicted lower social competence. Low morning cortisol level predicted smaller gains in executive control and higher total adjustment problems. Further, delay ability predicted lower adjustment problems above the effects of income and diurnal cortisol levels. The results suggest that HPA-axis dysregulation and effortful control contribute additively to children's adjustment. PMID:25414597

  19. Does HPA-Axis Dysregulation Account for the Effects of Income on Effortful Control and Adjustment in Preschool Children?

    PubMed Central

    Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen; Fisher, Phil; Moran, Lyndsey

    2014-01-01

    The effects of low income on children's adjustment might be accounted for by disruptions to hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and to the development of effortful control. Using longitudinal data and a community sample of preschool-age children (N = 306, 36–39 months) and their mothers, recruited to over-represent low-income families, we explored the associations among diurnal cortisol levels and effortful control, and we tested a model in which diurnal cortisol and effortful control account for the effects of family income on child adjustment. Continuous indicators of morning cortisol level and diurnal slope, as well as dichotomous indicators reflecting low morning levels and flat diurnal slope, were examined as predictors of rank-order changes in two dimensions of effortful control, executive control and delay ability. Low income was related to a flat diurnal cortisol slope, and above the effects of family income, a flat diurnal cortisol slope predicted lower social competence. Low morning cortisol level predicted smaller gains in executive control and higher total adjustment problems. Further, delay ability predicted lower adjustment problems above the effects of income and diurnal cortisol levels. The results suggest that HPA-axis dysregulation and effortful control contribute additively to children's adjustment. PMID:25414597

  20. Effects of LiDAR point density and landscape context on estimates of urban forest biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kunwar K.; Chen, Gang; McCarter, James B.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2015-03-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is being increasingly used as an effective alternative to conventional optical remote sensing to accurately estimate aboveground forest biomass ranging from individual tree to stand levels. Recent advancements in LiDAR technology have resulted in higher point densities and improved data accuracies accompanied by challenges for procuring and processing voluminous LiDAR data for large-area assessments. Reducing point density lowers data acquisition costs and overcomes computational challenges for large-area forest assessments. However, how does lower point density impact the accuracy of biomass estimation in forests containing a great level of anthropogenic disturbance? We evaluate the effects of LiDAR point density on the biomass estimation of remnant forests in the rapidly urbanizing region of Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. We used multiple linear regression to establish a statistical relationship between field-measured biomass and predictor variables derived from LiDAR data with varying densities. We compared the estimation accuracies between a general Urban Forest type and three Forest Type models (evergreen, deciduous, and mixed) and quantified the degree to which landscape context influenced biomass estimation. The explained biomass variance of the Urban Forest model, using adjusted R2, was consistent across the reduced point densities, with the highest difference of 11.5% between the 100% and 1% point densities. The combined estimates of Forest Type biomass models outperformed the Urban Forest models at the representative point densities (100% and 40%). The Urban Forest biomass model with development density of 125 m radius produced the highest adjusted R2 (0.83 and 0.82 at 100% and 40% LiDAR point densities, respectively) and the lowest RMSE values, highlighting a distance impact of development on biomass estimation. Our evaluation suggests that reducing LiDAR point density is a viable solution to regional

  1. Structural Nested Cumulative Failure Time Models to Estimate the Effects of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Picciotto, Sally; Hernán, Miguel A.; Page, John H.; Young, Jessica G.; Robins, James M.

    2013-01-01

    In the presence of time-varying confounders affected by prior treatment, standard statistical methods for failure time analysis may be biased. Methods that correctly adjust for this type of covariate include the parametric g-formula, inverse probability weighted estimation of marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models, and g-estimation of structural nested accelerated failure time models. In this article, we propose a novel method to estimate the causal effect of a time-dependent treatment on failure in the presence of informative right-censoring and time-dependent confounders that may be affected by past treatment: g-estimation of structural nested cumulative failure time models (SNCFTMs). An SNCFTM considers the conditional effect of a final treatment at time m on the outcome at each later time k by modeling the ratio of two counterfactual cumulative risks at time k under treatment regimes that differ only at time m. Inverse probability weights are used to adjust for informative censoring. We also present a procedure that, under certain “no-interaction” conditions, uses the g-estimates of the model parameters to calculate unconditional cumulative risks under nondynamic (static) treatment regimes. The procedure is illustrated with an example using data from a longitudinal cohort study, in which the “treatments” are healthy behaviors and the outcome is coronary heart disease. PMID:24347749

  2. Perceived parenting style and adolescent adjustment: revisiting directions of effects and the role of parental knowledge.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Margaret; Stattin, Håkan; Ozdemir, Metin

    2012-11-01

    In the present research on parenting and adolescent behavior, there is much focus on reciprocal, bidirectional, and transactional processes, but parenting-style research still adheres to a unidirectional perspective in which parents affect youth behavior but are unaffected by it. In addition, many of the most cited parenting-style studies have used measures of parental behavioral control that are questionable because they include measures of parental knowledge. The goals of this study were to determine whether including knowledge items might have affected results of past studies and to test the unidirectional assumption. Data were from 978 adolescents participating in a longitudinal study. Parenting-style and adolescent adjustment measures at 2 time points were used, with a 2-year interval between time points. A variety of internal and external adjustment measures were used. Results showed that including knowledge items in measures of parental behavioral control elevated links between behavioral control and adjustment. Thus, the results and conclusions of many of the most highly cited studies are likely to have been stronger than if the measures had focused strictly on parental behavior. In addition, adolescent adjustment predicted changes in authoritative and neglectful parenting styles more robustly than these styles predicted changes in adolescent adjustment. Adolescent adjustment also predicted changes in authoritativeness more robustly than authoritativeness predicted changes in adjustment. Thus, parenting style cannot be seen as independent of the adolescent. In summary, both the theoretical premises of parenting-style research and the prior findings should be revisited. PMID:22448987

  3. Improved representation of diurnal variability of rainfall retrieved from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Microwave Imager adjusted Precipitation Estimation From Remotely Sensed Information Using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yang; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Gao, Xiaogang

    2005-03-01

    Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information Using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) is a satellite infrared-based algorithm that produces global estimates of rainfall at resolutions of 0.25° × 0.25° and a half-hour. In this study the model parameters of PERSIANN are routinely adjusted using coincident rainfall derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Microwave Imager (TMI). The impact of such an adjustment on capturing the diurnal variability of rainfall is examined for the Boreal summer of 2002. General evaluations of the PERSIANN rainfall estimates with/without TMI adjustment were conducted using U.S. daily gauge rainfall and nationwide radar network (weather surveillance radar) 1988 Doppler data. The diurnal variability of PERSIANN rainfall estimates with TMI adjustment is improved over those without TMI adjustment. In particular, the amounts of afternoon and morning maximums in rainfall diurnal cycles improved by 14.9% and 26%, respectively, and the original 2-3 hours of time lag in the phase of diurnal cycles improved by 1-2 hours. In addition, the rainfall estimate with TMI adjustment has higher correlation (0.75 versus 0.63) and reduced bias (+8% versus -11%) at monthly 0.25° × 0.25° resolution than that without TMI adjustment and consistently shows higher correlation (0.62 versus 0.51) and lower bias (+22% versus -30%) at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale. This study provides evidence that the TMI, which measures instantaneous rain rates from the TRMM platform flying on a non-Sun-synchronous orbit, enables PERSIANN to capture more realistic diurnal variations of rainfall. This study also reveals the limitation of current satellite rainfall estimation techniques in retrieving the rainfall diurnal features and suggests that further investigation of precipitation generation in different periods of cloud life cycles might help resolve this limitation.

  4. Subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory for nonvolatile operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, In; Cheon, Woo Young; Choi, Woo Young

    2016-04-01

    A subthreshold-swing-adjustable tunneling-field-effect-transistor-based random-access memory (SAT RAM) has been proposed and fabricated for low-power nonvolatile memory applications. The proposed SAT RAM cell demonstrates adjustable subthreshold swing (SS) depending on stored information: small SS in the erase state ("1" state) and large SS in the program state ("0" state). Thus, SAT RAM cells can achieve low read voltage (Vread) with a large memory window in addition to the effective suppression of ambipolar behavior. These unique features of the SAT RAM are originated from the locally stored charge, which modulates the tunneling barrier width (Wtun) of the source-to-channel tunneling junction.

  5. Age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Wataru; Fukaya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Ohashi, Yukari

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints. Fifteen young adults and 14 older adults avoided a virtual white planar obstacle by lengthening or shortening their steps under free or constrained conditions. In the anterior-posterior direction, older adults demonstrated significantly decreased center of mass velocity at the swing foot contact under temporal constraints. Additionally, the distances between the 'extrapolated center of mass' position and base of support at the swing foot contact were greater in older adults than young adults. In the mediolateral direction, center of mass displacement was significantly increased in older adults compared with young adults. Consequently, older adults showed a significantly increased step width at the swing foot contact in the constraint condition. Overall, these data suggest that older adults demonstrate a conservative strategy to maintain anterior-posterior stability. By contrast, although older adults are able to modulate their step width to maintain mediolateral dynamic balance, age-related changes in mediolateral balance control under temporal constraints may increase the risk of falls in the lateral direction during obstacle negotiation. PMID:26852293

  6. The effects of physiological adjustments on the perceptual and acoustical characteristics of simulated laryngeal vocal tremor

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Story, Brad H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if adjustments to the voice source [i.e., fundamental frequency (F0), degree of vocal fold adduction] or vocal tract filter (i.e., vocal tract shape for vowels) reduce the perception of simulated laryngeal vocal tremor and to determine if listener perception could be explained by characteristics of the acoustical modulations. This research was carried out using a computational model of speech production that allowed for precise control and manipulation of the glottal and vocal tract configurations. Forty-two healthy adults participated in a perceptual study involving pair-comparisons of the magnitude of “shakiness” with simulated samples of laryngeal vocal tremor. Results revealed that listeners perceived a higher magnitude of voice modulation when simulated samples had a higher mean F0, greater degree of vocal fold adduction, and vocal tract shape for /i/ vs /ɑ/. However, the effect of F0 was significant only when glottal noise was not present in the acoustic signal. Acoustical analyses were performed with the simulated samples to determine the features that affected listeners' judgments. Based on regression analyses, listeners' judgments were predicted to some extent by modulation information present in both low and high frequency bands. PMID:26328711

  7. The differential effects of forms and settings of exposure to violence on adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    Ho, Man Yee; Cheung, Fanny M

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the link between exposure to violence and psychosocial adjustment for 442 Chinese secondary school students in Form 1-3. The students completed an inventory assessing exposure to violence through witnessing and through direct victimization in different settings (community, school, and home). Multiple measures and informants (i.e., self-report, teacher report, and school report) were used to assess emotional, behavioral, and cognitive functioning in adolescents. The results of this study showed that overall exposure to violence was related to emotional and behavior problems. High rates of exposure to violence across multiple contexts were found in this sample. After controlling for the co-occurrence of risk factors (e.g., exposure to violence in other settings), both witnessing school violence and being victimized by domestic violence were associated with emotional problems, whereas being victimized by community violence was related to behavior problems. These results suggest that there are differential effects of risks associated with different forms and settings of exposure. PMID:19752203

  8. Partial covariate adjusted regression

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2008-01-01

    Covariate adjusted regression (CAR) is a recently proposed adjustment method for regression analysis where both the response and predictors are not directly observed (Şentürk and Müller, 2005). The available data has been distorted by unknown functions of an observable confounding covariate. CAR provides consistent estimators for the coefficients of the regression between the variables of interest, adjusted for the confounder. We develop a broader class of partial covariate adjusted regression (PCAR) models to accommodate both distorted and undistorted (adjusted/unadjusted) predictors. The PCAR model allows for unadjusted predictors, such as age, gender and demographic variables, which are common in the analysis of biomedical and epidemiological data. The available estimation and inference procedures for CAR are shown to be invalid for the proposed PCAR model. We propose new estimators and develop new inference tools for the more general PCAR setting. In particular, we establish the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimators and propose consistent estimators of their asymptotic variances. Finite sample properties of the proposed estimators are investigated using simulation studies and the method is also illustrated with a Pima Indians diabetes data set. PMID:20126296

  9. Coping resources, perceived stress and adjustment to divorce among Israeli women: assessing effects.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Liat; Heine-Cohen, Etti

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how socioeconomic resources (level of education and evaluation of economic situation), cognitive resources (sense of coherence), emotional resources (the quality of relationship with the ex-spouse and the existence of a new romantic relationship), and perceived stress contribute to explaining the adjustment of Israeli women to divorce. Adjustment to divorce was examined along four dimensions: self-acceptance of divorce, disentanglement of the love relationship, symptoms of grief, and self-evaluation. The research sample consisted of 114 divorced Jewish women, all of whom had retained custody of their children. Among the resources examined, the contribution of sense of coherence to explaining adjustment to divorce was particularly significant, followed by the existence of a new romantic relationship. Furthermore, resources were found to interact with perceived stress in explaining women's adjustment to divorce. PMID:21375123

  10. The effect of an adjustable sitting angle on the perceived discomfort from the back and neck-shoulder regions in building crane operators.

    PubMed

    Gustafson-Söderman, U

    1987-12-01

    In a previous working environment study of building crane operators, it has been found that approximately 70% experienced discomfort from the locomotor system. Comments by the interviewed crane operators indicated that it is, among other things, the forward flexed sitting position during lifts close to the crane that causes discomfort. This investigation sought to apply knowledge from the forestry industry concerning the beneficial effects of improved operator's seats to the work situation of crane operators. On a construction site with three cranes, an operator's seat with adjustable sitting angle was installed in one of the cranes. Estimation of perceived strain-discomfort in the lumbar region of the back as well as in the neck-shoulder region was assessed according to Borg's scale. Data were collected from the crane operators seated in their ordinary operator's seat, seated in the test seat, and seated in another crane with an ordinary type of seat. The results showed that in [Formula: see text] of all lifts, the crane operator was sitting bent-forward with little opportunity for relief via a backrest or armrests. The highest estimated discomfort values in the study were also obtained in an ordinary operator's seat on days with a high proportion of lifts close to the crane. When working in the test seat, none of the subjects gave an estimate higher than 0.5 (discomfort equivalent to very, very weak). An adjustable operator's seat could be a good alternative to a fixed seat, and more tests would be desirable. PMID:15676634

  11. Performance of Random Effects Model Estimators under Complex Sampling Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Yue; Stokes, Lynne; Harris, Ian; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we consider estimation of parameters of random effects models from samples collected via complex multistage designs. Incorporation of sampling weights is one way to reduce estimation bias due to unequal probabilities of selection. Several weighting methods have been proposed in the literature for estimating the parameters of…

  12. WBGT clothing adjustment factors for four clothing ensembles and the effects of metabolic demands.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thomas E; Caravello, Victor; Schwartz, Skai W; Ashley, Candi D

    2008-01-01

    This study measured the clothing adjustment factors (CAFs) for four clothing ensembles (Cotton Coveralls, Tyvek 1427 Coveralls, NexGen Coveralls, and Tychem QC Coveralls; all coveralls were worn without hoods) against a baseline of cotton work clothes to determine whether the CAFs would be affected by the metabolic rate. Fifteen participants wore one of the five ensembles while walking on a treadmill at low, moderate, and high rates of work in an environment maintained at 50% relative humidity. A climatic chamber was used to slowly increase the level of heat stress by increasing air temperature. When the participant's core temperature reached a steady-state, the dry bulb temperature was increased. The point at which the core temperature began to increase was defined as the inflection point, and the WBGT recorded 5 min before the inflection point was the critical WBGT for each ensemble. A three-way mixed effects linear model with ensemble by metabolic rate category interactions demonstrated that the CAF did not change with metabolic rate, so CAFs can be used over a wide range of metabolic rates. The data at the moderate metabolic rate were combined with data on 14 participants from a previous study under the same conditions. The CAFs in degrees C WBGT were 0 for cotton coveralls, 1.0 for Tyvek 1422A, and 2.5 for NexGen. Although the value of 7.5 for Tychem QC was found, the recommendation remained at 10 to account for the effects of humidity. The standard error for the determination of WBGT crit at 50% relative humidity was 1.60 degrees C WBGT. PMID:17999329

  13. Effectiveness of pharmacist dosing adjustment for critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Zhu, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Liang; Lu, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Wu, Bao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on drug removal is complicated; pharmacist dosing adjustment for these patients may be advantageous. This study aims to describe the development and implementation of pharmacist dosing adjustment for critically ill patients receiving CRRT and to examine the effectiveness of pharmacist interventions. Methods A comparative study was conducted in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a university-affiliated hospital. Patients receiving CRRT in the intervention group received specialized pharmacy dosing service from pharmacists, whereas patients in the no-intervention group received routine medical care without pharmacist involvement. The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome of pharmacist dosing adjustment. Results The pharmacist carried out 233 dosing adjustment recommendations for patients receiving CRRT, and 212 (90.98%) of the recommendations were well accepted by the physicians. Changes in CRRT-related variables (n=144, 61.81%) were the most common risk factors for dosing errors, whereas antibiotics (n=168, 72.10%) were the medications most commonly associated with dosing errors. Pharmacist dosing adjustment resulted in a US$2,345.98 ICU cost savings per critically ill patient receiving CRRT. Suspected adverse drug events in the intervention group were significantly lower than those in the preintervention group (35 in 27 patients versus [vs] 18 in eleven patients, P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference between length of ICU stay and mortality after pharmacist dosing adjustment, which was 8.93 days vs 7.68 days (P=0.26) and 30.10% vs 27.36% (P=0.39), respectively. Conclusion Pharmacist dosing adjustment for patients receiving CRRT was well accepted by physicians, and was related with lower adverse drug event rates and ICU cost savings. These results may support the development of strategies to include a pharmacist in the multidisciplinary ICU team. PMID:24940066

  14. Previous International Experience, Cross-Cultural Training, and Expatriates' Cross-Cultural Adjustment: Effects of Cultural Intelligence and Goal Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo Moon, Hyoung; Kwon Choi, Byoung; Shik Jung, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Although various antecedents of expatriates' cross-cultural adjustment have been addressed, previous international experience, predeparture cross-cultural training, and cultural intelligence (CQ) have been most frequently examined. However, there are few attempts that explore the effects of these antecedents simultaneously or consider the possible…

  15. The Effectiveness of the Strength-Centered Career Adjustment Model for Dual-Career Women in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Chen; Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness of a Strength-Centered Career Adjustment Model for dual-career women (N = 28). Fourteen women in the experimental group received strength-centered career counseling for 6 to 8 sessions; the 14 women in the control group received test services in 1 to 2 sessions. All participants completed the Personal…

  16. Shyness and School Adjustment among Chinese Preschool Children: Examining the Moderating Effect of Gender and Teacher-Child Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, YunPeng; Wu, JianFen; Chen, YingMin; Han, Lei; Han, PiGuo; Wang, Peng; Gao, Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study examined the moderating effects of gender and teacher-child relationship on the association between shyness and school adjustment (school liking and avoidance, cooperative and independent participation). The sample consisted of 524 preschool students from 3 cities of Shandong province in northern China. Mothers…

  17. Does HPA-Axis Dysregulation Account for the Effects of Income on Effortful Control and Adjustment in Preschool Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen; Fisher, Phil; Moran, Lyndsey

    2013-01-01

    The effects of low income on children's adjustment might be accounted for by disruptions to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and to the development of effortful control. Using longitudinal data and a community sample of preschool-age children (N?=?306, 36-39?months) and their mothers, recruited to over-represent low-income…

  18. Exploring the Effects of Social Networking on Students' Perceptions of Social Connectedness, Adjustment, Academic Engagement, and Institutional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michele J.; Childress, Janice E.; Trujillo, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Social networking is a tool being explored by many institutions as a means of connecting to and communicating with students. This study explores whether or not students' use of social networking services (SNSs) has significant effects on social connectedness, college adjustment, academic engagement, and institutional commitment. Students' use of…

  19. The Effects of Occupational Work Adjustment on Factors Leading to High School Drop Out in Rural Northwest Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Angela

    The effect of four Occupational Work Adjustment (OWA) programs on risk factors leading to students dropping out of high school was assessed. Data were gathered from four OWA teachers in high schools in Northwest Ohio; information was provided for 27 individual students and 2 groups of 28 students each for the 1992-93 school year. The following…

  20. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy on Sexual Satisfaction and Marital Adjustment of Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Najafi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Hoseini Kamkar, Elnaz; Mahboubi, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of emotionally focused couples therapy (EFT-C) on enhancement of marital adjustment in infertile couples. Materials and Methods This was a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design. We selected 30 infertile couples (60 subjects) by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly assigned to two groups, sample and control. Each group consisted of 15 couples who had marital maladjustment and low sexual satisfaction. Couples answered the marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction questionnaires at baseline after which the sample group received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results Results of pre-test and post-test showed that EFT-C significantly impacted marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction. Conclusion EFT-C had a significant effect on enhancement of satisfaction, cohesion and affectional expression. This approach impacted physical and emotional sexual satisfaction of infertile couples. PMID:26644864

  1. Accounting for Uncertainty in Confounder and Effect Modifier Selection when Estimating Average Causal Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Zigler, Corwin Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Summary Confounder selection and adjustment are essential elements of assessing the causal effect of an exposure or treatment in observational studies. Building upon work by Wang et al. (2012) and Lefebvre et al. (2014), we propose and evaluate a Bayesian method to estimate average causal effects in studies with a large number of potential confounders, relatively few observations, likely interactions between confounders and the exposure of interest, and uncertainty on which confounders and interaction terms should be included. Our method is applicable across all exposures and outcomes that can be handled through generalized linear models. In this general setting, estimation of the average causal effect is different from estimation of the exposure coefficient in the outcome model due to non-collapsibility. We implement a Bayesian bootstrap procedure to integrate over the distribution of potential confounders and to estimate the causal effect. Our method permits estimation of both the overall population causal effect and effects in specified subpopulations, providing clear characterization of heterogeneous exposure effects that may vary considerably across different covariate profiles. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed method performs well in small sample size situations with 100 to 150 observations and 50 covariates. The method is applied to data on 15060 US Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor between 2000 and 2009 to evaluate whether surgery reduces hospital readmissions within thirty days of diagnosis. PMID:25899155

  2. Application of (13)C ramp CPMAS NMR with phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) for the quantitative estimation of carbon functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The composition of carbon (C) functional groups in natural organic matter (NOM), such as dissolved organic matter, soil organic matter, and humic substances, is frequently estimated using solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. A problem associated with quantitative analysis using general cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) spectra is the appearance of spinning side bands (SSBs) split from the original center peaks of sp (2) hybridized C species (i.e., aromatic and carbonyl C). Ramp CP/phase-adjusted side band suppressing (PASS) is a pulse sequence that integrates SSBs separately and quantitatively recovers them into their inherent center peaks. In the present study, the applicability of ramp CP/PASS to NOM analysis was compared with direct polarization (DPMAS), another quantitative method but one that requires a long operation time, and/or a ramp CP/total suppression side band (ramp CP/TOSS) technique, a popular but non-quantitative method for deleting SSBs. The test materials were six soil humic acid samples with various known degrees of aromaticity and two fulvic acids. There were no significant differences in the relative abundance of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, and aromatic C between the ramp CP/PASS and DPMAS methods, while the signal intensities corresponding to aromatic C in the ramp CP/TOSS spectra were consistently less than the values obtained in the ramp CP/PASS spectra. These results indicate that ramp CP/PASS can be used to accurately estimate the C composition of NOM samples. PMID:26522329

  3. An effect of physical activity-based recreation programs on children’s optimism, humor styles, and school life adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Gwang-Uk

    2015-01-01

    This study puts its purpose in identifying the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the optimism of children, humor styles, and school life adjustment. To achieve the study purpose, this study selected 190 subjects as samples were extracted targeting senior students of elementary schools who participated in the physical activity-based recreation in the metropolitan areas as of 2014. As research methods, questionnaire papers were used and reliability analysis, factor analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted by utilizing SPSS 18.0 after inputting analysis data into the computer. The study results, obtained in this study are as follows: First, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on optimism, participation frequency and participation intensity would have an effect on optimism, while participation period would have a significant effect on being positive among the sub-factors of optimism. Second, participation in physical activity-based recreation programs might have a significant effect on humor styles. Third, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the school life adjustment, it was demonstrated that participation period and participation intensity would have a significant effect on school life adjustment, while participation frequency would have a significant effect on regulation-observance and school life satisfaction. PMID:26171384

  4. An effect of physical activity-based recreation programs on children's optimism, humor styles, and school life adjustment.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Gwang-Uk

    2015-06-01

    This study puts its purpose in identifying the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the optimism of children, humor styles, and school life adjustment. To achieve the study purpose, this study selected 190 subjects as samples were extracted targeting senior students of elementary schools who participated in the physical activity-based recreation in the metropolitan areas as of 2014. As research methods, questionnaire papers were used and reliability analysis, factor analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were conducted by utilizing SPSS 18.0 after inputting analysis data into the computer. The study results, obtained in this study are as follows: First, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on optimism, participation frequency and participation intensity would have an effect on optimism, while participation period would have a significant effect on being positive among the sub-factors of optimism. Second, participation in physical activity-based recreation programs might have a significant effect on humor styles. Third, in terms of the effect of the participation in physical activity-based recreation programs on the school life adjustment, it was demonstrated that participation period and participation intensity would have a significant effect on school life adjustment, while participation frequency would have a significant effect on regulation-observance and school life satisfaction. PMID:26171384

  5. Estimating and Testing Mediation Effects with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated influences of censored data on mediation analysis. Mediation effect estimates can be biased and inefficient with censoring on any one of the input, mediation, and output variables. A Bayesian Tobit approach was introduced to estimate and test mediation effects with censored data. Simulation results showed that the Bayesian…

  6. Uncertainty in Propensity Score Estimation: Bayesian Methods for Variable Selection and Model Averaged Causal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Corwin Matthew; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Causal inference with observational data frequently relies on the notion of the propensity score (PS) to adjust treatment comparisons for observed confounding factors. As decisions in the era of “big data” are increasingly reliant on large and complex collections of digital data, researchers are frequently confronted with decisions regarding which of a high-dimensional covariate set to include in the PS model in order to satisfy the assumptions necessary for estimating average causal effects. Typically, simple or ad-hoc methods are employed to arrive at a single PS model, without acknowledging the uncertainty associated with the model selection. We propose three Bayesian methods for PS variable selection and model averaging that 1) select relevant variables from a set of candidate variables to include in the PS model and 2) estimate causal treatment effects as weighted averages of estimates under different PS models. The associated weight for each PS model reflects the data-driven support for that model’s ability to adjust for the necessary variables. We illustrate features of our proposed approaches with a simulation study, and ultimately use our methods to compare the effectiveness of surgical vs. nonsurgical treatment for brain tumors among 2,606 Medicare beneficiaries. Supplementary materials are available online. PMID:24696528

  7. Adjusted effects of domestic violence, tobacco use, and indoor air pollution from use of solid fuel on child mortality.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shanta; Lin, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Studies that have separately examined the consequences of gender based violence upon women, use of solid fuel for cooking, and mother and father's use of tobacco on child health have concluded that they serve as risk factors for maternal and child health. Some authors have implied that these studies may have run the risk of overestimating the burden of disease of one factor over another. In this paper, we included all four factors in the same model to estimate their adjusted effects on child mortality, controlling for the demographic factors. The data come from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey of India that interviewed a nationally representative sample of 39,257 couples. Of the four factors, mothers' use of tobacco presented the highest risk for child mortality (OR = 1.42; CI = 1.27-1.60) followed by fathers' use of tobacco (OR = 1.23; CI = 1.12-1.36), households' use of solid fuel for cooking (OR = 1.23; CI = 1.06-1.43), and physical abuse upon mothers (OR = 1.20; CI = 1.10-1.32). Among the households that used solid fuel for cooking, improved cookstoves users experienced 28 % lower odds of child mortality (OR = 0.72; CI = 0.61-0.86) compared to nonusers of improved cookstoves. Additionally, increase in age of mothers at birth of first child, parents' education, and household wealth served as protective factors for child mortality. To prevent child death, programs should focus on reducing couple's use of tobacco, protecting women from physical abuse, and helping households switch from solid to liquid fuel. Moreover, a significant reduction in child death could be attained by improving girls' education, and delaying their age at marriage and first birth. PMID:23065299

  8. Adjustment disorder

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum ...

  9. Location Memory in the Real World: Category Adjustment Effects in 3-Dimensional Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Mark P.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to remember spatial locations is critical to human functioning, both in an evolutionary and in an everyday sense. Yet spatial memories and judgments often show systematic errors and biases. Bias has been explained by models such as the Category Adjustment model (CAM), in which fine-grained and categorical information about locations…

  10. Effects of Individual Characteristics on Expatriates' Adjustment and Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Kaur, Sharan; Battour, Mohamed Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have been focusing on the predictors of expatriates' adjustment and job performance at different levels (individual level, organizational level and societal level), but still some of the predictors have been ignored or unclear in the expatriate literature. The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework…

  11. The Differential Effects of Forms and Settings of Exposure to Violence on Adolescents' Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Man Yee; Cheung, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the link between exposure to violence and psychosocial adjustment for 442 Chinese secondary school students in Form 1-3. The students completed an inventory assessing exposure to violence through witnessing and through direct victimization in different settings (community, school, and home). Multiple measures and informants…

  12. The Effects of Divorce and Parental Conflict on Children's Adjustment: A Prospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Daniel

    Replicating the methodology used by Block, Block, and Gjerde (1986), a prospective, longitudinal examination was made of relations between divorce and children's adjustment. Data from the New York Longitudinal Study (NYLS), originally collected by Thomas, Chess, and Birch (1963, 1968, 1977, 1983, 1984) was analyzed. The NYLS assessed children's…

  13. Post-Retirement Adjustment: Effective Coping with the Stresses of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holahan, Carole K.

    A study was conducted to examine the role of positive and negative life circumstances and individual coping factors in the psychological adjustment of older individuals. Interviews were conducted with 32 men and 32 women between the ages of 65 and 75 who were retired from mid-level or managerial jobs at the University of Texas. Most of the…

  14. [Estimation of the hypoglycemic effect of phytoecdysteroids].

    PubMed

    Syrov, V N; Iuldasheva, N Kh; Égamova, F R; Ismailova, G I; Abdullaev, N D; Khushbaktova, Z A

    2012-01-01

    A series of phytoecodysteroids, including alpha-ecdysone, 2-deoxy-alpha-ecdysone, and 2-deoxyecdysterone isolated from Silene praemixta, integristerone A and ecdysterone isolated from Rhaponticum carthamoides and 22-acetylcyasterone and turkesterone isolated from Ajuga turkestanica, exhibit a pronounced hypoglycemic effect in experiments on intact male rats. The most active compounds--ecdysteron and turkesterone--also produce an expressed hypoglycemic effect in animals with model hyperglycemia induced by the administration of glucose, adrenalin and alloxan. Phytoecdysteroids are substances possessing protein-anabolic activity and are somewhat similar to steranobols in this aspect. Phytoecdysteroids exhibit unidirectional effect and are well comparable with steranabol actionon the carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:22834126

  15. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Enhancing Marital Adjustment and Quality of Life among Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Maryam; Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Kamkar, Elnaz Hoseini

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of emotionally fo- cused therapy (EFT-C) on promoting marital adjustment of infertile couples with marital conflicts by improving quality of life. Materials and Methods This is a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post–test design in which 30 infertile couples (60 individuals) were chosen by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly divided into two groups, sample and control, of 15 couples each. Next, couples in the sample population answered questionnaires for marital adjustment, sexual satisfaction and quality of life after which they received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results Pre- and post-tests showed that EFT-C had a significant effect on marital adjust- ment and quality of life. Conclusion According to the results, EFT-C had a significant, positive effect on en- hancement of marital adjustment. Life quality of infertile couples significantly increased via application of EFT-C. This approach improved the physical, psychological and social relationships of infertile couples and enhanced their social environment. PMID:26246883

  16. A Novel Moisture Adjusted Vegetation Index (MAVI) to Reduce Background Reflectance and Topographical Effects on LAI Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gaolong; Ju, Weimin; Chen, J. M.; Liu, Yibo

    2014-01-01

    A new moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) is proposed using the red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectance in band-ratio form in this paper. The effectiveness of MAVI in retrieving leaf area index (LAI) is investigated using Landsat-5 data and field LAI measurements in two forest and two grassland areas. The ability of MAVI to retrieve forest LAI under different background conditions is further evaluated using canopy reflectance of Jack Pine and Black Spruce forests simulated by the 4-Scale model. Compared with several commonly used two-band vegetation index, such as normalized difference vegetation index, soil adjusted vegetation index, modified soil adjusted vegetation index, optimized soil adjusted vegetation index, MAVI is a better predictor of LAI, on average, which can explain 70% of variations of LAI in the four study areas. Similar to other SWIR-related three-band vegetation index, such as modified normalized difference vegetation index (MNDVI) and reduced simple ratio (RSR), MAVI is able to reduce the background reflectance effects on forest canopy LAI retrieval. MAVI is more suitable for retrieving LAI than RSR and MNDVI, because it avoids the difficulty in properly determining the maximum and minimum SWIR values required in RSR and MNDVI, which improves the robustness of MAVI in retrieving LAI of different land cover types. Moreover, MAVI is expressed as ratios between different spectral bands, greatly reducing the noise caused by topographical variations, which makes it more suitable for applications in mountainous area. PMID:25025128

  17. A novel moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) to reduce background reflectance and topographical effects on LAI retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gaolong; Ju, Weimin; Chen, J M; Liu, Yibo

    2014-01-01

    A new moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) is proposed using the red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectance in band-ratio form in this paper. The effectiveness of MAVI in retrieving leaf area index (LAI) is investigated using Landsat-5 data and field LAI measurements in two forest and two grassland areas. The ability of MAVI to retrieve forest LAI under different background conditions is further evaluated using canopy reflectance of Jack Pine and Black Spruce forests simulated by the 4-Scale model. Compared with several commonly used two-band vegetation index, such as normalized difference vegetation index, soil adjusted vegetation index, modified soil adjusted vegetation index, optimized soil adjusted vegetation index, MAVI is a better predictor of LAI, on average, which can explain 70% of variations of LAI in the four study areas. Similar to other SWIR-related three-band vegetation index, such as modified normalized difference vegetation index (MNDVI) and reduced simple ratio (RSR), MAVI is able to reduce the background reflectance effects on forest canopy LAI retrieval. MAVI is more suitable for retrieving LAI than RSR and MNDVI, because it avoids the difficulty in properly determining the maximum and minimum SWIR values required in RSR and MNDVI, which improves the robustness of MAVI in retrieving LAI of different land cover types. Moreover, MAVI is expressed as ratios between different spectral bands, greatly reducing the noise caused by topographical variations, which makes it more suitable for applications in mountainous area. PMID:25025128

  18. Adjusting the Chain Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloc, Z.; Korf, J.; Kavan, P.

    The adjustment (modification) deals with gear chains intermediating (transmitting) motion transfer between the sprocket wheels on parallel shafts. The purpose of the adjustments of chain gear is to remove the unwanted effects by using the chain guide on the links (sliding guide rail) ensuring a smooth fit of the chain rollers into the wheel tooth gap.

