Science.gov

Sample records for adjusted mortality hazard

  1. Standardization of age-adjusted mortality rates

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Sacks, S.T.; Merrill, D.W.

    1980-02-01

    Because age is a significant variable in the occurrence and frequency of human disease, any comparison of disease or mortality rates, to be useful, must be age-specific or age-adjusted. Age-specific comparisons are not always appropriate or possible, however. A common method of eliminating the influence of age in comparing mortality rates from one community to another is to employ statistical methods of age-adjustment. While a variety of methods will accomplish this task, most are weighted averages of the age-specific rates. Two widely used adjustment procedures are direct and indirect age-adjustment.

  2. Adjusted Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index Score as a Risk Measure of Perioperative Mortality before Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Wei, Chang-Kao; Wu, Chin-Chia; Su, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at risk of death from cancer surgery should aid in preoperative preparation. The purpose of this study is to assess and adjust the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) to identify cancer patients with increased risk of perioperative mortality. Methods We identified 156,151 patients undergoing surgery for one of the ten common cancers between 2007 and 2011 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Half of the patients were randomly selected, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop an adjusted-ACCI score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by variables from the original ACCI. The score was validated. The association between the score and perioperative mortality was analyzed. Results The adjusted-ACCI score yield a better discrimination on mortality after cancer surgery than the original ACCI score, with c-statics of 0.75 versus 0.71. Over 80 years of age, 70–80 years, and renal disease had the strongest impact on mortality, hazard ratios 8.40, 3.63, and 3.09 (P < 0.001), respectively. The overall 90-day mortality rates in the entire cohort varied from 0.9%, 2.9%, 7.0%, and 13.2% in four risk groups stratifying by the adjusted-ACCI score; the adjusted hazard ratio for score 4–7, 8–11, and ≥ 12 was 2.84, 6.07, and 11.17 (P < 0.001), respectively, in 90-day mortality compared to score 0–3. Conclusions The adjusted-ACCI score helps to identify patients with a higher risk of 90-day mortality after cancer surgery. It might be particularly helpful for preoperative evaluation of patients over 80 years of age. PMID:26848761

  3. Estimating animal mortality from anthropogenic hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcass searches are a common method for studying the risk of anthropogenic hazards to wildlife, including non-target poisoning and collisions with anthropogenic structures. Typically, numbers of carcasses found must be corrected for scavenging rates and imperfect detection. Para...

  4. Antipsychotics and Mortality: Adjusting for Mortality Risk Scores to Address Confounding by Terminal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonyoung; Franklin, Jessica M.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Levin, Raisa; Crystal, Stephen; Gerhard, Tobias; Huybrechts, Krista F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Earlier studies have documented a greater mortality risk associated with conventional compared with atypical antipsychotics. Concern remains that the association is not causal, but due to residual confounding by differences in underlying health. To address this concern, we evaluated whether adjustment for prognostic indices specifically developed fornursing home (NH) populations affected the magnitude of the previously observed associations. DESIGN Cohort study SETTING A merged dataset of Medicaid, Medicare, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system (OSCAR), and the National Death Index in the US for 2001-2005 PARTICIPANTS Dual eligible subjects ≥ 65 years who initiated antipsychotic treatment in a NH (n=75,445). MEASUREMENTS Three mortality risk scores (MRIS, MMRI-R, and ADEPT) were derived for each patient using baseline MDS data, and their performance was assessed using c-statistics and goodness-of-fit tests. The impact of adjusting for these indices in addition to propensity scores (PS) on the antipsychotic-mortality association was evaluated using Cox models with and without adjustment for risk scores. RESULTS Each risk score showed moderate discrimination for 6-month mortality with c-statistics ranging from 0.61 to 0.63. There was no evidence of lack of fit. Imbalances in risk scores between conventional and atypical antipsychotic users in the full cohort, suggesting potential confounding, were greatly reduced within PS deciles. Accounting for each score in the Cox model did not change the relative risk estimates: 2.24 with PS only adjustment vs. 2.20, 2.20, 2.22 after further adjustment for the three risk scores. CONCLUSION Although causality cannot be proven based on non-randomized studies, this study adds to the body of evidence rejecting alternative explanations for the increased mortality risk associated with conventional antipsychotics. PMID:25752911

  5. Case-mix adjusted hospital mortality is a poor proxy for preventable mortality: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Alan J; Hofer, Timothy P; Wu, Jianhua; Chilton, Peter J; Nicholl, Jonathan P; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Lilford, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Risk-adjustment schemes are used to monitor hospital performance, on the assumption that excess mortality not explained by case mix is largely attributable to suboptimal care. We have developed a model to estimate the proportion of the variation in standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) that can be accounted for by variation in preventable mortality. The model was populated with values from the literature to estimate a predictive value of the SMR in this context—specifically the proportion of those hospitals with SMRs among the highest 2.5% that fall among the worst 2.5% for preventable mortality. The extent to which SMRs reflect preventable mortality rates is highly sensitive to the proportion of deaths that are preventable. If 6% of hospital deaths are preventable (as suggested by the literature), the predictive value of the SMR can be no greater than 9%. This value could rise to 30%, if 15% of deaths are preventable. The model offers a ‘reality check’ for case mix adjustment schemes designed to isolate the preventable component of any outcome rate. PMID:23069860

  6. Trauma, comorbidity, and mortality following diagnoses of severe stress and adjustment disorders: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gradus, Jaimie L; Antonsen, Sussie; Svensson, Elisabeth; Lash, Timothy L; Resick, Patricia A; Hansen, Jens Georg

    2015-09-01

    Longitudinal outcomes following stress or trauma diagnoses are receiving attention, yet population-based studies are few. The aims of the present cohort study were to examine the cumulative incidence of traumatic events and psychiatric diagnoses following diagnoses of severe stress and adjustment disorders categorized using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes and to examine associations of these diagnoses with all-cause mortality and suicide. Data came from a longitudinal cohort of all Danes who received a diagnosis of reaction to severe stress or adjustment disorders (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, code F43.x) between 1995 and 2011, and they were compared with data from a general-population cohort. Cumulative incidence curves were plotted to examine traumatic experiences and psychiatric diagnoses during the study period. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to examine the associations of the disorders with mortality and suicide. Participants with stress diagnoses had a higher incidence of traumatic events and psychiatric diagnoses than did the comparison group. Each disorder was associated with a higher rate of all-cause mortality than that seen in the comparison cohort, and strong associations with suicide were found after adjustment. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the associations of stress disorders with a variety of outcomes, and we found that stress diagnoses may have long-lasting and potentially severe consequences.

  7. Medieval monastic mortality: hazard analysis of mortality differences between monastic and nonmonastic cemeteries in England.

    PubMed

    DeWitte, Sharon N; Boulware, Jessica C; Redfern, Rebecca C

    2013-11-01

    Scholarship on life in medieval European monasteries has revealed a variety of factors that potentially affected mortality in these communities. Though there is some evidence based on age-at-death distributions from England that monastic males lived longer than members of the general public, what is missing from the literature is an explicit examination of how the risks of mortality within medieval monastic settings differed from those within contemporaneous lay populations. This study examines differences in the hazard of mortality for adult males between monastic cemeteries (n = 528) and non-monastic cemeteries (n = 368) from London, all of which date to between AD 1050 and 1540. Age-at-death data from all cemeteries are pooled to estimate the Gompertz hazard of mortality, and "monastic" (i.e., buried in a monastic cemetery) is modeled as a covariate affecting this baseline hazard. The estimated effect of the monastic covariate is negative, suggesting that individuals in the monastic communities faced reduced risks of dying compared to their peers in the lay communities. These results suggest better diets, the positive health benefits of religious behavior, better living conditions in general in monasteries, or selective recruitment of healthy or higher socioeconomic status individuals.

  8. A New Body Shape Index Predicts Mortality Hazard Independently of Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Krakauer, Jesse C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity, typically quantified in terms of Body Mass Index (BMI) exceeding threshold values, is considered a leading cause of premature death worldwide. For given body size (BMI), it is recognized that risk is also affected by body shape, particularly as a marker of abdominal fat deposits. Waist circumference (WC) is used as a risk indicator supplementary to BMI, but the high correlation of WC with BMI makes it hard to isolate the added value of WC. Methods and Findings We considered a USA population sample of 14,105 non-pregnant adults () from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004 with follow-up for mortality averaging 5 yr (828 deaths). We developed A Body Shape Index (ABSI) based on WC adjusted for height and weight: ABSI had little correlation with height, weight, or BMI. Death rates increased approximately exponentially with above average baseline ABSI (overall regression coefficient of per standard deviation of ABSI [95% confidence interval: –]), whereas elevated death rates were found for both high and low values of BMI and WC. (–) of the population mortality hazard was attributable to high ABSI, compared to (–) for BMI and (–) for WC. The association of death rate with ABSI held even when adjusted for other known risk factors including smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol. ABSI correlation with mortality hazard held across the range of age, sex, and BMI, and for both white and black ethnicities (but not for Mexican ethnicity), and was not weakened by excluding deaths from the first 3 yr of follow-up. Conclusions Body shape, as measured by ABSI, appears to be a substantial risk factor for premature mortality in the general population derivable from basic clinical measurements. ABSI expresses the excess risk from high WC in a convenient form that is complementary to BMI and to other known risk factors. PMID:22815707

  9. A Hazard Analysis of Risk Factors of Mortality in Individuals Who Inject Drugs in Denver CO

    PubMed Central

    Suleta, Katie; Corsi, Karen F.; Booth, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite multiple risk factors for mortality among People Who Inject Drugs (PWID), more research is warranted that examines sub-populations within PWID. Mortality data from PWID participating in longitudinal HIV prevention research in Denver were obtained from The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Risk factors for both all-cause and acute-toxicity related mortality were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Two-thousand seven individuals were interviewed at baseline. Eighty-six individuals died during the time frame of the study, 58 of which were due to acutetoxicity. Disabled (HR = 3.3, p < 0.001), gay/lesbian-identified (HR = 2.6, p = 0.03), white race/ethnicity (HR = 2.4, p = 0.003), and use of a shared cooker (HR = 2.1, p = 0.01) were important adjusted risk factors. These suggest that drug and HIV interventions should utilize techniques that can address the needs of marginalized populations in addition to HIV drug risk behaviors. PMID:28063072

  10. Age-adjusted mortality and its association to variations in urban conditions in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Takano, Takehito; Fu, Jia; Nakamura, Keiko; Uji, Kazuyuki; Fukuda, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Masafumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the association between health and urbanization in a megacity, Shanghai, by calculating the age-adjusted mortality ratio by ward-unit of Shanghai and by examining relationships between mortalities and urban indicators. Crude mortality rates and age-adjusted mortality ratios by ward-unit were calculated. Demographic, residential environment, healthcare, and socioeconomic indicators were formulated for each of the ward-units between 1995 and 1998. Correlation and Poisson regression analyses were performed to examine the association between urban indicators and mortalities. The crude mortality rate by ward-unit in 1997 varied from 6.3 to 9.4 deaths per 1000 population. The age-adjusted mortality ratio in 1997 by ward-units as reference to the average mortality of urban China varied from 57.8 to 113.3 within Shanghai. Age-adjusted mortalities were inversely related with indicators of a larger floor space of dwellings per population, a larger proportion of parks, gardens, and green areas to total land area; a greater number of health professionals per population; and a greater number of employees in retail business per population. Spacious living showed independent association to a higher standard of community health in Shanghai (P < 0.05). Consequences of health policy and the developments of urban infrastructural resources from the viewpoint of the Healthy Cities concept were discussed.

  11. Dialysis Dose Scaled to Body Surface Area and Size-Adjusted, Sex-Specific Patient Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kapke, Alissa; Port, Friedrich K.; Wolfe, Robert A.; Saran, Rajiv; Pearson, Jeffrey; Hirth, Richard A.; Messana, Joseph M.; Daugirdas, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives When hemodialysis dose is scaled to body water (V), women typically receive a greater dose than men, but their survival is not better given a similar dose. This study sought to determine whether rescaling dose to body surface area (SA) might reveal different associations among dose, sex, and mortality. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Single-pool Kt/V (spKt/V), equilibrated Kt/V, and standard Kt/V (stdKt/V) were computed using urea kinetic modeling on a prevalent cohort of 7229 patients undergoing thrice-weekly hemodialysis. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 2008 ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. SA-normalized stdKt/V (SAN-stdKt/V) was calculated as stdKt/V × ratio of anthropometric volume to SA/17.5. Patients were grouped into sex-specific dose quintiles (reference: quintile 1 for men). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 1-year mortality were calculated using Cox regression. Results spKt/V was higher in women (1.7±0.3) than in men (1.5±0.2; P<0.001), but SAN-stdKt/V was lower (women: 2.3±0.2; men: 2.5±0.3; P<0.001). For both sexes, mortality decreased as spKt/V increased, until spKt/V was 1.6–1.7 (quintile 4 for men: HR, 0.62; quintile 3 for women: HR, 0.64); no benefit was observed with higher spKt/V. HR for mortality decreased further at higher SAN-stdKt/V in both sexes (quintile 5 for men: HR, 0.69; quintile 5 for women: HR, 0.60). Conclusions SA-based dialysis dose results in dose-mortality relationships substantially different from those with volume-based dosing. SAN-stdKt/V analyses suggest women may be relatively underdosed when treated by V-based dosing. SAN-stdKt/V as a measure for dialysis dose may warrant further study. PMID:22977208

  12. Adjusting for reverse causation to estimate the effect of obesity on mortality after incident heart failure in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The lower mortality rate of obese patients with heart failure (HF) has been partly attributed to reverse causation bias due to weight loss caused by disease. Using data about weight both before and after HF, this study aimed to adjust for reverse causation and examine the association of obesity both before and after HF with mortality. METHODS: Using the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 308 patients with data available from before and after the incidence of HF were included. Pre-morbid and post-morbid obesity were defined based on body mass index measurements at least three months before and after incident HF. The associations of pre-morbid and post-morbid obesity and weight change with survival after HF were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Pre-morbid obesity was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 2.49) but post-morbid obesity was associated with increased survival (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.88). Adjusting for weight change due to disease as a confounder of the obesity-mortality relationship resulted in the absence of any significant associations between post-morbid obesity and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that controlling for reverse causality by adjusting for the confounder of weight change may remove or reverse the protective effect of obesity on mortality among patients with incident HF. PMID:27283142

  13. Hidden Markov models for estimating animal mortality from anthropogenic hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcasses searches are a common method for studying the risk of anthropogenic hazards to wildlife, including non-target poisoning and collisions with anthropogenic structures. Typically, numbers of carcasses found must be corrected for scavenging rates and imperfect detection. ...

  14. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality: Adjustment of the Meteorological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kai; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Ruiming; Li, Runkui; Xu, Qun; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explicitly explored the impacts of the extensive adjustment (with a lag period of more than one week) of temperature and humidity on the association between ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and cardiovascular mortality. In a time stratified case-crossover study, we used a distributed lag nonlinear model to assess the impacts of extensive adjustments of temperature and humidity for longer lag periods (for 7, 14, 21, 28 and 40 days) on effects of PM2.5 on total cardiovascular mortality and mortality of cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease and corresponding exposure-response relationships in Beijing, China, between 2008 and 2011. Compared with results only controlled for temperature and humidity for 2 days, the estimated effects of PM2.5 were smaller and magnitudes of exposure-response curves were decreased when longer lag periods of temperature and relative humidity were included for adjustments, but these changes varied across subpopulation, with marked decreases occurring in males and the elderly who are more susceptible to PM2.5-related mortalities. Our findings suggest that the adjustment of meteorological factors using lag periods shorter than one week may lead to overestimated effects of PM2.5. The associations of PM2.5 with cardiovascular mortality in susceptible populations were more sensitive to further adjustments for temperature and relative humidity. PMID:27827945

  15. Trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in Slovakia between 1993 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Psota, Marek; Pekarciková, Jarmila; O'Mullane, Monica; Rusnák, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and especially coronary heart disease (CHD) are the main causes of death in the Slovak Republic (SR). The aim of this study is to explore trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in the whole Slovak population and in the population of working age between the years 1993 and 2009. A related indicator - potential years of life lost (PYLL) due to CHD--was calculated in the same period for males and females. Crude CHD mortality rates were age-adjusted using European standard population. The joinpoint Poisson regression was performed in order to find out the annual percentage change in trends. The age-adjusted CHD mortality rates decreased in the Slovak population and also in the population of working age. The change was significant only within the working-age sub-group. We found that partial diagnoses (myocardial infarction and chronic ischaemic heart disease) developed in the mirror-like manner. PYLL per 100,000 decreased during the observed period and the decline was more prominent in males. For further research we recommend to focus on several other issues, namely, to examine the validity of cause of death codes, to examine the development of mortality rates in selected age groups, to find out the cause of differential development of mortality rates in the Slovak Republic in comparison with the Czech Republic and Poland, and to explain the causes of decrease of the age-adjusted CHD mortality rates in younger age groups in Slovakia.

  16. Child mortality estimation: methods used to adjust for bias due to AIDS in estimating trends in under-five mortality.

    PubMed

    Walker, Neff; Hill, Kenneth; Zhao, Fengmin

    2012-01-01

    In most low- and middle-income countries, child mortality is estimated from data provided by mothers concerning the survival of their children using methods that assume no correlation between the mortality risks of the mothers and those of their children. This assumption is not valid for populations with generalized HIV epidemics, however, and in this review, we show how the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME) uses a cohort component projection model to correct for AIDS-related biases in the data used to estimate trends in under-five mortality. In this model, births in a given year are identified as occurring to HIV-positive or HIV-negative mothers, the lives of the infants and mothers are projected forward using survivorship probabilities to estimate survivors at the time of a given survey, and the extent to which excess mortality of children goes unreported because of the deaths of HIV-infected mothers prior to the survey is calculated. Estimates from the survey for past periods can then be adjusted for the estimated bias. The extent of the AIDS-related bias depends crucially on the dynamics of the HIV epidemic, on the length of time before the survey that the estimates are made for, and on the underlying non-AIDS child mortality. This simple methodology (which does not take into account the use of effective antiretroviral interventions) gives results qualitatively similar to those of other studies.

  17. Assessment and indirect adjustment for confounding by smoking in cohort studies using relative hazards models.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Laurier, Dominique; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Cole, Stephen R

    2014-11-01

    Workers' smoking histories are not measured in many occupational cohort studies. Here we discuss the use of negative control outcomes to detect and adjust for confounding in analyses that lack information on smoking. We clarify the assumptions necessary to detect confounding by smoking and the additional assumptions necessary to indirectly adjust for such bias. We illustrate these methods using data from 2 studies of radiation and lung cancer: the Colorado Plateau cohort study (1950-2005) of underground uranium miners (in which smoking was measured) and a French cohort study (1950-2004) of nuclear industry workers (in which smoking was unmeasured). A cause-specific relative hazards model is proposed for estimation of indirectly adjusted associations. Among the miners, the proposed method suggests no confounding by smoking of the association between radon and lung cancer--a conclusion supported by adjustment for measured smoking. Among the nuclear workers, the proposed method suggests substantial confounding by smoking of the association between radiation and lung cancer. Indirect adjustment for confounding by smoking resulted in an 18% decrease in the adjusted estimated hazard ratio, yet this cannot be verified because smoking was unmeasured. Assumptions underlying this method are described, and a cause-specific proportional hazards model that allows easy implementation using standard software is presented.

  18. Rural/urban mortality differences in England and Wales and the effect of deprivation adjustment.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Andrea; Farewell, Daniel; Roach, Paul; Dunstan, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Perceptions that rural populations are inevitably healthier and live longer than urban populations are increasingly being challenged. But very few publications have investigated the extent to which these putative differences can be explained by variation in area composition. Existing publications have tended to use conventional deprivation measures, often thought to mask rural deprivation by favourable averages. Further, they have typically been based on large and variably-sized geographical units, or confined to studies of a single region or cause of death. This study examines differences in mortality between rural and urban areas in the entire population of England and Wales for 2002-2004. It uses the most up-to-date small geographical units of similar size and homogeneity of population together with the recently-introduced Rural and Urban Area Classification, and adjusts for five different deprivation measures (including modern composite indices). The causes of death investigated were all-cause mortality, cancer, lung cancer, respiratory disease, circulatory disease, suicide and accidents. Particular points of focus for the study were the potential for interaction between deprivation and rurality, and the importance of choice of deprivation measure in quantifying the relationships between mortality, rurality and deprivation. Choice of deprivation measure was not found to alter the substantive conclusions of any analysis, and little evidence for differential effects of deprivation in rural and urban areas was uncovered. Differences between rural and urban areas in all-cause, circulatory disease and cancer mortality could largely be accounted for by adjusting for deprivation. For these causes of death, therefore, rural populations were not found to be inherently healthier than their urban counterparts. However, substantial residual differences between rural and urban areas were found in comparisons of mortality from lung cancer and respiratory disease, mortality

  19. TRENDS IN MORTALITY FROM OCCUPATIONAL HAZARDS AMONG MEN IN ENGLAND AND WALES DURING 1979-2010

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Palmer, Keith T; Cox, Vanessa; Darnton, Andrew; Osman, John; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To monitor the impact of health and safety provisions and inform future preventive strategies, we investigated trends in mortality from established occupational hazards in England and Wales. Methods We analysed data from death certificates on underlying cause of death and last full-time occupation for 3,688,916 deaths among men aged 20-74 years in England and Wales during 1979-2010 (excluding 1981 when records were incomplete). Proportional mortality ratios (PMRs), standardised for age and social class, were calculated for occupations at risk of specified hazards. Observed and expected numbers of deaths for each hazard were summed across occupations, and the differences summarised as average annual excesses. Results Excess mortality declined substantially for most hazards. For example, the annual excess of deaths from chronic bronchitis and emphysema fell from 170.7 during 1979-90 to 36.0 in 2001-10, and that for deaths from injury and poisoning from 237.0 to 87.5. In many cases the improvements were associated with falling PMRs (suggesting safer working practices), but they also reflected reductions in the numbers of men employed in more hazardous jobs, and declining mortality from some diseases across the whole population. Notable exceptions to the general improvement were diseases caused by asbestos, especially in some construction trades and sinonasal cancer in woodworkers. Conclusions The highest priority for future prevention of work-related fatalities is the minority of occupational disorders for which excess mortality remains static or is increasing, in particular asbestos-related disease among certain occupations in the construction industry and sinonasal cancer in woodworkers. PMID:26976946

  20. The social psychology of seismic hazard adjustment: re-evaluating the international literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, C.; Rossetto, T.; Joffe, H.

    2010-08-01

    The majority of people at risk from earthquakes do little or nothing to reduce their vulnerability. Over the past 40 years social scientists have tried to predict and explain levels of seismic hazard adjustment using models from behavioural sciences such as psychology. The present paper is the first to synthesise the major findings from the international literature on psychological correlates and causes of seismic adjustment at the level of the individual and the household. It starts by reviewing research on seismic risk perception. Next, it looks at norms and normative beliefs, focusing particularly on issues of earthquake protection responsibility and trust between risk stakeholders. It then considers research on attitudes towards seismic adjustment attributes, specifically beliefs about efficacy, control and fate. It concludes that an updated model of seismic adjustment must give the issues of norms, trust, power and identity a more prominent role. These have been only sparsely represented in the social psychological literature to date.

  1. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  2. Outdoor NOx and stroke mortality: adjusting for small area level smoking prevalence using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Ravi; Haining, Robert P; Pearson, Tim; Law, Jane; Brindley, Paul; Best, Nicola G

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing evidence, mainly from daily time series studies, linking air pollution and stroke. Small area level geographical correlation studies offer another means of examining the air pollution-stroke association. Populations within small areas may be more homogeneous than those within larger areal units, and census-based socioeconomic information may be available to adjust for confounding effects. Data on smoking from health surveys may be incorporated in spatial analyses to adjust for potential confounding effects but may be sparse at the small area level. Smoothing, using data from neighbouring areas, may be used to increase the precision of smoking prevalence estimates for small areas. We examined the effect of modelled outdoor NOx levels on stroke mortality using a Bayesian hierarchical spatial model to incorporate random effects, in order to allow for unmeasured confounders and to acknowledge sampling error in the estimation of smoking prevalence. We observed an association between NOx and stroke mortality after taking into account random effects at the small area level. We found no association between smoking prevalence and stroke mortality at the small area level after modelling took into account imprecision in estimating smoking prevalence. The approach we used to incorporate smoking as a covariate in a single large model is conceptually sound, though it made little difference to the substantive results.

  3. A Novel Lung Disease Phenotype Adjusted for Mortality Attrition for Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Modifier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chelsea; Commander, Clayton W.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Strug, Lisa J.; Li, Weili; Wright, Fred A.; Webel, Aaron D.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Naughton, Kathleen; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sandford, Andrew; Blackman, Scott M.; Berthiaume, Yves; Paré, Peter; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Zielenski, Julian; Durie, Peter; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Corey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic studies of lung disease in Cystic Fibrosis are hampered by the lack of a severity measure that accounts for chronic disease progression and mortality attrition. Further, combining analyses across studies requires common phenotypes that are robust to study design and patient ascertainment. Using data from the North American Cystic Fibrosis Modifier Consortium (Canadian Consortium for CF Genetic Studies, Johns Hopkins University CF Twin and Sibling Study, and University of North Carolina/Case Western Reserve University Gene Modifier Study), the authors calculated age-specific CF percentile values of FEV1 which were adjusted for CF age-specific mortality data. The phenotype was computed for 2061 patients representing the Canadian CF population, 1137 extreme phenotype patients in the UNC/Case Western study, and 1323 patients from multiple CF sib families in the CF Twin and Sibling Study. Despite differences in ascertainment and median age, our phenotype score was distributed in all three samples in a manner consistent with ascertainment differences, reflecting the lung disease severity of each individual in the underlying population. The new phenotype score was highly correlated with the previously recommended complex phenotype, but the new phenotype is more robust for shorter follow-up and for extreme ages. A disease progression and mortality adjusted phenotype reduces the need for stratification or additional covariates, increasing statistical power and avoiding possible distortions. This approach will facilitate large scale genetic and environmental epidemiological studies which will provide targeted therapeutic pathways for the clinical benefit of patients with CF. PMID:21462361

  4. A note on the empirical likelihood confidence band for hazards ratio with covariate adjustment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shihong; Yang, Yifan; Zhou, Mai

    2015-09-01

    In medical studies comparing two treatments in the presence of censored data, the stratified Cox model is an important tool that has the ability to flexibly handle non-proportional hazards while allowing parsimonious covariate adjustment. In order to capture the cumulative treatment effect, the ratio of the treatment specific cumulative baseline hazards is often used as a measure of the treatment effect. Pointwise and simultaneous confidence bands associated with the estimated ratio provide a global picture of how the treatment effect evolves over time. Recently, Dong and Matthews (2012, Biometrics 68, 408-418) proposed to construct a pointwise confidence interval for the ratio using a plug-in type empirical likelihood approach. However, their result on the limiting distribution of the empirical likelihood ratio is generally incorrect and the resulting confidence interval is asymptotically undercovering. In this article, we derive the correct limiting distribution for the likelihood ratio statistic. We also present simulation studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  5. 75 FR 10973 - Hazardous Materials: Risk-Based Adjustment of Transportation Security Plan Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials: Risk... security plan requirements applicable to the commercial transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail... Requirements The federal hazardous materials transportation law (federal hazmat law, 49......

  6. Costing the Morbidity and Mortality Consequences of Zoonoses Using Health-Adjusted Life Years.

    PubMed

    Jordan, H; Dunt, D; Hollingsworth, B; Firestone, S M; Burgman, M

    2016-10-01

    Governments are routinely involved in the biosecurity of agricultural and food imports and exports. This involves controlling the complex ongoing threat of the broad range of zoonoses: endemic, exotic and newly emerging. Policy-related decision-making in these areas requires accurate information and predictions concerning the effects and potential impacts of zoonotic diseases. The aim of this article was to provide information concerning the development and use of utility-based tools, specifically disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), for measuring the burden on human disease (morbidity and mortality) as a consequence of zoonotic infections. Issues and challenges to their use are also considered. Non-monetary utility approaches that are reviewed in this paper form one of a number of tools that can be used to estimate the monetary and non-monetary 'cost' of morbidity- and mortality-related consequences. Other tools derive from cost-of-illness, willingness-to-pay and multicriteria approaches. Utility-based approaches are specifically designed to capture the pain, suffering and loss of functioning associated with diseases, zoonotic and otherwise. These effects are typically complicated to define, measure and subsequently 'cost'. Utility-based measures will not be able to capture all of the effects, especially those that extend beyond the health sector. These will more normally be captured in financial terms. Along with other uncommon diseases, the quality of the relevant epidemiological data may not be adequate to support the estimation of losses in utility as a result of zoonoses. Other issues in their use have been identified. New empirical studies have shown some success in addressing these issues. Other issues await further study. It is concluded that, bearing in mind all caveats, utility-based methods are important tools in assessing the magnitude of the impacts of zoonoses in human disease. They make an important contribution to decision-making and priority

  7. Hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer mortality in Swedish women: results after adjustment for 'healthy drug-user' effect.

    PubMed

    Yuen, J; Persson, I; Bergkvist, L; Hoover, R; Schairer, C; Adami, H O

    1993-07-01

    No change of breast cancer mortality has been reported previously after long-term hormone replacement therapy. A conceivable explanation for the apparent discrepancy between incidence and mortality may be selection bias due to lower prevalence of breast cancer in women who receive replacement hormones, compared with nonexposed women. We used a new approach to correct for bias due to this 'healthy drug-user effect,' by adjusting the external, population-based, mortality rates for such cases prevalent during the recruitment period of our cohort. In this cohort of some 23,000 Swedish women, who were prescribed various hormone replacement regimens, breast cancer mortality was analyzed after follow-up to 12 years. External analyses revealed overall standardized mortality ratios for breast cancer rising from 0.71 to 0.81, but not significantly different from unity, after adjustment procedures. In multivariate regression models, excluding prevalent cases in the cohort, women prescribed estradiol, conjugated estrogens, or an estrogen-progestin combination were not at a higher risk relative to those given other and weak estrogens, relative risks being 0.81 and 0.68, respectively. On the basis of the present analytical approach, we conclude that breast cancer mortality does not appear to be changed overall or in subgroups, despite increased incidence.

  8. The African Development Bank, structural adjustment, and child mortality: a cross-national analysis of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Pandolfelli, Lauren E; Shandra, John M

    2013-01-01

    We conduct a cross-national analysis to test the hypothesis that African Development Bank (AfDB) structural adjustment adversely impacts child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. We use generalized least square random effects regression models and two-step Heckman models that correct for selection bias using data on 35 nations with up to four time points (1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005). We find substantial support for our hypothesis, which indicates that Sub-Saharan African nations that receive an AfDB structural adjustment loan tend to have higher levels of child mortality than Sub-Saharan African nations that do not receive such a loan. This finding remains stable even when controlling for selection bias on whether or not a Sub-Saharan African nation receives an AfDB structural adjustment loan. We conclude by discussing the methodological implications of the article, policy suggestions, and possible directions for future research.

  9. Quantifying and Adjusting for Disease Misclassification Due to Loss to Follow-Up in Historical Cohort Mortality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Laura L. F.; Maldonado, George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to quantify and adjust for disease misclassification from loss to follow-up in a historical cohort mortality study of workers where exposure was categorized as a multi-level variable. Disease classification parameters were defined using 2008 mortality data for the New Zealand population and the proportions of known deaths observed for the cohort. The probability distributions for each classification parameter were constructed to account for potential differences in mortality due to exposure status, gender, and ethnicity. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis (bias analysis), which uses Monte Carlo techniques, was then used to sample each parameter distribution 50,000 times, calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORDM-LTF) that compared the mortality of workers with the highest cumulative exposure to those that were considered never-exposed. The geometric mean ORDM-LTF ranged between 1.65 (certainty interval (CI): 0.50–3.88) and 3.33 (CI: 1.21–10.48), and the geometric mean of the disease-misclassification error factor (εDM-LTF), which is the ratio of the observed odds ratio to the adjusted odds ratio, had a range of 0.91 (CI: 0.29–2.52) to 1.85 (CI: 0.78–6.07). Only when workers in the highest exposure category were more likely than those never-exposed to be misclassified as non-cases did the ORDM-LTF frequency distributions shift further away from the null. The application of uncertainty analysis to historical cohort mortality studies with multi-level exposures can provide valuable insight into the magnitude and direction of study error resulting from losses to follow-up. PMID:26501295

  10. A Proportional Hazards Regression Model for the Sub-distribution with Covariates Adjusted Censoring Weight for Competing Risks Data

    PubMed Central

    HE, PENG; ERIKSSON, FRANK; SCHEIKE, THOMAS H.; ZHANG, MEI-JIE

    2015-01-01

    With competing risks data, one often needs to assess the treatment and covariate effects on the cumulative incidence function. Fine and Gray proposed a proportional hazards regression model for the subdistribution of a competing risk with the assumption that the censoring distribution and the covariates are independent. Covariate-dependent censoring sometimes occurs in medical studies. In this paper, we study the proportional hazards regression model for the subdistribution of a competing risk with proper adjustments for covariate-dependent censoring. We consider a covariate-adjusted weight function by fitting the Cox model for the censoring distribution and using the predictive probability for each individual. Our simulation study shows that the covariate-adjusted weight estimator is basically unbiased when the censoring time depends on the covariates, and the covariate-adjusted weight approach works well for the variance estimator as well. We illustrate our methods with bone marrow transplant data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Here cancer relapse and death in complete remission are two competing risks. PMID:27034534

  11. Adjusting for reverse causality in the relationship between obesity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Flanders, W D; Augestad, L B

    2008-08-01

    Reverse causality, in which obesity-induced disease leads to both weight loss and higher mortality, may bias observed associations between body mass index (BMI) and mortality, but the magnitude of that bias is unknown. The authors examined the impact of reverse causality and the exclusion of various diseases on the observed age-specific mortality ratios for BMI by using a state space model and sensitivity analyses. They found that reverse causality may decrease the ratios and induce a J-shaped curve on a graph. The authors further found that the net effect of excluding various diseases becomes a balance of competing forces, some tending to increase observed mortality ratios, where as others, such as selection based on common effects, may decrease them. Instead of studying just the change in observed mortality ratios, which can be misleading, investigators need to consider causal relationships and evaluate the conceptual and theoretical impact of any analytic maneuver. Analyses should be balanced with sensitivity approaches as well as with alternative analytic approaches such as the use of structural models, G-estimation, simulations and ancillary data from animal studies.

  12. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods.

  13. Adjusting for mortality effects in chronic toxicity testing: Mixture model approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.C.D.; Smith, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Chronic toxicity tests, such as the Ceriodaphnia dubia 7-d test are typically analyzed using standard statistical methods such as analysis of variance or regression. Recent research has emphasized the use of Poisson regression or more generalized regression for the analysis of the fecundity data from these studies. A possible problem in using standard statistical techniques is that mortality may occur from toxicant effects as well as reduced fecundity. A mixture model that accounts for fecundity and mortality is proposed for the analysis of data arising from these studies. Inferences about key parameters in the model are discussed. A joint estimate of the inhibition concentration is proposed based on the model. Confidence interval estimations via the bootstrap method is discussed. An example is given for a study involving copper and mercury.

  14. Breast-feeding, social variables, and infant mortality: a hazards model analysis of the case of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Holland, B

    1987-01-01

    A hazards model was used to estimate the relative risks of infant mortality at various points during the 1st year of life among Malaysian infants who were breastfed for various durations. Data on infant mortality, breastfeeding, and social variables were derived from the retrospective Malaysian Family Life Survey. To provide adequate samples in subperiods of the 1st year of life, analysis intervals were constructed starting at ages 0, 2, 4, and 7 months, and including up to 13 months of exposure. The preferred models for the 1st 3 analysis intervals included breastfeeding as a predictor of infant mortality. It is a particularly significant determinant in the 1st and 3rd intervals. The relative risk of death among those who received food other than human milk was 6.26 compared to those who did not, and the infant who was never breastfed was 12 times more likely to die than the infant who was breastfed at some time. Infants breastfed for intermediate durations had intermediate effects estimates. In each analysis interval, the regression coefficient for unsupplemented breastfeeding was of larger magnitude than that for supplemented breastfeeding. Overall, this study shows that breastfeeding is an important determinant of infant mortality in Malaysia. Studies with larger samples are urged to confirm the preliminary finding of a monotonic relationship between breastfeeding duration and lower infant of mortality risks. However, this analysis demonstrates the utility of hazard model methodology as a powerful tool for calculating relative risk estimates when the sample size is relatively small and there are numerous covariates.

  15. The Impact of Extreme-Risk Cases on Hospitals’ Risk-Adjusted Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Mortality Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Ho, Kalon K.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Messenger, John C.; Weaver, W. Douglas; Dai, David; Peterson, Eric D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to examine the calibration of a validated risk-adjustment model in very high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) cases and assess whether sites’ case mix affects their performance ratings. BACKGROUND There are concerns that treating PCI patients with particularly high-risk features such as cardiogenic shock or prior cardiac arrest may adversely impact hospital performance ratings. However, there is little investigation on the validity of these concerns. METHODS We examined 624,286 PCI procedures from 1,168 sites that participated in the CathPCI Registry in 2010. Procedural risk was estimated using the recently published Version 4 National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) PCI risk-adjusted mortality (RAM) model. We calculated observed/expected mortality using several risk classification methods, and simulated hospital performance after combining their highest risk cases over 2 years into a single year. RESULTS In 2010, crude in-hospital PCI mortality was 1.4%. The NCDR model was generally well calibrated among high risk, however there was slight overprediction of risk in extreme cases. Hospitals treating the highest overall expected risk PCI patients or those treating the top 20% of high-risk cases had lower (better) RAM ratings than centers treating lower-risk cases (1.25% vs. 1.51%). The observed/expected ratio for top-risk quintile versus low-risk quintile was 0.91 (0.87 to 0.96) versus 1.10 (1.03 to 1.17). Combining all the high-risk patients over a 2-year period into a single year also did not negatively impact the site’s RAM ratings. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of a contemporary sample of PCI cases across the United States showed no evidence that treating high-risk PCI cases adversely affects hospital RAM rates. PMID:25499301

  16. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure in India: Estimate adjusted for baseline mortality.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sourangsu; Dey, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    In India, more than a billion population is at risk of exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration exceeding World Health Organization air quality guideline, posing a serious threat to health. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure is poorly known for India. Here we develop a non-linear power law (NLP) function to estimate the relative risk associated with ambient PM2.5 exposure using satellite-based PM2.5 concentration (2001-2010) that is bias-corrected against coincident direct measurements. We show that estimate of annual premature death in India is lower by 14.7% (19.2%) using NLP (integrated exposure risk function, IER) for assumption of uniform baseline mortality across India (as considered in the global burden of disease study) relative to the estimate obtained by adjusting for state-specific baseline mortality using GDP as a proxy. 486,100 (811,000) annual premature death in India is estimated using NLP (IER) risk functions after baseline mortality adjustment. 54.5% of premature death estimated using NLP risk function is attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 24.0% to ischemic heart disease (IHD), 18.5% to stroke and the remaining 3.0% to lung cancer (LC). 44,900 (5900-173,300) less premature death is expected annually, if India achieves its present annual air quality target of 40μgm(-3). Our results identify the worst affected districts in terms of ambient PM2.5 exposure and resulting annual premature death and call for initiation of long-term measures through a systematic framework of pollution and health data archive.

  17. Adjusted effects of domestic violence, tobacco use, and indoor air pollution from use of solid fuel on child mortality.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shanta; Lin, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Studies that have separately examined the consequences of gender based violence upon women, use of solid fuel for cooking, and mother and father's use of tobacco on child health have concluded that they serve as risk factors for maternal and child health. Some authors have implied that these studies may have run the risk of overestimating the burden of disease of one factor over another. In this paper, we included all four factors in the same model to estimate their adjusted effects on child mortality, controlling for the demographic factors. The data come from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey of India that interviewed a nationally representative sample of 39,257 couples. Of the four factors, mothers' use of tobacco presented the highest risk for child mortality (OR = 1.42; CI = 1.27-1.60) followed by fathers' use of tobacco (OR = 1.23; CI = 1.12-1.36), households' use of solid fuel for cooking (OR = 1.23; CI = 1.06-1.43), and physical abuse upon mothers (OR = 1.20; CI = 1.10-1.32). Among the households that used solid fuel for cooking, improved cookstoves users experienced 28 % lower odds of child mortality (OR = 0.72; CI = 0.61-0.86) compared to nonusers of improved cookstoves. Additionally, increase in age of mothers at birth of first child, parents' education, and household wealth served as protective factors for child mortality. To prevent child death, programs should focus on reducing couple's use of tobacco, protecting women from physical abuse, and helping households switch from solid to liquid fuel. Moreover, a significant reduction in child death could be attained by improving girls' education, and delaying their age at marriage and first birth.

  18. Changing Climate Drives Lagging and Accelerating Glacier Responses and Accelerating Adjustments of the Hazard Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    advances) of glaciers due to historic and future anthropogenic and longer term climate change relate to a changing glacier hazard regime. Climate change is connected to changes in the geographic distribution and magnitudes of potentially hazardous glacier lakes, large rock and ice avalanches, ice-dammed rivers, and surges. I shall consider these changes in hazard environment in relation to response-time theory and dynamical divergences from idealized response-time theory. Case histories of certain hazard-prone regions, including developments in fast-response-type glaciers and slow-response glaciers and ice sheets will also be discussed. In short, there will be a strong tendency of the hazard regimes of glacierized regions to shift far more rapidly in the 21st century than they did in the 20th century. The magnitude of the shifts will be more dramatic than any simple linear scaling to climate warming would suggest; this is largely because, due to lagging responses, glaciers are still trying to catch up to a new equilibrium for 20th century climate, while climate change remains a moving target that will drive accelerating glacier responses (including responses in hazard environments) in most glacierized regions.

  19. The public health hazards of risk avoidance associated with public reporting of risk-adjusted outcomes in coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Resnic, Frederic S; Welt, Frederick G P

    2009-03-10

    Public reporting of risk-adjusted outcomes for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures has been mandated in New York State for more than a decade. During that time there has been a significant decline in the unadjusted mortality after such procedures. Massachusetts joined New York in 2003 as only the second state to require case level reporting of every coronary interventional procedure performed. In this review, we explore the differences in the populations reported by the 2 states and consider possible risks of public reporting of clinical outcomes after PCI procedures, including the risk of increasing conservatism in the treatment of the sickest patients. We offer a conceptual framework to understand the potential risk-averse behavior of interventional cardiologists subject to public reporting, and offer several proposals to counteract this potential deleterious effect of reporting programs.

  20. The public health hazards of risk avoidance associated with public reporting of risk adjusted outcomes in coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Resnic, Frederic S.; Welt, Frederick G. P.

    2009-01-01

    Public reporting of risk adjusted outcomes for percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) procedures has been mandated in New York State for more than a decade. Over that time there has been a significant decline in the unadjusted mortality following such procedures. Massachusetts joined New York in 2003 as only the second state to require case level reporting of every coronary interventional procedure performed. In this review, we explore the differences in the populations reported by the two states, and consider possible risks of public reporting of clinical outcomes following PCI procedures including the risk of increasing conservatism in the treatment of the sickest patients. We offer a conceptual framework to understand the potential risk-averse behavior of interventional cardiologists subject to public reporting, and offer several proposals to counteract this potential deleterious effect of reporting programs. PMID:19264236

  1. Historical cohort study of US man-made vitreous fiber production workers: VI. Respiratory system cancer standardized mortality ratios adjusted for the confounding effect of cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Marsh, G M; Buchanich, J M; Youk, A O

    2001-09-01

    To date, the US cohort study of man-made vitreous fiber workers has provided no consistent evidence of a relationship between man-made vitreous fiber exposure and mortality from malignant or non-malignant respiratory disease. Nevertheless, there have been small, overall excesses in respiratory system cancer (RSC) among workers from the fiberglass and rock/slag wool production plants included in the study that were unexplained by estimated worker exposures to respirable fiber or other agents present in the plants. The present investigation was designed to provide a quantitative estimate of the extent to which the overall excess in RSC mortality observed at the total cohort level among male fiberglass and rock/slag wool workers is a result of the positive confounding effects of cigarette smoking. Because cigarette-smoking data were neither available nor obtainable at the individual level for all members of the fiberglass and rock/slag wool cohorts, we used the "indirect" method to adjust RSC standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) at the group (cohort and plant) level. Our adjustment suggested that cigarette smoking accounts for all of the 7% and 24% excesses in RSC observed, respectively, for the male fiberglass and rock/slag wool cohorts in the latest mortality updates. The same conclusion was reached regardless of which of several alternative formulations were used to adjust local rate-based RSC SMRs. We found that our smoking adjustments were robust with respect to several alternative characterizations and (with the exception of one fiberglass plant) produced adjusted RSC SMRs that were lower than their unadjusted counterparts. Further, all statistically significantly elevated unadjusted SMRs were reduced to not statistically significant levels. These results reaffirm that RSC SMRs based on US and local rates must take into account the potential confounding effects of cigarette smoking. They also suggest that the use of local county mortality rate-based SMRs may not

  2. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the authors calculated…

  3. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. Methods: In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the…

  4. [Recent trends in mortality, years of life lost (YLLs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to tobacco in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, K

    2001-07-01

    To assess recent trends in mortality and disease burden from tobacco in Japan, the present study estimated the number of deaths, years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to tobacco for the years 1985 and 1995. Since smoking prevalence is a very poor measure of population exposure to tobacco, this study employed an alternative measure of the attributable fractions based on excess lung cancer mortality. It is suggested that there was a significant increase in both the absolute numbers and age-standardized rates of tobacco-attributed mortality and disease burden over the decade, in particular from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 1995, tobacco already accounted for 12% of total mortality, 16% of total male mortality and 7% of total female mortality. The burden of disease attributable to tobacco amounted to 10% of the total YLLs and 7% of total DALYs, suggesting that tobacco is probably a single major risk factor of mortality and morbidity in Japan.

  5. Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste - CERCLA Hazardous Substance Designation - Reportable Quantity Adjustment - Coke By-Products Wastes - Federal Register Notice, August 18, 1992

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is amending its regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by listing as hazardous seven wastes generated during the production, recovery, and refining of coke by-products produced from coal.

  6. Household environmental health hazards' effect on under-five mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: What can we learn from the Demographic and Health Survey?

    PubMed

    Adjiwanou, Vissého; Worku Engdaw, Alehegn

    2017-01-23

    Household environmental health hazards or simply household health hazards (HHH) are pathogens and chemicals in the household that can cause health problems. In this study, we assess their effect on under-five mortality (U5MR) in 12 sub-Saharan African countries, using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys. Referring to the principal component analysis approach, we measure the HHH by the following indicators: source of water and its location, type of toilet facility, flooring material, type of wall, type of roof and type of cooking fuel. In an unadjusted multilevel discrete-time hazard model, we find that HHH affect positively child mortality in 9 of the 12 countries, whereas this effect presented itself only in 4 countries when controlling for other covariates. However, using a model with interaction between the child's age and HHH, we find it interesting that increasing levels of the HHH are consistently associated with increasing risk of death during 24-59 months after birth in eight countries. Future researches are needed to decipher the mechanisms behind these findings, whether explained by the accumulation of hazardous environment in early childhood, or frequent contact with noxious environments at a later stage of childhood, or both.

  7. Antioxidant Vitamin Intake and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kawas, Claudia H.; Corrada, María M.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between antioxidant vitamin intake and all-cause mortality in older adults, we examined these associations using data from the Leisure World Cohort Study, a prospective study of residents of the Leisure World retirement community in Laguna Hills, California. In the early 1980s, participants (who were aged 44–101 years) completed a postal survey, which included details on use of vitamin supplements and dietary intake of foods containing vitamins A and C. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted (for factors related to mortality in this cohort—smoking, alcohol intake, caffeine consumption, exercise, body mass index, and histories of hypertension, angina, heart attack, stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer) hazard ratios for death were calculated using Cox regression for 8,640 women and 4,983 men (median age at entry, 74 years). During follow-up (1981–2013), 13,104 participants died (median age at death, 88 years). Neither dietary nor supplemental intake of vitamin A or vitamin C nor supplemental intake of vitamin E was significantly associated with mortality after multivariate adjustment. A compendium that summarizes previous findings of cohort studies evaluating vitamin intake and mortality is provided. Attenuation in the observed associations between mortality and antioxidant vitamin use after adjustment for confounders in our study and in previous studies suggests that such consumption identifies persons with other mortality-associated lifestyle and health risk factors. PMID:25550360

  8. External Validation of a Case-Mix Adjustment Model for the Standardized Reporting of 30-Day Stroke Mortality Rates in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ping; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Liping; Ji, Ruijun; Meng, Xia; Jing, Jing; Tong, Xu; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A case-mix adjustment model has been developed and externally validated, demonstrating promise. However, the model has not been thoroughly tested among populations in China. In our study, we evaluated the performance of the model in Chinese patients with acute stroke. Methods The case-mix adjustment model A includes items on age, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, and stroke type. Model B is similar to Model A but includes only the consciousness component of the NIHSS score. Both model A and B were evaluated to predict 30-day mortality rates in 13,948 patients with acute stroke from the China National Stroke Registry. The discrimination of the models was quantified by c-statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results The c-statistic of model A in our external validation cohort was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.82), and the c-statistic of model B was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.84). Excellent calibration was reported in the two models with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (0.892 for model A, p<0.001; 0.927 for model B, p = 0.008). Conclusions The case-mix adjustment model could be used to effectively predict 30-day mortality rates in Chinese patients with acute stroke. PMID:27846282

  9. Bayesian multilevel discrete interval hazard analysis to predict dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene mortality in Hyalella azteca based on body residues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Stow, Craig A; Landrum, Peter F

    2009-11-01

    We exposed Hyalella azteca to p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene for intervals of 1 to 4 d and followed mortality out to 10 d. Mortality was determined as the cessation of heartbeat; dead organism body residue was determined daily. To model mortality probability, body residues of the living organisms were estimated using published kinetic data with concentration-dependent rate constants. The estimated residues compared favorably with measured residues in the dead organisms (predicted body residue = 1.302 ± 0.142 measured body residue + 10.351 ± 15.766, r² = 0.64, n = 50). The response data were collected at discrete intervals; thus, it was not possible to determine the exact time of death for organisms. Consequently, we analyzed the mortality data using discrete interval analysis, in a Bayesian hierarchical framework, with body residue as the dose metric. The predicted body residues to produce mortality were similar across the duration of exposure when postexposure mortality was considered. The concentration for 50% mortality was 0.47 μmol/g (148.6 tg/g, range 0.32-0.66 μmol/g), and predictions of response indicted 95% (range 73-99.9%) mortality at 0.79 μmol/g (250 μg/g) and 4% (range 1.2-9.6%) mortality at 0.16 μmol/g (50 μg/g). The lethal residue for 50% mortality based on interval analysis for short-term exposures with postexposure mortality resulted in values similar to long-term continuous exposures for exposure durations of more than 600 h.

  10. Implications of Public Reporting of Risk-Adjusted Mortality Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Misperceptions and Potential Consequences for High-Risk Patients Including Nonsurgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anuj; Yeh, Robert W; Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline E; Patel, Shalin H; Guyton, Robert A; Klein, Lloyd W; Rab, Tanveer; Kirtane, Ajay J

    2016-10-24

    Assessment of clinical outcomes such as 30-day mortality following coronary revascularization procedures has historically been used to spur quality improvement programs. Public reporting of risk-adjusted outcomes is already mandated in several states, and proposals to further expand public reporting have been put forward as a means of increasing transparency and potentially incentivizing high quality care. However, for public reporting of outcomes to be considered a useful surrogate of procedural quality of care, several prerequisites must be met. First, the reporting measure must be truly representative of the quality of the procedure itself, rather than be dominated by other underlying factors, such as the overall level of illness of a patient. Second, to foster comparisons among physicians and institutions, the metric requires accurate ascertainment of and adjustment for differences in patient risk profiles. This is particularly relevant for high-risk clinical patient scenarios. Finally, the potential deleterious consequences of public reporting of a quality metric should be considered prior to expanding the use of public reporting more broadly. In this viewpoint, the authors review in particular the characterization of high-risk patients currently treated by percutaneous coronary interventional procedures, assessing the adequacy of clinical risk models used in this population. They then expand upon the limitations of 30-day mortality as a quality metric for percutaneous coronary intervention, addressing the strengths and limitations of this metric, as well as offering suggestions to enhance its future use in public reporting.

  11. The global burden of injury: incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and time trends from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Haagsma, Juanita A; Graetz, Nicholas; Bolliger, Ian; Naghavi, Mohsen; Higashi, Hideki; Mullany, Erin C; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry Puthenpurakal; Adofo, Koranteng; Alsharif, Ubai; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ammar, Walid; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T; Barrero, Lope H; Bekele, Tolesa; Bose, Dipan; Brazinova, Alexandra; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Dandona, Lalit; Dandona, Rakhi; Dargan, Paul I; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Derrett, Sarah; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Driscoll, Tim R; Duan, Leilei; Petrovich Ermakov, Sergey; Farzadfar, Farshad; Feigin, Valery L; Gabbe, Belinda; Gosselin, Richard A; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hijar, Martha; Hu, Guoqing; Jayaraman, Sudha P; Jiang, Guohong; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Chanda; Lecky, Fiona E; Leung, Ricky; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Lyons, Ronan Anthony; Majdan, Marek; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Matzopoulos, Richard; Meaney, Peter A; Mekonnen, Wubegzier; Miller, Ted R; Mock, Charles N; Norman, Rosana E; Polinder, Suzanne; Pourmalek, Farshad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Refaat, Amany; Rojas-Rueda, David; Roy, Nobhojit; Schwebel, David C; Shaheen, Amira; Shahraz, Saeid; Skirbekk, Vegard; Søreide, Kjetil; Soshnikov, Sergey; Stein, Dan J; Sykes, Bryan L; Tabb, Karen M; Temesgen, Awoke Misganaw; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah; Theadom, Alice M; Tran, Bach Xuan; Vasankari, Tommi J; Vavilala, Monica S; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Younis, Mustafa Z; Yu, Chuanhua; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Diseases (GBD), Injuries, and Risk Factors study used the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) to quantify the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. This paper provides an overview of injury estimates from the 2013 update of GBD, with detailed information on incidence, mortality, DALYs and rates of change from 1990 to 2013 for 26 causes of injury, globally, by region and by country. Methods Injury mortality was estimated using the extensive GBD mortality database, corrections for ill-defined cause of death and the cause of death ensemble modelling tool. Morbidity estimation was based on inpatient and outpatient data sets, 26 cause-of-injury and 47 nature-of-injury categories, and seven follow-up studies with patient-reported long-term outcome measures. Results In 2013, 973 million (uncertainty interval (UI) 942 to 993) people sustained injuries that warranted some type of healthcare and 4.8 million (UI 4.5 to 5.1) people died from injuries. Between 1990 and 2013 the global age-standardised injury DALY rate decreased by 31% (UI 26% to 35%). The rate of decline in DALY rates was significant for 22 cause-of-injury categories, including all the major injuries. Conclusions Injuries continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. The decline in rates for almost all injuries is so prominent that it warrants a general statement that the world is becoming a safer place to live in. However, the patterns vary widely by cause, age, sex, region and time and there are still large improvements that need to be made. PMID:26635210

  12. QT-Interval Duration and Mortality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme prolongation or reduction of the QT interval predisposes patients to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the association of variations in the QT interval within a reference range with mortality end points in the general population is unclear. Methods We included 7828 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline QT interval was measured via standard 12-lead electrocardiographic readings. Mortality end points were assessed through December 31, 2006 (2291 deaths). Results After an average follow-up of 13.7 years, the association between QT interval and mortality end points was U-shaped. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios comparing participants at or above the 95th percentile of age-, sex-, race-, and R-R interval–corrected QT interval (≥439 milliseconds) with participants in the middle quintile (401 to <410 milliseconds) were 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.81) for total mortality, 2.55 (1.59-4.09) for mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), 1.63 (0.96-2.75) for mortality due to coronary heart disease, and 1.65 (1.16-2.35) for non-CVD mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios comparing participants with a corrected QT interval below the fifth percentile (<377 milliseconds) with those in the middle quintile were 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.88) for total mortality, 1.35 (0.77-2.36) for CVD mortality, 1.02 (0.44-2.38) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 1.42 (0.97-2.08) for non-CVD mortality. Increased mortality also was observed with less extreme deviations of QT-interval duration. Similar, albeit weaker, associations also were observed with Bazett-corrected QT intervals. Conclusion Shortened and prolonged QT-interval durations, even within a reference range, are associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. PMID:22025428

  13. Clinical COPD Questionnaire score (CCQ) and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sundh, Josefin; Janson, Christer; Lisspers, Karin; Montgomery, Scott; Ställberg, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) measures health status and can be used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated whether CCQ is also associated with mortality. Methods Some 1111 Swedish primary and secondary care chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were randomly selected. Information from questionnaires and medical record review were obtained in 970 patients. The Swedish Board of Health and Welfare provided mortality data. Cox regression estimated survival, with adjustment for age, sex, heart disease, and lung function (for a subset with spirometry data, n = 530). Age and sex-standardized mortality ratios were calculated. Results Over 5 years, 220 patients (22.7%) died. Mortality risk was higher for mean CCQ ≥ 3 (37.8% died) compared with mean CCQ < 1 (11.4%), producing an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (and 95% confidence interval [CI]) of 3.13 (1.98 to 4.95). After further adjustment for 1 second forced expiratory volume (expressed as percent of the European Community for Steel and Coal reference values ), the association remained (HR 2.94 [1.42 to 6.10]). The mortality risk was higher than in the general population, with standardized mortality ratio (and 95% CI) of 1.87 (1.18 to 2.80) with CCQ < 1, increasing to 6.05 (4.94 to 7.44) with CCQ ≥ 3. Conclusion CCQ is predictive of mortality in COPD patients. As HRQL and mortality are both important clinical endpoints, CCQ could be used to target interventions. PMID:23277739

  14. Radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the American Cancer Society cohort.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Yue; Pope, C Arden; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    Radon is a known cause of human lung cancer. Previously, the authors observed a significant positive association between mean county-level residential radon concentrations and lung cancer mortality in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II), a large prospective study of nearly 1.2 million participants recruited in 1982 by the American Cancer Society. There was also a significant positive association with mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because it is unclear whether radon is associated with mortality from other malignant or nonmalignant disease, the authors examined the association between radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the CPS-II. Mean county-level residential radon concentrations (mean = 53.5 (standard deviation: 38.0) Bq/m(3)) were linked to participants by their zip code at enrollment. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for all-cause (excluding lung cancer and respiratory mortality) and cause-specific mortality associated with radon concentrations. A total of 811,961 participants in 2,754 counties were analyzed, including 265,477 deaths through 2006. There were no clear associations between radon and nonrespiratory mortality in the CPS-II. These findings suggest that residential radon is not associated with any other mortality beyond lung cancer or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  15. Perceived stress and mortality in a Taiwanese older adult population.