  19. LPM effect and primary energy estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, M. F.; Capdevielle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    The distortion of the electron cascade development under LPM effects is now admitted; it consists of an increase of depth of showers origin, of shower maximum T sum max, a decrease of the number of particles at maximum N sub max and results in a flattening and a widening of the cascade transition curve. Connected with the influence of multiple Coulomb scattering on basic electromagnetic processes (bremsstrahlung, pair production), this effect appears at high energy with a threshold dependent on the density of the medium (more than 10 TeV for lead, more than 10 sup 6 TeV in air). Consequently, the electromagnetic components of hadron induced showers in lead and EAS in air calculated for the same hadronic cascades in the different alternative, including or not the LPM effect are examined here.

  20. Effect of birth weight on adulthood renal function: A bias-adjusted meta-analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Das, Sumon Kumar; Mannan, Munim; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Ahmed, Tahmeed; McIntyre, Harold David; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2016-07-01

    While the association between low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g) and development of adult chronic renal disease (CKD) is inconsistently reported, less information is available regarding association of high birth weight (HBW; ≥4000 g) with CKD. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on studies published before 30 September 2015 and report associations between birth weight and renal function. Blood (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) and urine (microalbuminuria/albumin excreation rate (AER)/urinary albumin creatinine ratio (ACR)) parameters were used to define CKD. Three different effect size estimates were used (odds ratio, regression coefficient and mean difference). The odds of developing CKD in the life course among those born LBW was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.20) times and 1.68 (1.27, 2.33) times, assessed by blood and urine parameters respectively. Higher risk was also observed among Asian and Australian populations (blood: OR 2.68; urine: OR 2.28), individuals aged ≤30 years (blood: OR 2.30; urine: OR 1.26), and ≥50 years (blood: OR 3.66; urine: OR 3.10), people with diabetes (blood: OR 2.51), and aborigines (urine: OR 2.32). There was no significant association between HBW and CKD. For every 1 kg increase in BW, the estimated GFR increased by 2.09 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (1.33-2.85), and it was negatively associated with LogACR (ß -0.07, 95% CI: -0.14, 0.00). LBW inborn had lower mean GFR -4.62 (-7.10, -2.14) compared with normal BW. Findings of this study suggest that LBW increased the risk of developing CKD, and HBW did not show any significant impact. PMID:26807855

  1. Limitations of ozone data assimilation with adjustment of NOx emissions: mixed effects on NO2 forecast over Beijing and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z. F.; Gbaguidi, A.; Lin, C. Y.; Xin, J. Y.; Song, T.; Hu, B.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates a cross-variable ozone data assimilation (DA) method based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that has been validated as an efficient approach for improving ozone forecasts. The main purpose is to delve into the impacts of the cross-variable adjustment of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions on the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) forecasts over Beijing and surrounding regions during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. A mixed effect on the NO2 forecasts was observed during the application of the cross-variable assimilation approach in real-data assimilation (RDA) experiments. The method improved the NO2 forecast over almost half of the urban sites with reductions of the root mean square errors (RMSEs) by 15-36 % in contrast to big increases of the RMSEs over other urban stations by 56-239 %. Over the urban stations with negative DA impacts, improvement of the NO2 forecasts with 7 % reduction of the RMSEs was noticed during the night and the morning vs. significant deterioration of the forecasts during daytime with 190 % increase of the RMSEs, suggesting the negative DA impacts mainly occurred during daytime. Ideal data assimilation (IDA) experiments with a box model and the same cross-variable assimilation method, as a further investigation, confirmed the mixed effects found in the RDA experiments. An improvement of the NOx emission estimation was obtained from the cross-variable assimilation under relatively small errors in the prior estimation of NOx emissions during daytime, while deterioration of the NOx emission estimation was found under large biases in the prior estimation of NOx emissions during daytime. However, the cross-variable assimilation improved the NOx emission estimations during the night and the morning even with large biases in the prior estimations. The mixed effects observed in the cross-variable assimilation, i.e., positive DA impacts on NO2 forecast over some urban sites, negative DA impacts over the other urban sites and weak DA

  2. Effects of pelvic adjustment on pelvic posture and angles of the lower limb joints during walking in female university students

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Misuk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of pelvic adjustment on pelvic posture and lower limb joint angles during walking in female university students. [Subjects] Thirty healthy female university students were randomly assigned to an experimental group (pelvic adjustment group, n = 15) and a control group (stretching group, n = 15). [Methods] Pelvic adjustment was performed three times on the experimental group. The control group performed three sets of pelvic muscle stretching for 15 minutes. A back mapper and motion analysis equipment were used to measure pelvic posture and angles of lower limb joints for the experimental and control group. [Results] The values obtained before and after the intervention were compared. For the experimental group, the results were significantly different in terms of reduced differences in hip flexion between the left and right hips and in knee abduction between the left and right knees. Differences in pelvic position and pelvic torsion were also found in the experimental group. No significant differences in the control group were identified. [Conclusion] Pelvic adjustment affects pelvic position and torsion and this enhancement to pelvic stability decreases hip flexion and knee abduction during walking. PMID:27190468

  3. Direct estimation of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Kevin M; Sutter, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    This article estimates the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters using the annual probability of a tornado and new data on fatalities per building struck by a tornado. This approach differs from recent estimates of the cost effectiveness of tornado shelters in Reference 1 that use historical casualties. Historical casualties combine both tornado risk and resident action. If residents of tornado-prone states take greater precautions, observed fatalities might not be much higher than in states with lower risk. Estimation using the tornado probability avoids this potential bias. Despite the very different method used, the estimates are 68 million US dollars in permanent homes and 6.0 million US dollars in mobile homes in Oklahoma using a 3% real discount rate, within about 10% of estimates based on historical fatalities. The findings suggest that shelters provide cost-effective protection for mobile homes in the most tornado-prone states but not for permanent homes. PMID:16948687

  4. Compliance-Effect Correlation Bias in Instrumental Variables Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2010-01-01

    Instrumental variable estimators hold the promise of enabling researchers to estimate the effects of educational treatments that are not (or cannot be) randomly assigned but that may be affected by randomly assigned interventions. Examples of the use of instrumental variables in such cases are increasingly common in educational and social science…

  5. Estimates of genetic parameters for direct and maternal effects on embryonic survival in swine.

    PubMed

    Gama, L T; Boldman, K G; Johnson, R K

    1991-12-01

    Survival of 16,838 potential embryos was determined by counting corpora lutea and fetuses at 50 d of gestation for 1,081 litters by 225 sires. These data, coded as 1 or 0 depending on whether an ovulation was represented by a fetus, were used to estimate direct and maternal additive genetic variances and their covariance for embryonic survival. Data were from first-parity gilts of a Large White-Landrace composite population subdivided into two lines, one selected for an index of ovulation rate and embryonic survival for seven generations and a contemporary control line. Variance components were obtained by ANOVA and expectations of covariances among relatives and by derivative-free restricted maximum likelihood (DFREML) in an animal model. As a trait of the embryo, heritability of direct effects obtained with ANOVA was 3.8%, heritability of maternal effects was 1.5%, and the genetic correlation between them was -.51. After adjustment of embryonic survival for ovulation rate, lower estimates of each parameter were obtained with ANOVA. Heritability of embryonic survival as a trait of the dam was 9 to 10%. Estimates of heritability of both direct and maternal effects obtained with DFREML were less than 1% and the genetic correlation between them was -.64. When survival of embryos from only those dams with 15 or more ovulations was analyzed, heritability of maternal effects was 4.4%. Estimates of common environmental effects on embryonic survival ranged from 5 to 7%. PMID:1808176

  6. Estimating Contrail Climate Effects from Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Duda, David P.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Bedka, Sarah T.; Boeke, Robyn; Khlopenkov, Konstantin; Chee, Thad; Bedka, Kristopher T.

    2011-01-01

    An automated contrail detection algorithm (CDA) is developed to exploit six of the infrared channels on the 1-km MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites. The CDA is refined and balanced using visual error analysis. It is applied to MODIS data taken by Terra and Aqua over the United States during 2006 and 2008. The results are consistent with flight track data, but differ markedly from earlier analyses. Contrail coverage is a factor of 4 less than other retrievals and the retrieved contrail optical depths and radiative forcing are smaller by approx.30%. The discrepancies appear to be due to the inability to detect wider, older contrails that comprise a significant amount of the contrail coverage. An example of applying the algorithm to MODIS data over the entire Northern Hemisphere is also presented. Overestimates of contrail coverage are apparent in some tropical regions. Methods for improving the algorithm are discussed and are to be implemented before analyzing large amounts of Northern Hemisphere data. The results should be valuable for guiding and validating climate models seeking to account for aviation effects on climate.

  7. Unbiased estimation in seamless phase II/III trials with unequal treatment effect variances and hypothesis-driven selection rules.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-09-30

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials offer an efficient way to select an experimental treatment and perform confirmatory analysis within a single trial. However, combining the data from both stages in the final analysis can induce bias into the estimates of treatment effects. Methods for bias adjustment developed thus far have made restrictive assumptions about the design and selection rules followed. In order to address these shortcomings, we apply recent methodological advances to derive the uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimator for two-stage seamless phase II/III trials. Our framework allows for the precision of the treatment arm estimates to take arbitrary values, can be utilised for all treatments that are taken forward to phase III and is applicable when the decision to select or drop treatment arms is driven by a multiplicity-adjusted hypothesis testing procedure. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27103068

  8. Effect of impactor area on collision rate estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic and numercial estimates provide an assessment of the effect of impactor area on space debris collision rates, which is sufficiently small and insensitive to parameters of inerest that it could be neglected or corrected.

  9. Adjustable microforceps.

    PubMed

    Bao, J Y

    1991-04-01

    The commonly used microforceps have a much greater opening distance and spring resistance than needed. A piece of plastic ring or rubber band can be used to adjust the opening distance and reduce most of the spring resistance, making the user feel more comfortable and less fatigued. PMID:2051437

  10. Adjusting for Network Size and Composition Effects in Exponential-Family Random Graph Models.

    PubMed

    Krivitsky, Pavel N; Handcock, Mark S; Morris, Martina

    2011-07-01

    Exponential-family random graph models (ERGMs) provide a principled way to model and simulate features common in human social networks, such as propensities for homophily and friend-of-a-friend triad closure. We show that, without adjustment, ERGMs preserve density as network size increases. Density invariance is often not appropriate for social networks. We suggest a simple modification based on an offset which instead preserves the mean degree and accommodates changes in network composition asymptotically. We demonstrate that this approach allows ERGMs to be applied to the important situation of egocentrically sampled data. We analyze data from the National Health and Social Life Survey (NHSLS). PMID:21691424

  11. Instrumental variables estimates of peer effects in social networks.

    PubMed

    An, Weihua

    2015-03-01

    Estimating peer effects with observational data is very difficult because of contextual confounding, peer selection, simultaneity bias, and measurement error, etc. In this paper, I show that instrumental variables (IVs) can help to address these problems in order to provide causal estimates of peer effects. Based on data collected from over 4000 students in six middle schools in China, I use the IV methods to estimate peer effects on smoking. My design-based IV approach differs from previous ones in that it helps to construct potentially strong IVs and to directly test possible violation of exogeneity of the IVs. I show that measurement error in smoking can lead to both under- and imprecise estimations of peer effects. Based on a refined measure of smoking, I find consistent evidence for peer effects on smoking. If a student's best friend smoked within the past 30 days, the student was about one fifth (as indicated by the OLS estimate) or 40 percentage points (as indicated by the IV estimate) more likely to smoke in the same time period. The findings are robust to a variety of robustness checks. I also show that sharing cigarettes may be a mechanism for peer effects on smoking. A 10% increase in the number of cigarettes smoked by a student's best friend is associated with about 4% increase in the number of cigarettes smoked by the student in the same time period. PMID:25592943

  12. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  13. Estimating effects of a single gene and polygenes on quantitative traits from a diallel design.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Mark C K

    2006-01-01

    A genetic model is developed with additive and dominance effects of a single gene and polygenes as well as general and specific reciprocal effects for the progeny from a diallel mating design. The methods of ANOVA, minimum norm quadratic unbiased estimation (MINQUE), restricted maximum likelihood estimation (REML), and maximum likelihood estimation (ML) are suggested for estimating variance components, and the methods of generalized least squares (GLS) and ordinary least squares (OLS) for fixed effects, while best linear unbiased prediction, linear unbiased prediction (LUP), and adjusted unbiased prediction are suggested for analyzing random effects. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to evaluate the unbiasedness and efficiency of statistical methods involving two diallel designs with commonly used sample sizes, 6 and 8 parents, with no and missing crosses, respectively. Simulation results show that GLS and OLS are almost equally efficient for estimation of fixed effects, while MINQUE (1) and REML are better estimators of the variance components and LUP is most practical method for prediction of random effects. Data from a Drosophila melanogaster experiment (Gilbert 1985a, Theor appl Genet 69:625-629) were used as a working example to demonstrate the statistical analysis. The new methodology is also applicable to screening candidate gene(s) and to other mating designs with multiple parents, such as nested (NC Design I) and factorial (NC Design II) designs. Moreover, this methodology can serve as a guide to develop new methods for detecting indiscernible major genes and mapping quantitative trait loci based on mixture distribution theory. The computer program for the methods suggested in this article is freely available from the authors. PMID:17028974

  14. Estimating the effects of detection heterogeneity and overdispersion on trends estimated from avian point counts.

    PubMed

    Etterson, Matthew A; Niemi, Gerald J; Danz, Nicholas P

    2009-12-01

    Point counts are a common method for sampling avian distribution and abundance. Although methods for estimating detection probabilities are available, many analyses use raw counts and do not correct for detectability. We use a removal model of detection within an N-mixture approach to estimate abundance trends corrected for imperfect detection. We compare the corrected trend estimates to those estimated from raw counts for 16 species using 15 years of monitoring data on three national forests in the western Great Lakes, USA. We also tested the effects of overdispersion by modeling both counts and removal mixtures under three statistical distributions: Poisson, zero-inflated Poisson, and negative binomial. For most species, the removal model produced estimates of detection probability that conformed to expectations. For many species, but not all, estimates of trends were similar regardless of statistical distribution or method of analysis. Within a given combination of likelihood (counts vs. mixtures) and statistical distribution, trends usually differed by both stand type and national forest, with species showing declines in some stand types and increases in others. For three species, Brown Creeper, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and Black-throated Green Warbler, temporal patterns in detectability resulted in substantial differences in estimated trends under the removal mixtures compared to the analysis of raw counts. Overall, we found that the zero-inflated Poisson was the best distribution for our data, although the Poisson or negative binomial performed better for a few species. The similarity in estimated trends that we observed among counts and removal mixtures was probably a result of both experimental design and sampling effort. First, the study was originally designed to avoid confounding observer effects with habitats or time. Second, our time series is relatively long and our sample sizes within years are large. PMID:20014578

  15. Propensity score and doubly robust methods for estimating the effect of treatment on censored cost.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaqi; Handorf, Elizabeth; Bekelman, Justin; Mitra, Nandita

    2016-05-30

    The estimation of treatment effects on medical costs is complicated by the need to account for informative censoring, skewness, and the effects of confounders. Because medical costs are often collected from observational claims data, we investigate propensity score (PS) methods such as covariate adjustment, stratification, and inverse probability weighting taking into account informative censoring of the cost outcome. We compare these more commonly used methods with doubly robust (DR) estimation. We then use a machine learning approach called super learner (SL) to choose among conventional cost models to estimate regression parameters in the DR approach and to choose among various model specifications for PS estimation. Our simulation studies show that when the PS model is correctly specified, weighting and DR perform well. When the PS model is misspecified, the combined approach of DR with SL can still provide unbiased estimates. SL is especially useful when the underlying cost distribution comes from a mixture of different distributions or when the true PS model is unknown. We apply these approaches to a cost analysis of two bladder cancer treatments, cystectomy versus bladder preservation therapy, using SEER-Medicare data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26678242

  16. Effects of unilateral stroke on multi-finger synergies and their feed-forward adjustments.

    PubMed

    Jo, H J; Maenza, C; Good, D C; Huang, X; Park, J; Sainburg, R L; Latash, M L

    2016-04-01

    We explored the changes in multi-finger synergies in patients after a single cortical stroke with mild motor impairments. We hypothesized that both synergy indices and anticipatory synergy adjustments prior to the initiation of a self-paced quick action would be diminished in the patients compared to age-matched controls. The patients with history of cortical stroke, and age-matched controls (n=12 in each group) performed one-finger and multi-finger accurate force production tasks involving both steady-state and quick force pulse production. Finger interdependence (enslaving) and multi-finger synergies stabilizing total force were quantified. The stroke patients showed lower maximal finger forces, in particular in the contralesional hand, which also showed increased enslaving indices. Multi-finger synergies during steady-state force production were, however, unchanged after stroke. In contrast, a drop in the synergy index prior to the force pulse generation was significantly delayed in the stroke patients. Our results show that mild cortical stroke leads to no significant changes in multifinger synergies, but there is impairment in feed-forward adjustments of the synergies prior to a quick action, a drop in the maximal force production, and an increase in enslaving. We conclude that studies of synergies reveal two aspects of synergic control differentially affected by cortical stroke. PMID:26828408

  17. Effects of Hoods and Flame-Retardant Fabrics on WBGT Clothing Adjustment Factors.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Personal protective clothing (PPC) may include hoods and flame-retardant (FR) fabrics that may affect heat transfer and, thus, the critical wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT crit) to maintain thermal equilibrium. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in WBGT crit for hooded vs. nonhooded versions of particle barrier and vapor barrier coveralls as well as for coveralls made of two flame-retardant fabrics (INDURA cotton and Nomex). Acclimated men (n = 11) and women (n = 4) walked on a treadmill in a climatic chamber at 180 W/m2 wearing four different ensembles: limited-use, particle barrier coveralls with and without a hood (Tyvek 1427), and limited-use vapor barrier coveralls with and without a hood (Tychem QC, polyethylene-coated Tyvek). Twelve of the participants wore one of two flame-retardant coveralls. All participants wore standard cotton clothing. Progressive exposure testing at 50% relative humidity (rh) was designed so that each subject established a physiological steady-state followed by a clear loss of thermal equilibrium. WBGT crit was the WBGT 5 min prior to a loss of thermal equilibrium. Hooded ensembles had a lower WBGT crit than the nonhooded ensembles. The difference suggested a clothing adjustment of 1 degrees C for hoods. There were no significant differences among the FR ensembles and cotton work cloths, and the proposed clothing adjustment for FR coveralls clothing is 0 degrees C. PMID:18041645

  18. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis. PMID:21823805

  19. Therapeutic effects of minimally invasive adjustable and locking compression plate for unstable pelvic fractures via posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xu; Lv, Hong-Zhi; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Unstable pelvic fractures are clinically complex injuries. Selecting appropriate treatment remains a challenging problem for orthopedic physicians. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical effects of minimally invasive adjustable plate and locking compression plate in treatment of unstable pelvic fractures via posterior approach. Methods: From January 2009 to June 2012, fifty-six patients with unstable pelvic fractures were included. After at least 12-month follow-up, forty-four patients treated with two methods were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups: minimally invasive adjustable plate (group A) and locking compression plate (group B). Preoperative and postoperative radiography was taken to assess the fracture displacement and reduction quality. The size of incision, operation duration, blood loss, duration of X-ray exposures, Majeed postoperative functional evaluation and Lindahl postoperative reduction evaluation were analyzed. Results: The mean follow-up in group A was 27.3 months (range, 13-48 months), and that in group B was 21.8 months (range, 12-42 months). There were no iatrogenic neurovascular injuries during the operations in the two groups. In group B, malunion was observed in one patient, and infection of incision was observed in one case. The operation duration, blood loss, and size of incision of group A were significantly less than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the duration of X-ray exposures between the two groups. The Majeed functional evaluation score in group A was significantly higher than that in group B. The difference of the imaging score of the retained displacement was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Both the two methods can effectively stabilize the unstable pelvic fractures. However, the minimally invasive adjustable plate has the advantages of minimally invasive, less radiation exposure, technically safe and time saving. Minimally invasive adjustable plate is a

  20. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  1. The effects of missing data on global ozone estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drewry, J. W.; Robbins, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of missing data and model truncation on estimates of the global mean, zonal distribution, and global distribution of ozone are considered. It is shown that missing data can introduce biased estimates with errors that are not accounted for in the accuracy calculations of empirical modeling techniques. Data-fill techniques are introduced and used for evaluating error bounds and constraining the estimate in areas of sparse and missing data. It is found that the accuracy of the global mean estimate is more dependent on data distribution than model size. Zonal features can be accurately described by 7th order models over regions of adequate data distribution. Data variance accounted for by higher order models appears to represent climatological features of columnar ozone rather than pure error. Data-fill techniques can prevent artificial feature generation in regions of sparse or missing data without degrading high order estimates over dense data regions.

  2. Estimating controlled direct effects in the presence of intermediate confounding of the mediator-outcome relationship: Comparison of five different methods.

    PubMed

    Lepage, B; Dedieu, D; Savy, N; Lang, T

    2016-04-01

    In mediation analysis between an exposure X and an outcome Y, estimation of the direct effect of X on Y by usual regression after adjustment for the mediator M may be biased if Z is a confounder between M and Y, and is also affected by X Alternative methods have been described to avoid such a bias: inverse probability of treatment weighting with and without weight truncation, the sequential g-estimator and g-computation. Our aim was to compare the usual linear regression adjusted for M to these methods when estimating the controlled direct effect between X and Y in the causal structure and to explore the size of the potential bias. Estimations were computed in several simulated data sets as well as real data. We observed an increased bias of the controlled direct effect estimation using linear regression adjusted for M for larger effects of X on M and larger effects of Z on M The sequential g-estimator and g-computation gave unbiased estimations with adequate coverage values in every situation studied. With continuous exposure X and mediator M, inverse probability of treatment weighting resulted in some bias and less satisfactory coverage for large effects of X on M and Z on M. PMID:23070596

  3. Estimation of mediation effects for zero-inflated regression models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Albert, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-20

    The goal of mediation analysis is to identify and explicate the mechanism that underlies a relationship between a risk factor and an outcome via an intermediate variable (mediator). In this paper, we consider the estimation of mediation effects in zero-inflated (ZI) models intended to accommodate 'extra' zeros in count data. Focusing on the ZI negative binomial models, we provide a mediation formula approach to estimate the (overall) mediation effect in the standard two-stage mediation framework under a key sequential ignorability assumption. We also consider a novel decomposition of the overall mediation effect for the ZI context using a three-stage mediation model. Estimation of the components of the overall mediation effect requires an assumption involving the joint distribution of two counterfactuals. Simulation study results demonstrate low bias of mediation effect estimators and close-to-nominal coverage probability of confidence intervals. We also modify the mediation formula method by replacing 'exact' integration with a Monte Carlo integration method. The method is applied to a cohort study of dental caries in very low birth weight adolescents. For overall mediation effect estimation, sensitivity analysis was conducted to quantify the degree to which key assumption must be violated to reverse the original conclusion. PMID:22714572

  4. Colored noise effects on batch attitude accuracy estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The effects of colored noise on the accuracy of batch least squares parameter estimates with applications to attitude determination cases are investigated. The standard approaches used for estimating the accuracy of a computed attitude commonly assume uncorrelated (white) measurement noise, while in actual flight experience measurement noise often contains significant time correlations and thus is colored. For example, horizon scanner measurements from low Earth orbit were observed to show correlations over many minutes in response to large scale atmospheric phenomena. A general approach to the analysis of the effects of colored noise is investigated, and interpretation of the resulting equations provides insight into the effects of any particular noise color and the worst case noise coloring for any particular parameter estimate. It is shown that for certain cases, the effects of relatively short term correlations can be accommodated by a simple correction factor. The errors in the predicted accuracy assuming white noise and the reduced accuracy due to the suboptimal nature of estimators that do not take into account the noise color characteristics are discussed. The appearance of a variety of sample noise color characteristics are demonstrated through simulation, and their effects are discussed for sample estimation cases. Based on the analysis, options for dealing with the effects of colored noise are discussed.

  5. Estimation of Mediation Effects for Zero-inflated Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Albert, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of mediation analysis is to identify and explicate the mechanism that underlies a relationship between a risk factor and an outcome via an intermediate variable (mediator). In this paper, we consider the estimation of mediation effects in zero-inflated (ZI) models intended to accommodate `extra' zeros in count data. Focusing on the ZI negative binomial (ZINB) models, we provide a mediation formula approach to estimate the (overall) mediation effect in the standard two-stage mediation framework under a key sequential ignorability assumption. We also consider a novel decomposition of the overall mediation effect for the ZI context using a three-stage mediation model. Estimation of the components of the overall mediation effect requires an assumption involving the joint distribution of two counterfactuals. Simulation study results demonstrate low bias of mediation effect estimators and close-to-nominal coverage probability (CP) of confidence intervals. We also modify the mediation formula method by replacing `exact' integration with a Monte Carlo integration method. The method is applied to a cohort study of dental caries in very low birth weight adolescents. For overall mediation effect estimation, sensitivity analysis was conducted to quantify the degree to which key assumption must be violated to reverse the original conclusion. PMID:22714572

  6. Effect of mixed (boundary) pixels on crop proportion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    In estimating acreage proportions of crop types in a segment using Landsat data, considerable problem is caused by the presence of mixed pixels. Due to lack of understanding of their spectral characteristics, mixed pixels have been treated in the past as pure while clustering and classifying the segment data. This paper examines this approach of treating mixed pixels as pure pixels and the effect of mixed pixels on the bias and variance of a crop type proportion estimate. First, the spectral response of a boundary pixel is modeled and an analytical expression for the bias and variance of a proportion estimate is obtained. This is followed by a numerical illustration of the effect of mixed pixels on bias and variance. It is shown that as the size of the mixed pixel class increases in a segment, the variance increases, however, such increase does not always affect the bias of the proportion estimate.

  7. A regional classification scheme for estimating reference water quality in streams using land-use-adjusted spatial regression-tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Saad, D.A.; Heisey, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Various approaches are used to subdivide large areas into regions containing streams that have similar reference or background water quality and that respond similarly to different factors. For many applications, such as establishing reference conditions, it is preferable to use physical characteristics that are not affected by human activities to delineate these regions. However, most approaches, such as ecoregion classifications, rely on land use to delineate regions or have difficulties compensating for the effects of land use. Land use not only directly affects water quality, but it is often correlated with the factors used to define the regions. In this article, we describe modifications to SPARTA (spatial regression-tree analysis), a relatively new approach applied to water-quality and environmental characteristic data to delineate zones with similar factors affecting water quality. In this modified approach, land-use-adjusted (residualized) water quality and environmental characteristics are computed for each site. Regression-tree analysis is applied to the residualized data to determine the most statistically important environmental characteristics describing the distribution of a specific water-quality constituent. Geographic information for small basins throughout the study area is then used to subdivide the area into relatively homogeneous environmental water-quality zones. For each zone, commonly used approaches are subsequently used to define its reference water quality and how its water quality responds to changes in land use. SPARTA is used to delineate zones of similar reference concentrations of total phosphorus and suspended sediment throughout the upper Midwestern part of the United States. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  8. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  9. Doubly robust estimation of the local average treatment effect curve

    PubMed Central

    Ogburn, Elizabeth L.; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We consider estimation of the causal effect of a binary treatment on an outcome, conditionally on covariates, from observational studies or natural experiments in which there is a binary instrument for treatment. We describe a doubly robust, locally efficient estimator of the parameters indexing a model for the local average treatment effect conditionally on covariates V when randomization of the instrument is only true conditionally on a high dimensional vector of covariates X, possibly bigger than V. We discuss the surprising result that inference is identical to inference for the parameters of a model for an additive treatment effect on the treated conditionally on V that assumes no treatment–instrument interaction. We illustrate our methods with the estimation of the local average effect of participating in 401(k) retirement programs on savings by using data from the US Census Bureau's 1991 Survey of Income and Program Participation. PMID:25663814

  10. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  11. Heterogeneous Treatment Effects: What Does a Regression Estimate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William

    2010-01-01

    Regressions that control for confounding factors are the workhorse of evaluation research. When treatment effects are heterogeneous, however, the workhorse regression leads to estimated treatment effects that lack behavioral interpretations even when the selection on observables assumption holds. Regressions that use propensity scores as weights…

  12. Reporting Effect Size Estimates in School Psychology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the arguments for reporting effect size estimates as part of the statistical results in empirical studies. Following this review, formulas are presented for the calculation of major mean-difference and association-based effect size measures for t tests, one-way ANOVA, zero order correlation, simple regression, multiple…

  13. Estimation of effective hydrogeological parameters in heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Tsung; Tan, Yih-Chi; Chen, Chu-Hui; Yu, Hwa-Lung; Wu, Shih-Ching; Ke, Kai-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    SummaryObtaining reasonable hydrological input parameters is a key challenge in groundwater modeling. Analysis of temporal evolution during pump-induced drawdown is one common approach used to estimate the effective transmissivity and storage coefficients in a heterogeneous aquifer. In this study, we propose a Modified Tabu search Method (MTM), an improvement drawn from an alliance between the Tabu Search (TS) and the Adjoint State Method (ASM) developed by Tan et al. (2008). The latter is employed to estimate effective parameters for anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifers. MTM is validated by several numerical pumping tests. Comparisons are made to other well-known techniques, such as the type-curve method (TCM) and the straight-line method (SLM), to provide insight into the challenge of determining the most effective parameter for an anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifer. The results reveal that MTM can efficiently obtain the best representative and effective aquifer parameters in terms of the least mean square errors of the drawdown estimations. The use of MTM may involve less artificial errors than occur with TCM and SLM, and lead to better solutions. Therefore, effective transmissivity is more likely to be comprised of the geometric mean of all transmissivities within the cone of depression based on a precise estimation of MTM. Further investigation into the applicability of MTM shows that a higher level of heterogeneity in an aquifer can induce an uncertainty in estimations, while the changes in correlation length will affect the accuracy of MTM only once the degree of heterogeneity has also risen.

  14. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  15. Examining the Relationship between Heavy Alcohol Use and Assaults: With Adjustment for the Effects of Unmeasured Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenbin; Chikritzhs, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Background. Experimental studies suggest that alcohol can lead to aggression in laboratory settings; however, it is impossible to test the causal relationship between alcohol use and real-life violence among humans in randomized clinical trials. Objectives. (i) To examine the relationship between heavy alcohol use and assaults in a population based study; (ii) to demonstrate the proxy outcome method, as a means of controlling the effects of unknown/unmeasured confounders in observational studies. Methods. This study used data collected from three waves of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The effects of heavy alcohol use on assault were measured using multivariable logistic regressions in conjunction with the proxy outcome method. Results. Application of the proxy outcome method indicated that effect sizes of heavy alcohol use on the risk of assault were overestimated in the standard models. After adjusting for the effects of unknown/unmeasured confounders, the risk of assault remained 43% and 63% higher (P < 0.05) among participants who consumed 5+ drinks/day for 5–8 days/month and 9–30 days/month, respectively. Conclusions. Even after adjustment for unknown/unmeasured confounders the association between heavy alcohol use and risk of violence remained significant. These findings support the hypothesis that heavy alcohol use can cause violence. PMID:26380283

  16. Effects of adjusting cropping systems on utilization efficiency of climatic resources in Northeast China under future climate scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Yanhong; Chu, Zheng; Mu, Jia; Zhao, Qian

    Quantitatively evaluating the effects of adjusting cropping systems on the utilization efficiency of climatic resources under climate change is an important task for assessing food security in China. To understand these effects, we used daily climate variables obtained from the regional climate model RegCM3 from 1981 to 2100 under the A1B scenario and crop observations from 53 agro-meteorological experimental stations from 1981 to 2010 in Northeast China. Three one-grade zones of cropping systems were divided by heat, water, topography and crop-type, including the semi-arid areas of the northeast and northwest (III), the one crop area of warm-cool plants in semi-humid plain or hilly regions of the northeast (IV), and the two crop area in irrigated farmland in the Huanghuaihai Plain (VI). An agro-ecological zone model was used to calculate climatic potential productivities. The effects of adjusting cropping systems on climate resource utilization in Northeast China under the A1B scenario were assessed. The results indicated that from 1981 to 2100 in the III, IV and VI areas, the planting boundaries of different cropping systems in Northeast China obviously shifted toward the north and the east based on comprehensively considering the heat and precipitation resources. However, due to high temperature stress, the climatic potential productivity of spring maize was reduced in the future. Therefore, adjusting the cropping system is an effective way to improve the climatic potential productivity and climate resource utilization. Replacing the one crop in one year model (spring maize) by the two crops in one year model (winter wheat and summer maize) significantly increased the total climatic potential productivity and average utilization efficiencies. During the periods of 2011-2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100, the average total climatic potential productivities of winter wheat and summer maize increased by 9.36%, 11.88% and 12.13% compared to that of spring maize

  17. Cascading effects of interparental conflict in adolescence: Linking threat appraisals, self-efficacy, and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Fosco, Gregory M; Feinberg, Mark E

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the longitudinal implications of adolescents' exposure to interparental conflict for their developmental success. In the proposed developmental cascade model, adolescents' perceptions of parental conflict as threatening is a risk factor for diminished self-efficacy, which would account for diminished adjustment. This study presents longitudinal data for 768 sixth-grade students and their families over four time points, ending in eighth grade. Analyses were conducted in three steps. First, replication of longitudinal support for threat as a mediator of the link between interparental conflict and emotional distress was found; however, findings did not support threat as a mediator of behavior problems or subjective well-being. Second, threat was found to mediate the longitudinal association between interparental conflict and self-efficacy. Third, a developmental cascade model supported a risk process in which interparental conflict was related to adolescents' threat appraisals, which undermined self-efficacy beliefs, and was then linked with emotional distress, behavior problems, and subjective well-being. PMID:25017469

  18. Effects of the history of adoption in the emotional adjustment of adopted adolescents.

    PubMed

    Reppold, Caroline Tozzi; Hutz, Claudio Simon

    2009-11-01

    Since the decade of 1980, the model of stress and coping proposed for the assessment of vulnerability of adoptive families emphasizes that the emotional adjustment of those adopted is moderated by variables such as institutionalization, the manner and age at which the adoption was revealed, the change of first name, and the contact with the biological family. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of these variables to the perceived parenting style, mood, and self-esteem of the adopted adolescents. Participants in the study were 68 adolescents, between the ages of 14 and 15, adopted during infancy through judicial channels. The adolescents responded to a questionnaire about the history of adoption and to scales of Parenting Styles, Depression and Self-esteem. The main results indicated that the late revelation of adoption and the change of the first name are connected to higher levels of depression and low self-esteem and to more frequent perceptions of negligent or authoritarian parenting style. The contact with the biological family was frequently mentioned among those who perceived their parents as authoritative and presented the best indicator of mood and self-esteem. These findings were discussed in light of the necessity for multidisciplinary actions which can improve the psychological adaptation of the adopting families. PMID:19899647

  19. On the gravity and geoid effects of glacial isostatic adjustment in Fennoscandia - a short note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Many geoscientists argue that there is a gravity low of 10-30 mGal in Fennoscandia as a remaining fingerprint of the last ice age and load, both vanished about 10 kyr ago. However, the extraction of the gravity signal related with Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is complicated by the fact that the total gravity field is caused by many significant density distributions in the Earth. Here we recall a methodology originating with A. Bjerhammar 35 years ago, that emphasizes that the present land uplift phenomenon mainly occurs in the region thatwas covered by the ice cap, and it is highly correlated with the spectral window of degrees 10-22 of the global gravity field, whose lower limit fairly well corresponds to the wavelength that agrees with the size of the region. This implies that, although in principle the GIA is a global phenomenon, the geoid and gravity lows as well as the land upheaval in Fennoscandia are typically regional phenomena that cannot be seen in a global correlation study as it is blurred by many irrelevant gravity signals. It is suggested that a regional multi-regression analysis with a band-limited spectral gravity signal as the observable, a method tested already 2 decades ago, can absorb possible significant disturbing signals, e.g. from topographic and crustal depth variations, and thereby recover the GIA signal.

  20. On the gravity and geoid effects of glacial isostatic adjustment in Fennoscandia - a short note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, L. E.

    2016-02-01

    Many geoscientists argue that there is a gravity low of 10-30 mGal in Fennoscandia as a remaining fingerprint of the last ice age and load, both vanished about 10 kyr ago. However, the extraction of the gravity signal related with Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) is complicated by the fact that the total gravity field is caused by many significant density distributions in the Earth. Here we recall a methodology originating with A. Bjerhammar 35 years ago, that emphasizes that the present land uplift phenomenon mainly occurs in the region thatwas covered by the ice cap, and it is highly correlated with the spectral window of degrees 10-22 of the global gravity field, whose lower limit fairly well corresponds to the wavelength that agrees with the size of the region. This implies that, although in principle the GIA is a global phenomenon, the geoid and gravity lows as well as the land upheaval in Fennoscandia are typically regional phenomena that cannot be seen in a global correlation study as it is blurred by many irrelevant gravity signals. It is suggested that a regional multi-regression analysis with a band-limited spectral gravity signal as the observable, a method tested already 2 decades ago, can absorb possible significant disturbing signals, e.g. from topographic and crustal depth variations, and thereby recover the GIA signal.

  1. The "How" and "When" of Parental Loss in Adulthood: Effects on Grief and Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Hayslip, Bert; Pruett, Jessica H; Caballero, Daniela M

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of cause of death on the grief responses of parentally bereaved young and middle-aged adults, 400 individuals completed measures assessing their experiences and feelings surrounding the loss of a parent. Respondents included 247 young adults and 155 middle-aged adults. Cause of death was categorized as acute or anticipated with 209 participants reporting the parent's death as acute, while anticipated death was reported by 191 individuals. Results suggested that gender of the adult child and age level of the participant were important factors contributing to the grief response, and women were found to have more difficulty adjusting to the loss of a parent as well as demonstrating a more intense grief response. Young adults were found to be more impacted by the loss of a parent than were middle-aged adults. Those who were single or separated were similarly more impacted versus those who were married, where more young adults were single/separated and more middle-aged adults were married. Cause of death was only mildly influential in influencing responses to parental loss and did not interact with other studied variables. These results point to the importance of support from others in coping with a parent's death as well as for the counseling of bereaved persons who may be at risk for difficulties in coping with the death of a parent and enable a more precise understanding of individual grief processes across the adult lifespan. PMID:26152024

  2. Cascading Effects of Interparental Conflict in Adolescence: Linking Threat Appraisals, Self-Efficacy, and Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal implications of adolescents’ exposure to interparental conflict for their developmental success. In the proposed developmental cascade model, adolescents’ perceptions of parental conflict as threatening is a risk factor for diminished self-efficacy, which would account for diminished adjustment. This study presents longitudinal data for 768 6th-grade students and their families over four time points, ending in 8th grade. Analyses were conducted in three steps. First, replication of longitudinal support for threat as a mediator of the link between interparental conflict and emotional distress was found; however, findings did not support threat as a mediator of behavior problems or subjective well-being. Second, threat was found to mediate the longitudinal association between interparental conflict and self-efficacy. Finally, a developmental cascade model supported a risk process in which interparental conflict was related to adolescents’ threat appraisals, which undermined self-efficacy beliefs, and was then linked with emotional distress, behavior problems, and subjective well-being. PMID:25017469

  3. Estimated Short-Term Effects of Coarse Particles on Daily Mortality in Stockholm, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Christer; Forsberg, Bertil

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although serious health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5; fine fraction) are documented in many studies, the effects of coarse PM (PM2.5–10) are still under debate. Objective: In this study, we estimated the effects of short-term exposure of PM2.5–10 on daily mortality in Stockholm, Sweden. Method: We collected data on daily mortality for the years 2000 through 2008. Concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, ozone, and carbon monoxide were measured simultaneously in central Stockholm. We used additive Poisson regression models to examine the association between daily mortality and PM2.5–10 on the day of death and the day before. Effect estimates were adjusted for other pollutants (two-pollutant models) during different seasons. Results: We estimated a 1.68% increase [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20%, 3.15%] in daily mortality per 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5–10 (single-pollutant model). The association with PM2.5–10 was stronger for November through May, when road dust is most important (1.69% increase; 95% CI: 0.21%, 3.17%), compared with the rest of the year (1.31% increase; 95% CI: –2.08%, 4.70%), although the difference was not statistically significant. When adjusted for other pollutants, particularly PM2.5, the effect estimates per 10 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10 decreased slightly but were still higher than corresponding effect estimates for PM2.5. Conclusions: Our analysis shows an increase in daily mortality associated with elevated urban background levels of PM2.5–10. Regulation of PM2.5–10 should be considered, along with actions to specifically reduce PM2.5–10 emissions, especially road dust suspension, in cities. PMID:22182596

  4. Effects of pH adjustment with phosphates on attributes and functionalities of normal and high pH beef.

    PubMed

    Young, O A; Zhang, S X; Farouk, M M; Podmore, C

    2005-05-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscles from six normal- and six high-ultimate pH bulls were selected for fine mincing and subsequent pH adjustment with acid and alkaline pyrophosphate. Four pH treatments were prepared: initially high remains high (mean of pH 6.37), high becomes normal (5.62); initially normal remains normal (5.65), and normal becomes high (6.21). The addition level of phosphate as P(2)O(5) was the same in all replicates. Before pH adjustment, colour and water holding capacity (WHC) values were strongly affected by higher (initial) pH in expected ways: darker, lower chroma, higher capacity. After pH adjustment, these values were affected only by the final pH, not the initial pH (the pH history). Total protein solubility was likewise affected by final pH but not initial pH. In contrast, the combination high initial pH-high final pH improved sarcoplasmic protein solubility by 20% over the combination normal initial pH-high final pH. Sarcoplasmic protein solubility is an indicator of strain required to fracture cooked batters made from the minced meats; in the event, the rank order of the four treatments for strain-to-fracture matched that of sarcoplasmic protein solubility. Statistically, sarcoplasmic protein solubility and strain-to-fracture were both affected by initial pH (P<0.01) and final pH (P<0.001). However, stress required to fracture cooked batters was entirely controlled by initial pH (P<0.01). In other words, the stress-to-fracture advantage of initially high pH meat was not matched by upward pH adjustment of initially normal pH meat. Emulsion stability, which is better with higher pH meat, was affected by initial and final pH (both P<0.01). Cook yield, like WHC of pH-adjusted raw meat, was more due to final pH than initial pH, similarly cooked batter colour, whereas final pH had a significant effect on quality attributes (generally better when higher). An initially high pH history conferred an enduring advantage on three important batter attributes

  5. Locally efficient estimation of marginal treatment effects when outcomes are correlated: is the prize worth the chase?

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Alisa J.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; De Gruttola, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Semiparametric methods have been developed to increase efficiency of inferences in randomized trials by incorporating baseline covariates. Locally efficient estimators of marginal treatment effects, which achieve minimum variance under an assumed model, are available for settings in which outcomes are independent. The value of the pursuit of locally efficient estimators in other settings, such as when outcomes are multivariate, is often debated. We derive and evaluate semiparametric locally efficient estimators of marginal mean treatment effects when outcomes are correlated; such outcomes occur in randomized studies with clustered or repeated-measures responses. The resulting estimating equations modify existing generalized estimating equations (GEE) by identifying the efficient score under a mean model for marginal effects when data contain baseline covariates. Locally efficient estimators are implemented for longitudinal data with continuous outcomes and clustered data with binary outcomes. Methods are illustrated through application to AIDS Clinical Trial Group Study 398, a longitudinal randomized clinical trial that compared the effects of various protease inhibitors in HIV-positive subjects who had experienced antiretroviral therapy failure. In addition, extensive simulation studies characterize settings in which locally efficient estimators result in efficiency gains over suboptimal estimators and assess their feasibility in practice. Clinical trials; Correlated outcomes; Covariate adjustment; Semiparametric efficiency PMID:24566369

  6. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  7. Phase noise effects on turbulent weather radar spectrum parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonggil; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate weather spectrum moment estimation is important in the use of weather radar for hazardous windshear detection. The effect of the stable local oscillator (STALO) instability (jitter) on the spectrum moment estimation algorithm is investigated. Uncertainty in the stable local oscillator will affect both the transmitted signal and the received signal since the STALO provides transmitted and reference carriers. The proposed approach models STALO phase jitter as it affects the complex autocorrelation of the radar return. The results can therefore by interpreted in terms of any source of system phase jitter for which the model is appropriate and, in particular, may be considered as a cumulative effect of all radar system sources.

  8. Monte Carlo Investigation on the Effect of Heterogeneities on Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer for women with more than 225,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2012 (ACS, 2012). With the high prevalence, comes an increased emphasis on researching new techniques to treat this disease. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been used as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in order to treat occult disease after lumpectomy. Similar recurrence rates have been found using ABPI after lumpectomy as with mastectomy alone, but with the added benefit of improved cosmetic and psychological results. Intracavitary brachytherapy devices have been used to deliver the APBI prescription. However, inability to produce asymmetric dose distributions in order to avoid overdosing skin and chest wall has been an issue with these devices. Multi-lumen devices were introduced to overcome this problem. Of these, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) has demonstrated the greatest ability to produce an asymmetric dose distribution, which would have greater ability to avoid skin and chest wall dose, and thus allow more women to receive this type of treatment. However, SAVI treatments come with inherent heterogeneities including variable backscatter due to the proximity to the tissue-air and tissue-lung interfaces and variable contents within the cavity created by the SAVI. The dose calculation protocol based on TG-43 does not account for heterogeneities and thus will not produce accurate dosimetry; however Acuros, a model-based dose calculation algorithm manufactured by Varian Medical Systems, claims to accurately account for heterogeneities. Monte Carlo simulation can calculate the dosimetry with high accuracy. In this thesis, a model of the SAVI will be created for Monte Carlo, specifically using MCNP code, in order to explore the affects of heterogeneities on the dose distribution. This data will be compared to TG-43 and Acuros calculated dosimetry to explore their accuracy.

  9. Random effects and shrinkage estimation in capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the analysis of random effects in capture-recapture models, and outline Bayesian and frequentists approaches to their analysis. Under a normal model, random effects estimators derived from Bayesian or frequentist considerations have a common form as shrinkage estimators. We discuss some of the difficulties of analysing random effects using traditional methods, and argue that a Bayesian formulation provides a rigorous framework for dealing with these difficulties. In capture-recapture models, random effects may provide a parsimonious compromise between constant and completely time-dependent models for the parameters (e.g. survival probability). We consider application of random effects to band-recovery models, although the principles apply to more general situations, such as Cormack-Jolly-Seber models. We illustrate these ideas using a commonly analysed band recovery data set.

  10. Adjustment of deregressed values from cow evaluations to have the similar mean and variance as bull deregressed values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional evaluations of cows with genotypes have been adjusted since April 2010 to be compatible with evaluations of bulls to improve their accuracy in estimation SNP effects. This adjustment made them incomparable with traditional evaluations of cows. Recent work has improved the adjustment by u...

  11. The cooling-rate effect on microwave archeointensity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Wilbor; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Hill, Mimi J.; Biggin, Andrew J.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2013-08-01

    microwave (MW) paleointensity data on historical bricks from Northeast Brazil presented a bias toward higher fields when compared to previous cooling-rate corrected double-heating paleointensity estimates; the same relates to the previously reported values for pottery from Southwestern Pacific islands. A simple theoretical approach suggests that the MW bias in both collections is due to a cooling-rate effect on MW estimates. We then experimentally corrected the MW cooling-rate effect on Brazilian fragments, increasing the degree of consistency between the previous and new results (reducing discrepancies from 25% to 8%). Results indicate similar experimental behavior between microwave and thermal procedures despite the different ways in which the energy is transferred into the spin system. Finally, they allow cooling times of less than 90 s to be empirically estimated in most of these MW experiments highlighting the need for systematic cooling-rate corrections to be applied in similar MW paleointensity studies in the future.

  12. Socio-economic status and family structure differences in early trajectories of child adjustment: Individual and neighbourhood effects.

    PubMed

    Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily; Ruddy, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of single-parent family status and high parental socio-economic status (SES) on the trajectories of children's emotional/behavioural adjustment in early-to-middle childhood (ages 3-7 years). We also assessed whether these family characteristics interact with the equivalent neighbourhood characteristics of shares of single-parent families and high-SES adults in predicting these trajectories. Using data on 9850 children in England participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, we found that family status and parental SES predicted children's trajectories of adjustment. Even after controlling for these family factors and key child and parent characteristics, the neighbourhood shares of high-SES adults and single-parent families were related (negatively and positively, respectively) to child problem behaviour. Importantly, children of low-SES parents in neighbourhoods with a high concentration of high-SES adults had fewer emotional symptoms than their counterparts in areas with fewer high-SES adults. Surprisingly, the adverse effect of single-parent family status on child hyperactivity was attenuated in areas with a higher share of single-parent families. PMID:26699446

  13. Effects of measurement error on estimating biological half-life

    SciTech Connect

    Caudill, S.P.; Pirkle, J.L.; Michalek, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    Direct computation of the observed biological half-life of a toxic compound in a person can lead to an undefined estimate when subsequent concentration measurements are greater than or equal to previous measurements. The likelihood of such an occurrence depends upon the length of time between measurements and the variance (intra-subject biological and inter-sample analytical) associated with the measurements. If the compound is lipophilic the subject's percentage of body fat at the times of measurement can also affect this likelihood. We present formulas for computing a model-predicted half-life estimate and its variance; and we derive expressions for the effect of sample size, measurement error, time between measurements, and any relevant covariates on the variability in model-predicted half-life estimates. We also use statistical modeling to estimate the probability of obtaining an undefined half-life estimate and to compute the expected number of undefined half-life estimates for a sample from a study population. Finally, we illustrate our methods using data from a study of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure among 36 members of Operation Ranch Hand, the Air Force unit responsible for the aerial spraying of Agent Orange in Vietnam.

  14. A Practical Method of Policy Analysis by Estimating Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The previous articles on class size and other productivity research paint a complex and confusing picture of the relationship between policy variables and student achievement. Missing is a conceptual scheme capable of combining the seemingly unrelated research and dissimilar estimates of effect size into a unified structure for policy analysis and…

  15. Estimating the Cost-Effectiveness of Coordinated DSM Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Lawrence J.; Brown, Marilyn A.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the cost-effectiveness of coordinated programs from the standpoint of an electric or gas utility is described and illustrated. The discussion focuses on demand-side management programs cofunded by the government and utilities, but it can be applied to other types of cofunded programs. (SLD)

  16. The Effect of Omitted Responses on Ability Estimation in IRT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Ayala, R. J.; Plake, Barbara S.; Impara, James C.; Kozmicky, Michelle

    This study investigated the effect on examinees' ability estimate under item response theory (IRT) when they are presented an item, have ample time to answer the item, but decide not to respond to the item. Simulation data were modeled on an empirical data set of 25,546 examinees that was calibrated using the 3-parameter logistic model. The study…

  17. Estimates of genetic correlations among growth traits including competition effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to estimate genetic parameters of direct and competition effects for traits measured at the end of a growth test utilizing multi-trait analyses. A total of 9,720 boars were tested with 15 boars per pen from about 71 to 161 d of age and weight from 31 to 120 kg. Traits analyzed wi...

  18. Multiple trials may yield exaggerated effect size estimates.

    PubMed

    Brand, Andrew; Bradley, Michael T; Best, Lisa A; Stoica, George

    2011-01-01

    Published psychological research attempting to support the existence of small and medium effect sizes may not have enough participants to do so accurately, and thus, repeated trials or the use of multiple items may be used in an attempt to obtain significance. Through a series of Monte-Carlo simulations, this article describes the results of multiple trials or items on effect size estimates when the averages and aggregates of a dependent measure are analyzed. The simulations revealed a large increase in observed effect size estimates when the numbers of trials or items in an experiment were increased. Overestimation effects are mitigated by correlations between trials or items, but remain substantial in some cases. Some concepts, such as a P300 wave or a test score, are best defined as a composite of measures. Troubles may arise in more exploratory research where the interrelations among trials or items may not be well described. PMID:21404946

  19. Examining the Effects of Residence and Gender on College Student Adjustment in Iran: Implications for Psychotherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mehdi; Schwitzer, Alan M.; Nunnery, John

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of on-campus residence, in comparison with commuter status, on academic performance, vocational commitment, self-efficacy, and perceptions of the college environment among female and male Iranian students at Shiraz University, Iran. The study sought to extend previous work investigating the effects of college…

  20. 20 CFR 418.1230 - What is the effective date of an income-related monthly adjustment amount initial determination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-related monthly adjustment amount initial determination that is based on a more recent tax year? 418.1230... Income-Related Monthly Adjustment Amount Determinations Using A More Recent Tax Year's Modified Adjusted... initial determination that is based on a more recent tax year? (a) When you make your request prior...

  1. Teachers and Their International Relocation: The Effect of Self-Efficacy and Flexibility on Adjustment and Outcome Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Kirchenheim, Clement; Richardson, Warnie

    2005-01-01

    In this study the adjustment process in a designated group of expatriates, (teachers), who have severed ties with their home country and employer is investigated. Based on existing literature, the value of self-efficacy and flexibility on the adjustment process was explored. It was hypothesised that adjustment would result in reduced turnover…

  2. Relationship between efficiency and clinical effectiveness indicators in an adjusted model of resource consumption: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adjusted clinical groups (ACG®) have been widely used to adjust resource distribution; however, the relationship with effectiveness has been questioned. The purpose of the study was to measure the relationship between efficiency assessed by ACG® and a clinical effectiveness indicator in adults attended in Primary Health Care Centres (PHCs). Methods Research design: cross-sectional study. Subjects: 196, 593 patients aged >14 years in 13 PHCs in Catalonia (Spain). Measures: Age, sex, PHC, basic care team (BCT), visits, episodes (diagnoses), and total direct costs of PHC care and co-morbidity as measured by ACG® indicators: Efficiency indices for costs, visits, and episodes (costs EI, visits EI, episodes EI); a complexity or risk index (RI); and effectiveness measured by a general synthetic index (SI). The relationship between EI, RI, and SI in each PHC and BCT was measured by multiple correlation coefficients (r). Results In total, 56 of the 106 defined ACG® were present in the study population, with five corresponding to 44.5% of the patients, 11 to 68.0% of patients, and 30 present in less than 0.5% of the sample. The RI in each PHC ranged from 0.9 to 1.1. Costs, visits, and episodes had similar trends for efficiency in six PHCs. There was moderate correlation between costs EI and visits EI (r = 0.59). SI correlation with episodes EI and costs EI was moderate (r = 0.48 and r = −0.34, respectively) and was r = −0.14 for visits EI. Correlation between RI and SI was r = 0.29. Conclusions The Efficiency and Effectiveness ACG® indicators permit a comparison of primary care processes between PHCs. Acceptable correlation exists between effectiveness and indicators of efficiency in episodes and costs. PMID:24139144

  3. Generalized propensity score for estimating the average treatment effect of multiple treatments.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Zou, Qing-Ming; Fan, Ming-Yu; Li, Xiao-Song

    2012-03-30

    The propensity score method is widely used in clinical studies to estimate the effect of a treatment with two levels on patient's outcomes. However, due to the complexity of many diseases, an effective treatment often involves multiple components. For example, in the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), an effective treatment may include multiple components, e.g. Chinese herbs, acupuncture, and massage therapy. In clinical trials involving TCM, patients could be randomly assigned to either the treatment or control group, but they or their doctors may make different choices about which treatment component to use. As a result, treatment components are not randomly assigned. Rosenbaum and Rubin proposed the propensity score method for binary treatments, and Imbens extended their work to multiple treatments. These authors defined the generalized propensity score as the conditional probability of receiving a particular level of the treatment given the pre-treatment variables. In the present work, we adopted this approach and developed a statistical methodology based on the generalized propensity score in order to estimate treatment effects in the case of multiple treatments. Two methods were discussed and compared: propensity score regression adjustment and propensity score weighting. We used these methods to assess the relative effectiveness of individual treatments in the multiple-treatment IMPACT clinical trial. The results reveal that both methods perform well when the sample size is moderate or large. PMID:21351291

  4. Estimating hydraulic parameters when poroelastic effects are significant.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Hsieh, Paul A; Illman, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    For almost 80 years, deformation-induced head changes caused by poroelastic effects have been observed during pumping tests in multilayered aquifer-aquitard systems. As water in the aquifer is released from compressive storage during pumping, the aquifer is deformed both in the horizontal and vertical directions. This deformation in the pumped aquifer causes deformation in the adjacent layers, resulting in changes in pore pressure that may produce drawdown curves that differ significantly from those predicted by traditional groundwater theory. Although these deformation-induced head changes have been analyzed in several studies by poroelasticity theory, there are at present no practical guidelines for the interpretation of pumping test data influenced by these effects. To investigate the impact that poroelastic effects during pumping tests have on the estimation of hydraulic parameters, we generate synthetic data for three different aquifer-aquitard settings using a poroelasticity model, and then analyze the synthetic data using type curves and parameter estimation techniques, both of which are based on traditional groundwater theory and do not account for poroelastic effects. Results show that even when poroelastic effects result in significant deformation-induced head changes, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of hydraulic parameters using methods based on traditional groundwater theory, as long as pumping is sufficiently long so that deformation-induced effects have largely dissipated. PMID:21204832

  5. How to perform meaningful estimates of genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Castro, José M; Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Carlborg, Orjan

    2008-05-01

    Although the genotype-phenotype map plays a central role both in Quantitative and Evolutionary Genetics, the formalization of a completely general and satisfactory model of genetic effects, particularly accounting for epistasis, remains a theoretical challenge. Here, we use a two-locus genetic system in simulated populations with epistasis to show the convenience of using a recently developed model, NOIA, to perform estimates of genetic effects and the decomposition of the genetic variance that are orthogonal even under deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg proportions. We develop the theory for how to use this model in interval mapping of quantitative trait loci using Halley-Knott regressions, and we analyze a real data set to illustrate the advantage of using this approach in practice. In this example, we show that departures from the Hardy-Weinberg proportions that are expected by sampling alone substantially alter the orthogonal estimates of genetic effects when other statistical models, like F2 or G2A, are used instead of NOIA. Finally, for the first time from real data, we provide estimates of functional genetic effects as sets of effects of natural allele substitutions in a particular genotype, which enriches the debate on the interpretation of genetic effects as implemented both in functional and in statistical models. We also discuss further implementations leading to a completely general genotype-phenotype map. PMID:18451979

  6. Estimating peer effects in networks with peer encouragement designs.

    PubMed

    Eckles, Dean; Kizilcec, René F; Bakshy, Eytan

    2016-07-01

    Peer effects, in which the behavior of an individual is affected by the behavior of their peers, are central to social science. Because peer effects are often confounded with homophily and common external causes, recent work has used randomized experiments to estimate effects of specific peer behaviors. These experiments have often relied on the experimenter being able to randomly modulate mechanisms by which peer behavior is transmitted to a focal individual. We describe experimental designs that instead randomly assign individuals' peers to encouragements to behaviors that directly affect those individuals. We illustrate this method with a large peer encouragement design on Facebook for estimating the effects of receiving feedback from peers on posts shared by focal individuals. We find evidence for substantial effects of receiving marginal feedback on multiple behaviors, including giving feedback to others and continued posting. These findings provide experimental evidence for the role of behaviors directed at specific individuals in the adoption and continued use of communication technologies. In comparison, observational estimates differ substantially, both underestimating and overestimating effects, suggesting that researchers and policy makers should be cautious in relying on them. PMID:27382145

  7. Estimating peer effects in networks with peer encouragement designs

    PubMed Central

    Eckles, Dean; Kizilcec, René F.; Bakshy, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Peer effects, in which the behavior of an individual is affected by the behavior of their peers, are central to social science. Because peer effects are often confounded with homophily and common external causes, recent work has used randomized experiments to estimate effects of specific peer behaviors. These experiments have often relied on the experimenter being able to randomly modulate mechanisms by which peer behavior is transmitted to a focal individual. We describe experimental designs that instead randomly assign individuals’ peers to encouragements to behaviors that directly affect those individuals. We illustrate this method with a large peer encouragement design on Facebook for estimating the effects of receiving feedback from peers on posts shared by focal individuals. We find evidence for substantial effects of receiving marginal feedback on multiple behaviors, including giving feedback to others and continued posting. These findings provide experimental evidence for the role of behaviors directed at specific individuals in the adoption and continued use of communication technologies. In comparison, observational estimates differ substantially, both underestimating and overestimating effects, suggesting that researchers and policy makers should be cautious in relying on them. PMID:27382145

  8. Estimating Hydraulic Parameters When Poroelastic Effects Are Significant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, S.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Illman, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 80 years, deformation-induced head changes caused by poroelastic effects have been observed during pumping tests in multilayered aquifer-aquitard systems. As water in the aquifer is released from compressive storage during pumping, the aquifer is deformed both in the horizontal and vertical directions. This deformation in the pumped aquifer causes deformation in the adjacent layers, resulting in changes in pore pressure that may produce drawdown curves that differ significantly from those predicted by traditional groundwater theory. Although these deformation-induced head changes have been analyzed in several studies by poroelasticity theory, there are at present no practical guidelines for the interpretation of pumping test data influenced by these effects. To investigate the impact that poroelastic effects during pumping tests have on the estimation of hydraulic parameters, we generate synthetic data for three different aquifer-aquitard settings using a poroelasticity model, and then analyze the synthetic data using type curves and parameter estimation techniques, both of which are based on traditional groundwater theory and do not account for poroelastic effects. Results show that even when poroelastic effects result in significant deformation-induced head changes, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of hydraulic parameters using methods based on traditional groundwater theory, as long as pumping is sufficiently long so that deformation-induced effects have largely dissipated. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2011 National Ground Water Association.

  9. Adjusted peak-flow frequency estimates for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011: Chapter D in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-01-01

    The climatic conditions of the specific time period during which peak-flow data were collected at a given streamflow-gaging station (hereinafter referred to as gaging station) can substantially affect how well the peak-flow frequency (hereinafter referred to as frequency) results represent long-term hydrologic conditions. Differences in the timing of the periods of record can result in substantial inconsistencies in frequency estimates for hydrologically similar gaging stations. Potential for inconsistency increases with decreasing peak-flow record length. The representativeness of the frequency estimates for a short-term gaging station can be adjusted by various methods including weighting the at-site results in association with frequency estimates from regional regression equations (RREs) by using the Weighted Independent Estimates (WIE) program. Also, for gaging stations that cannot be adjusted by using the WIE program because of regulation or drainage areas too large for application of RREs, frequency estimates might be improved by using record extension procedures, including a mixed-station analysis using the maintenance of variance type I (MOVE.1) procedure. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to provide adjusted frequency estimates for selected gaging stations through water year 2011.The purpose of Chapter D of this Scientific Investigations Report is to present adjusted frequency estimates for 504 selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for the 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to the 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively.The at-site frequency estimates were

  10. The Estimated Effects of Service Learning on Students' Intercultural Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgo, Cindy A.

    2015-01-01

    As the higher education landscape continues to diversify, intercultural effectiveness comes to the forefront among important outcomes for students. Service learning is one programmatic tool that institutions of higher education can use to foster the development of intercultural effectiveness. This study provides evidence that service learning is…

  11. Observational data for comparative effectiveness research: an emulation of randomised trials to estimate the effect of statins on primary prevention of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Goodarz; García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Cantero, Oscar Fernández; Logan, Roger; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews methods to estimate treatment effectiveness research using observational data. The basic idea is using an observational study to emulate a hypothetical randomised trial by comparing initiators vs. non-initiators of treatment. After adjustment for baseline confounders, one can estimate the analogue of the intention-to-treat effect. We also explain two approaches to adjust for imperfect adherence using the per-protocol and as-treated analyses after adjusting for measured time-varying confounding and selection bias using inverse probability weighting of marginal structural models. As an example, we implemented these methods to estimate the effect of statins for primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) using data from electronic medical records in the United Kingdom. Despite strong confounding by indication, our approach detected a potential benefit of statin therapy. The analogue of the intention-to-treat hazard ratio of CHD was 0.89 (0.73, 1.09) for statin initiators vs. noninitiators. The hazard ratio of CHD was 0.84 (0.54, 1.30) in the per-protocol analysis and 0.79 (0.41, 1.41) in the as-treated analysis for 2-years of use vs. no use. In contrast, a conventional comparison of current users vs. never users of statin therapy resulted in a hazard ratio of 1.31 (1.04, 1.66). We provide a flexible and annotated SAS program to implement the proposed analyses. PMID:22016461

  12. Assessing the sensitivity of methods for estimating principal causal effects.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth A; Jo, Booil

    2015-12-01

    The framework of principal stratification provides a way to think about treatment effects conditional on post-randomization variables, such as level of compliance. In particular, the complier average causal effect (CACE) - the effect of the treatment for those individuals who would comply with their treatment assignment under either treatment condition - is often of substantive interest. However, estimation of the CACE is not always straightforward, with a variety of estimation procedures and underlying assumptions, but little advice to help researchers select between methods. In this article, we discuss and examine two methods that rely on very different assumptions to estimate the CACE: a maximum likelihood ('joint') method that assumes the 'exclusion restriction,' (ER) and a propensity score-based method that relies on 'principal ignorability.' We detail the assumptions underlying each approach, and assess each methods' sensitivity to both its own assumptions and those of the other method using both simulated data and a motivating example. We find that the ER-based joint approach appears somewhat less sensitive to its assumptions, and that the performance of both methods is significantly improved when there are strong predictors of compliance. Interestingly, we also find that each method performs particularly well when the assumptions of the other approach are violated. These results highlight the importance of carefully selecting an estimation procedure whose assumptions are likely to be satisfied in practice and of having strong predictors of principal stratum membership. PMID:21971481

  13. Estimates of the rate and distribution of fitness effects of spontaneous mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zeyl, C; DeVisser, J A

    2001-01-01

    The per-genome, per-generation rate of spontaneous mutation affecting fitness (U) and the mean fitness cost per mutation (s) are important parameters in evolutionary genetics, but have been estimated for few species. We estimated U and sh (the heterozygous effect of mutations) for two diploid yeast strains differing only in the DNA mismatch-repair deficiency used to elevate the mutation rate in one (mutator) strain. Mutations were allowed to accumulate in 50 replicate lines of each strain, during 36 transfers of randomly chosen single colonies (approximately 600 generations). Among wild-type lines, fitnesses were bimodal, with one mode showing no change in mean fitness. The other mode showed a mean 29.6% fitness decline and the petite phenotype, usually caused by partial deletion of the mitochondrial genome. Excluding petites, maximum-likelihood estimates adjusted for the effect of selection were U = 9.5 x 10(-5) and sh = 0.217 for the wild type. Among the mutator lines, the best fit was obtained with 0.005 < or = U < or = 0.94 and 0.049 > or = sh > or = 0.0003. Like other recently tested model organisms, wild-type yeast have low mutation rates, with high mean fitness costs per mutation. Inactivation of mismatch repair increases the frequency of slightly deleterious mutations by approximately two orders of magnitude. PMID:11139491

  14. [Effects of exogenous melatonin on nitrogen metabolism and osmotic adjustment substances of melon seedlings under sub-low temperature].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing-hai; Jia, Shuang-shuang; Miao, Yong-mei; Lu, Xiao-min; Li, Hui-min

    2016-02-01

    The melon cultivar 'Yangjiaosu' was subjected to the treatment of 18 °C/12 °C (day/night) in an artificial climate chamber for 6 days, and the activities of nitrogen metabolism related enzymes [nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) ] , the contents of total N, NO3(-)-N and NH4+-N as well as the osmotic adjustment substances of melon leaf were then determined. The results showed that, compared with the control, sub-low temperature treatment reduced the contents of total N, NO3(-)-N and the NR activity, but increased the content of NH4(+)-N, thereby leading to the growth inhibition of melon. Exogenous MT treatment significantly improved the activities of nitrogen metabolism related enzymes, especially the activities of GS and GOGAT, effectively reducing the content of NH4+-N. Moreover, MT treatment increased the contents of proline, soluble protein and soluble sugar, and alleviated the damage of sub-low temperature on the cell membrane by reducing the relative electrical conductivity and MDA content of melon leaves. In short, this work suggested that exogenous MT would enhance the sub-low temperature adaptability of melon by decreasing the leaf content of NH4-N, increasing the contents of osmotic adjustment substances and reducing the membrane lipid peroxidation levels. PMID:27396126

  15. Effects of Ocean Tide Models on Gnss-Estimated Ztd and Pwv in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbuz, G.; Jin, S.; Mekik, C.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations can precisely estimate the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and precipitable water vapour (PWV) for weather prediction and atmospheric research as a continuous and all-weather technique. However, apart from GNSS technique itself, estimations of ZTD and PWV are subject to effects of geophysical models with large uncertainties, particularly imprecise ocean tide models in Turkey. In this paper, GNSS data from Jan. 1st to Dec. 31st of 2014 are processed at 4 co-located GNSS stations (GISM, DIYB, GANM, and ADAN) with radiosonde from Turkish Met-Office along with several nearby IGS stations. The GAMIT/GLOBK software has been used to process GNSS data of 30-second sample using the Vienna Mapping Function and 10° elevation cut-off angle. Also tidal and non-tidal atmospheric pressure loadings (ATML) at the observation level are also applied in GAMIT/GLOBK. Several widely used ocean tide models are used to evaluate their effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation, such as IERS recommended FES2004, NAO99b from a barotropic hydrodynamic model, CSR4.0 obtained from TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry with the model FES94.1 as the reference model and GOT00 which is again long wavelength adjustments of FES94.1 using TOPEX/Poseidon data at 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid. The ZTD and PWV computed from radiosonde profile observations are regarded as reference values for the comparison and validation. In the processing phase, five different strategies are taken without ocean tide model and with four aforementioned ocean tide models, respectively, which are used to evaluate ocean tide models effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation through comparing with co-located Radiosonde. Results showed that ocean tide models have greatly affected the estimation of the ZTD in centimeter level and thus the precipitable water vapour in millimeter level, respectively at stations near coasts. The ocean tide model FES2004 that is the product of

  16. Adjustment of minimum seismic shear coefficient considering site effects for long-period structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Minsheng; Du, Hongbiao; Cui, Jie; Zeng, Qingli; Jiang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Minimum seismic base shear is a key factor employed in the seismic design of long-period structures, which is specified in some of the major national seismic building codes viz. ASCE7-10, NZS1170.5 and GB50011-2010. In current Chinese seismic design code GB50011-2010, however, effects of soil types on the minimum seismic shear coefficient are not considered, which causes problems for long-period structures sited in hard or rock soil to meet the minimum base shear requirement. This paper aims to modify the current minimum seismic shear coefficient by taking into account site effects. For this purpose, effective peak acceleration (EPA) is used as a representation for the ordinate value of the design response spectrum at the plateau. A large amount of earthquake records, for which EPAs are calculated, are examined through the statistical analysis by considering soil conditions as well as the seismic fortification intensities. The study indicates that soil types have a significant effect on the spectral ordinates at the plateau as well as the minimum seismic shear coefficient. Modified factors related to the current minimum seismic shear coefficient are preliminarily suggested for each site class. It is shown that the modified seismic shear coefficients are more effective to the determination of minimum seismic base shear of long-period structures.