    PubMed

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Glei, Dana A; Weinstein, Maxine; Goldman, Noreen

    2013-11-01

    Perceived stress is associated with poor health outcomes including negative affect, increased susceptibility to the common cold and cardiovascular disease; the consequences of perceived stress for mortality, however, have received less attention. This study characterizes the relationship between perceived stress and 11-year mortality in a population of Taiwanese adults aged 53+ years. Using the Survey of Health and Living Status of the Near Elderly and Elderly of Taiwan, we calculated a composite measure of perceived stress based on six items pertaining to the health, financial situation, and occupation of the respondents and their families. Proportional hazard models were used to determine whether perceived stress predicted mortality. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors only, we found that a one standard deviation increase in perceived stress was associated with a 19% increase in all-cause mortality risk during the 11-year follow-up period (hazard ratio, HR = 1.19, 95% confidence interval, CI 1.13-1.26). The relationship was greatly attenuated when perceptions of stress regarding health were excluded, and was not significant after adjusting for medical conditions, mobility limitations and depressive symptoms. We conclude that the association between perceived stress and mortality is explained by an individual's current health; however, our data do not allow us to distinguish between two possible interpretations of this conclusion: (a) the relationship between perceived stress and mortality is spurious, or (b) poor health acts as the mediator.

  16. An index of unhealthy lifestyle is associated with coronary heart disease mortality rates for small areas in England after adjustment for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, P; Allender, S; Rayner, M; Goldacre, M

    2011-03-01

    Indices of socio-economic deprivation are often used as a proxy for differences in the health behaviours of populations within small areas, but these indices are a measure of the economic environment rather than the health environment. Sets of synthetic estimates of the ward-level prevalence of low fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity, raised blood pressure, raised cholesterol and smoking were combined to develop an index of unhealthy lifestyle. Multi-level regression models showed that this index described about 50% of the large-scale geographic variation in CHD mortality rates in England, and substantially adds to the ability of an index of deprivation to explain geographic variations in CHD mortality rates.

  17. Effect of timing of first postnatal care home visit on neonatal mortality in Bangladesh: a observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saifuddin; Arifeen, Shams El; Darmstadt, Gary L; Rosecrans, Amanda M; Mannan, Ishtiaq; Rahman, Syed M; Begum, Nazma; Mahmud, Arif B A; Seraji, Habibur R; Williams, Emma K; Winch, Peter J; Santosham, Mathuram; Black, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the timing of first postnatal home visit by community health workers on neonatal mortality. Design Analysis of prospectively collected data using time varying discrete hazard models to estimate hazard ratios for neonatal mortality according to day of first postnatal home visit. Data source Data from a community based trial of neonatal care interventions conducted in Bangladesh during 2004-5. Main outcome measure Neonatal mortality. Results 9211 live births were included. Among infants who survived the first day of life, neonatal mortality was 67% lower in those who received a visit on day one than in those who received no visit (adjusted hazard ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 0.46; P<0.001). For those infants who survived the first two days of life, receiving the first visit on the second day was associated with a 64% lower neonatal mortality than in those who did not receive a visit (adjusted hazard ratio 0.36, 0.23 to 0.55; P<0.001). First visits on any day after the second day of life were not associated with reduced mortality. Conclusions In developing countries, especially where home delivery with unskilled attendants is common, postnatal home visits within the first two days of life by trained community health workers can significantly reduce neonatal mortality. PMID:19684100

  18. Mortality in HIV-Infected Alcohol and Drug Users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Fairbairn, Nadia S.; Walley, Alexander Y.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily; Bridden, Carly; Chaisson, Christine; Blokhina, Elena; Lioznov, Dmitry; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    In Russia, up to half of premature deaths are attributed to hazardous drinking. The respective roles of alcohol and drug use in premature death among people with HIV in Russia have not been described. Criminalization and stigmatization of substance use in Russia may also contribute to mortality. We explored whether alcohol, drug use and risk environment factors are associated with short-term mortality in HIV-infected Russians who use substances. Secondary analyses were conducted using prospective data collected at baseline, 6 and 12-months from HIV-infected people who use substances recruited between 2007–2010 from addiction and HIV care settings in a single urban setting of St. Petersburg, Russia. We used Cox proportional hazards models to explore associations between 30-day alcohol hazardous drinking, injection drug use, polysubstance use and environmental risk exposures (i.e. past incarceration, police involvement, selling sex, and HIV stigma) with mortality. Among 700 participants, 59% were male and the mean age was 30 years. There were 40 deaths after a median follow-up of 12 months (crude mortality rate 5.9 per 100 person-years). In adjusted analyses, 30-day NIAAA hazardous drinking was significantly associated with mortality compared to no drinking [adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) 2.60, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.24–5.44] but moderate drinking was not (aHR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.35–2.59). No other factors were significantly associated with mortality. The high rates of short-term mortality and the strong association with hazardous drinking suggest a need to integrate evidence-based alcohol interventions into treatment strategies for HIV-infected Russians. PMID:27898683

  19. Giving to Others and the Association Between Stress and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephanie L.; Dillard, Amanda J.; Smith, Dylan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to test the hypothesis that providing help to others predicts a reduced association between stress and mortality. Methods. We examined data from participants (n = 846) in a study in the Detroit, Michigan, area. Participants completed baseline interviews that assessed past-year stressful events and whether the participant had provided tangible assistance to friends or family members. Participant mortality and time to death was monitored for 5 years by way of newspaper obituaries and monthly state death-record tapes. Results. When we adjusted for age, baseline health and functioning, and key psychosocial variables, Cox proportional hazard models for mortality revealed a significant interaction between helping behavior and stressful events (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.58; P < .05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35, 0.98). Specifically, stress did not predict mortality risk among individuals who provided help to others in the past year (HR = 0.96; 95% CI = 0.79, 1.18), but stress did predict mortality among those who did not provide help to others (HR = 1.30; P < .05; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.62). Conclusions. Helping others predicted reduced mortality specifically by buffering the association between stress and mortality. PMID:23327269

  20. An age adjustment of very young children of India, 1981 and reappraisal of fertility and mortality rates--A model approach.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B K

    1986-01-01

    Several approaches were made by actuaries and demographers to correct and smooth the Indian age distribution with special emphasis on population in age group 0-4 at different points of time. The present analysis conceives the life table stationary population (using the West Model) as 'reference standard'. 2 parameters were estimated from a regression equation using the proportion of population in age groups 5-14 and 60-plus as independent variables and that in 0-4 as the dependent variable. The corrected census proportions in age group 0-4 obtained from the regression model under certain assumptions for the 14 major states and India seem to be consistent and to have slightly lower values than those of the 1971 adjusted data. Moreover, unadjusted and adjusted proportions in 5-14 and 60 plus do not show any significant difference between the predicted values. Using the corrected population aged 0-4 years, the average annual birth and death rates during the 5 year period preceeding the 1981 census have been estimated for those 14 states and India as well. The estimated birth rates so obtained were further adjusted using an appropriate factor from the West Model and Indian life table survival ratios. The final estimates seem to be consistent, except for a few, and to have slightly higher values than those of earlier estimates. As the present analysis is based on a 5% sample and confined to only 14 states, it is proposed to study the same for all the states and India in greater detail using full count data on age distribution and actul life tables as and when available.

  1. A population-based prospective study of energy-providing nutrients in relation to all-cause cancer mortality and cancers of digestive organs mortality.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alauddin; Chen, Yu; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-11-15

    The effect of dietary composition on mortality in low-income countries is largely unknown. We evaluated whether percentages of dietary energy derived from protein, fat and carbohydrates were associated with all-cause and cancer mortalities in a Bangladeshi population. Data from a prospective population-based cohort study of 17,244 men and women were used. Percentages of dietary energy derived from protein, fat and carbohydrates, assessed using a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline, were analyzed in relation to mortality over an average of 9 years (155,126 person-years) of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for all cause, all cancer and cancers of the digestive organs mortalities. Percentage of dietary energy from protein appeared to be significantly associated with cancer mortality. Fully adjusted hazard ratios for cancer mortality in increasing tertiles of percentage of dietary energy from protein were 1.0 (reference), 1.21 (0.73, 2.00) and 1.84 (1.08, 3.15) (p for trend = 0.023). These associations were much stronger for deaths from cancers of the digestive organs with fully adjusted hazard ratios in increasing tertiles of percentage of dietary energy from protein being 1.0 (reference), 2.25 (0.91, 5.59) and 4.85 (1.88, 12.51) (p for trend = 0.001). No significant associations in relation to cancer-related mortality were observed for percentage of dietary energy from fat. Novel findings from this prospective study show protein is an important risk factor or proxy to an important risk factor for cancer mortality especially from digestive organ cancers in Bangladesh.

  2. Adjusting to death: the effects of mortality salience and self-esteem on psychological well-being, growth motivation, and maladaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Clay; Ostafin, Brian; Juhl, Jacob; Sedikides, Constantine; Cathey, Christie; Liao, Jiangqun

    2010-12-01

    This research builds on terror management theory to examine the relationships among self-esteem, death cognition, and psychological adjustment. Self-esteem was measured (Studies 1-2, 4-8) or manipulated (Study 3), and thoughts of death were manipulated (Studies 1-3, 5-8) or measured (Study 4). Subsequently, satisfaction with life (Study 1), subjective vitality (Study 2), meaning in life (Studies 3-5), positive and negative affect (Studies 1, 4, 5), exploration (Study 6), state anxiety (Study 7), and social avoidance (Study 8) were assessed. Death-related cognition (a) decreased satisfaction with life, subjective vitality, meaning in life, and exploration; (b) increased negative affect and state anxiety; and (c) exacerbated social avoidance for individuals with low self-esteem but not for those with high self-esteem. These effects occurred only when death thoughts were outside of focal attention. Parallel effects were found in American (Studies 1-4, 6-8) and Chinese (Study 5) samples.

  3. Sedentary time assessed by actigraphy and mortality: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Koolhaas, Chantal M; Dhana, Klodian; van Rooij, Frank J A; Kocevska, Desana; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-02-01

    Research suggests that sedentary behavior is a risk factor for mortality. However, most studies rely on questionnaires, which are prone to reporting error. We examined the association between sedentary time assessed by actigraphy and mortality among 1839 participants, aged 45-98years, from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study, enrolled between 2004 and 2007. Participants wore an actigraph around the wrist for seven days. Sedentary time was evaluated continuously, per 1h/day increase, and categorically in three groups (<8, 8-11, ≥11h/day). The lowest category was used as reference. Mortality risks were examined using Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for confounders and biological risk factors. We examined the association between sedentary behavior and mortality over and beyond other activity measures (including physical activity (PA) and activities of daily living (ADL)) in a final model. During 11years of follow-up (median: 7.5years, interquartile range: 6.6-8.3years), 212 participants (11.5%) died. In the multivariable model, the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) per 1 more hour/day sedentary time was 1.09 (1.00, 1.18). The HR (95% CI) after adjustment for PA and ADL was 1.04 (0.96, 1.13). Participants sedentary for ≥11h/day had a higher mortality risk (HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.84) than those sedentary <8h/day, in the multivariable model. After adjusting for PA and ADL, this association was clearly attenuated (HR: 1.50, 95% CI: 0.93, 2.41). In conclusion, our study suggests that sedentary behavior is a risk factor for mortality. Further investigation is needed to examine whether this association is distinct from the effect of other measures of activity.

  4. Brain cancer mortality and potential occupational exposure to lead: findings from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study, 1979-1989.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Dosemeci, Mustafa

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the association between potential occupational lead exposure and the risk of brain cancer mortality in the National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS), which is a prospective census-based cohort study of mortality among the noninstitutionalized United States population (1979-1989). The present study was limited to individuals for whom occupation and industry were available (n = 317,968). Estimates of probability and intensity of lead exposure were assigned using a job-exposure matrix (JEM). Risk estimates for the impact of lead on brain cancer mortality were computed using standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and proportional hazards and Poisson regression techniques, adjusting for the effects of age, gender and several other covariates. Brain cancer mortality rates were greater among individuals in jobs potentially involving lead exposure as compared to those unexposed (age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.9-2.3) with indications of an exposure-response trend (probability: low HR = 0.7 (95% CI = 0.2-2.2), medium HR = 1.4 (95% CI = 0.8-2.5), high HR = 2.2 (95% CI = 1.2-4.0); intensity: low HR = 1.2 (95% CI = 0.7-2.1), medium/high HR = 1.9 (95% CI = 1.0-3.4)). Brain cancer risk was greatest among individuals with the highest levels of probability and intensity (HR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-4.2). These findings provide further support for an association between occupational lead exposure and brain cancer mortality, but need to be interpreted cautiously due to the consideration of brain cancer as one disease entity and the absence of biological measures of lead exposure.

  5. The Effect of Neurobehavioral Test Performance on the All-Cause Mortality among US Population.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao-Chun; Chen, Wei-Liang; Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Ying-Jen; Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Gia-Chi; Wang, Chung-Ching; Yang, Ya-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the association between global cognitive function and mortality is much, but whether specific cognitive function is related to mortality is unclear. To address the paucity of knowledge on younger populations in the US, we analyzed the association between specific cognitive function and mortality in young and middle-aged adults. We analyzed data from 5,144 men and women between 20 and 59 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-94) with mortality follow-up evaluation through 2006. Cognitive function tests, including assessments of executive function/processing speed (symbol digit substitution) and learning recall/short-term memory (serial digit learning), were performed. All-cause mortality was the outcome of interest. After adjusting for multiple variables, total mortality was significantly higher in males with poorer executive function/processing speed (hazard ratio (HR) 2.02; 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 2.99) and poorer recall/short-term memory (HR 1.47; 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 2.12). After adjusting for multiple variables, the mortality risk did not significantly increase among the females in these two cognitive tests groups. In this sample of the US population, poorer executive function/processing speed and poorer learning recall/short-term memory were significantly associated with increased mortality rates, especially in males. This study highlights the notion that poorer specific cognitive function predicts all-cause mortality in young and middle-aged males.

  6. Insulin Dose and Cardiovascular Mortality in the ACCORD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniel J.; Riddle, Matthew C.; Miller, Michael E.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Chen, Shyh-Huei; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Thomas, Abraham; Bestermann, William; Buse, John B.; Genuth, Saul; Joyce, Carol; Kovacs, Christopher S.; O'Connor, Patrick J.; Sigal, Ronald J.; Solomon, Sol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the ACCORD trial, intensive treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular (CV) risk was associated with higher all-cause and CV mortality. Post hoc analyses have failed to implicate rapid reduction of glucose, hypoglycemia, or specific drugs as the causes of this finding. We hypothesized that exposure to injected insulin was quantitatively associated with increased CV mortality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined insulin exposure data from 10,163 participants with a mean follow-up of 5 years. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we explored associations between CV mortality and total, basal, and prandial insulin dose over time, adjusting for both baseline and on-treatment covariates including randomized intervention assignment. RESULTS More participants allocated to intensive treatment (79%) than standard treatment (62%) were ever prescribed insulin in ACCORD, with a higher mean updated total daily dose (0.41 vs. 0.30 units/kg) (P < 0.001). Before adjustment for covariates, higher insulin dose was associated with increased risk of CV death (hazard ratios [HRs] per 1 unit/kg/day 1.83 [1.45, 2.31], 2.29 [1.62, 3.23], and 3.36 [2.00, 5.66] for total, basal, and prandial insulin, respectively). However, after adjustment for baseline covariates, no significant association of insulin dose with CV death remained. Moreover, further adjustment for severe hypoglycemia, weight change, attained A1C, and randomized treatment assignment did not materially alter this observation. CONCLUSIONS These analyses provide no support for the hypothesis that insulin dose contributed to CV mortality in ACCORD. PMID:26464212

  7. Radon and COPD mortality in the American Cancer Society Cohort.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle C; Krewski, Daniel; Chen, Yue; Pope, C Arden; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Although radon gas is a known cause of lung cancer, the association between residential radon and mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease has not been well characterised. The Cancer Prevention Study-II is a large prospective cohort study of nearly 1.2 million Americans recruited in 1982. Mean county-level residential radon concentrations were linked to study participants' residential address based on their ZIP code at enrolment (mean ± SD 53.5 ± 38.0 Bq · m(-3)). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for non-malignant respiratory disease mortality associated with radon concentrations. After necessary exclusions, a total of 811,961 participants in 2,754 counties were included in the analysis. Throughout 2006, there were a total of 28,300 non-malignant respiratory disease deaths. Radon was significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality (HR per 100 Bq · m(-3) 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21). There was a significant positive linear trend in COPD mortality with increasing categories of radon concentrations (p<0.05). Findings suggest residential radon may increase COPD mortality. Further research is needed to confirm this finding and to better understand possible complex inter-relationships between radon, COPD and lung cancer.

  8. National and sub-national age-sex specific and cause-specific mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to household air pollution from solid cookfuel use (HAP) in Iran, 1990-2013.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, Mehrnoosh; Koolivand, Ali; Dobaradaran, Sina; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar; Mohseni-Bandpei, Anoushiravan; Khaloo, Shokooh Sadat; Jorfi, Sahand; Saeedi, Reza

    2017-03-21

    National and sub-national mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for household air pollution from solid cookfuel use (HAP) in Iran, 1990-2013 were estimated based on the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013). The burden of disease attributable to HAP was quantified by the comparative risk assessment method using four inputs: (1) exposure to HAP, (2) the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL), (3) exposure-response relationships of related causes (4) disease burden of related causes. All across the country, solid fuel use decreased from 5.26% in 1990 to 0.15% in 2013. The drastic reduction of solid fuel use leaded to DALYs attributable to HAP fell by 97.8% (95% uncertainty interval 97.7-98.0%) from 87,433 (51072-144303) in 1990 to 1889 (1016-3247) in 2013. Proportion of YLLs in DALYs from HAP decreased from 95.7% in 1990 to 86.6% in 2013. Contribution of causes in the attributable DALYs was variable during the study period and in 2013 was in the following order: ischemic heart disease for 43.4%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for 24.7%, hemorrhagic stroke for 9.7%, lower respiratory infections for 9.3%, ischemic stroke for 7.8%, lung cancer for 3.4% and cataract for 1.8%. Based on the Gini coefficient, the spatial inequality of the disease burden from HAP increased during the study period. The remained burden of disease was relatively scarce and it mainly occurred in seven southern provinces. Further reduction of the disease burden from HAP as well as compensation of the increasing spatial inequality in Iran could be attained through an especial plan for providing cleaner fuels in the southern provinces.

  9. Skin autofluorescence predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kanno, Makoto; Watanabe, Kimio; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Suzuki, Hodaka; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Terawaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Masaaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) is thought to contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive measure of AGE accumulation using autofluorescence of the skin under ultraviolet light, has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality associated with CVD in Caucasian patients on chronic hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of skin autofluorescence on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis. Baseline skin autofluorescence was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 128 non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during a period of 6 years. During the follow-up period, 42 of the 128 patients died; 19 of those patients died of CVD. Skin autofluorescence did not have a significant effect on all-cause mortality. However, age, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), serum albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), skin autofluorescence and pre-existing CVD were significantly correlated with cardiovascular mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed skin autofluorescence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]1.67-9.43), serum albumin (adjusted HR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.32), and hsCRP (adjusted HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.18-2.05) to be independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. The present study suggests that skin autofluorescence is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis.

  10. Waaler revisited: The anthropometrics of mortality.

    PubMed

    Koch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Although many studies have been written about the relationship between BMI and human height on the one hand and mortality on the other, the issue of socio-economic status as confounding variable has been at times less emphasized. This study analyzes the influence of education and income on the relationship between BMI and mortality and between height and mortality. It is based on data collected between 1963 and 1975 by the Norwegian National Health Screening Service. 1.7 million subjects were recorded. The Norwegian statistics bureau linked these data to the national death records and to socio-economic information. We apply Cox proportional hazards regressions in order to determine whether adding income and education as covariates affects the relations among BMI, height, and mortality. Previous findings and insights are either not present or ambiguous. We conclude that the omission of SES does not significantly bias the effect of BMI on most causes of death, with one exception: type 2 diabetes mellitus, where the effect of BMI is substantially lower for both adults and adolescents when adjusted for education.

  11. Body Mass Index and Mortality in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Rathore, Saif S.; Reid, Kimberly J.; Jones, Philip G.; Chan, Paul S.; Rich, Michael W.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an “obesity paradox” with heart failure, whereby higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with lower mortality. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on survival after acute myocardial infarction. Methods Data from 2 registries of patients hospitalized in the United States with acute myocardial infarction between 2003–04 (PREMIER) and 2005–08 (TRIUMPH) were used to examine the association of BMI with mortality. Patients (n=6359) were categorized into BMI groups (kg/m2) using baseline measurements. Two sets of analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression with fractional polynomials to model BMI as categorical and continuous variables. To assess the independent association of BMI with mortality, analyses were repeated adjusting for 7 domains of patient and clinical characteristics. Results Median BMI was 28.6. BMI was inversely associated with crude 1-year mortality (normal, 9.2%; overweight, 6.1%; obese, 4.7%; morbidly obese; 4.6%; p<0.001), which persisted after multivariable adjustment. When BMI was examined as a continuous variable, the hazards curve declined with increasing BMI and then increased above a BMI of 40. Compared with patients with a BMI of 18.5, patients with higher BMIs had a 20% to 68% lower mortality at 1 year. No interactions between age (p=0.37), gender (p=0.87) or diabetes mellitus (p=0.55) were observed. Conclusions There appears to be an “obesity paradox” among acute myocardial infarction patients such that higher BMI is associated with lower mortality, an effect that was not modified by patient characteristics and was comparable across age, gender, and diabetes subgroups. PMID:22483510

  12. Poverty or income inequality as predictor of mortality: longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, K.; Franks, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of inequality in income between communities independent of household income on individual all cause mortality in the United States. DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study. SUBJECTS: A nationally representative sample of 14,407 people aged 25-74 years in the United States from the first national health and nutrition examination survey. SETTING: Subjects were followed from initial interview in 1971-5 until 1987. Complete follow up information was available for 92.2% of the sample. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relation between both household income and income inequality in community of residence and individual all cause mortality at follow up was examined with Cox proportional hazards survival analysis. RESULTS: Community income inequality showed a significant association with subsequent community mortality, and with individual mortality after adjustment for age, sex, and mean income in the community of residence. After adjustment for individual household income, however, the association with mortality was lost. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationally representative American sample, family income, but not community income inequality, independently predicts mortality. Previously reported ecological associations between income inequality and mortality may reflect confounding between individual family income and mortality. PMID:9185498

  13. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Carbapenem Resistance on Mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Cristina; Gozalo, Mónica; Murillas, Javier; Almirante, Benito; Pomar, Virginia; Aguilar, Manuela; Granados, Ana; Calbo, Esther; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Rodríguez, Fernando; Tubau, Fe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The impact of antimicrobial resistance on clinical outcomes is the subject of ongoing investigations, although uncertainty remains about its contribution to mortality. We investigated the impact of carbapenem resistance on mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in a prospective multicenter (10 teaching hospitals) observational study of patients with monomicrobial bacteremia followed up for 30 days after the onset of bacteremia. The adjusted influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality was studied by using Cox regression analysis. Of 632 episodes, 487 (77%) were caused by carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CSPA) isolates, and 145 (23%) were caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) isolates. The median incidence density of nosocomial CRPA bacteremia was 2.3 episodes per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 2.8). The regression demonstrated a time-dependent effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality as well as a significant interaction with the Charlson index: the deleterious effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality decreased with higher Charlson index scores. The impact of resistance on mortality was statistically significant only from the fifth day after the onset of the bacteremia, reaching its peak values at day 30 (adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 0 at day 30, 9.9 [95% CI, 3.3 to 29.4]; adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 5 at day 30, 2.6 [95% CI, 0.8 to 8]). This study clarifies the relationship between carbapenem resistance and mortality in patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Although resistance was associated with a higher risk of mortality, the study suggested that this deleterious effect may not be as great during the first days of the bacteremia or in the presence of comorbidities. PMID:22155832

  14. Spectrum of excess mortality due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections.

    PubMed

    Hauck, C; Cober, E; Richter, S S; Perez, F; Salata, R A; Kalayjian, R C; Watkins, R R; Scalera, N M; Doi, Y; Kaye, K S; Evans, S; Fowler, V G; Bonomo, R A; van Duin, D

    2016-06-01

    Patients infected or colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKp) are often chronically and acutely ill, which results in substantial mortality unrelated to infection. Therefore, estimating excess mortality due to CRKp infections is challenging. The Consortium on Resistance against Carbapenems in K. pneumoniae (CRACKLE) is a prospective multicenter study. Here, patients in CRACKLE were evaluated at the time of their first CRKp bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia or urinary tract infection (UTI). A control cohort of patients with CRKp urinary colonization without CRKp infection was constructed. Excess hospital mortality was defined as mortality in cases after subtracting mortality in controls. In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) for time-to-hospital-mortality at 30 days associated with infection compared with colonization were calculated in Cox proportional hazard models. In the study period, 260 patients with CRKp infections were included in the BSI (90 patients), pneumonia (49 patients) and UTI (121 patients) groups, who were compared with 223 controls. All-cause hospital mortality in controls was 12%. Excess hospital mortality was 27% in both patients with BSI and those with pneumonia. Excess hospital mortality was not observed in patients with UTI. In multivariable analyses, BSI and pneumonia compared with controls were associated with aHR of 2.59 (95% CI 1.52-4.50, p <0.001) and 3.44 (95% CI 1.80-6.48, p <0.001), respectively. In conclusion, in patients with CRKp infection, pneumonia is associated with the highest excess hospital mortality. Patients with BSI have slightly lower excess hospital mortality rates, whereas excess hospital mortality was not observed in hospitalized patients with UTI.

  15. Weight cycling and mortality in a large prospective US study.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Victoria L; Jacobs, Eric J; Sun, Juzhong; Patel, Alpa V; McCullough, Marjorie L; Teras, Lauren R; Gapstur, Susan M

    2012-04-15

    Weight cycling has been associated with an increased risk of death in some studies, but few studies differentiated weight cycling initiated by intentional weight loss from that initiated by illness. The association of weight cycling with death was examined among 55,983 men and 66,655 women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2008. A weight cycle was defined as an intentional loss of 10 or more pounds (≥4.5 kg) followed by regain of that weight, and the lifetime number of weight cycles was reported on a questionnaire administered at enrollment in 1992. A total of 15,138 men and 10,087 women died during follow-up, which ended in 2008. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. When the models were adjusted for age only, weight cycling was positively associated with mortality (P for trend < 0.0001). However, after adjustment for body mass index and other risk factors, low numbers of weight cycles (1-4 cycles) were associated with slightly lower mortality rates (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89, 0.97 in men and HR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.98 in women), whereas high numbers of weight cycles (≥20 cycles) were not associated with mortality (HR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.19 in men and HR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.88, 1.12 in women). These results do not support an increased risk of mortality associated with weight cycling.

  16. Parathyroidectomy Associates with Reduced Mortality in Taiwanese Dialysis Patients with Hyperparathyroidism: Evidence for the Controversy of Current Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Li-Chun; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Kuo, Te-Hui; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Wu, Jia-Ling; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Jung-Der; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Sung, Junne-Ming; Sung, Junne-Ming; Wang, Jung-Der; Li, Chung-Yi; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Kuo, Te-Hui; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Ho, Li-Chun; Wu, Jia-Ling; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Yen, Miao-Fen; Wu, Hung-Lien; Chen, Ping-Yu; Li, Wen-Huang; Chang, Wei-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroidectomy is recommended by the clinical guidelines for dialysis patients with unremitting secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). However, the survival advantage of parathyroidectomy is debated because of the selection bias in previous studies. To minimize potential bias in the present nationwide cohort study, we enrolled only dialysis patients who had undergone radionuclide parathyroid scanning to ensure all patients had severe SHPT. The parathyroidectomized patients were matched with the controls based on propensity score for parathyroidectomy. Mortality hazard was estimated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for comorbidities before scanning (model 1) or over the whole study period (model 2). Our results showed that among the 2786 enrolled patients, 1707 underwent parathyroidectomy, and the other 1079 were controls. The crude mortality rates were lower in the parathyroidectomized patients than in the controls. In adjusted analyses for the population matched on propensity score, parathyroidectomy was associated with a significant 20% to 25% lower risk for all-cause mortality (model 1: hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.94; model 2: hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence internal 0.64 to 0.98). We concluded that parathyroidectomy was associated with a reduced long-term mortality risk in dialysis patients with severe SHPT. PMID:26758515

  17. Hyperkalemia is Associated with Increased 30-Day Mortality in Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Norring-Agerskov, Debbie; Madsen, Christian Medom; Abrahamsen, Bo; Riis, Troels; Pedersen, Ole B; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Bathum, Lise; Lauritzen, Jes Bruun; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2017-02-17

    Abnormal plasma concentrations of potassium in the form of hyper- and hypokalemia are frequent among hospitalized patients and have been linked to poor outcomes. In this study, we examined the prevalence of hypo- and hyperkalemia in patients admitted with a fractured hip as well as the association with 30-day mortality in these patients. A total of 7293 hip fracture patients (aged 60 years or above) with admission plasma potassium measurements were included. Data on comorbidity, medication, and death was retrieved from national registries. The association between plasma potassium and mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities. The prevalence of hypo- and hyperkalemia on admission was 19.8% and 6.6%, respectively. The 30-day mortality rates were increased for patients with hyperkalemia (21.0%, p < 0.0001) compared to normokalemic patients (9.5%), whereas hypokalemia was not significantly associated with mortality. After adjustment for age, sex, and individual comorbidities, hyperkalemia was still associated with increased risk of death 30 days after admission (HR = 1.93 [1.55-2.40], p < 0.0001). After the same adjustments, hypokalemia remained non-associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality (HR = 1.06 [0.87-1.29], p = 0.6). Hyperkalemia, but not hypokalemia, at admission is associated with increased 30-day mortality after a hip fracture.

  18. Use of Life Course Work–Family Profiles to Predict Mortality Risk Among US Women

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Ivan Mejía; Glymour, M. Maria; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined relationships between US women’s exposure to midlife work–family demands and subsequent mortality risk. Methods. We used data from women born 1935 to 1956 in the Health and Retirement Study to calculate employment, marital, and parenthood statuses for each age between 16 and 50 years. We used sequence analysis to identify 7 prototypical work–family trajectories. We calculated age-standardized mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality associated with work–family sequences, with adjustment for covariates and potentially explanatory later-life factors. Results. Married women staying home with children briefly before reentering the workforce had the lowest mortality rates. In comparison, after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and education, HRs for mortality were 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58, 2.90) among single nonworking mothers, 1.48 (95% CI = 1.06, 1.98) among single working mothers, and 1.36 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.80) among married nonworking mothers. Adjustment for later-life behavioral and economic factors partially attenuated risks. Conclusions. Sequence analysis is a promising exposure assessment tool for life course research. This method permitted identification of certain lifetime work–family profiles associated with mortality risk before age 75 years. PMID:25713976

  19. Hazardous Waste

    MedlinePlus

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  20. Intracerebral hemorrhage mortality is not changing despite declining incidence

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Smith, Melinda A.; Brown, Devin L.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Meurer, William J.; Burke, James F.; Adelman, Eric E.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine trends in incidence and mortality of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rigorous population-based study. Methods: We identified all cases of spontaneous ICH in a South Texas community from 2000 to 2010 using rigorous case ascertainment methods within the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project. Yearly population counts were determined from the US Census, and deaths were determined from state and national databases. Age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted incidence was estimated for each year with Poisson regression, and a linear trend over time was investigated. Trends in 30-day case fatality and long-term mortality (censored at 3 years) were estimated with log-binomial or Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics, stroke severity, and comorbid disease. Results: A total of 734 cases of ICH were included. The age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted ICH annual incidence rate was 5.21 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.36, 6.24) in 2000 and 4.30 per 10,000 (95% CI 3.21, 5.76) in 2010. The estimated 10-year change in demographic-adjusted ICH annual incidence rate was −31% (95% CI −47%, −11%). Yearly demographic-adjusted 30-day case fatality ranged from 28.3% (95% CI 19.9%, 40.3%) in 2006 to 46.5% (95% CI 35.5, 60.8) in 2008. There was no change in ICH case fatality or long-term mortality over time. Conclusions: ICH incidence decreased over the past decade, but case fatality and long-term mortality were unchanged. This suggests that primary prevention efforts may be improving over time, but more work is needed to improve ICH treatment and reduce the risk of death. PMID:24838789

  1. Relation of physical activity to cardiovascular disease mortality and the influence of cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Reddigan, Jacinta I; Ardern, Chris I; Riddell, Michael C; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2011-11-15

    Physical activity can improve several metabolic risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is associated with a lower risk of CVD mortality. We sought to evaluate the extent to which metabolic risk factors mediate the association between physical activity and CVD mortality and whether physical activity provides protective effects against CVD mortality in healthy adults and those with metabolic risk factors. A sample of 10,261 adults from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with public-access mortality data linkage (follow-up 13.4 ± 3.9 years) was used. Physical activity was assessed by questionnaire and classified into inactive, light, and moderate/vigorous activity categories. Metabolic risk factors (dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, inflammation, and insulin resistance) were categorized using clinical thresholds. After adjusting for basic confounders, engaging in light or moderate/vigorous physical activity was associated with a lower risk of CVD mortality (p < 0.05). Adjustment for each risk-factor set only slightly attenuated this relation. When all risk-factor sets were added to the model simultaneously, light (hazard ratio 0.72, 0.62 to 0.84) and moderate/vigorous (hazard ratio 0.72, 0.62 to 0.85) activity remained at lower risk of CVD mortality. In addition, physical activity provided protective effects for CVD mortality in healthy subjects and those with metabolic risk factors in isolation or in clusters. In conclusion, physical activity was associated with a lower risk of CVD mortality independent of traditional and inflammatory risk factors. Taken together these results suggest that physical activity may protect against CVD mortality regardless of the presence of metabolic risk factors.

  2. Excess mortality among urban residents: how much, for whom, and why?

    PubMed Central

    House, J S; Lepkowski, J M; Williams, D R; Mero, R P; Lantz, P M; Robert, S A; Chen, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goals of this study were to estimate prospective mortality risks of city residence, specify how these risks vary by population subgroup, and explore possible explanations. METHODS: Data were derived from a probability sample of 3617 adults in the coterminous United States and analyzed via cross-tabular and Cox proportional hazards methods. RESULTS: After adjustment for baseline sociodemographic and health variables, city residents had a mortality hazard rate ratio of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21, 2.18) relative to rural/small-town residents; suburbanites had an intermediate but not significantly elevated hazard rate ratio. This urban mortality risk was significant among men (hazard rate ratio: 2.25), especially non-Black men, but not among women. Among Black men, and to some degree Black women, suburban residence carried the greatest risk. All risks were most evident for those younger than 65 years. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality risk of city residence, at least among men, rivals that of major psychosocial risk factors such as race, low income, smoking, and social isolation and merits comparable attention in research and policy. PMID:11111263

  3. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; P<0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  4. Use of Glucosamine and Chondroitin in Relation to Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Griffith A.; Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucosamine and chondroitin are products commonly used by older adults in the US and Europe. There is limited evidence that they have anti-inflammatory properties, which could provide risk reduction of several diseases. However, data on their long-term health effects is lacking. Objective To evaluate whether use of glucosamine and chondroitin are associated with cause-specific and total mortality. Design Participants (n = 77 510) were members of a cohort study of Washington State (US) residents aged 50–76 y who entered the cohort in 2000–2002 by completing a baseline questionnaire that included questions on glucosamine and chondroitin use. Participants were followed for mortality through 2008 (n = 5362 deaths). Hazard ratios for death adjusted for multiple covariates were estimated using Cox models. Results Current (baseline) glucosamine and chondroitin use were associated with a decreased risk of total mortality compared to never use. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) associated with current use of glucosamine (with or without chondroitin) was 0.82 (95% CI 0.75–0.90) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.78–0.96) for chondroitin (included in two-thirds of glucosamine supplements). Current use of glucosamine was associated with a significant decreased risk of death from cancer (HR 0.87 95% CI 0.76–0.98) and with a large risk reduction for death from respiratory diseases (HR 0.59 95% CI 0.41–0.83). Conclusions Use of glucosamine with or without chondroitin was associated with reduced total mortality and with reductions of several broad causes of death. Although bias cannot be ruled out, these results suggest that glucosamine may provide some mortality benefit. PMID:22828954

  5. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial factors as predictors of mortality in an elderly community sample

    PubMed Central

    Korten, A. E.; Jorm, A. F.; Jiao, Z.; Letenneur, L.; Jacomb, P. A.; Henderson, A. S.; Christensen, H.; Rodgers, B.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine whether cognitive and psychosocial factors predict mortality once physical health is controlled. DESIGN: A prospective study of community dwelling elderly. Mortality was assessed over a period of 3-4 years after the baseline assessment of predictors. The data were analysed using the Cox proportional hazards model. SETTING: Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 897 people aged 70 or over and living in the community, drawn from the compulsory electoral roll. RESULTS: For the sample as a whole, the significant predictors of mortality were male sex, poor physical health, poor cognitive functioning, and low neuroticism. Men had an adjusted relative risk of mortality of 2.5 compared with women. For the male sub-sample, poor self rated health and a poor performance on a speeded cognitive task were significant predictors, while for women, greater disability, low systolic blood pressure, and a low score on a dementia screening test were the strongest predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was predicted by physical ill health and poor cognitive functioning. Psychosocial factors such as socioeconomic status, psychiatric symptoms, and social support did not add to the prediction of mortality, once sex, physical health, and cognitive functioning were controlled. Mortality among men was more than twice that of women, even when adjusted for other predictors.   PMID:10396468

  6. Mortality following cotton defoliation: San Joaquin Valley, California, 1970-1990.

    PubMed

    Ames, R G; Gregson, J

    1995-07-01

    A proportional mortality study comparing the cotton-growing areas of the San Joaquin Valley with the rest of the State of California was performed by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a continuation of earlier studies related to mercaptan-releasing pesticides. This mortality study found a pattern of increased proportion of "respiratory causes" mortality (ICD codes 460-519), statistically significant at less than the .05 probability level, for 15 of 21 years between 1970 and 1990, for the time period during and immediately following cotton defoliation. Defoliants which have the potential to produce acute symptoms include DEF and Folex, both of which release odorous butyl mercaptan gas as a degradation product. This paper tests the hypothesis that exposure to cotton defoliant breakdown products may be associated with a disproportionate increase in mortality. Prediction of the mortality proportions by pounds of DEF and Folex used was not statistically significant in the unadjusted models or in models adjusted for air pollution variables. One air pollution adjustment factor, total suspended particulates, was a statistically significant independent mortality proportion predictor. This finding suggests that total suspended particulates, not defoliants, may be related to mortality differentials during defoliation season. Possible confounding by demographic variation of the counties was not controlled in the analysis.

  7. Dietary fiber intake and mortality among survivors of myocardial infarction: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Alan; Pai, Jennifer K; Forman, John P; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Rimm, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations of dietary fiber after myocardial infarction (MI) and changes in dietary fiber intake from before to after MI with all cause and cardiovascular mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Two large prospective cohort studies of US women and men with repeated dietary measurements: the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Participants 2258 women and 1840 men who were free of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or cancer at enrollment, survived a first MI during follow-up, were free of stroke at the time of initial onset of MI, and provided food frequency questionnaires pre-MI and at least one post-MI. Main outcome measures Associations of dietary fiber post-MI and changes from before to after MI with all cause and cardiovascular mortality using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for drug use, medical history, and lifestyle factors. Results Higher post-MI fiber intake was significantly associated with lower all cause mortality (comparing extreme fifths, pooled hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.58 to 0.97). Greater intake of cereal fiber was more strongly associated with all cause mortality (pooled hazard ratio 0.73, 0.58 to 0.91) than were other sources of dietary fiber. Increased fiber intake from before to after MI was significantly associated with lower all cause mortality (pooled hazard ratio 0.69, 0.55 to 0.87). Conclusions In this prospective study of patients who survived MI, a greater intake of dietary fiber after MI, especially cereal fiber, was inversely associated with all cause mortality. In addition, increasing consumption of fiber from before to after MI was significantly associated with lower all cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24782515

  8. Openness to Experience and Mortality in Men: Analysis of Trait and Facets

    PubMed Central

    Turiano, Nicholas A.; Spiro, Avron; Mroczek, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether specific facets are more robust predictors of mortality risk than overall trait openness in a sample of older men. Methods The current investigation used data from 1,349 men from the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study. From 1990–1991 to 2008, 547 (41%) had died. We used exploratory factor analysis to extract facets of openness, followed by proportional hazards modeling to examine 18-year mortality risk. Results Two facets emerged from the openness adjectives: intellect and creativity. In the fully adjusted model, only creativity predicted mortality risk. A 1-SD increase in creativity was associated with a 12% decrease in mortality risk. Discussion The study demonstrated that consideration of facets allows for a more precise understanding of the personality–health association. Higher levels of creativity predict longer survival in a sample of older men which provides preliminary support of the protective role creativity has on health even at advanced ages. PMID:22219209

  9. Mortality of iron-steel workers in Anshan, China: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Pan, Guowei; Tanaka, Chieko; Feng, Yiping; Yu, Lianzheng; Liu, Tiefu; Liu, Liming; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Foundry workers have increased mortality and morbidity risks from numerous causes, including various cancers. A retrospective Chinese iron-steel cohort study was conducted to examine the mortality effects of exposure to foundry work. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and standardized rate ratios (SRRs) were calculated to evaluate mortality risks among male workers with exposure to 15 hazardous factors, adjusting for confounders. During 14 years of follow-up, 13,363 of 121,846 male workers died. SMR analysis showed a healthy-worker effect in comparison with the general population. SRR analysis showed increased risks for all causes, all neoplasms, and others among the exposed workers compared with non-exposed blue-collar workers. Combined exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and two or more dusts increased the risks of lung cancer (SRR = 654; 95% CI: 113-3,780) and other malignancies. Foundry work has adverse health effects, including carcinogenic risks.

  10. Infant Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention. (2013). CDC health disparities and inequalities report—United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ... M. (2008). The fall and rise of U.S. inequalities in premature mortality: 1960–2002. PLOS Medicine, 5 ( ...

  11. A Swiss paradox? Higher income inequality of municipalities is associated with lower mortality in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Clough-Gorr, Kerri M; Egger, Matthias; Spoerri, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    It has long been surmised that income inequality within a society negatively affects public health. However, more recent studies suggest there is no association, especially when analyzing small areas. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of income inequality on mortality in Switzerland using the Gini index on municipality level. The study population included all individuals >30 years at the 2000 Swiss census (N = 4,689,545) living in 2,740 municipalities with 35.5 million person-years of follow-up and 456,211 deaths over follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression models were adjusted for age, gender, marital status, nationality, urbanization, and language region. Results were reported as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals. The mean Gini index across all municipalities was 0.377 (standard deviation 0.062, range 0.202-0.785). Larger cities, high-income municipalities and tourist areas had higher Gini indices. Higher income inequality was consistently associated with lower mortality risk, except for death from external causes. Adjusting for sex, marital status, nationality, urbanization and language region only slightly attenuated effects. In fully adjusted models, hazards of all-cause mortality by increasing Gini index quintile were HR = 0.99 (0.98-1.00), HR = 0.98 (0.97-0.99), HR = 0.95 (0.94-0.96), HR = 0.91 (0.90-0.92) compared to the lowest quintile. The relationship of income inequality with mortality in Switzerland is contradictory to what has been found in other developed high-income countries. Our results challenge current beliefs about the effect of income inequality on mortality on small area level. Further investigation is required to expose the underlying relationship between income inequality and population health.

  12. Plasma Biomarkers of Inflammation, the Kynurenine Pathway, and Risks of All-Cause, Cancer, and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hui; Ueland, Per M.; Ulvik, Arve; Eussen, Simone J. P. M.; Vollset, Stein E.; Nygård, Ottar; Midttun, Øivind; Theofylaktopoulou, Despoina; Meyer, Klaus; Tell, Grethe S.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate 10 biomarkers related to inflammation and the kynurenine pathway, including neopterin, kynurenine:tryptophan ratio, C-reactive protein, tryptophan, and 6 kynurenines, as potential predictors of all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a general population sample. The study cohort was participants involved in a community-based Norwegian study, the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK). We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of the biomarkers with all-cause mortality and competing-risk models for cause-specific mortality. Of the 7,015 participants, 1,496 deaths were recorded after a median follow-up time of 14 years (1998–2012). Plasma levels of inflammatory markers (neopterin, kynurenine:tryptophan ratio, and C-reactive protein), anthranilic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine were positively associated with all-cause mortality, and tryptophan and xanthurenic acid were inversely associated. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the highest (versus lowest) quartiles of the biomarkers were 1.19–1.60 for positive associations and 0.73–0.87 for negative associations. All of the inflammatory markers and most kynurenines, except kynurenic acid and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, were associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this general population, plasma biomarkers of inflammation and kynurenines were associated with risk of all-cause, cancer, and CVD mortality. Associations were stronger for CVD mortality than for mortality due to cancer or other causes. PMID:26823439

  13. Childhood-Onset Disease Predicts Mortality in an Adult Cohort of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Aimee O.; Trupin, Laura; Yazdany, Jinoos; Panopalis, Peter; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Yelin, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood-onset disease as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Data were derived from the University of California Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 957 adult subjects with SLE that includes 98 subjects with childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained via telephone interviews conducted between 2002-2007. The number of deaths during 5 years of follow-up was determined and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the cohort, and across age groups, were calculated. Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare mortality rates between childhood (defined as SLE diagnosis <18 years) and adult-onset SLE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine predictors of mortality. Results During the median follow-up period of 48 months, 72 deaths (7.5% of subjects) occurred, including 9 (12.5%) among those with childhood-onset SLE. The overall SMR was 2.5 (CI 2.0-3.2). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, after adjusting for age, childhood-onset subjects were at increased risk for mortality throughout the follow-up period (p<0.0001). In a multivariate model adjusting for age, disease duration and other covariates, childhood-onset SLE was independently associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-7.3), as was low socioeconomic status measured by education (HR: 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) and end stage renal disease (HR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.1-4.0). Conclusion Childhood-onset SLE was a strong predictor of mortality in this cohort. Interventions are needed to prevent early mortality in this population. PMID:20235215

  14. Long-Term Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Mortality From Diabetes in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Robert D.; Cakmak, Sabit; Turner, Michelle C.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Crouse, Dan L.; Peters, Paul A.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Brion, Orly; Jerrett, Michael; Martin, Randall V.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Goldberg, Mark S.; Pope, C. Arden; Burnett, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure to air pollution can promote the development of diabetes. However, whether this relationship actually translates into an increased risk of mortality attributable to diabetes is uncertain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association between long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and diabetes-related mortality in a prospective cohort analysis of 2.1 million adults from the 1991 Canadian census mortality follow-up study. Mortality information, including ∼5,200 deaths coded as diabetes being the underlying cause, was ascertained by linkage to the Canadian Mortality Database from 1991 to 2001. Subject-level estimates of long-term exposure to PM2.5 were derived from satellite observations. The hazard ratios (HRs) for diabetes-related mortality were related to PM2.5 and adjusted for individual-level and contextual variables using Cox proportional hazards survival models. RESULTS Mean PM2.5 exposure levels for the entire population were low (8.7 µg/m3; SD, 3.9 µg/m3; interquartile range, 6.2 µg/m3). In fully adjusted models, a 10-µg/m3 elevation in PM2.5 exposure was associated with an increase in risk for diabetes-related mortality (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.37–1.62). The monotonic change in risk to the population persisted to PM2.5 concentration <5 µg/m3. CONCLUSIONS Long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is related to an increased risk of mortality attributable to diabetes. These findings have considerable public health importance given the billions of people exposed to air pollution and the worldwide growing epidemic of diabetes. PMID:23780947

  15. Social isolation, loneliness, and all-cause mortality in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Shankar, Aparna; Demakakos, Panayotes; Wardle, Jane

    2013-04-09

    Both social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality, but it is uncertain whether their effects are independent or whether loneliness represents the emotional pathway through which social isolation impairs health. We therefore assessed the extent to which the association between social isolation and mortality is mediated by loneliness. We assessed social isolation in terms of contact with family and friends and participation in civic organizations in 6,500 men and women aged 52 and older who took part in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing in 2004-2005. A standard questionnaire measure of loneliness was administered also. We monitored all-cause mortality up to March 2012 (mean follow-up 7.25 y) and analyzed results using Cox proportional hazards regression. We found that mortality was higher among more socially isolated and more lonely participants. However, after adjusting statistically for demographic factors and baseline health, social isolation remained significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.26, 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.48 for the top quintile of isolation), but loneliness did not (hazard ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.09). The association of social isolation with mortality was unchanged when loneliness was included in the model. Both social isolation and loneliness were associated with increased mortality. However, the effect of loneliness was not independent of demographic characteristics or health problems and did not contribute to the risk associated with social isolation. Although both isolation and loneliness impair quality of life and well-being, efforts to reduce isolation are likely to be more relevant to mortality.

  16. Association of Cardiometabolic Multimorbidity With Mortality

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is increasing. OBJECTIVE To estimate reductions in life expectancy associated with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using individual participant data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration (689 300 participants; 91 cohorts; years of baseline surveys: 1960–2007; latest mortality follow-up: April 2013; 128 843 deaths). The HRs from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration were compared with those from the UK Biobank (499 808 participants; years of baseline surveys: 2006–2010; latest mortality follow-up: November 2013; 7995 deaths). Cumulative survival was estimated by applying calculated age-specific HRs for mortality to contemporary US age-specific death rates. EXPOSURES A history of 2 or more of the following: diabetes mellitus, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All-cause mortality and estimated reductions in life expectancy. RESULTS In participants in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration without a history of diabetes, stroke, or MI at baseline (reference group), the all-cause mortality rate adjusted to the age of 60 years was 6.8 per 1000 person-years. Mortality rates per 1000 person-years were 15.6 in participants with a history of diabetes, 16.1 in those with stroke, 16.8 in those with MI, 32.0 in those with both diabetes and MI, 32.5 in those with both diabetes and stroke, 32.8 in those with both stroke and MI, and 59.5 in those with diabetes, stroke, and MI. Compared with the reference group, the HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.9 (95%CI, 1.8–2.0) in participants with a history of diabetes, 2.1 (95%CI, 2.0–2.2) in those with stroke, 2.0 (95%CI, 1.9–2.2) in those with MI, 3.7 (95%CI, 3.3–4.1) in those with both diabetes and MI, 3.8 (95%CI, 3.5–4.2) in those with both diabetes and stroke, 3.5 (95%CI, 3.1–4.0) in those with both stroke and

  17. Symptoms of depression and all-cause mortality in farmers, a cohort study: the HUNT study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Letnes, Jon Magne; Hilt, Bjørn; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Krokstad, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore all-cause mortality and the association between symptoms of depression and all-cause mortality in farmers compared with other occupational groups, using a prospective cohort design. Methods We included adult participants with a known occupation from the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (Helseundersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag 2 (HUNT2) 1995–1997), Norway. Complete information on emigration and death from all causes was obtained from the National Registries. We used the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to measure symptoms of depression. We compared farmers to 4 other occupational groups. Our baseline study population comprised 32 618 participants. Statistical analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards models. Results The estimated mortality risk in farmers was lower than in all other occupations combined, with a sex and age-adjusted HR (0.91, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.00). However, farmers had an 11% increased age-adjusted and sex-adjusted mortality risk compared with the highest ranked socioeconomic group (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.25). In farmers, symptoms of depression were associated with a 13% increase in sex-adjusted and age-adjusted mortality risk (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.45). Compared with other occupations this was the lowest HR, also after adjusting for education, marital status, long-lasting limiting somatic illness and lifestyle factors (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.39). Conclusions Farmers had lower all-cause mortality compared with the other occupational groups combined. Symptoms of depression were associated with an increased mortality risk in farmers, but the risk increase was smaller compared with the other occupational groups. PMID:27188811

  18. The mortality of companies

    PubMed Central

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  19. Impact on mortality following first acute myocardial infarction of distance between home and hospital: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L; Lang, C C; Sullivan, F M; Boyle, P; Wang, J; Pringle, S D; MacDonald, T M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of distance between home and acute hospital on mortality outcome of patients experiencing an incident myocardial infarction (MI). Design: Cohort study using a record linkage database. Setting: Tayside, Scotland, UK. Patients: 10 541 patients with incident acute MI between 1994 and 2003 were identified from Tayside hospital discharge data and from death certification data. Main outcome measures: MI mortality in the community, all-cause mortality in hospital and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results: 4133 subjects died following incident MI in the community (that is, were not hospitalised), 6408 patients survived to be hospitalised and 1010 of these (15.8%) died in hospital. Of 5398 discharged from hospital, 1907 (35.3%) died during a median of 3.2 years of follow-up. After adjustment for rurality and other known risk factors, distance between home and admitting hospital was significantly associated with increased mortality both before hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.21 for >9 miles and 1.46, 1.09 to 1.95 for 3–9 miles when compared to <3 miles) and after hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.90, 1.19 to 3.02 and 1.27, 0.96 to 1.68). However, there was no effect of distance on in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 0.95, 0.45 to 2.03 and 1.02, 0.66 to 1.58). Conclusion: The distance between home and hospital of admission may predict mortality in subjects experiencing a first acute MI. This association was found both before and after hospitalisation. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this association. However these data provide support for policies that locate services for acute MI closer to where patients live. PMID:17984217

  20. Chiropractic Adjustment

    MedlinePlus

    ... structural alignment and improve your body's physical function. Low back pain, neck pain and headache are the most common ... treated. Chiropractic adjustment can be effective in treating low back pain, although much of the research done shows only ...