  17. Practice effects distort translational validity estimates for a Neurocognitive Battery

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ibtihal; Tobar, Salwa; Elassy, Mai; Mansour, Hader; Chen, Kehui; Wood, Joel; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.; El Bahaei, Wafaa; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the globalization of biomedical research and the advent of “precision medicine”, there is increased need for translation of neuropsychological tests, such as computerized batteries that can be incorporated in large-scale genomic studies. Estimates of translational validity are obtained by administering the test in the original and the translated versions to bilingual individuals. We investigated the translation of a neuropsychological battery from English to Arabic and how practice effects influence translational validity estimates. Methods The Penn computerized neurocognitive battery (Penn CNB) includes tests that were validated with functional neuroimaging and provides measures of accuracy and speed of performance in several cognitive domains. To develop an Arabic version of the CNB, the English version was translated into Arabic, then back translated and revised. The Arabic and the original English versions were administered in a randomized crossover design to bilingual participants (N=22). Results Performance varied by cognitive domain, but generally improved at the second session regardless of the language of the initial test. When performance on the English and Arabic version was compared, significant positive correlations were detected for accuracy in 8/13 cognitive domains and for speed in 4/13 domains (r=0.02 to 0.97). When the practice estimates using linear models were incorporated, the translational validity estimates improved substantially (accuracy, r=0.50-0.96, speed, r=0.63-0.92, all correlations, p=0.05 or better). Conclusion While crossover designs control for order effects on average performance, practice effects, regardless of language, still need to be removed to obtain estimates of translational validity. When practice effect is controlled for, the Arabic and English versions of the Penn-CNB are well correlated and the Arabic version is suitable for use in research. PMID:26054545

  18. Identifiability, stratification and minimum variance estimation of causal effects.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xingwei; Zheng, Zhongguo; Geng, Zhi

    2005-10-15

    The weakest sufficient condition for the identifiability of causal effects is the weakly ignorable treatment assignment, which implies that potential responses are independent of treatment assignment in each fine subpopulation stratified by a covariate. In this paper, we expand the independence that holds in fine subpopulations to the case that the independence may also hold in several coarse subpopulations, each of which consists of several fine subpopulations and may have overlaps with other coarse subpopulations. We first show that the identifiability of causal effects occurs if and only if the coarse subpopulations partition the whole population. We then propose a principle, called minimum variance principle, which says that the estimator possessing the minimum variance is preferred, in dealing with the stratification and the estimation of the causal effects. The simulation results with the detail programming and a practical example demonstrate that it is a feasible and reasonable way to achieve our goals. PMID:16149123

  19. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  20. Effect of distance-related heterogeneity on population size estimates from point counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, M.G.; Dawson, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Point counts are used widely to index bird populations. Variation in the proportion of birds counted is a known source of error, and for robust inference it has been advocated that counts be converted to estimates of absolute population size. We used simulation to assess nine methods for the conduct and analysis of point counts when the data included distance-related heterogeneity of individual detection probability. Distance from the observer is a ubiquitous source of heterogeneity, because nearby birds are more easily detected than distant ones. Several recent methods (dependent double-observer, time of first detection, time of detection, independent multiple-observer, and repeated counts) do not account for distance-related heterogeneity, at least in their simpler forms. We assessed bias in estimates of population size by simulating counts with fixed radius w over four time intervals (occasions). Detection probability per occasion was modeled as a half-normal function of distance with scale parameter sigma and intercept g(0) = 1.0. Bias varied with sigma/w; values of sigma inferred from published studies were often 50% for a 100-m fixed-radius count. More critically, the bias of adjusted counts sometimes varied more than that of unadjusted counts, and inference from adjusted counts would be less robust. The problem was not solved by using mixture models or including distance as a covariate. Conventional distance sampling performed well in simulations, but its assumptions are difficult to meet in the field. We conclude that no existing method allows effective estimation of population size from point counts.

  1. Effect of Anxiety Reduction on Children's School Performance and Social Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the effect of reductions in children's anxiety over time on improvements in school performance and social functioning in the context of participation in a cognitive-behavioral intervention program. Participants included 40 children with high anxiety (6-13 years of age). Independent evaluators, children, and parents rated child…

  2. Socioenvironmental Risk and Adjustment in Latino Youth: The Mediating Effects of Family Processes and Social Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prelow, Hazel M.; Loukas, Alexandra; Jordan-Green, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The direct and mediated effects of socioenvironmental risk on internalizing and externalizing problems among Latino youth aged 10-14 were examined using prospective analyses. Participants in this study were 464 Latino mother and child dyads surveyed as part of the "Welfare, Children & Families: A Three City Study." It was hypothesized that…

  3. Effectiveness of Home Visiting as a Strategy for Promoting Children's Adjustment to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkland, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that involving families in home visiting services promotes positive experiences during the initial years of a child's life; however less is known about whether or not the benefits continue to accrue after a child enters school. This article describes the results of a study examining the effectiveness of an…

  4. Child adjustment and parent functioning: Considering the role of child-driven effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ni; Ansari, Arya

    2016-04-01

    Based on 13,694 mother-child dyads from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Kindergarten Study (ECLS-K; Rock & Pollack, 2002; Tourangeau, Nord, Lê, Sorongon, & Najarian, 2009), this study is an examination of the bidirectional relations between parental and child functioning from kindergarten through 3rd grade. Results from the cross-lagged models demonstrated that child-driven effects co-occurred with parental effects, and that these effects were comparable in size. At the same time, however, results from the latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed idiosyncratic patterns of parent and child functioning. Compared with children in the least optimal functioning profiles, those in the average and above-average profiles elicited greater improvement in parents' functioning over time. Although children characterized by poor academic performance at kindergarten appeared to precede parents characterized by harsh parenting at 3rd grade, there was a threshold in the evolving strength of the overall child-driven effects. Taken together, the results from this study underscore the importance of considering reciprocal processes in the parent-child dynamic while also underscoring individual differences in these processes across the early- to middle-childhood years. PMID:26866838

  5. Accounting for missing data in the estimation of contemporary genetic effective population size (N(e) ).

    PubMed

    Peel, D; Waples, R S; Macbeth, G M; Do, C; Ovenden, J R

    2013-03-01

    Theoretical models are often applied to population genetic data sets without fully considering the effect of missing data. Researchers can deal with missing data by removing individuals that have failed to yield genotypes and/or by removing loci that have failed to yield allelic determinations, but despite their best efforts, most data sets still contain some missing data. As a consequence, realized sample size differs among loci, and this poses a problem for unbiased methods that must explicitly account for random sampling error. One commonly used solution for the calculation of contemporary effective population size (N(e) ) is to calculate the effective sample size as an unweighted mean or harmonic mean across loci. This is not ideal because it fails to account for the fact that loci with different numbers of alleles have different information content. Here we consider this problem for genetic estimators of contemporary effective population size (N(e) ). To evaluate bias and precision of several statistical approaches for dealing with missing data, we simulated populations with known N(e) and various degrees of missing data. Across all scenarios, one method of correcting for missing data (fixed-inverse variance-weighted harmonic mean) consistently performed the best for both single-sample and two-sample (temporal) methods of estimating N(e) and outperformed some methods currently in widespread use. The approach adopted here may be a starting point to adjust other population genetics methods that include per-locus sample size components. PMID:23280157

  6. Alcoholism and Intimate Partner Violence: Effects on Children’s Psychosocial Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, Keith; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that alcoholism and relationship violence often have serious consequences for adults; however, children living with alcoholic parents are susceptible to the deleterious familial environments these caregivers frequently create. Given the prevalence of IPV among patients entering substance abuse treatment, coupled with the negative familial consequences associated with these types of behavior, this review explores what have been, to this point, two divergent lines of research: (a) the effects of parental alcoholism on children, and (b) the effects of children’s exposure to intimate partner violence. In this article, the interrelationship between alcoholism and IPV is examined, with an emphasis on the developmental impact of these behaviors (individually and together) on children living in the home and offers recommendations for future research directions. PMID:20049253

  7. Health Effects of Lesion Localization in Multiple Sclerosis: Spatial Registration and Confounding Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Eloyan, Ani; Shou, Haochang; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sweeney, Elizabeth M.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Reich, Daniel S.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesion localization in multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be associated with the type and severity of adverse health effects. However, several factors hinder statistical analyses of such associations using large MRI datasets: 1) spatial registration algorithms developed for healthy individuals may be less effective on diseased brains and lead to different spatial distributions of lesions; 2) interpretation of results requires the careful selection of confounders; and 3) most approaches have focused on voxel-wise regression approaches. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five registration algorithms and observed that conclusions regarding lesion localization can vary substantially with the choice of registration algorithm. Methods for dealing with confounding factors due to differences in disease duration and local lesion volume are introduced. Voxel-wise regression is then extended by the introduction of a metric that measures the distance between a patient-specific lesion mask and the population prevalence map. PMID:25233361

  8. The effects of the nonstationarity on the regional frequency estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, W.; Jang, H.; Choi, W.; Heo, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Regional frequency analysis (RFA) is widely used to estimate more reliable quantiles of extreme hydro-meteorological events. This approach requires the assumption of stationarity. In this paper, index flood method was used to analyze the nonstationary 24-hour rainfall maxima of 9 virtual sites in a region. Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate the nonstationary data based on the generalized extreme value (GEV) model with time varying location/scale parameters. To analyze the temporal change of regional frequency estimates such as index flood, growth curve, quantile, and the heterogeneity measure, the accumulation of the data from the given time step and moving window concept were applied. Results indicated that the stationarity of the data had more effects on the index flood than the growth curve. There was little effects of the shape parameter of GEV distribution on the temporal pattern of the regional frequency estimates. Temporal change of the heterogeneity measure was not significant. These results showed that the time varying parameters of the nonstationary GEV model need to be formed considering the temporal pattern of the regional frequency estimates.

  9. Comparison of validity of food group intake by food frequency questionnaire between pre- and post- adjustment estimates derived from 2-day 24-hour recalls in combination with the probability of consumption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Woo; Oh, Se-Young; Kwon, Sung-Ok; Kim, Jeongseon

    2012-01-01

    Validation of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) utilising a short-term measurement method is challenging when the reference method does not accurately reflect the usual food intake. In addition, food group intake that is not consumed on daily basis is more critical when episodically consumed foods are related and compared. To overcome these challenges, several statistical approaches have been developed to determine usual food intake distributions. The Multiple Source Method (MSM) can calculate the usual food intake by combining the frequency questions of an FFQ with the short-term food intake amount data. In this study, we applied the MSM to estimate the usual food group intake and evaluate the validity of an FFQ with a group of 333 Korean children (aged 3-6 y) who completed two 24-hour recalls (24HR) and one FFQ in 2010. After adjusting the data using the MSM procedure, the true rate of non-consumption for all food groups was less than 1% except for the beans group. The median Spearman correlation coefficients against FFQ of the mean of 2-d 24HRs data and the MSM-adjusted data were 0.20 (range: 0.11 to 0.40) and 0.35 (range: 0.14 to 0.60), respectively. The weighted kappa values against FFQ ranged from 0.08 to 0.25 for the mean of 2-d 24HRs data and from 0.10 to 0.41 for the MSM-adjusted data. For most food groups, the MSM-adjusted data showed relatively stronger correlations against FFQ than raw 2-d 24HRs data, from 0.03 (beverages) to 0.34 (mushrooms). The results of this study indicated that the application of the MSM, which was a better estimate of the usual intake, could be worth considering in FFQ validation studies among Korean children. PMID:22938437

  10. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  11. Systematic adjustment of charge densities and size of polyglycerol amines reduces cytotoxic effects and enhances cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Hellmund, Markus; Achazi, Katharina; Neumann, Falko; Thota, Bala N S; Ma, Nan; Haag, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    Excessive cationic charge density of polyplexes during cellular uptake is still a major hurdle in the field of non-viral gene delivery. The most efficient cationic vectors such as polyethylene imine (PEI) or polyamidoamine (PAMAM) can be highly toxic and may induce strong side effects due to their high cationic charge densities. Alternatives like polyethylene glycol (PEG) are used to 'shield' these charges and thus to reduce the cytotoxic effects known for PEI/PEG-core-shell architectures. In this study, we compared the ability of hyperbranched polyglycerol amines (hPG amines) with different amine densities and molecular weights as non-viral cationic vectors for DNA delivery. By adjusting the hydroxyl to amine group ratio on varying molecular weights, we were able to perform a systematic study on the cytotoxic effects caused by the effective charge density in correlation to size. We could demonstrate that carriers with moderate charge density have a higher potential for effective DNA delivery as compared to high/low charged ones independent of their size, but the final efficiency can be optimized by the molecular weight. We analyzed the physicochemical properties and cellular uptake capacity as well as the cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency of these new vector systems. PMID:26244171

  12. Covariate Adjusted Correlation Analysis with Application to FMR1 Premutation Female Carrier Data

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Nguyen, Danh V.; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Motivated by molecular data on female premutation carriers of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, we present a new method of covariate adjusted correlation analysis to examine the association of messenger RNA (mRNA) and number of CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. The association between the molecular variables in female carriers needs to adjust for activation ratio (ActRatio), a measure which accounts for the protective effects of one normal X chromosome in females carriers. However, there are inherent uncertainties in the exact effects of ActRatio on the molecular measures of interest. To account for these uncertainties, we develop a flexible adjustment that accommodates both additive and multiplicative effects of ActRatio nonparametrically. The proposed adjusted correlation uses local conditional correlations, which are local method of moments estimators, to estimate the Pearson correlation between two variables adjusted for a third observable covariate. The local method of moments estimators are averaged to arrive at the final covariate adjusted correlation estimator, which is shown to be consistent. We also develop a test to check the nonparametric joint additive and multiplicative adjustment form. Simulation studies illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method. (Application to FMR1 premutation data on 165 female carriers indicates that the association between mRNA and CGG repeat after adjusting for ActRatio is stronger.) Finally, the results provide independent support for a specific jointly additive and multiplicative adjustment form for ActRatio previously proposed in the literature. PMID:19173699

  13. Simultaneous Detection And Estimation Amid Strong Dynamical Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra

    1991-01-01

    Effective signal-to-noise ratio several decibels greater than in previous schemes. Proposed for digital processing of received noisy, binary-phase-modulated radio signal for simultaneous detection of binary modulation and estimation of Doppler phase, frequency, and frequency derivative. Intended for use where relative motion between transmitter and receiver includes large velocities, strong accelerations, and/or intense jerks, resulting in possibly large Doppler frequency shifts with respect to time. Improves reception in radar, mobile/satellite communications, and navigation systems.

  14. How do clarinet players adjust the resonances of their vocal tracts for different playing effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Claudia; Wolfe, Joe

    2005-11-01

    In a simple model, the reed of the clarinet is mechanically loaded by the series combination of the acoustical impedances of the instrument itself and of the player's airway. Here we measure the complex impedance spectrum of players' airways using an impedance head adapted to fit inside a clarinet mouthpiece. A direct current shunt with high acoustical resistance allows players to blow normally, so the players can simulate the tract condition under playing conditions. The reproducibility of the results suggest that the players' ``muscle memory'' is reliable for this task. Most players use a single, highly stable vocal tract configuration over most of the playing range, except for the altissimo register. However, this ``normal'' configuration varies substantially among musicians. All musicians change the configuration, often drastically for ``special effects'' such as glissandi and slurs: the tongue is lowered and the impedance magnitude reduced when the player intends to lower the pitch or to slur downwards, and vice versa.

  15. How do clarinet players adjust the resonances of their vocal tracts for different playing effects?

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Wolfe, Joe

    2005-11-01

    In a simple model, the reed of the clarinet is mechanically loaded by the series combination of the acoustical impedances of the instrument itself and of the player's airway. Here we measure the complex impedance spectrum of players' airways using an impedance head adapted to fit inside a clarinet mouthpiece. A direct current shunt with high acoustical resistance allows players to blow normally, so the players can simulate the tract condition under playing conditions. The reproducibility of the results suggest that the players' "muscle memory" is reliable for this task. Most players use a single, highly stable vocal tract configuration over most of the playing range, except for the altissimo register. However, this "normal" configuration varies substantially among musicians. All musicians change the configuration, often drastically for "special effects" such as glissandi and slurs: the tongue is lowered and the impedance magnitude reduced when the player intends to lower the pitch or to slur downwards, and vice versa. PMID:16334701

  16. Longitudinal Effects of Teacher and Student Perceptions of Teacher-Student Relationship Qualities on Academic Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jan N.

    2010-01-01

    The shared and unique effects of teacher and student reports of teacher student relationship quality (TSRQ) in second and third grade on academic self views, behavioral engagement, and achievement the following year were investigated in a sample of 714 academically at-risk students. Teacher and student reports of teacher-student support and conflict showed low correspondence. As a block, teacher and student reports of TSRQ predicted all outcomes, above prior performance on that outcome and background variables. Student reports uniquely predicted school belonging, perceived academic competence, and math achievement. Teacher reports uniquely predicted behavioral engagement and child perceived academic competence. Teacher and student reports of the teacher-student relationship assess largely different constructs that predict different outcomes. Implications of findings for practice and research are discussed. PMID:21984843

  17. Estimating terra MODIS polarization effect using ocean data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Andrew; Brinkmann, Jake; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Jack

    2016-05-01

    Terra MODIS has been known since pre-launch to have polarization sensitivity, particularly in shortest-wavelength bands 8 and 9. On-orbit reflectance trending of pseudo-invariant sites show a variation in reflectance as a function of band and scan mirror angle of incidence consistent with time-dependent polarization effects from the rotating doublesided scan mirror. The MODIS Characterization Support Team [MCST] estimates the Mueller matrix trending from this variation as observed from a single desert site, but this effect is not included in Collection 6 [C6] calibration. Here we extend the MCST's current polarization sensitivity monitoring to two ocean sites distributed over latitude to help estimate the uncertainties in the derived Mueller matrix. The Mueller matrix elements derived for polarization-sensitive Band 8 for a given site are found to be fairly insensitive to surface brdf modeling. The site-to-site variation is a measure of the uncertainty in the Mueller estimation. Results for band 8 show that the polarization correction reduces mirror-side striping by up to 50% and reduces the instrument polarization effect on reflectance time series of an ocean target.

  18. The Effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy in Reducing Adolescent Mental Health Risk and Family Adjustment Difficulties in an Irish Context.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Dan; Carr, Alan; Sexton, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy (FFT) 42 cases were randomized to FFT and 55 to a waiting-list control group. Minimization procedures controlled the effects of potentially confounding baseline variables. Cases were treated by a team of five therapists who implemented FFT with a moderate degree of fidelity. Rates of clinical recovery were significantly higher in the FFT group than in the control group. Compared to the comparison group, parents in the FFT group reported significantly greater improvement in adolescent problems on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and both parents and adolescents reported improvements in family adjustment on the Systemic Clinical Outcomes and Routine Evaluation (SCORE). In addition, 93% of youth and families in the treatment condition completed FFT. Improvements shown immediately after treatment were sustained at 3-month follow-up. Results provide a current demonstration of FFT's effectiveness for youth with behavior problems in community-based settings, expand our understanding of the range of positive outcomes of FFT to include mental health risk and family-defined problem severity and impact, and suggests that it is an effective intervention when implemented in an Irish context. PMID:26542420

  19. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  20. 8 CFR 240.21 - Suspension of deportation and adjustment of status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provided in 8 CFR 240.21 (as in effect prior to September 30, 1998). (b) Conditional grants of suspension... status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect before April 1, 1997) and cancellation of removal... of deportation and adjustment of status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect before April...

  1. 8 CFR 1240.21 - Suspension of deportation and adjustment of status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cancellation of removal as provided in 8 CFR 240.21 (as in effect prior to September 30, 1998). (b) Conditional... status under section 244(a) of the Act (as in effect before April 1, 1997) and cancellation of removal... in effect before April 1, 1997) and cancellation of removal and adjustment of status under...

  2. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  3. A robust estimation model for surgery durations with temporal, operational, and surgery team effects.

    PubMed

    Kayış, Enis; Khaniyev, Taghi T; Suermondt, Jaap; Sylvester, Karl

    2015-09-01

    For effective operating room (OR) planning, surgery duration estimation is critical. Overestimation leads to underutilization of expensive hospital resources (e.g., OR time) whereas underestimation leads to overtime and high waiting times for the patients. In this paper, we consider a particular estimation method currently in use and using additional temporal, operational, and staff-related factors provide a statistical model to adjust these estimates for higher accuracy.The results show that our method increases the accuracy of the estimates, in particular by reducing large errors. For the 8093 cases we have in our data, our model decreases the mean absolute deviation of the currently used scheduled duration (42.65 ± 0.59 minutes) by 1.98 ± 0.28 minutes. For the cases with large negative errors, however, the decrease in the mean absolute deviation is 20.35 ± 0.74 minutes (with a respective increase of 0.89 ± 0.66 minutes in large positive errors). We find that not only operational and temporal factors, but also medical staff and team experience related factors (such as number of nurses and the frequency of the medical team working together) could be used to improve the currently used estimates. Finally, we conclude that one could further improve these predictions by combining our model with other good prediction models proposed in the literature. Specifically, one could decrease the mean absolute deviation of 39.98 ± 0.58 minutes obtained via the method of Dexter et al (Anesth Analg 117(1):204-209, 2013) by 1.02 ± 0.21 minutes by combining our method with theirs. PMID:25501470

  4. A comparison of estimated and calculated effective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Prieksat, Mark A.; Ankeny, Mark D.; Blandford, Neil; Roth, Tracy L.; Kelsey, James A.; Whitworth, Julia R.

    Effective porosity in solute-transport analyses is usually estimated rather than calculated from tracer tests in the field or laboratory. Calculated values of effective porosity in the laboratory on three different textured samples were compared to estimates derived from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. The agreement was poor and it seems that no clear relationships exist between effective porosity calculated from laboratory tracer tests and effective porosity estimated from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. A field tracer test in a sand-and-gravel aquifer produced a calculated effective porosity of approximately 0.17. By comparison, estimates of effective porosity from textural data, moisture retention, and published values were approximately 50-90% greater than the field calibrated value. Thus, estimation of effective porosity for chemical transport is highly dependent on the chosen transport model and is best obtained by laboratory or field tracer tests. Résumé La porosité effective dans les analyses de transport de soluté est habituellement estimée, plutôt que calculée à partir d'expériences de traçage sur le terrain ou au laboratoire. Les valeurs calculées de la porosité effective au laboratoire sur trois échantillons de textures différentes ont été comparées aux estimations provenant de distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. La concordance était plutôt faible et il semble qu'il n'existe aucune relation claire entre la porosité effective calculée à partir des expériences de traçage au laboratoire et la porosité effective estimée à partir des distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. Une expérience de traçage de terrain dans un aquifère de sables et de graviers a fourni une porosité effective calculée d'environ 0,17. En comparaison, les estimations de porosité effective de données de

  5. The Effects of Baseline Estimation on the Reliability, Validity, and Precision of CBM-R Growth Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Norman, Ethan R.; Christ, Theodore J.; Zopluoglu, Cengiz

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of baseline estimation on the quality of trend estimates derived from Curriculum Based Measurement of Oral Reading (CBM-R) progress monitoring data. The authors used a linear mixed effects regression (LMER) model to simulate progress monitoring data for schedules ranging from 6-20 weeks for datasets with high and low…

  6. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta F(i)) in a given population. The values of delta F(i) are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - F(i)) where F(i) is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of N(e) can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  7. Estimating the Effect of Gypsy Moth Defloiation Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBeurs, K. M.; Townsend, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    The area of North American forests affected by gypsy moth defoliation continues to expand despite efforts to slow the spread. With the increased area of infestation, ecological, environmental and economic concerns about gypsy moth disturbance remain significant, necessitating coordinated, repeatable and comprehensive monitoring of the areas affected. In this study, our primary objective was to estimate the magnitude of defoliation using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery for a gypsy moth outbreak that occurred in the US central Appalachian Mountains in 2000 and 2001. We focused on determining the appropriate spectral MODIS indices and temporal compositing method to best monitor the effects of gypsy moth defoliation. We tested MODIS-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), and two versions of the Normalized Difference Infrared index (NDIIb6 and NDIIb7, using the channels centered on 1640 nm and 2130 nm respectively) for their capacity to map defoliation as estimated by ground observations. In addition, we evaluated three temporal resolutions: daily, 8-day and 16-day data. We validated the results through quantitative comparison to Landsat based defoliation estimates and traditional sketch maps. Our MODIS based defoliation estimates based on NDIIb6 and NDIIb7 closely matched Landsat defoliation estimates derived from field data as well as sketch maps. We conclude that daily MODIS data can be used with confidence to monitor insect defoliation on an annual time scale, at least for larger patches (greater than 0.63 km2). Eight-day and 16-day MODIS composites may be of lesser use due to the ephemeral character of disturbance by the gypsy moth.

  8. Bias Adjustment of PERSIANN Rainfall for Hydrologic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, K.; Braithwaite, D.; Imam, B.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2008-05-01

    The exchange of water and energy through the land and atmospheric interaction occurs at various space and time scales. Modeling these exchanges, in general, and more specifically, adequate capturing of land surface hydrologic processes such as soil moisture and runoff generation requires reliable modeling and measurement of precipitation at fine time scale. The maturity of Satellite-based rainfall estimates is now sufficient to consider the value of such products in improving land surface models. This study addresses the measurement and bias correction of PERSIANN (Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks) rainfall to sub-daily scale of 0.25ox0.25o with emphasis on its potential use in land-surface hydrologic applications. The satellite-based PERSIANN system estimates surface rainfall based on infrared temperature and local image texture from geostationary satellites. Model parameters of PERSIANN are frequently adjusted when passive microwave rainfall estimates from low-orbital satellites (EOS, TRMM, NOAA, and DMSP) are available. PERSIANN estimates rainfall at hourly and 0.25ox0.25o lat-long scales. Its products are accumulated to daily and monthly scales for various applications. In this presentation, PERSIANN bias adjustment using monthly estimates from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) product is explored. Hourly PERSIANN rainfall estimates are first aggregated both spatially and temporally to the monthly 2.5ox2.5o scale and subsequently adjusted using GCPC monthly estimates as reference. Values of bias in PERSIANN are used to adjust PERSIANN rainfall at the 0.25ox0.25o hourly scale. The effectiveness of bias adjustment is evaluated using radar and gauge measurements at sub- daily to monthly scales at a spatial resolution of 0.25ox0.25o lat-long. The potential use of adjusted PERSIANN in hydrologic applications will be presented and discussed.

  9. Estimating peer effects in longitudinal dyadic data using instrumental variables.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, A James; Elwert, Felix; Rosenquist, J Niels; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2014-09-01

    The identification of causal peer effects (also known as social contagion or induction) from observational data in social networks is challenged by two distinct sources of bias: latent homophily and unobserved confounding. In this paper, we investigate how causal peer effects of traits and behaviors can be identified using genes (or other structurally isomorphic variables) as instrumental variables (IV) in a large set of data generating models with homophily and confounding. We use directed acyclic graphs to represent these models and employ multiple IV strategies and report three main identification results. First, using a single fixed gene (or allele) as an IV will generally fail to identify peer effects if the gene affects past values of the treatment. Second, multiple fixed genes/alleles, or, more promisingly, time-varying gene expression, can identify peer effects if we instrument exclusion violations as well as the focal treatment. Third, we show that IV identification of peer effects remains possible even under multiple complications often regarded as lethal for IV identification of intra-individual effects, such as pleiotropy on observables and unobservables, homophily on past phenotype, past and ongoing homophily on genotype, inter-phenotype peer effects, population stratification, gene expression that is endogenous to past phenotype and past gene expression, and others. We apply our identification results to estimating peer effects of body mass index (BMI) among friends and spouses in the Framingham Heart Study. Results suggest a positive causal peer effect of BMI between friends. PMID:24779654

  10. Estimating Peer Effects in Longitudinal Dyadic Data Using Instrumental Variables

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, A James; Elwert, Felix; Rosenquist, J Niels; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The identification of causal peer effects (also known as social contagion or induction) from observational data in social networks is challenged by two distinct sources of bias: latent homophily and unobserved confounding. In this paper, we investigate how causal peer effects of traits and behaviors can be identified using genes (or other structurally isomorphic variables) as instrumental variables (IV) in a large set of data generating models with homophily and confounding. We use directed acyclic graphs to represent these models and employ multiple IV strategies and report three main identification results. First, using a single fixed gene (or allele) as an IV will generally fail to identify peer effects if the gene affects past values of the treatment. Second, multiple fixed genes/alleles, or, more promisingly, time-varying gene expression, can identify peer effects if we instrument exclusion violations as well as the focal treatment. Third, we show that IV identification of peer effects remains possible even under multiple complications often regarded as lethal for IV identification of intra-individual effects, such as pleiotropy on observables and unobservables, homophily on past phenotype, past and ongoing homophily on genotype, inter-phenotype peer effects, population stratification, gene expression that is endogenous to past phenotype and past gene expression, and others. We apply our identification results to estimating peer effects of body mass index (BMI) among friends and spouses in the Framingham Heart Study. Results suggest a positive causal peer effect of BMI between friends. PMID:24779654

  11. Apollo video photogrammetry estimation of plume impingement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip; Clements, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    Future missions to the Moon may require numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modern photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1°-3°. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10 8-10 13 particles/m 3. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  12. [Integral estimation of genetic effects of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V A

    1997-01-01

    A system of criteria (direct, indirect, extrapolational, integral, populational, evolutional) has been proposed to estimate the consequences of irradiation of flora, fauna and human population. This system makes it possible to obtain the most comprehensive estimate of genetic effects from exposure of live organisms to ionizing radiations. An attempt has been made to use extrapolational approaches for assessing the genetic risk on the basis of the results of cytogenetic examination of the human population in a number of regions exposed to the action of ionizing radiations as a result of the Chernobyl accident, in connection with the activity of the chemical plant Mayak in the Chelyabinsk region, nuclear explosions at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site, the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in the U.S.A. PMID:9599614

  13. Detailed Report on 2014/15 Influenza Virus Characteristics, and Estimates on Influenza Virus Vaccine Effectiveness from Austria’s Sentinel Physician Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) is influenced by the antigenic similarity between vaccine- and circulating strains. Material and Methods This paper presents data obtained by the Austrian sentinel surveillance system on the evolution of influenza viruses during the season 2014/15 and its impact on influenza vaccine effectiveness in primary care in Austria as estimated by a test-negative case control design. VE estimates were performed for each influenza virus type/subtype, stratified by underlying diseases and adjusted for age, sex and calendar week of infection. Results Detailed genetic and antigenic analyses showed that circulating A(H3N2) viruses were genetically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2) vaccine component indicating a profound vaccine mismatch. The Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were antigenically conserved and matched the respective vaccine component. Influenza B viruses were lineage-matched B/Yamagata viruses with a clade-level variation. Consistent with substantial vaccine mismatch for the A(H3N2) viruses a crude overall VE of only 47% was estimated, whereas the VE estimates for A(H1N1)pdm09 were 84% and for influenza B viruses 70%. Increased VE estimates were obtained after stratification by underlying diseases and adjustment for the covariates sex and age, whereby the adjustment for the calendar week of infection was the covariate exerting the highest influence on adjusted VE estimates. Conclusion In summary, VE data obtained in this study underscore the importance to perform VE estimates in the context of detailed characterization of the contributing viruses and also demonstrate that the calendar week of influenza virus infection is the most important confounder of VE estimates. PMID:26975056

  14. Estimating the Effect of a Community-Based Intervention with Two Communities

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya; Zheng, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based programs in practice, there is substantial interest in methods to estimate the causal effects of community-level treatments or exposures on individual level outcomes. The challenge one is confronted with is that different communities have different environmental factors affecting the individual outcomes, and all individuals in a community share the same environment and intervention. In practice, data are often available from only a small number of communities, making it difficult if not impossible to adjust for these environmental confounders. In this paper we consider an extreme version of this dilemma, in which two communities each receives a different level of the intervention, and covariates and outcomes are measured on a random sample of independent individuals from each of the two populations; the results presented can be straightforwardly generalized to settings in which more than two communities are sampled. We address the question of what conditions are needed to estimate the causal effect of the intervention, defined in terms of an ideal experiment in which the exposed level of the intervention is assigned to both communities and individual outcomes are measured in the combined population, and then the clock is turned back and a control level of the intervention is assigned to both communities and individual outcomes are measured in the combined population. We refer to the difference in the expectation of these outcomes as the marginal (overall) treatment effect. We also discuss conditions needed for estimation of the treatment effect on the treated community. We apply a nonparametric structural equation model to define these causal effects and to establish conditions under which they are identified. These identifiability conditions provide guidance for the design of studies to investigate community level causal effects and for assessing the validity of causal interpretations when data are

  15. Effects Of Family Conflict, Divorce, And Attachment Patterns On The Psychological Distress And Social Adjustment Of College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannum,James W.; Dvorak,Dawn M.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-five freshmen completed measures of attachment, family conflict, family structure, psychological distress, and social adjustment. Attachment to mother predicted less psychological distress and attachment to father and structure predicted better social adjustment. Conflict reduced attachment and predicted psychological distress. Attachment…

  16. Long-Term Effects of Incestuous Child Abuse in College Women: Social Adjustment, Social Cognition, and Family Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, Stephanie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated family and social cognitive characteristics as mediators of social adjustment among college women. Indicated decreased cohesion and adaptability in the family of origin, increased perception of social isolation, and poorer social adjustment among subjects abused as children. Family characteristics and especially increased perceptions…

  17. Modeling Quality-Adjusted Life Expectancy Loss Resulting from Tobacco Use in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert M.; Anderson, John P.; Kaplan, Cameron M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development of a model for estimating the effects of tobacco use upon Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and to estimate the impact of tobacco use on health outcomes for the United States (US) population using the model. Method: We obtained estimates of tobacco consumption from 6 years of the National Health Interview…

  18. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  19. Effect of radon measurement methods on dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kávási, Norbert; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kovács, Tibor; Somlai, János; Jobbágy, Viktor; Nagy, Katalin; Deák, Eszter; Berhés, István; Bender, Tamás; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Vaupotic, Janja; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2011-05-01

    Different radon measurement methods were applied in the old and new buildings of the Turkish bath of Eger, Hungary, in order to elaborate a radon measurement protocol. Besides, measurements were also made concerning the radon and thoron short-lived decay products, gamma dose from external sources and water radon. The most accurate results for dose estimation were provided by the application of personal radon meters. Estimated annual effective doses from radon and its short-lived decay products in the old and new buildings, using 0.2 and 0.1 measured equilibrium factors, were 0.83 and 0.17 mSv, respectively. The effective dose from thoron short-lived decay products was only 5 % of these values. The respective external gamma radiation effective doses were 0.19 and 0.12 mSv y(-1). Effective dose from the consumption of tap water containing radon was 0.05 mSv y(-1), while in the case of spring water, it was 0.14 mSv y(-1). PMID:21450699

  20. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    abstract Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  1. Antipsychotic effects on estimated 10 year coronary heart disease risk in the CATIE Schizophrenia Study

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; Goff, Donald C.; Meyer, Jonathan M.; Davis, Vicki G.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Rosenheck, Robert; Davis, Sonia M.; Hsiao, John K.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Persons with schizophrenia die earlier than the general population, in large part due to cardiovascular disease. The study objective was to examine effects of different antipsychotic treatments on estimates of 10 year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk calculated by the Framingham Heart Study formula. Method Change in ten-year risk for CHD was compared between treatment groups in 1125 patients followed for 18 months or until treatment discontinuation in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) Schizophrenia Trial. Results The covariate-adjusted mean change in 10-year CHD risk differed significantly between treatments. Olanzapine was associated with a 0.5% (SE 0.3) increase and quetiapine, a 0.3% (SE 0.3) increase; whereas risk decreased in patients treated with perphenazine, −0.5% (SE 0.3), risperidone, −0.6% (SE 0.3), and ziprasidone −0.6% (SE 0.4). The difference in 10-year CHD risk between olanzpaine and risperidone was statistically significant (p=0.004). Differences in estimated 10 year CHD risk between drugs were most marked in the tertile of subjects with a baseline CHD risk of at least 10%. Among individual CHD risk factors used in the Framingham formula, only total and HDL cholesterol levels differed between treatments. Conclusions These results indicate that the impact on 10-year CHD risk differs significantly between antipsychotic agents, with olanzapine producing the largest elevation in CHD risk of the agents studied in CATIE. PMID:18775645

  2. Semiparametric Estimation of Treatment Effect in a Pretest–Posttest Study with Missing Data

    PubMed Central

    Davidian, Marie; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.; Leon, Selene

    2008-01-01

    The pretest–posttest study is commonplace in numerous applications. Typically, subjects are randomized to two treatments, and response is measured at baseline, prior to intervention with the randomized treatment (pretest), and at prespecified follow-up time (posttest). Interest focuses on the effect of treatments on the change between mean baseline and follow-up response. Missing posttest response for some subjects is routine, and disregarding missing cases can lead to invalid inference. Despite the popularity of this design, a consensus on an appropriate analysis when no data are missing, let alone for taking into account missing follow-up, does not exist. Under a semiparametric perspective on the pretest–posttest model, in which limited distributional assumptions on pretest or posttest response are made, we show how the theory of Robins, Rotnitzky and Zhao may be used to characterize a class of consistent treatment effect estimators and to identify the efficient estimator in the class. We then describe how the theoretical results translate into practice. The development not only shows how a unified framework for inference in this setting emerges from the Robins, Rotnitzky and Zhao theory, but also provides a review and demonstration of the key aspects of this theory in a familiar context. The results are also relevant to the problem of comparing two treatment means with adjustment for baseline covariates. PMID:19081743

  3. Semiparametric Estimation of Treatment Effect in a Pretest-Posttest Study with Missing Data.

    PubMed

    Davidian, Marie; Tsiatis, Anastasios A; Leon, Selene

    2005-08-01

    The pretest-posttest study is commonplace in numerous applications. Typically, subjects are randomized to two treatments, and response is measured at baseline, prior to intervention with the randomized treatment (pretest), and at prespecified follow-up time (posttest). Interest focuses on the effect of treatments on the change between mean baseline and follow-up response. Missing posttest response for some subjects is routine, and disregarding missing cases can lead to invalid inference. Despite the popularity of this design, a consensus on an appropriate analysis when no data are missing, let alone for taking into account missing follow-up, does not exist. Under a semiparametric perspective on the pretest-posttest model, in which limited distributional assumptions on pretest or posttest response are made, we show how the theory of Robins, Rotnitzky and Zhao may be used to characterize a class of consistent treatment effect estimators and to identify the efficient estimator in the class. We then describe how the theoretical results translate into practice. The development not only shows how a unified framework for inference in this setting emerges from the Robins, Rotnitzky and Zhao theory, but also provides a review and demonstration of the key aspects of this theory in a familiar context. The results are also relevant to the problem of comparing two treatment means with adjustment for baseline covariates. PMID:19081743

  4. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population.

    PubMed

    Bowers, E Keith; Thompson, Charles F; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2015-03-01

    A major component of sex-allocation theory, the Trivers-Willard model (TWM), posits that sons and daughters are differentially affected by variation in the rearing environment. In many species, the amount of parental care received is expected to have differing effects on the fitness of males and females. When this occurs, the TWM predicts that selection should favour adjustment of the offspring sex ratio in relation to the expected fitness return from offspring. However, evidence for sex-by-environment effects is mixed, and little is known about the adaptive significance of producing either sex. Here, we test whether offspring sex ratios vary according to predictions of the TWM in the house wren (Troglodytes aedon, Vieillot). We also test the assumption of a sex-by-environment effect on offspring using two experiments, one in which we manipulated age differences among nestlings within broods, and another in which we held nestling age constant but manipulated brood size. As predicted, females with high investment ability overproduced sons relative to those with lower ability. Males were also overproduced early within breeding seasons. In our experiments, the body mass of sons was more strongly affected by the sibling-competitive environment and resource availability than that of daughters: males grew heavier than females when reared in good conditions but were lighter than females when in poor conditions. Parents rearing broods with 1:1 sex ratios were more productive than parents rearing broods biased more strongly towards sons or daughters, suggesting that selection favours the production of mixed-sex broods. However, differences in the condition of offspring as neonates persisted to adulthood, and their reproductive success as adults varied with the body mass of sons, but not daughters, prior to independence from parental care. Thus, selection should favour slight but predictable variations in the sex ratio in relation to the quality of offspring that parents are

  5. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, E. Keith; Thompson, Charles F.; Sakaluk, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A major component of sex-allocation theory, the Trivers-Willard Model (TWM), posits that sons and daughters are differentially affected by variation in the rearing environment. In many species, the amount of parental care received is expected to have differing effects on the fitness of males and females. When this occurs, the TWM predicts that selection should favour adjustment of the offspring sex ratio in relation to the expected fitness return from offspring. However, evidence for sex-by-environment effects is mixed and little is known about the adaptive significance of producing either sex. Here, we test whether offspring sex ratios vary according to predictions of the TWM in the house wren (Troglodytes aedon, Vieillot). We also test the assumption of a sex-by-environment effect on offspring using two experiments, one in which we manipulated age-differences among nestlings within broods, and another in which we held nestling age constant but manipulated brood size. As predicted, females with high investment ability over-produced sons relative to those with lower ability. Males were also over-produced early within breeding seasons. In our experiments, the body mass of sons was more strongly affected by the sibling-competitive environment and resource availability than that of daughters: males grew heavier than females when reared in good conditions but were lighter than females when in poor conditions. Parents rearing broods with 1:1 sex ratios were more productive than parents rearing broods biased more strongly towards sons or daughters, suggesting that selection favours the production of mixed-sex broods. However, differences in the condition of offspring as neonates persisted to adulthood, and their reproductive success as adults varied with the body mass of sons, but not daughters, prior to independence from parental care. Thus, selection should favour slight but predictable variations in the sex ratio in relation to the quality of offspring that

  6. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science.

    PubMed

    Mengersen, Kerrie L; Drovandi, Christopher C; Robert, Christian P; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a 'magnitude-based inference' approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements. PMID:27073897

  7. Bayesian Estimation of Small Effects in Exercise and Sports Science

    PubMed Central

    Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Drovandi, Christopher C.; Robert, Christian P.; Pyne, David B.; Gore, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a Bayesian formulation of the so-called magnitude-based inference approach to quantifying and interpreting effects, and in a case study example provide accurate probabilistic statements that correspond to the intended magnitude-based inferences. The model is described in the context of a published small-scale athlete study which employed a magnitude-based inference approach to compare the effect of two altitude training regimens (live high-train low (LHTL), and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE)) on running performance and blood measurements of elite triathletes. The posterior distributions, and corresponding point and interval estimates, for the parameters and associated effects and comparisons of interest, were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. The Bayesian analysis was shown to provide more direct probabilistic comparisons of treatments and able to identify small effects of interest. The approach avoided asymptotic assumptions and overcame issues such as multiple testing. Bayesian analysis of unscaled effects showed a probability of 0.96 that LHTL yields a substantially greater increase in hemoglobin mass than IHE, a 0.93 probability of a substantially greater improvement in running economy and a greater than 0.96 probability that both IHE and LHTL yield a substantially greater improvement in maximum blood lactate concentration compared to a Placebo. The conclusions are consistent with those obtained using a ‘magnitude-based inference’ approach that has been promoted in the field. The paper demonstrates that a fully Bayesian analysis is a simple and effective way of analysing small effects, providing a rich set of results that are straightforward to interpret in terms of probabilistic statements. PMID:27073897

  8. Quantifying the causal effects of 20mph zones on road casualties in London via doubly robust estimation.

    PubMed

    Li, Haojie; Graham, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    This paper estimates the causal effect of 20mph zones on road casualties in London. Potential confounders in the key relationship of interest are included within outcome regression and propensity score models, and the models are then combined to form a doubly robust estimator. A total of 234 treated zones and 2844 potential control zones are included in the data sample. The propensity score model is used to select a viable control group which has common support in the covariate distributions. We compare the doubly robust estimates with those obtained using three other methods: inverse probability weighting, regression adjustment, and propensity score matching. The results indicate that 20mph zones have had a significant causal impact on road casualty reduction in both absolute and proportional terms. PMID:27173361

  9. An analytical approach to estimate curvature effect of coseismic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jie; Sun, Wenke; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to compute the curvature effect by the new analytical solutions of co-seismic deformation derived for the homogeneous sphere model. We consider two spheres with different radii: one is the same as earth, the other with a larger radius can approximate a half-space model. Then, we calculate the co-seismic displacements for the two spheres and define the relative percentage of the displacements as the curvature effect. The near-field curvature effect is defined relative to the maximum co-seismic displacement. The results show that the maximum curvature effect is about 4% for source depths of less than 100 km, and about 30% for source depths of less than 600 km. For the far-field curvature effect, we define it relative to the observing point. The curvature effect is extremely large and sometimes exceeds 100%. Moreover, this new approach can be used to estimate any planet's curvature effect quantitatively. For a smaller sphere, such as the Moon, the curvature effect is much larger than that of the Earth, with an inverse ratio to the earth's radius.

  10. An analytical approach to estimate curvature effect of coseismic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jie; Sun, Wenke; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-08-01

    We present an analytical approach to compute the curvature effect by the new analytical solutions of coseismic deformation derived for the homogeneous sphere model. We consider two spheres with different radii: one is the same as earth and the other with a larger radius can approximate a half-space model. Then, we calculate the coseismic displacements for the two spheres and define the relative percentage of the displacements as the curvature effect. The near-field curvature effect is defined relative to the maximum coseismic displacement. The results show that the maximum curvature effect is about 4 per cent for source depths of less than 100 km, and about 30 per cent for source depths of less than 600 km. For the far-field curvature effect, we define it relative to the observing point. The curvature effect is extremely large and sometimes exceeds 100 per cent. Moreover, this new approach can be used to estimate any planet's curvature effect quantitatively. For a smaller sphere, such as the Moon, the curvature effect is much larger than that of the Earth, with an inverse ratio to the earth's radius.

  11. Biochar's effect on soil nitrous oxide emissions from a maize field with lime-adjusted pH treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, R.; Felber, R.; Neftel, A.; Six, J.; Leifeld, J.

    2015-07-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich, porous pyrolysis product of organic residues may positively affect plant yield and can, owing to its inherent stability, promote soil carbon sequestration when amended to agricultural soils. Another possible effect of biochar is the reduction in emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of laboratory incubations have shown significantly reduced N2O emissions from soil when mixed with biochar. Emission measurements under field conditions however are more scarce and show weaker or no reductions, or even increases in N2O emissions. One of the hypothesized mechanisms for reduced N2O emissions from soil is owing to the increase in soil pH following the application of alkaline biochar. To test the effect of biochar on N2O emissions in a temperate maize system, we set up a field trial with a 20 t ha-1 biochar treatment, a limestone treatment adjusted to the same pH as the biochar treatment, and a control treatment without any addition. An automated static chamber system measured N2O emissions for each replicate plot (n = 3) every 3.6 h over the course of 8 months. The field was conventionally fertilised at a rate of 160 kg-N ha-1 in 3 applications of 40, 80 and 40 kg-N ha-1. Cumulative N2O emissions were 53 % smaller in the biochar compared to the control treatment. However, the effect of the treatments overall was not statistically significant (p = 0.26) because of the large variability in the dataset. Limed soils emitted similar mean cumulative amounts of N2O as the control. This indicates that the observed N2O reduction effect of biochar was not caused by a pH effect.

  12. Effect of survey design and catch rate estimation on total catch estimates in Chinook salmon fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Roving–roving and roving–access creel surveys are the primary techniques used to obtain information on harvest of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho sport fisheries. Once interviews are conducted using roving–roving or roving–access survey designs, mean catch rate can be estimated with the ratio-of-means (ROM) estimator, the mean-of-ratios (MOR) estimator, or the MOR estimator with exclusion of short-duration (≤0.5 h) trips. Our objective was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates obtained from use of the two survey designs and three catch rate estimators for Idaho Chinook salmon fisheries. Information on angling populations was obtained by direct visual observation of portions of Chinook salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over an 18-d period. Based on data from the angling populations, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the properties of the catch rate estimators and survey designs. Among the three estimators, the ROM estimator provided the most accurate and precise estimates of mean catch rate and total catch for both roving–roving and roving–access surveys. On average, the root mean square error of simulated total catch estimates was 1.42 times greater and relative bias was 160.13 times greater for roving–roving surveys than for roving–access surveys. Length-of-stay bias and nonstationary catch rates in roving–roving surveys both appeared to affect catch rate and total catch estimates. Our results suggest that use of the ROM estimator in combination with an estimate of angler effort provided the least biased and most precise estimates of total catch for both survey designs. However, roving–access surveys were more accurate than roving–roving surveys for Chinook salmon fisheries in Idaho.

  13. Limitations of ozone data assimilation with adjustment of NOx emissions: mixed effects on NO2 forecasts over Beijing and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, ZiFa; Gbaguidi, Alex; Lin, CaiYan; Xin, JinYuan; Song, Tao; Hu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates a cross-variable ozone data assimilation (DA) method based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that has been used in the companion study to improve ozone forecasts over Beijing and surrounding areas. The main purpose is to delve into the impacts of the cross-variable adjustment of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions on the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) forecasts over this region during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. A mixed effect on the NO2 forecasts was observed through application of the cross-variable assimilation approach in the real-data assimilation (RDA) experiments. The method improved the NO2 forecasts over almost half of the urban sites with reductions of the root mean square errors (RMSEs) by 15-36 % in contrast to big increases of the RMSEs over other urban stations by 56-239 %. Over the urban stations with negative DA impacts, improvement of the NO2 forecasts (with 7 % reduction of the RMSEs) was noticed at night and in the morning versus significant deterioration during daytime (with 190 % increase of the RMSEs), suggesting that the negative data assimilation impacts mainly occurred during daytime. Ideal-data assimilation (IDA) experiments with a box model and the same cross-variable assimilation method confirmed the mixed effects found in the RDA experiments. In the same way, NOx emission estimation was improved at night and in the morning even under large biases in the prior emission, while it deteriorated during daytime (except for the case of minor errors in the prior emission). The mixed effects observed in the cross-variable data assimilation, i.e., positive data assimilation impacts on NO2 forecasts over some urban sites, negative data assimilation impacts over the other urban sites, and weak data assimilation impacts over suburban sites, highlighted the limitations of the EnKF under strong nonlinear relationships between chemical variables. Under strong nonlinearity between daytime ozone concentrations and NOx emissions

  14. How Accurately Do Spectral Methods Estimate Effective Elastic Thickness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gussinye, M.; Lowry, A. R.; Watts, A. B.; Velicogna, I.

    2002-12-01

    The effective elastic thickness, Te, is an important parameter that has the potential to provide information on the long-term thermal and mechanical properties of the the lithosphere. Previous studies have estimated Te using both forward and inverse (spectral) methods. While there is generally good agreement between the results obtained using these methods, spectral methods are limited because they depend on the spectral estimator and the window size chosen for analysis. In order to address this problem, we have used a multitaper technique which yields optimal estimates of the bias and variance of the Bouguer coherence function relating topography and gravity anomaly data. The technique has been tested using realistic synthetic topography and gravity. Synthetic data were generated assuming surface and sub-surface (buried) loading of an elastic plate with fractal statistics consistent with real data sets. The cases of uniform and spatially varying Te are examined. The topography and gravity anomaly data consist of 2000x2000 km grids sampled at 8 km interval. The bias in the Te estimate is assessed from the difference between the true Te value and the mean from analyzing 100 overlapping windows within the 2000x2000 km data grids. For the case in which Te is uniform, the bias and variance decrease with window size and increase with increasing true Te value. In the case of a spatially varying Te, however, there is a trade-off between spatial resolution and variance. With increasing window size the variance of the Te estimate decreases, but the spatial changes in Te are smeared out. We find that for a Te distribution consisting of a strong central circular region of Te=50 km (radius 600 km) and progressively smaller Te towards its edges, the 800x800 and 1000x1000 km window gave the best compromise between spatial resolution and variance. Our studies demonstrate that assumed stationarity of the relationship between gravity and topography data yields good results even in

  15. Estimating Potential Effects of Hypothetical Oil Spills on Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; McDonald, T.L.; Johnson, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about the transport and fate of oil spilled into the sea and its toxicity to exposed wildlife. Previously, however, there has been no way to quantify the probability that wildlife dispersed over the seascape would be exposed to spilled oil. Polar bears, the apical predator of the arctic, are widely dispersed near the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean, an area also undergoing considerable hydrocarbon exploration and development. We used 15,308 satellite locations from 194 radiocollared polar bears to estimate the probability that polar bears could be exposed to hypothetical oil spills. We used a true 2 dimensional Gausian kernel density estimator, to estimate the number of bears likely to occur in each 1.00 km2 cell of a grid superimposed over near shore areas surrounding 2 oil production facilities: the existing Northstar oil production facility, and the proposed offshore site for the Liberty production facility. We estimated the standard errors of bear numbers per cell with bootstrapping. Simulated oil spill footprints for September and October, the times during which we hypothesized effects of an oil-spill would be worst, were estimated using real wind and current data collected between 1980 and 1996. We used ARC/Info software to calculate overlap (numbers of bears oiled) between simulated oil-spill footprints and polar bear grid-cell values. Numbers of bears potentially oiled by a hypothetical 5912 barrel spill (the largest spill thought probable from a pipeline breach) ranged from 0 to 27 polar bears for September open water conditions, and from 0 to 74 polar bears in October mixed ice conditions. Median numbers oiled by the 5912 barrel hypothetical spill from the Liberty simulation in September and October were 1 and 3 bears, equivalent values for the Northstar simulation were 3 and 11 bears. In October, 75% of trajectories from the 5912 barrel simulated spill at Liberty oiled 9 or fewer bears while 75% of the trajectories affected 20 or

  16. Effects of RR segment duration on HRV spectrum estimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilbag; Vinod, Kumar; Saxena, Suresh C; Deepak, Kishore K

    2004-06-01

    Although patterns of heart rate variability (HRV) hold considerable promise for clarifying issues in clinical applications, the inappropriate quantification and interpretation of these patterns may obscure critical issues or relationships and may impede rather than foster the development of clinical applications. The duration of the RR interval series is not a matter of convenience but a fine balance between two important issues: acceptable variance and stationarity of the time series on one hand, and acceptable resolution of the spectral estimate and reduced spectral leakage on the other. Further, in the standard short-term HRV analysis, it has been observed that the previous studies in HRV spectral analysis use a wide range of RR interval segment duration for spectral estimation by Welch's algorithm. The standardization of RR interval segment duration is also important for comparisons among studies and is essential for within-study experimental contrasts. In the present study, a comparative analysis for RR interval segment durations has been made to propose an optimal RR interval segment duration. Firstly a simulated signal was analyzed with Hann window and zero padding for the segment lengths of 1024, 512, 256 and 128 samples resampled at 4 Hz with 50% overlapping. Again, the above procedure was applied to RR interval series and it was concluded that segment length of 256 samples with 50% overlapping provides a smoothed spectral estimate with clearly outlined peaks in low- and high-frequency bands. This easily understandable and interpretable spectral estimate leads to a better visual and automated analysis, which is not only desirable in basic physiology studies, but also a prerequisite for a widespread utilization of frequency domain techniques in clinical studies, where simplicity and effectiveness of information are of primary importance. PMID:15253123

  17. Smooth regression to estimate effective porosity using seismic attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is very important to characterize complex geological structures, where a large variety of geophysical and petrophysical variables are typically involved and interrelated. In this paper we apply smooth regression for data analysis, by means of the Gamma test (a revolutionary estimator of the noise in a data set) to aid in the construction of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predict effective porosity ( φe) using seismic attributes. As a result, we obtain the best combination of seismic attributes to estimate φe. We briefly describe the Gamma test, its benefits in model identification and model building. The first validation of the Neural Network based on leave-one-out was poor. Therefore, we generate a complementary set of synthetic data (from the original well-log data), varying the effective porosity and applying the Gassmann's equation for fluid substitution to obtain resulting velocities and densities. The complete procedure is repeated including the new synthetic well-logs and the best suited selection of seismic attributes is used to train a new ANN producing a better validation and more accurate results. The advantage of smooth regression over other techniques is that it tells us how well we can predict φe using any model. This information saves time during training of the ANN and also sets a lower bound for the mean squared error to prevent over-training.

  18. Estimating Effects of Species Interactions on Populations of Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Roth, Tobias; Bühler, Christoph; Amrhein, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    Global change causes community composition to change considerably through time, with ever-new combinations of interacting species. To study the consequences of newly established species interactions, one available source of data could be observational surveys from biodiversity monitoring. However, approaches using observational data would need to account for niche differences between species and for imperfect detection of individuals. To estimate population sizes of interacting species, we extended N-mixture models that were developed to estimate true population sizes in single species. Simulations revealed that our model is able to disentangle direct effects of dominant on subordinate species from indirect effects of dominant species on detection probability of subordinate species. For illustration, we applied our model to data from a Swiss amphibian monitoring program and showed that sizes of expanding water frog populations were negatively related to population sizes of endangered yellow-bellied toads and common midwife toads and partly of natterjack toads. Unlike other studies that analyzed presence and absence of species, our model suggests that the spread of water frogs in Central Europe is one of the reasons for the decline of endangered toad species. Thus, studying population impacts of dominant species on population sizes of endangered species using data from biodiversity monitoring programs should help to inform conservation policy and to decide whether competing species should be subject to population management. PMID:27028074

  19. Estimation of effective connectivity via data-driven neural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Freestone, Dean R.; Karoly, Philippa J.; Nešić, Dragan; Aram, Parham; Cook, Mark J.; Grayden, David B.

    2014-01-01

    This research introduces a new method for functional brain imaging via a process of model inversion. By estimating parameters of a computational model, we are able to track effective connectivity and mean membrane potential dynamics that cannot be directly measured using electrophysiological measurements alone. The ability to track the hidden aspects of neurophysiology will have a profound impact on the way we understand and treat epilepsy. For example, under the assumption the model captures the key features of the cortical circuits of interest, the framework will provide insights into seizure initiation and termination on a patient-specific basis. It will enable investigation into the effect a particular drug has on specific neural populations and connectivity structures using minimally invasive measurements. The method is based on approximating brain networks using an interconnected neural population model. The neural population model is based on a neural mass model that describes the functional activity of the brain, capturing the mesoscopic biophysics and anatomical structure. The model is made subject-specific by estimating the strength of intra-cortical connections within a region and inter-cortical connections between regions using a novel Kalman filtering method. We demonstrate through simulation how the framework can be used to track the mechanisms involved in seizure initiation and termination. PMID:25506315

  20. Estimating effective longitudinal dispersion in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Jay A.

    2004-07-01

    An analysis of Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program hydrographic dataset shows that the bay responds coherently to variability in freshwater flux. Mean salinity and salinity stratification both respond to variability in freshwater flux on time scales of roughly 90 days. Stratification is also influenced by local wind forcing but on much shorter (4-5 day) time scales. The volume of available data allows the effective longitudinal dispersion coefficient to be estimated as a function of either time or space. Values for this dispersion coefficient vary between 200 and 1000 m 2 s -1, with mean values around 650 m 2 s -1. The spatially dependent structure has a maximum roughly 75 km from the head of the estuary, and decreases gradually towards the mouth. The temporally varying effective dispersion varies spatially as the inverse of the estuarine cross-section, and temporally as the cube root of the freshwater flux, and is at least qualitatively consistent with models of estuarine circulation and results of previous field studies. Estimates of the numerical values of the dispersion are useful for better understanding distributions of other tracers within the bay, as well as providing another metric against which numerical models should be measured.

  1. Parents who hit and scream: interactive effects of verbal and severe physical aggression on clinic-referred adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Fang, Qijuan

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study were first, to delineate the co-occurrence of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression toward clinic-referred adolescents, and second, to examine the interactive effects of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. This research involved 239 referrals of 11- to 18-year-old youth and their dual-parent families to a non-profit, private community mental health center in a semi-rural Midwest community. Multiple informants (i.e., adolescents and mothers) were used to assess parental aggression and adolescent behavior problems. More than half of clinic-referred adolescents (51%) experienced severe physical aggression and/or high verbal aggression from one or both parents. A pattern of interactive effects of mother-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent behavior problems emerged, indicating that when severe physical aggression was present, mother-to-adolescent verbal aggression was positively associated with greater adolescent behavior problems whereas when severe physical aggression was not present, the links between verbal aggression and behavior problems was no longer significant. No interactive effects were found for father-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent adjustment; however, higher father-to-adolescent verbal aggression was consistently linked to behavior problems above and beyond the influence of severe physical aggression. The results of this study should promote the practice of routinely assessing clinic-referred adolescents and their parents about their experiences of verbal aggression in addition to severe physical aggression and other forms of abuse. PMID:24252744

  2. Biochar's effect on soil nitrous oxide emissions from a maize field with lime adjusted pH treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Felber, Raphael; Neftel, Albrecht; Six, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous product from pyrolysis of organic residues. Especially tropical soils have shown positive response in yield to biochar addition. Its high stability in soil makes biochar a potent carbon sequestration option at the same time. A number of laboratory incubations have shown significantly reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soil when mixed with biochar. Emission measurements from the field show the same trend but are much more scarce. One of the hypothesized mechanisms for reduced N2O emissions from soil is owing to the increase in soil pH from the application of alkaline biochar. To test the effect of biochar on N2O emissions from a temperate maize system, we set up a field trial with a 20 t/ha biochar treatment, a limestone treatment adjusted to the same pH as with biochar and a control without addition. An automated static chamber greenhouse gas measurement system measured N2O emissions for each replicated (n=3) every 3.6 hours. The field was conventionally fertilised at a rate of 160 kg-N/ha in 3 doses of 40, 80 and 40 kg-N/ha. Cumulative emissions show a significant reduction for N2O in the biochar treatment by about 55 % relative to the control. The limed treatment shows similar emissions than control but with higher variability. This suggests that the N2O reduction effect of biochar is not mainly due to its liming effect. In conclusion, we confirm that biochar is a promising material to reduce N2O emissions from intensively managed agricultural soils.

  3. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, Richard L.; Pennock, Steve T.; Poggio, Andrew J.; Ray, Scott L.

    1992-01-01

    Tools and techniques for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance for avionics and electronic controls are described. A finite-difference-time-domain (FD-TD) modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling is described. This code can quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code are described. Facilities and techniques for making low-power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance are also described. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects are presented. A method for extrapolating these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects are presented.

  4. Signal Amplification in Field Effect-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosensing by Tuned Buffer Concentration with Ionic Strength Adjuster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satyendra; Kumar, Narendra; Panda, Siddhartha

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturization of the sandwich enzyme-based immunosensor has several advantages but could result in lower signal strength due to lower enzyme loading. Hence, technologies for amplification of the signal are needed. Signal amplification in a field effect-based electrochemical immunosensor utilizing chip-based ELISA is presented in this work. First, the molarities of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and concentrations of KCl as ionic strength adjuster were optimized to maximize the GOx glucose-based enzymatic reactions in a beaker for signal amplification measured by change in the voltage shift with an EIS device (using 20 μl of solution) and validated with a commercial pH meter (using 3 ml of solution). The PBS molarity of 100 μM with 25 mM KCl provided the maximum voltage shift. These optimized buffer conditions were further verified for GOx immobilized on silicon chips, and similar trends with decreased PBS molarity were obtained; however, the voltage shift values obtained on chip reaction were lower as compared to the reactions occurring in the beaker. The decreased voltage shift with immobilized enzyme on chip could be attributed to the increased Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values in the immobilized GOx. Finally, a more than sixfold signal enhancement (from 8 to 47 mV) for the chip-based sandwich immunoassay was obtained by altering the PBS molarity from 10 to 100 μM with 25 mM KCl. PMID:26801818

  5. Disability-adjusted life years in the assessment of health effects of traffic-related air pollution.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Ł; Badyda, A J; Gayer, A; Mucha, D

    2015-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollutants have an impact on human health and have been recognized as one of the main stressors that cause mortality and morbidity in urban areas. Research confirms that citizens living in the vicinity of main roads are strongly exposed to high concentrations of numerous air pollutants. In the present study the measurements of traffic-related parameters such as density, velocity, and structure were performed for cross-sections of selected street canyons in Warsaw, the capital city of Poland. In addition, the results of the general traffic measurements were used to describe the number of cars crossing the border of the city. Vehicle emissions of PM10 were calculated for the whole city area and changes of the PM10 concentration were modeled to present the exposure to this pollutant that could be attributable to traffic. The principles of the environmental burden of disease (EBD) were used. The assessment of the impact of traffic-related air pollutants on human health was made. The results, presented in disability-adjusted life years (DALY), were based on the outcomes of the study conducted in 2008-2012 in Warsaw, one the most congested agglomerations in Europe, and included the health damage effect of the exposure to high concentrations of air pollutants. DALY calculations were performed in accordance to the methodologies used in renowned international scientific research on EBD. PMID:25310938

  6. Lithosphere and upper-mantle structure of the southern Baltic Sea estimated from modelling relative sea-level data with glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, H.; Kaufmann, G.; Lampe, R.

    2014-06-01

    thickness as determined with ICE-5G does not agree with the lithosphere models. Hence, more investigations have to be undertaken to sufficiently determine structures such as the Ringkøbing-Fyn High as seen with seismics with the help of glacial isostatic adjustment modelling.

  7. Effect of six days of staging on physiologic adjustments and acute mountain sickness during ascent to 4300 meters.

    PubMed

    Beidleman, Beth A; Fulco, Charles S; Muza, Stephen R; Rock, Paul B; Staab, Janet E; Forte, Vincent A; Brothers, Michael D; Cymerman, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of 6 days (d) of staging at 2200 m on physiologic adjustments and acute mountain sickness (AMS) during rapid, high-risk ascent to 4300 m. Eleven sea-level (SL) resident men (means +/- SD; 21 +/- 3 yr; 78 +/- 13 kg) completed resting measures of end-tidal CO(2) (Petco(2)), arterial oxygen saturation (Sao(2)), heart rate (HR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) at SL and within 1 h of exposure to 4300 m in a hypobaric chamber prior to 6 d of staging at 2200 m (preSTG) and on the summit of Pikes Peak following 6 d of staging at 2200 m (postSTG). Immediately following resting ventilation measures, all performed submaximal exercise ( approximately 55% of altitude-specific maximal oxygen uptake) for approximately 2 h on a bicycle ergometer to induce higher levels of AMS. AMS-C, calculated from the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire, was measured following 4 h and 8 h of exposure at preSTG and postSTG, and the mean was calculated. Resting Petco(2) (mmHg) was unchanged from SL (39.8 +/- 2.6) to preSTG (39.3 +/- 3.0), but decreased (p < 0.05) from preSTG to postSTG (32.8 +/- 2.6). Resting Sao(2) (%) decreased (p < 0.05) from SL (97 +/- 2) to preSTG (80 +/- 4) and increased (p < 0.05) from preSTG to postSTG (83 +/- 3). Resting HR (bpm) and MAP (mmHg) did not change in any of the test conditions. The incidence and severity of AMS-C decreased (p < 0.05) from preSTG (91 +/- 30%; 1.05 +/- 0.56) to postSTG (45 +/- 53%; 0.59 +/- 0.43), respectively. These results suggest that modest physiologic adjustments induced by staging for 6 d at 2200 m reduced the incidence and severity of AMS during rapid, high-risk ascent to 4300 m. PMID:19775215

  8. Analytical investigation of turbines with adjustable stator blades and effect of these turbines on jet-engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silvern, David H; Slivka, William R

    1950-01-01

    Adjustable-stator turbines are applied to turbojet engines and probable performance is compared with conventional engines with and without variable-area exhaust nozzles. Variation in stator-exit angle and exhaust area was not excessive for wide ranges of engine output. Variation in turbine efficiency for contemporary turbines equipped with adjustable stators was small. Improvements from 4.5 to 17 percent in over-all engine specific fuel consumption over conventional engines and from 2 to 8.5 percent over engines equipped with only adjustable-area exhaust nozzles were obtained at 60-percent rated power with adjustable-stator turbines and variable-area exhaust nozzles. The improvements depend on design parameters.