  1. Adjustment disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... from other people Skipped heartbeats and other physical complaints Trembling or twitching To have adjustment disorder, you ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  2. Age- and gender-specific population attributable risks of metabolic disorders on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent of attributable risks of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components on mortality remains unclear, especially with respect to age and gender. We aimed to assess the age- and gender-specific population attributable risks (PARs) for cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality and all-cause mortality for public health planning. Methods A total of 2,092 men and 2,197 women 30 years of age and older, who were included in the 2002 Taiwan Survey of Hypertension, Hyperglycemia, and Hyperlipidemia (TwSHHH), were linked to national death certificates acquired through December 31, 2009. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios and PARs for mortality, with a median follow-up of 7.7 years. Results The respective PAR percentages of MetS for all-cause and CVD-related mortality were 11.6 and 39.2 in men, respectively, and 18.6 and 44.4 in women, respectively. Central obesity had the highest PAR for CVD mortality in women (57.5%), whereas arterial hypertension had the highest PAR in men (57.5%). For all-cause mortality, younger men and post-menopausal women had higher PARs related to Mets and its components; for CVD mortality, post-menopausal women had higher overall PARs than their pre-menopausal counterparts. Conclusions MetS has a limited application to the PAR for all-cause mortality, especially in men; its PAR for CVD mortality is more evident. For CVD mortality, MetS components have higher PARs than MetS itself, especially hypertension in men and waist circumference in post-menopausal women. In addition, PARs for diabetes mellitus and low HDL-cholesterol may exceed 20%. We suggest differential control of risk factors in different subpopulation as a strategy to prevent CVD-related mortality. PMID:22321049

  3. Tea Consumption and Mortality Among Oldest-Old Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Rongping; Feng, Lei; Li, Jialiang; Ng, Tze-Pin; Zeng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between tea consumption and mortality among oldest-old Chinese. Design Population-based longitudinal data from The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) was analyzed using Cox semi-parametric proportional hazard model. Setting 631 randomly selected counties and cities of China’s 22 provinces. Participants 9,093 old adults aged 80 and above who provided complete data at baseline survey (year 1998). Measurements Self-reported current frequency of tea drinking and past frequency around age 60 were ascertained at baseline survey, and follow-up survey was conducted respectively in years 2000, 2002 and 2005. Results Among oldest-old Chinese, tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of mortality after adjusting for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, health practices, and health status. Compared with non-tea drinkers, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.90 (95% CI 0.84–0.96) for daily tea drinkers (at the baseline survey, 1998) and 1.00 (95% CI 1.01–1.07) for occasional tea drinkers respectively (P for linear trend=0.003). Similar results were found when tea drinking status around age 60 was used in analysis. Further analysis showed that compared to consistently infrequent tea drinkers, subjects who reported frequent tea drinking at both age 60 and at baseline survey had a 10% reduction in mortality (HR=0.90, 95%CI 0.84–0.97). Conclusion Tea consumption is associated reduced risk of mortality among oldest-old Chinese. PMID:24117374

  4. Beverage Habits and Mortality in Chinese Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pereira, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited research examining beverage habits, one of the most habitual dietary behaviors, with mortality risk. Objective: This study examined the association between coffee, black and green tea, sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks and juice), and alcohol and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Methods: A prospective data analysis was conducted with the use of the Singapore Chinese Health Study, including 52,584 Chinese men and women (aged 45–74 y) free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer at baseline (1993–1998) and followed through 2011 with 10,029 deaths. Beverages were examined with all-cause and cause-specific (cancer, CVD, and respiratory disease) mortality risk with the use of Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The associations between coffee, black tea, and alcohol intake and all-cause mortality were modified by smoking status. Among never-smokers there was an inverse dose-response association between higher amounts of coffee and black tea intake and all-cause, respiratory-related, and CVD mortality (black tea only). The fully adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality for coffee for <1/d, 1/d, and ≥2/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.89, 0.86, and 0.83, respectively (P-trend = 0.0003). For the same black tea categories the HRs were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.72, respectively (P-trend = 0.0005). Among ever-smokers there was no association between coffee or black tea and the outcomes. Relative to no alcohol, light to moderate intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96) in never-smokers with a similar magnitude of association in ever-smokers. There was no association between heavy alcohol intake and all-cause mortality in never-smokers and a strong positive association in ever-smokers (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.40, 1.74). Green tea and sugar-sweetened beverages were not associated with all-cause or cause-specific mortality. Conclusions: Higher coffee and black tea intake was

  5. Association between inflammatory biomarkers and all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Shipley, Martin J.; Bell, Joshua A.; Canonico, Marianne; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimäki, Mika

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory biomarker α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) was found to have the strongest association with 5-year mortality in a recent study of 106 biomarkers. We examined whether AGP is a better biomarker of mortality risk than the more widely used inflammatory biomarkers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS: We analyzed data for 6545 men and women aged 45–69 (mean 55.7) years from the Whitehall II cohort study. We assayed AGP, IL-6 and CRP levels from fasting serum samples collected in 1997–1999. Mortality followup was until June 2015. Cox regression analysis was used to model associations of inflammatory biomarkers with all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer-related mortality. RESULTS: Over the mean follow-up of 16.7 years, 736 deaths occurred, of which 181 were from cardiovascular disease and 347 from cancer. In the model adjusted for all covariates (age, sex, socioeconomic status, body mass index, health behaviours and chronic disease), AGP did not predict mortality beyond the first 5 years of follow-up; over this period, IL-6 and CRP had stronger associations with mortality. When we considered all covariates and biomarkers simultaneously, AGP no longer predicted all-cause mortality over the entire follow-up period (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90–1.08). Only IL-6 predicted all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.12–1.33) and cancer-related mortality (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.00–1.29) over the entire follow-up period, whereas CRP predicted only cardiovascular mortality (adjusted HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.06–1.61). INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that AGP is not a better marker of short-or long-term mortality risk than the more commonly used biomarkers IL-6 and CRP. PMID:27895145

  6. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as lead and mercury Chemicals such as pesticides Cigarettes Some viruses Alcohol For men, a reproductive hazard can affect the sperm. For a woman, a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. ...

  7. Associations of Bowel Movement Frequency with Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality among US Women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjie; Li, Yanping; Heianza, Yoriko; Staller, Kyle D.; Chan, Andrew T.; Rimm, Eric B.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a potential impact of gastrointestinal function on cardiometabolic risk. Abnormal bowel movements have been related to various cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and altered metabolism of bile acids and gut microbiota. However, little is known about whether bowel movement frequency affects risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. In the Nurses’ Health Study, bowel movement frequency was self-reported in 1982 by 86,289 women free from CVD and cancer. During up to 30 years of follow-up, we documented 7,628 incident CVD cases and 21,084 deaths. After adjustment for dietary intake, lifestyle, medication use, and other risk factors, as compared with women with daily bowel movement, having bowel movements more than once daily was significantly associated with increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–1.21), total mortality (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12–1.22), and cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.07–1.28). With further adjustment for body mass index and diabetes status, the association with total mortality remained significant (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.06–1.15), whereas the associations with incident CVD and cardiovascular mortality were no longer significant. Our results suggest increased bowel movement frequency is a potential risk factor for premature mortality. PMID:27596972

  8. Night work and mortality: prospective study among Finnish employees over the time span 1984 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Nätti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Oinas, Tomi; Mustosmäki, Armi

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that night work is associated with increased morbidity, but only a few studies have focused on its relation to mortality. This study investigates the relationship between the type of working-time arrangement (weekly night work/daytime work) and total and cause-specific mortality among men and women. The data consist of a representative working conditions survey of Finnish employees conducted in 1984 (2286 men/2216 women), which has been combined with register-based follow-up data from Statistics Finland covering the years 1985-2008. In the 1984 survey, the employees were asked if they worked during the night (23:00-06:00 h) and if so, how often. In this study, the authors compare employees who worked at night (121 men/89 women) to daytime employees who did not do night work (1325 men/1560 women). The relative risk of death was examined by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for background (age, level of education, family situation, and county), health (longstanding illness, pain symptoms, smoking status, and psychological symptoms), and work-related factors (weekly working hours, physical and psychological demands, demands of learning at work, and perceived job insecurity). Female employees working at night had a 2.25-fold higher risk of mortality than female dayworkers (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-4.20) after adjustment for background and health- and work-related factors. In addition to total mortality, night work was also associated with tumor mortality. Female night workers had a 2.82-fold higher risk of tumor mortality than female dayworkers (95% CI 1.20-6.65) in the adjusted model. Among men, no such significant association was observed. The present study indicated that female night workers had a higher risk of both total and tumor mortality compared to female daytime employees. Additional research on the potential factors and mechanisms behind the association between night work and mortality is required.

  9. GHb level and subsequent mortality among adults in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Saydah, Sharon; Tao, Min; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Gregg, Edward

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association of hyperglycemia, as measured by GHb, with subsequent mortality in a nationally representative sample of adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We included adults aged > or =20 years who participated in Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and had complete information, including baseline diabetes status by self-report and measured GHb (n = 19,025) and follow-up through the end of 2000 for mortality. RESULTS In the overall population, higher levels of GHb were associated with increased risk of mortality from all causes, heart disease, and cancer. After adjustment for potential risk factors, the relative hazard (RH) for adults with GHb > or =8% compared with adults with GHb <6% was 2.59 (95% CI 1.88-3.56) for all-cause mortality, 3.38 (1.98-5.77) for heart disease mortality, and 2.64 (1.17-5.97) for cancer mortality. Among adults with diagnosed diabetes, having GHb > or =8% compared with GHb <6% was associated with higher all-cause mortality (RH 1.68, 95% CI 1.03-2.74) and heart disease mortality (2.48, 1.09-5.64), but there was no increased risk of cancer mortality by GHb category. Among adults without diagnosed diabetes, there was no significant association of all-cause, heart disease, or cancer mortality and GHb category. CONCLUSIONS These results highlight the importance of GHb levels in mortality risk among a nationally representative sample of adults with and without diagnosed diabetes and indicate that higher levels are associated with increased mortality in adults with diabetes.

  10. Relation of perioperative elevation of troponin to long-term mortality after orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Oberweis, Brandon S; Smilowitz, Nathaniel R; Nukala, Swetha; Rosenberg, Andrew; Xu, Jinfeng; Stuchin, Steven; Iorio, Richard; Errico, Thomas; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2015-06-15

    Myocardial necrosis in the perioperative period of noncardiac surgery is associated with short-term mortality, but long-term outcomes have not been characterized. We investigated the association between perioperative troponin elevation and long-term mortality in a retrospective study of consecutive subjects who underwent hip, knee, and spine surgery. Perioperative myocardial necrosis and International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision-coded myocardial infarction (MI) were recorded. Long-term survival was assessed using the Social Security Death Index database. Logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors of long-term mortality. A total of 3,050 subjects underwent surgery. Mean age was 60.8 years, and 59% were women. Postoperative troponin was measured in 1,055 subjects (34.6%). Myocardial necrosis occurred in 179 cases (5.9%), and MI was coded in 20 (0.7%). Over 9,015 patient-years of follow-up, 111 deaths (3.6%) occurred. Long-term mortality was 16.8% in subjects with myocardial necrosis and 5.8% with a troponin in the normal range. Perioperative troponin elevation (hazard ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 4.10) and coded postoperative MI (adjusted hazard ratio 3.51, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 8.53) were significantly associated with long-term mortality after multivariable adjustment. After excluding patients with coronary artery disease and renal dysfunction, myocardial necrosis remained associated with long-term mortality. In conclusion, postoperative myocardial necrosis is common after orthopedic surgery. Myocardial necrosis is independently associated with long-term mortality at 3 years and may be used to identify patients at higher risk for events who may benefit from aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Associations of Insulin Resistance and Adiponectin With Mortality in Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Catherine; Irwin, Melinda L.; Xiao, Liren; Henderson, Katherine D.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Baumgartner, Richard N.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Overweight or obese breast cancer patients have a worse prognosis compared with normal-weight patients. This may be attributed to hyperinsulinemia and dysregulation of adipokine levels associated with overweight and obesity. Here, we evaluate whether low levels of adiponectin and a greater level of insulin resistance are associated with breast cancer mortality and all-cause mortality. Patients and Methods We measured glucose, insulin, and adiponectin levels in fasting serum samples from 527 women enrolled in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study, a multiethnic, prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with stage I-IIIA breast cancer. We evaluated the association between adiponectin and insulin and glucose levels (expressed as the Homeostatic Model Assessment [HOMA] score) represented as continuous measures and median split categories, along with breast cancer mortality and all-cause mortality, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Increasing HOMA scores were associated with reduced breast cancer survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.20) and reduced all-cause survival (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.15) after adjustment for possible confounders. Higher levels of adiponectin (above the median: 15.5 μg/mL) were associated with longer breast cancer survival (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.95) after adjustment for covariates. A continuous measure of adiponectin was not associated with either breast cancer–specific or all-cause mortality. Conclusion Elevated HOMA scores and low levels of adiponectin, both associated with obesity, were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the association between low levels of adiponectin and increased breast cancer mortality in breast cancer survivors. PMID:21115858

  12. A frailty index to predict the mortality risk in a population of senior mexican adults

    PubMed Central

    García-González, José Juan; García-Peña, Carmen; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Background Frailty in the elderly can be regarded as nonspecific vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, caused by multiple factors. The aim was to analyze the relationships between the frailty index, age and mortality in a two year follow up study of Mexican elderly. Methods A frailty index was developed using 34 variables. To obtain the index, the mean of the total score for each individual was obtained. Survival analyses techniques were used to examine the risk ratios for the different levels of the frailty index. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained, adjusted for age and gender. Cox proportional hazards models were also built to obtain hazard ratio estimates. Results A total of 4082 participants was analyzed. Participants had an average age of 73 years and 52.5% were women. On average, participants were followed-up for 710 days (standard deviation = 111 days) and 279 of them died. Mortality increased with the frailty index level, especially in those with levels between .21 to .65, reaching approximately 17% and 21%, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models showed that participants with frailty index levels associated to increased mortality (.21 and higher) represent 24.0% of those aged 65-69 years and 47.6% of those 85 and older. Conclusion The frailty index shows the properties found in the other studies, it allows stratifying older Mexican into several groups different by the degree of the risk of mortality, and therefore the frailty index can be used in assessing health of elderly. PMID:19887005

  13. Relationship Between Circulating Concentrations of Thyrotropin, Free Thyroxine, and Free Triiodothyronine and 9-Year Mortality in Euthyroid Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ceresini, Graziano; Marina, Michela; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Thyroid dysfunction in the elderly is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, with mortality being associated with low TSH. However, it is still unknown whether variability of thyroid function test within the reference range is associated with mortality in older adults. We studied the association between plasma levels of TSH, free T3 (FT3), and free T4 (FT4), and all-cause mortality in older adults who had all three hormones within the normal range. Design Longitudinal study Setting Community-based Participants Total of 815 euthyroid participants of the InCHIANTI study, aged 65 years or older Measurements All subjects had TSH, FT3, and FT4 within the reference range at baseline. Plasma TSH, FT3 and FT4 were predictors and 9-year all-cause mortality was the outcome. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for confounders were used to examine the relationship between quartiles of TSH, FT3, and FT4 and all-cause mortality over 9 years of follow-up. Results During the follow-up (mean persons-years 8643.74 [min-max, 35.36-16985.00]), 181 deaths occurred (22.2%). Participants with TSH in the lower quartile had higher mortality than the rest of the population. After adjusting for multiple confounders, participants with TSH in the lowest quartile (Hazard Ratio: 2.22; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.19–4.22) had significantly higher all-cause mortality than those with TSH in the highest quartile. Neither FT3 nor FT4 were associated with mortality. Conclusions In euthyroid elderly subjects, normal-low TSH represents an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. PMID:27000328

  14. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) mortality score

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; dos Santos, Cecília Andrade; Esmeraldo, Isaac Melo; Chaves, Mariana Leal; Lins, Ricardo Felipe de Albuquerque; Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score) fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality. Methods Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed. Results 360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1) - 1.3%, (2) - 11.4%, (3)-27.3%, (4) - 50 %, (P<0.001); Aristotle basic score (1) - 1.1%, (2) - 12.2%, (3) - 34%, (4) - 64.7%, (P<0.001); and STS-EACTS mortality score (1) - 5.5 %, (2) - 13.6%, (3) - 18.7%, (4) - 35.8%, (P<0.001). The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766. Conclusion The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality. PMID:26107445

  15. Quality of diet and mortality among Japanese men and women: Japan Public Health Center based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Shamima; Kashino, Ikuko; Goto, Atsushi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between adherence to the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top and total and cause specific mortality. Design Large scale population based prospective cohort study in Japan with follow-up for a median of 15 years. Setting 11 public health centre areas across Japan. Participants 36 624 men and 42 970 women aged 45-75 who had no history of cancer, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or chronic liver disease. Main outcome measures Deaths and causes of death identified with the residential registry and death certificates. Results Higher scores on the food guide (better adherence) were associated with lower total mortality; the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of total mortality for the lowest through highest scores were 1.00, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97), 0.88 (0.83 to 0.93), and 0.85 (0.79 to 0.91) (P<0.001 for trend) and the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase in food guide scores was 0.93 (0.91 to 0.95; P<0.001 for trend). This score was inversely associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase 0.93, 0.89 to 0.98; P=0.005 for trend) and particularly from cerebrovascular disease (0.89, 0.82 to 0.95; P=0.002 for trend). There was some evidence, though not significant, of an inverse association for cancer mortality (0.96, 0.93 to 1.00; P=0.053 for trend). Conclusion Closer adherence to Japanese dietary guidelines was associated with a lower risk of total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease, particularly from cerebrovascular disease, in Japanese adults. PMID:27005903

  16. Childhood Sleep Duration and Lifelong Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Katherine A.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Kern, Margaret L.; Friedman, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sleep duration is known to significantly affect health in adults and children, but little is understood about long-term associations. This prospective cohort study is the first to examine whether childhood sleep duration is associated with lifelong mortality risk. Methods Data from childhood were refined and mortality data collected for 1,145 participants from the Terman Life Cycle Study. Participants were born between 1904 and 1915, lived to at least 1940, and had complete age, bedtime, and waketime data at initial data collection (1917–1926). Homogeneity of the cohort sample (intelligent, mostly white) limits generality but provides natural control of common confounds. Through 2009, 1,039 participants had confirmed deaths. Sleep duration was calculated as the difference between each child’s bed and wake times. Age-adjusted sleep (deviation from that predicted by age) was computed. Cox proportional hazards survival models evaluated childhood sleep duration as a predictor of mortality separately by sex, controlling for baseline age. Results For males, a quadratic relation emerged: male children who under-slept or over-slept compared to peers were at increased risk of lifelong all-cause mortality (HR = 1.15, CI = 1.05 – 1.27). Effect sizes were smaller and non-significant in females (HR = 1.02, CI = 0.91 – 1.14). Conclusions Male children with shorter or longer sleep durations than expected for their age were at increased risk of death at any given age in adulthood. The findings suggest that sleep may be a core biobehavioral trait, with implications for new models of sleep and health throughout the entire lifespan. PMID:24588628

  17. Dietary quality and mortality among myocardial infarction survivors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Flint, Alan; Pai, Jennifer; Forman, John P.; Hu, Frank B.; Willett, Walter C.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Rimm, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Information on diet after myocardial infarction (MI) and mortality is limited, despite the growing number of MI survivors in the United States. Objective To examine the association of post-MI dietary quality, and changes from pre- to post-MI, with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among MI survivors. Design, Setting, and Participants We included 2,258 women from the Nurses’ Health Study and 1,840 men from the Health Professional Follow-Up Study. Participants survived an initial MI during study follow up and provided both pre- and post-MI food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Diet quality was measured using Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI2010), which consists of food and nutrients associated with risk of chronic disease in the literature. We adjusted for medication use, medical history, and lifestyle risk factors using Cox proportional hazards models. Main Outcome Measures all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Results During follow-up, we confirmed 682 all-cause deaths for women, and 451 for men. The median survival time after initial MI onset was 8.7 years for women and 9.0 years for men. After pooling results together, the adjusted HR was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.60–0.96) for all-cause and 0.73 (95% CI: 0.51–1.04) for cardiovascular mortality, comparing extreme quintiles of post-MI AHEI2010. A greater increase in the AHEI2010 score from pre- to post-MI was significantly associated with lower all-cause (pooled HR= 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56–0.91) and cardiovascular mortality (pooled HR= 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41–0.86), comparing extreme quintiles. The adjusted HR associated with post-MI AHEI2010 were 0.73 (95% CI: 0.58–0.93) for all-cause mortality and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.64–1.04) for cardiovascular mortality when the alcohol component was excluded. Conclusions and Relevance MI survivors who consume a higher quality diet, which has been associated with lower risk of CHD in primary prevention, have lower subsequent all-cause mortality. PMID:23999993

  18. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 Concentrations Predict AKI and Long-Term Mortality in Adults after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, William R.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Devereaux, Philip J.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Shortt, Colleen; Shlipak, Michael; Whitlock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has an integral role in the pathophysiology of AKI. We investigated the associations of two biomarkers of inflammation, plasma IL-6 and IL-10, with AKI and mortality in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were enrolled at six academic centers (n=960). AKI was defined as a ≥50% or ≥0.3-mg/dl increase in serum creatinine from baseline. Pre- and postoperative IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were categorized into tertiles and evaluated for associations with outcomes of in-hospital AKI or postdischarge all-cause mortality at a median of 3 years after surgery. Preoperative concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were not significantly associated with AKI or mortality. Elevated first postoperative IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI, and the risk increased in a dose-dependent manner (second tertile adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.61 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.10 to 2.36]; third tertile adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 1.45 to 3.13]). First postoperative IL-6 concentration was not associated with risk of mortality; however, the second tertile of peak IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with lower risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.57 to 0.99]). Elevated first postoperative IL-10 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI (adjusted OR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.04 to 2.38]) and lower risk of mortality (adjusted HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.56 to 0.93]). There was a significant interaction between the concentration of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, an established AKI biomarker, and the association of IL-10 concentration with mortality (P=0.01). These findings suggest plasma IL-6 and IL-10 may serve as biomarkers for perioperative outcomes. PMID:25855775

  19. Lower Mortality Associated With Overweight in the U.S. National Health Interview Survey: Is Overweight Protective?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Meina; Pan, Tania; Tong, Shilu

    2016-01-01

    It is still debatable whether overweight has protective or detrimental effects on survival. The focus of the ongoing debate is on possible confounding bias due to factors such as preexisting illness and smoking. We aimed to assess the association between overweight and mortality and to examine confounding effects of various factors including smoking and preexisting cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, asthma, bronchitis, and kidney disease on the overweight-mortality association in adults.The data were extracted from the public-use National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 1997 to 2009. Mortality data up to December 31, 2011 were linked to 131,813 with normal weight and 120,217 overweight adults. We assessed the association between overweight and mortality using Cox proportional hazard model with adjustments for various sets of confounding factors-age, sex, smoking, race, survey year, diabetes, CVD, cancer, asthma, bronchitis, and kidney disease.During the period from the original surveys to December 31, 2011, 22,513 (11,815 normal weight and 10,698 overweight) adults died. Normal weight and overweight groups differed in the characteristics of age, sex, smoking, and preexisting diseases. After adjusting for age and sex, the risk of dying was lower for overweight than normal weight adults (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-0.85). Lower mortality risk associated with overweight remained after further adjusting for smoking and preexisting diseases such as diabetes, CVD, cancer, asthma, bronchitis, and kidney disease (HR, 0.80; 95% CI: 0.78-0.82). We observed a similar pattern for men and women, and for those free from preexisting diabetes, hypertension, and CVD.In conclusion, overweight adults have a lower mortality risk than normal weight adults. Our findings do not support that the lower mortality in overweight adults is due to confounding effects of smoking and preexisting diseases.

  20. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: A Cohort Mortality Study With Emphasis on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schleiff, Patricia L.; Lubin, Jay H.; Blair, Aaron; Stewart, Patricia A.; Vermeulen, Roel; Coble, Joseph B.; Silverman, Debra T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current information points to an association between diesel exhaust exposure and lung cancer and other mortality outcomes, but uncertainties remain. Methods We undertook a cohort mortality study of 12 315 workers exposed to diesel exhaust at eight US non-metal mining facilities. Historical measurements and surrogate exposure data, along with study industrial hygiene measurements, were used to derive retrospective quantitative estimates of respirable elemental carbon (REC) exposure for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios and internally adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate REC exposure–associated risk. Analyses were both unlagged and lagged to exclude recent exposure such as that occurring in the 15 years directly before the date of death. Results Standardized mortality ratios for lung cancer (1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 1.44), esophageal cancer (1.83, 95% CI = 1.16 to 2.75), and pneumoconiosis (12.20, 95% CI = 6.82 to 20.12) were elevated in the complete cohort compared with state-based mortality rates, but all-cause, bladder cancer, heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality were not. Differences in risk by worker location (ever-underground vs surface only) initially obscured a positive diesel exhaust exposure–response relationship with lung cancer in the complete cohort, although it became apparent after adjustment for worker location. The hazard ratios (HRs) for lung cancer mortality increased with increasing 15-year lagged cumulative REC exposure for ever-underground workers with 5 or more years of tenure to a maximum in the 640 to less than 1280 μg/m3-y category compared with the reference category (0 to <20 μg/m3-y; 30 deaths compared with eight deaths of the total of 93; HR = 5.01, 95% CI = 1.97 to 12.76) but declined at higher exposures. Average REC intensity hazard ratios rose to a plateau around 32 μg/m3. Elevated hazard ratios and evidence of exposure

  1. Education and Mortality in the Rome Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Cacciani, Laura; Bargagli, Anna Maria; Cesaroni, Giulia; Forastiere, Francesco; Agabiti, Nera; Davoli, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence supports an inverse association between socioeconomic status and mortality. We analysed data from a large cohort of residents in Rome followed-up between 2001 and 2012 to assess the relationship between individual education and mortality. We distinguished five causes of death and investigated the role of age, gender, and birthplace. Methods From the Municipal Register we enrolled residents of Rome on October 21st 2001 and collected information on educational level attained from the 2001 Census. We selected Italian citizens aged 30–74 years and followed-up their vital status until 2012 (n = 1,283,767), identifying the cause of death from the Regional Mortality Registry. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for overall and cause-specific mortality in relation to education. We used age, gender, and birthplace for adjusted or stratified analyses. We used the inverse probability weighting approach to account for right censoring due to emigration. Results We observed an inverse association between education (none vs. post-secondary+ level) and overall mortality (HRs(95%CIs): 2.1(1.98–2.17), males; 1.5(1.46–1.59), females) varying according to demographic characteristics. Cause-specific analysis also indicated an inverse association with education, in particular for respiratory, digestive or circulatory system related-mortality, and the youngest people seemed to be more vulnerable to low education. Conclusion Our results confirm the inverse association between education and overall or cause-specific mortality and show differentials particularly marked among young people compared to the elderly. The findings provide further evidence from the Mediterranean area, and may contribute to national and cross-country comparisons in Europe to understand the mechanisms generating socioeconomic differentials especially during the current recession period. PMID:26376166

  2. Consequences of intimate partner violence against women on under-five child mortality in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akhtar; Sumi, Nahid Sultana; Haque, M Ershadul; Bari, Wasimul

    2014-05-01

    It is well established that intimate partner violence (IPV) against women adversely affects maternal morbidity and mortality. But a limited number of studies were found in the literature regarding the association between IPV and under-five child mortality. In this article, using Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2007 data, we examined the effect of IPV on under-five child mortality. A product-limit approach was used for bivariate survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazard multiple regression models were used to investigate the effect of IPV controlling potential confounders. In bivariate analysis, the variables exposure to IPV, mother's age at birth, mother's education, residence type, division, number of children, wealth index, occupation, access to media, and decision autonomy were found to be potential risk factors for child mortality. Results indicated that women exposed to IPV were more likely to experience under-five child mortality compared with women not exposed. The unadjusted hazard ratio for IPV was 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.09, 1.35]) with p value < .01, whereas it was 1.16 (95% CI = [1.04, 1.29]) with p value < .01 and 1.13 (95% CI = [1.01, 1.26]) with p value < .05 in two adjusted models. These results implied that IPV against women is a problem not only for women but also for their children's survival.

  3. Emotion Suppression and Mortality Risk Over a 12-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Fiscella, Kevin; Kawachi, Ichiro; Duberstein, Paul; Muennig, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Suppression of emotion has long been suspected to have a role in health, but empirical work has yielded mixed findings. We examined the association between emotion suppression and all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality over 12 years of follow-up in a nationally representative US sample. Methods We used the 2008 General Social Survey-National Death Index (NDI) cohort, which included an emotion suppression scale administered to 729 people in 1996. Prospective mortality follow up between 1996 and 2008 of 111 deaths (37 by cardiovascular disease, 34 by cancer) was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, gender, education, and minority race/ethnicity. Results The 75th vs. 25th percentile on the emotional suppression score was associated with hazard ratio (HR) of 1.35 (95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] = 1.00, 1.82; p = .049) for all-cause mortality. For cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality, the HRs were 1.70 (95% CI = 1.01, 2.88, p = 0.049) and 1.47 (95% CI = .87, 2.47, p = 0.148) respectively. Conclusions Emotion suppression may convey risk for earlier death, including death from cancer. Further work is needed to better understand the biopsychosocial mechanisms for this risk, as well as the nature of associations between suppression and different forms of mortality. PMID:24119947

  4. Cardiorespiratory Fitness as a Predictor of Dementia Mortality in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Sui, Xuemei; Laditka, James N.; Church, Timothy S.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Hussey, Jim; Blair, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that physical activity may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. However, few reports have examined the physical activity-dementia association with objective measures of physical activity. Cardiorespiratory fitness (hereafter called fitness) is an objective reproducible measure of recent physical activity habits. Purpose: We sought to determine whether fitness is associated with lower risk for dementia mortality in women and men. Methods: We followed 14,811 women and 45,078 men, ages 20-88 at baseline, for an average of 17 years. All participants completed a preventive health examination at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas during 1970-2001. Fitness was measured with a maximal treadmill exercise test, with results expressed in maximal metabolic equivalents (METs). The National Death Index identified deaths through 2003. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between baseline fitness and dementia mortality, adjusting for age, sex, examination year, body mass index, smoking, alcohol use, abnormal ECGs, and health status. Results: There were 164 deaths with dementia listed as the cause during 1,012,125 person-years of exposure. Each 1-MET increase in fitness was associated with a 14% lower adjusted risk of dementia mortality (95% confidence interval, CI 6%-22%). With fitness expressed in tertiles, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for those in the middle and high fitness groups suggest their risk of dementia mortality was less than half that of those in the lowest fitness group (respectively: HR 0.44, CI 0.26-0.74; HR 0.49, CI 0.26-0.90). Conclusion: Greater fitness was associated with lower risk of mortality from dementia in a large cohort of men and women. PMID:21796048

  5. Use of glucosamine and chondroitin in relation to mortality.

    PubMed

    Bell, Griffith A; Kantor, Elizabeth D; Lampe, Johanna W; Shen, Danny D; White, Emily

    2012-08-01

    Glucosamine and chondroitin are products commonly used by older adults in the US and Europe. There is limited evidence that they have anti-inflammatory properties, which could provide risk reduction of several diseases. However, data on their long-term health effects is lacking. To evaluate whether use of glucosamine and chondroitin are associated with cause-specific and total mortality. Participants (n = 77,510) were members of a cohort study of Washington State (US) residents aged 50-76 years who entered the cohort in 2000-2002 by completing a baseline questionnaire that included questions on glucosamine and chondroitin use. Participants were followed for mortality through 2008 (n = 5,362 deaths). Hazard ratios (HR) for death adjusted for multiple covariates were estimated using Cox models. Current (baseline) glucosamine and chondroitin use were associated with a decreased risk of total mortality compared to never use. The adjusted HR associated with current use of glucosamine (with or without chondroitin) was 0.82 (95 % CI 0.75-0.90) and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.78-0.96) for chondroitin (included in two-thirds of glucosamine supplements). Current use of glucosamine was associated with a significant decreased risk of death from cancer (HR 0.87 95 % CI 0.76-0.98) and with a large risk reduction for death from respiratory diseases (HR 0.59 95 % CI 0.41-0.83). Use of glucosamine with or without chondroitin was associated with reduced total mortality and with reductions of several broad causes of death. Although bias cannot be ruled out, these results suggest that glucosamine may provide some mortality benefit.

  6. Correlation of mutagenic assessment of Houston air particulate extracts in relation to lung cancer mortality rates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.D.; Connor, T.H.; MacDonald, E.J.; Trieff, N.M.; Legator, M.S.; MacKenzie, K.W. Jr.; Dobbins, J.G.

    1982-08-01

    Air particulate extracts from a series of solvents were tested in the Ames mutagen detection system and were found to be mutagenic in varying degrees as a function of the particulate collection site in Houston, Texas. The mutagenicity level at seven sites was compared with age-adjusted mortality rates in the same areas. Significant correlation was found with the lung cancer mortality rates but not with mortality rates for other causes. These findings support the hypothesis of a contribution of urban air particulate to the lung cancer rates. Furthermore, these findings suggest that an index of the mutagenicity of air particulate is a more powerful measure of the human health hazard of air pollution than the traditional indices of particulate concentration.

  7. Prospective study of coffee consumption and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular mortality in Swedish women.

    PubMed

    Löf, Marie; Sandin, Sven; Yin, Li; Adami, Hans-Olov; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether coffee consumption was associated with all-cause, cancer, or cardiovascular mortality in a prospective cohort of 49,259 Swedish women. Of the 1576 deaths that occurred in the cohort, 956 were due to cancer and 158 were due to cardiovascular disease. We used Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate multivariable relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Compared to a coffee consumption of 0-1 cups/day, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.69-0.94) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.88 (95 % CI 0.74-1.05) for >5 cups/day. Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality or cardiovascular mortality when analyzed in the entire cohort. However, in supplementary analyses of women over 50 years of age, the RR for all cause-mortality was 0.74 (95 % CI 0.62-0.89) for 2-5 cups/day and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.70-1.06) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. In this same subgroup, the RRs for cancer mortality were 1.06 (95 % CI 0.81-1.38) for 2-5 cups/day and 1.40 (95 % CI 1.05-1.89) for >5 cups/day when compared to 0-1 cups/day. No associations between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality, or cardiovascular mortality were observed among women below 50 years of age. In conclusion, higher coffee consumption was associated with lower all-cause mortality when compared to a consumption of 0-1 cups/day. Furthermore, coffee may have differential effects on mortality before and after 50 years of age.

  8. Landslide Hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Landslide hazards occur in many places around What Can You Do If You Live Near Steep Hills? the world and include fast-moving debris flows, slow-moving landslides, and a variety of flows and slides initiating from volcanoes. Each year, these hazards cost billions of dollars and cause numerous fatalities and injuries. Awareness and education about these hazards is a first step toward reducing damaging effects. The U.S. Geological Survey conducts research and distributes information about geologic hazards. This Fact Sheet is published in English and Spanish and can be reproduced in any form for further distribution. 

  9. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, H.H.

    1988-03-11

    Abstract and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus. 3 figs.

  10. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  11. Insomnia symptoms and mortality: a register-linked study among women and men from Finland, Norway and Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Lallukka, Tea; Podlipskytė, Aurelija; Sivertsen, Børge; Andruškienė, Jurgita; Varoneckas, Giedrius; Lahelma, Eero; Ursin, Reidun; Tell, Grethe S; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2016-02-01

    Evidence on the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality is limited and inconsistent. This study examined the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality in cohorts from three countries to show common and unique patterns. The Finnish cohort comprised 6605 employees of the City of Helsinki, aged 40-60 years at baseline in 2000-2002. The Norwegian cohort included 6236 participants from Western Norway, aged 40-45 years at baseline in 1997-1999. The Lithuanian cohort comprised 1602 participants from the City of Palanga, aged 35-74 years at baseline in 2003. Mortality data were derived from the Statistics Finland and Norwegian Cause of Death Registry until the end of 2012, and from the Lithuanian Regional Mortality Register until the end of 2013. Insomnia symptoms comprised difficulties initiating sleep, nocturnal awakenings, and waking up too early. Covariates were age, marital status, education, smoking, alcohol, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, depression, shift work, sleep duration, and self-rated health. Cox regression analysis was used. Frequent difficulties initiating sleep were associated with all-cause mortality among men after full adjustments in the Finnish (hazard ratio 2.51; 95% confidence interval 1.07-5.88) and Norwegian (hazard ratio 3.42; 95% confidence interval 1.03-11.35) cohorts. Among women and in Lithuania, insomnia symptoms were not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality after adjustments. In conclusion, difficulties initiating sleep were associated with mortality among Norwegian and Finnish men. Variation and heterogeneity in the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality highlights that further research needs to distinguish between men and women, specific symptoms and national contexts, and focus on more chronic insomnia.

  12. Longitudinal Analysis of Patient Specific Predictors for Mortality in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Danda, Neeraja; Etzion, Zipora; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction White Blood Cell (WBC) count, %HbF, and serum creatinine (Cr), have been identified as markers for increased mortality in sickle cell anemia (SCA) but no studies have examined the significance of longitudinal rate of change in these or other biomarkers for SCA individuals. Methods Clinical, demographic and laboratory data from SCA patients seen in 2002 by our hospital system were obtained. Those who were still followed in 2012 (survival cohort) were compared to those who had died in the interim (mortality cohort). Patients lost to follow-up were excluded. Age adjusted multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to assess hazard ratios of mortality risk associated with the direction and degree of change for each variable. Results 359 SCA patients were identified. Baseline higher levels of WBC, serum creatinine and hospital admissions were associated with increased mortality, as were alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransaminase levels. Lower baseline levels of %HbF were also associated with increased mortality. When longitudinal rates of change for individuals were assessed, increases in Hb or WBC over patient baseline values were associated with greater mortality risk (HR 1.54, p = 0.02 and HR 1.16, p = 0.01 with negative predictive values of 87.8 and 94.4 respectively), while increasing ED use was associated with decreased mortality (HR 0.84, p = 0.01). We did not detect any increased mortality risk for longitudinal changes in annual clinic visits or admissions, creatinine or %HbF. Conclusions Although initial steady state observations can help predict survival in SCA, the longitudinal course of a patient may give additional prognostic information. PMID:27764159

  13. Are psychosocial stressors associated with the relationship of alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown a protective association of moderate alcohol intake with mortality. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship could be due to misclassification confounding. As psychosocial stressors are among those factors that have not been sufficiently controlled for, we assessed whether they may confound the relationship between alcohol consumption and all-cause mortality. Methods Three cross-sectional MONICA surveys (conducted 1984–1995) including 11,282 subjects aged 25–74 years were followed up within the framework of KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg), a population-based cohort, until 2002. The prevalences of diseases as well as of lifestyle, clinical and psychosocial variables were compared in different alcohol consumption categories. To assess all-cause mortality risks, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models which included lifestyle, clinical and psychosocial variables. Results Diseases were more prevalent among non-drinkers than among drinkers: Moreover, non-drinkers showed a higher percentage of an unfavourable lifestyle and were more affected with psychosocial stressors at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted HRs for moderate alcohol consumption versus no consumption were 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58-0.94) in men and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.66-1.16) in women. In men, moderate drinkers had a significantly lower all-cause mortality risk than non-drinkers or heavy drinkers (p = 0.002) even after multivariable adjustment. In women, moderate alcohol consumption was not associated with lowered risk of death from all causes. Conclusions The present study confirmed the impact of sick quitters on mortality risk, but failed to show that the association between alcohol consumption and mortality is confounded by psychosocial stressors. PMID:24708657

  14. Leukocyte telomere length and mortality among U.S. adults: Effect modification by physical activity behaviour.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-02-17

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and mortality (outcome variable), with consideration by physical activity behaviour. Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were employed (N = 6,611; 20-85 yrs), with follow-up mortality assessment through 31 December 2006. DNA was extracted from whole blood to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared to those in the first LTL tertile, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for those in the 2(nd) and 3(rd) LTL tertiles, respectively, was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60-1.12; P = .22) and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.50-1.14; P = .18). However, after adjustments, LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1) was associated with all-cause mortality (HR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.14-0.93; P = .03) for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise. Similarly, LTL was associated with CVD-specific mortality for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise (HR = 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04-0.73; P = .02). Longer telomeres are associated with increased survival, particularly among men and those who are active, underscoring the importance of promotion of physical activity behaviour.

  15. High Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Cardiovascular Mortality in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a novel simple biomarker of inflammation. It has emerged as a predictor of poor prognosis in cancer and cardiovascular disease in general population. But little was known of its prognostic value in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Here we investigated the association between NLR and cardiovascular risk markers, including increased pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and intima-media thickness (IMT), and mortality in HD patients. Two hundred and sixty-eight HD patients were enrolled in this study and were followed for 36 months. The primary end point was all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate the adjusted hazard ratios for NLR on all-cause and cardiovascular survival. We pinpointed that higher NLR in HD patients was a predictor of increased PP, LVMI, and IMT; HD patients with higher NLR had a lower survival at the end of the study; furthermore, high NLR was an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when adjusted for other risk factors. In conclusion, higher NLR in HD patients was associated with cardiovascular risk factors and mortality. PMID:28316378

  16. Serum prealbumin and its changes over time are associated with mortality in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenji; Pan, Yu; Tang, Xiao; Hao, Guihua; Xie, Yingxin; Ma, Shuai; Luo, Jianfeng; Guo, Daqiao; Ding, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Serum prealbumin is a clinically relevant indicator of nutritional status and inflammation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). This study aimed to determine whether serum prealbumin and its longitudinal changes over a week could improve the prediction of 90-day mortality in AKI patients. This prospective cohort study included 340 adults with AKI between 2014 and 2015. There were 94 (27.6%) patient deaths within 90 days. Serum prealbumin level <10 mg/dL at the time of AKI diagnosis was associated with a 155% increased death risk ratio (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 5.49; P = 0.02). Serum prealbumin fall >4 mg/dL was also associated with 90-day mortality in adjusted Cox regression models (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.06 to 3.03; P = 0.03). Compared to serum albumin, mortality-predictability of serum prealbumin (P = 0.01) and its changes (P = 0.01) were both increased. Adding prealbumin and its changes on the conventional covariates improved the prediction of progression to 90-day mortality (NRI 0.29, P = 0.04; aIDI 0.08; P = 0.03). In conclusion, serum prealbumin, and its changes were independent predictors of worse prognosis in AKI, and could be potential surrogates to better predict 90-day mortality. PMID:28145481

  17. The effects of intestinal tract bacterial diversity on mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Littmann, Eric R.; Morjaria, Sejal; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Viale, Agnes; Dahi, Parastoo B.; Ponce, Doris M.; Barker, Juliet N.; Giralt, Sergio; van den Brink, Marcel; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly diverse bacterial populations inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and modulate host inflammation and promote immune tolerance. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the gastrointestinal mucosa is damaged, and colonizing bacteria are impacted, leading to an impaired intestinal microbiota with reduced diversity. We examined the impact of intestinal diversity on subsequent mortality outcomes following transplantation. Fecal specimens were collected from 80 recipients of allo-HSCT at the time of stem cell engraftment. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were characterized, and microbial diversity was estimated using the inverse Simpson index. Subjects were classified into high, intermediate, and low diversity groups and assessed for differences in outcomes. Mortality outcomes were significantly worse in patients with lower intestinal diversity; overall survival at 3 years was 36%, 60%, and 67% for low, intermediate, and high diversity groups, respectively (P = .019, log-rank test). Low diversity showed a strong effect on mortality after multivariate adjustment for other clinical predictors (transplant related mortality: adjusted hazard ratio, 5.25; P = .014). In conclusion, the diversity of the intestinal microbiota at engraftment is an independent predictor of mortality in allo-HSCT recipients. These results indicate that the intestinal microbiota may be an important factor in the success or failure in allo-HSCT. PMID:24939656

  18. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  19. Meta-analysis of digoxin use and risk of mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ai-Jun; Lv, Yan-Ni; Zhong, Hai-Li; Wen, Jin-Hua; Wei, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Li-Li

    2015-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the safety of digoxin use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). To address this issue, the investigators assembled a synthesis of the available evidence on the relation between digoxin and all-cause mortality in patients with AF. PubMed and the Embase database were systematically searched to identify all eligible studies examining the association between digoxin use and the mortality risk in AF. Overall hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the random-effects model. Eleven observational studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria, 5 of which additionally used propensity score matching for statistical adjustment. In total, 318,191 patients were followed up for a mean of 2.8 years. Overall, digoxin use was associated with a 21% increased risk for mortality (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.30). Sensitivity analyses found the results to be robust. In the propensity score-matched AF patients, digoxin use was associated with a 17% greater risk for mortality (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 1.22). When the AF cohort was grouped into patients with and without heart failure, the use of digoxin was associated with an increase in mortality in patients with and those without heart failure, and no significant heterogeneity was seen between the groups (p >0.10). In conclusion, the results suggest that digoxin use was associated with a greater risk for mortality in patients with AF, regardless of concomitant heart failure. A well-powered randomized trial is necessary to reveal the true effect of digoxin.

  20. The Relative Severity of Single Hazards within a Multi-Hazard Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Joel C.; Malamud, Bruce D.

    2013-04-01

    Here we present a description of the relative severity of single hazards within a multi-hazard framework, compiled through examining, quantifying and ranking the extent to which individual hazards trigger or increase the probability of other hazards. Hazards are broken up into six major groupings (geophysical, hydrological, shallow earth processes, atmospheric, biophysical and space), with the interactions for 21 different hazard types examined. These interactions include both one primary hazard triggering a secondary hazard, and one primary hazard increasing the probability of a secondary hazard occurring. We identify, through a wide-ranging review of grey- and peer-review literature, >90 interactions. The number of hazard-type linkages are then summed for each hazard in terms of their influence (the number of times one hazard type triggers another type of hazard, or itself) and their sensitivity (the number of times one hazard type is triggered by other hazard types, or itself). The 21 different hazards are then ranked based on (i) influence and (ii) sensitivity. We found, by quantification and ranking of these hazards, that: (i) The strongest influencers (those triggering the most secondary hazards) are volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and storms, which when taken together trigger almost a third of the possible hazard interactions identified; (ii) The most sensitive hazards (those being triggered by the most primary hazards) are identified to be landslides, volcanic eruptions and floods; (iii) When sensitivity rankings are adjusted to take into account the differential likelihoods of different secondary hazards being triggered, the most sensitive hazards are found to be landslides, floods, earthquakes and ground heave. We believe that by determining the strongest influencing and the most sensitive hazards for specific spatial areas, the allocation of resources for mitigation measures might be done more effectively.

  1. The Association of Body Mass Index and Mortality after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Lesli E.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Levine, Deborah A; Baek, Jonggyu; Kerber, Kevin A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of severe obesity is rising in the US. Although mild to moderately elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) is associated with reduced mortality after acute ischemic stroke, less is known about severe obesity. Methods and Results Acute ischemic stroke patients (n=1,791) aged ≥45 years were identified from the bi-ethnic population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) study from June 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010. Median follow-up was 660 days. BMI was abstracted from the medical record. Survival was estimated by BMI category (underweight normal-weight, overweight, class 1 obesity, class 2 obesity, and severe obesity) using Kaplan-Meier methods. Hazard ratios for the relationship between BMI modeled continuously and mortality were estimated from Cox regression models after adjusting for patient factors. The median BMI was 27.1 kg/m2 (interquartile range, 23.7–31.2) and 56% were Mexican American. A total of 625 (35%) patients died during the study period. Persons with higher baseline BMI had longer survival in unadjusted analysis (P<0.01). After adjusting for demographics, stroke severity, stroke and mortality risk factors, the relationship between BMI and mortality was U-shaped. The lowest mortality risk was observed among patients with an approximate BMI of 35 kg/m2, whereas those with lower or higher BMI had higher mortality risk. Conclusions Severe obesity is associated with increased post-stroke mortality in middle-aged and older adults. Stroke patients with class 2 obesity had the lowest mortality risk. More research is needed to determine weight management goals among stroke survivors. PMID:24326935

  2. Risk factors for early mortality in haematological malignancy patients with pulmonary mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Russell E; Georgiadou, Sarah P; Sampsonas, Fotis; Chamilos, George; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis (PM) is a life-threatening opportunistic mycosis with a variable clinical evolution and few prognostic markers for outcome assessment. Several clinical risk factors for poor outcome present at the diagnosis of PM were analyzed in 75 consecutive hematology patients from 2000-2012. Significant variables (P < 0.1) were entered into a multivariate Cox-proportional hazard regression model adjusting for baseline APACHE II to identify independent risk factors for mortality within 28 days. Twenty-eight of 75 patients died within 4-week follow up. A lymphocyte count < 100/mm³ at the time of diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio 4.0, 1.7-9.4, P = 0.01) and high level of lactate dehydrogenase (AHR 3.7, 1.3-10.2, P = 0.015) were independent predictors along with APACHE II score for 28-day mortality. A weighted risk score based on these 3 baseline variables accurately identified non-surviving patients at 28 days (area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.87, 0.77-0.93, P < 0.001). A risk score > 22 was associated with 8-fold high rates of mortality (P < 0.0001) within 28 days of diagnosis and median survival of 7 days versus ≥28 days in patients with risk scores ≤22. We found that APACHE II score, severe lymphocytopenia and high LDH levels at the time of PM diagnosis were independent markers for rapid disease progression and death.

  3. Evidence for a black-white crossover in all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality in an older population: the North Carolina EPESE.

    PubMed Central

    Corti, M C; Guralnik, J M; Ferrucci, L; Izmirlian, G; Leveille, S G; Pahor, M; Cohen, H J; Pieper, C; Havlik, R J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cohort study evaluated racial differences in mortality among Blacks and Whites 65 years and older. METHODS: A total of 4136 men and women (1875 Whites and 2261 Blacks) living in North Carolina were interviewed in 1986 and followed up for mortality until 1994. Hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality were calculated, with adjustment for sociodemographic and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. RESULTS: Black persons had higher mortality rates than Whites at young-old age (65-80 years) but had significantly lower mortality rates after age 80. Black persons age 80 or older had a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR of Blacks vs Whites, 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.62, 0.90) and of CHD mortality (HR 0.44: 95% CI = 0.30, 0.66). These differences were not observed for other causes of death. CONCLUSIONS: Racial differences in mortality are modified by age. This mortality crossover could be attributed to selective survival of the healthiest oldest Blacks or to other biomedical factors affecting longevity after age 80. Because the crossover was observed for CHD deaths only, age overreporting by Black older persons seems an unlikely explanation of the mortality differences. PMID:10076478

  4. Maternal Obesity During Pregnancy Associates With Premature Mortality and Major Cardiovascular Events in Later Life.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan Ken; Raja, Edwin A; Lee, Amanda J; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-11-01

    One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06-1.27 and 1.26; 1.01-1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09-1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07-1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04-1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.

  5. Total cholesterol concentration and mortality at a relatively young age: do men and women differ?

    PubMed Central

    Monique Verschuren, W. M.; Kromhout, D.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the relation between total cholesterol concentration and mortality from coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases, non-cardiovascular causes, and all causes. DESIGN--Population based cohort study. SUBJECTS--23,000 men and 26,000 women aged 30-54 years examined between 1974 and 1980. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Mortality for the above mentioned end points for fifths of cholesterol distribution, and relative risks estimated by using Cox's proportional hazard (survival) analysis. Adjustment was made for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index. RESULTS--Mortality from coronary heart disease in men was five times higher than that in women. A strong positive association between total cholesterol concentration and mortality from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases was observed in both men and women. The relative risk for the highest compared with the lowest fifth of the cholesterol distribution was for mortality from coronary heart disease (3.0 (95% confidence interval 1.8 to 5.1) in men and 3.8 (1.1 to 13.1) in women) and for mortality from cardiovascular disease (2.8 (1.8 to 4.2) in men and 2.9 (1.4 to 6.0) in women). No increase of non-cardiovascular mortality at low cholesterol concentration was observed. All cause mortality was significantly higher in the highest compared with the lowest fifth of the cholesterol distribution: relative risk 1.6 (1.3 to 2.0) in men and 1.5 (1.1 to 1.9) in women. CONCLUSION--Total cholesterol concentration is a strong predictor of mortality from coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases, and all causes in women as well as in men. Low cholesterol concentrations are not associated with increased mortality from non-cardiovascular causes. PMID:7580439

  6. An Update on Mortality in the U.S. Astronaut Corps: 1959-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirian, E.; Clark, April; Halm, Melissa; Hartnett, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Although it has now been over 50 years since mankind first ventured into space, the long-term health impacts of human space flight remain largely unknown. Identifying factors that affect survival and prognosis among those who participate in space flight is vitally important, as the era of commercial space flight approaches and NASA prepares for missions to Mars. The Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health is a prospective study designed to examine trends in astronaut morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this analysis was to describe and explore predictors of overall and cause-specific mortality among individuals selected for the U.S. astronaut corps. All U.S. astronauts (n=321), regardless of flight status, were included in this analysis. Death certificate searches were conducted to ascertain vital status and cause of death through April 2009. Data were collected from medical records and lifestyle questionnaires. Multivariable Cox regression modeling was used to calculate the mortality hazard associated with embarking on space flight, adjusted for sex, race, and age at selection. Between 1959 and 2009, there were 39 (12.1%) deaths. Of these deaths, 18 (42.2%) were due to occupational accidents; 7 (17.9%) were due to other accidents; 6 (15.4%) were attributable to cancer; 6 (15.4%) resulted from cardiovascular/circulatory diseases; and 2 (5.1%) were from other causes. Participation in space flight did not significantly increase mortality hazard over time (adjusted hazard ratio=0.57; 95% confidence interval=0.26-1.26. Because our results are based on a small sample size, future research that includes payload specialists, other space flight participants, and international crew members is warranted to maximize statistical power.

  7. A note on calculating asymptotic confidence intervals for the adjusted risk difference and number needed to treat in the Cox regression model.

    PubMed

    Laubender, Ruediger P; Bender, Ralf

    2014-02-28

    Recently, Laubender and Bender (Stat. Med. 2010; 29: 851-859) applied the average risk difference (RD) approach to estimate adjusted RD and corresponding number needed to treat measures in the Cox proportional hazards model. We calculated standard errors and confidence intervals by using bootstrap techniques. In this paper, we develop asymptotic variance estimates of the adjusted RD measures and corresponding asymptotic confidence intervals within the counting process theory and evaluated them in a simulation study. We illustrate the use of the asymptotic confidence intervals by means of data of the Düsseldorf Obesity Mortality Study.

  8. Relationships between social isolation, neighborhood poverty, and cancer mortality in a population-based study of US adults

    PubMed Central

    Illescas, Alex H.; Hohl, Bernadette C.; Llanos, Adana A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Social isolation is an important determinant of all-cause mortality, with evidence suggesting an association with cancer-specific mortality as well. In this study, we examined the associations between social isolation and neighborhood poverty (independently and jointly) on cancer mortality in a population-based sample of US adults. Methods Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; 1988–1994), NHANES III Linked Mortality File (through 2011) and 1990 Census, we estimated the relationship between social isolation and high neighborhood poverty and time-to-cancer death using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. We examined the associations of each factor independently and explored the multiplicative and additive interaction effects on cancer mortality risk and also analyzed these associations by sex. Results Among 16 044 US adults with 17–23 years of follow-up, there were 1133 cancer deaths. Social isolation (HR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01–1.54) and high neighborhood poverty (HR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60) were associated with increased risk of cancer mortality adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity; in sex-specific estimates this increase in risk was evident among females only (HR 1.39, 95% CI: 1.04–1.86). These associations were attenuated upon further adjustment for socioeconomic status. There was no evidence of joint effects of social isolation and high neighborhood poverty on cancer mortality overall or in the sex-stratified models. Conclusions These findings suggest that social isolation and higher neighborhood poverty are independently associated with increased risk of cancer mortality, although there is no evidence to support our a priori hypothesis of a joint effect. PMID:28273125

  9. Height loss starting in middle age predicts increased mortality in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Masunari, Naomi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Yamada, Michiko; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mortality risk among Japanese men and women with height loss starting in middle age, taking into account lifestyle and physical factors. A total of 2498 subjects (755 men and 1743 women) aged 47 to 91 years old underwent physical examinations during the period 1994 to 1995. Those individuals were followed for mortality status through 2003. Mortality risk was estimated using an age-stratified Cox proportional hazards model. In addition to sex, adjustment factors such as radiation dose, lifestyle, and physical factors measured at the baseline--including smoking status, alcohol intake, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and diagnosed diseases--were used for analysis of total mortality and mortality from each cause of death. There were a total of 302 all-cause deaths, 46 coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, 58 respiratory deaths including 45 pneumonia deaths, and 132 cancer deaths during the follow-up period. Participants were followed for 20,787 person-years after baseline. Prior history of vertebral deformity and hip fracture were not associated with mortality risk. However, more than 2 cm of height loss starting in middle age showed a significant association with all-cause mortality among the study participants (HR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.31 to 2.38, p = 0.0002), after adjustment was made for sex, attained age, atomic-bomb radiation exposure, and lifestyle and physical factors. Such height loss also was significantly associated with death due to coronary heart disease or stroke (HR = 3.35, 95% CI 1.63 to 6.86, p = 0.0010), as well as respiratory-disease death (HR = 2.52, 95% CI 1.25 to 5.22, p = 0.0130), but not cancer death. Continuous HL also was associated with all-cause mortality and CHD- or stroke-caused mortality. Association between height loss and mortality was still significant, even after excluding persons with vertebral deformity. Height loss of more than 2 cm starting in middle age

  10. Do different measures of early life socioeconomic circumstances predict adult mortality? Evidence from the British Whitehall II and French GAZEL studies

    PubMed Central

    Stringhini, Silvia; Dugravot, Aline; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2011-01-01

    Background Father’s occupational position, education and height have all been used to examine the effects of adverse early life socioeconomic circumstances on health, but it remains unknown whether they predict mortality equally well. Methods We used pooled data on 18393 men and 7060 women from the Whitehall-II and GAZEL cohorts to examine associations between early life socioeconomic circumstances and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Results During the 20-year follow-up period, 1487 participants died. Education had a monotonic association with all mortality outcomes, the age, sex and cohort adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) for the lowest versus the highest educational group was 1.45 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.24,1.69) for all-cause mortality. There was evidence of a U-shaped association between height and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, robust to adjustment for the other indicators (HR=1.41; 95% CI: 1.03,1.93 for those shorter-than-average and HR=1.36; 95% CI: 0.98,1.88 for those taller-than-average for cardiovascular (CVD) mortality). Greater all-cause and cancer mortality was observed in participants whose father’s occupational position was manual rather than non-manual (HR=1.11; 95% CI: 1.00,1.23 for all-cause mortality), but the risks were attenuated after adjusting for education and height. Conclusions The association between early life socioeconomic circumstances and mortality depends on the socioeconomic indicator used and the cause of death examined. Height is not a straightforward measure of early life socioeconomic circumstances as taller people do not have a health advantage for all mortality outcomes. PMID:20675701

  11. Prediction of Mortality and Postoperative Complications using the Hip-Multidimensional Frailty Score in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Kwan-Jae; Kim, Sun-wook; Yoon, Sol-Ji; Kang, Min-gu; Kim, Kwang-il; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    High mortality and dependent living after hip fracture pose a significant public health concern. Retrospective study was conducted with 481 hip fracture patients (≥65 years of age) undergoing surgery from March 2009 to May 2014. The Hip-MFS was calculated by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). The primary outcome was the 6-month all-cause mortality rate. The secondary outcomes were 1-year all-cause mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay, and institutionalization. Thirty-five patients (7.3%) died within 6 months after surgery (median [interquartile range], 2.9 [1.4–3.9] months). The fully adjusted hazard ratio per 1 point increase in Hip-MFS was 1.458 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.210–1.758) for 6-months mortality and odds ratio were 1.239 (95% CI: 1.115–1.377), 1.156 (95% CI: 1.031–1.296) for postoperative complications and prolonged total hospital stay, respectively. High-risk patients (Hip-MFS > 8) showed higher risk of 6-month mortality (hazard ratio: 3.545, 95% CI: 1.466–8.572) than low-risk patients after adjustment. Hip-MFS successfully predict 6-month mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay in elderly hip fracture patients after surgery. Hip-MFS more precisely predict 6-month mortality than age or existing tools (P values of comparison of ROC curve: 0.002, 0.004, and 0.044 for the ASA classification, age and NHFS, respectively). PMID:28233870

  12. Hazardous'' terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of terms (e.g., hazardous chemicals,'' hazardous materials,'' hazardous waste,'' and similar nomenclature) refer to substances that are subject to regulation under one or more federal environmental laws. State laws and regulations also provide additional, similar, or identical terminology that may be confused with the federally defined terms. Many of these terms appear synonymous, and it easy to use them interchangeably. However, in a regulatory context, inappropriate use of narrowly defined terms can lead to confusion about the substances referred to, the statutory provisions that apply, and the regulatory requirements for compliance under the applicable federal statutes. This information Brief provides regulatory definitions, a brief discussion of compliance requirements, and references for the precise terminology that should be used when referring to hazardous'' substances regulated under federal environmental laws. A companion CERCLA Information Brief (EH-231-004/0191) addresses toxic'' nomenclature.