  9. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  10. Shrinkage Estimation of Varying Covariate Effects Based On Quantile Regression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Limin; Xu, Jinfeng; Kutner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Varying covariate effects often manifest meaningful heterogeneity in covariate-response associations. In this paper, we adopt a quantile regression model that assumes linearity at a continuous range of quantile levels as a tool to explore such data dynamics. The consideration of potential non-constancy of covariate effects necessitates a new perspective for variable selection, which, under the assumed quantile regression model, is to retain variables that have effects on all quantiles of interest as well as those that influence only part of quantiles considered. Current work on l1-penalized quantile regression either does not concern varying covariate effects or may not produce consistent variable selection in the presence of covariates with partial effects, a practical scenario of interest. In this work, we propose a shrinkage approach by adopting a novel uniform adaptive LASSO penalty. The new approach enjoys easy implementation without requiring smoothing. Moreover, it can consistently identify the true model (uniformly across quantiles) and achieve the oracle estimation efficiency. We further extend the proposed shrinkage method to the case where responses are subject to random right censoring. Numerical studies confirm the theoretical results and support the utility of our proposals. PMID:25332515

  11. Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical parameter adjustments to exercise: effect of a probiotic in horses during training.

    PubMed

    Art, T; Votion, D; McEntee, K; Amory, H; Linden, A; Close, R; Lekeux, P

    1994-01-01

    Two randomly distributed groups of thoroughbred horses were compared during a 12-week period for their cardio-respiratory and metabolic adjustment to strenuous exercise, training and detraining. The horses were trained following the same standardized schedule and were regularly investigated using standardized treadmill exercise tests (SET) of increasing speed. After the first SET and during the whole experimental period, a group of 6 horses received a probiotic (Bioracing) once a day while a group of 5 horses received a placebo. All other conditions were similar for both groups. During each SET, the oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, tidal volume (inspired volume), respiratory rate and expired minute volume were obtained using 2 ultrasonic pneumotachographs and a mass spectrometer. All the parameters were the mean of the values calculated during the last 20 s of the SET. Heart rate was continuously measured with a polar horse tester. Venous blood was sampled before and after the test and analyzed for various biochemical parameters. In both groups, training induced significant modification in most of the cardio-respiratory parameters, ie peak oxygen uptake, peak carbon dioxide output, respiratory exchange ratio, ventilation/min to oxygen-uptake ratio and oxygen-uptake to heart-rate ratio. After the 3-week detraining period, most of the values were again similar to the pre-training values in both groups. However, the training-induced modifications of most of the cardio-respiratory parameters occurred earlier and were proportionally greater in the probiotic-treated group than in the control. The respiratory coefficient decreased in the control but not in the treated group. All other parameters changed similarly in both groups. This suggests that Bioracing could modify the physiological effects of training by improving some aerobic metabolic capacities for carbohydrate utilization, but that this effect occurs only during training and not during periods of physical

  12. 3D viscosity maps for Greenland and effect on GRACE mass balance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Xu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE satellite mission measures mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. To correct for glacial isostatic adjustment numerical models are used. Although generally found to be a small signal, the full range of possible GIA models has not been explored yet. In particular, low viscosities due to a wet mantle and high temperatures due to the nearby Iceland hotspot could have a significant effect on GIA gravity rates. The goal of this study is to present a range of possible viscosity maps, and investigate the effect on GRACE mass balance estimates. Viscosity is derived using flow laws for olivine. Mantle temperature is computed from global seismology models, based on temperature derivatives for different mantle compositions. An indication for grain sizes is obtained by xenolith findings at a few locations. We also investigate the weakening effect of the presence of melt. To calculate gravity rates, we use a finite-element GIA model with the 3D viscosity maps and the ICE-5G loading history. GRACE mass balances for mascons in Greenland are derived with a least-squares inversion, using separate constraints for the inland and coastal areas in Greenland. Biases in the least-squares inversion are corrected using scale factors estimated from a simulation based on a surface mass balance model (Xu et al., submitted to The Cryosphere). Model results show enhanced gravity rates in the west and south of Greenland with 3D viscosity maps, compared to GIA models with 1D viscosity. The effect on regional mass balance is up to 5 Gt/year. Regional low viscosity can make present-day gravity rates sensitivity to ice thickness changes in the last decades. Therefore, an improved ice loading history for these time scales is needed.

  13. Evaluating lidar point densities for effective estimation of aboveground biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Stoker, Jason; Vogel, John M.; Velasco, Miguel G.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) was recently established to provide airborne lidar data coverage on a national scale. As part of a broader research effort of the USGS to develop an effective remote sensing-based methodology for the creation of an operational biomass Essential Climate Variable (Biomass ECV) data product, we evaluated the performance of airborne lidar data at various pulse densities against Landsat 8 satellite imagery in estimating above ground biomass for forests and woodlands in a study area in east-central Arizona, U.S. High point density airborne lidar data, were randomly sampled to produce five lidar datasets with reduced densities ranging from 0.5 to 8 point(s)/m2, corresponding to the point density range of 3DEP to provide national lidar coverage over time. Lidar-derived aboveground biomass estimate errors showed an overall decreasing trend as lidar point density increased from 0.5 to 8 points/m2. Landsat 8-based aboveground biomass estimates produced errors larger than the lowest lidar point density of 0.5 point/m2, and therefore Landsat 8 observations alone were ineffective relative to airborne lidar for generating a Biomass ECV product, at least for the forest and woodland vegetation types of the Southwestern U.S. While a national Biomass ECV product with optimal accuracy could potentially be achieved with 3DEP data at 8 points/m2, our results indicate that even lower density lidar data could be sufficient to provide a national Biomass ECV product with accuracies significantly higher than that from Landsat observations alone.

  14. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  15. Sensitivity analyses for parametric causal mediation effect estimation.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jeffrey M; Wang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Causal mediation analysis uses a potential outcomes framework to estimate the direct effect of an exposure on an outcome and its indirect effect through an intermediate variable (or mediator). Causal interpretations of these effects typically rely on sequential ignorability. Because this assumption is not empirically testable, it is important to conduct sensitivity analyses. Sensitivity analyses so far offered for this situation have either focused on the case where the outcome follows a linear model or involve nonparametric or semiparametric models. We propose alternative approaches that are suitable for responses following generalized linear models. The first approach uses a Gaussian copula model involving latent versions of the mediator and the final outcome. The second approach uses a so-called hybrid causal-observational model that extends the association model for the final outcome, providing a novel sensitivity parameter. These models, while still assuming a randomized exposure, allow for unobserved (as well as observed) mediator-outcome confounders that are not affected by exposure. The methods are applied to data from a study of the effect of mother education on dental caries in adolescence. PMID:25395683

  16. Sensitivity analyses for parametric causal mediation effect estimation

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Causal mediation analysis uses a potential outcomes framework to estimate the direct effect of an exposure on an outcome and its indirect effect through an intermediate variable (or mediator). Causal interpretations of these effects typically rely on sequential ignorability. Because this assumption is not empirically testable, it is important to conduct sensitivity analyses. Sensitivity analyses so far offered for this situation have either focused on the case where the outcome follows a linear model or involve nonparametric or semiparametric models. We propose alternative approaches that are suitable for responses following generalized linear models. The first approach uses a Gaussian copula model involving latent versions of the mediator and the final outcome. The second approach uses a so-called hybrid causal-observational model that extends the association model for the final outcome, providing a novel sensitivity parameter. These models, while still assuming a randomized exposure, allow for unobserved (as well as observed) mediator-outcome confounders that are not affected by exposure. The methods are applied to data from a study of the effect of mother education on dental caries in adolescence. PMID:25395683

  17. Concurrent estimation of efficiency, effectiveness and returns to scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodakarami, Mohsen; Shabani, Amir; Farzipoor Saen, Reza

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, data envelopment analysis (DEA) has been widely used to assess both efficiency and effectiveness. Accurate measurement of overall performance is a product of concurrent consideration of these measures. There are a couple of well-known methods to assess both efficiency and effectiveness. However, some issues can be found in previous methods. The issues include non-linearity problem, paradoxical improvement solutions, efficiency and effectiveness evaluation in two independent environments: dividing an operating unit into two autonomous departments for performance evaluation and problems associated with determining economies of scale. To overcome these issues, this paper aims to develop a series of linear DEA methods to estimate efficiency, effectiveness, and returns to scale of decision-making units (DMUs), simultaneously. This paper considers the departments of a DMU as a united entity to recommend consistent improvements. We first present a model under constant returns to scale (CRS) assumption, and examine its relationship with one of existing network DEA model. We then extend model under variable returns to scale (VRS) condition, and again its relationship with one of existing network DEA models is discussed. Next, we introduce a new integrated two-stage additive model. Finally, an in-depth analysis of returns to scale is provided. A case study demonstrates applicability of the proposed models.

  18. Assessing Planning Ability Across the Adult Life Span: Population-Representative and Age-Adjusted Reliability Estimates for the Tower of London (TOL-F).

    PubMed

    Kaller, Christoph P; Debelak, Rudolf; Köstering, Lena; Egle, Johanna; Rahm, Benjamin; Wild, Philipp S; Blettner, Maria; Beutel, Manfred E; Unterrainer, Josef M

    2016-03-01

    Planning ahead the consequences of future actions is a prototypical executive function. In clinical and experimental neuropsychology, disc-transfer tasks like the Tower of London (TOL) are commonly used for the assessment of planning ability. Previous psychometric evaluations have, however, yielded a poor reliability of measuring planning performance with the TOL. Based on theory-grounded task analyses and a systematic problem selection, the computerized TOL-Freiburg version (TOL-F) was developed to improve the task's psychometric properties for diagnostic applications. Here, we report reliability estimates for the TOL-F from two large samples collected in Mainz, Germany (n = 3,770; 40-80 years) and in Vienna, Austria (n = 830; 16-84 years). Results show that planning accuracy on the TOL-F possesses an adequate internal consistency and split-half reliability (>0.7) that are stable across the adult life span while the TOL-F covers a broad range of graded difficulty even in healthy adults, making it suitable for both research and clinical application. PMID:26715472

  19. Estimating Effects of Multipath Propagation on GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Sung; Hajj, George; Young, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    Multipath Simulator Taking into Account Reflection and Diffraction (MUSTARD) is a computer program that simulates effects of multipath propagation on received Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. MUSTARD is a very efficient means of estimating multipath-induced position and phase errors as functions of time, given the positions and orientations of GPS satellites, the GPS receiver, and any structures near the receiver as functions of time. MUSTARD traces each signal from a GPS satellite to the receiver, accounting for all possible paths the signal can take, including all paths that include reflection and/or diffraction from surfaces of structures near the receiver and on the satellite. Reflection and diffraction are modeled by use of the geometrical theory of diffraction. The multipath signals are added to the direct signal after accounting for the gain of the receiving antenna. Then, in a simulation of a delay-lock tracking loop in the receiver, the multipath-induced range and phase errors as measured by the receiver are estimated. All of these computations are performed for both right circular polarization and left circular polarization of both the L1 (1.57542-GHz) and L2 (1.2276-GHz) GPS signals.

  20. Effects of sampling standardization on estimates of Phanerozoic marine diversification

    PubMed Central

    Alroy, J.; Marshall, C. R.; Bambach, R. K.; Bezusko, K.; Foote, M.; Fürsich, F. T.; Hansen, T. A.; Holland, S. M.; Ivany, L. C.; Jablonski, D.; Jacobs, D. K.; Jones, D. C.; Kosnik, M. A.; Lidgard, S.; Low, S.; Miller, A. I.; Novack-Gottshall, P. M.; Olszewski, T. D.; Patzkowsky, M. E.; Raup, D. M.; Roy, K.; Sepkoski, J. J.; Sommers, M. G.; Wagner, P. J.; Webber, A.

    2001-01-01

    Global diversity curves reflect more than just the number of taxa that have existed through time: they also mirror variation in the nature of the fossil record and the way the record is reported. These sampling effects are best quantified by assembling and analyzing large numbers of locality-specific biotic inventories. Here, we introduce a new database of this kind for the Phanerozoic fossil record of marine invertebrates. We apply four substantially distinct analytical methods that estimate taxonomic diversity by quantifying and correcting for variation through time in the number and nature of inventories. Variation introduced by the use of two dramatically different counting protocols also is explored. We present sampling-standardized diversity estimates for two long intervals that sum to 300 Myr (Middle Ordovician-Carboniferous; Late Jurassic-Paleogene). Our new curves differ considerably from traditional, synoptic curves. For example, some of them imply unexpectedly low late Cretaceous and early Tertiary diversity levels. However, such factors as the current emphasis in the database on North America and Europe still obscure our view of the global history of marine biodiversity. These limitations will be addressed as the database and methods are refined. PMID:11353852

  1. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation Of Plume Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip T.; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing in order to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modem photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1-3 degrees. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10(exp 8)- 10(exp 13) particles per cubic meter. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  2. The effect of high leverage points on the maximum estimated likelihood for separation in logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Syaiba Balqish; Midi, Habshah; Arasan, Jayanthi; Rana, Md Sohel

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the performance of the maximum estimated likelihood estimator in the presence of separation in the space of the independent variables and high leverage points. The maximum likelihood estimator suffers from the problem of non overlap cases in the covariates where the regression coefficients are not identifiable and the maximum likelihood estimator does not exist. Consequently, iteration scheme fails to converge and gives faulty results. To remedy this problem, the maximum estimated likelihood estimator is put forward. It is evident that the maximum estimated likelihood estimator is resistant against separation and the estimates always exist. The effect of high leverage points are then investigated on the performance of maximum estimated likelihood estimator through real data sets and Monte Carlo simulation study. The findings signify that the maximum estimated likelihood estimator fails to provide better parameter estimates in the presence of both separation, and high leverage points.

  3. Estimation of optical proximity effect caused by mask fabrication error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamon, Kazuya; Hanawa, Tetsuro; Moriizumi, Koichi

    1997-07-01

    To get wide lithography latitudes in ULSI fabrication, an optical proximity correction system is being widely used. We previously demonstrated that the optical proximity effect is highly dependent on beam interference conditions. By using an aperture with a spindle shaped opaque region and a controlling interference beam number optimized for imaging, we can obtain a high correction accuracy of less than +/- 0.01 micrometers for all kinds of pattern. To put the optical proximity correction into practical use, we must fabricate the corrected mask either by an EB or a laser writing system. But during mask writing, there is another problematic proximity effect. The optical proximity effect caused by mask fabrication error is becoming a serious problem. In this paper, we estimate the optical proximity effect caused by mask fabrication error. For EB writing, the mask feature size of 0.35 micrometers line changes dramatically in a space less than 0.8 micrometers in size; this is not tolerable. For a large pitch pattern, modified illumination reduces the DOF to 0 micrometers . Otherwise, laser writing stably fabricates a mask feature size for a 0.35 micrometers line, and the modified illumination reduces the optical proximity effect. This resist feature fluctuation is binary, so, correcting the mask pattern is easy. Although, it was wrongly thought that for larger pitch pattern, the DOF was reduced by the modified illumination, the DOF reduction actually came from the combination of the two proximity effects. Using an accurate mask produced by a laser writer, we do not observe any DOF reduction in modified illumination. Moreover, this has led to development of an optical proximity correction system with EB proximity correction.

  4. Effectiveness of Group Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) in Changing Child Behavior, Parenting Style, and Parental Adjustment: An Intervention Study in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Kato, Noriko; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a group-based family intervention program known as the Group Positive Parenting Program (Triple P), with families in Japan. Reductions in children's behavioral problems, changes in dysfunctional parenting practices, and affects on parenting adjustment were examined. Participants of…

  5. 42 CFR 495.211 - Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.211 Section 495... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to Medicare Advantage (MA) Organizations § 495.211 Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated...

  6. 42 CFR 495.211 - Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.211 Section 495... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to Medicare Advantage (MA) Organizations § 495.211 Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated...

  7. 42 CFR 495.211 - Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.211 Section 495... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to Medicare Advantage (MA) Organizations § 495.211 Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent MA payment years with respect to MA EPs and MA-affiliated...

  8. The Peer Group as a Context: Moderating Effects on Relations between Maternal Parenting and Social and School Adjustment in Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xinyin; Chang, Lei; He, Yunfeng; Liu, Hongyun

    2005-01-01

    This 2-year longitudinal study examined, in a sample of Chinese children (initial M age=11 years), the moderating effects of the peer group on relations between maternal supportive parenting and social and school adjustment. Data were collected from multiple sources including peer assessments, teacher ratings, school records, and maternal reports.…

  9. The Effects of Economic and Social Stressors on Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment of African-American Families. CEIC Research Brief, No. 109.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald

    This study examines economic and social stressors and their effects on the parenting styles and adolescent adjustment of African American families. It systematically characterizes and explains the nature of some of the chronic economic and social stressors experienced by poor African American families as they affect parenting and adolescent…

  10. Language Adjustment of International Students in the US: A Social Network Analysis on the Effects of Language Resources, Language Norm and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The study explores factors that enhance or inhibit the language adjustment of international students in the U.S. Using social network influence model, the study examines the effects of language resources, language norm, and technology use on international students' self-confidence in overall English skills and four subskills, namely, listening,…

  11. Growing up in a Dangerous Developmental Milieu: The Effects of Parenting Processes on Adjustment in Inner-City African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T.; Pickering, Lloyd E.; Bolland, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the protective effects of parenting processes on measures of adolescent adjustment (health-compromising and violent behaviors) in a sample of high-risk, inner-city, poor African American youth N = 2,867). Parenting processes played an important role in this dangerous developmental milieu. For male…

  12. Kinematic analysis of a spatial mechanism for estimating shaking effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, P. S. S.; Satyadevi, A.; Gopala Krishna, A.; Eswaraiah, K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial mechanisms are the most general category of kinematic devices. They offer the greatest capability to accomplish any desired kinematic task. A mechanism exerts forces and moments on its supporting frame, which result in vibration. Besides of its effect on efficiency, reducing vibration has become inevitable in the current industrial environment where stern standards on noise and vibration prevail. Balancing of shaking forces and shaking moments in mechanisms is important in order to improve their dynamic performance and fatigue life by reducing vibration, noise and wear. The analysis and synthesis of spatial mechanisms which involves extensive vector mathematics and linear algebra is to be simplified to be taught to engineers in undergraduate education. In the present paper the kinematic analysis of a spatial four-link RSCR mechanism is done to get the velocities and accelerations of its various links which is necessary for the estimation of inertia forces in a mechanism.

  13. A review of causal estimation of effects in mediation analyses.

    PubMed

    Ten Have, Thomas R; Joffe, Marshall M

    2012-02-01

    We describe causal mediation methods for analysing the mechanistic factors through which interventions act on outcomes. A number of different mediation approaches have been presented in the biomedical, social science and statistical literature with an emphasis on different aspects of mediation. We review the different sets of assumptions that allow identification and estimation of effects in the simple case of a single intervention, a temporally subsequent mediator and outcome. These assumptions include various no confounding assumptions including sequential ignorability assumptions and also interaction assumptions involving the treatment and mediator. The understanding of such assumptions is crucial since some can be assessed under certain conditions (e.g. treatment-mediator interactions), whereas others cannot (sequential ignorability). These issues become more complex with multiple mediators and longitudinal outcomes. In addressing these assumptions, we review several causal approaches to mediation analyses. PMID:21163849

  14. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation of Plume Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Each of the six Apollo mission landers touched down at unique sites on the lunar surface. Aside from the Apollo 12 landing site located 180 meters from the Surveyor III lander, plume impingement effects on ground hardware during the landings were largely not an issue. The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. With high vacuum conditions on the moon (10 (exp -14) to 10 (epx -12) torr), motion of all particles is completely ballistic. Estimates from damage to the Surveyor III show that the ejected regolith particles to be anywhere 400 m/s to 2500 m/s. It is imperative to understand the physics of plume impingement to safely design landing sites for the Constellation Program.

  15. Systemic estimation of the effect of photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Eugenia A.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Volkova, Anna I.; Posypanova, Anna M.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer needs objective estimation and its unification in experimental as well as in clinical studies. They must include not only macroscopical changes but also the complex of following morphological criteria: (1) the level of direct tumor damage (direct necrosis and apoptosis); (2) the level of indirect tumor damage (ischemic necrosis); (3) the signs of vascular alterations; (4) the local and systemic antiblastome resistance; (5) the proliferative activity and malignant potential of survival tumor tissue. We have performed different regimes PDT using phthalocyanine derivatives. The complex of morphological methods (Ki-67, p53, c-myc, bcl-2) was used. Obtained results showed the connection of the tilted morphological criteria with tumor regression.

  16. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  17. Tools and techniques for estimating high intensity RF effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.; Pennock, S.; Poggio, A.; Ray, S.

    1991-07-01

    With the ever-increasing dependence of modern aircraft on sophisticated avionics and electronic controls, the need to assure aircraft survivatality when exposed to high Intensity RF (HIRF) signals has become of great Interest. Advisory regulation is currently being proposed which would require testing and/or analysis to assure RF hardness of installed flight critical and flight essential equipment. While full-aircraft, full-threat testing may be the most thorough manner to assure survivability, it is not generally practical in loins of cost. Various combinations of limited full-aircraft testing, box-level testing, modeling, and analysis are also being considered as methods to achieve compliance. Modeling, analysis, and low power measurements may hold the key to making full-system survivability estimates at reasonable cost. In this paper we will describe some of the tools and techniques we use for estimating and measuring coupling and component disturbance. A finite difference time domain modeling code, TSAR, used to predict coupling will be described. This code has the capability to quickly generate a mesh model to represent the test object. Some recent applications as well as the advantages and limitations of using such a code will be described. We will also describe some of the facilities and techniques we have developed for making low power coupling measurements and for making direct injection test measurements of device disturbance. Some scaling laws for coupling and device effects will be presented. A method to extrapolate these low-power test results to high-power full-system effects will be presented.

  18. Estimating cumulative effects of clearcutting on stream temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Stream Segment Temperature Model was used to estimate cumulative effects of large-scale timber harvest on stream temperature. Literature values were used to create parameters for the model for two hypothetical situations, one forested and the other extensively clearcut. Results compared favorably with field studies of extensive forest canopy removal. The model provided insight into the cumulative effects of clearcutting. Change in stream shading was, as expected, the most influential factor governing increases in maximum daily water temperature, accounting for 40% of the total increase. Altered stream width was found to be more influential than changes to air temperature. Although the net effect from clearcutting was a 4oC warming, increased wind and reduced humidity tended to cool the stream. Temperature increases due to clearcutting persisted 10 km downstream into an unimpacted forest segment of the hypothetical stream, but those increases were moderated by cooler equilibrium conditions downstream. The model revealed that it is a complex set of factors, not single factors such as shade or air temperature, that governs stream temperature dynamics.

  19. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding on branched-chain amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Bradley, David; Schweitzer, George G; Finck, Brian N; Eagon, J Christopher; Ilkayeva, Olga; Newgard, Christopher B; Klein, Samuel

    2013-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that a greater decline in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) after weight loss induced by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery than after calorie restriction alone has independent effects on glucose homeostasis, possibly by decreased signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We evaluated plasma BCAAs and their C3 and C5 acylcarnitine metabolites, muscle mTOR phosphorylation, and insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose Rd) in obese subjects before and after ~20% weight loss induced by RYGB (n = 10, BMI 45.6 ± 6.7 kg/m(2)) or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) (n = 10, BMI 46.5 ± 8.8 kg/m(2)). Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated glucose Rd by ~55%, decreased total plasma BCAA and C3 and C5 acylcarnitine concentrations by 20-35%, and did not alter mTOR phosphorylation; no differences were detected between surgical groups (all P values for interaction >0.05). Insulin-stimulated glucose Rd correlated negatively with plasma BCAAs and with C3 and C5 acylcarnitine concentrations (r values -0.56 to -0.75, P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that weight loss induced by either LAGB or RYGB causes the same decline in circulating BCAAs and their C3 and C5 acylcarnitine metabolites. Plasma BCAA concentration is negatively associated with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism(s) responsible for this relationship is not known. PMID:23610059

  20. Estimation of capture probabilities using generalized estimating equations and mixed effects approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akanda, Md Abdus Salam; Alpizar-Jara, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Modeling individual heterogeneity in capture probabilities has been one of the most challenging tasks in capture–recapture studies. Heterogeneity in capture probabilities can be modeled as a function of individual covariates, but correlation structure among capture occasions should be taking into account. A proposed generalized estimating equations (GEE) and generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) approaches can be used to estimate capture probabilities and population size for capture–recapture closed population models. An example is used for an illustrative application and for comparison with currently used methodology. A simulation study is also conducted to show the performance of the estimation procedures. Our simulation results show that the proposed quasi-likelihood based on GEE approach provides lower SE than partial likelihood based on either generalized linear models (GLM) or GLMM approaches for estimating population size in a closed capture–recapture experiment. Estimator performance is good if a large proportion of individuals are captured. For cases where only a small proportion of individuals are captured, the estimates become unstable, but the GEE approach outperforms the other methods. PMID:24772290

  1. Use of two dosimeters for better estimation of effective dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Hyeong

    Obviously, a single dosimeter on the chest can underestimate effective dose (E) and effective dose equivalent (HE) significantly when radiation comes from the back because the dosimeter on the chest is shielded by the body of a radiation worker. This problem can be solved by using an extra dosimeter on the back so that at least one dosimeter is always directly exposed to radiation. In this work, the use of two dosimeters was studied using the MCNP code and mathematical phantoms. First, an optimal combination of dosimeter weighting factors was found to be 0.58 and 0.42 for chest and back dosimeters, respectively, through a systematic optimization process. The optimal algorithm, which uses these weighting factors, was superior to other algorithms reported in the literature. The underestimation problem when using a single-dosimeter approach for posterior incident radiation was completely solved by using two dosimeters and the optimal algorithm. The two-dosimeter approach also estimated E and HE very well for a broad range of frontal incident photon beams, neither underestimating E or HE by more than 11%, nor overestimating by more than about 50%. Although the use of two dosimeters effectively solved the underestimation problem of the single-dosimeter approach for posterior incident radiation, this approach overestimated E and HE for lateral, overhead, and underfoot beam directions. However, this overestimation can be reduced by using suitably selected anisotropic-responding dosimeters. To study the effect of anisotropic-responding properties of personal dosimeters on the estimation of E and HE, this work considered several types of anisotropic-responding dosimeters. In practical exposure situations, radiation workers move during exposure, which results in less overestimation of E and HE than static lateral, overhead, and underfoot exposures. To quantify the reduction of the overestimation by the movement of radiation workers, we averaged photon beam results over

  2. Estimation of the isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity of group IV and group III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D. T.; Heremans, J. P.; Slack, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    The isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity for group IV and group III-V semiconductors is calculated using the Debye-Callaway model modified to include both transverse and longitudinal phonon modes explicitly. The frequency and temperature dependences of the normal and umklapp phonon-scattering rates are kept the same for all compounds. The model requires as adjustable parameters only the longitudinal and transverse phonon Grüneisen constants and the effective sample diameter. The model can quantitatively account for the observed isotope effect in diamond and germanium but not in silicon. The magnitude of the isotope effect is predicted for silicon carbide, boron nitride, and gallium nitride. In the case of boron nitride the predicted increase in the room-temperature thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment is in excess of 100%. Finally, a more general method of estimating normal phonon-scattering rate coefficients for other types of solids is presented.

  3. Effects on pulmonary health of neighboring residents of concentrated animal feeding operations: exposure assessed using optimized estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja; Römmelt, Horst; Ehrenstein, Vera; van Strien, Rob; Praml, Georg; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Nowak, Dennis; Radon, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Potential adverse health effects of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), which were also shown in the authors' Lower Saxony Lung Study, are of public concern. The authors aimed to investigate pulmonary health effect of neighboring residents assessed using optimized estimation technique. Annual ammonia emission was measured to assess the emission from CAFO and from surrounding fields. Location of sampling points was optimized using cluster analysis. Individual exposure of 457 nonfarm subjects was interpolated by weighting method. Mean estimated annual ammonia levels varied between 16 and 24 μg/m³. Higher exposed participants were more likely to be sensitized against ubiquitous allergens as compared to lower exposed subjects (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-13.2). In addition, they showed a significantly lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁) (adjusted mean difference in % of predicted -8%; 95% CI -13% to -3%). The authors' previous findings that CAFOs may contribute to burden of respiratory diseases were confirmed by this study. PMID:21864103

  4. Rate adjusters for Medicare under capitation

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.

    1986-01-01

    This article addresses three issues related to capitation. First, the average adjusted per capita cost (AAPCC) fluctuates with the mix of risks in the fee-for-service system. More sensitive adjusters in the AAPCC are needed. Second, the AAPCC, as now estimated, exhibits large geographic variance; so-called shrinkage estimators may help. Third, the AAPCC requires new adjusters to yield more homogeneous risk classes. Otherwise, the portion of the Medicare population under capitation may experience access problems at alternative delivery systems: Until such adjusters are developed, it seems better to rely upon a blend of capitation and fee-for-service than the present AAPCC. PMID:10311926

  5. FMRI group analysis combining effect estimates and their variances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Nath, Audrey R; Beauchamp, Michael S; Cox, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) group analysis makes two key assumptions that are not always justified. First, the data from each subject is condensed into a single number per voxel, under the assumption that within-subject variance for the effect of interest is the same across all subjects or is negligible relative to the cross-subject variance. Second, it is assumed that all data values are drawn from the same Gaussian distribution with no outliers. We propose an approach that does not make such strong assumptions, and present a computationally efficient frequentist approach to FMRI group analysis, which we term mixed-effects multilevel analysis (MEMA), that incorporates both the variability across subjects and the precision estimate of each effect of interest from individual subject analyses. On average, the more accurate tests result in higher statistical power, especially when conventional variance assumptions do not hold, or in the presence of outliers. In addition, various heterogeneity measures are available with MEMA that may assist the investigator in further improving the modeling. Our method allows group effect t-tests and comparisons among conditions and among groups. In addition, it has the capability to incorporate subject-specific covariates such as age, IQ, or behavioral data. Simulations were performed to illustrate power comparisons and the capability of controlling type I errors among various significance testing methods, and the results indicated that the testing statistic we adopted struck a good balance between power gain and type I error control. Our approach is instantiated in an open-source, freely distributed program that may be used on any dataset stored in the universal neuroimaging file transfer (NIfTI) format. To date, the main impediment for more accurate testing that incorporates both within- and cross-subject variability has been the high computational cost. Our efficient implementation makes this approach

  6. Estimating anatomical trajectories with Bayesian mixed-effects modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, G.; Penny, W.D.; Ridgway, G.R.; Ourselin, S.; Friston, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a mass-univariate framework for the analysis of whole-brain structural trajectories using longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry data and Bayesian inference. Our approach to developmental and aging longitudinal studies characterizes heterogeneous structural growth/decline between and within groups. In particular, we propose a probabilistic generative model that parameterizes individual and ensemble average changes in brain structure using linear mixed-effects models of age and subject-specific covariates. Model inversion uses Expectation Maximization (EM), while voxelwise (empirical) priors on the size of individual differences are estimated from the data. Bayesian inference on individual and group trajectories is realized using Posterior Probability Maps (PPM). In addition to parameter inference, the framework affords comparisons of models with varying combinations of model order for fixed and random effects using model evidence. We validate the model in simulations and real MRI data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. We further demonstrate how subject specific characteristics contribute to individual differences in longitudinal volume changes in healthy subjects, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). PMID:26190405

  7. Estimating anatomical trajectories with Bayesian mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, G; Penny, W D; Ridgway, G R; Ourselin, S; Friston, K J

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a mass-univariate framework for the analysis of whole-brain structural trajectories using longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry data and Bayesian inference. Our approach to developmental and aging longitudinal studies characterizes heterogeneous structural growth/decline between and within groups. In particular, we propose a probabilistic generative model that parameterizes individual and ensemble average changes in brain structure using linear mixed-effects models of age and subject-specific covariates. Model inversion uses Expectation Maximization (EM), while voxelwise (empirical) priors on the size of individual differences are estimated from the data. Bayesian inference on individual and group trajectories is realized using Posterior Probability Maps (PPM). In addition to parameter inference, the framework affords comparisons of models with varying combinations of model order for fixed and random effects using model evidence. We validate the model in simulations and real MRI data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. We further demonstrate how subject specific characteristics contribute to individual differences in longitudinal volume changes in healthy subjects, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). PMID:26190405

  8. Effects of measurement error on horizontal hydraulic gradient estimates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J F; McElwee, C D

    2007-01-01

    During the design of a natural gradient tracer experiment, it was noticed that the hydraulic gradient was too small to measure reliably on an approximately 500-m(2) site. Additional wells were installed to increase the monitored area to 26,500 m(2), and wells were instrumented with pressure transducers. The resulting monitoring system was capable of measuring heads with a precision of +/-1.3 x 10(-2) m. This measurement error was incorporated into Monte Carlo calculations, in which only hydraulic head values were varied between realizations. The standard deviation in the estimated gradient and the flow direction angle from the x-axis (east direction) were calculated. The data yielded an average hydraulic gradient of 4.5 x 10(-4)+/-25% with a flow direction of 56 degrees southeast +/-18 degrees, with the variations representing 1 standard deviation. Further Monte Carlo calculations investigated the effects of number of wells, aspect ratio of the monitored area, and the size of the monitored area on the previously mentioned uncertainties. The exercise showed that monitored areas must exceed a size determined by the magnitude of the measurement error if meaningful gradient estimates and flow directions are to be obtained. The aspect ratio of the monitored zone should be as close to 1 as possible, although departures as great as 0.5 to 2 did not degrade the quality of the data unduly. Numbers of wells beyond three to five provided little advantage. These conclusions were supported for the general case with a preliminary theoretical analysis. PMID:17257340

  9. The effects of baseline estimation on the reliability, validity, and precision of CBM-R growth estimates.

    PubMed

    Van Norman, Ethan R; Christ, Theodore J; Zopluoglu, Cengiz

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the effect of baseline estimation on the quality of trend estimates derived from Curriculum Based Measurement of Oral Reading (CBM-R) progress monitoring data. The authors used a linear mixed effects regression (LMER) model to simulate progress monitoring data for schedules ranging from 6-20 weeks for datasets with high and low levels of residual variance (poor and good quality datasets respectively). Three observations per day for the first three days of data collection were generated for baseline estimation. As few as one and as many as nine observations were used to calculate baseline. The number of weeks of progress monitoring and the quality of the dataset were highly influential on the reliability, validity, and precision of simulated growth estimates. Results supported the use of using the median of three observations collected on the first day to estimate baseline, particularly when the first observation of that day systematically underestimated student performance. Collecting a large number of observations to estimate baseline does not appear to improve the quality of CBM-R growth estimates. PMID:23937103

  10. Estimating the Roles of Genetic Risk, Perinatal Risk, and Marital Hostility on Early Childhood Adjustment: Medical Records and Self-Reports.