  13. Identifying Hazards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The federal government has established a system of labeling hazardous materials to help identify the type of material and threat posed. Summaries of information on over 300 chemicals are maintained in the Envirofacts Master Chemical Integrator.

  14. Coastal Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandas, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on hurricanes and tsunamis and uses these topics to address other parts of the science curriculum. In addition to a discussion on beach erosion, a poster is provided that depicts these natural hazards that threaten coastlines. (DDR)

  15. Mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic and radiographic screening.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okada, Katsuo; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening, we undertook a population-based cohort study in which both radiographic and endoscopic screenings for gastric cancer have been carried out. The subjects were selected from the participants of gastric cancer screening in two cities in Japan, Tottori and Yonago, from 2007 to 2008. The subjects were defined as participants aged 40-79 years who had no gastric cancer screening in the previous year. Follow-up of mortality was continued from the date of the first screening to the date of death or up to December 31, 2013. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of gastric cancer incidence, gastric cancer death, all cancer deaths except gastric cancer death, and all-causes death except gastric cancer death. The number of subjects selected for endoscopic screening was 9950 and that for radiographic screening was 4324. The subjects screened by endoscopy showed a 67% reduction of gastric cancer compared with the subjects screened by radiography (adjusted RR by sex, age group, and resident city = 0.327; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.118-0.908). The adjusted RR of endoscopic screening was 0.968 (95%CI, 0.675-1.387) for all cancer deaths except gastric cancer death, and 0.929 (95%CI, 0.740-1.168) for all-causes death except gastric cancer death. This study indicates that endoscopic screening can reduce gastric cancer mortality by 67% compared with radiographic screening. This is consistent with previous studies showing that endoscopic screening reduces gastric cancer mortality.

  16. Month of birth and cause-specific mortality between 50 and 80 years: a population-based longitudinal cohort study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Peter; Edstedt Bonamy, Anna-Karin; Granath, Fredrik; Cnattingius, Sven

    2014-02-01

    Month of birth-a proxy for a variety of prenatal and early postnatal exposures including nutritional status, ambient temperature and infections-has been linked to mortality risk in adult life. We assessed the relation between month of birth and cause-specific mortality risk from cardiovascular diseases, infections, tumors and external causes-in ages of more than 50-80 years. In this nation-wide Swedish study, 4,240,338 subjects were followed from 1991 to 2010, using data from population-based health and administrative registries. The relation between month of birth and cause-specific mortality risk was assessed by fitting Cox proportional hazard regression models with attained age as the underlying time scale. In models adjusted for sex and education, month of birth was associated with cardiovascular and infectious mortality, but not with deaths from tumors or external causes. Compared with subjects born in November, a higher cardiovascular mortality was seen in subjects born from January through August, peaking in March/April [hazard ratio (HR) 1.066 compared to November, 95 % CI 1.045-1.086]. The mortality from infections was lowest for the birth months November and December and a distinct peak was observed for September-born (HR 1.108 compared to November, 95 % CI 1.046-1.175). Month of birth is associated with mortality from cardiovascular diseases and infections in ages of more than 50-80 years in Sweden. The mechanisms behind these associations remain to be elucidated.

  17. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  18. Serum Bicarbonate and Mortality in Stage 3 and Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schold, Jesse D.; Arrigain, Susana; Jolly, Stacey E.; Wehbe, Edgard; Raina, Rupesh; Simon, James F.; Srinivas, Titte R.; Jain, Anil; Schreiber, Martin J.; Nally, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The incidence and prevalence of metabolic acidosis increase with declining kidney function. We studied the associations of both low and high serum bicarbonate levels with all-cause mortality among stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We examined factors associated with low (<23 mmol/L) and high (>32 mmol/L) serum bicarbonate levels using logistic regression models and associations between bicarbonate and all-cause mortality using Cox-proportional hazard models, Kaplan–Meier survival curves, and time-dependent analysis. Results Out of 41,749 patients, 13.9% (n = 5796) had low and 1.6% (n = 652) had high serum bicarbonate levels. After adjusting for relevant covariates, there was a significant association between low serum bicarbonate and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, 95% CI 1.16, 1.31). This association was not statistically significant among patients with stage 4 CKD and diabetes. The time-dependent analysis demonstrated a significant mortality risk associated with a decline from normal to low bicarbonate level (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.49, 1.69). High serum bicarbonate levels were associated with death irrespective of the level of kidney function (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.52, 2.00). When serum bicarbonate was examined as a continuous variable, a J-shaped relationship was noted between serum bicarbonate and mortality. Conclusions Low serum bicarbonate levels are associated with increased mortality among stage 3 CKD patients and patients without diabetes. High serum bicarbonate levels are associated with mortality in both stage 3 and stage 4 CKD patients. PMID:21885787

  19. Mortality in mild cognitive impairment varies by subtype, sex and lifestyle factors. The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Vassilaki, Maria; Cha, Ruth H.; Aakre, Jeremiah A.; Therneau, Terry M.; Geda, Yonas E.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Roberts, Rosebud O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Etiologic differences in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes may impact mortality. Objective To assess the rate of death in MCI overall, and by subtype, in the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Methods Participants aged 70–89 years at enrollment were clinically evaluated at baseline and 15-month intervals to assess diagnoses of MCI and dementia. Mortality in MCI cases vs. cognitively normal (CN) individuals was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Over a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 331 of 862 (38.4%) MCI cases and 224 of 1292 (17.3%) cognitively normal participants died. Compared to CN individuals, mortality was elevated in persons with MCI (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.61 to 2.55), and was higher for non-amnestic MCI (naMCI; HR = 2.47; 95% CI: 1.80 to 3.39) than for amnestic MCI (aMCI; HR = 1.89; 95% CI: 1.48 to 2.41) after adjusting for confounders. Mortality varied significantly by sex, education, history of heart disease, and engaging in moderate physical exercise (p for interaction <0.05 for all). Mortality rate estimates were highest in MCI cases who were men, did not exercise, had heart disease, and had higher education vs. CN without these factors, and for naMCI cases vs. aMCI cases without these factors. Conclusions These findings suggest stronger impact of etiologic factors on naMCI mortality. Prevention of heart disease, exercise vigilance, may reduce MCI mortality. Delayed MCI diagnosis in persons with higher education impacts mortality, and higher mortality in men may explain similar dementia incidence by sex in our cohort. PMID:25697699

  20. The association of breast density with breast cancer mortality in African American and white women screened in community practice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengfan; Ivy, Julie S; Diehl, Kathleen M; Yankaskas, Bonnie C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of breast density on survival outcomes for American women who participate in screening remains unknown. We studied the role of breast density on both breast cancer and other cause of mortality in screened women. Data for women with breast cancer, identified from the community-based Carolina Mammography Registry, were linked with the North Carolina cancer registry and NC death tapes for this study. Cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models were developed to analyze the effect of several covariates on breast cancer mortality-namely, age, race (African American/White), cancer stage at diagnosis (in situ, local, regional, and distant), and breast density (BI-RADS( ® ) 1-4). Two stratified Cox models were considered controlling for (1) age and race, and (2) age and cancer stage, respectively, to further study the effect of density. The cumulative incidence function with confidence interval approximation was used to quantify mortality probabilities over time. For this study, 22,597 screened women were identified as having breast cancer. The non-stratified and stratified Cox models showed no significant statistical difference in mortality between dense tissue and fatty tissue, while controlling for other covariate effects (p value = 0.1242, 0.0717, and 0.0619 for the non-stratified, race-stratified, and cancer stage-stratified models, respectively). The cumulative mortality probability estimates showed that women with dense breast tissues did not have significantly different breast cancer mortality than women with fatty breast tissue, regardless of age (e.g., 10-year confidence interval of mortality probabilities for whites aged 60-69 white: 0.056-0.090 vs. 0.054-0.083). Aging, African American race, and advanced cancer stage were found to be significant risk factors for breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio >1.0). After controlling for cancer incidence, there was not a significant association between mammographic breast density and mortality, adjusting

  1. Comparative risk of renal, cardiovascular, and mortality outcomes in controlled, uncontrolled resistant, and non-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sim, John J.; Bhandari, Simran K.; Shi, Jiaxiao; Reynolds, Kristi; Calhoun, David A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to compare the risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD), ischemic heart event (IHE), congestive heart failure (CHF), cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and all-cause mortality among 470,386 individuals with resistant and nonresistant hypertension (non-RH). Resistant hypertension (60,327 individuals) was sub-categorized into 2 groups; 23,104 patients with cRH (controlled on 4 or more medicines) and 37,223 patients with uRH (uncontrolled on 3 or more medicines) in a 5 year retrospective cohort study. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios adjusting for age, gender, race, body mass index, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and co-morbidities. Resistant hypertension (cRH and uRH) compared to non-RH, had multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.32 (1.27–1.37), 1.24 (1.20–1.28), 1.46 (1.40–1.52), 1.14 (1.10–1.19), and 1.06 (1.03–1.08) for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality, respectively. Comparison of uRH to cRH had hazard ratios of 1.25 (1.18–1.33), 1.04 (0.99–1.10), 0.94 (0.89–1.01), 1.23 (1.14–1.31), and 1.01 (0.97–1.05) for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality, respectively. Males and Hispanics had greater risk for ESRD within all 3 cohorts. Resistant hypertension had greater risk for ESRD, IHE, CHF, CVA, and mortality. The risk of ESRD and CVA and were 25% and 23% greater, respectively, in uRH compared to cRH supporting the linkage between blood pressure and both outcomes. PMID:25945406

  2. Cognitive Reserve, Incident Dementia, and Associated Mortality in the Ibadan Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Ojagbemi, Akin; Bello, Toyin; Gureje, Oye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe factors associated with incident dementia and dementia mortality over 5 years in a large community sample of elderly persons. Design Longitudinal investigation of a household multistage probability sample. Setting Eight contiguous states of the Yoruba-speaking region of Nigeria. Participants Individuals aged 65 and older (N=2,149). Measurements Dementia was diagnosed using tools previously validated in the population. Incident cases of dementia over three follow-up waves were determined after censoring cases in the preceding wave. Information on mortality was collected from key informants in subjects’ households. Results A dementia incident rate was found of 20.9 per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI)=17.7–24.9). The adjusted mortality hazard for those with dementia was 1.5 (95% CI=1.1–2.1). Along with previously identified social and demographic factors, poor predementia cognitive function (hazard ratio (HR)=1.8, 95% CI=1.1–2.8) and low occupational complexity (HR=3.2, 95% CI=1.3–8.0) were associated with incident dementia. Conclusion The findings confirm the low incidence of dementia in this population, as previously reported. The condition is nevertheless associated with higher risk of mortality. Along with some features of social disadvantage, proxies of lower cognitive reserve were risk factors for incident dementia. PMID:26926137

  3. Chronic and Acute Effects of Coal Tar Pitch Exposure and Cardiopulmonary Mortality Among Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Demers, Paul A.; Spinelli, John J.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Lorenzi, Maria F.; Le, Nhu D.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution causes several adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects. In occupational studies, where levels of particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are higher, the evidence is inconsistent. The effects of acute and chronic PAH exposure on cardiopulmonary mortality were examined within a Kitimat, Canada, aluminum smelter cohort (n = 7,026) linked to a national mortality database (1957–1999). No standardized mortality ratio was significantly elevated compared with the province's population. Smoking-adjusted internal comparisons were conducted using Cox regression for male subjects (n = 6,423). Ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality (n = 281) was associated with cumulative benzo[a]pyrene (B(a)P) exposure (hazard ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.46) in the highest category. A monotonic but nonsignificant trend was observed with chronic B(a)P exposure and acute myocardial infarction (n = 184). When follow-up was restricted to active employment, the hazard ratio for IHD was 2.39 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 6.05) in the highest cumulative B(a)P category. The stronger associations observed during employment suggest that risk may not persist after exposure cessation. No associations with recent or current exposure were observed. IHD was associated with chronic (but not current) PAH exposure in a high-exposure occupational setting. Given the widespread workplace exposure to PAHs and heart disease's high prevalence, even modest associations produce a high burden. PMID:20702507

  4. β blockers and mortality after myocardial infarction in patients without heart failure: multicentre prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Riant, Elisabeth; Aissoui, Nadia; Soria, Angèle; Ducrocq, Gregory; Coste, Pierre; Cottin, Yves; Aupetit, Jean François; Bonnefoy, Eric; Blanchard, Didier; Cattan, Simon; Steg, Gabriel; Schiele, François; Ferrières, Jean; Juillière, Yves; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between early and prolonged β blocker treatment and mortality after acute myocardial infarction. Design Multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting Nationwide French registry of Acute ST- and non-ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (FAST-MI) (at 223 centres) at the end of 2005. Participants 2679 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction and without heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction. Main outcome measures Mortality was assessed at 30 days in relation to early use of β blockers (≤48 hours of admission), at one year in relation to discharge prescription, and at five years in relation to one year use. Results β blockers were used early in 77% (2050/2679) of patients, were prescribed at discharge in 80% (1783/2217), and were still being used in 89% (1230/1383) of those alive at one year. Thirty day mortality was lower in patients taking early β blockers (adjusted hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.26 to 0.82), whereas the hazard ratio for one year mortality associated with β blockers at discharge was 0.77 (0.46 to 1.30). Persistence of β blockers at one year was not associated with lower five year mortality (hazard ratio 1.19, 0.65 to 2.18). In contrast, five year mortality was lower in patients continuing statins at one year (hazard ratio 0.42, 0.25 to 0.72) compared with those discontinuing statins. Propensity score and sensitivity analyses showed consistent results. Conclusions Early β blocker use was associated with reduced 30 day mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction, and discontinuation of β blockers at one year was not associated with higher five year mortality. These findings question the utility of prolonged β blocker treatment after acute myocardial infarction in patients without heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00673036. PMID:27650822

  5. Relation of aortic valve calcium detected by cardiac computed tomography to all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Michael J; Budoff, Matthew J; Rivera, Juan J; Khan, Atif N; Santos, Raul D; Shaw, Leslee J; Raggi, Paolo; Berman, Daniel; Rumberger, John A; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram

    2010-12-15

    Aortic valve calcium (AVC) can be quantified on the same computed tomographic scan as coronary artery calcium (CAC). Although CAC is an established predictor of cardiovascular events, limited evidence is available for an independent predictive value for AVC. We studied a cohort of 8,401 asymptomatic subjects (mean age 53 ± 10 years, 69% men), who were free of known coronary heart disease and were undergoing electron beam computed tomography for assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis. The patients were followed for a median of 5 years (range 1 to 7) for the occurrence of mortality from any cause. Multivariate Cox regression models were developed to predict all-cause mortality according to the presence of AVC. A total of 517 patients (6%) had AVC on electron beam computed tomography. During follow-up, 124 patients died (1.5%), for an overall survival rate of 96.1% and 98.7% for those with and without AVC, respectively (hazard ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 2.09 to 5.49). After adjustment for age, gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and a family history of premature coronary heart disease, AVC remained a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.82, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 2.98). Likelihood ratio chi-square statistics demonstrated that the addition of AVC contributed significantly to the prediction of mortality in a model adjusted for traditional risk factors (chi-square = 5.03, p = 0.03) as well as traditional risk factors plus the presence of CAC (chi-square = 3.58, p = 0.05). In conclusion, AVC was associated with increased all-cause mortality, independent of the traditional risk factors and the presence of CAC.

  6. Racial-ethnic differences in all-cause and HIV mortality, Florida, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Fennie, Kristopher P.; Sheehan, Diana M.; Niyonsenga, Theophile; Lieb, Spencer; Maddox, Lorene M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared all-cause and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mortality in a population-based, HIV-infected cohort. Methods Using records of people diagnosed with HIV during 2000–2009 from the Florida Enhanced HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Reporting System, we conducted a proportional hazards analysis for all-cause mortality and a competing risk analysis for HIV mortality through 2011 controlling for individual level factors, neighborhood poverty, and rural/urban status and stratifying by concurrent AIDS status (AIDS within 3 months of HIV diagnosis). Results Of 59,880 HIV-infected people, 32.2% had concurrent AIDS, and 19.3% died. Adjusting for period of diagnosis, age group, sex, country of birth, HIV transmission mode, area level poverty and rural/urban status, non-Hispanic Black (NHB) and Hispanic people had an elevated adjusted hazards ratio (aHR) for HIV mortality relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHB concurrent AIDS: aHR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23–1.47; NHB without concurrent AIDS: aHR 1.41, 95% CI 1.26–1.57; Hispanic concurrent AIDS: aHR 1.18, 95% CI 1.05–1.32; Hispanic without concurrent AIDS: aHR 1.18, 95% CI 1.03–1.36). Conclusions Considering competing causes of death, NHB and Hispanic people had a higher risk of HIV mortality even among those without concurrent AIDS, indicating a need to identify and address barriers to HIV care in these populations. PMID:26948103

  7. Early changes in body weight and blood pressure are associated with mortality in incident dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Duranton, Flore; Duny, Yohan; Szwarc, Ilan; Deleuze, Sébastien; Rouanet, Catherine; Selcer, Isabelle; Maurice, François; Rivory, Jean-Pierre; Servel, Marie-Françoise; Jover, Bernard; Brunet, Philippe; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Argilés, Àngel

    2016-01-01

    Background While much research is devoted to identifying novel biomarkers, addressing the prognostic value of routinely measured clinical parameters is of great interest. We studied early blood pressure (BP) and body weight (BW) trajectories in incident haemodialysis patients and their association with all-cause mortality. Methods In a cohort of 357 incident patients, we obtained all records of BP and BW during the first 90 days on dialysis (over 12 800 observations) and analysed trajectories using penalized B-splines and mixed linear regression models. Baseline comorbidities and all-cause mortality (median follow-up: 2.2 years) were obtained from the French Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (REIN) registry, and the association with mortality was assessed by Cox models adjusting for baseline comorbidities. Results During the initial 90 days on dialysis, there were non-linear decreases in BP and BW, with milder slopes after 15 days [systolic BP (SBP)] or 30 days [diastolic BP (DBP) and BW]. SBP or DBP levels at dialysis initiation and changes in BW occurring in the first month or during the following 2 months were significantly associated with survival. In multivariate models adjusting for baseline comorbidities and prescriptions, higher SBP value and BW slopes were independently associated with a lower risk of mortality. Hazard ratios of mortality and 95% confidence intervals were 0.92 (0.85–0.99) for a 10 mmHg higher SBP and 0.76 (0.66–0.88) for a 1 kg/month higher BW change on Days 30–90. Conclusions BW loss in the first weeks on dialysis is a strong and independent predictor of mortality. Low BP is also associated with mortality and is probably the consequence of underlying cardiovascular diseases. These early markers appear to be valuable prognostic factors. PMID:26985382

  8. Thrombomodulin Gene Variants are Associated with Increased Mortality Following Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Replicated Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Robert L.; White, William D.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Newman, Mark F.; Smith, Peter K.; McCants, Charles B.; Alexander, John H.; Podgoreanu, Mihai V.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in thrombotic and inflammatory pathways is independently associated with long-term mortality following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and Results Two separate cohorts of patients undergoing CABG at a single institution were examined, and all-cause mortality between 30 days and 5 years after the index CABG was ascertained from the National Death Index. In a discovery cohort of 1018 patients, a panel of 90 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 49 candidate genes was tested in Cox proportional hazard models to identify clinical and genomic multivariate predictors of incident death. After adjustment for multiple comparisons and clinical predictors of mortality, the homozygote minor allele of a common variant in the thrombomodulin (THBD) gene (rs1042579) was independently associated with significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR 2.26; 95%CI, 1.31–3.92; p=0.003). Six tag SNPs in the THBD gene, one of which (rs3176123) in complete linkage disequilibrium with rs1042579, were then assessed in an independent validation cohort of 930 patients. Following multivariate adjustment for the clinical predictors identified in the discovery cohort and multiple testing, the homozygote minor allele of rs3176123 independently predicted all-cause mortality (HR 3.6; 95%CI, 1.67–7.78; p=0.001). Conclusion In two independent cardiac surgery cohorts, linked common allelic variants in the THBD gene are independently associated with increased long-term mortality risk following CABG, and significantly improve the classification ability of traditional postoperative mortality prediction models. PMID:21911804

  9. Alcohol, drinking pattern and all-cause, cardiovascular and alcohol-related mortality in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Horvat, Pia; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Kubinova, Ruzena; Simonova, Galina; Topor-Madry, Roman; Peasey, Anne; Pikhart, Hynek; Marmot, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol has been implicated in the high mortality in Central and Eastern Europe but the magnitude of its effect, and whether it is due to regular high intake or episodic binge drinking remain unclear. The aim of this paper was to estimate the contribution of alcohol to mortality in four Central and Eastern European countries. We used data from the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe is a prospective multi-centre cohort study in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), Kaunas (Lithuania) and six Czech towns. Random population samples of 34,304 men and women aged 45-69 years in 2002-2005 were followed up for a median 7 years. Drinking volume, frequency and pattern were estimated from the graduated frequency questionnaire. Deaths were ascertained using mortality registers. In 230,246 person-years of follow-up, 2895 participants died from all causes, 1222 from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), 672 from coronary heart disease (CHD) and 489 from pre-defined alcohol-related causes (ARD). In fully-adjusted models, abstainers had 30-50% increased mortality risk compared to light-to-moderate drinkers. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) in men drinking on average ≥60 g of ethanol/day (3% of men) were 1.23 (95% CI 0.95-1.59) for all-cause, 1.38 (0.95-2.02) for CVD, 1.64 (1.02-2.64) for CHD and 2.03 (1.28-3.23) for ARD mortality. Corresponding HRs in women drinking on average ≥20 g/day (2% of women) were 1.92 (1.25-2.93), 1.74 (0.76-3.99), 1.39 (0.34-5.76) and 3.00 (1.26-7.10). Binge drinking increased ARD mortality in men only. Mortality was associated with high average alcohol intake but not binge drinking, except for ARD in men.

  10. No Obesity Paradox-BMI Incapable of Adequately Capturing the Relation of Obesity with All-Cause Mortality: An Inception Diabetes Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bozorgmanesh, Mohammadreza; Arshi, Banafsheh; Sheikholeslami, Farhad; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Background. To reconcile "the obesity paradox," we tested if (1) the contribution of anthropometric measures to mortality was nonlinear and (2) the confounding of hip circumference contributed to the obesity paradox recently observed among diabetic patients. Methods. We analyzed data of diabetic patients attending a community-based prospective, "Tehran lipid and glucose study." In the mortality analysis, anthropometric measures-body mass index (BMI), waist, and hip circumference-were assessed using Cox models incorporating cubic spline functions. Results. During 12 990 person-years follow-up, BMI levels below 27 and those above 40 kg·m(-2) were associated with increased mortality. When we added waist circumference to the BMI in the multivariate-adjusted model, the steepness of BMI-mortality association curve slope for values below 27 kg·m(-2) increased, whereas the steepness of BMI-mortality association curve slope for values above this threshold decreased. Further adjusting the model for hip circumference, the steepness of the slopes of the association curve moved towards null on both extremes and no associations between BMI and all-cause mortality remained. Conclusion. BMI harbors intermixed positive and negative confounding effects on mortality of waist and hip circumference. Failing to control for the confounding effect of hip circumference may stymie unbiased hazard estimation and render conclusions paradoxical.

  11. Early and small changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with mortality in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Nin, Nicolás; Lombardi, Raúl; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Esteban, Andrés; Lorente, José A; Ferguson, Niall D; Hurtado, Javier; Apezteguia, Carlos; Brochard, Laurent; Schortgen, Fréderique; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; González, Marco; Nightingale, Peter; Abroug, Fekri; Pelosi, Paolo; Arabi, Yaseen; Moreno, Rui; Anzueto, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that minor changes in serum creatinine concentrations are associated with increased hospital mortality rates. However, whether serum creatinine concentration (SCr) on admission and its change are associated with an increased mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients is not known. We have conducted an international, prospective, observational cohort study enrolling adult intensive care unit patients under mechanical ventilation (MV). Recursive partitioning was used to determine the values of SCr at the start of MV (SCr0) and the change in SCr ([DeltaSCr] defined as the maximal difference between the value at start of MV [day 0] and the value on MV day 2 at 8:00 am) that best discriminate mortality. In-hospital mortality, adjusted by a proportional hazards model, was the primary outcome variable. A total of 2,807 patients were included; median age was 59 years and median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 44. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 44%. The variable that best discriminated outcome was a SCr0 greater than 1.40 mg/dL (mortality, 57% vs. 36% for patients with SCr0 mortality (56% vs. 34%, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, geographic area, advanced age, severity of illness, reason for MV, and cardiovascular and hepatic failure were also associated with mortality. Our study suggests that SCr0 greater than 1.40 mg/dL and, in patients with low baseline SCr, a DeltaSCr greater than 0.31 are predictors of in-hospital mortality in mechanically ventilated patients.

  12. The Effect of Clozapine on Premature Mortality: An Assessment of Clinical Monitoring and Other Potential Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Richard D.; Downs, Johnny; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Jackson, Richard G.; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Hotopf, Matthew; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine can cause severe adverse effects yet it is associated with reduced mortality risk. We test the hypothesis this association is due to increased clinical monitoring and investigate risk of premature mortality from natural causes. We identified 14 754 individuals (879 deaths) with serious mental illness (SMI) including schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders aged ≥ 15 years in a large specialist mental healthcare case register linked to national mortality tracing. In this cohort study we modeled the effect of clozapine on mortality over a 5-year period (2007–2011) using Cox regression. Individuals prescribed clozapine had more severe psychopathology and poorer functional status. Many of the exposures associated with clozapine use were themselves risk factors for increased mortality. However, we identified a strong association between being prescribed clozapine and lower mortality which persisted after controlling for a broad range of potential confounders including clinical monitoring and markers of disease severity (adjusted hazard ratio 0.4; 95% CI 0.2–0.7; p = .001). This association remained after restricting the sample to those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or those taking antipsychotics and after using propensity scores to reduce the impact of confounding by indication. Among individuals with SMI, those prescribed clozapine had a reduced risk of mortality due to both natural and unnatural causes. We found no evidence to indicate that lower mortality associated with clozapine in SMI was due to increased clinical monitoring or confounding factors. This is the first study to report an association between clozapine and reduced risk of mortality from natural causes. PMID:25154620

  13. Frailty prior to Critical Illness and Mortality for Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Aluko A.; Gong, Michelle N.; Guerra, Carmen; Wunsch, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Health categories of elderly patients prior to critical illness may explain differences in mortality during and after admission to intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives To estimate the effect of pre-ICU health categories on mortality during and after critical illness, focusing specifically on the effect of pre-ICU frailty on short- and long-term mortality. Design Retrospective cohort study using linked Medicare claims data from 2004–2008. Participants A nationally representative sample of elderly Medicare beneficiaries who were admitted to an ICU in 2005. Measurements Patients were classified into four pre-ICU health categories (Robust; Cancer; Chronic Organ Failure; Frailty) using claims data from the year prior to admission, allowing for assignment to multiple categories. We assessed the association between pre-ICU health categories and hospital and 3-year mortality using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional Hazards models. Results Among 47,427 elderly ICU patients, 18.8% were Robust; 28.6% had pre-ICU Cancer; 68.1% Chronic Organ Failure and 34.0% Frailty; 41.3% qualified for multiple categories. Overall hospital mortality was 12.6%, with the lowest mortality for Robust patients (9.7%). Patients with pre-ICU Frailty had a higher hospital mortality compared to patients with the same pre-ICU health categories without frailty (adjusted Odds Ratios ranged from 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–1.47) to 1.52 (95% CI 1.35–1.63)). Robust hospital survivors had the lowest 3-year mortality (24.6%). Pre-ICU Frailty conferred a higher 3-year mortality compared to pre-ICU categories without frailty (adjusted Hazard Ratios ranged from 1.54 (95% CI 1.45–1.64) to 1.84 (95% CI 1.70–1.99). Conclusion Critically ill elderly patients can be categorized by Pre-ICU health categories. These categories, particularly pre-ICU Frailty, may be important for understanding risk of death during and after critical illness. PMID:26096386

  14. Post-diagnostic oral bisphosphonate use and colorectal cancer mortality: a population-based cohort study within the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, B M; Murray, L J; Hughes, C; Cardwell, C R

    2015-01-01

    Background: We conducted the first study to investigate post-diagnostic oral bisphosphonates use and colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Methods: Colorectal cancer patients were identified from the National Cancer Data Repository (1998–2007) and linked to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, providing prescription records, and Office of National Statistics mortality data. Time-dependent Cox regression models investigated colorectal cancer-specific mortality in post-diagnostic bisphosphonate users. Results: Overall, in 4791 colorectal cancer patients, there was no evidence of an association between bisphosphonate use and colorectal cancer-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio=1.11; 95% confidence interval 0.80, 1.54) or with drug frequency or type. Conclusions: In this novel population-based cohort study, post-diagnostic bisphosphonate use was not associated with longer rates of colorectal cancer survival. PMID:25989268

  15. Early mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a developing country: the role of malnutrition at diagnosis. A multicenter cohort MIGICCL study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Trejo, Jorge Alfonso; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Medina-Sansón, Aurora; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sanchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-Gonzalez, José Gabriel; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Francisco Javier; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Espinosa-Elizondo, Rosa Martha; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Pérez-Saldivar, Maria Luisa; Rodriguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Núñez-Villegas, Nora Nancy; Velazquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, César Raúl; Flores-Villegas, Luz Victoria; Rangel-López, Angélica; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Gil-Hernández, Ana Elena; Duarte-Rodríguez, David Aldebarán; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The role of malnutrition at diagnosis as a predictor of early mortality in Mexican leukemia children remains controversial. The objective of present study was to investigate whether malnutrition was a predictor of early mortality during the first year of treatment in Mexican acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children through the first population-based study. A total of 794 newly diagnosed ALL pediatric patients from public hospitals of Mexico City were enrolled. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was constructed and adjusted by patient's age at diagnosis, gender, hospital of treatment, and socioeconomic status. Early mortality was high (12.1%) and malnutrition by different indicators was not associated with mortality at induction phase and at 6th month; a high risk of dying (RR = 2.08; 95% CI: 1.08-4.01) was observed in the group of malnourished children with a high-risk ALL.

  16. Consumption of dairy products and associations with incident diabetes, CHD and mortality in the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed

    Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Masset, Gabriel; Verberne, Lisa; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Brunner, Eric J

    2013-02-28

    Few prospective studies have examined the effects of different types of dairy food on the risks of type 2 diabetes, CHD and mortality. We examined whether intakes of total dairy, high-fat dairy, low-fat dairy, milk and fermented dairy products were related to these outcomes in the Whitehall II prospective cohort study. At baseline, dairy consumption was assessed by FFQ among 4526 subjects (72% men) with a mean age 56 (sd 6) years. Death certificates and medical records were used to ascertain CHD mortality and non-fatal myocardial infarction. Incident diabetes was detected by the oral glucose tolerance test or self-report. Incidence data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for lifestyle and dietary factors. During approximately 10 years of follow-up, 273 diabetes, 323 CHD and 237 all-cause mortality cases occurred. In multivariable models, intakes of total dairy and types of dairy products were not significantly associated with incident diabetes or CHD (all P values for trend >0·1). Fermented dairy products was inversely associated with overall mortality (hazard ratios approximately 0·7 in the middle and highest tertiles; P for trend < 0·01) but not with incident CHD or diabetes (P>0·3). In conclusion, intakes of total dairy and types of dairy products showed no consistent relationship with incident diabetes, CHD or all-cause mortality.

  17. Renal Function and All-Cause Mortality Risk Among Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Hui-Yan; Zhou, Qian; Peng, Zhen-Wei; An, Xin; Li, Wei; Xiong, Li-Ping; Yu, Xue-Qing; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Mao, Hai-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Renal dysfunction predicts all-cause mortality in general population. However, the prevalence of renal insufficiency and its relationship with mortality in cancer patients are unclear.We retrospectively studied 9465 patients with newly diagnosed cancer from January 2010 to December 2010. Renal insufficiency was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality associated with baseline eGFR was assessed by Cox regression.Three thousand sixty-nine patients (32.4%) exhibited eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m and 3% had abnormal serum creatinine levels at the time of diagnosis. Over a median follow-up of 40.5 months, 2705 patients (28.6%) died. Compared with the reference group (eGFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m), an elevated all-cause mortality was observed among patients with eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m stratified by cancer stage in the entire cohort, the corresponding hazard ratios were 1.87 (95% CI, 1.41-2.47) and 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.62) for stage I to III and stage IV, respectively. However, this relationship was not observed after multivariate adjustment. Subgroup analysis found that eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m independently predicted death among patients with hematologic (adjusted HR 2.93, 95% CI [1.36-6.31]) and gynecological cancer (adjusted HR 2.82, 95% CI [1.19-6.70]), but not in those with other cancer. Five hundred fifty-seven patients (6%) had proteinuria. When controlled for potential confounding factors, proteinuria was a risk factor for all-cause mortality among patients in the entire cohort, regardless of cancer stage and eGFR values. When patients were categorized by specific cancer type, the risk of all-cause death was only significant in patients with digestive system cancer (adjusted HR, 1.85 [1.48-2.32]).The prevalence of renal dysfunction was common in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. Patients with eGFR < 60 m

  18. Body Shape, Adiposity Index, and Mortality in Postmenopausal Women: Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia A.; Garcia, David O.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Hingle, Melanie D.; Bea, Jennifer W.; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Caire-Juvera, Graciela; Rohan, Thomas; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Thompson, Patricia A.; Lewis, Cora E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Studies evaluating the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality demonstrate a U-shaped association. To expand, this study evaluated the relationship between adiposity indices, a body shape index (ABSI) and body adiposity index (BAI), and mortality in 77,505 postmenopausal women. Methods A prospective cohort analysis was conducted in the Women’s Health Initiative to ascertain the independent relationships between adiposity indices and mortality in order to inform on the clinical usefulness of alternate measures of mortality risk. ABSI (waist circumference (cm)/[BMI2/3 × height (cm)1/2]), BAI (hip circumference (cm)/[height (m)1.5] − 18), weight, BMI, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated in relation to mortality risk using adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results ABSI showed a linear association with mortality (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.28–1.47 for quintile 5 vs. 1) while BMI and BAI had U-shaped relationships with HR of 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20–1.40 for obesity II/III BMI and 1.06, 95% CI, 0.99–1.13 for BAI. Higher WC (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13–1.29 for quintile 5 vs. 1) showed relationships similar to BMI. Conclusions ABSI appears to be a clinically useful measure for estimating mortality risk, perhaps more so than BAI and BMI in postmenopausal women. PMID:26991923

  19. The impact of water and sanitation on childhood mortality in Nigeria: evidence from demographic and health surveys, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Osita K; Agho, Kingsley E; Dibley, Michael J; Hall, John; Page, Andrew N

    2014-09-05

    In Nigeria, approximately 109 million and 66 million people lack access to sanitation facilities and water, respectively. This study aimed to determine whether children under 5 years old without access to improved water and sanitation facilities are at higher risk of death in Nigeria. Pooled 2003, 2008 and 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data were used to examine the impact of water and sanitation on deaths of children aged 0-28 days, 1-11 months, and 12-59 months using Cox regression analysis. Survival information of 63,844 children was obtained, which included 6285 deaths of children under 5 years old; there were 2254 cases of neonatal mortality (0-28 days), 1859 cases of post-neonatal mortality (1-11 months) and 2,172 cases of child mortality (1-4 years old). Over a 10-year period, the odds of neonatal, post-neonatal and child deaths significantly reduced by 31%, 41% and 47% respectively. The risk of mortality from both unimproved water and sanitation was significantly higher by 38% (Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) = 1.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-1.66) for post-neonatal mortality and 24% (HR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.04-1.48) for child mortality. The risk of neonatal mortality increased by 6% (HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.85-1.23) but showed no significant effect. The Nigerian government needs to invest more in water and sanitation to reduce preventable child deaths.

  20. Mortality patterns in the Russian Federation: indirect technique using widowhood data.

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, Martin; Murphy, Michael; Pikhart, Hynek; Martikainen, Pekka; Rose, Richard; Marmot, Michael

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Russian mortality crisis of the early 1990s attracted considerable attention, but information on possible covariates of mortality is lacking, and concerns have been raised about the validity of official mortality data. To help elucidate the determinants of mortality, we examined whether indirect demographic techniques could be used to study mortality in countries such as the Russian Federation, where mortality data are inadequate, using input data independent from official vital statistics. METHODS: A national sample of the population was interviewed (n = 1600, response rate = 67%). Participants who had ever been married (82% of the sample) were asked about the date of birth and vital status of their first spouse. Spousal mortality was then estimated indirectly for the 531 men and 710 women for whom valid data were available. FINDINGS: The estimated risk of death between the ages of 35-69 years was 57% for male spouses and 17% for female spouses. Corresponding figures derived from national data for 1990 were 52% and 25% for the Russian Federation, and 31% and 20% for the United Kingdom. According to spouses' reports, 38% of their husbands died from cardiovascular disease, 22% from cancer, and 14% from injuries and accidents. Mortality of male spouses was inversely related to the education level of their wives, and the age-adjusted hazard ratios for death from all causes, compared to primary education, were 0.77 for secondary education and 0.57 for university education (trend P = 0.03). Mortality was also inversely related to ownership of household items, but not to size of settlement, pride in Russia, membership in the Soviet Communist Party, nationality or self-assessed social status. CONCLUSIONS: Although the indirect estimates were imprecise (partly owing to the small population size of the study), and mortality in women was probably underestimated (owing to many factors, including poorer reporting by males and high male mortality), our results

  1. Tinned fruit consumption and mortality in three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Aasheim, Erlend T; Sharp, Stephen J; Appleby, Paul N; Shipley, Martin J; Lentjes, Marleen A H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Brunner, Eric; Key, Tim J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Dietary recommendations to promote health include fresh, frozen and tinned fruit, but few studies have examined the health benefits of tinned fruit. We therefore studied the association between tinned fruit consumption and mortality. We followed up participants from three prospective cohorts in the United Kingdom: 22,421 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort (1993-2012), 52,625 participants from the EPIC-Oxford cohort (1993-2012), and 7440 participants from the Whitehall II cohort (1991-2012), all reporting no history of heart attack, stroke, or cancer when entering these studies. We estimated the association between frequency of tinned fruit consumption and all cause mortality (primary outcome measure) using Cox regression models within each cohort, and pooled hazard ratios across cohorts using random-effects meta-analysis. Tinned fruit consumption was assessed with validated food frequency questionnaires including specific questions about tinned fruit. During 1,305,330 person years of follow-up, 8857 deaths occurred. After adjustment for lifestyle factors and risk markers the pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of all cause mortality compared with the reference group of tinned fruit consumption less often than one serving per month were: 1.05 (0.99, 1.12) for one to three servings per month, 1.10 (1.03, 1.18) for one serving per week, and 1.13 (1.04, 1.23) for two or more servings per week. Analysis of cause-specific mortality showed that tinned fruit consumption was associated with mortality from cardiovascular causes and from non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. In a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts from the United Kingdom self-reported tinned fruit consumption in the 1990s was weakly but positively associated with mortality during long-term follow-up. These findings raise questions about the evidence underlying dietary recommendations to promote tinned fruit consumption

  2. Tinned Fruit Consumption and Mortality in Three Prospective Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Aasheim, Erlend T.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Shipley, Martin J.; Lentjes, Marleen A. H.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Brunner, Eric; Key, Tim J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary recommendations to promote health include fresh, frozen and tinned fruit, but few studies have examined the health benefits of tinned fruit. We therefore studied the association between tinned fruit consumption and mortality. We followed up participants from three prospective cohorts in the United Kingdom: 22,421 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort (1993–2012), 52,625 participants from the EPIC-Oxford cohort (1993–2012), and 7440 participants from the Whitehall II cohort (1991–2012), all reporting no history of heart attack, stroke, or cancer when entering these studies. We estimated the association between frequency of tinned fruit consumption and all cause mortality (primary outcome measure) using Cox regression models within each cohort, and pooled hazard ratios across cohorts using random-effects meta-analysis. Tinned fruit consumption was assessed with validated food frequency questionnaires including specific questions about tinned fruit. During 1,305,330 person years of follow-up, 8857 deaths occurred. After adjustment for lifestyle factors and risk markers the pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of all cause mortality compared with the reference group of tinned fruit consumption less often than one serving per month were: 1.05 (0.99, 1.12) for one to three servings per month, 1.10 (1.03, 1.18) for one serving per week, and 1.13 (1.04, 1.23) for two or more servings per week. Analysis of cause-specific mortality showed that tinned fruit consumption was associated with mortality from cardiovascular causes and from non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. In a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts from the United Kingdom self-reported tinned fruit consumption in the 1990s was weakly but positively associated with mortality during long-term follow-up. These findings raise questions about the evidence underlying dietary recommendations to promote tinned fruit

  3. Impact of Visual Impairment and Eye diseases on Mortality: the Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES).

    PubMed

    Siantar, Rosalynn Grace; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Ong, Peng Guan; Chow, Khuan Yew; Mitchell, Paul; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheung, Carol Y

    2015-11-09

    We investigated the relationship of visual impairment (VI) and age-related eye diseases with mortality in a prospective, population-based cohort study of 3,280 Malay adults aged 40-80 years between 2004-2006. Participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination and standardized lens and fundus photographic grading. Visual acuity was measured using logMAR chart. VI was defined as presenting (PVA) and best-corrected (BCVA) visual acuity worse than 0.30 logMAR in the better-seeing eye. Participants were linked with mortality records until 2012. During follow-up (median 7.24 years), 398 (12.2%) persons died. In Cox proportional-hazards models adjusting for relevant factors, participants with VI (PVA) had higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio[HR], 1.57; 95% confidence interval[CI], 1.25-1.96) and cardiovascular (CVD) mortality (HR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.24-2.49) than participants without. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was associated with increased all-cause (HR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.25-2.36) and CVD mortality (HR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.05-2.43). Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) was associated with increased CVD mortality (HR 3.14; 95% CI, 1.26-7.73). No significant associations were observed between cataract, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration with mortality. We conclude that persons with VI were more likely to die than persons without. DR and RVO are markers of CVD mortality.

  4. Impact of Visual Impairment and Eye diseases on Mortality: the Singapore Malay Eye Study (SiMES)

    PubMed Central

    Siantar, Rosalynn Grace; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Ong, Peng Guan; Chow, Khuan Yew; Mitchell, Paul; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of visual impairment (VI) and age-related eye diseases with mortality in a prospective, population-based cohort study of 3,280 Malay adults aged 40–80 years between 2004–2006. Participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination and standardized lens and fundus photographic grading. Visual acuity was measured using logMAR chart. VI was defined as presenting (PVA) and best-corrected (BCVA) visual acuity worse than 0.30 logMAR in the better-seeing eye. Participants were linked with mortality records until 2012. During follow-up (median 7.24 years), 398 (12.2%) persons died. In Cox proportional-hazards models adjusting for relevant factors, participants with VI (PVA) had higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio[HR], 1.57; 95% confidence interval[CI], 1.25–1.96) and cardiovascular (CVD) mortality (HR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.24–2.49) than participants without. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was associated with increased all-cause (HR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.25–2.36) and CVD mortality (HR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.05–2.43). Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) was associated with increased CVD mortality (HR 3.14; 95% CI, 1.26–7.73). No significant associations were observed between cataract, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration with mortality. We conclude that persons with VI were more likely to die than persons without. DR and RVO are markers of CVD mortality. PMID:26549406

  5. Epidemiologic Correlates of Mortality among Symptomatic Visceral Leishmaniasis Cases: Findings from Situation Assessment in High Endemic Foci in India

    PubMed Central

    Karthick, Morchan; Dwivedi, Shweta; Banerjee, Indranath; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Srikantiah, Sridhar; Chaudhuri, Indrajit

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is highly prevalent in the Indian state of Bihar and, without proper diagnosis and treatment, is associated with high fatality. However, lack of efficient reporting mechanism had been an impediment in estimating the burden of mortality and its antecedents among symptomatic VL cases. The objectives of the current study were to generate a reliable estimate of symptomatic VL caseload and mortality in Bihar, as well as to identify the epidemiologic and health infrastructure-related predictors of VL mortality. Methodology and Principal Findings Using an elaborate index case tracing method, we attempted to locate all symptomatic VL patients in eight districts of Bihar. Interviews and medical-record-reviews were conducted with cases (or next-of-kin for the dead) meeting the eligibility criteria. The information collected during the interviews included socio-demographic characteristics, onset of disease symptoms, place of diagnosis, pre- and post-diagnosis treatment history, type and duration of drugs received. In total, we analyzed data on 4925 VL patients—59% were male and 68% were less than 30 years old. There were 158 (3.2%) deaths and the incidence rate of mortality was 3.2/100 person-years. In the adjusted Cox-proportional-hazards analysis, treatment at public facility [Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR) = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.43–0.86], shorter (≤30 days) diagnostic delay [AHR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.43–0.92], and treatment completion [AHR = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.02–0.05] emerged as significant negative predictors of mortality. Conclusion Mortality reduction efforts in Bihar should focus on improving access to early diagnosis, quality treatment and treatment-adherence measures, with special emphasis on marginalized communities. PMID:27870870

  6. Mortality, TB/HIV co-infection, and treatment dropout: predictors of tuberculosis prognosis in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Mirian Pereira; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio

    2008-04-01

    This non-concurrent cohort study aims to identify predictors of tuberculosis mortality in a large population database in Brazil. Tuberculosis, death, and TB/HIV cases were validated respectively from the tuberculosis surveillance (SINAN/TB), mortality (SIM), and SINAN/AIDS databases for a five-year period. Analysis included proportional hazard models with relative risk estimates. Out of 5,451 individuals reported with tuberculosis, 320 (5.9%) died (incidence and mortality rates of 98.6 and 12.2/100 thousand inhabitants, respectively). After adjustment, relative risk of dying from tuberculosis was 9.8 for individuals>50 years of age; 9.0 for TB/HIV co-infection; 3.0 for mixed TB clinical presentation; and 2.0 for treatment dropout. In the multivariate model, using cases with HIV/AIDS, all adjusted predictors lost significance except mixed clinical presentation (RR 1.9; 1.1-3.1). TB/HIV co-infection is an important predictor of TB mortality. However, among individuals without HIV/AIDS, mortality is still highly associated with older age, mixed clinical forms, and treatment dropout.

  7. Associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria with mortality and renal failure by sex: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nitsch, Dorothea; Grams, Morgan; Sang, Yingying; Black, Corri; Cirillo, Massimo; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Jassal, Simerjot K; Kimm, Heejin; Kronenberg, Florian; Øien, Cecilia M; Levin, Adeera; Woodward, Mark; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess for the presence of a sex interaction in the associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and end stage renal disease. Design Random effects meta-analysis using pooled individual participant data. Setting 46 cohorts from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and Australasia. Participants 2 051 158 participants (54% women) from general population cohorts (n=1 861 052), high risk cohorts (n=151 494), and chronic kidney disease cohorts (n=38 612). Eligible cohorts (except chronic kidney disease cohorts) had at least 1000 participants, outcomes of either mortality or end stage renal disease of ≥50 events, and baseline measurements of estimated glomerular filtration rate according to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (mL/min/1.73 m2) and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (mg/g). Results Risks of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were higher in men at all levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albumin-creatinine ratio. While higher risk was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher albumin-creatinine ratio in both sexes, the slope of the risk relationship for all-cause mortality and for cardiovascular mortality were steeper in women than in men. Compared with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 95, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality at estimated glomerular filtration rate 45 was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.61) in women and 1.22 (1.00 to 1.48) in men (Pinteraction<0.01). Compared with a urinary albumin-creatinine ratio of 5, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality at urinary albumin-creatinine ratio 30 was 1.69 (1.54 to 1.84) in women and 1.43 (1.31 to 1.57) in men (Pinteraction<0.01). Conversely, there was no evidence of a sex difference in associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio with end stage renal

  8. Comparison of effects of statin use on mortality in patients with peripheral arterial disease with versus without elevated C-reactive protein and d-dimer levels.

    PubMed

    Vidula, Himabindu; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Criqui, Michael H; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Green, David; Ridker, Paul; McDermott, Mary M

    2010-05-01

    We determined whether statin use was associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in 579 participants with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) according to the presence and absence of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer levels. Statin use was determined at baseline and at each annual visit. The CRP and D-dimer levels were measured at baseline. The mean follow-up was 3.7 years. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, race, co-morbidities, ankle brachial index, cholesterol, and other confounders. Of the 579 participants, 242 (42%) were taking a statin at baseline and 129 (22%) died during follow-up. Statin use was associated with lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30 to 0.86, p = 0.012) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.89, p = 0.027) compared to statin nonuse. No statistically significant interaction was found for the baseline CRP or D-dimer level with the association of statin use and mortality. However, statin therapy was associated with significantly lower all-cause and total mortality only among participants with baseline CRP values greater than the median and not among those with CRP values less than the median (hazard ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.88 vs hazard ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.31 to 1.75 for all-cause mortality and hazard ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.063 to 0.65 vs hazard ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.093 to 3.79 for CVD mortality). In conclusion, among those with PAD, statin use was associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality compared to no statin use. The favorable association of statin use with mortality was not influenced significantly by the baseline CRP or D-dimer level.

  9. Increased Risk of Post-Transplant Malignancy and Mortality in Transplant Tourists

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mu-Chi; Wu, Ming-Ju; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Yu, Tung-Min; Ho, Hao-Chung; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Chung, Chi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Information on post-transplant malignancy and mortality risk in kidney transplant tourists remains controversial and is an important concern. The present study aimed to evaluate the incidence of post-transplant malignancy and mortality risk between tourists and domestic transplant recipients using the claims data from Taiwan's universal health insurance. A retrospective study was performed on 2394 tourists and 1956 domestic recipients. Post-transplant malignancy and mortality were defined from the catastrophic illness patient registry by using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for the analyses. The incidence for post-transplant de novo malignancy in the tourist group was 1.8-fold higher than that of the domestic group (21.8 vs 12.1 per 1000 person-years). The overall cancer recurrence rate was approximately 11%. The top 3 post-transplant malignancies, in decreasing order, were urinary tract, kidney, and liver cancers, regardless of the recipient type. Compared with domestic recipients, there was significant higher mortality risk in transplant tourists (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.0–1.5). In addition, those with either pre-transplant or post-transplant malignancies were associated with increased mortality risk. We suggest that a sufficient waiting period for patients with pre-transplant malignancies should be better emphasized to eliminate recurrence, and transplant tourists should be discouraged because of the possibility of higher post-transplant de novo malignancy occurrence and mortality. PMID:25546686

  10. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  11. An invasive strategy is associated with decreased mortality in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction: GUSTO IIb trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Leslie; Bhatt, Deepak L; Marso, Steve P; Brennan, Danielle; Holmes, David R; Califf, Robert M; Topol, Eric J

    2003-02-01

    There has been much debate concerning an invasive versus a conservative strategy for patients with acute coronary syndromes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early in-hospital catheterization reduced mortality in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. We performed a retrospective analysis of data collected in the Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) IIb trial, which compared hirudin and heparin in patients with acute coronary syndromes. We identified 8011 patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina who were enrolled in the trial. The primary endpoints were all-cause mortality at 30 days and 1 year. Data were analyzed with multivariate hazards models and propensity scores.After accounting for inception time bias, there were 7897 patients identified, of whom 4536 patients (57%) underwent invasive therapy and 3361 (43%) underwent conservative therapy. Adjusting for propensity scores, the adjusted 30-day mortality for the invasive group was 2.5% compared with 2.7% in the conservative group (P = 0.92); at 1 year, the invasive group had a 6.2% mortality, versus 8.6% in the conservative group (P = 0.005). In a multivariate analysis that adjusted for other clinical factors, an invasive strategy was associated with lower 1-year mortality (hazard ratio = 0.46; 95% confidence interval: 0.10 to 0.84). In patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, an invasive strategy is associated with improved survival at 1 year even after adjusting for baseline differences.

  12. The association between SBP and mortality risk differs with level of cognitive function in very old individuals

    PubMed Central

    Weidung, Bodil; Littbrand, Håkan; Nordström, Peter; Carlberg, Bo; Gustafson, Yngve

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive impairment and dementia are highly prevalent in very old populations. Cardiovascular disease is a common cause of death in people with dementia. This study investigated whether the association of blood pressure (BP) with mortality differed with respect to mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score in a representative sample of very old individuals. Methods: The sample consisted of 1115 participants aged 85, 90, and at least 95 years from the Umeå85+/GErontological Regional DAtabase cohort study. The main outcome was all-cause mortality within 2 years according to BP and MMSE score, using Cox proportional-hazard regression models adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with death. Results: Mean age, MMSE score, and SBP and DBP were 89.4 ± 4.6 years, 21.1 ± 7.6, 146.1 ± 23.4 mmHg, and 74.1 ± 11.7 mmHg, respectively. Within 2 years, 293 (26%) participants died. BP was not associated independently with mortality risk, except among participants with MMSE scores of 0–10 among whom mortality risk was increased in association with SBP at least 165 mmHg and 125 mmHg or less, compared with 126–139 mmHg (adjusted hazard ratio 4.54, 95% confidence interval = 1.52–13.60 and hazard ratio 2.23, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–4.45, respectively). In age and sex-adjusted analyses, SBP 125 mmHg or less was associated with increased mortality risk in participants with MMSE scores at least 18. Conclusion: In people aged at least 85 years, the association of SBP with mortality appears to differ with respect to MMSE score. Very old individuals with very severe cognitive impairment and low or high BP may have increased mortality risk. PMID:26938812

  13. Lower serum uric acid level predicts mortality in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eunjin; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Shin, Nara; Kim, Sun Moon; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Hajeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the impact of serum uric acid (SUA) on mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. A total of 4132 adult patients on dialysis were enrolled prospectively between August 2008 and September 2014. Among them, we included 1738 patients who maintained dialysis for at least 3 months and had available SUA in the database. We categorized the time averaged-SUA (TA-SUA) into 5 groups: <5.5, 5.5–6.4, 6.5–7.4, 7.5–8.4, and ≥8.5 mg/dL. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality according to SUA group. The mean TA-SUA level was slightly higher in men than in women. Patients with lower TA-SUA level tended to have lower body mass index (BMI), phosphorus, serum albumin level, higher proportion of diabetes mellitus (DM), and higher proportion of malnourishment on the subjective global assessment (SGA). During a median follow-up of 43.9 months, 206 patients died. Patients with the highest SUA had a similar risk to the middle 3 TA-SUA groups, but the lowest TA-SUA group had a significantly elevated HR for mortality. The lowest TA-SUA group was significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.720; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–2.937; P = 0.047) even after adjusting for demographic, comorbid, nutritional covariables, and medication use that could affect SUA levels. This association was prominent in patients with well nourishment on the SGA, a preserved serum albumin level, a higher BMI, and concomitant DM although these parameters had no significant interaction in the TA-SUA-mortality relationship except DM. In conclusion, a lower TA-SUA level <5.5 mg/dL predicted all-cause mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. PMID:27310949

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Mortality among Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Mannstadt, Michael; Isakova, Tamara; Rauh-Hain, Jose Alejandro; Tamez, Hector; Shah, Anand; Smith, Kelsey; Lee, Hang; Thadhani, Ravi; Jüppner, Harald; Wolf, Myles

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) is a hormone that increases the rate of urinary excretion of phosphate and inhibits renal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thus helping to mitigate hyperphosphatemia in patients with kidney disease. Hyperphosphatemia and low 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease, but the effect of the level of FGF-23 on mortality is unknown. Methods We examined mortality according to serum phosphate levels in a prospective cohort of 10,044 patients who were beginning hemodialysis treatment and then analyzed FGF-23 levels and mortality in a nested case–control sample of 200 subjects who died and 200 who survived during the first year of hemodialysis treatment. We hypothesized that increased FGF-23 levels at the initiation of hemodialysis would be associated with increased mortality. Results Serum phosphate levels in the highest quartile (>5.5 mg per deciliter [1.8 mmol per liter]) were associated with a 20% increase in the multivariable adjusted risk of death, as compared with normal levels (3.5 to 4.5 mg per deciliter [1.1 to 1.4 mmol per liter]) (hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.4). Median C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF-23) levels were significantly higher in case subjects than in controls (2260 vs. 1406 reference units per milliliter, P<0.001). Multivariable adjusted analyses showed that increasing FGF-23 levels were associated with a monotonically increasing risk of death when examined either on a continuous scale (odds ratio per unit increase in log-transformed cFGF-23 values, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4 to 2.4) or in quartiles, with quartile 1 as the reference category (odds ratio for quartile 2, 1.6 [95% CI, 0.8 to 3.3]; for quartile 3, 4.5 [95% CI, 2.2 to 9.4]; and for quartile 4, 5.7 [95% CI, 2.6 to 12.6]). Conclusions Increased FGF-23 levels appear to be independently associated with mortality among patients who are beginning hemodialysis

  15. Obesity Indexes and Total Mortality among Elderly Subjects at High Cardiovascular Risk: The PREDIMED Study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Miguel A.; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. Methods We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. Results After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78–1.34), 1.30 (0.97–1.75) and 1.55 (1.06–2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88–1.59), 1.02 (0.74–1.41) and 1.57 (1.19–2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Conclusions Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Trial

  16. Breast feeding and infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Golding, J; Emmett, P M; Rogers, I S

    1997-10-29

    The evidence linking bottle feeding to infant and early childhood mortality has been reviewed. Ecological studies of national time trends in infant mortality do not parallel breast feeding trends in those countries, and indicate that falling death rates are more likely to be related to better health care facilities and social conditions. Direct studies of deaths provide some contradictory findings; meta-analyses are not informative because of the many differences in statistical and sample methodology. The methodology exhibited in most studies is more likely to have over- rather than under-estimated a relationship between bottle feeding and infant mortality. Retrospective analyses must take account of changes in feeding pattern due to early signs of illness. Prospective population studies able to account for large numbers of potential confounders provide the best estimates, especially if proportional hazards models are used. Two such studies have been carried out--both showed protective effects of breast feeding.

  17. Abdominal lean muscle is associated with lower mortality among kidney waitlist candidates.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jayme E; Carr, J Jeffrey; Nair, Sangeeta; Terry, James G; Reed, Rhiannon D; Smith, Grant D; Segev, Dorry L; Kumar, Vineeta; Lewis, Cora E

    2017-03-01

    Morphometric assessments, such as muscle density and body fat distribution, have emerged as strong predictors of cardiovascular risk and postoperative morbidity and mortality. To date, no study has examined morphometric mortality risk prediction among kidney transplant (KT) candidates. KT candidates, waitlisted 2008-2009, were identified (n=96) and followed to the earliest of transplant, death, or administrative end of study. Morphometric measures, including abdominal adipose tissue, paraspinous and psoas muscle composition, and aortic calcification, were measured from CTs. Risk of waitlist mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazard regression. On adjusted analyses, radiologic measures remained independently and significantly associated with lower waitlist mortality; the addition of radiologic measures significantly improved model predictive ability over models containing traditional risk factors alone (net reclassification index: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.31-0.75). Higher psoas muscle attenuation (indicative of leaner muscle) was associated with decreased risk of death (aHR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.91-0.96, P<.001), and for each unit increase in lean paraspinous volume, there was an associated 2% decreased risk for death (aHR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.96-0.99, P=.03). Radiologic measures of lean muscle mass, such as psoas muscle attenuation and paraspinous lean volume, may improve waitlist mortality risk prediction and candidate selection.

  18. Occupational career and risk of mortality among US Civil War veterans.

    PubMed

    Su, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have extended the traditional framework on occupational disparities in health by examining mortality differentials from a career perspective. Few studies, however, have examined the relation between career and mortality in a historical U.S. population. This study explores the relation between occupational career and risk of mortality in old age among 7096 Union Army veterans who fought the American Civil War in the 1860s. Occupational mobility was commonplace among the veterans in the postbellum period, with 54% of them changing occupations from the time of enlistment to 1900. Among veterans who were farmers at enlistment, 46% of them changed to a non-farming occupation by the time of 1900. Results from the Cox Proportional Hazard analysis suggest that relative to the average mortality risk of the sample, being a farmer at enlistment or circa 1900 are both associated with a lower risk of mortality in old age, although the effect is more salient for veterans who were farmers at enlistment. Occupational immobility for manual labors poses a serious threat to chance of survival in old age. These findings still hold after adjusting for the effects of selected variables characterizing risk exposures during early life, wartime, and old age. The robustness of the survival advantage associated with being a farmer at enlistment highlights the importance of socioeconomic conditions early in life in chance of survival at older ages.

  19. Does shared family background influence the impact of educational differences on early mortality?

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Mortensen, Laust H; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Per Kragh; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Madsen, Mia; Osler, Merete

    2012-10-15

    The mechanisms behind social differences in mortality rates have been debated. The authors examined the extent to which shared family background and health in early life could explain the association between educational status and all-cause mortality rates using a sibling design. The study was register-based and included all individuals born in Denmark between 1950 and 1979 who had at least 1 full sibling born in the same time period (n = 1,381,436). All individuals were followed from 28 years of age until death, emigration, or December 2009. The authors used Cox regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios for mortality according to educational level. Conventional cohort and intersibling analyses were carried out and conducted separately for deaths occurring before and after the age of 45 years, respectively. The cohort analyses showed an inverse association between educational status and all-cause mortality that was strongest for males, increased with younger birth cohorts, and tended to be strongest in the analyses of death before 45 years of age. The associations were attenuated slightly in the intersibling analyses and after adjustment for serious health conditions in early life. Hence, health selection and confounding by factors shared by siblings explained only a minor part of the association between educational level and all-cause mortality.

  20. Increased mortality associated with treated active tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kabali, Conrad; Mtei, Lillian; Brooks, Daniel R; Waddell, Richard; Bakari, Muhammad; Matee, Mecky; Arbeit, Robert D; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham; Horsburgh, C Robert

    2013-07-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected patients, even when successfully treated, may be associated with excess mortality. We conducted a prospective cohort study nested in a randomized TB vaccine trial to compare mortality between HIV-infected patients diagnosed and treated for TB (TB, n = 77) and HIV-infected patients within the same CD4 range, who were not diagnosed with or treated for active TB (non-TB, n = 308) in the period 2001-2008. Only twenty four subjects (6%) were on antiretroviral therapy at the beginning of this study. After accounting for covariate effects including use of antiretroviral therapy, isoniazid preventive therapy, and receipt of vaccine, we found a four-fold increase in mortality in TB patients compared with non-TB patients (adjusted Hazard Ratio 4.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.63, 13.05). These findings suggest that treatment for TB alone is not sufficient to avert the excess mortality associated with HIV-related TB and that prevention of TB may provide a mortality benefit.

  1. Pulmonary Support On Day 30 As A Predictor Of Morbidity And Mortality In Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Ryan P.; Stoffan, Alexander; Potanos, Kristina; Fullington, Nora; Graham, Dionne A.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Kim, Heung Bae; Wilson, Jay M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with significant in-hospital mortality, morbidity and length-of-stay (LOS). We hypothesized that the degree of pulmonary support on hospital day-30 may predict in-hospital mortality, LOS, and discharge oxygen needs and could be useful for risk prediction and counseling. Methods 862 patients in the CDH Study Group registry with a LOS≥30 days were analyzed (2007–2010). Pulmonary support was defined as (1) room-air (n=320) (2) noninvasive supplementation (n=244) (3) mechanical ventilation (n=279) and (4) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, n=19). Cox Proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to determine the case-mix adjusted association of oxygen requirements on day-30 with mortality and oxygen requirements at discharge. Results On multivariate analysis, use of ventilator (HR 5.1, p=.003) or ECMO (HR 19.6, p<.001) were significant predictors of in-patient mortality. Need for non-invasive supplementation or ventilator on day-30 was associated with a respective 22-fold (p<.001) and 43-fold (p<.001) increased odds of oxygen use at discharge compared to those on room-air. Conclusions Pulmonary support on Day-30 is a strong predictor of length of stay, oxygen requirements at discharge and in-patient mortality and may be used as a simple prognostic indicator for family counseling, discharge planning, and identification of high-risk infants. PMID:23845605

  2. Statin Use Reduces Prostate Cancer All-Cause Mortality: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Ni; Liang, Ji-An; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    Studies have suggested that statin use is related to cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine whether using statins in prostate cancer patients is associated with reduced all-cause mortality rates. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5179 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who used statins for at least 6 months between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2010. To form a comparison group, each patient was randomly frequency-matched (according to age and index date) with a prostate cancer patient who did not use any type of statin-based drugs during the study period. The study endpoint was mortality. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using Cox regression models. Among prostate cancer patients, statin use was associated with significantly decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.60-0.71). This phenomenon was observed among various types of statin, age groups, and treatment methods. Analyzing the defined daily dose of statins indicated that both low- and high-dose groups exhibited significantly decreased death rates compared with nonusers, suggesting a dose-response relationship. The results of this population-based cohort study suggest that using statins reduces all-cause mortality among prostate cancer patients, and a dose-response relationship may exist.

  3. Does educational status impact adult mortality in Denmark? A twin approach.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mia; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Christensen, Kaare; Andersen, Per Kragh; Osler, Merete

    2010-07-15

    To disentangle an independent effect of educational status on mortality risk from direct and indirect selection mechanisms, the authors used a discordant twin pair design, which allowed them to isolate the effect of education by means of adjustment for genetic and environmental confounding per design. The study is based on data from the Danish Twin Registry and Statistics Denmark. Using Cox regression, they estimated hazard ratios for mortality according to the highest attained education among 5,260 monozygotic and 11,088 dizygotic same-sex twin pairs born during 1921-1950 and followed during 1980-2008. Both standard cohort and intrapair analyses were conducted separately for zygosity, gender, and birth cohort. Educational differences in mortality were demonstrated in the standard cohort analyses but attenuated in the intrapair analyses in all subgroups but men born during 1921-1935, and no effect modification by zygosity was observed. Hence, the results are most compatible with an effect of early family environment in explaining the educational inequality in mortality. However, large educational differences were still reflected in mortality risk differences within twin pairs, thus supporting some degree of independent effect of education. In addition, the effect of education may be more pronounced in older cohorts of Danish men.

  4. Mortal assets

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  5. Statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinkal; Lehman, Amy; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Arun, Monica; Manson, JoAnn E.; Lavasani, Sayeh; Wasswertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Sarto, Gloria E.; LeBoff, Meryl; Cauley, Jane; Cote, Michele; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Jay, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative. Methods The study population included 128,675 post-menopausal women aged 50–79 years, out of which there were 7,883 newly diagnosed cases of in situ (19 %), local (61 %)-, regional (19 %)- and distant (1 %)-stage breast cancer and 401 deaths due to breast cancer after an average of 11.5 (SD = 3.7) years of follow-up. Stage was coded using SEER criteria and was stratified into early (in situ and local)- versus late (regional and distant)-stage disease. Information on statins and other risk factors were collected by self- and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Cause of death was based on medical record review. Multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) evaluating the relationship between statin use (at baseline only and in a time-dependent manner) and diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer and breast cancer-specific mortality were computed from Cox proportional hazards analyses after adjusting for appropriate confounders. Results Statins were used by 10,474 women (8 %) at baseline. In the multivariable-adjusted time-dependent model, use of lipophilic statins was associated with a reduction in diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer (HR 0.80, 95 % CI 0.64–0.98, p = 0.035) which was also significant among women with estrogen receptor-positive disease (HR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.56–0.93, p = 0.012). Breast cancer mortality was marginally lower in statin users compared with nonusers (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.32–1.06, p = 0.075). Conclusions Prior statin use is associated with lower breast cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:25736184

  6. A prospective cohort study of stroke mortality and arsenic in drinking water in Bangladeshi adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic in drinking water causes increased coronary artery disease (CAD) and death from CAD, but its association with stroke is not known. Methods Prospective cohort study with arsenic exposure measured in well water at baseline. 61074 men and women aged 18 years or older on January 2003 were enrolled in 2003. The cohort was actively followed for an average of 7 years (421,754 person-years) through December 2010. Based on arsenic concentration the population was categorized in three groups and stroke mortality HR was compared to the referent. The risk of stroke mortality Hazard Ratio (HR) and 95% Confidence Interval was calculated in relation to arsenic exposure was estimated by Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders. Results A total of 1033 people died from stroke during the follow-up period, accounting for 23% of the total deaths. Multivariable adjusted HRs (95% confidence interval) for stroke for well water arsenic concentrations <10, 10-49, and ≥50 μg/L were 1.0 (reference), 1.20 (0.92 to 1.57), and 1.35 (1.04 to 1.75) respectively (Ptrend=0.00058). For men, multivariable adjusted HRs (95%) for well water arsenic concentrations <10, 10-49, and ≥50 μg/L were 1.0 (reference), 1.12 (0.78 to 1.60), and 1.07 (0.75 to 1.51) respectively (Ptrend=0.45) and for women 1.0 (reference),1.31 (0.87 to 1.98), and 1.72 (1.15 to 2.57) respectively (Ptrend=0.00004). Conclusion The result suggests that arsenic exposure was associated with increased stroke mortality risk in this population, and was more significant in women compared to men. PMID:24548416

  7. Oxidative Balance Score as Predictor of All-Cause, Cancer, and Non-cancer Mortality in a Biracial US Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kong, So Yeon; Goodman, Michael; Judd, Suzanne; Bostick, Roberd M.; Flanders, W. Dana; McClellan, William

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously proposed an oxidative balance score (OBS) that combines pro- and anti-oxidant exposures to represent the overall oxidative balance status of an individual. In this study, we investigated associations of the OBS with all-cause and cause-specific mortality, and explored alternative OBS weighting methods in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study cohort. Methods The OBS was calculated by combining information from 14 a priori selected pro- and anti-oxidant factors, and then divided into quartiles with the lowest quartile (predominance of pro-oxidants) as reference. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each OBS category compared to the reference. Results Over a median 5.8 years of follow-up, 2,079 of the 21,031 participants died. The multivariable adjusted HRs (95% CI) for all-cause, cancer, and non-cancer mortality for those in the highest vs. the lowest equal-weighting OBS quartile were: 0.70 (0.61, 0.81), 0.50 (0.37, 0.67), and 0.77 (0.66, 0.89), respectively (P-trend < 0.01 for all). Similar results were observed with all weighting methods. Conclusion These results suggest that individuals with a greater balance of anti-oxidant to pro-oxidant lifestyle exposures may have lower mortality. PMID:25682727

  8. Fifty-Year Trends in Atrial Fibrillation Prevalence, Incidence, Risk Factors, and Mortality in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Yin, Xiaoyan; PhilimonGona; Larson, Martin G.; Beiser, Alexa S.; McManus, David D.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Lubitz, Steven A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; SudhaSeshadri; Wolf, Philip A; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Comprehensive long-term data on atrial fibrillation trends in men and women are scant. Methods We investigated trends in atrial fibrillation incidence, prevalence, and risk factors, and in stroke and mortality following its onset in Framingham Heart Study participants (n=9511) from 1958 to 2007. To accommodate sex differences in atrial fibrillation risk factors and disease manifestations, sex-stratified analyses were performed. Findings During 50 years of observation (202,417 person-years), there were 1,544 new-onset atrial fibrillation cases (46.8% women). We observed about a fourfold increase in the age-adjusted prevalence and more than a tripling in age-adjusted incidence of atrial fibrillation (prevalence 20.4 versus 96.2 per 1000 person-years in men; 13.7 versus 49.4 in women; incidence rates in first versus last decade 3.7 versus 13.4 per 1000 person-years in men; 2.5 versus 8.6 in women, ptrend<0.0001). For atrial fibrillation diagnosed by ECG during routine Framingham examinations, age-adjusted prevalence increased (12.6versus 25.7 per 1000 person-years in men; 8.1 versus 11.8 in women, ptrend<0.0001). The age-adjusted incidence increased, but did not achieve statistical significance. Although the prevalence of most risk factors changed over time, their associated hazards for atrial fibrillation changed little. Multivariable-adjusted proportional hazards models revealed a 73.5% decline in stroke and a 25.4% decline in mortality following atrial fibrillation onset (ptrend=0.0001, ptrend=0.003, respectively). Interpretation Our data suggest that observed trends of increased incidence of atrial fibrillation in the community were partially due to enhanced surveillance. Stroke occurrence and mortality following atrial fibrillation onset declined over the decades, and prevalence increased approximately fourfold. The hazards for atrial fibrillation risk factors remained fairly constant. Our data indicate a need for measures to enhance early

  9. Age at Menarche and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Singaporean Chinese Women: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, NT; Odegaard, AO; Gross, MD; Koh, WP; Yuan, JM; Pereira, MA

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether menarcheal age was inversely associated with CVD mortality in Singaporean Chinese women. Methods 34,022 Chinese women aged 45–74 at enrollment (1993–1998), with complete data on study variables, were followed prospectively through 2009 for primary cause of death due to CVD, including coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CERE). Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD mortality were computed across menarcheal age categories and adjusted for potential confounders and BMI. Results Over 460,374 person-years of follow-up, 1,852 women died from CVD; 998 of them from CHD and 557 from CERE. There was a significant interaction between menarcheal age and smoking (p<0.05). In nonsmokers, menarcheal age was inversely associated with risk for CVD and CHD mortality. HRs (and 95% CI) for CVD mortality across menarcheal age categories (≤12, 13–14, 15–16, ≥17) were: 1.06 (0.87–1.29), 1 (referent), 0.89 (0.79–1.00), and 0.80 (0.69–0.93), respectively (ptrend<0.001); HRs for CHD mortality were: 1.06 (0.80–1.34), 1 (referent), 0.76 (0.65–0.90), and 0.72 (0.58–0.88), respectively (ptrend<0.001). In nonsmokers there was no association between menarcheal age and CERE mortality. Among smokers, menarcheal age was not associated with CVD, CHD or CERE mortality. Conclusion Menarcheal age was inversely associated with risk of CVD mortality in nonsmoking Chinese women. PMID:22939833

  10. Higher levels of serum lycopene are associated with reduced mortality in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Meza, Jane L; Soliman, Ghada A; Islam, K M Monirul; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of mortality. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation may play an important role in the high mortality of individuals with metabolic syndrome. Previous studies have suggested that lycopene intake might be related to the reduced oxidative stress and decreased inflammation. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined the hypothesis that lycopene is associated with mortality among individuals with metabolic syndrome. A total of 2499 participants 20 years and older with metabolic syndrome were divided into 3 groups based on their serum concentration of lycopene using the tertile rank method. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from years 2001 to 2006 was linked to the mortality file for mortality follow-up data through December 31, 2011, to determine the mortality rate and hazard ratios (HR) for the 3 serum lycopene concentration groups. The mean survival time was significantly higher in the group with the highest serum lycopene concentration (120.6 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 118.8-122.3) and the medium group (116.3 months; 95% CI, 115.2-117.4), compared with the group with lowest serum lycopene concentration (107.4 months; 95% CI, 106.5-108.3). After adjusting for possible confounding factors, participants in the highest (HR, 0.61; P = .0113) and in the second highest (HR, 0.67; P = .0497) serum lycopene concentration groups showed significantly lower HRs of mortality when compared with participants in the lower serum lycopene concentration. The data suggest that higher serum lycopene concentration has a significant association with the reduced risk of mortality among individuals with metabolic syndrome.

  11. Relation between serum thrombospondin-2 and cardiovascular mortality in older men screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Clancy, Paula; Hankey, Graeme J; Norman, Paul E

    2013-06-15

    Thrombospondin-1 and -2 (TSP-1 and -2) have been implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis, thrombosis, and inflammation, which are believed to be critical in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum TSP-1 and TSP-2 concentrations were associated with cardiovascular mortality in older men. A cohort of 992 elderly men was recruited between 2001 and 2004, and blood was collected for assessment of serum TSP-1 and TSP-2 by immunoassay. The men were followed by means of the Western Australia Data Linkage System until July 31, 2009. The association of TSP-1 and TSP-2 with mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard analysis. Serum TSP-2 quartile was strongly positively associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Men with serum TSP-2 in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles had a cumulative incidence of cardiovascular mortality of 3.3%, 8.0%, 9.7%, and 12.5% at 5 years, respectively, p = 0.001. Men with serum TSP-2 in the highest quartile had a 3.37-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.53-7.44, p = 0.003) increased risk of cardiovascular mortality after adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors. Most deaths were secondary to cardiac causes, and serum TSP-2 was also independently associated with cardiac mortality (relative risk: 3.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.54-8.20 for men in the top compared with the lowest quartile). Serum TSP-1 was not associated with cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, increased serum TSP-2 concentration is independently and significantly associated with the risk of cardiac mortality in older men.

  12. THE IMPACT OF LOW-THRESHOLD METHADONE MAINTENANCE TREATMENT ON MORTALITY IN A CANADIAN SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Seonaid; Hyashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Dong, Huiru; Lima, Viviane Dias; Lappalainen, Leslie; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) is among the most effective treatment modalities available for the management of opioid use disorder. However, the effect of MMT on mortality, and optimal strategies for delivering methadone are less clear. This study sought to estimate the effect of low-threshold MMT and its association with all-cause mortality among persons who inject drugs (PWID) in a setting where methadone is widely available through primary care physicians and community pharmacies at no cost through the setting’s universal medical insurance plan. Methods Between May, 1996 and December, 2011 data were collected as part of two prospective cohort studies of PWID in Vancouver, Canada, and were linked to the provincial vital statistics database to ascertain rates and causes of death. The association of MMT with all-cause mortality was estimated using multivariable extended Cox regression with timedependent variables. Results Of 2335 PWID providing 15027 person-years of observation, 511 deaths were observed for a mortality rate of 3.4 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 3.1 – 3.7) deaths per 100 person-years. After adjusting for potential confounders including age and HIV seropositivity, MMT enrolment was found to be associated with lower mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61 – 0.88). Conclusions While observed all-cause mortality rates among PWID in this setting were high, participation in low-threshold MMT was significantly associated with improved survival. These findings add to the known benefits of providing low-threshold MMT on reducing the harms associated with injection drug use. PMID:26455554

  13. Multiple Inflammatory Biomarkers in Relation to Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Fontes, João D.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rong, Jian; Levy, Daniel; Keaney, John F.; Wang, Thomas J.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress are related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Approach and Results We examined 11 established and novel biomarkers representing inflammation and oxidative stress (C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (mass and activity), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, myeloperoxidase, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor receptor II [TNFRII]) in relation to incident major CVD and mortality in the community. We studied 3035 participants (mean age 61±9 years, 53% women). During follow-up (median 8.9 years), 253 participants experienced a CVD event and 343 died. CRP (hazard ratios [HR] reported per standard deviation ln-transformed biomarker, 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.35; nominal P=0.02) and TNFRII (HR 1.15, 95% CI; 1.01-1.32; nominal P=0.04) were retained in multivariable-adjusted models for major CVD, but were not significant after adjustment for multiple testing. The biomarkers related to mortality were TNFRII (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19-1.49; P<0.0001); ICAM-1 (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.12-1.37; P<0.0001), and interleukin-6 (HR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.39; P<0.0001). The addition of these markers to the model including traditional risk factors increased discrimination and reclassification for risk of death (P<0.0001), but not for CVD. Conclusions Of 11 biomarkers, TNFRII was associated nominally with incident major CVD, and significantly with all-cause mortality, which renders it an interesting target for future research. The combination of TNFRII with CRP in relation to CVD and with interleukin-6 to mortality increased the predictive ability in addition to CVD risk factors for total mortality but not for incident CVD. PMID:23640499

  14. Racial Disparities in Poverty Account for Mortality Differences in US Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Paul L; Fwu, Chyng-Wen; Abbott, Kevin C; Ratner, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W

    2016-12-01

    Higher mortality in Blacks than Whites has been consistently reported in the US, but previous investigations have not accounted for poverty at the individual level. The health of its population is an important part of the capital of a nation. We examined the association between individual level poverty and disability and racial mortality differences in a 5% Medicare beneficiary random sample from 2004 to 2010. Cox regression models examined associations of race with all-cause mortality, adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, disability, neighborhood income, and Medicare "Buy-in" status (a proxy for individual level poverty) in 1,190,510 Black and White beneficiaries between 65 and 99 years old as of January 1, 2014, who had full and primary Medicare Part A and B coverage in 2004, and lived in one of the 50 states or Washington DC. Overall, black beneficiaries had higher sex-and-age adjusted mortality than Whites (hazard ratio [HR] 1.18). Controlling for health-related measures and disability reduced the HR for Black beneficiaries to 1.03. Adding "Buy-in" as an individual level covariate lowered the HR for Black beneficiaries to 0.92. Neither of the residential measures added to the predictive model. We conclude that poorer health status, excess disability, and most importantly, greater poverty among Black beneficiaries accounts for racial mortality differences in the aged US Medicare population. Poverty fosters social and health inequalities, including mortality disparities, notwithstanding national health insurance for the US elderly. Controlling for individual level poverty, in contrast to the common use of area level poverty in previous analyses, accounts for the White survival advantage in Medicare beneficiaries, and should be a covariate in analyses of administrative databases.

  15. Controlling Time-Dependent Confounding by Health Status and Frailty: Restriction Versus Statistical Adjustment.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Leah J; Ellis, Alan R; Brookhart, M Alan

    2015-07-01

    Nonexperimental studies of preventive interventions are often biased because of the healthy-user effect and, in frail populations, because of confounding by functional status. Bias is evident when estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness, even after adjustment for claims-based indicators of illness. We explored bias reduction methods while estimating vaccine effectiveness in a cohort of adult hemodialysis patients. Using the United States Renal Data System and linked data from a commercial dialysis provider, we estimated vaccine effectiveness using a Cox proportional hazards marginal structural model of all-cause mortality before and during 3 influenza seasons in 2005/2006 through 2007/2008. To improve confounding control, we added frailty indicators to the model, measured time-varying confounders at different time intervals, and restricted the sample in multiple ways. Crude and baseline-adjusted marginal structural models remained strongly biased. Restricting to a healthier population removed some unmeasured confounding; however, this reduced the sample size, resulting in wide confidence intervals. We estimated an influenza vaccine effectiveness of 9% (hazard ratio = 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.72, 1.15) when bias was minimized through cohort restriction. In this study, the healthy-user bias could not be controlled through statistical adjustment; however, sample restriction reduced much of the bias.

  16. Sleep duration and risk of stroke mortality among Chinese adults: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, An; De Silva, Deidre Anne; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prospective relation between sleep duration and stroke risk is less studied, particularly in Asians. We examined the association between sleep duration and stroke mortality among Chinese adults. Methods The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults aged 45-74 years enrolled during 1993 through 1998. Sleep duration at baseline was assessed via in-person interview, and death information during follow-up was ascertained via record linkage with the death registry up to December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with adjustment for other comorbidities and lifestyle risk factors of stroke mortality. Results During 926,752 person-years of follow-up, we documented 1,381 stroke deaths (322 from hemorrhagic and 1,059 from ischemic or non-specified strokes). Compared to individuals with 7 hours/day of sleep, the multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval) of total stroke mortality was 1.25 (1.05-1.50) for ≤5 hours/day (short duration), 1.01 (0.87-1.18) for 6 hours/day, 1.09 (0.95-1.26) for 8 hours/day, and 1.54 (1.28-1.85) for ≥9 hours/day (long duration). The increased risk of stroke death with short (1.54; 1.16-2.03) and long duration of sleep (1.95; 1.48-2.57) was seen among subjects with a history of hypertension, but not in those without hypertension. These findings were limited to risk of death from ischemic or non-specified stroke, but not observed for hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions Both short and long sleep durations are associated with increased risk of stroke mortality in a Chinese population, particularly among those with a history of hypertension. PMID:24743442

  17. Impact of recovery of renal function on long-term mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Honeycutt, Emily; Patel, Uptal D; Lopes, Renato D; Shaw, Linda K; Glower, Donald D; Harrington, Robert A; Califf, Robert M; Sketch, Michael H

    2010-12-15

    Whether prognosis differs in acute renal failure (ARF) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with and without recovery of renal function is not known. We studied patients who had CABG at Duke University Medical Center (1995 to 2008). ARF was defined as an increase in peak creatinine ≥50% after CABG or ≥0.7 mg/dl above baseline or need for new dialysis. Patients were categorized into 3 groups: (1) no ARF after CABG, (2) ARF after CABG and completely recovered renal function at day 7 (return of creatinine to no higher than baseline and no dialysis), or (3) ARF after CABG with no recovery of renal function at day 7 (creatinine no higher than baseline or new dialysis). Main outcome measurement was risk-adjusted long-term mortality (excluding death ≤7 days). ARF after CABG occurred in 2,083 of 10,415 patients (20%) and completely recovered in 703 (33.7%). Risk-adjusted mortality was highest in patients with ARF without recovery of renal function (hazard ratios 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.34 to 1.62) and intermediate in those with ARF but completely recovered renal function (hazard ratios 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.37, referent no-ARF group). Mortality was lower in patients with ARF compared to those without complete recovery of renal function (p = 0.0083). In conclusion, in patients with ARF after CABG, complete recovery of renal function was associated with significantly lower long-term mortality compared to those without such recovery, although this was significantly higher than in those without ARF. Thus, major emphasis should be on prevention of ARF in patients undergoing CABG.

  18. Association of Metformin Use With Cancer-Specific Mortality in Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Seok; Kim, Yun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Sook; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Sang Bum; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Youn Joo; Jang, Won Il; Kang, Shin Hee; Tchoe, Ha Jin; Park, Chan Mi; Jo, Ae Jung; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Jin A; Choi, Hyung Jin; Polak, Michael N.; Ko, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many preclinical reports and retrospective population studies have shown an anticancer effect of metformin in patients with several types of cancer and comorbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this work, the anticancer effect of metformin was assessed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with T2DM who underwent curative resection. A population-based retrospective cohort design was used. Data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Service and Korea Center Cancer Registry in the Republic of Korea, identifying 5494 patients with newly diagnosed HCC who underwent curative resection between 2005 and 2011. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models to estimate effects. In the sensitivity analysis, we excluded patients who started metformin or other oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) after HCC diagnosis to control for immortal time bias. From the patient cohort, 751 diabetic patients who were prescribed an OHA were analyzed for HCC-specific mortality and retreatment upon recurrence, comparing 533 patients treated with metformin to 218 patients treated without metformin. In the fully adjusted analyses, metformin users showed a significantly lower risk of HCC-specific mortality (HR 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30–0.49) and retreatment events (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.33–0.52) compared with metformin nonusers. Risks for HCC-specific mortality were consistently lower among metformin-using groups, excluding patients who started metformin or OHAs after diagnosis. In this large population-based cohort of patients with comorbid HCC and T2DM, treated with curative hepatic resection, metformin use was associated with improvement of HCC-specific mortality and reduced occurrence of retreatment events. PMID:27124061

  19. [Maternal mortality and perinatal mortality].

    PubMed

    Boutaleb, Y; Mesbahi, M; Lahlou, D; Aderdour, M

    1982-01-01

    94 maternal deaths and 1546 fetal and neonatal deaths were registered among 28,706 births at the CHU Averroes in Casablanca between 1978-80. 45% of women who deliver at the clinic are very poor and only 10% are relatively well off. Obstetrical antecedents were noted in 27% of the fetal deaths. 70% of the maternal deaths occurred in women aged 20-34. 32 maternal deaths occurred among 16,232 women with 1-2 children, 30 among 6514 women with 3-5 children, and 32 among 5960 women with 6-14 children. 11,027 of the 28,706 were primaparas. Perinatal mortality was 4.46% among primaparas, 8.24% among grand multiparas, and 4.1% among secondiparas. In 58 of the 94 cases of maternal mortality the woman was hospitalized after attempting delivery at home or in a village clinic. Among women with 1 or 2 children, hemorrhage was the cause of death in 8 cases, infection in 7 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, thromboembolism in 2 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, pulmonary tuberculosis in 1 case, embolism in 5 cases, and other causes 1 case each. Among women with 3-5 children hemorrhage was the cause of death in 10 cases, septicemia in 3 cases, uterine rupture in 3 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, viral hepatitis in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other reasons 1 case each. Among grand multiparas hemorrhage was the cause of death in 11 cases, uterine rupture in 12 cases, peritonitis in 2 cases, eclampsia in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other causes 1 case each. 19 of the maternal deaths were judged to have been avoidable with better management. Prematurity and birth weight of 1000-2500 g associated or not with other pathology were found in 714 of 1546 perinatal deaths. Of 390 cases of death in utero with retention and maceration, 68 were caused by reno-vascular syndromes, 76 by maternal infections, 33 by maternal syphilis, 26 by fetal malformation, 18 by maternal diabetes, 10 by Rh incompatability, and 159 by indeterminate causes. In 795 cases of

  20. Daily Sitting Time and All-Cause Mortality: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Josephine Y.; Grunseit, Anne C.; Chey, Tien; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Brown, Wendy J.; Matthews, Charles E.; Bauman, Adrian E.; van der Ploeg, Hidde P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the association between daily total sitting and all-cause mortality risk and to examine dose-response relationships with and without adjustment for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Methods Studies published from 1989 to January 2013 were identified via searches of multiple databases, reference lists of systematic reviews on sitting and health, and from authors’ personal literature databases. We included prospective cohort studies that had total daily sitting time as a quantitative exposure variable, all-cause mortality as the outcome and reported estimates of relative risk, or odds ratios or hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Two authors independently extracted the data and summary estimates of associations were computed using random effects models. Results Six studies were included, involving data from 595,086 adults and 29,162 deaths over 3,565,569 person-years of follow-up. Study participants were mainly female, middle-aged or older adults from high-income countries; mean study quality score was 12/15 points. Associations between daily total sitting time and all-cause mortality were not linear. With physical activity adjustment, the spline model of best fit had dose-response HRs of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.98-1.03), 1.02 (95% CI: 0.99-1.05) and 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.08) for every 1-hour increase in sitting time in intervals between 0-3, >3-7 and >7 h/day total sitting, respectively. This model estimated a 34% higher mortality risk for adults sitting 10 h/day, after taking physical activity into account. The overall weighted population attributable fraction for all-cause mortality for total daily sitting time was 5.9%, after adjusting for physical activity. Conclusions Higher amounts of daily total sitting time are associated with greater risk of all-cause mortality and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity appears to attenuate the hazardous association. These findings provide a starting point for identifying a threshold on which

  1. Pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure-variability is independently associated with all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Viknesh; Pasea, Laura; Ojha, Sanjay; Wilkinson, Ian B; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2014-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure variability is an independent risk factor for mortality and cardiovascular events. Standard measures of blood pressure predict outcome poorly in haemodialysis patients. We investigated whether systolic blood pressure variability was associated with mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. We performed a longitudinal observational study of patients commencing haemodialysis between 2005 and 2011 in East Anglia, UK, excluding patients with cardiovascular events within 6 months of starting haemodialysis. The main exposure was variability independent of the mean (VIM) of systolic blood pressure from short-gap, pre-dialysis blood pressure readings between 3 and 6 months after commencing haemodialysis, and the outcome was all-cause mortality. Of 203 patients, 37 (18.2%) patients died during a mean follow-up of 2.0 (SD 1.3) years. The age and sex-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.17) for a one-unit increase of VIM. This was not altered by adjustment for diabetes, prior cardiovascular disease and mean systolic blood pressure (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.16). Patients with VIM of systolic blood pressure above the median were 2.4 (95% CI 1.17-4.74) times more likely to die during follow-up than those below the median. Results were similar for all measures of blood pressure variability and further adjustment for type of dialysis access, use of antihypertensives and absolute or variability of fluid intake did not alter these findings. Diastolic blood pressure variability showed no association with all cause mortality. Our study shows that variability of systolic blood pressure is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. Further research is needed to understand the mechanism as this may form a therapeutic target or focus for management.

  2. Diabetes and Perinatal Mortality in Twin Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Zhao, Yan-Jun; Ouyang, Fengxiu; Yang, Zu-Jing; Guo, Yu-Na; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnancy has been associated with a paradoxically reduced risk of neonatal death in twin pregnancies. Risk “shift” may be a concern in that the reduction in neonatal deaths may be due to an increase in fetal deaths (stillbirths). This study aimed to clarify the impact of diabetes on the risk of perinatal death (neonatal death plus stillbirth) in twin pregnancies. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of twin births using the largest available dataset on twin births (the U.S. matched multiple birth data 1995-2000; 19,676 neonates from diabetic pregnancies, 541,481 from non-diabetic pregnancies). Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) of perinatal death accounting for twin cluster-level dependence. Results Comparing diabetic versus non-diabetic twin pregnancies, overall perinatal mortality rate was counterintuitively lower [2.1% versus 3.3%, aHR 0.70 (95% confidence intervals 0.63-0.78)]. Individually, both stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates were lower in diabetic pregnancies, but we identified significant differences by gestational age and birth weight. Diabetes was associated with a survival benefit in pregnancies completed before 32 weeks [aHR 0.55 (0.48-0.63)] or with birth weight <1500 g [aHR 0.61 (0.53-0.69)]. In contrast, diabetes was associated with an elevated risk of perinatal death in pregnancies delivered between 32 and 36 weeks [aHR 1.38 (1.10-1.72)] or with birth weight >=2500 g [aHR 2.20 (1.55-3.13)]. Conclusions Diabetes in pregnancy appears to be “protective” against perinatal death in twin pregnancies ending in very preterm or very low birth weight births. Prospective studies are required to clarify whether these patterns of risk are real, or they are artifacts of unmeasured confounders. Additional data correlating these outcomes with the types of diabetes in pregnancy are also needed to distinguish the effects of pre-gestational vs. gestational diabetes

  3. The combined relationship of occupational and leisure-time physical activity with all-cause mortality among men, accounting for physical fitness.

    PubMed

    Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark; De Bacquer, Dirk; Van Herck, Koen; De Backer, Guy; Kittel, France; de Smet, Patrick; Holtermann, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the combined relationship of occupational physical activity and leisure-time physical activity with all-cause mortality among men, while accounting for physical fitness. The prospective Belgian Physical Fitness Study included 1,456 male workers aged 40-55 years who were free of coronary heart disease at baseline. Baseline data were collected through questionnaires and clinical examinations from 1976 to 1978. To estimate physical fitness, a submaximal graded exercise test was performed on a bicycle ergometer. Total mortality was registered during a mean follow-up period of 16.9 years. Main results were obtained through Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. A total of 145 deaths were registered during follow-up. After adjustment for confounders, a significantly increased mortality rate was observed in workers who had low levels of both physical activity types (hazard ratio = 2.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 4.19) but also in workers combining high occupational physical activity and low leisure-time physical activity (hazard ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 3.91); the latter finding was particularly pronounced among workers with a low physical fitness level. The present results confirm the existence of a complex interplay among different physical activity settings and fitness levels in predicting mortality.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis patients are not at increased risk for 30-day cardiovascular events, infections, or mortality after total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Serious infection, cardiovascular disease, and mortality are increased in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether RA affects the risk for these complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is unknown, we hypothesize that it does. We compared the occurrence of 30-day postoperative complications and mortality in a large cohort of RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing hip or knee TJA. Methods Analyses included 7-year data from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The 30-day complications were compared by diagnosis by using logistic regression, and long-term mortality was examined by using Cox proportional hazards regression. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and clustering by surgical site. Additional covariates included sociodemographics, comorbidities, health behaviors, and operative risk factors. Results The 34,524 patients (839 RA, 33,685 OA) underwent knee (65.9%) or hip TJA. Patients were 95.7% men with a mean (SD) age of 64.4 (10.7) years and had 3,764 deaths over a mean follow-up of 3.7 (2.3) years. Compared with OA patients, those with RA were significantly more likely to require a return to the operating room (odds ratio (OR), 1.45 (95% CI, 1.08 to 1.94), but had similar rates of 30-day postoperative infection, OR 1.02 (0.72 to 1.47), cardiovascular events, OR 0.69 (0.37 to 1.28), and mortality, OR 0.94 (0.38 to 2.33). RA was associated with a significantly higher long-term mortality; hazard ratio (HR), 1.22 (1.00 to 1.49). Conclusion In this study of US veterans, RA patients were not at an increased risk for short-term mortality or other major complications after TJA, although they returned to the operating room more often and had increased long-term mortality. PMID:24252350

  5. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; Kurozawa, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC) Study. Methods A cohort study of 34,128 men and 49,282 women aged 40–79 years was conducted, to explore the association between lifestyle and cancer in Japan. Participants completed a baseline survey during 1988 to 1990 and were followed until the end of 2009. We classified participants into two groups according to dietary habits with respect to eating or skipping breakfast and carried out intergroup comparisons of lifestyle. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results There were 5,768 deaths from cancer and 5,133 cases of death owing to circulatory diseases and 17,112 cases for all causes of mortality during the median 19.4 years follow-up. Skipping breakfast was related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. After adjusting for confounding factors, skipping breakfast significantly increased the risk of mortality from circulatory diseases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42] and all causes (HR = 1.43) in men and all causes mortality (HR = 1.34) in women. Conclusion Our findings showed that skipping breakfast is associated with increasing risk of mortality from circulatory diseases and all causes among men and all causes mortality among women in Japan. PMID:27046951

  6. Association between long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution and mortality in China: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Yang, Chunxue; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Renjie; Chen, Bingheng; Gu, Dongfeng; Kan, Haidong

    2011-02-28

    No prior cohort studies exist in China examining the association of outdoor air pollution with mortality. We studied 70,947 middle-aged men and women in the China National Hypertension Survey and its follow-up study. Baseline data were obtained in 1991 using a standard protocol. The follow-up evaluation was conducted in 1999 and 2000. Annual average air pollution exposure between 1991 and 2000, including total suspended particle (TSP), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), were estimated by linking fixed-site monitoring data with resident zip code. We examined the association of air pollution with mortality using proportional hazards regression model. We found significant associations between air pollution levels and mortality from cardiopulmonary diseases and from lung cancer. Each 10 μg/m(3) elevation of TSP, SO(2) and NO(x) was associated with a 0.9% (95%CI: 0.3%, 1.5%), 3.2% (95%CI: 2.3%, 4.0%), and 2.3% (95%CI: 0.6%, 4.1%) increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, respectively. We found significant effects of SO(2) on mortality after adjustment for TSP. Conclusively, ambient air pollution was associated with increased cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality in China. These data contribute to the scientific literature on long-term effects of air pollution for high exposure settings typical in developing countries.

  7. Leading Causes of Unintentional Injury and Suicide Mortality in Canadian Adults Across the Urban-Rural Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Nathalie; Gamache, Philippe; Hamel, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined the leading causes of unintentional injury and suicide mortality in adults across the urban-rural continuum. Methods Injury mortality data were drawn from a representative cohort of 2,735,152 Canadians aged ≥25 years at baseline, who were followed for mortality from 1991 to 2001. We estimated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for urban-rural continuum and cause-specific unintentional injury (i.e., motor vehicle, falls, poisoning, drowning, suffocation, and fire/burn) and suicide (i.e., hanging, poisoning, firearm, and jumping) mortality, adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. Results Rates of unintentional injury mortality were elevated in less urbanized areas for both males and females. We found an urban-rural gradient for motor vehicle, drowning, and fire/burn deaths, but not for fall, poisoning, or suffocation deaths. Urban-rural differences in suicide risk were observed for males but not females. Declining urbanization was associated with higher risks of firearm suicides and lower risks of jumping suicides, but there was no apparent trend in hanging and poisoning suicides. Conclusion Urban-rural gradients in adults were more pronounced for unintentional motor vehicle, drowning, and fire/burn deaths, as well as for firearm and jumping suicide deaths than for other causes of injury mortality. These results suggest that the degree of urbanization may be an important consideration in guiding prevention efforts for many causes of injury fatality. PMID:24179256

  8. Association Between Blood Cadmium Levels and Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Chia; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Huang, Wen-Hung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Ja-Liang; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Chen, Kuan-Hsing; Hsu, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The negative impact of environmental exposure of cadmium has been well established in the general population. However, the effect of cadmium exposure in chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients remains uncertain. A total of 306 chronic PD patients were included in this 36-month observational study. Patients were stratified into 3 groups by the tertile of baseline blood cadmium levels (BCLs): high (>0.244 μg/L, n = 101), middle (0.130–0.244 μg/L, n = 102), and low (<0.130 μg/L, n = 103) for cross-sectional analyses. Mortality rates and cause of death were recorded for longitudinal analyses. Patients in the high-BCL group were older, more likely to have diabetes mellitus, had lower levels of serum albumin and lower percentage of lean body mass than patients in the low-BCL group. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that logarithmic transformed BCL was independently associated with a higher risk of low turnover bone disease (odds ratio = 3.8, P = 0.005). At the end of the 36-month follow-up, 66 (21.6%) patients died. Mortality rates increased with higher BCLs (P for trend = 0.005). A Cox multivariate analysis showed that, using the low-BCL group as the reference, the high-BCL group had increased hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality in chronic PD patients after adjusting for related variables (HR = 2.469, 95% confidence interval = 1.078–5.650, P = 0.043). In conclusion, BCL showed significant association with malnutrition and low turnover bone disease in chronic PD patients. Furthermore, BCL is an important determinant of mortality. Our findings suggest that avoiding environmental exposure to cadmium as much as possible is warranted in chronic PD patients. PMID:27175714

  9. A prospective study of cardiorespiratory fitness and breast cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    Peel, J. Brent; Sui, Xuemei; Adams, Swann A.; Hébert, James R.; Hardin, James W.; Blair, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may protect against breast cancer. Few prospective studies have evaluated breast cancer mortality in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness, an objective marker of physiologic response to physical activity habits. Methods We examined the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of death from breast cancer in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Women (N=14,811), aged 20 to 83 years with no prior breast cancer history, received a preventive medical examination at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, TX, between 1970 and 2001. Mortality surveillance was completed through December 31, 2003. Cardiorespiratory fitness was quantified as maximal treadmill exercise test duration and was categorized for analysis as low (lowest 20% of exercise duration), moderate (middle 40%), and high (upper 40%). At baseline, all participants were able to complete the exercise test to at least 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate. Results A total of 68 breast cancer deaths occurred during follow-up (mean=16 years). Age-adjusted breast cancer mortality rates per 10,000 woman-years were 4.4, 3.2, and 1.8 for low, moderate, and high cardiorespiratory fitness groups, respectively (trend P = 0.008). After further controlling for body mass index, smoking, drinking, chronic conditions, abnormal exercise electrocardiogram responses, family history of breast cancer, oral contraceptive use, and estrogen use, hazard ratios (95% CI) for breast cancer mortality across incremental cardiorespiratory fitness categories were 1.00 (referent), 0.67 (0.35–1.26), 0.45 (0.22–0.95); trend P = 0.04. Conclusions These results indicate that cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with a reduced risk of dying from breast cancer in women. PMID:19276861

  10. The Obesity-Mortality Paradox in Patients With Heart Failure in Taiwan and a Collaborative Meta-Analysis for East Asian Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gen-Min; Li, Yi-Hwei; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2016-10-01

    A global heart failure (HF) registry suggested that the inverse association between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality differed by race, particularly stronger in Japanese patients at 1-year follow-up. Whether this finding was consistent across all East Asian populations was unknown. In a multicenter prospective study in Taiwan, we enrolled 1,301 patients hospitalized for systolic HF from 2013 to 2014 and followed up the mortality after their discharge for a median of 1-year period. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to assess the association of BMI with all-cause mortality. The results showed that BMI was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio and 95% CI per 5-kg/m(2) increase: 0.75 [0.62 to 0.91]) after adjusting for demographics, traditional risk factors, HF severity, and medications at discharge. Subsequently, we sought previous studies regarding the BMI association with mortality for East Asian patients with HF from Medline, and a random-effect meta-analysis was performed by the inverse variance method. The meta-analysis including 7 previous eligible studies (3 for the Chinese and 4 for the Japanese cohorts) and the present one showed similar results that BMI was inversely associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.65 [0.58 to 0.73], I(2) = 37%). In conclusion, our study in Taiwan and a collaborative meta-analysis confirmed a strong inverse BMI-mortality association consistently among East Asian patients with HF.

  11. Association of Coffee Consumption With Overall and Cause-Specific Mortality in a Large US Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Loftfield, Erikka; Freedman, Neal D; Graubard, Barry I; Guertin, Kristin A; Black, Amanda; Huang, Wen-Yi; Shebl, Fatma M; Mayne, Susan T; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-12-15

    Concerns about high caffeine intake and coffee as a vehicle for added fat and sugar have raised questions about the net impact of coffee on health. Although inverse associations have been observed for overall mortality, data for cause-specific mortality are sparse. Additionally, few studies have considered exclusively decaffeinated coffee intake or use of coffee additives. Coffee intake was assessed at baseline by self-report in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Among 90,317 US adults without cancer at study baseline (1998-2001) or history of cardiovascular disease at study enrollment (1993-2001), 8,718 deaths occurred during 805,644 person-years of follow-up from 1998 through 2009. Following adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders, coffee drinkers, as compared with nondrinkers, had lower hazard ratios for overall mortality (<1 cup/day: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92, 1.07); 1 cup/day: HR = 0.94 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.02); 2-3 cups/day: HR = 0.82 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.88); 4-5 cups/day: HR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.86); ≥6 cups/day: HR = 0.84 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.95)). Similar findings were observed for decaffeinated coffee and coffee additives. Inverse associations were observed for deaths from heart disease, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, pneumonia and influenza, and intentional self-harm, but not cancer. Coffee may reduce mortality risk by favorably affecting inflammation, lung function, insulin sensitivity, and depression.

  12. Second derivative of the finger photoplethysmogram and cardiovascular mortality in middle-aged and elderly Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Noriko; Kawakami, Hideshi; Yamamoto, Hideya; Ito, Chikako; Fujiwara, Saeko; Sasaki, Hideo; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-02-01

    The second derivative of the digital photoplethysmogram (SDPTG) is an indicator of arterial stiffness. The ratio of the height of the d wave to the a wave of the SDPTG (d/a) is associated with functional peripheral vascular tension and represents aortic-blood pressure (BP) augmented by reflection waves from the periphery. This longitudinal study aimed to investigate the relationship between SDPTG and cardiovascular mortality in middle-aged and elderly Japanese women. From 1998 to 2008, we recruited 4373 women (50-79 years old at baseline) who underwent medical check-ups and SDPTG measurement. The SDPTG index (d/a) was calculated from the wave component height, and was divided into quartiles (Q) according to the d/a value. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. The d/a value was negatively associated with age and BP, and positively associated with heart rate and body height. Using the Cox proportional hazards model, the hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality for Q2, Q3 and Q4 were significantly higher than that of Q1. In multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio was 2.30 for Q3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-4.99, P<0.05) and 2.60 for Q4 (95% CI: 1.21-5.60, P<0.05), after adjustment for age, height, body mass index, BP levels, heart rate and other atherosclerosis-related factors. The hazard ratios of cardiovascular mortality for Q3 and Q4 were significantly higher compared with the reference (Q1). Thus, the SDPTG d/a is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in middle-aged and elderly Japanese women.

  13. Hyperlipidemia is associated with lower risk of poststroke mortality independent of statin use: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Flaherty, Matthew L; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; de los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Mackey, Jason; Khatri, Pooja; Kissela, Brett M; Khoury, Jane C

    2017-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is associated with reduced stroke and mortality risk, some studies report that higher lipid levels are associated with improved outcomes following ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the association of hyperlipidemia (HLD) combined with statin therapy on all-cause mortality in stroke patients. Methods All stroke patients in the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky region of ~1.3 million were identified using ICD-9 discharge codes in 2005 and 2010. Stroke patients with and without HLD were categorized based on their reported statin use at baseline or discharge into three groups: no-HLD/no-statins, HLD/no-statins, and HLD/on-statins. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years poststroke. Results Overall, 77% (2953) of the 3813 ischemic stroke patients were diagnosed with HLD and 72% (n = 2123) of those patients were on statin medications. The mean age was 70.0 ± 14.6 years, 56% were women, and 21% were black. In adjusted analyses, the HLD/no-statins group showed 35% (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92), 27% (aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59–0.90), and 17% (aHR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70–0.97) reduced risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively, poststroke, compared with no-HLD/no-statins group. The HLD/on-statins group showed an additional 17% significant survival benefit at 3 years poststroke compared with HLD/no-statins group. Conclusions A diagnosis of HLD in ischemic stroke patients is associated with reduced short- and long-term mortality, irrespective of statin use. Statin therapy is associated with significant, additional long-term survival benefit. PMID:27649737

  14. Association of mild anemia with hospitalization and mortality in the elderly: the Health and Anemia population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Mosconi, Paola; Apolone, Giovanni; Gandini, Francesca; Nobili, Alessandro; Tallone, Maria Vittoria; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Clerico, Mario; Tempia, Patrizia; Guala, Adriano; Fasolo, Gilberto; Lucca, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild anemia is a frequent laboratory finding in the elderly usually disregarded in everyday practice as an innocent bystander. The aim of the present population-based study was to prospectively investigate the association of mild grade anemia with hospitalization and mortality. Design and Methods A prospective population-based study of all 65 to 84 year old residents in Biella, Italy was performed between 2003 and 2007. Data from a total of 7,536 elderly with blood tests were available to estimate mortality; full health information available to evaluate health-related outcomes was available for 4,501 of these elderly subjects. Mild grade anemia was defined as a hemoglobin concentration between 10.0 and 11.9 g/dL in women and between 10.0 and 12.9 g/dL in men. Results The risk of hospitalization in the 3 years following recruitment was higher among the mildly anemic elderly subjects than among subjects who were not anemic (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.32; 95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.60). Mortality risk in the following 3.5 years was also higher among the mildly anemic elderly (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval: 1.34–2.53). Similar results were found when slightly elevating the lower limit of normal hemoglobin concentration to 12.2 g/dL in women and to 13.2 g/dL in men. The risk of mortality was significantly increased in mild anemia of chronic disease but not in that due to β-thalassemia minor. Conclusions After controlling for many potential confounders, mild grade anemia was found to be prospectively associated with clinically relevant outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Whether raising hemoglobin concentrations can reduce the risks associated with mild anemia should be tested in controlled clinical trials. PMID:19001283

  15. Association between red cell distribution width and mortality in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Tsai, Shr-Mei; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Although red cell distribution width (RDW) has emerged as a biomarker of clinical prognostic value across a variety of clinical settings in the last two decades, limited evidence is available for its role in end-stage renal disease. We enrolled 313 incident patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in this retrospective observational study from 2006 to 2015. In the fully adjusted model of Cox regression analysis, the adjusted hazard ratios for the high RDW group versus the low RDW group were 2.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31–5.09, p = 0.006) and 3.48 (95% CI = 1.44–8.34, p = 0.006) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, respectively. Based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis, RDW (AUC = 0.699) had a stronger predictive value for all-cause and CVD-related mortality than other biological markers including hemoglobin (AUC = 0.51), ferritin (AUC = 0.584), iron saturation (AUC = 0.535), albumin (AUC = 0.683) and white blood cell count (AUC = 0.588). Given that RDW is a readily available hematological parameter without the need for additional cost, we suggest that it can be used as a valuable index to stratify the risk of mortality beyond a diagnosis of anemia. PMID:28367961

  16. Male Pattern Baldness in Relation to Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality: A Prospective Analysis in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Levine, Paul H.; Cleary, Sean D.; Hoffman, Heather J.; Graubard, Barry I.; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    We used male pattern baldness as a proxy for long-term androgen exposure and investigated the association of dermatologist-assessed hair loss with prostate cancer–specific mortality in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. From the baseline survey (1971–1974), we included 4,316 men who were 25–74 years of age and had no prior cancer diagnosis. We estimated hazard ratios and used Cox proportional hazards regressions with age as the time metric and baseline hazard stratified by baseline age. A hybrid framework was used to account for stratification and clustering of the sample design, with adjustment for the variables used to calculate sample weights. During follow-up (median, 21 years), 3,284 deaths occurred; prostate cancer was the underlying cause of 107. In multivariable models, compared with no balding, any baldness was associated with a 56% higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.37), and moderate balding specifically was associated with an 83% higher risk (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.92). Conversely, patterned hair loss was not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Our analysis suggests that patterned hair loss is associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer and supports the hypothesis of overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:26764224

  17. Male Pattern Baldness in Relation to Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: A Prospective Analysis in the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Levine, Paul H; Cleary, Sean D; Hoffman, Heather J; Graubard, Barry I; Cook, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    We used male pattern baldness as a proxy for long-term androgen exposure and investigated the association of dermatologist-assessed hair loss with prostate cancer-specific mortality in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. From the baseline survey (1971-1974), we included 4,316 men who were 25-74 years of age and had no prior cancer diagnosis. We estimated hazard ratios and used Cox proportional hazards regressions with age as the time metric and baseline hazard stratified by baseline age. A hybrid framework was used to account for stratification and clustering of the sample design, with adjustment for the variables used to calculate sample weights. During follow-up (median, 21 years), 3,284 deaths occurred; prostate cancer was the underlying cause of 107. In multivariable models, compared with no balding, any baldness was associated with a 56% higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (hazard ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.37), and moderate balding specifically was associated with an 83% higher risk (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.92). Conversely, patterned hair loss was not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Our analysis suggests that patterned hair loss is associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer and supports the hypothesis of overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms.