    PubMed

    Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Marceau, Kristine; De Araujo-Greecher, Marielena; Ganiban, Jody M; Mayes, Linda C; Shaw, Daniel S; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of perinatal risk factors have been linked to later developmental outcomes in children. Much of this work has relied on either birth/medical records or mothers' self-reports collected after delivery, and there has been an ongoing debate about which strategy provides the most accurate and reliable data. This report uses a parent-offspring adoption design (N = 561 families) to (1) examine the correspondence between medical record data and self-report data, (2) examine how perinatal risk factors may influence child internalizing and externalizing behavior at age 4.5 years, and (3) explore interactions among genetic, perinatal risk, and rearing environment on child internalizing and externalizing behavior during early childhood. The agreement of self-reports and medical records data was relatively high (51-100 %), although there was some variation based on the construct. There were few main effects of perinatal risk on child outcomes; however, there were several 2- and 3-way interactions suggesting that the combined influences of genetic, perinatal, and rearing environmental risks are important, particularly for predicting whether children exhibit internalizing versus externalizing symptoms at age 4.5 years. PMID:27075497

  11. The Effect of Undergraduate GPA Selectivity Adjustment on Pre-interview Ranking of Rural Medical School Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Gregory Eastham; Blue, Amy Victoria; Basco, William Thomas, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Almost all U.S. medical schools adjust applicants' GPAs based on the selectivity of applicants' undergraduate institutions. Analysis of data from 2,033 in-state applicants to the Medical University of South Carolina, 1996-99, found that this practice did not adversely affect the number of rural applicants offered admission interviews. (SV)

  12. The Effects of Work Intensity on Adolescent Mental Health, Achievement and Behavioral Adjustment: New Evidence from a Prospective Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Jeylan T.; And Others

    This longitudinal study examined adolescents' mental health, academic achievement, and behavioral adjustment in relation to work intensity during high school. Data were collected from approximately 1,000 adolescents during a 4-year period, beginning in the subjects' freshman year of high school. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed…

  13. Effects of Autistic Traits on Social and School Adjustment in Children and Adolescents: The Moderating Roles of Age and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Mei-Ni; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hui-Yi; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the associations between children's and adolescents' autistic-like social deficits and school and social adjustment as well as the moderating roles of age and gender in these associations. The sample consisted of 1321 students (48.7% boys) in Grade 1 to Grade 8 from northern Taiwan. Children's and adolescents' autistic-like…

  14. The Adjustment Process for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: The Effect of Perceived Premorbid Sense of Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Daniel C.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perceived changes in sense of coherence from pre- to postinjury and adjustment for a group of individuals with spinal cord injury. It was hypothesized that after a spinal cord injury, an individual's belief that he or she had significantly reduced his or her sense of coherence would be associated…

  15. The Effects of Child Sexual Abuse in Later Family Life; Mental Health, Parenting and Adjustment of Offspring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ron; O'Connor, Tom; Dunn, Judy; Golding, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate links between child sexual abuse (occurring before 13 years), later mental health, family organization, parenting behaviors, and adjustment in offspring. Method: The present study investigates a subsample of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children an ongoing study of women and their families in the area of…

  16. The sensitivity of health effect estimates from time-series studies to fine particulate matter component sampling schedule.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Sheppard, Lianne; Hannigan, Michael P; Dutton, Steven J; Peel, Jennifer L; Clark, Maggie L; Vedal, Sverre

    2013-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency air pollution monitoring data have been a valuable resource commonly used for investigating the associations between short-term exposures to PM2.5 chemical components and human health. However, the temporally sparse sampling on every third or sixth day may affect health effect estimation. We examined the impact of non-daily monitoring data on health effect estimates using daily data from the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study. Daily concentrations of four PM2.5 chemical components (elemental and organic carbon, sulfate, and nitrate) and hospital admission counts from 2003 through 2007 were used. Three every-third-day time series were created from the daily DASH monitoring data, imitating the US Speciation Trend Network (STN) monitoring schedule. A fourth, partly irregular, every-third-day time series was created by matching existing sampling days at a nearby STN monitor. Relative risks (RRs) of hospital admissions for PM2.5 components at lags 0-3 were estimated for each data set, adjusting for temperature, relative humidity, longer term temporal trends, and day of week using generalized additive models, and compared across different sampling schedules. The estimated RRs varied somewhat between the non-daily and daily sampling schedules and between the four non-daily schedules, and in some instances could lead to different conclusions. It was not evident which features of the data or analysis were responsible for the variation in effect estimates, although seeing similar variability in resampled data sets with relaxation of the every-third-day constraint suggests that limited power may have had a role. The use of non-daily monitoring data can influence interpretation of estimated effects of PM2.5 components on hospital admissions in time-series studies. PMID:23673462

  17. Adjustable perineal male sling using tissue expander as an effective treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Melih; Tuncel, Altug; Bilgin, Ovunc; Aslan, Yilmaz; Atan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report our intermediate experience in treating patients with severe incontinence using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander. Materials and Methods An adjustable male sling procedure was performed on 21 patients with severe incontinence. The underlying etiology of urinary incontinence was radical prostatectomy in 13 patients, open prostatectomy in 5 patients and transurethral prostate resection in 3 patients. The difference between the classical and the adjustable sling is that in the latter there is a 25 mL tissue expander between the two layers of polypropylene mesh with an injection port. Adjustment of the sling was performed with saline via an inflation port, in case of recurrence or persistence of incontinence. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.2±7.3 (50-79) years and mean pad usage was 6.4±0.6 per day. The mean follow-up time was 40.1±23.2 (6-74) months. The balloon was postoperatively inflated on average with 11.6±5.7 (5-25) mL. After the mean 40.1 months of follow-up, 16 of the 21 patients (76.2%) were dry (11 patients, 0 pads; 5 patients using safety pads), 3 patients (14%) had mild and 2 (9.8%) had moderate degree post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI). The average maximum urine flow rate of the patients was 15.6±4.7 (10-31) mL/s. No residual urine was found. In 2 patients, all parts of the device were removed due to infection and discomfort, and in 3 patients only the inflation component was removed due to local scrotal infection. Conclusions Our results show that using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander seems to be an efficient, and safe surgical treatment option in patients with PPI. PMID:26005973

  18. Effects of autistic traits on social and school adjustment in children and adolescents: the moderating roles of age and gender.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mei-Ni; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Huang, Hui-Yi; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the associations between children's and adolescents' autistic-like social deficits and school and social adjustment as well as the moderating roles of age and gender in these associations. The sample consisted of 1321 students (48.7% boys) in Grade 1 to Grade 8 from northern Taiwan. Children's and adolescents' autistic-like social deficits were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and their school and social adjustment (i.e., academic performance, negative attitudes toward schoolwork/teachers/classmates, behavioral problems at schools, negative peer relationships, and problems with peers) were assessed using the Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents (SAICA). Both measures were completed by the mothers of the participants. Results from the linear mixed models demonstrated that autistic-like social deficits were associated with poor academic performance, negative attitudes toward schoolwork, teachers, and classmates, behavioral problems at schools, negative peer relationships, and problematic peer interactions. Moreover, gender and/or age moderated the associations between autistic-like social deficits and school and social adjustment problems. For example, autistic-like social deficits were more strongly related to negative school attitude, school social problems, and negative peer relationships in boys than in girls. Further, autistic-like social deficits were more strongly related to problems with peers in older girls than in older boys or younger children (regardless of gender). In conclusion, the present study suggests that autistic-like social deficits may place children and adolescents at increased risk for social and school maladjustment and that the extent of maladjustment may vary with the child's age and gender and the domains of adjustment under discussion. PMID:22960068

  19. Effect of packing density on strain estimation by Fry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Ojha, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Fry method is a graphical technique that uses relative movement of material points, typically the grain centres or centroids, and yields the finite strain ellipse as the central vacancy of a point distribution. Application of the Fry method assumes an anticlustered and isotropic grain centre distribution in undistorted samples. This assumption is, however, difficult to test in practice. As an alternative, the sedimentological degree of sorting is routinely used as an approximation for the degree of clustering and anisotropy. The effect of the sorting on the Fry method has already been explored by earlier workers. This study tests the effect of the tightness of packing, the packing density%, which equals to the ratio% of the area occupied by all the grains and the total area of the sample. A practical advantage of using the degree of sorting or the packing density% is that these parameters, unlike the degree of clustering or anisotropy, do not vary during a constant volume homogeneous distortion. Using the computer graphics simulations and the programming, we approach the issue of packing density in four steps; (i) generation of several sets of random point distributions such that each set has same degree of sorting but differs from the other sets with respect to the packing density%, (ii) two-dimensional homogeneous distortion of each point set by various known strain ratios and orientation, (iii) estimation of strain in each distorted point set by the Fry method, and, (iv) error estimation by comparing the known strain and those given by the Fry method. Both the absolute errors and the relative root mean squared errors give consistent results. For a given degree of sorting, the Fry method gives better results in the samples having greater than 30% packing density. This is because the grain centre distributions show stronger clustering and a greater degree of anisotropy with the decrease in the packing density. As compared to the degree of sorting alone, a

  20. Proxies for site effect estimation: can statistics help us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, G.; Cadet, H.; De Rubeis, V.; Theodoulidis, N.; Bard, P.-Y.; Di Giulio, G.

    2012-04-01

    The earthquake site response is one of the causes of different damage level at nearby sites. Its assessment is possibly based on empirical methods using the earthquake recordings. However, when limited resources and/or recorded earthquakes are not available, several proxies are used. In this framework the standard spectral ratio (SSR) is considered the reference empirical method to detect amplification as a function of frequency, but other estimates can be easily obtained from noise measurements. The ambient noise is largely used to compute the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVN) and the Rayleigh-wave dispersion curve (DC). The first method, HVN, realistically indicates the fundamental frequency but, for the majority of the worldwide-examined sites, its reliability in terms of amplitude is controversial. The dispersion curve, DC, instead, is inverted to obtain the shear-wave velocity profile below the station and to compute the average shear-wave velocity in the first 30 meters (Vs30); the Vs30 parameter is then used as a most common proxy of site effect, even though it is presently criticized because it cannot represent alone the main physics of site response. Using a well-known statistical tool, the canonical correlation analysis, we verify and quantify the relationship between HVN and SSR measured at the same sites, and between DC and SSR computed for another database. We studied the correlation between SSR and HVN using recordings from 64 sites worldwide and we show that linear combinations of the HVN amplitudes in different frequency intervals are significantly correlated to linear combinations of the SSR. These results can be used to estimate the expected SSR spectral ratio from the recorded HVN curve at sites located in the same investigated areas. The canonical correlation between SSR and DC has been studied on a set of theoretical dispersion curves and transfer functions, computed from shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles measured at more than 400

  1. Estimating the Effects of Detection Heterogeneity and Overdispersion on Trends Estimated from Avian Point Counts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point counts are a common method for sampling avian distribution and abundance. Though methods for estimating detection probabilities are available, many analyses use raw counts and do not correct for detectability. We use a removal model of detection within an N-mixture approa...

  2. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-12-15

    calculated to be 0.124 mSv (ICRP60) [0.134 mSv (ICRP103)]. This is less than 75% of that predicted by scaling of the PA mA s ratio. This lower dose was due to changes in the focal-spot-to-skin distance, effective changes in collimation with projection angle, rounding down of the mA s step, and variations in organ exposure to the primary x-ray beam for each view. Large errors in dose estimation can occur if these factors are not accurately modeled. Conclusions: The effective dose of a chest examination with this chest tomosynthesis system is about twice that of a two-view chest examination and less than 2% of the published average values for thoracic CT. It is shown that complete consideration of the tomosynthesis acquisition technique and geometry is required for accurate determination of the effective dose to the patient. Tomosynthesis provides three-dimensional imaging at a dose level comparable to a two-view chest x-ray examination and may provide a low dose alternative to thoracic CT for obtaining depth information in chest imaging.

  3. Effects of changing stance conditions on anticipatory postural adjustment and reaction time to voluntary arm movement in humans.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Kowalewski, R; Nakazawa, K; Colombo, G

    2000-04-15

    1. The effect on reaction time (RT) and anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) of unexpectedly changing stance conditions was studied using a push or pull arm movement task. The aim was to evaluate the modifiability of RT and APA by an external perturbation associated with an automatic compensatory reaction. 2. Subjects standing on a moveable platform were asked to push or pull a rigid handle as quickly and as strongly as possible in response to the 'go-signal', a visual signal from a green or red light-emitting diode. Forward and backward translations of the platform were randomly induced at four time intervals after the go-signal. In some experiments to detect unspecific arousal there were no platform translations but an acoustic signal was given before the go-signal. Surface electromyographic activity (EMG) of upper arm and lower leg muscles was analysed. 3. During the push task both RT and the duration of APA (onset of APA till the force signal indicating hand action) were shorter during backward than during forward translation. During the pull task the effect of platform translations was the reverse. The delay between go-signal and onset of APA remained constant. Consequently, RT and APA became shorter when the platform was translated in the same direction as that in which the upper body was displaced by the push or pull movement, and longer when it was translated in the opposite direction. The effects were maximal when translations were induced 250 ms after the go-signal, but a difference was detected up to 375 ms. 4. Furthermore, with forward and backward platform translations RT was shorter when the translations were induced early rather than late after the go-signal. This was associated with a shortening of the delay between the go-signal and onset of APA, while APA duration remained constant. The shortened RT was in the range of that obtained when an acoustic signal was given just before the go-signal. 5. It is concluded that (i) both the RT and the

  4. Effects of live weight adjusted feeding strategy on plasma indicators of energy balance in Holstein cows managed for extended lactation.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, C; Vestergaard, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Sehested, J

    2016-04-01

    In early lactation, most of the dairy cows are in negative energy balance; the extent and duration depend in part on the feeding strategy. Previous studies showed an increased lactation milk yield by use of a live weight (LW) adjusted feeding strategy with a high energy diet before and a reduced energy diet after LW nadir compared with a standard diet throughout lactation. The objective of the present study was to examine how such an individualized feeding strategy affects plasma indicators of energy status. It was hypothesized that an energy-enriched diet until LW nadir will reduce the severity of the negative energy balance, and that the reduction in diet energy concentration from LW nadir will extend the negative energy balance period further. Sixty-two Holstein cows (30% first parity) were managed for 16 months extended lactation and randomly allocated to one of two feeding strategies at calving. Two partially mixed rations were used, one with a high energy density (HD) and a 50 : 50 forage : concentrate ratio, and one with a lower energy density (LD, control diet) and a 60 : 40 forage : concentrate ratio. Half of the cows were offered the HD diet until they reached at least 42 days in milk and a LW gain⩾0 kg/day based on a 5-days LW average, and were then shifted to the LD diet (strategy HD-LD). The other half of the cows were offered the LD diet throughout lactation (control strategy LD-LD). Weekly blood samples were drawn for analysis of plasma metabolites and hormones. Before the shift in diet, the HD-LD cows had higher glucose and lower beta-hydroxybutyrate and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations than the LD-LD cows. After the shift until 36 weeks after calving, plasma NEFA was higher in HD-LD than LD-LD cows. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 were not affected by the feeding strategy. To conclude, in early lactation, the energy-enriched diet reduced the negative energy balance. Plasma NEFA was higher in HD-LD than LD-LD cows from

  5. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothée; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA+) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA−) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We imputed 8,961 classical HLA alleles, amino acids, and SNPs from Immunochip data in a discovery set of 2,406 ACPA− RA case and 13,930 control individuals. We developed a statistical approach to identify and adjust for clinical heterogeneity within ACPA− RA and observed independent associations for serine and leucine at position 11 in HLA-DRβ1 (p = 1.4 × 10−13, odds ratio [OR] = 1.30) and for aspartate at position 9 in HLA-B (p = 2.7 × 10−12, OR = 1.39) within the peptide binding grooves. These amino acid positions induced associations at HLA-DRB1∗03 (encoding serine at 11) and HLA-B∗08 (encoding aspartate at 9). We validated these findings in an independent set of 427 ACPA− case subjects, carefully phenotyped with a highly sensitive ACPA assay, and 1,691 control subjects (HLA-DRβ1 Ser11+Leu11: p = 5.8 × 10−4, OR = 1.28; HLA-B Asp9: p = 2.6 × 10−3, OR = 1.34). Although both amino acid sites drove risk of ACPA+ and ACPA− disease, the effects of individual residues at HLA-DRβ1 position 11 were distinct (p < 2.9 × 10−107). We also identified an association with ACPA+ RA at HLA-A position 77 (p = 2.7 × 10−8, OR = 0.85) in 7,279 ACPA+ RA case and 15,870 control subjects. These results contribute to mounting evidence that ACPA+ and ACPA− RA are genetically distinct and potentially have separate autoantigens contributing to pathogenesis. We expect that our approach might have broad applications in analyzing clinical conditions with heterogeneity at both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC regions. PMID:24656864

  6. Psychophysical estimation of speed discrimination. II. Aging effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuram, Aparna; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Khanna, Ritu

    2005-10-01

    We studied the effects of aging on a speed discrimination task using a pair of first-order drifting luminance gratings. Two reference speeds of 2 and 8 deg/s were presented at stimulus durations of 500 ms and 1000 ms. The choice of stimulus parameters, etc., was determined in preliminary experiments and described in Part I. Thresholds were estimated using a two-alternative-forced-choice staircase methodology. Data were collected from 16 younger subjects (mean age 24 years) and 17 older subjects (mean age 71 years). Results showed that thresholds for speed discrimination were higher for the older age group. This was especially true at stimulus duration of 500 ms for both slower and faster speeds. This could be attributed to differences in temporal integration of speed with age. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were not statistically observed to mediate age differences in the speed discrimination thresholds. Gender differences were observed in the older age group, with older women having higher thresholds.

  7. Effective Fingerprint Quality Estimation for Diverse Capture Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Shin, Jinwook; Park, Dong Sun

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the quality of fingerprints in advance can be beneficial for improving the performance of fingerprint recognition systems. The representative features to assess the quality of fingerprint images from different types of capture sensors are known to vary. In this paper, an effective quality estimation system that can be adapted for different types of capture sensors is designed by modifying and combining a set of features including orientation certainty, local orientation quality and consistency. The proposed system extracts basic features, and generates next level features which are applicable for various types of capture sensors. The system then uses the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to determine whether or not an image should be accepted as input to the recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed method can perform better than previous methods in terms of accuracy. In the meanwhile, the proposed method has an ability to eliminate residue images from the optical and capacitive sensors, and the coarse images from thermal sensors. PMID:22163632

  8. The effects of numerical-model complexity and observation type on estimated porosity values

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Green, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The relative merits of model complexity and types of observations employed in model calibration are compared. An existing groundwater flow model coupled with an advective transport simulation of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah (USA), is adapted for advective transport, and effective porosity is adjusted until simulated tritium concentrations match concentrations in samples from wells. Two calibration approaches are used: a “complex” highly parameterized porosity field and a “simple” parsimonious model of porosity distribution. The use of an atmospheric tracer (tritium in this case) and apparent ages (from tritium/helium) in model calibration also are discussed. Of the models tested, the complex model (with tritium concentrations and tritium/helium apparent ages) performs best. Although tritium breakthrough curves simulated by complex and simple models are very generally similar, and there is value in the simple model, the complex model is supported by a more realistic porosity distribution and a greater number of estimable parameters. Culling the best quality data did not lead to better calibration, possibly because of processes and aquifer characteristics that are not simulated. Despite many factors that contribute to shortcomings of both the models and the data, useful information is obtained from all the models evaluated. Although any particular prediction of tritium breakthrough may have large errors, overall, the models mimic observed trends.

  9. The effects of numerical-model complexity and observation type on estimated porosity values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Green, Christopher T.

    2015-09-01

    The relative merits of model complexity and types of observations employed in model calibration are compared. An existing groundwater flow model coupled with an advective transport simulation of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah (USA), is adapted for advective transport, and effective porosity is adjusted until simulated tritium concentrations match concentrations in samples from wells. Two calibration approaches are used: a "complex" highly parameterized porosity field and a "simple" parsimonious model of porosity distribution. The use of an atmospheric tracer (tritium in this case) and apparent ages (from tritium/helium) in model calibration also are discussed. Of the models tested, the complex model (with tritium concentrations and tritium/helium apparent ages) performs best. Although tritium breakthrough curves simulated by complex and simple models are very generally similar, and there is value in the simple model, the complex model is supported by a more realistic porosity distribution and a greater number of estimable parameters. Culling the best quality data did not lead to better calibration, possibly because of processes and aquifer characteristics that are not simulated. Despite many factors that contribute to shortcomings of both the models and the data, useful information is obtained from all the models evaluated. Although any particular prediction of tritium breakthrough may have large errors, overall, the models mimic observed trends.

  10. Parental physical punishment and adolescent adjustment: bidirectionality and the moderation effects of child ethnicity and parental warmth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Te; Kenny, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This study used cross-lagged modeling to examine reciprocal relations between maternal and paternal physical punishment and adolescent misconduct and depressive symptoms, while accounting for stability in both physical punishment and adjustment problems over time. Data were drawn from a sample of 862 two-parent families and their adolescent children (52 % males; 54 % European American; 44 % African American; 2 % other ethnic backgrounds). Mothers' and fathers' physical punishment of their adolescents' ages 12 and 14 predicted increased misconduct and depressive symptoms among these adolescents at ages 14 and 16. Adolescent misconduct, but not depressive symptoms, at ages 12 and 14 predicted increased physical punishment by their parents at ages 14 and 16. Neither parental warmth nor child ethnicity moderated the longitudinal relationship between parental physical punishment and adolescent adjustment. Patterns of findings were similar across mothers and fathers. PMID:24384596

  11. Effects of molybdenum on water utilization, antioxidative defense system and osmotic-adjustment ability in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songwei; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Nie, Zhaojun; Sun, Xuecheng

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum (Mo), as an essential trace element in plants, plays an essential role in abiotic stress tolerance of plants. To obtain a better understanding of drought tolerance enhanced by Mo, a hydroponic trial was conducted to investigate the effects of Mo on water utilization, antioxidant enzymes, non-enzymatic antioxidants, and osmotic-adjustment products in the Mo-efficient '97003' and Mo-inefficient '97014' under PEG simulated drought stress. Our results indicate that Mo application significantly enhanced Pn, chlorophyll, dry matter, grain yield, biomass, RWC and WUE and decreased Tr, Gs and water loss of wheat under drought stress, suggesting that Mo application improved the water utilization capacity in wheat. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants content such as ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, carotenoid were significantly increased and malonaldehyde contents were decreased by Mo application under PEG simulated drought stress, suggesting that Mo application enhanced the ability of scavenging active oxygen species. The osmotic-adjustment products such as soluble protein, proline and soluble sugar were also increased by Mo application under PEG simulated drought stress, indicating that Mo improved the osmotic adjustment ability in wheat. It is hypothesized that Mo application might improve the drought tolerance of wheat by enhancing water utilization capability and the abilities of antioxidative defense and osmotic adjustment. Similarities and differences between the Mo-efficient and Mo-inefficient cultivars wheat in response to Mo under drought stress are discussed. PMID:25221925

  12. Three-dimensional adjustment of trilateration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, L.-Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional locations of the monuments in the USGS Hollister trilateration network were adjusted to fit line length observations observed in 1977, using a Bayesian approach, and incorporating prior elevation estimates as data in the adjustment procedure. No significant discrepancies in the measured line lengths were found, but significant elevation adjustments (up to 1.85 m) were needed to fit the length data.

  13. Estimating the Effects of Parental Divorce and Death With Fixed Effects Models.

    PubMed

    Amato, Paul R; Anthony, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    The authors used child fixed effects models to estimate the effects of parental divorce and death on a variety of outcomes using 2 large national data sets: (a) the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (kindergarten through the 5th grade) and (b) the National Educational Longitudinal Study (8th grade to the senior year of high school). In both data sets, divorce and death were associated with multiple negative outcomes among children. Although evidence for a causal effect of divorce on children was reasonably strong, effect sizes were small in magnitude. A second analysis revealed a substantial degree of variability in children's outcomes following parental divorce, with some children declining, others improving, and most not changing at all. The estimated effects of divorce appeared to be strongest among children with the highest propensity to experience parental divorce. PMID:24659827

  14. A Generalized DIF Effect Variance Estimator for Measuring Unsigned Differential Test Functioning in Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Algina, James

    2006-01-01

    One approach to measuring unsigned differential test functioning is to estimate the variance of the differential item functioning (DIF) effect across the items of the test. This article proposes two estimators of the DIF effect variance for tests containing dichotomous and polytomous items. The proposed estimators are direct extensions of the…

  15. A prospective study of the effects of marital status and family relations on young children's adjustment among African American and European American families.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D S; Winslow, E B; Flanagan, C

    1999-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of divorce and family relations on young children's development prospectively, using an ethnically diverse sample of approximately 300 low-income families. We also were able to examine the moderating effects of ethnicity on child adjustment in always two-parent, to-be-divorced, already-divorced, and always single-parent families. Results indicated that to-be-divorced European American and African American families demonstrated higher rates of preschool-age behavior problems, and already-divorced families showed similar trends. Parental conflict and behavior problems accounted for predivorce differences in child behavior problems, whereas rejecting parenting accounted for differences in problem behavior between always single-parent and always two-parent families. The results are discussed in terms of the importance of ethnicity in influencing young, low-income children's adjustment to different family structures. PMID:10368919

  16. Comparative cost-effectiveness of 11 oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention in schizophrenia within Singapore using effectiveness estimates from a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Zhao, Ying J; Zhou, Hui J; Khoo, Ai L; Teng, Monica; Soh, Lay B; Lim, Boon P; Sim, Kang

    2016-03-01

    This study modelled the cost-effectiveness of 11 oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention among patients with remitted schizophrenia in Singapore. A network meta-analysis determined the relative efficacy and tolerability of 11 oral antipsychotics (amisulpride, aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, haloperidol, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, sulpiride, trifluoperazine and ziprasidone). The clinical estimates were applied in a Markov model to estimate lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years gained. Quality-of-life data were obtained from published literature. Resource utilization and cost data were retrieved from local hospital databases. The annual direct cost of healthcare services for a patient experiencing a relapse episode was three-fold that of a patient not in relapse of schizophrenia. The most favourable pharmacological treatment for relapse prevention was olanzapine with an annual probability of relapse of 0.24 (0.13-0.38) with placebo as a reference of 0.75 (0.73-0.78). Olanzapine emerged as the dominant treatment with the highest quality-adjusted life-years gained and lowest lifetime costs. Ziprasidone, aripiprazole and paliperidone incurred higher lifetime costs compared with no treatment. Probability and cost of relapse were key drivers of cost-effectiveness in sensitivity analyses. The data can help prescribers in choosing appropriate treatment and payers in allocating resources for the clinical management of this serious psychiatric disorder. PMID:26619182

  17. Positional accommodative intraocular lens power error induced by the estimation of the corneal power and the effective lens position

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, David P; Camps, Vicente J; Ramón, María L; Mateo, Verónica; Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictability of the refractive correction achieved with a positional accommodating intraocular lenses (IOL) and to develop a potential optimization of it by minimizing the error associated with the keratometric estimation of the corneal power and by developing a predictive formula for the effective lens position (ELP). Materials and Methods: Clinical data from 25 eyes of 14 patients (age range, 52–77 years) and undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of the accommodating IOL Crystalens HD (Bausch and Lomb) were retrospectively reviewed. In all cases, the calculation of an adjusted IOL power (PIOLadj) based on Gaussian optics considering the residual refractive error was done using a variable keratometric index value (nkadj) for corneal power estimation with and without using an estimation algorithm for ELP obtained by multiple regression analysis (ELPadj). PIOLadj was compared to the real IOL power implanted (PIOLReal, calculated with the SRK-T formula) and also to the values estimated by the Haigis, HofferQ, and Holladay I formulas. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between PIOLReal and PIOLadj when ELPadj was used (P = 0.10), with a range of agreement between calculations of 1.23 D. In contrast, PIOLReal was significantly higher when compared to PIOLadj without using ELPadj and also compared to the values estimated by the other formulas. Conclusions: Predictable refractive outcomes can be obtained with the accommodating IOL Crystalens HD using a variable keratometric index for corneal power estimation and by estimating ELP with an algorithm dependent on anatomical factors and age. PMID:26139807

  18. 76 FR 4395 - Postal Service Price Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Postal Service Price Adjustment AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a recently-filed Postal Service request to establish price adjustments for all market... with the Commission announcing price adjustments, effective April 17, 2011, affecting all...

  19. Adjustment to College in Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine college adjustment in students reporting an ADHD diagnosis and the effect of medication treatment on students' adjustment. Method: 1,648 first-semester freshmen attending a public and a private university completed a Web-based survey to examine their adjustment to college. Results: Compared with 200 randomly selected control…

  20. Dimensions of Adjustment among College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson-Clarke, Saundra

    1998-01-01

    Examines academic, social, and personal-emotional adjustment, as well as institutional attachment for women (N=198) attending a predominantly white coeducational research university. Significant main effects were found on academic achievement for year in college. Students differed on personal-emotional adjustment by race. Academic adjustment and…

  1. A note on variance estimation in random effects meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Kurex; Jonkman, Jeffrey N

    2005-01-01

    For random effects meta-regression inference, variance estimation for the parameter estimates is discussed. Because estimated weights are used for meta-regression analysis in practice, the assumed or estimated covariance matrix used in meta-regression is not strictly correct, due to possible errors in estimating the weights. Therefore, this note investigates the use of a robust variance estimation approach for obtaining variances of the parameter estimates in random effects meta-regression inference. This method treats the assumed covariance matrix of the effect measure variables as a working covariance matrix. Using an example of meta-analysis data from clinical trials of a vaccine, the robust variance estimation approach is illustrated in comparison with two other methods of variance estimation. A simulation study is presented, comparing the three methods of variance estimation in terms of bias and coverage probability. We find that, despite the seeming suitability of the robust estimator for random effects meta-regression, the improved variance estimator of Knapp and Hartung (2003) yields the best performance among the three estimators, and thus may provide the best protection against errors in the estimated weights. PMID:16078388

  2. Estimating Peer Effects in Swedish High School Using School, Teacher, and Student Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sund, Krister

    2009-01-01

    In this paper I use a rich dataset in order to observe each student in different subjects and courses over time. Unlike most peer studies, I identify the peers and the teachers that each student has had in every classroom. This enables me to handle the simultaneity and selection problems, which are inherent in estimating peer effects in the…

  3. Estimating Effects of Arsenic Exposure During Pregnancy on Perinatal Outcomes in a Bangladeshi Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Andres; Rodrigues, Ema; Mazumdar, Maitreyi; Dobson, Christine; Golam, Mostofa; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmudar; Christiani, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between arsenic and birth weight is not well understood. The objective was to evaluate the causal relationship between prenatal arsenic exposure and birth weight considering the potential mediation effects of gestational age and maternal weight gain during pregnancy using structural equation models. Methods: A prospectively enrolled cohort of pregnant women was recruited in Bangladesh from 2008 to 2011. Arsenic was measured in personal drinking water at the time of enrollment (gestational age <16 weeks, N = 1,140) and in toenails collected ≤1 month postpartum (N = 624) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Structural equation models estimated the direct and indirect effects of arsenic on birth weight with gestational age and maternal weight gain considered as mediating variables. Results: Every unit increase in natural log water arsenic was indirectly associated with decreased birth weight (β = −19.17 g, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −24.64, −13.69) after adjusting for other risk factors. This association was mediated entirely through gestational age (β = −17.37 g, 95% CI: −22.77, −11.98) and maternal weight gain during pregnancy (β = −1.80 g, 95% CI: −3.72, 0.13). When exposure was modeled using toenail arsenic concentrations, similar results were observed. Every increase in natural log toenail arsenic was indirectly associated with decreased birth weight (β = −15.72 g, 95% CI: −24.52, −6.91) which was mediated through gestational age (β = −13.59 g, 95% CI: −22.10, −5.07) and maternal weight gain during pregnancy (β = −2.13 g, 95% CI: −5.24, 0.96). Conclusion: Arsenic exposure during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight. The effect of arsenic on birth weight appears to be mediated mainly through decreasing gestational age and to a lesser extent by lower maternal weight gain during pregnancy. PMID:26583609

  4. The relationship between effectiveness and costs measured by a risk-adjusted case-mix system: multicentre study of Catalonian population data bases

    PubMed Central

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Blanca-Tamayo, Milagrosa; Velasco-Velasco, Soledad; Escribano-Herranz, Esperanza; Llopart-López, Josep Ramon; Violan-Fors, Concepción; Vilaseca-Llobet, Josep Maria; Sánchez-Fontcuberta, Encarna; Benavent-Areu, Jaume; Flor-Serra, Ferran; Aguado-Jodar, Alba; Rodríguez-López, Daniel; Prados-Torres, Alejandra; Estelrich-Bennasar, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Background The main objective of this study is to measure the relationship between morbidity, direct health care costs and the degree of clinical effectiveness (resolution) of health centres and health professionals by the retrospective application of Adjusted Clinical Groups in a Spanish population setting. The secondary objectives are to determine the factors determining inadequate correlations and the opinion of health professionals on these instruments. Methods/Design We will carry out a multi-centre, retrospective study using patient records from 15 primary health care centres and population data bases. The main measurements will be: general variables (age and sex, centre, service [family medicine, paediatrics], and medical unit), dependent variables (mean number of visits, episodes and direct costs), co-morbidity (Johns Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System) and effectiveness. The totality of centres/patients will be considered as the standard for comparison. The efficiency index for visits, tests (laboratory, radiology, others), referrals, pharmaceutical prescriptions and total will be calculated as the ratio: observed variables/variables expected by indirect standardization. The model of cost/patient/year will differentiate fixed/semi-fixed (visits) costs of the variables for each patient attended/year (N = 350,000 inhabitants). The mean relative weights of the cost of care will be obtained. The effectiveness will be measured using a set of 50 indicators of process, efficiency and/or health results, and an adjusted synthetic index will be constructed (method: percentile 50). The correlation between the efficiency (relative-weights) and synthetic (by centre and physician) indices will be established using the coefficient of determination. The opinion/degree of acceptance of physicians (N = 1,000) will be measured using a structured questionnaire including various dimensions. Statistical analysis: multiple regression analysis (procedure

  5. Estimates of the Effective Elastic Thickness: Any signs of agreement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan

    2016-04-01

    There is little controversy about the value of Te estimated from oceanic measurements of gravity and bathymetry. Its value is often obtained from the relationship between the free air gravity and bathymetry in the spectral domain. Estimates of Te from those few regions where there is good 2D bathymetric coverage give values which vary from 2-4 km for spreading ridges to ˜ 20 km for old lithosphere like that beneath Hawaii. There is a general belief that the elastic thickness is controlled by the depth of an isotherm whose value is ˜ 450°C, and that Te < T_s, the seismogenic thickness, which closely follows the 600°C isotherm. In contrast, there is no agreement between different estimates of Te from continents, most of which are based on Forsyth's method using the coherence between Bouguer gravity and topography. In regions of rough topography his approach gives estimates of Te that are similar to, though generally about double, those obtained from the free air gravity using the same approach as in the oceans. However, in regions with little topography, which includes most shields, the ratio between the two estimates often exceeds a factor of 5, with estimates of Te from Forsyth's method often exceeding 100 km, corresponding to a limiting isotherm of 1000°C or more. Laboratory experiments at such temperatures show that elastic stresses are relaxed in hours. This problem has generated a long running controversy. It is straightforward to show that estimates of Te from Bouguer gravity depend only on the ratio of the power spectra of free air gravity to topography when the two are incoherent (McK, 2015), and are independent of the actual value of T_e. In many shield regions the topography is indeed incoherent with the topography. No valid estimates of Te can then be obtained. However, it is nonetheless often possible to use the spectral ratio to estimate an upper bound on the value of T_e, which is generally < 30 km. Accurate maps of topography and gravity are now

  6. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  7. Adjustable sutures in children.