  18. Severe Hypoglycemia and Cardiovascular or All-Cause Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Hwang, Seawon; Yim, Eun-Jung; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Park, Yong-Moon; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the association between severe hypoglycemia (SH) and the risk of cardiovascular (CV) or all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study included 1,260 patients aged 25 to 75 years with type 2 diabetes from the Vincent Type 2 Diabetes Resgistry (VDR), who consecutively enrolled (n=1,260) from January 2000 to December 2010 and were followed up until May 2015 with a median follow-up time of 10.4 years. Primary outcomes were death from any cause or CV death. We investigated the association between the CV or all-cause mortality and various covariates using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results Among the 906 participants (71.9%) who completed follow-up, 85 patients (9.4%) had at least one episode of SH, and 86 patients (9.5%) died (9.1 per 1,000 patient-years). Patients who had died were older, had a longer duration of diabetes and hypertension, received more insulin, and had more diabetic microvascular complications at baseline, as compared with surviving patients. The experience of SH was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39 to 5.02; P=0.003) and CV mortality (HR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.02 to 19.87; P=0.002) after adjusting for sex, age, diabetic duration, hypertension, mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels, diabetic nephropathy, lipid profiles, and insulin use. Conclusion We found a strong association between SH and increased risk of all-cause and CV mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27098504

  19. Effect of Online Hemodiafiltration on All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Grooteman, Muriel P.C.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.; Bots, Michiel L.; Penne, E. Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; Mazairac, Albert H.A.; den Hoedt, Claire H.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Lévesque, Renée; Nubé, Menso J.; ter Wee, Piet M.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with ESRD, the effects of online hemodiafiltration on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events are unclear. In this prospective study, we randomly assigned 714 chronic hemodialysis patients to online postdilution hemodiafiltration (n=358) or to continue low-flux hemodialysis (n=356). The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. The main secondary endpoint was a composite of major cardiovascular events, including death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, therapeutic coronary intervention, therapeutic carotid intervention, vascular intervention, or amputation. After a mean 3.0 years of follow-up (range, 0.4–6.6 years), we did not detect a significant difference between treatment groups with regard to all-cause mortality (121 versus 127 deaths per 1000 person-years in the online hemodiafiltration and low-flux hemodialysis groups, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.75–1.20). The incidences of cardiovascular events were 127 and 116 per 1000 person-years, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.83–1.39). Receiving high-volume hemodiafiltration during the trial associated with lower all-cause mortality, a finding that persisted after adjusting for potential confounders and dialysis facility. In conclusion, this trial did not detect a beneficial effect of hemodiafiltration on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events compared with low-flux hemodialysis. On-treatment analysis suggests the possibility of a survival benefit among patients who receive high-volume hemodiafiltration, although this subgroup finding requires confirmation. PMID:22539829

  20. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mortality risk: Analysis of SEER data.

    PubMed

    Knoble, Naomi B; Alderfer, Melissa A; Hossain, Md Jobayer

    2016-10-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is a complex construct of multiple indicators, known to impact cancer outcomes, but has not been adequately examined among pediatric AML patients. This study aimed to identify the patterns of co-occurrence of multiple community-level SES indicators and to explore associations between various patterns of these indicators and pediatric AML mortality risk. A nationally representative US sample of 3651 pediatric AML patients, aged 0-19 years at diagnosis was drawn from 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database registries created between 1973 and 2012. Factor analysis, cluster analysis, stratified univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used. Four SES factors accounting for 87% of the variance in SES indicators were identified: F1) economic/educational disadvantage, less immigration; F2) immigration-related features (foreign-born, language-isolation, crowding), less mobility; F3) housing instability; and, F4) absence of moving. F1 and F3 showed elevated risk of mortality, adjusted hazards ratios (aHR) (95% CI): 1.07(1.02-1.12) and 1.05(1.00-1.10), respectively. Seven SES-defined cluster groups were identified. Cluster 1 (low economic/educational disadvantage, few immigration-related features, and residential-stability) showed the minimum risk of mortality. Compared to Cluster 1, Cluster 3 (high economic/educational disadvantage, high-mobility) and Cluster 6 (moderately-high economic/educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features) exhibited substantially greater risk of mortality, aHR(95% CI)=1.19(1.0-1.4) and 1.23 (1.1-1.5), respectively. Factors of correlated SES-indicators and their pattern-based groups demonstrated differential risks in the pediatric AML mortality indicating the need of special public-health attention in areas with economic-educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features.

  1. Effect of online hemodiafiltration on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Grooteman, Muriel P C; van den Dorpel, Marinus A; Bots, Michiel L; Penne, E Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C; Mazairac, Albert H A; den Hoedt, Claire H; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Lévesque, Renée; Nubé, Menso J; ter Wee, Piet M; Blankestijn, Peter J

    2012-06-01

    In patients with ESRD, the effects of online hemodiafiltration on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events are unclear. In this prospective study, we randomly assigned 714 chronic hemodialysis patients to online postdilution hemodiafiltration (n=358) or to continue low-flux hemodialysis (n=356). The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. The main secondary endpoint was a composite of major cardiovascular events, including death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, therapeutic coronary intervention, therapeutic carotid intervention, vascular intervention, or amputation. After a mean 3.0 years of follow-up (range, 0.4-6.6 years), we did not detect a significant difference between treatment groups with regard to all-cause mortality (121 versus 127 deaths per 1000 person-years in the online hemodiafiltration and low-flux hemodialysis groups, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.20). The incidences of cardiovascular events were 127 and 116 per 1000 person-years, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.39). Receiving high-volume hemodiafiltration during the trial associated with lower all-cause mortality, a finding that persisted after adjusting for potential confounders and dialysis facility. In conclusion, this trial did not detect a beneficial effect of hemodiafiltration on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events compared with low-flux hemodialysis. On-treatment analysis suggests the possibility of a survival benefit among patients who receive high-volume hemodiafiltration, although this subgroup finding requires confirmation.

  2. The Use of Hypnotics and Mortality - A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Zeng, Ya-Fang; Tang, Gau-Jun; Kao, Hui-Chuan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ho, Hsiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, have become major health problem worldwide and, as a result, the use of hypnotics is steadily increasing. However, few studies with a large sample size and long-term observation have been conducted to investigate the relationship between specific hypnotics and mortality. Methods We conducted this retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Information from claims data including basic characteristics, the use of hypnotics, and survival from 2000 to 2009 for 1,320,322 individuals were included. The use of hypnotics was divided into groups using the defined daily dose and the cumulative length of use. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated from a Cox proportional hazards model, with two different matching techniques to examine the associations. Results Compared to the non-users, both users of benzodiazepines (HR = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78–1.85) and mixed users (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.42–1.47) had a higher risk of death, whereas the users of other non-benzodiazepines users showed no differences. Zolpidem users (HR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.71–0.75) exhibited a lower risk of mortality in the adjusted models. This pattern remained similar in both matching techniques. Secondary analysis indicated that zolpidem users had a reduced risk of major cause-specific mortality except cancer, and that this protective effect was dose-responsive, with those using for more than 1 year having the lowest risk. Conclusions The effects of different types of hypnotics on mortality were diverse in this large cohort with long-term follow-up based on representative claims data in Taiwan. The use of zolpidem was associated with a reduced risk of mortality. PMID:26709926

  3. Painless myocardial ischemia is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Broce, Mike; Malas, Amer; Almehmi, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Background Painless myocardial ischemia (PMI) is associated with poor outcomes in the general population. We hypothesized that presence of PMI is inversely related to level of kidney function and is associated with impaired survival in CKD. Methods A total of 356 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention were assessed for PMI, defined as the absence of chest pain in response to balloon dilation of the affected vessel. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate 10-year all-cause mortality. Results There was an increase in PMI occurrence by strata of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), whereby PMI was present in only 20.6% of individuals with eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73m2 but was found in 50.0% of individuals with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2 (P = 0.004 for trend). Classification of individuals as having either CKD or PMI showed significant differences in adjusted mortality between groups (P < 0.001 for trend), with individuals having both CKD and PMI demonstrating the highest 10-year mortality. Compared to individuals with neither CKD nor PMI, individuals with CKD and no PMI had a hazard ratio (HR) for mortality of 1.64 (95% confidence intervals 1.03 – 2.63, P = 0.038), while individuals with both PMI and CKD had a HR of 2.08 (1.30 – 3.33, P = 0.002). Conclusion PMI is common in CKD population, is inversely related to the level of eGFR, and confers substantially increased risk in CKD. These findings may partially explain the high mortality traditionally attributed to cardiovascular disease in CKD patients. PMID:23466572

  4. Vancomycin MIC Does Not Predict 90-Day Mortality, Readmission, or Recurrence in a Prospective Cohort of Adults with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Clemenzi-Allen, Angelo; Gahbauer, Alice; Deck, Daniel; Imp, Brandon; Vittinghoff, Eric; Chambers, Henry F.; Doernberg, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a tremendous health burden. Previous studies examining the association of vancomycin MIC and outcomes in patients with SAB have been inconclusive. This study evaluated the association between vancomycin MICs and 30- or 90-day mortality in individuals with SAB. This was a prospective cohort study of adults presenting from 2008 to 2013 with a first episode of SAB. Subjects were identified by an infection surveillance system. The main predictor was vancomycin MIC by MicroScan. The primary outcomes were death at 30 and 90 days, and secondary outcomes included recurrence, readmission, or a composite of death, recurrence, and readmission at 30 and 90 days. Covariates included methicillin susceptibility, demographics, illness severity, comorbidities, infectious source, and antibiotic use. Cox proportional-hazards models with propensity score adjustment were used to estimate 30- and 90-day outcomes. Of 429 unique first episodes of SAB, 11 were excluded, leaving 418 individuals for analysis. Eighty-three (19.9%) participants had a vancomycin MIC of 2 μg/ml. In the propensity-adjusted Cox model, a vancomycin MIC of 2 μg/ml compared to <2 μg/ml was not associated with a greater hazard of mortality or composite outcome of mortality, readmission, and recurrence at either 30 days (hazard ratios [HRs] of 0.86 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.41, 1.80] [P = 0.70] and 0.94 [95% CI, 0.55, 1.58] [P = 0.80], respectively) or 90 days (HRs of 0.91 [95% CI, 0.49, 1.69] [P = 0.77] and 0.69 [95% CI, 0.46, 1.04] [P = 0.08], respectively) after SAB diagnosis. In a prospective cohort of patients with SAB, vancomycin MIC was not associated with 30- or 90-day mortality or a composite of mortality, disease recurrence, or hospital readmission. PMID:27324762

  5. Socioeconomic Factors and All Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality among Older People in Latin America, India, and China: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Cleusa P.; Acosta, Daisy; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Llibre-Rodriguez, Juan J.; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph D.; Gaona, Ciro; Liu, Zhaorui; Noriega-Fernandez, Lisseth; Jotheeswaran, A. T.; Prince, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Even in low and middle income countries most deaths occur in older adults. In Europe, the effects of better education and home ownership upon mortality seem to persist into old age, but these effects may not generalise to LMICs. Reliable data on causes and determinants of mortality are lacking. Methods and Findings The vital status of 12,373 people aged 65 y and over was determined 3–5 y after baseline survey in sites in Latin America, India, and China. We report crude and standardised mortality rates, standardized mortality ratios comparing mortality experience with that in the United States, and estimated associations with socioeconomic factors using Cox's proportional hazards regression. Cause-specific mortality fractions were estimated using the InterVA algorithm. Crude mortality rates varied from 27.3 to 70.0 per 1,000 person-years, a 3-fold variation persisting after standardisation for demographic and economic factors. Compared with the US, mortality was much higher in urban India and rural China, much lower in Peru, Venezuela, and urban Mexico, and similar in other sites. Mortality rates were higher among men, and increased with age. Adjusting for these effects, it was found that education, occupational attainment, assets, and pension receipt were all inversely associated with mortality, and food insecurity positively associated. Mutually adjusted, only education remained protective (pooled hazard ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.89–0.98). Most deaths occurred at home, but, except in India, most individuals received medical attention during their final illness. Chronic diseases were the main causes of death, together with tuberculosis and liver disease, with stroke the leading cause in nearly all sites. Conclusions Education seems to have an important latent effect on mortality into late life. However, compositional differences in socioeconomic position do not explain differences in mortality between sites. Social protection for older people, and the

  6. Urine matrix metalloproteinase-7 and risk of kidney disease progression and mortality in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Afkarian, Maryam; Zelnick, Leila R; Ruzinski, John; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; de Boer, Ian H; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    Aims The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and WNT pathways are dysregulated in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Urine excretion of angiotensinogen, gremlin-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), components of the RAAS, BMP and WNT pathways, respectively, is increased in DKD. We asked if this increase is associated with subsequent progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Methods Using time-to-event analyses, we examined the association of baseline urine concentration of these proteins with progression to ESRD or death in a predominantly Mexican-American cohort with type 2 diabetes and proteinuric DKD (n=141). Results Progression to ESRD occurred for 38 participants over a median follow-up of 3.0 years; 39 participants died over a median follow-up of 3.6 years. Urine MMP-7 and gremlin-1 were associated with increased risk of ESRD after adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates. Angiotensinogen showed a U-shaped relationship with ESRD, with the middle tertile associated with lowest risk of ESRD. After additional adjustment for glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria, all associations with ESRD lost significance. Only urine MMP-7 was associated with mortality, and this association remained robust in the fully adjusted model with a Hazard ratio of 3.59 (95% confidence interval 1.31 to 9.85) for highest vs. lowest tertile. Serum MMP-7 was not associated with mortality and did not attenuate the association of urine MMP-7 with mortality (HR 4.03 for highest vs. lowest urine MMP-7 tertile). Conclusions Among people with type 2 diabetes and proteinuric DKD, urine MMP-7 concentration was strongly associated with subsequent mortality. PMID:26412030

  7. Disability Stage Is an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Medicare Beneficiaries 65 Years of Age and Older

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Pan, Qiang; Streim, Joel E.; Bogner, Hillary; Xie, Dawei; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stages of activity limitation based on activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) have been found to predict mortality in those age 70 years and above but have not been examined in Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years and older using routinely collected data. Objective To examine the association between functional stages based on activities of ADLs and IADLs with three-year mortality in Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years and older, accounting for baseline sociodemographics, heath status, smoking, subjective health, and psychological well-being. Design Cohort study using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) and associated health care utilization data. Setting Community administered survey. Participants We included 9698 Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older who entered the MCBS in 2005–07. Main outcome measures Death within three years of cohort entry. Results The overall mortality rate was 3.6 per 100 person years, and three-year cumulative mortality was 10.3%. Unadjusted three-year mortality was monotonically associated with both ADL stage and IADL stag. Adjusted three-year mortality was associated with ADL and IADL stages, except that in some models the hazard ratio for stage III (which includes persons with atypical activity limitation patterns) was numerically lower than that for stage II. Conclusion We found nearly monotonic relationships between ADL and IADL stage and adjusted three-year mortality. These findings could aid in the development of population health approaches and metrics for evaluating the success of alternative economic, social, or health policies on the longevity of older adults with activity limitations. PMID:26003869

  8. Taxation Categories for Long-term Care Insurance Premiums and Mortality Among Elderly Japanese: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Background This cohort study examined the association between taxation categories of long-term care insurance premiums and survival among elderly Japanese. Methods A total of 3000 participants aged 60 years or older were randomly recruited in Y City, Japan in 2002, of whom 2964 provided complete information for analysis. Information on income level, mobility status, medical status, and vital status of each participant was collected annually from 2002 to 2006. Follow-up surveys on survival were conducted until August 2007. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by a Cox model, using taxation categories at baseline. In these analyses, age-adjusted and age- and mobility-adjusted models were used. Results A significantly higher mortality risk was seen only in the lowest taxation category among men: as compared with men in the second highest taxation category, the HR in the lowest category was 2.53 (95% CI, 1.26–5.08, P = 0.009). This significant association between taxation category and mortality was lost after adjustment for mobility. There was no other difference in mortality among taxation categories in men or women. Conclusions The present findings only partly supported our hypothesis that taxation category is a good indicator of socioeconomic status in examining health inequalities among elderly Japanese. PMID:23258217

  9. Association of Alternative Approaches to Normalizing Peritoneal Dialysis Clearance with Mortality and Technique Failure: A Retrospective Analysis Using the United States Renal Data System-Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study, Wave 2.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Suzanne M; Li, Yimei; Wilson, F Perry; Glickman, Joel D; Feldman, Harold I

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Total body water (V) is an imprecise metric for normalization of dialytic urea clearance (Kt). This poses a risk of early mortality/technique failure (TF). We examined differences in the distribution of peritoneal Kt/V when V was calculated with actual weight (AW), ideal weight (IW), and adjusted weight (ADW). We also examined the associations of these Kt/V measurements, Kt/body surface area (BSA), and non-normalized Kt with mortality and TF. ♦ METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of 534 incident peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients from the Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study Wave 2 linked with United States Renal Data System through 2010. Using Cox-proportional hazard models, we examined the relationship of several normalization strategies for peritoneal urea clearance, including Kt/VAW, Kt/VIW, Kt/VADW, Kt/BSA, and non-normalized Kt, with the outcomes of mortality and TF. Harrell's c-statistics were used to assess the relative predictive ability of clearance metrics for mortality and TF. The distributions of Kt/VAW, KT/VIW, and KT/VADW were compared within and between body mass index (BMI) strata. ♦ RESULTS: Median patient age: 59 (54% male; 72% white; 91% continuous ambulatory PD [CAPD]). Median 24-hour urine volume: 700 mL; median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at initiation: 7.15 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Technique failure and transplant-censored mortality at 5 years: 37%. Death and transplant-censored TF at 5 years: 60%. There were no significant differences in initial eGFR and 24-hour urine volume across BMI strata. There were statistically significant differences in each Kt/V calculation within the underweight, overweight, and obese strata. After adjustment, there were no significant differences in the hazard ratios (HRs) for TF/mortality for each clearance calculation. Harrell's c-statistics for mortality for each clearance calculation were 0.78, and for TF, 0.60 - 0.61. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: Peritoneal urea clearances are

  10. Polyphenol intake and mortality risk: a re-analysis of the PREDIMED trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyphenols may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other chronic diseases due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as their beneficial effects on blood pressure, lipids and insulin resistance. However, no previous epidemiological studies have evaluated the relationship between the intake of total polyphenols intake and polyphenol subclasses with overall mortality. Our aim was to evaluate whether polyphenol intake is associated with all-cause mortality in subjects at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We used data from the PREDIMED study, a 7,447-participant, parallel-group, randomized, multicenter, controlled five-year feeding trial aimed at assessing the effects of the Mediterranean Diet in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Polyphenol intake was calculated by matching food consumption data from repeated food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) with the Phenol-Explorer database on the polyphenol content of each reported food. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between polyphenol intake and mortality were estimated using time-dependent Cox proportional hazard models. Results Over an average of 4.8 years of follow-up, we observed 327 deaths. After multivariate adjustment, we found a 37% relative reduction in all-cause mortality comparing the highest versus the lowest quintiles of total polyphenol intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.63; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.97; P for trend = 0.12). Among the polyphenol subclasses, stilbenes and lignans were significantly associated with reduced all-cause mortality (HR =0.48; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.91; P for trend = 0.04 and HR = 0.60; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.97; P for trend = 0.03, respectively), with no significant associations apparent in the rest (flavonoids or phenolic acids). Conclusions Among high-risk subjects, those who reported a high polyphenol intake, especially of stilbenes and lignans, showed a reduced risk of overall mortality compared to those

  11. Pain and Mortality Risk in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Persons with Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily; Bridden, Carly; Merlin, Jessica S.; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Pain has been associated with increased risk for mortality in some studies. We analyzed data from a cohort study [HIV-longitudinal interrelationships of viruses and ethanol (HIV-LIVE)] of HIV-infected persons with alcohol use disorders enrolled 2001–2003 to explore whether reporting moderate or greater pain interference was associated with mortality. The main independent variable was pain that at least moderately interfered with work based on a single question from the SF-12. Primary analyses dichotomized at “moderately” or above. Cox proportional hazards models assessed the association between pain interference and death adjusting for demographics, substance use, CD4 count, HIV viral load and co-morbidities. Although significant in unadjusted models (HR = 1.58 (95 % CI 1.03–2.41; p value = 0.04)), after adjusting for confounders, ≥moderate pain interference was not associated with an increased risk of death [aHR = 1.30 (95 % CI 0.81–2.11, p value = 0.28)]. Among HIV-infected persons with alcohol use disorders, we did not detect a statistically significant independent association between pain interference and risk of death after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:26438486

  12. Digoxin-associated mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Mate; Erath, Julia W; Hohnloser, Stefan H

    2015-07-21

    There are conflicting data regarding the effect of digoxin use on mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or with congestive heart failure (CHF). The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide detailed analysis of the currently available study reports. We performed a MEDLINE and a COCHRANE search (1993-2014) of the English literature dealing with the effects of digoxin on all-cause-mortality in subjects with AF or CHF. Only full-sized articles published in peer-reviewed journals were considered for this meta-analysis. A total of 19 reports were identified. Nine reports dealt with AF patients, seven with patients suffering from CHF, and three with both clinical conditions. Based on the analysis of adjusted mortality results of all 19 studies comprising 326 426 patients, digoxin use was associated with an increased relative risk of all-cause mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07 to 1.38, P < 0.01]. Compared with subjects not receiving glycosides, digoxin was associated with a 29% increased mortality risk (HR 1.29; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.39) in the subgroup of publications comprising 235 047 AF patients. Among 91.379 heart failure patients, digoxin-associated mortality risk increased by 14% (HR 1.14, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.22). The present systematic review and meta-analysis of all available data sources suggest that digoxin use is associated with an increased mortality risk, particularly among patients suffering from AF.

  13. European Society of Cardiology Guideline-Adherent Antithrombotic Treatment and Risk of Mortality in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Chou, Annie Y.; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chen, Su-Jung; Wang, Kang-Ling; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the risk of mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated adherent to the 2012 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for stroke prevention and those who were not treated according to guideline recommendations. This study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1996 to 2011, 354,649 newly diagnosed AF patients were identified as the study population. Among the study cohort, 45,595 and 309,054 patients were defined as Guideline-Adherent and Non-Adherent groups, respectively. During the follow up of 1,480,280 person-years, 133,552 (37.7%) patients experienced mortality. The risk of mortality was lower among AF patients whose treatment was adherent to the guideline recommendation for stroke prevention than those whose treatment was not (annual risk of mortality = 4.3% versus 10.0%) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval = 0.61–0.64, p value < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, CHA2DS2-VASc score and antiplatelet therapy. The findings were consistently observed after propensity matching analysis. In conclusion, the risk of mortality was lower for AF patients who were treated according to the antithrombotic recommendations of the 2012 ESC guidelines, guided by the CHA2DS2-VASc score. Better efforts to implement guidelines would lead to improved outcomes for patients with AF. PMID:27498702

  14. Declining mortality among HIV-positive indigenous people at a Vancouver indigenous-focused urban-core health care centre

    PubMed Central

    Klakowicz, Piotr; Zhang, Wen; Colley, Guillaume; Moore, David; Tu, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine mortality rates among HIV-positive indigenous people and others after initiation of HIV care improvements based on the chronic care model to address high HIV-related mortality. Design Retrospective cohort preintervention-to-postintervention evaluation study. Setting Urban-core primary health care centre focused on indigenous people in Vancouver, BC. Participants Individuals infected with HIV. Intervention Adoption of the chronic care model to improve HIV care over time. Main outcome measures All-cause mortality and HIV-related mortality rates, overall and from preintervention (2007 to 2009) to postintervention (2010 to 2012), by indigenous ethnicity, were calculated from clinical data linked with the provincial HIV treatment clinical registry. Results Of the 546 eligible study patients, 323 (59%) self-identified as indigenous. Indigenous persons had higher all-cause mortality compared with other patients (14% vs 8%, P = .035; 6.25 vs 4.02 per 100 person-years [PYRs], P = .113), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.77 (95% CI 0.95 to 3.30). Indigenous persons also had higher HIV-related mortality (6% vs 2%, P = .027; 2.50 vs 0.89 per 100 PYRs, P = .063), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.88 (95% CI 0.93 to 8.92). Between 2007 to 2009 and 2010 to 2012, a significant decline was observed in all-cause mortality for indigenous patients (10.00 to 5.00 per 100 PYRs, P = .023) and a non-significant decline was observed in other patients (7.21 to 2.97 per 100 PYRs, P = .061). A significant decline in HIV-related mortality was also seen for indigenous patients (5.56 to 1.80 per 100 PYRs, P = .005). Conclusion Despite the overall higher risk of death among indigenous patients compared with others, the decline in mortality in HIV-positive indigenous patients after the initiation of efforts to improve HIV care at the clinic further support HIV primary care informed by indigenous issues and the adoption of the chronic care model.

  15. Low systolic blood pressure and mortality from all-cause and vascular diseases among the rural elderly in Korea; Kangwha cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Seri; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2015-01-01

    The association between low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular diseases is unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the association between SBP, especially low SBP, and mortality from all causes and vascular diseases among the elderly in Korea. Six thousand two hundred ninety four residents in a rural community were followed-up for deaths from 1985 to 2008. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by Cox proportional hazard model. A stratified analysis was conducted by age at enrollment. Among the elderly aged 65 and above, the lowest SBP (<100 mm Hg) group had an elevated aHR for mortality from vascular diseases (aHR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.9) including stroke (aHR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9-6.3) and ischemic heart diseases (aHR = 5.1, 95% CI = 1.0-26.0) compared to those with SBP of 100-119 mm Hg, while higher SBP was associated with higher mortality. This J-curve association was generally maintained when analysis was restricted to those with fair or good self-rated health, or those with no known vascular diseases. In people below 65, increasing SBP nearly monotonically increased the mortality from all-cause and vascular diseases. Our results suggest that elderly persons with low SBP should be treated with caution, since low SBP may increase vascular mortality.

  16. The aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio predicts all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zoppini, Giacomo; Cacciatori, Vittorio; Negri, Carlo; Stoico, Vincenzo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Targher, Giovanni; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An increased aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR) has been widely used as a marker of advanced hepatic fibrosis. Increased AAR was also shown to be significantly associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the AAR and mortality risk in a well-characterized cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. A cohort of 2529 type 2 diabetic outpatients was followed-up for 6 years to collect cause-specific mortality. Cox regression analyses were modeled to estimate the independent association between AAR and the risk of all-cause and CV mortality. Over the 6-year follow-up period, 12.1% of patients died, 47.5% of whom from CV causes. An increased AAR, but not its individual components, was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause (adjusted-hazard risk 1.83, confidence interval [CI] 95% 1.14–2.93, P = 0.012) and CV (adjusted-hazard risk 2.60, CI 95% 1.38–4.90, P < 0.003) mortality after adjustment for multiple clinical risk factors and potential confounding variables. The AAR was independently associated with an increased risk of both all-cause and CV mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest that an increased AAR may reflect more systemic derangements that are not simply limited to liver damage. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological implications of an increased AAR. PMID:27787357

  17. Sex composition of the workplace and mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron J

    2013-11-01

    This study uses Swedish occupational register data to examine whether the proportion of men in administrative workplaces in the Swedish public service affects all-cause mortality risks amongst both males and females of working age. Using piecewise constant survival models to analyse occupational data from the Swedish administrative registers from 1995 to 2007, it was found that for males, a 1% increase in the proportion of males was associated with a 1.3% increase in mortality risk (hazard ratio, HR 1.013, 95% CI 1.007-1.020, p<0.001), but no association was found for females (HR 1.004, 95% CI 0.996-1.012, p=0.297). Adjustments were made for age, family status, education, occupational status, occupational segregation by sex, the total number of individuals in the workplace, level of government, region, period and variables reflecting the workplace structure by age, age by sex, occupation and education. A higher proportion of males may be related to (i) an increased exposure to risky health behaviours such as alcohol consumption and unhealthy dietary patterns, (ii) a tendency towards sickness presenteeism, and (iii) an increase in the levels of several well-established emotional stressors in the workplace, leading to an increased level of psychosocial stress. The findings and potential extensions of this research are discussed.

  18. Mortality Risk of Hypnotics: Strengths and Limits of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-02-01

    Sleeping pills, more formally defined as hypnotics, are sedatives used to induce and maintain sleep. In a review of publications for the past 30 years, descriptive epidemiologic studies were identified that examined the mortality risk of hypnotics and related sedative-anxiolytics. Of the 34 studies estimating risk ratios, odds ratios, or hazard ratios, excess mortality associated with hypnotics was significant (p < 0.05) in 24 studies including all 14 of the largest, contrasted with no studies at all suggesting that hypnotics ever prolong life. The studies had many limitations: possibly tending to overestimate risk, such as possible confounding by indication with other risk factors; confusing hypnotics with drugs having other indications; possible genetic confounders; and too much heterogeneity of studies for meta-analyses. There were balancing limitations possibly tending towards underestimates of risk such as limited power, excessive follow-up intervals with possible follow-up mixing of participants taking hypnotics with controls, missing dosage data for most studies, and over-adjustment of confounders. Epidemiologic association in itself is not adequate proof of causality, but there is proof that hypnotics cause death in overdoses; there is thorough understanding of how hypnotics euthanize animals and execute humans; and there is proof that hypnotics cause potentially lethal morbidities such as depression, infection, poor driving, suppressed respiration, and possibly cancer. Combining these proofs with consistent evidence of association, the great weight of evidence is that hypnotics cause huge risks of decreasing a patient's duration of survival.

  19. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina; Konradsen, Helle Bossen; Benfield, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Background Invasive infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. Methods Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed between 1990 and 2001. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results After adjustment for other markers of disease severity, we found that infection with serotype 3 was associated with an increased relative risk (RR) of death of 2.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–5.27), whereas infection with serotype 1 was associated with a decreased risk of death (RR 0.23 (95% CI, 0.06–0.97)). Additionally, older age, relative leucopenia and relative hypothermia were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion Our study shows that capsular serotypes independently influenced the outcome from invasive pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines. PMID:15228629

  20. Type of alcohol consumed, changes in intake over time and mortality: the Leisure World Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kawas, Claudia H.; Corrada, María M.

    2012-01-01

    Background modifiable behavioural risk factors including smoking and alcohol consumption are major contributing or actual causes of mortality. Objective to examine the effect of alcohol intake on all-cause mortality in older adults. Design and Setting prospective population-based cohort study of residents of a California, United States retirement community. Subjects 8,877 women and 5,101 men (median age, 74 years) who in the early 1980s completed a postal health survey including details on alcohol consumption. Methods participants were followed for 23 years (1981–2004) including two follow-up questionnaires (in 1992 and 1998) asking about current alcohol intake. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted risk ratios of death and 95% confidence intervals were calculated separately for men and women, using proportional hazard regression. Results of the 8,644 women and 4,980 men with complete information on the variables of interest and potential confounders, 6,930 women and 4,456 men had died (median age, 87 years). Both men and women who drank alcohol had decreased mortality compared with non-drinkers. Those who drank two or more drinks per day had a 15% reduced risk of death. The reduced risk was not limited to one type of alcohol. Stable drinkers (those who reported drinking both at baseline and follow-up) had a significantly decreased risk of death compared with stable non-drinkers. Those who started drinking at follow-up also had a significantly lower risk. Women who quit drinking were at increased risk of death. Conclusion in elderly men and women, moderate alcohol intake exhibits a beneficial effect on mortality. Those who quit may do so for health reasons that affect mortality. PMID:17350977

  1. Early mortality and morbidity after total hip arthroplasty in patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hailer, Nils P; Garland, Anne; Rogmark, Cecilia; Garellick, Göran; Kärrholm, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Early postoperative mortality is relatively high after total hip arthroplasty (THA) that has been performed due to femoral neck fracture. However, this has rarely been investigated after adjustment for medical comorbidity and comparison with the mortality in an age-matched population. We therefore assessed early mortality in hip fracture patients treated with a THA, in the setting of a nationwide matched cohort study. Patients and methods — 24,699 patients who underwent THA due to a femoral neck fracture between 1992 and 2012 were matched with 118,518 controls. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to calculate cumulative unadjusted survival, and Cox regression models were fitted to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), with adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, and socioeconomic background. Results — 90-day survival was 96.3% (95% CI: 96.0–96.5) for THA cases and 98.7% (95% CI: 98.6–98.8) for control individuals, giving an adjusted HR of 2.2 (95% CI: 2.0–2.4) for THA cases compared to control individuals. Comorbidity burden increased in THA cases over time, but the adjusted risk of death within 90 days did not differ statistically significantly between the time periods investigated (1992–1998, 1999–2005, and 2006–2012). A Charlson comorbidity index of 3 or more, an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade of 3 and above, male sex, an age of 80 years and above, an income below the first quartile, and a lower level of education were all associated with an increased risk of 90-day mortality. Interpretation — The adjusted early mortality in femoral neck fracture patients who underwent THA was about double that in a matched control population. Patients with femoral neck fracture but with no substantial comorbidity and an age of less than 80 years appear to have a low risk of early death. Patients older than 80 years and those with a Charlson comorbidity index of more than 2 have a high

  2. NASA Hazard Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews The NASA Hazard Analysis process. The contents include: 1) Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Spaceflight; 2) Subsystem Safety Engineering Through the Project Life Cycle; 3) The Risk Informed Design Process; 4) Types of NASA Hazard Analysis; 5) Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA); 6) Hazard Analysis Process; 7) Identify Hazardous Conditions; 8) Consider All Interfaces; 9) Work a Preliminary Hazard List; 10) NASA Generic Hazards List; and 11) Final Thoughts

  3. Mortality Among Adults With Intellectual Disability in England: Comparisons With the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Hosking, Fay J.; Shah, Sunil M.; Harris, Tess; DeWilde, Stephen; Beighton, Carole; Cook, Derek G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe mortality among adults with intellectual disability in England in comparison with the general population. Methods. We conducted a cohort study from 2009 to 2013 using data from 343 general practices. Adults with intellectual disability (n = 16 666; 656 deaths) were compared with age-, gender-, and practice-matched controls (n = 113 562; 1358 deaths). Results. Adults with intellectual disability had higher mortality rates than controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.3, 3.9). This risk remained high after adjustment for comorbidity, smoking, and deprivation (HR = 3.1; 95% CI = 2.7, 3.4); it was even higher among adults with intellectual disability and Down syndrome or epilepsy. A total of 37.0% of all deaths among adults with intellectual disability were classified as being amenable to health care intervention, compared with 22.5% in the general population (HR = 5.9; 95% CI = 5.1, 6.8). Conclusions. Mortality among adults with intellectual disability is markedly elevated in comparison with the general population, with more than a third of deaths potentially amenable to health care interventions. This mortality disparity suggests the need to improve access to, and quality of, health care among people with intellectual disability. PMID:27310347

  4. Does religious observance promote health? mortality in secular vs religious kibbutzim in Israel.

    PubMed Central

    Kark, J D; Shemi, G; Friedlander, Y; Martin, O; Manor, O; Blondheim, S H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study assessed the association of Jewish religious observance with mortality by comparing religious and secular kibbutzim. These collectives are highly similar in social structure and economic function and are cohesive and supportive communities. METHODS. In a 16-year (1970 through 1985) historical prospective study of mortality in 11 religious and 11 matched secular kibbutzim in Israel, 268 deaths occurred among 3900 men and women 35 years of age and older during 41347 person-years of observation. RESULTS. Mortality was considerably higher in secular kibbutzim. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to adjust for age and the matched design; rate ratios were 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.17, 2.39) for men, 2.67 (95% CI=1.55, 4.60) for women, and 1.93 (95% CI=1.44, 2.59) overall. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of birth cohorts confirmed the association. The lower mortality in religious kibbutzim was consistent for all major causes of death. CONCLUSIONS. Belonging to a religious collective was associated with a strong protective effect not attributable to confounding by sociodemographic factors. Elucidation of mechanisms mediating this effect may provide etiologic insights and leads for intervention. PMID:8604758

  5. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  6. War-related stress exposure and mortality: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roelfs, David; Shor, Eran; Davidson, Karina; Schwartz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestic and international wars continue to be pervasive in the 21st century. This study summarizes the effects of war-related stress on all-cause mortality using meta-analyses and meta-regressions. Methods A keyword search was performed, supplemented by extensive iterative hand-searches for observational studies of war-related stress and mortality. Two hundred and twenty mortality risk estimates from 30 studies were extracted, providing data on more than 9 million persons. Results The mean hazard ratio (HR) was 1.05 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98–1.13] among HRs adjusted for age and additional covariates. The mean effect for men was 1.14 (CI 1.00–1.31), and for women it was 0.92 (CI 0.66–1.28). No differences were found for various follow-up durations or for various types of war stress. Neither civilians nor military personnel had an elevated mortality risk. Those exposed to a combat zone during the Vietnam War had a slightly higher chance of death (HR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00–1.23). Conclusions The results show that, over all, exposure to war-stress did not increase the risk of death when studies were well controlled. Effects were small when found. This lack of substantial effect may be the result of selection processes, developed resiliency and/or institutional support. PMID:20724455

  7. Investigating the Mechanism of Marital Mortality Reduction: The Transition to Widowhood and Quality of Health Care

    PubMed Central

    JIN, LEI; CHRISATAKIS, NICHOLAS A.

    2009-01-01

    While it is well known that the widowed suffer increased mortality risks, the mechanism of this survival disadvantage is still under investigation. In this article, we examine the quality of health care as a possible link between widowhood and mortality using a unique data set of 475,313 elderly couples who were followed up for up to nine years. We address whether the transition to widowhood affects the quality of care that individuals receive and explore the extent to which these changes mediate the elevated mortality hazard for the widowed. We analyze six established measures of quality of health care in a fixed-effect framework to account for unobserved heterogeneity. Caregiving and acute bereavement during the transition to widowhood appear to distract individuals from taking care of their own health care needs in the short run. However, being widowed does not have long-term detrimental effects on individuals’ ability to sustain contact with the formal medical system. Moreover, the short-run disruption does not mediate the widowhood effect on mortality. Nevertheless, long after spousal death, men suffer from a decline in the quality of informal care, coordination between formal and informal care, and the ability to advocate and communicate in formal medical settings. These findings illustrate women’s centrality in the household production of health and identify important points of intervention in optimizing men’s adjustment to widowhood. PMID:19771947

  8. Substance use disorders, psychiatric disorders, and mortality after release from prison: a nationwide longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zheng; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Fazel, Seena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High mortality rates have been reported in people released from prison compared with the general population. However, few studies have investigated potential risk factors associated with these high rates, especially psychiatric determinants. We aimed to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders and mortality in people released from prison in Sweden. Methods We studied all people who were imprisoned since Jan 1, 2000, and released before Dec 31, 2009, in Sweden for risks of all-cause and external-cause (accidents, suicide, homicide) mortality after prison release. We obtained data for substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders, and criminological and sociodemographic factors from population-based registers. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) by Cox regression, and then used them to calculate population attributable fractions for post-release mortality. To control for potential familial confounding, we compared individuals in the study with siblings who were also released from prison, but without psychiatric disorders. We tested whether any independent risk factors improved the prediction of mortality beyond age, sex, and criminal history. Findings We identified 47 326 individuals who were imprisoned. During a median follow-up time of 5·1 years (IQR 2·6–7·5), we recorded 2874 (6%) deaths after release from prison. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 1205 deaths per 100 000 person-years. Substance use disorders significantly increased the rate of all-cause mortality (alcohol use: adjusted HR 1·62, 95% CI 1·48–1·77; drug use: 1·67, 1·53–1·83), and the association was independent of sociodemographic, criminological, and familial factors. We identified no strong evidence that other psychiatric disorders increased mortality after we controlled for potential confounders. In people released from prison, 925 (34%) of all-cause deaths in men and 85 (50%) in women were potentially attributable to substance

  9. Relationship between Hemoglobin Levels Corrected by Interdialytic Weight Gain and Mortality in Japanese Hemodialysis Patients: Miyazaki Dialysis Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwakiri, Takashi; Sato, Yuji; Komatsu, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Background Although hemoglobin (Hb) levels are affected by a change in the body fluid status, the relationship between Hb levels and mortality while taking interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) at blood sampling into account has not yet been examined in hemodialysis patients. Study design Cohort study. Setting, Participants Data from the Miyazaki Dialysis cohort study, including 1375 prevalent hemodialysis patients (median age (interquartile range), 69 (60–77) years, 42.3% female). Predictor Patients were divided into 5 categories according to baseline Hb levels and two groups based on the median value of IDWG rates at blood sampling at pre-HD on the first dialysis session of the week. Outcomes All-cause and cardiovascular mortalities during a 3-year follow-up. Measurements Hazard ratios were estimated using a Cox model for the relationship between Hb categories and mortality, and adjusted for potential confounders such as age, sex, dialysis duration, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosage, Kt/V, comorbid conditions, anti-hypertensive drug use, serum albumin, serum C-reactive protein, serum ferritin, and serum intact parathyroid hormone. Patients with Hb levels of 9–9.9 g/dL were set as our reference category. Results A total of 246 patients (18%) died of all-cause mortality, including 112 cardiovascular deaths. Lower Hb levels (<9.0g/dL) were associated with all-cause mortality (adjusted HRs 2.043 [95% CI, 1.347–3.009]), while Hb levels were not associated with cardiovascular mortality. When patients were divided into two groups using the median value of IDWG rates (high IDWG, ≥5.4% and low IDWG, <5.4%), the correlation between lower Hb levels and all-cause mortality disappeared in high IDWG patients, but was maintained in low IDWG patients (adjusted HRs 3.058 [95% CI,1.575–5.934]). On the other hand, higher Hb levels (≥12g/dL) were associated with cardiovascular mortality in high IDWG patients (adjusted HRs 2.724 [95% CI, 1.010–7.349]), but not in low

  10. One-year mortality among Danish intensive care patients with acute kidney injury: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There are few studies on long-term mortality among intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). We assessed the prevalence of AKI at ICU admission, its impact on mortality during one year of follow-up, and whether the influence of AKI varied in subgroups of ICU patients. Methods We identified all adults admitted to any ICU in Northern Denmark (approximately 1.15 million inhabitants) from 2005 through 2010 using population-based medical registries. AKI was defined at ICU admission based on the risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) classification, using plasma creatinine changes. We included four severity levels: AKI-risk, AKI-injury, AKI-failure, and without AKI. We estimated cumulative mortality by the Kaplan-Meier method and hazard ratios (HRs) using a Cox model adjusted for potential confounders. We computed estimates for all ICU patients and for subgroups with different comorbidity levels, chronic kidney disease status, surgical status, primary hospital diagnosis, and treatment with mechanical ventilation or with inotropes/vasopressors. Results We identified 30,762 ICU patients, of which 4,793 (15.6%) had AKI at ICU admission. Thirty-day mortality was 35.5% for the AKI-risk group, 44.2% for the AKI-injury group, and 41.0% for the AKI-failure group, compared with 12.8% for patients without AKI. The corresponding adjusted HRs were 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.80-2.13), 2.60 (95% CI 2.38 to 2.85) and 2.41 (95% CI 2.21 to 2.64), compared to patients without AKI. Among patients surviving 30 days (n = 25,539), 31- to 365 day mortality was 20.5% for the AKI-risk group, 23.8% for the AKI-injury group, and 23.2% for the AKI-failure group, compared with 10.7% for patients without AKI, corresponding to adjusted HRs of 1.33 (95% CI 1.17 to 1.51), 1.60 (95% CI 1.37 to1.87), and 1.64 (95% CI 1.42 to 1.90), respectively. The association between AKI and 30-day mortality was evident in

  11. Added sugar intake and cardiovascular diseases mortality among US adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quanhe; Zhang, Zefeng; Gregg, Edward W; Flanders, W Dana; Merritt, Robert; Hu, Frank B

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Epidemiologic studies have suggested that higher intake of added sugar is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Few prospective studies have examined the association of added sugar intake with CVD mortality. OBJECTIVE To examine time trends of added sugar consumption as percentage of daily calories in the United States and investigate the association of this consumption with CVD mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 1988-1994 [III], 1999-2004, and 2005-2010 [n = 31,147]) for the time trend analysis and NHANES III Linked Mortality cohort (1988-2006 [n = 11 733]), a prospective cohort of a nationally representative sample of US adults for the association study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cardiovascular disease mortality. RESULTS Among US adults, the adjusted mean percentage of daily calories from added sugar increased from 15.7% (95% CI, 15.0%-16.4%) in 1988-1994 to 16.8% (16.0%-17.7%; P = .02) in 1999-2004 and decreased to 14.9% (14.2%-15.5%; P < .001) in 2005-2010. Most adults consumed 10% or more of calories from added sugar (71.4%) and approximately 10% consumed 25% or more in 2005-2010. During a median follow-up period of 14.6 years, we documented 831 CVD deaths during 163,039 person-years. Age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CVD mortality across quintiles of the percentage of daily calories consumed from added sugar were 1.00 (reference), 1.09 (95% CI, 1.05-1.13), 1.23 (1.12-1.34), 1.49 (1.24-1.78), and 2.43 (1.63-3.62; P < .001), respectively. After additional adjustment for sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, HRs were 1.00 (reference), 1.07 (1.02-1.12), 1.18 (1.06-1.31), 1.38 (1.11-1.70), and 2.03 (1.26-3.27; P = .004), respectively. Adjusted HRs were 1.30 (95% CI, 1.09-1.55) and 2.75 (1.40-5.42; P = .004), respectively, comparing participants who consumed 10.0% to 24.9% or 25.0% or

  12. The relationship between fermented food intake and mortality risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort.

    PubMed

    Praagman, Jaike; Dalmeijer, Geertje W; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Monique Verschuren, W M; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Beulens, Joline W J

    2015-02-14

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between total and subtypes of bacterial fermented food intake (dairy products, cheese, vegetables and meat) and mortality due to all causes, total cancer and CVD. From the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort, 34 409 Dutch men and women, aged 20-70 years who were free from CVD or cancer at baseline, were included. Baseline intakes of total and subtypes of fermented foods were measured with a validated FFQ. Data on the incidence and causes of death were obtained from the national mortality register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyse mortality in relation to the quartiles of fermented food intake. After a mean follow-up of 15 (sd 2·5) years, 2436 deaths occurred (1216 from cancer and 727 from CVD). After adjustment for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, education level, hypertension, smoking habit, BMI, and intakes of fruit, vegetables and alcohol, total fermented food intake was not found to be associated with mortality due to all causes (hazard ratio upper v. lowest quartile (HR(Q4 v. Q1)) 1·00, 95% CI 0·88, 1·13), cancer (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 1·02, 95% CI 0·86, 1·21) or CVD (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 1·04, 95 % CI 0·83, 1·30). Bacterial fermented foods mainly consisted of fermented dairy foods (78 %) and cheese (16%). None of the subtypes of fermented foods was consistently related to mortality, except for cheese which was moderately inversely associated with CVD mortality, and particularly stroke mortality (HR(Q4 v. Q1) 0·59, 95% CI 0·38, 0·92, P trend= 0·046). In conclusion, the present study provides no strong evidence that intake of fermented foods, particularly fermented dairy foods, is associated with mortality.

  13. The potential monetary benefits of reclaiming hazardous waste sites in the Campania region: an economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evaluating the economic benefit of reducing negative health outcomes resulting from waste management is of pivotal importance for designing an effective waste policy that takes into account the health consequences for the populations exposed to environmental hazards. Despite the high level of Italian and international media interest in the problem of hazardous waste in Campania little has been done to reclaim the land and the waterways contaminated by hazardous waste. Objective This study aims to reduce the uncertainty about health damage due to waste exposure by providing for the first time a monetary valuation of health benefits arising from the reclamation of hazardous waste dumps in Campania. Methods First the criteria by which the landfills in the Campania region, in particular in the two provinces of Naples and Caserta, have been classified are described. Then, the annual cases of premature death and fatal cases of cancers attributable to waste exposure are quantified. Finally, the present value of the health benefits from the reclamation of polluted land is estimated for each of the health outcomes (premature mortality, fatal cancer and premature mortality adjusted for the cancer premium). Due to the uncertainty about the time frame of the benefits arising from reclamation, the latency of the effects of toxic waste on human health and the lack of context specific estimates of the Value of Preventing a Fatality (VPF), extensive sensitivity analyses are performed. Results There are estimated to be 848 cases of premature mortality and 403 cases of fatal cancer per year as a consequence of exposure to toxic waste. The present value of the benefit of reducing the number of waste associated deaths after adjusting for a cancer premium is €11.6 billion. This value ranges from €5.4 to €20.0 billion assuming a time frame for benefits of 10 and 50 years respectively. Conclusion This study suggests that there is a strong economic argument for both

  14. Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher albuminuria are associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. A collaborative meta-analysis of high-risk population cohorts.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, Marije; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C; Woodward, Mark; Levey, Andrew; de Jong, Paul; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Velde, Marije; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C; Woodward, Mark; Levey, Andrew S; de Jong, Paul E; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew; El-Nahas, Meguid; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Chalmers, John; Macmahon, Stephen; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Sacks, Frank; Curhan, Gary; Collins, Allan J; Li, Suying; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Hawaii Cohort, K P; Lee, Brian J; Ishani, Areef; Neaton, James; Svendsen, Ken; Mann, Johannes F E; Yusuf, Salim; Teo, Koon K; Gao, Peggy; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Bilo, Henk J; Joosten, Hanneke; Kleefstra, Nanno; Groenier, K H; Auguste, Priscilla; Veldhuis, Kasper; Wang, Yaping; Camarata, Laura; Thomas, Beverly; Manley, Tom

    2011-06-01

    Screening for chronic kidney disease is recommended in people at high risk, but data on the independent and combined associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality are limited. To clarify this, we performed a collaborative meta-analysis of 10 cohorts with 266,975 patients selected because of increased risk for chronic kidney disease, defined as a history of hypertension, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Risk for all-cause mortality was not associated with eGFR between 60-105 ml/min per 1.73 m², but increased at lower levels. Hazard ratios at eGFRs of 60, 45, and 15 ml/min per 1.73 m² were 1.03, 1.38 and 3.11, respectively, compared to an eGFR of 95, after adjustment for albuminuria and cardiovascular risk factors. Log albuminuria was linearly associated with log risk for all-cause mortality without thresholds. Adjusted hazard ratios at albumin-to-creatinine ratios of 10, 30 and 300 mg/g were 1.08, 1.38, and 2.16, respectively compared to a ratio of five. Albuminuria and eGFR were multiplicatively associated with all-cause mortality, without evidence for interaction. Similar associations were observed for cardiovascular mortality. Findings in cohorts with dipstick data were generally comparable to those in cohorts measuring albumin-to-creatinine ratios. Thus, lower eGFR and higher albuminuria are risk factors for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in high-risk populations, independent of each other and of cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. Effect of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor on All-Cause Mortality and Coronary Revascularization in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Eun; Jeon, Jooyeong; Hwang, In-Chang; Sung, Jidong; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-atherosclerotic effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors has been suggested from previous studies, and yet, its association with cardiovascular outcome has not been demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the effect of DPP-4 inhibitors in reducing mortality and coronary revascularization, in association with baseline coronary computed tomography (CT). Methods The current study was performed as a multi-center, retrospective observational cohort study. All subjects with diabetes mellitus who had diagnostic CT during 2007-2011 were included, and 1866 DPP-4 inhibitor users and 5179 non-users were compared for outcome. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and secondary outcome included any coronary revascularization therapy after 90 days of CT in addition to all-cause mortality. Results DPP-4 inhibitors users had significantly less adverse events [0.8% vs. 4.4% in users vs. non-users, adjusted hazard ratios (HR) 0.220, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.102-0.474, p = 0.0001 for primary outcome, 4.1% vs. 7.6% in users vs. non-users, HR 0.517, 95% CI 0.363-0.735, p = 0.0002 for secondary outcome, adjusted variables were age, sex, presence of hypertension, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, glycated hemoglobin, statin use, coronary artery calcium score and degree of stenosis]. Interestingly, DPP-4 inhibitor seemed to be beneficial only in subjects without significant stenosis (adjusted HR 0.148, p = 0.0013 and adjusted HR 0.525, p = 0.0081 for primary and secondary outcome). Conclusion DPP-4 inhibitor is associated with reduced all-cause mortality and coronary revascularization in diabetic patients. Such beneficial effect was significant only in those without significant coronary stenosis, which implies that DPP-4 inhibitor may have beneficial effect in earlier stage of atherosclerosis. PMID:26755932

  16. Variable Impact on Mortality of AIDS-Defining Events Diagnosed during Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: Not All AIDS-Defining Conditions Are Created Equal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)–defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started combination antiretroviral therapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate mortality hazard ratios for each ADE that occurred in >50 patients, after stratification by cohort and adjustment for sex, HIV transmission group, number of anti-retroviral drugs initiated, regimen, age, date of starting combination antiretroviral therapy, and CD4+ cell count and HIV RNA load at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy. ADEs that occurred in <50 patients were grouped together to form a “rare ADEs” category. Results During a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 19–70 months), 2880 ADEs were diagnosed in 2262 patients; 1146 patients died. The most common ADEs were esophageal candidiasis (in 360 patients), Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (320 patients), and Kaposi sarcoma (308 patients). The greatest mortality hazard ratio was associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (hazard ratio, 17.59; 95% confidence interval, 13.84–22.35) and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (hazard ratio, 10.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.70–14.92). Three groups of ADEs were identified on the basis of the ranked hazard ratios with bootstrapped confidence intervals: severe (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy [hazard ratio, 7.26; 95% confidence interval, 5.55–9.48]), moderate (cryptococcosis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, AIDS dementia complex, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, and rare ADEs [hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.76–3.13]), and mild (all other ADEs [hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.00]). Conclusions In the combination antiretroviral therapy era, mortality rates

  17. The association between ischemic and jeopardized myocardia and all-cause mortality in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Tarek A; Yousefzai, Rayan; Venkatachalam, Sridhar; Lowry, Ashley; Gornik, Heather L; Jaber, Wael; Bartholomew, John R; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cerqueira, Manuel; Gray, Bruce H; Blackstone, Eugene H; Shishehbor, Mehdi H

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with increased mortality and concomitant coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether uncovering the presence of functional coronary ischemia by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) would further help stratifying that excess risk. From January 2000 to 2009, 4294 individuals underwent cardiac stress testing within 180 days of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements. Of these, 645 had PAD and SPECT MPI stress testing. Abnormal ABI was defined as ⩽ 0.9 or prior lower extremity arterial revascularization. Myocardial ischemic burden and total jeopardized myocardium were represented by the summed difference score (SDS) and summed stress score (SSS), respectively. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to study the impact of SDS and SSS on all-cause mortality. Additionally, using a hierarchical approach, we examined the step-wise addition of post-stress test coronary and lower extremity arterial revascularizations as time-varying covariates on outcomes. We found no significant difference in all-cause mortality between patients with ischemic myocardium (SDS > 0) and those without (SDS = 0) (adjusted HR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.53-1.69; p = 0.84). Similarly, the presence of jeopardized myocardium (SSS > 0) did not have a significant impact on mortality (adjusted HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.67-2.00; p = 0.59). Moreover, adjustment for post-testing coronary and lower extremity arterial revascularizations did not affect our results. In conclusion, ischemic and jeopardized myocardia are not predictors of all-cause mortality in PAD; thus, SPECT MPI does not appear to be a useful risk stratification tool in these patients.