    PubMed

    Engel, J Mark; Guyton, David L; Hunter, David G

    2014-06-01

    Although adjustable sutures are considered a standard technique in adult strabismus surgery, most surgeons are hesitant to attempt the technique in children, who are believed to be unlikely to cooperate for postoperative assessment and adjustment. Interest in using adjustable sutures in pediatric patients has increased with the development of surgical techniques specific to infants and children. This workshop briefly reviews the literature supporting the use of adjustable sutures in children and presents the approaches currently used by three experienced strabismus surgeons. PMID:24924284

  8. The Effects of School-Based Maum Meditation Program on the Self-Esteem and School Adjustment in Primary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yang Gyeong; Lee, In Soo

    2013-01-01

    Self-esteem and school adjustment of children in the lower grades of primary school, the beginning stage of school life, have a close relationship with development of personality, mental health and characters of children. Therefore, the present study aimed to verify the effect of school-based Maum Meditation program on children in the lower grades of primary school, as a personality education program. The result showed that the experimental group with application of Maum Meditation program had significant improvements in self-esteem and school adjustment, compared to the control group without the application. In conclusion, since the study provides significant evidence that the intervention of Maum Meditation program had positive effects on self-esteem and school adjustment of children in the early stage of primary school, it is suggested to actively employ Maum Meditation as a school-based meditation program for mental health promotion of children in the early school ages, the stage of formation of personalities and habits. PMID:23777717

  9. Estimating the Effects of the Terminal Area Productivity Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Kostiuk, Peter F.; Hemm, Robert V., Jr.; Wingrove, Earl R., III; Shapiro, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    The report describes methods and results of an analysis of the technical and economic benefits of the systems to be developed in the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. A runway capacity model using parameters that reflect the potential impact of the TAP technologies is described. The runway capacity model feeds airport specific models which are also described. The capacity estimates are used with a queuing model to calculate aircraft delays, and TAP benefits are determined by calculating the savings due to reduced delays. The report includes benefit estimates for Boston Logan and Detroit Wayne County airports. An appendix includes a description and listing of the runway capacity model.

  10. Residential self-selection bias in the estimation of built environment effects on physical activity between adolescence and young adulthood

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Built environment research is dominated by cross-sectional designs, which are particularly vulnerable to residential self-selection bias resulting from health-related attitudes, neighborhood preferences, or other unmeasured characteristics related to both neighborhood choice and health-related outcomes. Methods We used cohort data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (United States; Wave I, 1994-95; Wave III, 2001-02; n = 12,701) and a time-varying geographic information system. Longitudinal relationships between moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) bouts and built and socioeconomic environment measures (landcover diversity, pay and public physical activity facilities per 10,000 population, street connectivity, median household income, and crime rate) from adolescence to young adulthood were estimated using random effects models (biased by unmeasured confounders) and fixed effects models (within-person estimator, which adjusts for unmeasured confounders that are stable over time). Results Random effects models yielded null associations except for negative crime-MVPA associations [coefficient (95% CI): -0.056 (-0.083, -0.029) in males, -0.061 (-0.090, -0.033) in females]. After controlling for measured and time invariant unmeasured characteristics using within-person estimators, MVPA was higher with greater physical activity pay facilities in males [coefficient (95% CI): 0.024 (0.006, 0.042)], and lower with higher crime rates in males [coefficient (95% CI): -0.107 (-0.140, -0.075)] and females [coefficient (95% CI): -0.046 (-0.083, -0.009)]. Other associations were null or in the counter-intuitive direction. Conclusions Comparison of within-person estimates to estimates unadjusted for unmeasured characteristics suggest that residential self-selection can bias associations toward the null, as opposed to its typical characterization as a positive confounder. Differential environment-MVPA associations by residential relocation

  11. Effect of adjusted pH prior to ultrafiltration of skim milk on membrane performance and physical functionality of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Vasiljevic, T; Ramchandran, L

    2016-02-01

    Processing conditions during ultrafiltration of skim milk influence properties of the casein micelle and thereby the physical properties of milk protein concentrate (MPC). The aim of the study was to establish the effects of pH adjustment of skim milk feed to obtain MPC with desired emulsification properties. The ultrafiltration was conducted using commercially pasteurized skim milk with the pH adjusted to 6.7 (control), 6.3, 5.9, or 5.5 at 15°C until a volume concentration factor of 5 was reached. Effects of pH adjustment on selected physico-chemical properties (Ca content, particle size, ζ-potential) and functionalities (solubility, heat stability, emulsification capacity, and stability) of MPC were determined. Lowering the feed pH solubilized colloidal calcium phosphate that substantially contributed to modifying the properties of casein. This caused a reduction in the particle size while increasing the net negative charge. The structural modifications in proteins were manifested in the Fourier transform infrared spectra. Subsequent concentration did not induce any further protein structural changes. Such modifications to the casein micelles and colloidal calcium phosphate negatively affected the solubility and heat stability of the corresponding MPC powders. However, the emulsion activity index improved only until the pH of the feed was lowered to 5.9 and declined when pH was dropped to 5.5, followed with the loss of stability. Readjusting the pH of MPC powder dispersions to 6.7 restored their surface properties and thereby their functionality. Lowering the feed pH also negatively affected the membrane performance by clogging the membrane pores and lowering the flux, particularly at pH 5.5. Adjusting pH to 5.9 produced MPC with optimum emulsifying properties with minimal influence on membrane performance. PMID:26686705

  12. Part 3. Estimating the effects of air pollution on mortality in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Vajanapoom, Nitaya; Ostro, Bart

    2010-11-01

    pollution and cold weather, with its associated adverse health problems. Multiday averages of PM10 generated even higher effect estimates. Our analysis of age- and disease-specific mortality indicated elevated ERs for young children, especially infants with respiratory illnesses, children less than 5 years of age with lower respiratory infections (LRIs), and people with asthma. Age-restricted analyses showed that the associations between mortality due to all natural causes and PM10 concentration increased with age, with the strongest effects among people aged 75 years and older. However, associations between increases in PM10 concentration and mortality were observed for all of the other age groups. With a few exceptions, relatively similar results were observed for several of the other pollutants-sulfur dioxide (SO2), NO2, O3, and NO, which were highly correlated with PM10. However, many of the effects from gaseous pollutants were attenuated in multipollutant models, while effects from PM10 appeared to be most consistent. In addition, there was some evidence of an independent effect of O3 for certain health outcomes. We conducted substantial sensitivity analyses to examine whether our results were robust. The results indicated that our core model was generally robust to the choice of model specification, spline model, degrees of freedom (df) of time-smoothing functions, lags for temperature, adjustment for autocorrelation, adjustment for epidemics, and adjustment for missing values using centered data (see the description of the centering method used in the Common Protocol found at the end of this volume). Finally, the concentration-response functions for most of the pollutants appear to be linear. Thus, our sensitivity analyses results suggest an impact of pollution on mortality in Bangkok that is fairly consistent. They also provide support for the extrapolation of results from health effects studies conducted in North America and Western Europe to other parts of the

  13. Evaluating the Feasibility of Fitting Haplotype Effects as Random: Variance Component Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fitting haplotypes as random effects in association studies may prevent overestimation of haplotypic effects with low frequencies. The objective was to determine whether haplotypic variance could be accurately estimated. Using simulation, haplotypic effects were deterministically assigned to eithe...

  14. Estimation of Intervention Effects in Seasonal Time-Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willson, Victor L.

    A model for the integrated moving averages process of order one, IMA (1, 1), having a seasonal (cyclic) component is presented. The model incorporates a parameter for possible change in level of the process after intervention, following methods developed by Box and Tiao (1965), and Glass, Willson, and Gottmann (1972). Least-squares estimates and…

  15. Effect of wind averaging time on wind erosivity estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) and Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ) are widely used for estimating the wind-induced soil erosion at a field scale. Wind is the principal erosion driver in the two models. The wind erosivity, which describes the capacity of wind to cause soil erosion is ...

  16. Attributes Effecting Software Testing Estimation; Is Organizational Trust an Issue?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammoud, Wissam

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative correlational research explored the potential association between the levels of organizational trust and the software testing estimation. This was conducted by exploring the relationships between organizational trust, tester's expertise, organizational technology used, and the number of hours, number of testers, and time-coding…

  17. Eliminating artificial trans fatty acids in Argentina: estimated effects on the burden of coronary heart disease and costs

    PubMed Central

    Elorriaga, Natalia; Garay, Osvaldo U; Poggio, Rosana; Caporale, Joaquin; Matta, Maria G; Augustovski, Federico; Pichon-Riviere, Andres; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the impact of Argentine policies to reduce trans fatty acids (TFA) on coronary heart disease (CHD), disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and associated health-care costs. Methods We estimated the baseline intake of TFA before 2004 to be 1.5% of total energy intake. We built a policy model including baseline intake of TFA, the oils and fats used to replace artificial TFAs, the clinical effect of reducing artificial TFAs and the costs and DALYs saved due to averted CHD events. To calculate the percentage of reduction of CHD, we calculated CHD risks on a population-based sample before and after implementation. The effect of the policies was modelled in three ways, based on projected changes: (i) in plasma lipid profiles; (ii) in lipid and inflammatory biomarkers; and (iii) the results of prospective cohort studies. We also estimated the present economic value of DALYs and associated health-care costs of coronary heart disease averted. Findings We estimated that projected changes in lipid profile would avert 301 deaths, 1066 acute CHD events, 5237 DALYs and 17 million United States dollars (US$) in health-care costs annually. Based on the adverse effects of TFA intake reported in prospective cohort studies, 1517 deaths, 5373 acute CHD events, 26 394 DALYs and US$ 87 million would be averted annually. Conclusion Even under the most conservative scenario, reduction of TFA intake had a substantial effect on public health. These findings will help inform decision-makers in Argentina and other countries on the potential public health and economic impact of this policy. PMID:26478625

  18. Continuously adjustable Pulfrich spectacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2011-03-01

    A number of Pulfrich 3-D movies and TV shows have been produced, but the standard implementation has inherent drawbacks. The movie and TV industries have correctly concluded that the standard Pulfrich 3-D implementation is not a useful 3-D technique. Continuously Adjustable Pulfrich Spectacles (CAPS) is a new implementation of the Pulfrich effect that allows any scene containing movement in a standard 2-D movie, which are most scenes, to be optionally viewed in 3-D using inexpensive viewing specs. Recent scientific results in the fields of human perception, optoelectronics, video compression and video format conversion are translated into a new implementation of Pulfrich 3- D. CAPS uses these results to continuously adjust to the movie so that the viewing spectacles always conform to the optical density that optimizes the Pulfrich stereoscopic illusion. CAPS instantly provides 3-D immersion to any moving scene in any 2-D movie. Without the glasses, the movie will appear as a normal 2-D image. CAPS work on any viewing device, and with any distribution medium. CAPS is appropriate for viewing Internet streamed movies in 3-D.

  19. Effects of Item Difficulty Heterogeneity on the Estimation of True-Score and Classification Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Judith A.; Welch, Catherine J.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect that large within-examinee item difficulty variability had on estimates of the proportion of consistent classification of examinees into mastery categories over two test administrations. The classification consistency estimate was based on a single test administration from an estimation procedure…

  20. The effect of errors-in-variables on variance component estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiliang

    2016-04-01

    Although total least squares (TLS) has been widely applied, variance components in an errors-in-variables (EIV) model can be inestimable under certain conditions and unstable in the sense that small random errors can result in very large errors in the estimated variance components. We investigate the effect of the random design matrix on variance component (VC) estimation of MINQUE type by treating the design matrix as if it were errors-free, derive the first-order bias of the VC estimate, and construct bias-corrected VC estimators. As a special case, we obtain a bias-corrected estimate for the variance of unit weight. Although TLS methods are statistically rigorous, they can be computationally too expensive. We directly Taylor-expand the nonlinear weighted LS estimate of parameters up to the second-order approximation in terms of the random errors of the design matrix, derive the bias of the estimate, and use it to construct a bias-corrected weighted LS estimate. Bearing in mind that the random errors of the design matrix will create a bias in the normal matrix of the weighted LS estimate, we propose to calibrate the normal matrix by computing and then removing the bias from the normal matrix. As a result, we can obtain a new parameter estimate, which is called the N-calibrated weighted LS estimate. The simulations have shown that (i) errors-in-variables have a significant effect on VC estimation, if they are large/significant but treated as non-random. The variance components can be incorrectly estimated by more than one order of magnitude, depending on the nature of problems and the sizes of EIV; (ii) the bias-corrected VC estimate can effectively remove the bias of the VC estimate. If the signal-to-noise is small, higher order terms may be necessary. Nevertheless, since we construct the bias-corrected VC estimate by directly removing the estimated bias from the estimate itself, the simulation results have clearly indicated that there is a great risk to obtain

  1. The effect of errors-in-variables on variance component estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiliang

    2016-08-01

    Although total least squares (TLS) has been widely applied, variance components in an errors-in-variables (EIV) model can be inestimable under certain conditions and unstable in the sense that small random errors can result in very large errors in the estimated variance components. We investigate the effect of the random design matrix on variance component (VC) estimation of MINQUE type by treating the design matrix as if it were errors-free, derive the first-order bias of the VC estimate, and construct bias-corrected VC estimators. As a special case, we obtain a bias-corrected estimate for the variance of unit weight. Although TLS methods are statistically rigorous, they can be computationally too expensive. We directly Taylor-expand the nonlinear weighted LS estimate of parameters up to the second-order approximation in terms of the random errors of the design matrix, derive the bias of the estimate, and use it to construct a bias-corrected weighted LS estimate. Bearing in mind that the random errors of the design matrix will create a bias in the normal matrix of the weighted LS estimate, we propose to calibrate the normal matrix by computing and then removing the bias from the normal matrix. As a result, we can obtain a new parameter estimate, which is called the N-calibrated weighted LS estimate. The simulations have shown that (i) errors-in-variables have a significant effect on VC estimation, if they are large/significant but treated as non-random. The variance components can be incorrectly estimated by more than one order of magnitude, depending on the nature of problems and the sizes of EIV; (ii) the bias-corrected VC estimate can effectively remove the bias of the VC estimate. If the signal-to-noise is small, higher order terms may be necessary. Nevertheless, since we construct the bias-corrected VC estimate by directly removing the estimated bias from the estimate itself, the simulation results have clearly indicated that there is a great risk to obtain

  2. Emotional adjustment and distressed interpersonal relations among low-income African American mothers: moderating effects of demanding kin relations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ronald D; Budescu, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Association of mothers' emotional adjustment and negative kin relations with distressed interpersonal relations was examined. Among 115 low-income African American mothers, relationship of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and demanding kin relations with psychological control and stressful interpersonal relations was assessed. Depressive symptoms and demanding kin relations were positively associated with mothers' use of psychological control in parenting. Interaction of self-esteem with demanding kin relations revealed that self-esteem was negatively associated with psychological control for mothers with high-demanding kin relations but not for mothers with low-demanding kin relations. Mothers' depressive symptoms and demanding kin relations were positively associated with their stressful interpersonal relations. Findings were discussed in terms of the need for research on the beneficial and detrimental aspects of families' social network. PMID:23356357

  3. Biased Exposure–Health Effect Estimates from Selection in Cohort Studies: Are Environmental Studies at Particular Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, David; Hu, Howard; Power, Melinda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The process of creating a cohort or cohort substudy may induce misleading exposure–health effect associations through collider stratification bias (i.e., selection bias) or bias due to conditioning on an intermediate. Studies of environmental risk factors may be at particular risk. Objectives We aimed to demonstrate how such biases of the exposure–health effect association arise and how one may mitigate them. Methods We used directed acyclic graphs and the example of bone lead and mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and ischemic heart disease) among 835 white men in the Normative Aging Study (NAS) to illustrate potential bias related to recruitment into the NAS and the bone lead substudy. We then applied methods (adjustment, restriction, and inverse probability of attrition weighting) to mitigate these biases in analyses using Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Analyses adjusted for age at bone lead measurement, smoking, and education among all men found HRs (95% CI) for the highest versus lowest tertile of patella lead of 1.34 (0.90, 2.00), 1.46 (0.86, 2.48), and 2.01 (0.86, 4.68) for all-cause, cardiovascular, and ischemic heart disease mortality, respectively. After applying methods to mitigate the biases, the HR (95% CI) among the 637 men analyzed were 1.86 (1.12, 3.09), 2.47 (1.23, 4.96), and 5.20 (1.61, 16.8), respectively. Conclusions Careful attention to the underlying structure of the observed data is critical to identifying potential biases and methods to mitigate them. Understanding factors that influence initial study participation and study loss to follow-up is critical. Recruitment of population-based samples and enrolling participants at a younger age, before the potential onset of exposure-related health effects, can help reduce these potential pitfalls. Citation Weisskopf MG, Sparrow D, Hu H, Power MC. 2015. Biased exposure–health effect estimates

  4. Misregistration's effects on classification and proportion estimation accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, R. D.; Hall, F.

    1982-01-01

    The estimates of crop type and acreage are undertaken in the AgRISTARS program by registering multiple date acquisitions of small subareas of LANDSAT scenes (termed segments), and applying multispectral analysis to them. An important contribution to errors in classification and acreage estimates is misregistration between multiple acquisitions. The formula used to express this relationship is given and the operations applied are so shown in diagrams. The taking of a LANDSAT feature vector and the derivation of the brightness and greeness are illustrated. It is shown that for any given sensor IFOV geometry, typical populations of fields can be derived and histograms can be plotted of the number of fields against field size according to ground truth. As a function of the resolution element, the IFOV of the sensor can draw the proportion of pure pixels in a given crop. Because the thematic mapper has a smaller resolution, the proportion of pixels that are pure in any given area will be larger.

  5. Small Sample Effects on Information-Theoretic Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew; Tracy, Eugene; Weaver, Dennis

    2001-10-01

    Symbolic time-series methods have received some significant attention recently due to their robustness to noise, numerical efficiency, and ability to use low-resolution sensor data. Given a symbolic time-series, one often proceeds to estimate information-theoretic quantities as measures of information content (Shannon Entropy), correlation between two symbolic processes (Mutual Information), and information transfer (transfer entropy[1]). If the dynamical system under study is weakly non-stationary, or the real-time monitoring of the system requires rapid decision making (e.g. early detection of a plasma instability for control purposes), then the amount of symbolic data in the observation window will be severely restricted. In this poster, we examine the problem of estimating these information-theoretic quantities using limited samples of data. 9 s T. Schreiber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 461 (2000) thebibliography

  6. The effect of land cover heterogeneity of MODIS pixel on canopy LAI estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, T.; Puttonen, N.

    2012-04-01

    The boreal zone land cover has a very significant influence on the northern hemisphere albedo and is an important component of the northern hemisphere carbon budget. Both albedo and the leaf area index (LAI) are one of the most important biophysical vegetation parameters and belong to the Essential Climate Variables (ECV) . In addition, in winter time the boreal forest albedo is a complicated combination of snow and canopy radiative properties, so that the albedo is a function of the canopy LAI. One possibility to estimate LAI using optical satellite data is by determination of spectral vegetation indices (SVIs), such as the reduced simple ratio (RSR). It uses the visible near infrared and short wave infrared channels. In large areas moderate resolution instruments, like MODIS, are suitable for LAI mapping. Yet, the heterogeneity of land cover in many boreal areas, for example in Finland, causes a challenge for LAI estimation. This effect was studied using several Landsat and MODIS images and the high resolution CORINE land cover map covering the same area in various parts of Finland. The atmospheric correction of the Landsat images was adjusted so that each MODIS pixel reflectance matched the average of the Landsat pixel reflectances within the MODIS pixel. The LAI values for Landsat and MODIS images were then determined using the RSR index. The LAI average of forested Landsat pixels was compared to the corresponding MODIS pixel LAI as a function of open water area fraction in the MODIS pixel. A regression function was determined to derive a method to correct the MODIS based LAI values with the open water area fraction. It turned out that the existence of open water in the MODIS pixels reduces the determined canopy LAI value on the average 30%. Also other land cover classes affect the LAI value, but the effect of water is largest, because the reflectance of water deviates so much from that of the canopy. The canopy LAI map of whole Finland was then calculated

  7. Accurate Non-parametric Estimation of Recent Effective Population Size from Segments of Identity by Descent

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Sharon R.; Browning, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for estimating historical effective population size from genetic data have been unable to accurately estimate effective population size during the most recent past. We present a non-parametric method for accurately estimating recent effective population size by using inferred long segments of identity by descent (IBD). We found that inferred segments of IBD contain information about effective population size from around 4 generations to around 50 generations ago for SNP array data and to over 200 generations ago for sequence data. In human populations that we examined, the estimates of effective size were approximately one-third of the census size. We estimate the effective population size of European-ancestry individuals in the UK four generations ago to be eight million and the effective population size of Finland four generations ago to be 0.7 million. Our method is implemented in the open-source IBDNe software package. PMID:26299365

  8. Estimating the Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Prevention Programmes in Vietnam, 2006-2010: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Quang Duy; Wilson, David P.; Kerr, Cliff C.; Shattock, Andrew J.; Do, Hoa Mai; Duong, Anh Thuy; Nguyen, Long Thanh; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vietnam has been largely reliant on international support in its HIV response. Over 2006-2010, a total of US$480 million was invested in its HIV programmes, more than 70% of which came from international sources. This study investigates the potential epidemiological impacts of these programmes and their cost-effectiveness. Methods We conducted a data synthesis of HIV programming, spending, epidemiological, and clinical outcomes. Counterfactual scenarios were defined based on assumed programme coverage and behaviours had the programmes not been implemented. An epidemiological model, calibrated to reflect the actual epidemiological trends, was used to estimate plausible ranges of programme impacts. The model was then used to estimate the costs per averted infection, death, and disability adjusted life-year (DALY). Results Based on observed prevalence reductions amongst most population groups, and plausible counterfactuals, modelling suggested that antiretroviral therapy (ART) and prevention programmes over 2006-2010 have averted an estimated 50,600 [95% uncertainty bound: 36,300–68,900] new infections and 42,600 [36,100–54,100] deaths, resulting in 401,600 [312,200–496,300] fewer DALYs across all population groups. HIV programmes in Vietnam have cost an estimated US$1,972 [1,447–2,747], US$2,344 [1,843–2,765], and US$248 [201–319] for each averted infection, death, and DALY, respectively. Conclusions Our evaluation suggests that HIV programmes in Vietnam have most likely had benefits that are cost-effective. ART and direct HIV prevention were the most cost-effective interventions in reducing HIV disease burden. PMID:26196290

  9. Correcting Bias Caused by Missing Data in the Estimate of the Effect of Apolipoprotein ε4 on Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Hall, Charles B; Lipton, Richard B; Katz, Mindy J; Wang, Cuiling

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal administration of neuropsychological instruments are often used to assess age-related changes in cognition. Informative loss to follow-up may bias the results of these studies. Herein, we use auxiliary data to adjust for informative loss to follow-up. In the Einstein Aging Study, memory was assessed annually in a community sample of adults age 70+, free of dementia at baseline, using the free recall from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test, and via telephone using the Memory Impairment Screen for Telephone (the auxiliary data). Joint linear mixed models were used to assess how the effect of the APOE ε4 genotype may be affected by informative missingness in the in-person data. A total of 620 EAS participants contributed 2085 person years of follow-up to the analyses. Memory decline rates estimated in joint models were 19% greater in ε4 negative participants and 27% greater in ε4 positive participants compared to traditional approaches; the effect of APOE ε4 on memory decline was 37% greater. Joint modeling methods can help address bias caused by informative missing data in the estimation of the effect of risk factors on cognitive change, and may be applicable to a broader range of outcomes in longitudinal aging studies. PMID:25389642

  10. Correcting treatment effect for treatment switching in randomized oncology trials with a modified iterative parametric estimation method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Chen, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In randomized oncology trials, patients in the control arm are sometimes permitted to switch to receive experimental drug after disease progression. This is mainly due to ethical reasons or to reduce the patient dropout rate. While progression-free survival is not usually impacted by crossover, the treatment effect on overall survival can be highly confounded. The rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) model and iterative parametric estimation (IPE) are the main randomization-based methods used to adjust for confounding in the analysis of overall survival. While the RPSFT has been extensively studied, the properties of the IPE have not been thoroughly examined and its application is not common. In this manuscript, we clarify the re-censoring algorithm needed for IPE estimation and incorporate it into a method we propose as modified IPE (MIPE). We compared the MIPE and RPSFT via extensive simulations and then walked through the analysis using the modified IPE in a real clinical trial. We provided practical guidance on bootstrap by examining the performance in estimating the variance and confidence interval for the MIPE. Our results indicate that the MIPE method with the proposed re-censoring rule is an attractive alternative to the RPSFT method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26919271

  11. Estimation of Effect Size Under Nonrandom Sampling: The Effects of Censoring Studies Yielding Statistically Insignificant Mean Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    1984-01-01

    If the quantitative result of a study is observed only when the mean difference is statistically significant, the observed mean difference, variance, and effect size are biased estimators of corresponding population parameters. The exact distribution of sample effect size and the maximum likelihood estimator of effect size are derived. (Author/BW)

  12. Estimating Peer Effects in Sexual Behavior among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Mir M.; Dwyer, Debra S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we seek to empirically quantify the role of peer social networks in influencing sexual behavior among adolescents. Using data of a nationally representative sample of adolescents we utilize a multivariate structural model with school-level fixed effects to account for the problems of contextual effects, correlated effects and peer…

  13. Standard errors for EM estimates in generalized linear models with random effects.

    PubMed

    Friedl, H; Kauermann, G

    2000-09-01

    A procedure is derived for computing standard errors of EM estimates in generalized linear models with random effects. Quadrature formulas are used to approximate the integrals in the EM algorithm, where two different approaches are pursued, i.e., Gauss-Hermite quadrature in the case of Gaussian random effects and nonparametric maximum likelihood estimation for an unspecified random effect distribution. An approximation of the expected Fisher information matrix is derived from an expansion of the EM estimating equations. This allows for inferential arguments based on EM estimates, as demonstrated by an example and simulations. PMID:10985213

  14. Maternal adjustment or constraint: differential effects of food availability on maternal deposition of macro-nutrients, steroids and thyroid hormones in rock pigeon eggs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Bin-Yan; Dijkstra, Cor; Darras, Veerle M; de Vries, Bonnie; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2016-01-01

    In oviparous species like birds, eggs provide the direct environment in which embryos are developing. Mothers may adjust different egg components in different ways in reaction to environmental cues either to adjust offspring development or because of constraints. In this study, we investigated the effects of food quality and quantity before and during egg laying on three different aspects of egg quality: macro-nutrients (egg and yolk mass), androgens (testosterone and androstenedione), and thyroid hormones (3,5,3'-triiodothyronine, T3 and l-thyroxine, T4), using the rock pigeon (Columba livia). As expected, egg and yolk mass were significantly reduced for the eggs laid under the poor-food condition, indicating a maternal trade-off between offspring and self in allocating important resources. We did not find any significant change in yolk testosterone or their within-clutch pattern over the laying sequence. This is consistent with the fact that, in contrast with nutrients, these hormones are not costly to produce, but does not support the hypothesis that they play a role in adjusting brood size to food conditions. In contrast, we found that T3 levels were higher in the egg yolks under the poor-food condition whereas the total T4 content was lower. This change could be related to the fact that iodine, the critical constituent of thyroid hormones, might be a limiting factor in the production of this hormone. Given the knowledge that food restriction usually lead to reduction of circulating T3 levels, our results suggested that avian mothers can independently regulate its concentrations in their eggs from their own circulation. The study demonstrates that environmentally induced maternal effects via the egg can be a result of a combination of constrained resources and unconstrained signals and that thyroid hormones might be an interesting case of both. Therefore, this hormone and the interplay of different maternal effects on the offspring phenotype deserve much more

  15. Synthesis gas production with an adjustable H{sub 2}/CO ratio through the coal gasification process: effects of coal ranks and methane addition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

    2008-05-15

    Direct production of synthesis gas using coal as a cheap feedstock is attractive but challenging due to its low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas. Three typical U.S. coals of different ranks were tested in a 2.5 in. coal gasifier to investigate their gasification reactivity and adjustability on H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas with or without the addition of methane. Tests indicated that lower-rank coals (lignite and sub-bituminous) have higher gasification reactivity than bituminous coals. The coal gasification reactivity is correlated to its synthesis-gas yield and the total percentage of H{sub 2} and CO in the synthesis gas, but not to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio of coal gasification was found to be correlated to the rank of coals, especially the H/C ratio of coals. Methane addition into the dense phase of the pyrolysis and gasification zone of the cogasification reactor could make the best use of methane in adjusting the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the generated synthesis gas. The maximum methane conversion efficiency, which was likely correlated to its gasification reactivity, could be achieved by 70% on average for all tested coals. The actual catalytic effect of generated coal chars on methane conversion seemed coal-dependent. The coal-gasification process benefits from methane addition and subsequent conversion on the adjustment of the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of synthesis gas. The methane conversion process benefits from the use of coal chars due to their catalytic effects. This implies that there were likely synergistic effects on both. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3

  16. Photonic approach for microwave frequency measurement with adjustable measurement range and resolution using birefringence effect in highly non-linear fiber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Qian, Lifen; Bai, Qinhong; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-06-29

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach for microwave frequency measurement utilizing birefringence effect in the highly non-linear fiber (HNLF). A detailed theoretical analysis is presented to implement the adjustable measurement range and resolution. By stimulating a complementary polarization-domain interferometer pair in the HNLF, a mathematical expression that relates the microwave frequency and amplitude comparison function is developed. We carry out a proof-to-concept experiment. A frequency measurement range of 2.5-30 GHz with a measurement error within 0.5 GHz is achieved except 16-17.5 GHz. This method is all-optical and requires no high-speed electronic components. PMID:26191769

  17. The effect of weak lensing on distance estimates from supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mathew; Maartens, Roy; Bacon, David J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Clarkson, Chris; Bassett, Bruce A.; Cinabro, David; Finley, David A.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shapiro, Charles; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 608 Type Ia supernovae from the SDSS-II and BOSS surveys, combined with a sample of foreground galaxies from SDSS-II, we estimate the weak lensing convergence for each supernova line of sight. We find that the correlation between this measurement and the Hubble residuals is consistent with the prediction from lensing (at a significance of 1.7σ). Strong correlations are also found between the residuals and supernova nuisance parameters after a linear correction is applied. When these other correlations are taken into account, the lensing signal is detected at 1.4σ. We show, for the first time, that distance estimates from supernovae can be improved when lensing is incorporated, by including a new parameter in the SALT2 methodology for determining distance moduli. The recovered value of the new parameter is consistent with the lensing prediction. Using cosmic microwave background data from WMAP7, H {sub 0} data from Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, we find the best-fit value of the new lensing parameter and show that the central values and uncertainties on Ω {sub m} and w are unaffected. The lensing of supernovae, while only seen at marginal significance in this low-redshift sample, will be of vital importance for the next generation of surveys, such as DES and LSST, which will be systematics-dominated.

  18. Simultaneous estimation of effects of gender, age and walking speed on kinematic gait data.

    PubMed

    Røislien, Jo; Skare, Øivind; Gustavsen, Marit; Broch, Nana L; Rennie, Linda; Opheim, Arve

    2009-11-01

    Analysis of variations in normal gait has received considerable attention over the last years. However, most such analyses are carried out on one explanatory variable at a time, and adjustments for other possibly influencing factors are often done using ad hoc methods. As a result, it can be difficult to know whether observed effects are actually a result of the variable under study. We wanted to simultaneously statistically test the effect of gender, age and walking speed on gait in a normal population, while also properly adjusting for the possibly confounding effects of body height and weight. Since point-by-point analysis does not take into account the time dependency in the data, we turned to functional data analysis (FDA). In FDA the whole gait curve is represented not by a set of points, but by a mathematical function spanning the whole gait cycle. We performed several multiple functional regression analyses, and the results indicate that walking speed is the main factor influencing gait in the reference material at our motion analysis laboratory. This effect is also largely unaffected by the presence of other variables in the model. A gender effect was also apparent in several planes and joints, but this effect was often more outspoken in the multiple than in the univariate regression analyses, highlighting the importance of adjusting for confounders like body height and weight. PMID:19665379

  19. The effect of high leverage points on the logistic ridge regression estimator having multicollinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Syaiba Balqish; Midi, Habshah

    2014-06-01

    This article is concerned with the performance of logistic ridge regression estimation technique in the presence of multicollinearity and high leverage points. In logistic regression, multicollinearity exists among predictors and in the information matrix. The maximum likelihood estimator suffers a huge setback in the presence of multicollinearity which cause regression estimates to have unduly large standard errors. To remedy this problem, a logistic ridge regression estimator is put forward. It is evident that the logistic ridge regression estimator outperforms the maximum likelihood approach for handling multicollinearity. The effect of high leverage points are then investigated on the performance of the logistic ridge regression estimator through real data set and simulation study. The findings signify that logistic ridge regression estimator fails to provide better parameter estimates in the presence of both high leverage points and multicollinearity.

  20. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of () and () genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Cushman, R A; McNeel, A K; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Freetly, H C; Bennett, G L

    2016-03-01

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for 2 yr to equalize and genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epistatic and pleiotropic effects of these markers on BW, reproduction, and first calf performance traits in replacement beef females ( = 171) managed under 2 postweaning development protocols. Traits evaluated on the heifers were birth BW, weaning BW, 11-mo BW, 12-mo BW, 13-mo BW, first breeding season pregnancy evaluation BW, first calving season BW, 11-mo puberty, 12-mo puberty, 13-mo puberty, first breeding season pregnancy, and first calf weaning rate. Additionally, heifer's first calf performance traits of ordinal calving date, first calf birth BW, and first calf weaning BW (with and without age adjustment) were analyzed. Selection to increase minor allele frequencies and balanced sampling across genotype classes enhanced the ability to detect all genetic effects except dominance × dominance epistasis. The × genotype effect was significant ( < 0.05) for 11-mo BW and 12-mo BW and tended to be significant ( = 0.08) for 13-mo BW. Consistently, for all 3 traits, the most significant effect among epistatic × genotype effects was the additive effect, with the G allele decreasing BW. There were no associations between × genotype and fertility related traits ( ≥ 0.46) in this study. Additionally, there were no × genotype associations with first progeny performance traits ( ≥ 0.14). The large effect of the additive × additive interaction on first calf weaning BW was imprecisely estimated, which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27065254