  18. Delta-He: a novel marker of inflammation predicting mortality and ESA response in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Kristin; Beshara, Soheir; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimbürger, Olof; Lindholm, Bengt; Hansson, Magnus; Hylander, Britta; Germanis, Guna; Stenvinkel, Peter; Barany, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation impairs erythropoiesis, iron availability and is associated with a higher mortality risk in patients with end-stage renal disease. We studied the associations between Delta-He [the difference between the reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret-He) and erythrocyte haemoglobin content], a suggested marker of iron availability, and markers of inflammation, iron status, response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and mortality in prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods Eighty-two PD patients were followed weekly for 12 weeks with an additional follow-up of 36 months. Delta-He, Ret-He and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured weekly and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and iron markers every fourth week. Mortality risk was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for potential confounding factors. The relationships between ESA response, inflammatory markers, iron markers and Delta-He were evaluated in the PD patients. The relationship between Delta-He and iron markers was analysed in 87 healthy subjects. Results Delta-He correlated with IL-6 (rho = 0.48, P < 0.001), hs-CRP (rho = 0.36, P < 0.001) and ESA hyporesponsivess index (EHRI; rho = −0.44, P < 0.001) in the PD patients. Delta-He did not correlate with iron markers in PD patients nor in healthy subjects. The mean Delta-He levels were significantly different between the tertiles of EHRI (P < 0.01). Delta-He was associated with all-cause mortality risk in PD patients after adjusting for age, gender, hs-CRP, comorbidity and nutritional status [OR 0.70 (0.51–0.96), P < 0.05]. Conclusions Delta-He independently predicts all-cause mortality in PD patients after adjusting for potential confounders and is a predictor of ESA response in PD patients. PMID:25852889

  19. Association between Sleep Duration and Mortality Is Mediated by Markers of Inflammation and Health in Older Adults: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Martica H.; Smagula, Stephen F.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Harris, Tamara B.; Naydeck, Barbara L.; Rubin, Susan M.; Samuelsson, Laura; Satterfield, Suzanne; Stone, Katie L.; Visser, Marjolein; Newman, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Inflammation may represent a common physiological pathway linking both short and long sleep duration to mortality. We evaluated inflammatory markers as mediators of the relationship between sleep duration and mortality in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Prospective cohort with longitudinal follow-up for mortality outcomes. Setting: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Memphis, Tennessee. Participants: Participants in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study (mean age 73.6 ± 2.9 years at baseline) were sampled and recruited from Medicare listings. Measurements and Results: Baseline measures of subjective sleep duration, markers of inflammation (serum interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein) and health status were evaluated as predictors of all-cause mortality (average follow-up = 8.2 ± 2.3 years). Sleep duration was related to mortality, and age-, sex-, and race-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were highest for those with the shortest (< 6 h HR: 1.30, CI: 1.05–1.61) and longest (> 8 h HR: 1.49, CI: 1.15–1.93) sleep durations. Adjustment for inflammatory markers and health status attenuated the HR for short (< 6 h) sleepers (HR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.83–1.34). Age-, sex-, and race-adjusted HRs for the > 8-h sleeper group were less strongly attenuated by adjustment for inflammatory markers than by other health factors associated with poor sleep with adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.93–1.63. Inflammatory markers remained significantly associated with mortality. Conclusions: Inflammatory markers, lifestyle, and health status explained mortality risk associated with short sleep, while the mortality risk associated with long sleep was explained predominantly by lifestyle and health status. Citation: Hall MH, Smagula SF, Boudreau RM, Ayonayon HN, Goldman SE, Harris TB, Naydeck BL, Rubin SM, Samuelsson L, Satterfield S, Stone KL, Visser M, Newman AB. Association between sleep duration and mortality is mediated by

  20. Mortality risk attributable to smoking, hypertension and diabetes among English and Brazilian older adults (The ELSA and Bambui cohort ageing studies)

    PubMed Central

    Marmot, Michael G.; Demakakos, Panayotes; Vaz de Melo Mambrini, Juliana; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main aim of this study was to quantify and compare 6-year mortality risk attributable to smoking, hypertension and diabetes among English and Brazilian older adults. This study represents a rare opportunity to approach the subject in two different social and economic contexts. Methods: Data from the data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and the Bambuí Cohort Study of Ageing (Brazil) were used. Deaths in both cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Risk factors considered in this study were baseline smoking, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Both age–sex adjusted hazard ratios and population attributable risks (PAR) of all-cause mortality and their 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Participants were 3205 English and 1382 Brazilians aged 60 years and over. First, Brazilians showed much higher absolute risk of mortality than English and this finding was consistent in all age, independently of sex. Second, as a rule, hazard ratios for mortality to smoking, hypertension and diabetes showed more similarities than differences between these two populations. Third, there was strong difference among English and Brazilians on attributable deaths to hypertension. Conclusions: The findings indicate that, despite of being in more recent transitions, the attributable deaths to one or more risk factors was twofold among Brazilians relative to the English. These findings call attention for the challenge imposed to health systems to prevent and treat non-communicable diseases, particularly in populations with low socioeconomic level. PMID:26666869

  1. Barriers to Care and 1-Year Mortality Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-Infected People in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Sharon M.; Giddy, Janet; Bogart, Laura M.; Chaisson, Christine E.; Ross, Douglas; Flash, Moses J. E.; Govender, Tessa; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Losina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prompt entry into HIV care is often hindered by personal and structural barriers. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of self-perceived barriers to health care on 1-year mortality among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Durban, South Africa. Methods: Before HIV testing at 4 outpatient sites, adults (≥18 years) were surveyed regarding perceived barriers to care including (1) service delivery, (2) financial, (3) personal health perception, (4) logistical, and (5) structural. We assessed deaths via phone calls and the South African National Population Register. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association between number of perceived barriers and death within 1 year. Results: One thousand eight hundred ninety-nine HIV-infected participants enrolled. Median age was 33 years (interquartile range: 27–41 years), 49% were females, and median CD4 count was 192/μL (interquartile range: 72–346/μL). One thousand fifty-seven participants (56%) reported no, 370 (20%) reported 1–3, and 460 (24%) reported >3 barriers to care. By 1 year, 250 [13%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12% to 15%] participants died. Adjusting for age, sex, education, baseline CD4 count, distance to clinic, and tuberculosis status, participants with 1–3 barriers (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.06 to 2.08) and >3 barriers (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.35 to 2.43) had higher 1-year mortality risk compared with those without barriers. Conclusions: HIV-infected individuals in South Africa who reported perceived barriers to medical care at diagnosis were more likely to die within 1 year. Targeted structural interventions, such as extended clinic hours, travel vouchers, and streamlined clinic operations, may improve linkage to care and antiretroviral therapy initiation for these people. PMID:28060226

  2. An Estimation of Mortality Risks among People Living with HIV in Karnataka State, India: Learnings from an Intensive HIV/AIDS Care and Support Programme

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ravi; Isac, Shajy; Washington, Reynold; Halli, Shiva S.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Indian context, limited attempts have been made to estimate the mortality risks among people living with HIV (PLHIV). We estimated the rates of mortality among PLHIV covered under an integrated HIV-prevention cum care and support programme implemented in Karnataka state, India, and attempted to identify the key programme components associated with the higher likelihood of their survival. Methods Retrospective programme data of 55,801 PLHIV registered with the Samastha programme implemented in Karnataka state during 2006–11 was used. Kaplan-Meier survival methods were used to estimate the ten years expected survival probabilities and Cox-proportional hazard model was used to examine the factors associated with risk of mortality among PLHIV. We also calculated mortality rates (per 1000 person-year) across selected demographic and clinical parameters. Results Of the total PLHIV registered with the programme, about nine percent died within the 5-years of programme period with an overall death rate of 38 per 1000 person-years. The mortality rate was higher among males, aged 18 and above, among illiterates, and those residing in rural areas. While the presence of co-infections such as Tuberculosis leads to higher mortality rate, adherence to ART was significantly associated with reduction in overall death rate. Cox proportional hazard model revealed that increase in CD4 cell counts and exposure to intensive care and support programme for at least two years can bring significant reduction in risk of death among PLHIV [(hazard ratio: 0.234; CI: 0.211–0.260) & (hazard ratio: 0.062; CI: 0.054–0.071), respectively] even after adjusting the effect of other socio-demographic, economic and health related confounders. Conclusion Study confirms that while residing in rural areas and presence of co-infection significantly increases the mortality risk among PLHIV, adherence to ART and improvement in CD4 counts led to significant reduction in their mortality risk

  3. Mortality differences between self-employed and paid employees: a 5-year follow-up study of the working population in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, Susanna; Griep, Rosane Härter; Mellner, Christin; Vinberg, Stig; Eloranta, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Analyse mortality differences between self-employed and paid employees with a focus on industrial sector, educational level and gender using Swedish register data. Methods A cohort of the total working population (4 776 135 individuals; 7.2% self-employed; 18–100 years of age at baseline 2003) in Sweden with a 5-year follow-up (2004–2008) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality (57 743 deaths). Self-employed individuals were categorised as sole proprietors or limited liability company (LLC) owners according to their enterprise's legal form. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to compare mortality rates between sole proprietors, LLC owners and paid employees, adjusted for sociodemographic confounders. Results Mortality from cardiovascular diseases was 16% lower and from suicide 26% lower among LLC owners than among paid employees, adjusted for confounders. Within the industrial category, all-cause mortality was 13–15% lower among sole proprietors and LLC owners compared with employees in manufacturing and mining (MM) as well as personal and cultural services (PCS), and 11–20% higher in sole proprietors in trade, transport and communication and the welfare industry (W). A significant three-way interaction indicated 17–23% lower all-cause mortality among male LLC owners in MM and female sole proprietors in PCS, and 50% higher mortality in female sole proprietors in W than in employees in the same industries. Conclusions Mortality differences between self-employed individuals and paid employees vary by the legal form of self-employment, across industries, and by gender. Differences in work environment exposures and working conditions, varying market competition across industries and gender segregation in the labour market are potential mechanisms underlying these findings. PMID:27443155

  4. Determinants of Early Mortality Among 37,568 Patients With Colon Cancer Who Participated in 25 Clinical Trials From the Adjuvant Colon Cancer Endpoints Database

    PubMed Central

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Kerr, David; de Gramont, Aimery; Saltz, Leonard B.; Grothey, Axel; Alberts, Steven R.; Andre, Thierry; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Labianca, Roberto; Francini, Guido; Seitz, Jean-Francois; O’Callaghan, Chris; Twelves, Chris; Van Cutsem, Eric; Haller, Daniel G.; Yothers, Greg; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Factors associated with early mortality after surgery and treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer are poorly understood. We aimed to characterize the determinants of early mortality in a large cohort of colon cancer trial participants. Methods A pooled analysis of 37,568 patients in 25 randomized trials of adjuvant systemic therapy was conducted. Multivariable logistic regression models with several definitions of early mortality (30, 60, and 90 days, and 6 months) were constructed, adjusting for clinically and statistically significant variables. A nomogram for 6-month mortality was developed and validated. Results Median age among patients was 61 years, patient demographics included 54% men and 90% White, 29% and 71% had stage II and III disease, respectively, and 79%, 20%, and 1% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) of 0, 1, and ≥ 2, respectively. Early mortality was low: 0.3% at 30 days, 0.6% at 60 days, 0.8% at 90 days, and 1.4% at 6 months. Of those patients who died by 6 months post–random assignment, 40% had documented disease recurrence prior to death. Early disease recurrence was associated with a markedly increased risk of death during the first 6 months post-treatment (hazard ratio, 82.6; 95%CI, 66.9 to 102.1). In prognostic analyses, advanced age, male sex, poorer PS, increasing ratio of positive to examined lymph nodes, earlier decade of enrollment, and higher tumor stage and grade predicted a greater likelihood of early mortality, whereas treatment received was not strongly predictive. A multivariable model for 6-month mortality showed strong optimism-adjusted discrimination (concordance index, 0.73) and calibration. Conclusion Early mortality was infrequent but more prevalent in patients with advanced age and a PS of ≥ 2, underscoring the need to carefully consider the risk-to-benefit ratio when making treatment decisions in these subgroups. PMID:26858337

  5. Usefulness of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein to Predict Mortality in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, José; Lopez, Faye L.; Montes, Ramón; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Astor, Brad C.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a marker for risk of cardiovascular and overall mortality, but information about the association between hs-CRP and mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is scarce. A total of 293 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study with a history of AF and available hs-CRP levels were studied. During a median time follow-up of 9.4 years, 134 participants died (46%). The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality associated with the highest vs. the lowest tertile of hs-CRP was 2.52; 95% CI 1.49–4.25 after adjusting for age, sex, history of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors. A similar trend was observed for cardiovascular mortality (57 events) (HR=1.90; 95% CI 0.81–4.45). CHADS2 score was also associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: the adjusted HR were, respectively, 3.39 (95% CI 1.91–6.01) and 8.71, (95% CI 2.98–25.47) comparing those with CHADS2>2 versus CHADS2=0. Adding hs-CRP to a predictive model including CHADS2 score was associated with an improvement of the C-statistic for total mortality (from 0.627 to 0.677) and for cardiovascular mortality (from 0.700 to 0.718). In conclusion, high levels of hs-CRP constitute an independent marker for risk of mortality in AF patients. PMID:21962993

  6. Ten‐Year Blood Pressure Trajectories, Cardiovascular Mortality, and Life Years Lost in 2 Extinction Cohorts: the Minnesota Business and Professional Men Study and the Zutphen Study

    PubMed Central

    Tielemans, Susanne M. A. J.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Menotti, Alessandro; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Soedamah‐Muthu, Sabita S.; Jacobs, David R.; Blackburn, Henry; Kromhout, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) trajectories derived from measurements repeated over years have low measurement error and may improve cardiovascular disease prediction compared to single, average, and usual BP (single BP adjusted for regression dilution). We characterized 10‐year BP trajectories and examined their association with cardiovascular mortality, all‐cause mortality, and life years lost. Methods and Results Data from 2 prospective and nearly extinct cohorts of middle‐aged men—the Minnesota Business and Professional Men Study (n=261) and the Zutphen Study (n=632)—were used. BP was measured annually during 1947–1957 in Minnesota and 1960–1970 in Zutphen. BP trajectories were identified by latent mixture modeling. Cox proportional hazards and linear regression models examined BP trajectories with cardiovascular mortality, all‐cause mortality, and life years lost. Associations were adjusted for age, serum cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes mellitus. Mean initial age was about 50 years in both cohorts. After 10 years of BP measurements, men were followed until death on average 20 years later. All Minnesota men and 98% of Zutphen men died. Four BP trajectories were identified, in which mean systolic BP increased by 5 to 49 mm Hg in Minnesota and 5 to 20 mm Hg in Zutphen between age 50 and 60. The third systolic BP trajectories were associated with 2 to 4 times higher cardiovascular mortality risk, 2 times higher all‐cause mortality risk, and 4 to 8 life years lost, compared to the first trajectory. Conclusions Ten‐year BP trajectories were the strongest predictors, among different BP measures, of cardiovascular mortality, all‐cause mortality, and life years lost in Minnesota. However, average BP was the strongest predictor in Zutphen. PMID:25753924

  7. Financial Insolvency as a Risk Factor for Early Mortality Among Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Aasthaa; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Blough, David K.; Overstreet, Karen A.; Shankaran, Veena; Newcomb, Polly

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with cancer are more likely to file for bankruptcy than the general population, but the impact of severe financial distress on health outcomes among patients with cancer is not known. Methods We linked Western Washington SEER Cancer Registry records with federal bankruptcy records for the region. By using propensity score matching to account for differences in several demographic and clinical factors between patients who did and did not file for bankruptcy, we then fit Cox proportional hazards models to examine the relationship between bankruptcy filing and survival. Results Between 1995 and 2009, 231,596 persons were diagnosed with cancer. Patients who filed for bankruptcy (n = 4,728) were more likely to be younger, female, and nonwhite, to have local- or regional- (v distant-) stage disease at diagnosis, and have received treatment. After propensity score matching, 3,841 patients remained in each group (bankruptcy v no bankruptcy). In the matched sample, mean age was 53.0 years, 54% were men, mean income was $49,000, and majorities were white (86%), married (60%), and urban (91%) and had local- or regional-stage disease at diagnosis (84%). Both groups received similar initial treatments. The adjusted hazard ratio for mortality among patients with cancer who filed for bankruptcy versus those who did not was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.64 to 1.96). Hazard ratios varied by cancer type: colorectal, prostate, and thyroid cancers had the highest hazard ratios. Excluding patients with distant-stage disease from the models did not have an effect on results. Conclusion Severe financial distress requiring bankruptcy protection after cancer diagnosis appears to be a risk factor for mortality. Further research is needed to understand the process by which extreme financial distress influences survival after cancer diagnosis and to find strategies that could mitigate this risk. PMID:26811521

  8. Mortality among young injection drug users in San Francisco: a 10-year follow-up of the UFO study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer L; Tsui, Judith I; Hahn, Judith A; Davidson, Peter J; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-02-15

    This study examined associations between mortality and demographic and risk characteristics among young injection drug users in San Francisco, California, and compared the mortality rate with that of the population. A total of 644 young (<30 years) injection drug users completed a baseline interview and were enrolled in a prospective cohort study, known as the UFO ("U Find Out") Study, from November 1997 to December 2007. Using the National Death Index, the authors identified 38 deaths over 4,167 person-years of follow-up, yielding a mortality rate of 9.1 (95% confidence interval: 6.6, 12.5) per 1,000 person-years. This mortality rate was 10 times that of the general population. The leading causes of death were overdose (57.9%), self-inflicted injury (13.2%), trauma/accidents (10.5%), and injection drug user-related medical conditions (13.1%). Mortality incidence was significantly higher among those who reported injecting heroin most days in the past month (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 24.3). The leading cause of death in this group was overdose, and primary use of heroin was the only significant risk factor for death observed in the study. These findings highlight the continued need for public health interventions that address the risk of overdose in this population in order to reduce premature deaths.

  9. Mortality Among Young Injection Drug Users in San Francisco: A 10-Year Follow-up of the UFO Study

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jennifer L.; Tsui, Judith I.; Hahn, Judith A.; Davidson, Peter J.; Lum, Paula J.; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations between mortality and demographic and risk characteristics among young injection drug users in San Francisco, California, and compared the mortality rate with that of the population. A total of 644 young (<30 years) injection drug users completed a baseline interview and were enrolled in a prospective cohort study, known as the UFO (“U Find Out”) Study, from November 1997 to December 2007. Using the National Death Index, the authors identified 38 deaths over 4,167 person-years of follow-up, yielding a mortality rate of 9.1 (95% confidence interval: 6.6, 12.5) per 1,000 person-years. This mortality rate was 10 times that of the general population. The leading causes of death were overdose (57.9%), self-inflicted injury (13.2%), trauma/accidents (10.5%), and injection drug user-related medical conditions (13.1%). Mortality incidence was significantly higher among those who reported injecting heroin most days in the past month (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 24.3). The leading cause of death in this group was overdose, and primary use of heroin was the only significant risk factor for death observed in the study. These findings highlight the continued need for public health interventions that address the risk of overdose in this population in order to reduce premature deaths. PMID:22227793

  10. Circulating TNF Receptors 1 and 2 Predict Mortality in Patients with End-stage Renal Disease Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gohda, Tomohito; Maruyama, Shuntaro; Kamei, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Saori; Shibata, Terumi; Murakoshi, Maki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Ohsawa, Isao; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Nojiri, Shuko; Suzuki, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    Relatively high circulating levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors (TNFRs: TNFR1, TNFR2) have been associated with not only progression to end-stage renal disease but also mortality in patients with diabetes. It remains unknown whether elevated TNFR levels in haemodialysis patients are associated with mortality. We studied 319 patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis who were followed for a median of 53 months. Circulating markers of TNF pathway (TNFα and TNFRs) were measured with immunoassay. Strong positive correlations between TNFR1 and TNFR2 were observed (r = 0.81, P < 0.0001). During follow-up, 88 (27.6%) patients died of any cause (40 [45.5%] died of cardiovascular disease). In the Cox multivariate model, either TNFR but not TNFα remained a significant independent predictor of all-cause mortality (TNFR1: hazard ratio [HR] 2.34, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50–3.64; TNFR2: HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.38–3.29) after adjustment for age, prior cardiovascular disease, predialysis systolic blood pressure, and large systolic blood pressure decline during dialysis session. For cardiovascular mortality, significance was only observed in TNFR1 (TNFR1: HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.13–4.10). Elevated TNFRs levels were associated with the risk of cardiovascular and/or all-cause mortality independent of all relevant covariates in patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:28256549

  11. The Gamma Gap and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Moliterno, Alison R.; Checkley, William; Miller, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The difference between total serum protein and albumin, i.e. the gamma gap, is a frequently used clinical screening measure for both latent infection and malignancy. However, there are no studies defining a positive gamma gap. Further, whether it is an independent risk factor of mortality is unknown. Methods and Findings This study examined the association between gamma gap, all-cause mortality, and specific causes of death (cardiovascular, cancer, pulmonary, or other) in 12,260 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999–2004. Participants had a comprehensive metabolic panel measured, which was linked with vital status data from the National Death Index. Cause of death was based on ICD10 codes from death certificates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for mortality risk factors. The mean (SE) age was 46 (0.3) years and the mean gamma gap was 3.0 (0.01) g/dl. The population was 52% women and 10% black. During a median follow-up period of 4.8 years (IQR: 3.3 to 6.2 years), there were 723 deaths. The unadjusted 5-year cumulative incidences across quartiles of the gamma gap (1.7–2.7, 2.8–3.0, 3.1–3.2, and 3.3–7.9 g/dl) were 5.7%, 4.2%, 5.5%, and 7.8%. After adjustment for risk factors, participants with a gamma gap of ≥3.1 g/dl had a 30% higher risk of death compared to participants with a gamma gap <3.1 g/dl (HR: 1.30; 95%CI: 1.08, 1.55; P = 0.006). Gamma gap (per 1.0 g/dl) was most strongly associated with death from pulmonary causes (HR 2.22; 95%CI: 1.19, 4.17; P = 0.01). Conclusions The gamma gap is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality at values as low as 3.1 g/dl (in contrast to the traditional definition of 4.0 g/dl), and is strongly associated with death from pulmonary causes. Future studies should examine the biologic pathways underlying these associations. PMID:26629820

  12. Dipstick Proteinuria as a Predictor of All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Bangladesh: a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Pesola, Gene R.; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Islam, Tariqul; Eunus, Mahbubul; Sarwar, Golam; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Baseline, persistent, incident, and remittent dipstick proteinuria have never been tested as predictors of mortality in an undeveloped country. The goal of this study was to determine which of these four types of proteinuria (if any) predict mortality. Methods Baseline data was collected from 2000–2002 in Bangladesh from 11,121 adults. Vital status was ascertained over 11–12 years. Cox models were used to evaluate proteinuria in relation to all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. CVD mortality was evaluated only in those with baseline proteinuria. Persistent, remittent, and incident proteinuria were determined at the 2-year exam. Results Baseline proteinuria of 1+ or greater was significantly associated with all-cause (hazard ratio (HR) 2.87; 95% C.I., 1.71 – 4.80) and CVD mortality (HR: 3.55; 95% C.I., 1.81–6.95) compared to no proteinuria, adjusted for age, gender, arsenic well water concentration, education, hypertension, BMI, smoking, and diabetes mellitus. Persistent 1+ proteinuria had a stronger risk of death, 3.49 (1.64 – 7.41)-fold greater, than no proteinuria. Incident 1+ proteinuria had a 1.87 (0.92 – 3.78)-fold greater mortality over 9–10 years. Remittent proteinuria revealed no increased mortality. Conclusions Baseline, persistent, and incident dipstick proteinuria were predictors of all-cause mortality with persistent proteinuria having the greatest risk. In developing countries, those with 1+ dipstick proteinuria, particularly if persistent, should be targeted for definitive diagnosis and treatment. The two most common causes of proteinuria to search for are diabetes mellitus and hypertension. PMID:26190365

  13. Short‐ and Long‐term Rehospitalization and Mortality for Heart Failure in 4 Racial/Ethnic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vivo, Rey P.; Krim, Selim R.; Liang, Li; Neely, Megan; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The degree to which outcomes following hospitalization for acute heart failure (HF) vary by racial and ethnic groups is poorly characterized. We sought to compare 30‐day and 1‐year rehospitalization and mortality rates for HF among 4 race/ethnic groups. Methods and Results Using the Get With The Guidelines–HF registry linked with Medicare data, we compared 30‐day and 1‐year outcomes between racial/ethnic groups by using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for clinical, hospital, and socioeconomic status characteristics. We analyzed 47 149 Medicare patients aged ≥65 years who had been discharged for HF between 2005 and 2011: there were 39 213 whites (83.2%), 4946 blacks (10.5%), 2347 Hispanics (5.0%), and 643 Asians/Pacific Islanders (1.4%). Relative to whites, blacks and Hispanics had higher 30‐day and 1‐year unadjusted readmission rates but lower 30‐day and 1‐year mortality; Asians had similar 30‐day readmission rates but lower 1‐year mortality. After risk adjustment, blacks had higher 30‐day and 1‐year CV readmission than whites but modestly lower short‐ and long‐term mortality; Hispanics had higher 30‐day and 1‐year readmission rates and similar 1‐year mortality than whites, while Asians had similar outcomes. When socioeconomic status data were added to the model, the majority of associations persisted, but the difference in 30‐day and 1‐year readmission rates between white and Hispanic patients became nonsignificant. Conclusions Among Medicare patients hospitalized with HF, short‐ and long‐term readmission rates and mortality differed among the 4 major racial/ethnic populations and persisted even after controlling for clinical, hospital, and socioeconomic status variables. PMID:25324354

  14. Delisting a Hazardous Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page discussed the hazardous waste delisting process. A hazardous waste delisting is a rulemaking procedure to amend the list of hazardous wastes to exclude a waste produced at a particular facility.

  15. Rest/activity rhythms and mortality rates in older men: MrOS Sleep Study.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Misti L; Taylor, Brent C; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Blackwell, Terri; Stone, Katie L; Tranah, Greg; Redline, Susan; Cummings, Steven R; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2010-01-01

    An association between increased risk of mortality and disruptions in rest/activity circadian rhythms (RAR) has been shown among adults with dementia and with metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the association among a more general population of older adults has not been studied. Our study population consisted of 2964 men aged > or = 67 yrs of age enrolled in the Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men (MrOS Sleep) Study. Rest/activity patterns were measured with wrist actigraphy. RAR parameters were computed and expressed as quintiles, and included acrophase (time of peak activity level), amplitude (peak-to-nadir difference), mesor (middle of the peak), pseudo F-value (overall circadian rhythmicity), beta (steepness), and alpha (peak-to-trough width). After adjustment for multiple potential confounders, men in the lowest quintile of pseudo F-value had a 57% higher mortality rate (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% CI, 1.03-2.39) than men in the highest quintile. This association was even stronger with increased risk of cardiovascular disease-related mortality (CVD) (HR = 2.32, 95% CI, 1.04-5.22). Additionally, men in the lowest quintile of acrophase had a 2.8-fold higher rate of CVD-related mortality (HR = 2.84, 95% CI, 1.29-6.24). There was no evidence of independent associations with amplitude, mesor, alpha, beta, and mortality risk. Older men with less robust RAR and earlier acrophase timing have modestly higher all-cause and CVD-related mortality rates. Further research should examine potential biological mechanisms underlying this association.

  16. The Predictive Role of Red Cell Distribution Width in Mortality among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Yang, Yu; Wen, Yao-Ko; Chiu, Ping-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that RDW independently predicts clinically important outcomes in many populations. However, the role of RDW has not been elucidated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We conducted the present study with the aim to evaluate the predictive value of RDW in CKD patients. Methods A retrospective observational cohort study of 1075 stage 3–5 CKD patients was conducted in a medical center. The patients’ baseline information included demographic data, laboratory values, medications, and comorbid conditions. The upper limit of normal RDW value (14.9%) was used to divide the whole population. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of mortality. Results Of the 1075 participants, 158 patients (14.7%) died over a mean follow-up of approximately 2.35 years. The crude mortality rate was significantly higher in the high RDW group (high RDW group, 22.4%; low RDW group 11%, p <0.001). From the adjusted model, the high RDW group was correlated with a hazard ratio of 2.19 for overall mortality as compared with the low RDW group (95% CI = 1.53–3.09, p<0.001). In addition, the high RDW group was also associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (HR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.14–4.25, p = 0.019) and infection (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.15–3.14, p = 0.012)) related mortality in comparison with the low RDW group. Conclusions In stage 3–5 CKD patients, RDW was associated with patient mortality of all-cause, cardiovascular disease and infection. RDW should be considered as a clinical predictor for mortality when providing healthcare to CKD patients. PMID:27906969

  17. Differential white blood cell count and all-cause mortality in the Korean elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Jaebong; Heo, Nam Ju; Kim, Sejoong; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Suhnggwon

    2013-02-01

    The circulating white blood cell (WBC) count has been considered a good biomarker of systemic inflammation, but the predictive value of this inexpensive and universally obtained test result has not been fully explored in the elderly. The objective of this study was to assess the independent association of WBC count and its individual components with mortality in an elderly population. We studied a total of 9996 participants (age ≥65 years) who underwent routine health examinations at the 2 healthcare centers affiliated with Seoul National University. Mortality data were obtained from the National Statistics Office of Korea. The mean age of the study population was 69.7 (SD 4.3) years, and 5491 of the subjects (54.9%) were male. The median length of follow-up was 44.9 months (range, 1.2-78.7 months). There were 118 deaths (1.2%) during the follow-up period. The leading cause of death was cancer. Compared with the survivors, the deceased subjects were older, predominantly male, had increased levels of inflammatory markers, and had poor nutritional status. A significant difference in mortality was identified among patients in different WBC and WBC subtype quartile groups. Cox proportional hazards analysis indicated that monocyte count (HR: 5.18, 95% CI: 2.44-11.02) was a strongest predictor of all-cause mortality than total WBC count (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.88-2.80), granulocyte count (HR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.15-3.88), and lymphocyte count (HR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.66-1.86), even after adjusting for possible confounding variables. Monocyte counts were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cancer-related mortality in the elderly population. In conclusion, the total WBC count is an independent predictor of mortality in older adults, but the monocyte subtype provides greater predictive ability.

  18. Kidney cancer mortality and ionizing radiation among French and German uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Ancelet, Sophie; Acker, Alain; Kreuzer, Michaela; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2014-08-01

    The investigation of potential adverse health effects of occupational exposures to ionizing radiation, on uranium miners, is an important area of research. Radon is a well-known carcinogen for lung, but the link between radiation exposure and other diseases remains controversial, particularly for kidney cancer. The aims of this study were therefore to perform external kidney cancer mortality analyses and to assess the relationship between occupational radiation exposure and kidney cancer mortality, using competing risks methodology, from two uranium miners cohorts. The French (n = 3,377) and German (n = 58,986) cohorts of uranium miners included 11 and 174 deaths from kidney cancer. For each cohort, the excess of kidney cancer mortality has been assessed by standardized mortality ratio (SMR) corrected for the probability of known causes of death. The associations between cumulative occupational radiation exposures (radon, external gamma radiation and long-lived radionuclides) or kidney equivalent doses and both the cause-specific hazard and the probability of occurrence of kidney cancer death have been estimated with Cox and Fine and Gray models adjusted to date of birth and considering the attained age as the timescale. No significant excess of kidney cancer mortality has been observed neither in the French cohort (SMR = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval [0.73; 2.67]) nor in the German cohort (SMR = 0.91 [0.77; 1.06]). Moreover, no significant association between kidney cancer mortality and any type of occupational radiation exposure or kidney equivalent dose has been observed. Future analyses based on further follow-up updates and/or large pooled cohorts should allow us to confirm or not the absence of association.

  19. Cohort study of all-cause mortality among tobacco users in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, P. C.; Mehta, H. C.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Overall mortality rates are higher among cigarette smokers than non-smokers. However, very little is known about the health effects of other forms of tobacco use widely prevalent in India, such as bidi smoking and various forms of smokeless tobacco (e.g. chewing betel-quid). We therefore carried out a cohort study in the city of Mumbai, India, to estimate the relative risks for all-cause mortality among various kinds of tobacco users. METHODS: A baseline survey of all individuals aged > or = 35 years using voters' lists as a selection frame was conducted using a house-to-house approach and face-to-face interviews. RESULTS: Active follow-up of 52,568 individuals in the cohort was undertaken 5-6 years after the baseline study, and 97.6% were traced. A total of 4358 deaths were recorded among these individuals. The annual age-adjusted mortality rates were 18.4 per 1000 for men and 12.4 per 1000 for women. For men the mortality rates for smokers were higher than those of non-users of tobacco across all age groups, with the difference being greater for lower age groups (35-54 years). The relative risk was 1.39 for cigarette smokers and 1.78 for bidi smokers, with an apparent dose-response relationship for frequency of smoking. Women were basically smokeless tobacco users, with the relative risk among such users being 1.35 and a suggestion of a dose-response relationship. DISCUSSION: These findings establish bidi smoking as no less hazardous than cigarette smoking and indicate that smokeless tobacco use may also cause higher mortality. Further studies should be carried out to obtain cause-specific mortality rates and relative risks. PMID:10994260

  20. Effects of Individual, Spousal, and Offspring Socioeconomic Status on Mortality Among Elderly People in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Martikainen, Pekka; Silventoinen, Karri

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between socio-economic status and health among elderly people has been well studied, but less is known about how spousal or offspring’s education affects mortality, especially in non-Western countries. We investigated these associations using a large sample of Chinese elderly. Methods The data came from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) from the years 2005 to 2011 (n = 15 355, aged 65–105 years at baseline; 5046 died in 2008, and 2224 died in 2011). Educational attainment, occupational status, and household income per capita were used as indicators of socio-economic status. Spousal and offspring’s education were added into the final models. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to study mortality risk by gender. Results Adjusted for age, highly educated males and females had, on average, 29% and 37% lower mortality risk, respectively, than those with a lower education. Particularly among men, this effect was observed among those whose children had intermediate education only. A higher household income was also associated with lower mortality risk among the elderly. Male elderly living with a well-educated spouse (HR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99) had a lower mortality risk than those living with a low-educated spouse. Conclusions Both the socio-economic status of the individual and the educational level of a co-resident spouse or child are associated with mortality risk in elderly people. The socio-economic position of family members plays an important role in producing health inequality among elderly people. PMID:27150012

  1. Salivary Immunoglobulin A Secretion Rate Is Negatively Associated with Cancer Mortality: The West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Douglas; Drayson, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are essential for combating infectious disease although very high levels can indicate underlying pathology. The present study examined associations between secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in saliva and mortality rates in the general population. Participants were 639 adults from the eldest cohort of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Study aged 63 years at the time of saliva sampling in 1995. From unstimulated 2-minute saliva samples, saliva volume and S-IgA concentration were measured, and S-IgA secretion rate determined as their product. Mortality data were tracked for 19 years. Cox proportional hazard models were applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality from sIgA secretion rate. Associations were adjusted for gender, assay batch, household occupational group, smoking, medication usage, and self-reported health. There was a negative association between log sIgA secretion rate and all-cause mortality, HR = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.73–0.91, p < .001. Further analysis of specific causes of mortality revealed that the all-cause association was due to an underlying association with cancer mortality and in particular with cancers other than lung cancer. The HR for non-lung cancer was 0.68 (95%CI = 0.54 to 0.85) implying a 32% reduction in mortality risk per standard deviation rise in log sIgA secretion rate. Effects were stronger for men than women. For deaths from respiratory diseases, sIgA secretion had a non-linear relationship with mortality risk whereby only the very lowest levels of secretion were associated with elevated risk. SIgA concentration revealed a similar but weaker pattern of association. In the present study, higher secretion rates of sIgA were associated with a decreased risk of death from cancer, specifically non-lung cancer, as well as from respiratory disease. Thus, it appears that sIgA plays a protective role among older adults, and could serve as a marker of mortality risk, specifically cancer mortality. PMID:26699127

  2. Flavonoid intake and cardiovascular disease mortality in a prospective cohort of US adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julia J; Patel, Roshni; Jacques, Paul F; Shah, Roma; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids are plant-based phytochemicals with cardiovascular protective properties. Few studies have comprehensively examined flavonoid classes in relation to cardiovascular disease mortality. Objective: We examined the association between flavonoid intake and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality among participants in a large, prospective US cohort. Design: In 1999, a total of 38,180 men and 60,289 women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with a mean age of 70 and 69 y, respectively, completed questionnaires on medical history and lifestyle behaviors, including a 152-item food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate multivariate-adjusted hazard RRs and 95% CIs for associations between total flavonoids, 7 flavonoid classes, and CVD mortality. Results: During 7 y of follow-up, 1589 CVD deaths in men and 1182 CVD deaths in women occurred. Men and women with total flavonoid intakes in the top (compared with the bottom) quintile had a lower risk of fatal CVD (RR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.92; P-trend = 0.01). Five flavonoid classes—anthocyanidins, flavan-3-ols, flavones, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins—were individually associated with lower risk of fatal CVD (all P-trend < 0.05). In men, total flavonoid intakes were more strongly associated with stroke mortality (RR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.89; P-trend = 0.04) than with ischemic heart disease (RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.13). Many associations appeared to be nonlinear, with lower risk at intakes above the referent category. Conclusions: Flavonoid consumption was associated with lower risk of death from CVD. Most inverse associations appeared with intermediate intakes, suggesting that even relatively small amounts of flavonoid-rich foods may be beneficial. PMID:22218162

  3. Risk of mortality during four years after substance detoxification in urban adults.

    PubMed

    Saitz, Richard; Gaeta, Jessie; Cheng, Debbie M; Richardson, Jessica M; Larson, Mary Jo; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this analysis was to assess the mortality rate and risk factors in adults, with substance dependence, who are not receiving primary medical care (PC). Date and cause of death were identified using the National Death Index data and death certificates for 470 adults without PC over a period of almost 4 years after detailed clinical assessment after detoxification. Factors associated with risk of mortality were determined using stepwise Cox proportional hazards models. Subjects were 76% male, 47% homeless, and 47% with chronic medical illness; 40% reported alcohol, 27% heroin, and 33% cocaine as substance of choice. Median age was 35. During a period of up to 4 years, 27 (6%) subjects died. Median age at death was 39. Causes included: poisoning by any substance (40.9% of deaths), trauma (13%), cardiovascular disease (13.6%), and exposure to cold (9.1%). The age adjusted mortality rate was 4.4 times that of the general population in the same city. Among these individuals without PC in a detoxification unit, risk factors associated with death were the following: drug of choice [heroin: hazard ratio (HR) 6.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-31.1]; alcohol: HR 3.7 (95% CI 0.79-16.9) compared to cocaine); past suicide attempt (HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.96-4.5); persistent homelessness (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.3); and history of any chronic medical illness (HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.93-4.7). Receipt of primary care was not significantly associated with death (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.34-2.1). Risk of mortality is high in patients with addictions and risk factors identifiable when these patients seek help from the health care system (i.e., for detoxification) may help identify those at highest risk for whom interventions could be targeted.

  4. Seismic hazard in the Intermountain West

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haller, Kathleen; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mueller, Charles; Rezaeian, Sanaz; Petersen, Mark D.; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 national seismic-hazard model for the conterminous United States incorporates new scientific results and important model adjustments. The current model includes updates to the historical catalog, which is spatially smoothed using both fixed-length and adaptive-length smoothing kernels. Fault-source characterization improved by adding faults, revising rates of activity, and incorporating new results from combined inversions of geologic and geodetic data. The update also includes a new suite of published ground motion models. Changes in probabilistic ground motion are generally less than 10% in most of the Intermountain West compared to the prior assessment, and ground-motion hazard in four Intermountain West cities illustrates the range and magnitude of change in the region. Seismic hazard at reference sites in Boise and Reno increased as much as 10%, whereas hazard in Salt Lake City decreased 5–6%. The largest change was in Las Vegas, where hazard increased 32–35%.

  5. Frequency of nut consumption and mortality risk in the PREDIMED nutrition intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies in non-Mediterranean populations have consistently related increasing nut consumption to lower coronary heart disease mortality. A small protective effect on all-cause and cancer mortality has also been suggested. To examine the association between frequency of nut consumption and mortality in individuals at high cardiovascular risk from Spain, a Mediterranean country with a relatively high average nut intake per person. Methods We evaluated 7,216 men and women aged 55 to 80 years randomized to 1 of 3 interventions (Mediterranean diets supplemented with nuts or olive oil and control diet) in the PREDIMED (‘PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea’) study. Nut consumption was assessed at baseline and mortality was ascertained by medical records and linkage to the National Death Index. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression and multivariable analyses with generalized estimating equation models were used to assess the association between yearly repeated measurements of nut consumption and mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 323 total deaths, 81 cardiovascular deaths and 130 cancer deaths occurred. Nut consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of all-cause mortality (P for trend <0.05, all). Compared to non-consumers, subjects consuming nuts >3 servings/week (32% of the cohort) had a 39% lower mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.61; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.83). A similar protective effect against cardiovascular and cancer mortality was observed. Participants allocated to the Mediterranean diet with nuts group who consumed nuts >3 servings/week at baseline had the lowest total mortality risk (HR 0.37; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.66). Conclusions Increased frequency of nut consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Please see related commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/165. Trial registration Clinicaltrials

  6. Sickness absence as a prognostic marker for common chronic conditions: analysis of mortality in the GAZEL study

    PubMed Central

    Kivimaki, Mika; Head, Jenny; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Westerlund, Hugo; Vahtera, Jussi; Leclerc, Annette; Melchior, Maria; Chevalier, Anne; Alexanderson, Kristina; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether sickness absence is a prognostic marker in terms of mortality among people with common chronic conditions. Methods Prospective occupational cohort study of 13 077 men and 4871 women aged 37 to 51 from the National Gas and Electricity Company, France. Records of physician-certified sickness absences over a 3-year period were obtained from employers’ registers. Chronic conditions were assessed in annual surveys over the same period. The main outcome measure was all-cause mortality (803 deaths, mean follow-up after assessment of sickness absence, 13.9 years) Results In Cox proportional-hazard models adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position and co-morbidity, >28 annual sickness absence days vs no absence days was associated with an excess mortality risk among those with cancer (hazard ratio 5.4, 95% CI 2.2 to 13.1), depression (1.7, 1.1 to 2.8), chronic bronchitis/asthma (2.7, 1.6 to 4.6), and hypertension (1.6, 1.0 to 2.6). The corresponding hazard ratios for more than 5 long (>14 days) sickness absence episodes per 10 person-years vs no such episodes were 5.4 (2.2 to 13.1), 1.8 (1.3 to 2.7), 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) and 1.8 (1.2 to 2.7), respectively. Areas under receiver-operating-characteristics curves for these absence measures varied between 0.56 and 0.73 indicating the potential of these measures to distinguish groups at high risk of mortality. The findings were consistent across sex, age and socioeconomic groups and in those with and without co-morbid conditions. Conclusion Data on sickness absence may provide useful prognostic information for common chronic conditions at the population level. PMID:18611969

  7. Association between engagement in-care and mortality in HIV-positive persons

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Caroline A.; Howarth, Alison; Jose, Sophie; Hill, Teresa; Apea, Vanessa; Morris, Steve; Burns, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess associations between engagement in-care and future mortality. Design: UK-based observational cohort study. Methods: HIV-positive participants with more than one visit after 1 January 2000 were identified. Each person-month was classified as being in or out-of-care based on the dates of the expected and observed next care visits. Cox models investigated associations between mortality and the cumulative proportion of months spent in-care (% IC, lagged by 1 year), and cumulative %IC prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in those attending clinic for more than 1 year, with adjustment for age, CD4+/viral load, year, sex, infection mode, ethnicity, and receipt/type of ART. Results: The 44 432 individuals (27.8% women; 50.5% homosexual, 28.9% black African; median age 36 years) were followed for a median of 5.5 years, over which time 2279 (5.1%) people died. Higher %IC was associated with lower mortality both before [relative hazard 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.88–0.95)/10% higher, P = 0.0001] and after [0.90 (0.87–0.93), P = 0.0001] adjustment. Adjustment for future CD4+ changes revealed that the association was explained by poorer CD4+ cell counts in those with lower %IC. In total 8730 participants under follow-up for more than 1 year initiated ART of whom 237 (2.7%) died. Higher values of %IC prior to ART initiation were associated with a reduced risk of mortality before [0.29 (0.17–0.47)/10%, P = 0.0001] and after [0.36 (0.21–0.61)/10%, P = 0.0002] adjustment; the association was again explained by poorer post-ART CD4+/ viral load in those with lower pre-ART %IC. Conclusions: Higher levels of engagement in-care are associated with reduced mortality at all stages of infection, including in those who initiate ART. PMID:28060018

  8. Association of Body Mass Index and Body Mass Index Change with Mortality in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liping; Cao, Shirong; Xu, Fenghua; Zhou, Qian; Fan, Li; Xu, Qingdong; Yu, Xueqing; Mao, Haiping

    2015-01-01

    Although high body mass index (BMI) appears to confer a survival advantage in hemodialysis patients, the association of BMI with mortality in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients is uncertain. We enrolled incident CAPD patients and BMI was categorized according to World Health Organization classification for Asian population. BMI at baseline and one year after the initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment was assessed to calculate the BMI change (∆BMI). Patients were split into four categories according quartiles of ∆BMI. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression proportional hazard analysis were performed to assess the association of BMI on outcomes. A total of 1263 CAPD patients were included, with a mean age of 47.8 ± 15.0 years, a mean BMI of 21.58 ± 3.13 kg/m2. During a median follow-up of 25.3 months, obesity was associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) death (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 2.01; 95% CI 1.14, 3.54), but not all-cause mortality. Additionally, patients with more BMI decline (>0.80%) during the first year after CAPD initiation had an elevated risk for both all-cause (AHR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.23–3.95) and CVD mortality (AHR 2.31, 95% CI 1.11, 4.84), which was independent of baseline BMI values. PMID:26473916

  9. Glycated Hemoglobin Level and Mortality in a Nondiabetic Population with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Marie; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Benedicte; Thervet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose diabetes mellitus (DM) and guide its management. The association between higher HbA1c and progression to ESRD and mortality has been demonstrated in populations with DM. This study examined the association between HbA1c and these end points in a population with CKD and without DM. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In the hospital-based NephroTest cohort study, measured GFR (mGFR) was taken by 51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and HbA1c in 1165 adults with nondialysis CKD stages 1–5 and without DM between January 2000 and December 2010. The median follow-up was 3.48 years (interquartile range, 1.94–5.82) for the competing events of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality. Time-fixed and time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for ESRD and mortality according to HbA1c, treated continuously or in tertiles. Results At inclusion, the mean mGFR was 42.2±19.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean HbA1c value was 5.5%±0.5%. During follow-up, 109 patients died, and 162 patients reached ESRD. Pre-ESRD mortality was significantly associated with HbA1c treated continuously: for every 1% higher HbA1c, the crude HR was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.27 to 3.68), and it was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 3.24) after adjustment for mGFR and other risk factors of death. After excluding incident diabetes over time, the updated mean of HbA1c remained significantly associated with higher mortality risk: adjusted HR for the highest (5.7%–6.4%) versus the lowest tertile (<5.3%) was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.16 to 5.91). There was no association with ESRD risk after adjustment for risk factors of CKD progression. Conclusions In a CKD cohort, HbA1c values in the prediabetes range are associated with mortality. Such values should be therefore included among the risk factors for negative outcomes in CKD populations. PMID:25979978

  10. Sarcopenia predicts readmission and mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Haozhong; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Birong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate the associations between sarcopenia and long‐term mortality and readmission in a population of elderly inpatients in acute care wards. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study in the acute care wards of a teaching hospital in western China. The muscle mass was estimated according to a previously validated anthropometric equation. Handgrip strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer, and physical performance was measured via a 4 m walking test. Sarcopenia was defined according to the recommended diagnostic algorithm of the Asia Working Group for Sarcopenia. The survival status and readmission information were obtained via telephone interviews at 12, 24, and 36 months during the 3 year follow‐up period following the baseline investigation. Results Two hundred and eighty‐eight participants (mean age: 81.1 ± 6.6 years) were included. Forty‐nine participants (17.0%) were identified as having sarcopenia. This condition was similar in men and women (16.9% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P = 0.915). During the 3 year follow‐up period, 49 men (22.7%) and 9 women (16.4%) died (P = 0.307). The mortality of sarcopenic participants was significantly increased compared with non‐sarcopenic participants (40.8% vs. 17.1%, respectively, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and other confounders, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of 3 year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.49; 95% confidential interval: 1.25–4.95) and readmission (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.81; 95% confidential interval: 1.17–2.80). Conclusions Sarcopenia, which is evaluated by a combination of anthropometric measures, gait speed, and handgrip strength, is valuable to predict hospital readmission and long‐term mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards. PMID:27896949

  11. Filtration Markers, Cardiovascular Disease, Mortality, and Kidney Outcomes in Stable Kidney Transplant Recipients: The FAVORIT Trial.

    PubMed

    Foster, M C; Weiner, D E; Bostom, A G; Carpenter, M A; Inker, L A; Jarolim, P; Joseph, A A; Kusek, J W; Pesavento, T; Pfeffer, M A; Rao, M; Solomon, S D; Levey, A S

    2017-03-03

    Cystatin C and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) are filtration markers associated with adverse outcomes in non-transplant populations, sometimes with stronger associations than for creatinine. We evaluated associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate from cystatin C (eGFRcys ), B2M (eGFRB2M ), and creatinine (eGFRcr ) with cardiovascular outcomes, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients using a case-cohort study nested within the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial. A random subcohort was selected (N=508; mean age 51.6 years, median transplant vintage 4 years, 38% women, 23.6% non-white race) with enrichment for cardiovascular events (N=306; 54 within the subcohort), mortality (N=208; 68 within the subcohort), and kidney failure (N=208; 52 within the subcohort). Mean eGFRcr , eGFRcys , and eGFRB2M were 46.0, 43.8, and 48.8 mL/min/1.73m(2), respectively. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios for eGFRcys and eGFRB2M <30 vs. 60+ were 2.02 (95% CI 1.09-3.76; p=0.03) and 2.56 (1.35-4.88; p=0.004) for cardiovascular events; 3.92 (2.11-7.31) and 4.09 (2.21-7.54; both p<0.001) for mortality; and 9.49 (4.28-21.00) and 15.53 (6.99-34.51; both p<0.001) for kidney failure. Associations persisted with additional adjustment for baseline eGFRcr . We conclude that cystatin C and B2M are strongly associated with cardiovascular events, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations of dietary magnesium intake with mortality from cardiovascular disease: the JACC study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Iso, Hiroyasu; Ohira, Tetsuya; Date, Chigusa; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2012-04-01

    The authors sought to investigate the relationship between dietary magnesium intake and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a population-based sample of Asian adults. Reported findings are based on dietary magnesium intake in 58,615 healthy Japanese aged 40-79 years, in the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study. Dietary magnesium intake was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire administered between 1988 and 1990. During the median 14.7-year follow-up, we documented 2690 deaths from cardiovascular disease, comprising 1227 deaths from strokes and 557 deaths from coronary heart disease. Dietary magnesium intake was inversely associated with mortality from hemorrhagic stroke in men and with mortality from total and ischemic strokes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and total cardiovascular disease in women. The multivariable hazard ratio (95% CI) for the highest vs. the lowest quintiles of magnesium intake after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factor and sodium intake was 0.49 (0.26-0.95), P for trend = 0.074 for hemorrhagic stroke in men, 0.68 (0.48-0.96), P for trend = 0.010 for total stroke, 0.47 (0.29-0.77), P for trend < 0.001 for ischemic stroke, 0.50 (0.30-0.84), P for trend = 0.005 for coronary heart disease, 0.50 (0.28-0.87), P for trend = 0.002 for heart failure and 0.64 (0.51-0.80), P for trend < 0.001 for total cardiovascular disease in women. The adjustment for calcium and potassium intakes attenuated these associations. In conclusion, dietary magnesium intake was associated with reduced mortality from cardiovascular disease in Japanese, especially for women.

  13. Frailty, Inflammation, and Mortality Among Persons Aging With HIV Infection and Injection Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Varadhan, Ravi; Mehta, Shruti H.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Huifen; Walston, Jeremy D.; Leng, Sean X.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Serum markers of inflammation increase with age and have been strongly associated with adverse clinical outcomes among both HIV-infected and uninfected adults. Yet, limited data exist on the predictive and clinical utility of aggregate measures of inflammation. This study sought to evaluate the relationship of a recently validated aggregate inflammatory index with frailty and mortality among aging HIV-infected and uninfected injection drug users. Methods. Frailty was assessed among HIV-infected and uninfected participants in the AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience (ALIVE) cohort study using the five Fried phenotypic criteria: weight loss, exhaustion, low physical activity, decreased grip strength, and slow gait. The aggregate inflammatory index was constructed from serum measures of interleukin-6 and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-1. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship of frailty with inflammation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate risk for all-cause mortality. Results. Among 1,326 subjects, the median age was 48 years and 29% were HIV-infected. Adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, and HIV status, frailty was significantly associated with each standard deviation increase in log interleukin-6 (odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI, 1.09–1.61), log tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-1 (odds ratio 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04–1.51) and inflammatory index score (odds ratio 1.39; 95% CI, 1.14–1.68). Adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, HIV status, and frailty, the inflammatory index score was independently associated with increased mortality (HR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.44–1.89). Conclusion. A recently validated, simple, biologically informed inflammatory index is independently associated with frailty and mortality risk among aging HIV-infected and uninfected injection drug users. PMID:26386010

  14. Malignant mesothelioma mortality in the United States, 1999-2001.

    PubMed

    Bang, Ki Moon; Pinheiro, Germania A; Wood, John M; Syamlal, Girija

    2006-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is strongly associated with asbestos exposure. This paper describes demographic, geographic, and occupational distributions of mesothelioma mortality in the United States, 1999-2001. The data (n = 7,524) were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics multiple-cause-of-death records. Mortality rates (per million per year) were age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population, and proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) were calculated by occupation and industry, and adjusted for age, sex, and race. The overall age-adjusted mortality rate was 11.52, with males (22.34) showing a sixfold higher rate than females (3.94). Geographic distribution of mesothelioma mortality is predominantly coastal. Occupations with significantly elevated PMRs included plumbers/pipefitters and mechanical engineers. Industries with significantly elevated PMRs included ship and boat building and repairing, and industrial and miscellaneous chemicals. These surveillance findings can be useful in generating hypotheses and developing strategies to prevent mesothelioma.

  15. All-cause cancer mortality over 15 years in multi-ethnic Mauritius: the impact of diabetes and intermediate forms of glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jessica L; Soderberg, Stefan; Shaw, Jonathan E; Zimmet, Paul Z; Pauvaday, Vassen; Kowlessur, Sudhir; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Alberti, K George M M; J Magliano, Dianna

    2012-11-15

    There are accumulating data describing the association between diabetes and cancer mortality from Westernised populations. There are no data describing the relationship between diabetes and cancer mortality in African or South Asian populations from developing countries. We explored the relationship of abnormal glucose tolerance and diabetes on cancer mortality risk in a large, multi-ethnic cohort from the developing nation of Mauritius. Population-based surveys were undertaken in 1987, 1992 and 1998. The 9559 participants comprised 66% of South Asian (Indian), 27% of African (Creole), and 7% of Chinese descent. Cox's proportional hazards model with time varying covariates was used to obtain hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for risk of cancer mortality, after adjustment for confounding factors. In men, but not women, cancer mortality risk increased with rising 2h-PG levels with HR for the top versus bottom quintile of 2.77 (95%CI: 1.28 to 5.98). South Asian men with known diabetes had a significantly greater risk of cancer mortality than those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) HR: 2.74 (95%CI: 1.00-7.56). Overall, impaired glucose tolerance was associated with an elevated risk of cancer mortality compared to NGT (HR: 1.47, 95% CI: 0.98-2.19), though this was not significant. We have shown that the association between abnormal glucose tolerance and cancer extends to those of African and South Asian descent. These results highlight the importance of understanding this relationship in a global context to direct future health policy given the rapid increase in type 2 diabetes, especially in developing nations.

  16. Association between the markers of metabolic acid load and higher all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a general population with preserved renal function.

    PubMed

    Park, Minseon; Jung, Sung Jae; Yoon, Seoyoung; Yun, Jae Moon; Yoon, Hyung-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Although metabolic acid load has been associated with many well-known risk factors for mortality, its clinical implications are not yet clear. To evaluate the association between biomarkers of metabolic acid load, such as serum bicarbonate, serum anion gap and urine pH and mortality, we analyzed the health records of 31,590 adults who underwent a health screening between January 2001 and December 2010 and had an estimated glomerular filtration rate ⩾60 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m2. Urine pH was measured by a dipstick test performed on fast morning urine sample and categorized as acidic (urine pH ⩽5.5), neutral and alkaline (urine pH ⩾8.0). Using the Cox proportional hazard model, the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of all-cause mortality of the lowest quartile of serum bicarbonate was 1.460 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.068-1.995) compared with the highest quartile, after a median follow-up of 93 months. The aHRs of cardiovascular and cancer mortality of the lowest quartile of serum bicarbonate were 2.647 (95% CI 1.148-6.103) and 1.604 (95% CI 1.024-2.513), respectively, compared with the highest quartile. Acidic and neutral urine pH were significantly associated with a higher all-cause mortality (aHR 2.550, 95% CI 1.316-4.935; aHR 2.376 95% CI 1.254-4.501, respectively), compared with an alkaline urine pH. In conclusion, higher metabolic acid load was associated with an increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a healthy population. The association between metabolic acid load and mortality and the causality of the relationship need to be confirmed.

  17. Lower Education Level Is a Risk Factor for Peritonitis and Technique Failure but Not a Risk for Overall Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis under Comprehensive Training System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Joongyub; Park, Miseon; Kim, Yuri; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Cho, Eun Jin; Ahn, Curie

    2017-01-01

    Background Lower education level could be a risk factor for higher peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis, potentially resulting in technique failure. This study evaluated the influence of lower education level on the development of peritonitis, technique failure, and overall mortality. Methods Patients over 18 years of age who started PD at Seoul National University Hospital between 2000 and 2012 with information on the academic background were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups: middle school or lower (academic year≤9, n = 102), high school (912, n = 324). Outcomes were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models and competing risk regression. Results A total of 655 incident PD patients (60.9% male, age 48.4±14.1 years) were analyzed. During follow-up for 41 (interquartile range, 20–65) months, 255 patients (38.9%) experienced more than one episode of peritonitis, 138 patients (21.1%) underwent technique failure, and 78 patients (11.9%) died. After adjustment, middle school or lower education group was an independent risk factor for peritonitis (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–2.36; P = 0.015) and technique failure (adjusted HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.10–3.18; P = 0.038), compared with higher than high school education group. However, lower education was not associated with increased mortality either by as-treated (adjusted HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.53–2.33; P = 0.788) or intent-to-treat analysis (P = 0.726). Conclusions Although lower education was a significant risk factor for peritonitis and technique failure, it was not associated with increased mortality in PD patients. Comprehensive training and multidisciplinary education may overcome the lower education level in PD. PMID:28056058

  18. The impact on cardiac diagnosis and mortality of focused transthoracic echocardiography in hip fracture surgery patients with increased risk of cardiac disease: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Royse, C F; Kilpatrick, D; Bowyer, A; Royse, A G

    2012-11-01

    Hip fracture surgery is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity; heart disease is the leading cause and is often unrecognised and inadequately treated. Pre-operative focused transthoracic echocardiography by anaesthetists frequently influences management, but mortality outcome studies have not been performed to date. Mortality over the 12 months after hip fracture surgery, in 64 patients at risk of cardiac disease who received pre-operative echocardiography, was compared with 66 randomised historical controls who did not receive echocardiography. Mortality was lower in the group that received echocardiography over the 30 days (4.7% vs 15.2%, log rank p=0.047) and 12 months after surgery (17.1% vs 33.3%, log rank p=0.031). Hazard of death was also reduced with pre-operative echocardiography over 12 months after adjustment for known risk factors (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.2-0.85, p=0.016). Pre-operative echocardiography was not associated with a delay in surgery. These data support a randomised controlled trial to confirm these findings.

  19. Mortality table construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  20. Central adiposity, obesity during early adulthood, and pancreatic cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Genkinger, J. M.; Kitahara, C. M.; Bernstein, L.; Berrington de Gonzalez, A.; Brotzman, M.; Elena, J. W.; Giles, G. G.; Hartge, P.; Singh, P. N.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R. Z.; Weiderpass, E.; Adami, H.-O.; Anderson, K. E.; Beane-Freeman, L. E.; Buring, J. E.; Fraser, G. E.; Fuchs, C. S.; Gapstur, S. M.; Gaziano, J. M.; Helzlsouer, K. J.; Lacey, J. V.; Linet, M. S.; Liu, J. J.; Park, Y.; Peters, U.; Purdue, M. P.; Robien, K.; Schairer, C.; Sesso, H. D.; Visvanathan, K.; White, E.; Wolk, A.; Wolpin, B. M.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Jacobs, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity typically assessed in middle age or later, is known to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer. However, little evidence exists regarding the influence of central adiposity, a high BMI during early adulthood, and weight gain after early adulthood on pancreatic cancer risk. Design We conducted a pooled analysis of individual-level data from 20 prospective cohort studies in the National Cancer Institute BMI and Mortality Cohort Consortium to examine the association of pancreatic cancer mortality with measures of central adiposity (e.g. waist circumference; n = 647 478; 1947 pancreatic cancer deaths), BMI during early adulthood (ages 18–21 years) and BMI change between early adulthood and cohort enrollment, mostly in middle age or later (n = 1 096 492; 3223 pancreatic cancer deaths). Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results Higher waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02–1.17 per 0.1 increment) and waist circumference (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00–1.14 per 10 cm) were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, even when adjusted for BMI at baseline. BMI during early adulthood was associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11–1.25 per 5 kg/m2), with increased risk observed in both overweight and obese individuals (compared with BMI of 21.0 to <23 kg/m2, HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.20–1.55 for BMI 25.0 < 27.5 kg/m2, HR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.20–1.84 for BMI 27.5 to <30 kg/m2, HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.11–1.85 for BMI ≥30 kg/m2). BMI gain after early adulthood, adjusted for early adult BMI, was less strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.01–1.10 per 5 kg/m2). Conclusions Our results support an association between pancreatic cancer mortality and central obesity, independent of BMI, and also suggest that being overweight or obese

  1. The Relationship of Diabetes and Smoking Status to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Hsieh; Lu, Chia-Wen; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Hung, Shou-Hung; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-02-01

    The relationship of diabetes and smoking status to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mortality is not clear. We aimed to investigate the association of smoking cessation relative to diabetes status with subsequent deaths from HCC.We followed up 51,164 participants (aged 44-94 years) without chronic hepatitis B or C from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2008 enrolled from nationwide health screening units in a prospective cohort study. The primary outcomes were deaths from HCC.During the study period, there were 253 deaths from HCC. History of diabetes was associated with deaths from HCC for both total participants (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.08-4.23) and ever smokers with current or past smoking habits (HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.10-3.34). Both never smokers (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32-0.65) and quitters (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.97) had a lower adjusted risk of HCC deaths compared with current smokers. Among all ever smokers with current or past smoking habits, as compared with diabetic smokers, only quitters without diabetes had a lower adjusted risk of HCC deaths (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.78). However, quitters with diabetes were observed to have a similar risk of deaths from HCC when compared with smokers with diabetes. Regarding the interaction between diabetes and smoking status on adjusted HCC-related deaths, with the exception of quitters without history of diabetes, all groups had significantly higher HRs than nondiabetic never smokers. There was also a significant multiplicative interaction between diabetes and smoking status on risk of dying from HCC (P = 0.033). We suggest clinicians should promote diabetes prevention and never smoking to associate with reduced subsequent HCC mortality even in adults without chronic viral hepatitis.

  2. Impact of metabolic disturbances and malnutrition-inflammation on 6-year mortality in Japanese patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Matsuki, Motoki; Yao, Naoyuki; Hirayama, Tomoya; Ishida, Hironori; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome confers an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population. The relationship between adiponectins, and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing hemodialysis remains controversial. We investigated whether adiponectins, biomarkers of inflammation, nutrition status and clinical features predict the mortality of patients undergoing hemodialysis for 6 years. We measured baseline plasma total and high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectins, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and clinical characteristics including visceral fat area (VFA) and the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) in 133 patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Forty-one of the 133 patients died during follow-up. The deceased patients were significantly older, had more prior CVD and diabetes, higher TNF-α and hsCRP levels but lower GNRI. VFA, and total and HMW adiponectin did not significantly differ between the two groups. TNF-α and hsCRP levels and GNRI score were significant for predicting all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in receiver operating curve analyses. When stratified by a GNRI score of 96, Cox proportional hazards analyses identified TNF-α as a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23; P = 0.038) and hsCRP as a significant predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (HR, 2.32, P = 0.003; HR 2.30, P = 0.012, respectively) after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes mellitus, and prior CVD, only in malnourished patients. These results demonstrate that malnutrition and the inflammatory markers TNF-α and hsCRP, but not metabolic markers, including VFA and adiponectins have a significant impact on 6-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Japanese patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  3. Elevation in systolic blood pressure during heart failure hospitalization is associated with increased short and long-term mortality

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP) change during hospitalization of patients with heart failure (HF) and clinical outcomes has never been thoroughly investigated. A total of 3393 patients hospitalized with HF, from 25 hospitals in Israel, were enrolled. The SBP change was calculated by subtracting the discharge SBP values from the admission values and then divided into quartiles of SBP change. We compared the group with upper quartile SBP change to the lower 3 quartiles of change. Both groups had largely similar demographics and clinical characteristics. All-cause mortality rate was 24% at 1-year and 82.6% at 10-years, whereas patients in the upper SBP change group had significantly higher cumulative mortality probability at 1-year (30% vs 22%; log-rank P <0.001), and at 10-years (86% vs 82%; log-rank P <0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusted for comorbidities demonstrated that patients in the upper SBP change quartile have an independent 17% higher mortality risk at 10-years [hazard ratio (HR) 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.28]. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality risk was more pronounced in patients with preserved ejection fraction and in the subgroup with admission SBP ≥140 mm Hg. SBP change is significantly associated with 1- and 10-year all-cause mortality, as an increased SBP change is associated with worse prognosis. We believe that this readily available marker might facilitate risk stratification of patients and possibly improve care. PMID:28151864

  4. Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension and risk for stroke, coronary heart disease, and all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Irvin, Marguerite R; Booth, John N; Shimbo, Daichi; Lackland, Daniel T; Oparil, Suzanne; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M; Muntner, Paul; Calhoun, David A

    2014-06-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as uncontrolled hypertension despite the use of three or more antihypertensive medication classes or controlled hypertension while treated with four or more antihypertensive medication classes. We evaluated the association of aTRH with incident stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and all-cause mortality. Participants from the population-based REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study treated for hypertension with aTRH (n = 2043) and without aTRH (n = 12,479) were included. aTRH was further categorized as controlled aTRH (≥4 medication classes and controlled hypertension) and uncontrolled aTRH (≥3 medication classes and uncontrolled hypertension). Over a median of 5.9, 4.4, and 6.0 years of follow-up, the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for stroke, CHD, and all-cause mortality associated with aTRH versus no aTRH was 1.25 (0.94-1.65), 1.69 (1.27-2.24), and 1.29 (1.14-1.46), respectively. Compared with controlled aTRH, uncontrolled aTRH was associated with CHD (hazard ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-4.48), but not stroke or mortality. Comparing controlled aTRH with no aTRH, risk of stroke, CHD, and all-cause mortality was not elevated. aTRH was associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality.

  5. Predictors, including blood, urine, anthropometry, and nutritional indices, of all-cause mortality among institutionalized individuals with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Ohwada, Hiroko; Nakayama, Takeo; Tomono, Yuji; Yamanaka, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    As the life expectancy of people with intellectual disability (ID) increases, it is becoming necessary to understand factors affecting survival. However, predictors that are typically assessed among healthy people have not been examined. Predictors of all-cause mortality, including blood, urine, anthropometry, and nutritional indices, were examined among institutionalized people with ID. This retrospective cohort study involved 316 participants (191 males, 125 females; mean age, 36.5 ± 10.5 years) at a public facility for people with ID in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. During the follow-up from the examination day in 1984-1992 through December 31, 2007 (mean follow-up, 18.6 years), 44 deaths occurred. Mean age at death was 47.1 ± 10.0 years (range, 22.3-65.3 years). Early deaths within three years (n = 4) were treated as censored cases. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of all-cause mortality. Sex- and age-adjusted analysis (p<0.15) revealed positive associations with mortality for high serum cholesterol, high thymol turbidity test (TTT), and glucosuria and negative associations with mortality for high serum albumin, high uric acid, high potassium, high calcium, and high systolic blood pressure. Multivariate analysis revealed that male sex (HR, 4.11; 95% CI, 1.59-10.59), high serum cholesterol (1.01; 1.00-1.02), high serum TTT (1.21; 1.03-1.41), and epilepsy significantly increased the mortality risk. The results indicate that the predictors of life expectancy for people with ID included both factors that are shared with healthy people (male sex, high serum cholesterol) and factors specific to people with disabilities (high serum TTT and epilepsy).

  6. Relation of digoxin use in atrial fibrillation and the risk of all-cause mortality in patients ≥65 years of age with versus without heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mitesh; Avgil Tsadok, Meytal; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Essebag, Vidal; Behlouli, Hassan; Pilote, Louise

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies on digoxin use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and the risk of all-cause mortality found conflicting results. We conducted a population-based, retrospective, cohort study of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to a hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of AF, in Quebec province, Canada, from 1998 to 2012. The AF cohort was grouped into patients with and without heart failure (HF) and into digoxin and no-digoxin users according to the first prescription filled for digoxin within 30 days after AF hospital discharge. We derived propensity score-matched digoxin and no-digoxin treatment groups for the groups of patients with and without HF, respectively, and conducted multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to determine association between digoxin use and all-cause mortality. The AF propensity score-matched cohorts of patients with and without HF were well balanced on baseline characteristics. In the propensity score-matched HF group, digoxin use was associated with a 14% greater risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.17). In the propensity score-matched no-HF group, digoxin use was associated with a 17% greater risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.19). In conclusion, our retrospective analyses found that digoxin use was associated with a greater risk for all-cause mortality in patients aged ≥65 years with AF regardless of concomitant HF. Large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials or prospective cohort studies are required to clarify this issue.

  7. Ambient Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure and Mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, George D.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Cromar, Kevin R.; Shao, Yongzhao; Reynolds, Harmony R.; Jerrett, Michael; Lim, Chris C.; Shanley, Ryan; Park, Yikyung; Hayes, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Outdoor fine particulate matter (≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) has been identified as a global health threat, but the number of large U.S. prospective cohort studies with individual participant data remains limited, especially at lower recent exposures. Objectives: We aimed to test the relationship between long-term exposure PM2.5 and death risk from all nonaccidental causes, cardiovascular (CVD), and respiratory diseases in 517,041 men and women enrolled in the National Institutes of Health-AARP cohort. Methods: Individual participant data were linked with residence PM2.5 exposure estimates across the continental United States for a 2000–2009 follow-up period when matching census tract–level PM2.5 exposure data were available. Participants enrolled ranged from 50 to 71 years of age, residing in six U.S. states and two cities. Cox proportional hazard models yielded hazard ratio (HR) estimates per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5 exposure. Results: PM2.5 exposure was significantly associated with total mortality (HR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.05) and CVD mortality (HR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.15), but the association with respiratory mortality was not statistically significant (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.13). A significant association was found with respiratory mortality only among never smokers (HR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.56). Associations with 10-μg/m3 PM2.5 exposures in yearly participant residential annual mean, or in metropolitan area-wide mean, were consistent with baseline exposure model results. Associations with PM2.5 were similar when adjusted for ozone exposures. Analyses of California residents alone also yielded statistically significant PM2.5 mortality HRs for total and CVD mortality. Conclusions: Long-term exposure to PM2.5 air pollution was associated with an increased risk of total and CVD mortality, providing an independent test of the PM2.5–mortality relationship in a new large U.S. prospective cohort experiencing lower post-2000 PM2.5 exposure levels

  8. Naturalization of immigrants and perinatal mortality

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Yvon; Buekens, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background: Differences in neonatal mortality among immigrants have been documented in Belgium and elsewhere, and these disparities are poorly understood. Our objective was to compare perinatal mortality rates in immigrant mothers according to citizenship status. Methods: This was a population-based study using 2008 data from the Belgian birth register data pertaining to regions of Brussels and Wallonia. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for perinatal mortality according to naturalization status were calculated by logistic regression analyses adjusting for parents’ medical and social characteristics. Results: Four hundred and thirty-seven perinatal deaths were registered among 60 881 births (7.2‰). Perinatal mortality rate varied according to the origin of the mother and her naturalization status: among immigrants, non-naturalized immigrants had a higher incidence of perinatal mortality (10.3‰) than their naturalized counterparts (6.1‰) with an adjusted OR of 2.2, 95% CI (1.1–4.5). Conclusion: In a country with a high frequency of naturalization, and universal access to health care, naturalized immigrant mothers experience less perinatal mortality than their not naturalized counterparts. PMID:22490473

  9. Mortality rates among Arab Americans in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Dallo, Florence J; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans were in the range of whites and blacks. However, Arab American men had lower mortality rates from cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease compared to both whites and blacks. Among women, Arab Americans had lower mortality rates from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes than whites and blacks. Arab Americans are growing in number. Future study should focus on designing rigorous separate analyses for this population.

  10. A cohort study relating urban green space with mortality in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Paul J; Jerrett, Michael; Su, Jason G; Burnett, Richard T; Chen, Hong; Wheeler, Amanda J; Goldberg, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    Parks and green space areas are important to human health for psychological and physiological reasons. There have been few evaluations of access to green space on mortality. This paper describes a cohort study of approximately 575,000 adults, 35 years of age and older, who resided in 10 urban areas in Ontario, Canada, between 1982 and 1986. Individuals were identified from income tax filings, and vital status was determined up to December 31, 2004 through record linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base. Place of residence was defined by postal code data that were extracted from income tax filings. Urban green space was defined by Landsat satellite retrievals with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and this was assigned to individuals' place of residence at inception into the cohort using both a 30 m grid cell and a 500 m buffer. The proportional hazards model was used to estimate rate ratios (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for selected underlying causes of death. The rate ratios were adjusted for income, marital status, ambient air pollution, and contextual neighborhood characteristics. About 187,000 subjects died during follow-up. An increase in the interquartile range of green space, using a 500 m buffer, was associated with reduced non-accidental mortality (RR=0.95, 95% CI=0.94-0.96). Reductions in mortality with increased residential green space were observed for each underlying cause of death; the strongest association was found for respiratory disease mortality (RR=0.91, 95% CI=0.89-0.93). Risk estimates were essentially unchanged after adjusting for ambient air pollution. Our study suggests that green space in urban environments was associated with long-term reduction in mortality although this finding should be interpreted cautiously as this association may be influenced by residual confounding of sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Further research is needed to: confirm these findings, better understand the

  11. A Prospective Study of Mortality and Trauma-Related Risk Factors Among a Nationally Representative Sample of Vietnam Veterans.

    PubMed

    Schlenger, William E; Corry, Nida H; Williams, Christianna S; Kulka, Richard A; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; DeBakey, Samar; Murphy, Catherine M; Marmar, Charles R

    2015-12-15

    Because Vietnam veterans comprise the majority of all living veterans and most are now older adults, the urgency and potential value of studying the long-term health effects of service in the Vietnam War, including effects on mortality, is increasing. The present study is the first prospective mortality assessment of a representative sample of Vietnam veterans. We used one of the longest follow-up periods to date (spanning older adulthood) and conducted one of the most comprehensive assessments of potential risk factors. Vital status and cause of death were ascertained for the 1,632 veterans who fought in the Vietnam theater (hereafter referred to as theater veterans) and for 716 Vietnam War-era veterans (hereafter referred to as era veterans) who participated in the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (1987-2011). As of April 2011, 16.0% (95% confidence interval: 13.1, 19.0) of all Vietnam veterans who were alive in the 1980s were deceased. Male theater veterans with a high probability of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were nearly 2 times more likely to have died than were those without PTSD, even after adjustment for sociodemographic and other characteristics. A high level of exposure to war zone stress was independently associated with mortality for both male and female theater veterans after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, PTSD, and physical comorbid conditions. Theater veterans with a high level of exposure to war zone stress and a high probability of PTSD had the greatest mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 4.43).

  12. Hand osteoarthritis in relation to mortality and incidence of cardiovascular disease: data from the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Ida K; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Misra, Devyani; Neogi, Tuhina; Niu, Jingbo; Yang, Tianzhong; Zhang, Yuqing; Felson, David T

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study whether hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased mortality and cardiovascular events in a large community based cohort (Framingham Heart Study) in which OA, mortality and cardiovascular events have been carefully assessed. Methods We examined whether symptomatic (≥1 joint (s) with radiographic OA and pain in the same joint) and radiographic hand OA (≥1 joint(s) with radiographic OA without pain) were associated with mortality and incident cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure and/or atherothrombotic brain infarction) using Cox proportional hazards models. In the adjusted models, we included possible confounding factors from baseline (eg, metabolic factors, medication use, smoking/alcohol). We also adjusted for the number of painful joints in the lower limb and physical inactivity. Results We evaluated 1348 participants (53.8% women) with mean (SD) age of 62.2 (8.2) years, of whom 540 (40.1%) and 186 (13.8%) had radiographic and symptomatic hand OA, respectively. There was no association between hand OA and mortality. Although there was no significant relation to incident cardiovascular events overall or a relation of radiographic hand OA with events, we found a significant association between symptomatic hand OA and incident coronary heart disease (myocardial infarction/coronary insufficiency syndrome) (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.22 to 4.18). The association remained after additional adjustment for pain in the lower limb or physical inactivity. Conclusions Symptomatic hand OA, but not radiographic hand OA, was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease events. The results suggest an effect of pain, which may be a possible marker of inflammation. PMID:24047870

  13. Vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality: Evidence from a large population-based Australian cohort - the 45 and Up Study.

    PubMed

    Mihrshahi, Seema; Ding, Ding; Gale, Joanne; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Banks, Emily; Bauman, Adrian E

    2017-04-01

    The vegetarian diet is thought to have health benefits including reductions in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Evidence to date suggests that vegetarians tend to have lower mortality rates when compared with non-vegetarians, but most studies are not population-based and other healthy lifestyle factors may have confounded apparent protective effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between categories of vegetarian diet (including complete, semi and pesco-vegetarian) and all-cause mortality in a large population-based Australian cohort. The 45 and Up Study is a cohort study of 267,180 men and women aged ≥45years in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Vegetarian diet status was assessed by baseline questionnaire and participants were categorized into complete vegetarians, semi-vegetarians (eat meat≤once/week), pesco-vegetarians and regular meat eaters. All-cause mortality was determined by linked registry data to mid-2014. Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between vegetarian diet and all-cause mortality adjusting for a range of potential confounding factors. Among 243,096 participants (mean age: 62.3years, 46.7% men) there were 16,836 deaths over a mean 6.1years of follow-up. Following extensive adjustment for potential confounding factors there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality for vegetarians versus non-vegetarians [HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.93-1.45)]. There was also no significant difference in mortality risk between pesco-vegetarians [HR=0.79 (95% CI 0.59-1.06)] or semi-vegetarians [HR=1.12 (95% CI 0.96-1.31)] versus regular meat eaters. We found no evidence that following a vegetarian diet, semi-vegetarian diet or a pesco-vegetarian diet has an independent protective effect on all-cause mortality.

  14. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A; Wolkewitz, Martin; Davey, Peter G; Koller, Walter; Berger, Jutta; Nagler, Jan; Icket, Claudine; Kalenic, Smilja; Horvatic, Jasminka; Seifert, Harald; Kaasch, Achim J; Paniara, Olga; Argyropoulou, Athina; Bompola, Maria; Smyth, Edmond; Skally, Mairead; Raglio, Annibale; Dumpis, Uga; Kelmere, Agita Melbarde; Borg, Michael; Xuereb, Deborah; Ghita, Mihaela C; Noble, Michelle; Kolman, Jana; Grabljevec, Stanko; Turner, David; Lansbury, Louise; Grundmann, Hajo

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  15. Physical activity level, waist circumference, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Reeder, Bruce A.; Elliott, Susan; Joffres, Michel R.; Pahwa, Punam; Kirkland, Susan A.; Paradis, Gilles; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

    2014-01-01

    This study predicted all-cause mortality based on physical activity level (active or inactive) and waist circumference (WC) in 8208 Canadian adults in Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, and Saskatchewan, surveyed between 1986–1995 and followed through 2004. Physically inactive adults had higher mortality risk than active adults overall (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval = 1.20, 1.05–1.37) and within the low WC category (1.51, 1.19–1.92). Detrimental effects of physical inactivity and high WC demonstrate the need for physical activity promotion. PMID:22703160

  16. Hard Suit With Adjustable Torso Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, Hubert C.

    1987-01-01

    Torso sizing rings allow single suit to fit variety of people. Sizing rings inserted between coupling rings of torso portion of hard suit. Number of rings chosen to fit torso length of suit to that of wearer. Rings mate with, and seal to, coupling rings and to each other. New adjustable-size concept with cost-saving feature applied to other suits not entirely constructed of "hard" materials, such as chemical defense suits and suits for industrial-hazard cleanup.

  17. Relation of blood pressure and all-cause mortality in 180,000 Japanese participants: pooled analysis of 13 cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshitaka; Hozawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2008-06-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of death because of cardiovascular disease and predominantly affects total mortality. To reduce avoidable deaths from hypertension, we need to collect blood pressure data and assess their impact on total mortality. To examine this issue, a meta-analysis of 13 cohort studies was conducted in Japan. Poisson regression was used for estimating all-cause mortality rates and ratios. In the model, blood pressure data were treated as continuous (10-mm Hg increase) and categorical (every 10 mm Hg) according to recommendations of the Seventh Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Hypertension. Potential confounders included body mass index, smoking, drinking, and cohort. The impact of hypertension was measured by the population-attributable fraction. After excluding participants with cardiovascular disease history, 176 389 participants were examined in the analysis. Adjusted mortality rates became larger as the blood pressure increased, and these were more distinct in younger men and women. Hazard ratios also showed the same trends, and these trends were more apparent in younger men (hazard ratio [unit: 10-mm Hg increase] aged 40 to 49 years: systolic blood pressure 1.37 (range: 1.15 to 1.62); diastolic blood pressure 1.46 [range: 1.05 to 2.03]) than older ones (hazard ratio: aged 80 to 89 years: systolic blood pressure 1.09 [range: 1.05 to 1.13]and diastolic blood pressure 1.12 [range: 1.03 to 1.22]). Population-attributable fraction of hypertension was approximately 20% when the normal category was used as a reference level and was 10% when we included the prehypertension group in the reference level. In conclusion, high blood pressure raised the risk of total mortality, and this trend was higher in the younger Japanese population.

  18. Association Between Valvular Surgery and Mortality Among Patients With Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Todd; Park, Lawrence; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Cortes, Claudia; Casillo, Roberta; Chu, Vivian; Delahaye, Francois; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Edathodu, Jameela; Falces, Carlos; Logar, Mateja; Miró, José M.; Naber, Christophe; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Murdoch, David R.; Moreillon, Philippe; Utili, Riccardo; Wang, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context Heart failure (HF) is the most common complication of infective endocarditis. However, clinical characteristics of HF in patients with infective endocarditis, use of surgical therapy, and their associations with patient outcome are not well described. Objectives To determine the clinical, echocardiographic, and microbiological variables associated with HF in patients with definite infective endocarditis and to examine variables independently associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality for patients with infective endocarditis and HF, including the use and association of surgery with outcome. Design, Setting, and Patients The International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, a prospective, multicenter study enrolling 4166 patients with definite native- or prosthetic-valve infective endocarditis from 61 centers in 28 countries between June 2000 and December 2006. Main Outcome Measures In-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results Of 4075 patients with infective endocarditis and known HF status enrolled, 1359 (33.4% [95% CI, 31.9%–34.8%]) had HF, and 906 (66.7% [95% CI, 64.2%–69.2%]) were classified as having New York Heart Association class III or IV symptom status. Within the subset with HF, 839 (61.7% [95% CI, 59.2%–64.3%]) underwent valvular surgery during the index hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 29.7% (95% CI, 27.2%–32.1%) for the entire HF cohort, with lower mortality observed in patients undergoing valvular surgery compared with medical therapy alone (20.6% [95% CI, 17.9%–23.4%] vs 44.8% [95% CI, 40.4%–49.0%], respectively; P<.001). One-year mortality was 29.1% (95% CI, 26.0%–32.2%) in patients undergoing valvular surgery vs 58.4% (95% CI, 54.1%–62.6%) in those not undergoing surgery (P<.001). Cox proportional hazards modeling with propensity score adjustment for surgery showed that advanced age, diabetes mellitus, health care–associated infection, causative microorganism (Staphylococcus aureus or

  19. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and their association with cancer mortality among workers in one automobile foundry factory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Weng, Shaofan; Wen, Sheng; Shi, Tingming; Sun, Gangtao; Zeng, Yuyu; Qi, Cheng; Chen, Weihong

    2013-01-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) have been reported as possible carcinogenic hazards to humans. However, epidemiological studies on their carcinogenic roles are limited. The current study was designed to determine the concentrations and characteristics of PCDD/Fs and evaluate their association with cancer mortality in exposed workers in one automobile foundry factory. PCDD/F levels in factory and surrounding environment were analyzed through air and settling dust sampling. The cancer mortalities among workers in this foundry factory were calculated using data from a cohort study. The results showed that the PCDD/F concentrations of air in workplace ranged 0.36-2.25 pg World Health Organization-Toxic Equivalent (WHO-TEQ) Nm(-3) (average 1.01 pg WHO-TEQ Nm(-3)), which were 1.16-7.26 times higher than those outside the factory. The PCDD/F concentrations of settling dust in the workplace ranged 3.34-18.64 pg WHO-TEQ g(-1) (average 8.25 pg WHO-TEQ g(-1)), which were lower than those just outside the factory (average 16.13 pg WHO-TEQ g(-1)). Furthermore, a cohort study of workers in this factory with average follow-up of 24.52 years showed that cancer was the leading cause of death, with significant elevated mortality (standardized mortality ratio (SMR)=1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35-2.13) among workers, when compared with Chinese national mortality. The cancer mortality among front-line workers was increased significantly (adjusted relative risk (RR)=1.73, 95% CI: 1.14-2.60), particularly among melting and casting workers, when compared with that among assistant workers. Our results indicated that there was a dose-response relationship between PCDD/F exposure and cancer mortality among foundry workers.

  20. Impact of oral beta-blocker therapy on mortality after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for Killip class 1 myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Hirofumi; Motoki, Hirohiko; Izawa, Atsushi; Kashima, Yuichirou; Miura, Takashi; Ebisawa, Souichirou; Tomita, Takeshi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Koyama, Jun; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-05-01

    The use of beta-blockers therapy has been recommended to reduce mortality in patients with left ventricular dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), which has become the mainstay of treatment for AMI, is associated with a lower mortality than fibrinolysis. The benefits of beta-blockers after primary PCI in AMI patients without pump failure are unclear. We hypothesized that oral beta-blocker therapy after primary PCI might reduce the mortality in AMI patients without pump failure. The assessment of lipophilic vs. hydrophilic statin therapy in acute myocardial infarction (ALPS-AMI) study was a multi-center study that enrolled 508 AMI patients to compare the efficacy of hydrophilic and lipophilic statins in secondary prevention after myocardial infarction. We prospectively tracked cardiovascular events for 3 years in 444 ALPS-AMI patients (median age 66 years; 18.2 % women) who had Killip class 1 on admission and were discharged alive. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. The 3-year follow-up was completed in 413 patients (93.0 %). During this follow-up, 21 patients (4.7 %) died. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients on beta-blockers had a significantly lower incidence of all-cause mortality (2.7 vs. 7.3 %, log-rank p = 0.025). After adjusting for the calculated propensity score for using beta-blockers, their use remained an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.309; 95 % confidence interval 0.116-0.824; p = 0.019). In the statin era, the use of beta-blocker therapy after primary PCI is associated with lower mortality in AMI patients with Killip class 1 on admission.

  1. Cardiovascular disease mortality in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, E S; Peruga, A; Restrepo, H E

    1993-01-01

    Despite subregional differences, mortality profiles have undergone major changes in most countries of the Americas. While the proportion of deaths caused by noncommunicable diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, has increased, overall age-adjusted mortality rates attributable to all cardiovascular disease are declining in 13 of the 15 countries selected for the present study. About half the countries showed decreasing mortality rates for ischaemic heart disease; the other half had increasing rates. The mortality rates for cerebrovascular disease and hypertensive disease declined in all but four countries. The ischaemic heart disease/cerebrovascular disease mortality ratio increased as a consequence of a greater decline in deaths due to cerebrovascular disease, except in two countries that exhibited a greater decline for ischaemic heart disease. With few exceptions the male-to-female mortality ratios increased for all cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, reflecting a greater decline in female mortality. In general there was a decline in all cardiovascular disease mortality for almost every age group in the North American, Southern Cone, English-speaking Caribbean, and Andean subregions, while there were increases in the Central American and Latin Caribbean subregions. The magnitude of the changes was related to the initial level of mortality and the date of onset of the decline. Change began earlier and the declines were largest in the countries with the highest initial mortality levels, whereas in the countries that initially had comparatively low values the mortality rates are still increasing. Insufficient information is available to permit elucidation of the determinants of the changes reported. There has been speculation about the possible role of factors such as demographic and sociocultural changes, changes in lifestyle and subsequently in the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and the

  2. Use of tiotropium Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler versus HandiHaler and mortality in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Katia M C; Afonso, Ana; Romio, Silvana; Stricker, Bruno C; Brusselle, Guy G O; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2013-09-01

    Tiotropium, a long-acting anticholinergic, is delivered via HandiHaler or via Respimat. Randomised controlled trials suggest that use of tiotropium Respimat increases the risk of dying. We compared the risk of mortality between tiotropium Respimat versus HandiHaler. Within the Integrated Primary Care Information database, we defined a source population of patients, aged ≥ 40 years, with ≥ 1 year of follow-up. Based on prescription data, we defined episodes of tiotropium use (Respimat or HandiHaler). The risk of mortality, within these episodes, was calculated using a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. From the source population, 11 287 patients provided 24 522 episodes of tiotropium use. 496 patients died while being exposed to HandiHaler or Respimat. Use of Respimat was associated with almost 30% increased risk of dying (adjusted HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03-1.57) with the highest risk for cardiovascular/cerebrovascular death (adjusted HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.08-2.25). The risk was higher in patients with co-existing cardiovascular disease (adjusted HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07-1.73) than in patients without (adjusted HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.61-1.71). Use of tiotropium Respimat was associated with an almost 30% increase of mortality compared with HandiHaler and the association was the strongest for cardiovascular/cerebrovascular death. It is unclear whether this association is causal or due to residual confounding by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity.

  3. Effect of statin treatment on mortality in a large cohort of heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Alejandro J; Anguita, Manuel P

    2009-03-01

    We studied 3162 heart failure patients included in the Spanish BADAPIC registry in order to determine whether statin treatment influences prognosis. Patients were followed up for 35 +/- 22 months (median, 32 months). Patients on statins were more often male and had higher prevalences of risk factors, ischemic heart disease and systolic dysfunction (P< .001) than those not on statins. After adjustment for age, risk factors, ischemic heart disease, renal failure, ejection fraction, anemia, heart rate and drug treatment, statin treatment was found to be a favorable independent predictor of survival: the hazard ratio for mortality was 0.73 (95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.88; P< .001). During follow-up, the 3-year survival rate was higher in patients treated with statins (75% vs. 68%; P< .001). In patients with heart failure, statin treatment appears to be independently associated with better survival.

  4. Relationship of dietary phosphate intake with risk of end-stage renal disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5: The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Selamet, Umut; Tighiouart, Hocine; Sarnak, Mark J; Beck, Gerald; Levey, Andrew S; Block, Geoffrey; Ix, Joachim H

    2016-01-01

    KDIGO guidelines recommend dietary phosphate restriction to lower serum phosphate levels in CKD stages 3-5. Recent studies suggest that dietary phosphate intake is only weakly linked to its serum concentration, and the relationship of phosphate intake with adverse outcomes is uncertain. To evaluate this, we used Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of baseline 24-h urine phosphate excretion with risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, and mortality subtypes (cardiovascular disease [CVD] and non-CVD) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease data. Models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, iothalamate GFR, and urine protein and nitrogen excretion. Phosphate excretion was modestly inversely correlated with serum phosphate concentrations. There was no association of 24-h urinary phosphate excretion with risk of ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality. For comparison, higher serum phosphate concentrations were associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 0.7 mg/dl higher, 1.15 [95% CI 1.01, 1.30]). Thus, phosphate intake is not tightly linked with serum phosphate concentrations in CKD stages 3-5, and there was no evidence that greater phosphate intake, assessed by 24-h phosphate excretion, is associated with ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality in CKD stages 3-5. Hence, factors other than dietary intake may be key determinants of serum phosphate concentrations and require additional investigation.

  5. Increased mortality in COPD among construction workers exposed to inorganic dust.

    PubMed

    Bergdahl, I A; Torén, K; Eriksson, K; Hedlund, U; Nilsson, T; Flodin, R; Järvholm, B

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if occupational exposure to dust, fumes or gases, especially among never-smokers, increased the mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cohort of 317,629 Swedish male construction workers was followed from 1971 to 1999. Exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man-made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), gases and irritants (epoxy resins, isocyanates and organic solvents), fumes (asphalt fumes, diesel exhaust and metal fumes), and wood dust was based on a job-exposure matrix. An internal control group with "unexposed" construction workers was used, and the analyses were adjusted for age and smoking. When all subjects were analysed, there was an increased mortality from COPD among those with any airborne exposure (relative risk 1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.22)). In a Poisson regression model, including smoking, age and the major exposure groups, exposure to inorganic dust was associated with an increased risk (hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% CI 1.06-1.14)), especially among never-smokers (HR 2.30 (95% CI 1.07-4.96)). The fraction of COPD among the exposed attributable to any airborne exposure was estimated as 10.7% overall and 52.6% among never-smokers. In conclusion, occupational exposure among construction workers increases mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even among never-smokers.

  6. Twenty five year mortality and air pollution: results from the French PAARC survey

    PubMed Central

    Filleul, L; Rondeau, V; Vandentorren, S; Le Moual, N; Cantagrel, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Charpin, D; Declercq, C; Neukirch, F; Paris, C; Vervloet, D; Brochard, P; Tessier, J; Kauffmann, F; Baldi, I

    2005-01-01

    Aims and Methods: Long term effects of air pollution on mortality were studied in 14 284 adults who resided in 24 areas from seven French cities when enrolled in the PAARC survey (air pollution and chronic respiratory diseases) in 1974. Daily measurements of sulphur dioxide, total suspended particles, black smoke, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric oxide were made in 24 areas for three years (1974–76). Cox proportional hazards models controlling for individual confounders (smoking, educational level, body mass index, occupational exposure) were applied, and frailty models used to take into account spatial correlation. Indicators of air pollution were the mean concentration. Results: Models were run before and after exclusion of six area monitors influenced by local traffic (NO/NO2 >3 in ppb). After exclusion of these areas, analyses showed that adjusted risk ratios (95% CI) for TSP, BS, NO2, and NO for non-accidental mortality were 1.05 (1.02 to 1.08), 1.07 (1.03 to 1.10), 1.14 (1.03 to 1.25), and 1.11 (1.05 to 1.17) for 10 µg/m3 respectively. Consistent patterns for lung cancer and cardiopulmonary causes were observed. Conclusions: Urban air pollution assessed in the 1970s was associated with increased mortality over 25 years in France. PMID:15961621

  7. Radiation-related mortality among offspring of atomic bomb survivors: a half-century of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shizue; Suyama, Akihiko; Koyama, Kojiro

    2003-11-01

    Our objective was to examine whether parental exposure to atomic bomb radiation has led to increased cancer and/or noncancer mortality rates among the offspring. We studied 41,010 subjects born from May 1946 through December 1984 (i.e., conceived between 1 month and 38 years after the bombings) and surviving for at least 1 year. One or both parents were in Hiroshima or Nagasaki at the time of the bombings and childbirth. We analyzed mortality data from 1946 to 1999 using the Japanese family registry system by Cox regression model and examined the effects of paternal and maternal irradiation with adjustment for city, sex, year of birth and parental age at childbirth. During follow-up, 314 cancer deaths and 1,125 noncancer disease deaths occurred. The mean age of living subjects was 45.7 years. Median doses were 143 mSv for 12,722 exposed fathers and 132 mSv for 7,726 exposed mothers. Cancer and noncancer mortality rates were no higher for subjects with exposed parents (5+ mSv or unknown dose) than for reference subjects (0-4 mSv), and mortality did not increase with increasing dose. For subjects with both parents exposed, the adjusted hazard ratios were 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.46] for noncancer and 0.96 (95% CI 0.59-1.55) for cancer. This was true of deaths occurring both before and after 20 years of age. However, because of uncertainty due to the small number of deaths and relatively young ages of subjects, we cannot rule out an increase in disease mortality at this time.

  8. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  9. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, L.; Vogel, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Studies from the natural hazards literature indicate that many natural processes, including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow and earthquakes, show evidence of nonstationary behavior such as trends in magnitudes through time. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on partial duration series (PDS) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e. that the probability of exceedance is constant through time. Given evidence of trends and the consequent expected growth in devastating impacts from natural hazards across the world, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (x) with its failure time series (t), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose PDS magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied Poisson-GP model. We derive a 2-parameter Generalized Pareto hazard model and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard event series x, with corresponding failure time series t, should have application to a wide class of natural hazards.

  10. The Change in Body Weight During Hospitalization Predicts Mortality in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Tomo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Kitajima, Ken; Iwata, Atsushi; Morito, Natsumi; Yahiro, Eiji; Fujimi, Kanta; Matsunaga, Akira; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background In our experience, the change in body weight (BW) during hospitalization varies greatly in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Since the clinical significance of a change in BW is not clear, we investigated whether a change in BW could predict mortality. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 130 patients (72 males; aged 68 ± 10 years) who were hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF and followed for 2 years after discharge. The change in the BW index during hospitalization (ΔBWI) was calculated as (BW at hospital admission minus BW at hospital discharge)/body surface area at hospital discharge. Results The patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔBWI, and the 2-year mortality rates in the quartiles with the lowest, second, third and highest ΔBWI were 18.8%, 12.1%, 3.1% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for variables with a P value less than 0.05, ΔBWI was independently associated with 2-year mortality (P = 0.0002), and the quartile with the lowest ΔBWI had a higher relative risk (RR) for 2-year mortality than the quartile with the highest ΔBWI (RR: 7.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 - 53.99, P = 0.04). Conclusion In conclusion, ΔBWI was significantly associated with 2-year mortality after discharge, which indicates that ΔBWI might be a simple predictor of prognosis in acute decompensated HF. PMID:28179967

  11. Predictors of Mortality Up to One Year After Emergent Major Abdominal Surgery in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zara; Mitchell, Susan L.; Gorges, Rebecca J.; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of older patients who undergo emergent major abdominal procedures is expected to increase yet little is known about mortality beyond 30 days after surgery. Objective Identify factors associated with mortality among older patients at 30, 180 and 365 days after emergency major abdominal surgery. Design A retrospective study of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) linked to Medicare Claims from 2000-2010. Setting N/A Participants Medicare beneficiaries > 65.5 years enrolled in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) from 2000-2010, with at least one urgent/emergent major abdominal surgery and a core interview from the HRS within 3 years prior to surgery. Main Outcomes and Measures Survival analysis was used to describe all-cause mortality at 30, 180 and 365 days after surgery. Complementary log-log regression was used to identify patient characteristics and postoperative events associated with worse survival. Results 400 patients had one of the urgent/emergent surgeries of interest. Of these 24% were > 85 years; 50% had coronary artery disease, 48% had cancer, and 33% had congestive heart failure; and 37% experienced a postoperative complication. Postoperative mortality was 20%, 31% and 34% at 30, 180 days and 365 days. Among those > 85 years, 50% were dead one year after surgery. After multivariate adjustment including postoperative complications, dementia (Hazard ratio (HR) 2.02, 95%CI 1.24-3.31), hospitalization within 6 months before surgery (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.12-2.28) and complications (HR 3.45, 95%CI (2.32-5.13) were independently associated with worse one-year survival. Conclusion Overall mortality is high up to one year after surgery in many older patients undergoing emergency major abdominal surgery. The occurrence of a complication is the clinical factor most strongly associated with worse survival. PMID:26661929

  12. Spiritual absence and 1-year mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Deidre B; Christian, Lisa M; Patidar, Seema; Bishop, Michelle M; Dodd, Stacy M; Athanason, Rebecca; Wingard, John R; Reddy, Vijay S

    2010-08-01

    Religiosity and spirituality have been associated with better survival in large epidemiologic studies. This study examined the relationship between spiritual absence and 1-year all-cause mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Depression and problematic compliance were examined as possible mediators of a significant spiritual absence-mortality relationship. Eighty-five adults (mean = 46.85 years old, SD = 11.90 years) undergoing evaluation for allogeneic HSCT had routine psychologie evaluation prior to HSCT admission. The Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic was used to assess spiritual absence, depression, and problematic compliance, the psychosocial predictors of interest. Patient status at 1 year and survival time in days were abstracted from medical records. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the psychosocial factors of interest and mortality after adjusting for relevant biobehavioral factors. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) of participants died within 1 year of HSCT. After covarying for disease type, individuals with the highest spiritual absence and problematic compliance scores were significantly more likely to die 1-year post-HSCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49, P = .043 and HR = 3.74, P = .029, respectively), particularly secondary to infection, sepsis, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.56, P = .01 and HR = 5.61, P = .014), relative to those without elevations on these scales. Depression was not associated with 1-year mortality, and problematic compliance did not mediate the relationship between spiritual absence and mortality. These preliminary results suggest that both spiritual absence and problematic compliance may be associated with poorer survival following HSCT. Future research should examine these relations in a larger sample using a more comprehensive assessment of spirituality.

  13. Symmetric Dimethylarginine as Predictor of Graft loss and All-Cause Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; Dahle, Dag Olav; Pilz, Stefan; Midtvedt, Karsten; März, Winfried; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Holdaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and all cause mortality in diverse populations. The potential role of SDMA as a risk marker in renal transplant recipients (RTR) has not been investigated. Methods We analyzed SDMA in the placebo arm of the Assessment of Lescol in Renal Transplantation study, a randomized controlled trial of fluvastatin in RTR. Mean follow-up was 5.1 years. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on SDMA levels at study inclusion. Relationships between SDMA and traditional risk factors for graft function and all-cause mortality were analyzed in 925 RTR using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Results In univariate analysis, SDMA was significantly associated with renal graft loss, all-cause death, and major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for established risk factors including estimated glomerular filtration rate, an elevated SDMA-level (4th quartile, >1.38 μmol/L) was associated with renal graft loss; hazard ratio (HR), 5.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.95–15.57; P=0.001, compared to the 1st quartile. Similarly, SDMA in the 4th quartile was independently associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 4.56; 95% CI, 2.15–9.71; P<0.001), and there was a strong borderline significant trend for an association with cardiovascular mortality (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 0.99–8.21; P=0.051). Conclusion In stable RTR, an elevated SDMA level is independently associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and renal graft loss. PMID:24999963

  14. Risk of Mortality According to Body Mass Index and Body Composition Among Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bea, Jennifer W.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Nicholas, J. Skye; Ernst, Kacey C.; Hu, Chengcheng; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Cauley, Jane A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Caan, Bette; Roe, Denise J.; Chen, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, often defined as a body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) of 30 or higher, has been associated with mortality, but age-related body composition changes can be masked by stable BMI. A subset of Women's Health Initiative participants (postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years) enrolled between 1993 and 1998 who had received dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans for estimation of total body fat (TBF) and lean body mass (LBM) (n = 10,525) were followed for 13.6 (standard deviation, 4.6) years to test associations between BMI, body composition, and incident mortality. Overall, BMI ≥35 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.82), while TBF and LBM were not. However, an interaction between age and body composition (P < 0.001) necessitated age stratification. Among women aged 50–59 years, higher %TBF increased risk of death (HR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.38, 4.34) and higher %LBM decreased risk of death (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.23, 0.74), despite broad-ranging BMIs (16.4–69.1). However, the relationships were reversed among women aged 70–79 years (P < 0.05). BMI did not adequately capture mortality risk in this sample of postmenopausal women. Our data suggest the clinical utility of evaluating body composition by age group to more robustly assess mortality risk among postmenopausal women. PMID:26350478

  15. Social networks, social support and burden in relationships, and mortality after breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Michael, Yvonne; Tindle, Hilary; Gage, Elizabeth; Chlebowski, Rowan; Garcia, Lorena; Messina, Catherine; Manson, Joann E; Caan, Bette J

    2012-05-01

    Though larger social networks are associated with reduced breast cancer mortality, there is a need to clarify how both social support and social burden influence this association. We included 4,530 women from the Women's Health Initiative who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1993 and 2009, and provided data on social networks (spouse or intimate partner, religious ties, club ties, and number of first-degree relatives) before diagnosis. Of those, 354 died during follow-up, with 190 from breast cancer. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate associations of social network members with risk of post-diagnosis mortality, further evaluating associations by social support and social burden (caregiving, social strain). In multivariate-adjusted analyses, among women with high but not low social support, being married was related to lower all-cause mortality. By contrast, among women with high but not low social burden, those with a higher number of first-degree relatives, including siblings, parents, and children, had higher all-cause and breast cancer mortality (among caregivers: 0-3 relatives (ref), 4-5 relatives, HR = 1.47 (95% CI: 0.62-3.52), 6-9 relatives, HR = 2.08 (95% CI: 0.89-4.86), 10+ relatives, HR = 3.55 (95% CI: 1.35-9.33), P-continuous = 0.02, P-interaction = 0.008). The association by social strain was similar though it was not modified by level of social support. Other social network members were unrelated to mortality. Social relationships may have both adverse and beneficial influences on breast cancer survival. Clarifying these depends on understanding the context of women's relationships.

  16. Long-term mortality of hospitalized pneumonia in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    PubMed

    Myint, P K; Hawkins, K R; Clark, A B; Luben, R N; Wareham, N J; Khaw, K-T; Wilson, A M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about cause-specific long-term mortality beyond 30 days in pneumonia. We aimed to compare the mortality of patients with hospitalized pneumonia compared to age- and sex-matched controls beyond 30 days. Participants were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk prospective population study. Hospitalized pneumonia cases were identified from record linkage (ICD-10: J12-J18). For this study we excluded people with hospitalized pneumonia who died within 30 days. Each case identified was matched to four controls and followed up until the end June 2012 (total 15 074 person-years, mean 6·1 years, range 0·08-15·2 years). Cox regression models were constructed to examine the all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality using date of pneumonia onset as baseline with binary pneumonia status as exposure. A total of 2465 men and women (503 cases, 1962 controls) [mean age (s.d.) 64·5 (8·3) years] were included in the study. Between a 30-day to 1-year period, hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were 7·3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5·4-9·9] and 5·9 (95% CI 3·5-9·7), respectively (with very few respiratory deaths within the same period) in cases compared to controls after adjusting for age, sex, asthma, smoking status, pack years, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, prevalent cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. All outcomes assessed also showed increased risk of death in cases compared to controls after 1 year; respiratory cause of death being the most significant during that period (HR 16·4, 95% CI 8·9-30·1). Hospitalized pneumonia was associated with increased all-cause and specific-cause mortality beyond 30 days.

  17. Race and Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses increasing racial and socioeconomic disparities in mortality despite general declines in mortality, examining disparities in infant mortality and explaining that whenever two groups differ in their susceptibility to some condition, the less prevalent the condition, the greater will be the disparity in rates of experiencing the condition.…

  18. Pre- and Postdiagnosis Physical Activity, Television Viewing, and Mortality Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Hollenbeck, Albert; Park, Yikyung; Matthews, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical inactivity has been associated with higher mortality risk among survivors of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the independent effects of pre- versus postdiagnosis activity are unclear, and the association between watching television (TV) and mortality in survivors of CRC is previously undefined. Methods We analyzed the associations between prediagnosis (n = 3,797) and postdiagnosis (n = 1,759) leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and TV watching and overall and disease-specific mortality among patients with CRC. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs, adjusting for known mortality risk factors. Results Comparing survivors of CRC reporting more than 7 hours per week (h/wk) of prediagnosis LTPA with those reporting no LTPA, we found a 20% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.95; P for trend = .021). Postdiagnosis LTPA of ≥ 7 h/wk, compared with none, was associated with a 31% lower all-cause mortality risk (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.98; P for trend = .006), independent of prediagnosis activity. Compared with 0 to 2 TV hours per day (h/d) before diagnosis, those reporting ≥ 5 h/d of TV before diagnosis had a 22% increased all-cause mortality risk (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.41; P trend = .002), and more postdiagnosis TV watching was associated with a nonsignificant 25% increase in all-cause mortality risk (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.67; P for trend = .126). Conclusion LTPA was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, whereas more TV watching was associated with increased mortality risk. For both LTPA and TV watching, postdiagnosis measures independently explained the association with mortality. Clinicians should promote both minimizing TV time and increasing physical activity for longevity among survivors of CRC, regardless of previous behaviors. PMID:25488967

  19. Losing Life and Livelihood: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Unemployment and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Roelfs, David J.; Shor, Eran; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Unemployment rates in the United States remain near a 25-year high and global unemployment is rising. Previous studies have shown that unemployed persons have an increased risk of death, but the magnitude of the risk and moderating factors have not been explored. The study is a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression designed to assess the association between unemployment and all-cause mortality among working-age persons. We extracted 235 mortality risk estimates from 42 studies, providing data on more than 20 million persons. The mean hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.63 among HRs adjusted for age and additional covariates. The mean effect was higher for men than for women. Unemployment was associated with an increased mortality risk for those in their early and middle careers, but less for those in their late-career. The risk of death was highest during the first 10 years of follow up, but decreased subsequently. The mean HR was 24% lower among the subset of studies controlling for health-related behaviors. Public health initiatives could target unemployed persons for more aggressive cardiovascular screening and interventions aimed at reducing risk-taking behaviors. PMID:21330027

  20. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Xuan, Lei; Lee, Simon J. Craddock

    2016-01-01

    To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes—i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile—and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995–2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts) adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics) had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born) Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed. PMID:27983668

  1. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Sandi L; Tiro, Jasmin A; Xuan, Lei; Lee, Simon J Craddock

    2016-12-14

    To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes-i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile-and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995-2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts) adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics) had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born) Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed.

  2. Race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and ALS mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Norman J.; Chen, Jarvis T.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status are associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mortality in the United States. Methods: The National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS), a United States–representative, multistage sample, collected race/ethnicity and socioeconomic data prospectively. Mortality information was obtained by matching NLMS records to the National Death Index (1979–2011). More than 2 million persons (n = 1,145,368 women, n = 1,011,172 men) were included, with 33,024,881 person-years of follow-up (1,299 ALS deaths , response rate 96%). Race/ethnicity was by self-report in 4 categories. Hazard ratios (HRs) for ALS mortality were calculated for race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status separately and in mutually adjusted models. Results: Minority vs white race/ethnicity predicted lower ALS mortality in models adjusted for socioeconomic status, type of health insurance, and birthplace (non-Hispanic black, HR 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48–0.78; Hispanic, HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.88; other races, non-Hispanic, HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31–0.86). Higher educational attainment compared with < high school was in general associated with higher rate of ALS (high school, HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.42; some college, HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.04–1.48; college, HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.90–1.36; postgraduate, HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.06–1.62). Income, household poverty, and home ownership were not associated with ALS after adjustment for race/ethnicity. Rates did not differ by sex. Conclusion: Higher rate of ALS among whites vs non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic other races was not accounted for by multiple measures of socioeconomic status, birthplace, or type of health insurance. Higher rate of ALS among whites likely reflects actual higher risk of ALS rather than ascertainment bias or effects of socioeconomic status on ALS risk. PMID:27742817

  3. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality: A Detailed Pooled Analysis of the Dose-Response Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C.; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T.; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S.; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic equivalent hours per week (MET h/wk)) of aerobic activity for “substantial” health benefit, and suggested “additional” benefits by doing more than double this amount. However, the upper limit of longevity benefit or possible harm with more physical activity is unclear. Objective To quantify the dose-response association between leisure-time physical activity and mortality, and to define the upper limit of benefit or harm associated with more physical activity. Design We pooled data from six studies in the NCI Cohort Consortium (baseline 1992–2003). We used Cox proportional hazards regression with cohort stratification to generate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median follow-up time was 14.2 years. Setting Population-based prospective cohorts in the U.S. and Europe with self-reported physical activity. Participants 661,137 men and women (116,686 deaths); median age 62 (range 21–98) years. Exposure Leisure-time moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity Main Outcome Mortality Results Compared to those reporting no leisure-time physical activity, we observed a 20% lower mortality risk among those performing less than the recommended 7.5 MET h/wk minimum (HR=0.80, 95% CI 0.78–0.82), a 31% lower risk at 1–2 times the recommended minimum (0.69, 0.67–0.70), and a 37% lower risk at 2–3 times the minimum (0.63, 0.62–0.65). An upper threshold for mortality benefit occurred at 3–5 times the physical activity recommendation (0.61, 0.59–0.62), but compared to the recommended minimum, the additional benefit was modest (31% vs. 39%). There was no evidence of harm at 10+ times the recommended minimum (0.68, 0.59–0.78). A similar dose-response was observed for mortality due to cardiovascular disease and to cancer. Conclusions and

  4. Coming home to die? The association between migration and mortality in rural Tanzania before and after ART scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Levira, Francis; Todd, Jim; Masanja, Honorati

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior to the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), demographic surveillance cohort studies showed higher mortality among migrants than residents in many rural areas. Objectives This study quantifies the overall and AIDS-specific mortality between migrants and residents prior to ART, during ART scale-up, and after widespread availability of ART in Rufiji district in Tanzania. Design In Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), the follow-up of individuals aged 15–59 years was categorized into three periods: before ART (1998–2003), during ART scale-up (2004–2007), and after widespread availability of ART (2008–2011). Residents were those who never migrated within and beyond HDSS, internal migrants were those who moved within the HDSS, and external migrants were those who moved into the HDSS from outside. Mortality rates were estimated from deaths and person-years of observations calculated in each time period. Hazard ratios were estimated to compare mortality between migrants and residents. AIDS deaths were identified from verbal autopsy, and the odds ratio of dying from AIDS between migrants and residents was estimated using the multivariate logistic regression model. Results Internal and external migrants experienced higher overall mortality than residents before the introduction of ART. After widespread availability of ART overall mortality were similar for internal and external migrants. These overall mortality experiences observed were similar for males and females. In the multivariate logistic regression model, adjusting for age, sex, education, and social economic status, internal migrants had similar likelihood of dying from AIDS as residents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–1.87) while external migrants were 70% more likely to die from AIDS compared to residents prior to the introduction of ART (AOR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.06–2.73). After widespread availability of ART with the same adjustment

  5. Prospective Study of Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Mortality Risk in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Wen; Wheeler, David C.; Park, Yikyung; Spriggs, Michael; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Freedman, D. Michal; Abnet, Christian C.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic variations in mortality rate in the United States could be due to several hypothesized factors, one of which is exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Limited evidence from previous prospective studies has been inconclusive. The association between ambient residential UVR exposure and total and cause-specific mortality risks in a regionally diverse cohort (346,615 white, non-Hispanic subjects, 50–71 years of age, in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)–AARP Diet and Health Study) was assessed, with accounting for individual-level confounders. UVR exposure (averaged for 1978–1993 and 1996–2005) from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer was linked to the US Census Bureau 2000 census tract of participants' baseline residence. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Over 12 years, UVR exposure was associated with total deaths (n = 41,425; hazard ratio for highest vs. lowest quartiles (HRQ4 vs. Q1) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.09; Ptrend < 0.001) and with deaths (all Ptrend < 0.05) due to cancer (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.11), cardiovascular disease (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.12), respiratory disease (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.55), and stroke (HRQ4 vs. Q1 = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.33) but not with deaths due to injury, diabetes, or infectious disease. These results suggest that UVR exposure might not be beneficial for longevity. PMID:23863757

  6. Hypertension and mortality in the Golestan Cohort Study: A prospective study of 50 000 adults in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sepanlou, S G; Sharafkhah, M; Poustchi, H; Malekzadeh, M M; Etemadi, A; Khademi, H; Islami, F; Pourshams, A; Pharoah, P D; Abnet, C C; Brennan, P; Boffetta, P; Dawsey, S M; Esteghamati, A; Kamangar, F; Malekzadeh, R

    2016-04-01

    High blood pressure has been the second most important determinant of disease burden in Iran since the 1990s. Despite well-recognized evidence on the association of high blood pressure and mortality in other countries, this relationship has not been fully investigated in the demographic setting of Iran. The current study is the first large-scale longitudinal study of this association in Iran. Briefly, 50 045 subjects between 40 and 75 years of age have been recruited and followed. Blood pressure measurements were carried out at baseline. Causes of death were reported and verified by verbal autopsy throughout the follow-up period. The outcomes of interest were all-cause deaths and deaths due to ischemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). A total of 46 674 subjects free from cardiovascular disease at baseline were analyzed. Absolute mortality rates increased along with increasing systolic or diastolic blood pressure above 120 and 80 mm Hg, respectively. Adjusted HRs (95% confidence intervals) for each 20 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure in all age groups were 1.18 (1.13-1.23) for all-cause mortality, 1.21 (1.13-1.31) for deaths due to IHD and 1.50 (1.39-1.63) for deaths due to stroke. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were higher in younger subjects and decreased with increasing age of the participants. High blood pressure is a serious threat to the health of Iranians. The entire health-care system of Iran should be involved in a comprehensive action plan for controlling blood pressure.

  7. Association of Patient-Reported Health Status with Long-Term Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Report from the STS/ACC TVT Registry™

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Suzanne V.; Spertus, John A.; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Dai, Dadi; O’Brien, Sean M.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Mack, Michael J.; Green, Philip; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Cohen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an effective treatment for aortic stenosis, long-term mortality after TAVR remains high and challenging to predict. The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) is a health status measure, assessed directly from patients, that integrates two clinically relevant factors (symptoms and functional status) that may predict TAVR outcomes. Methods and Results Among 7769 patients from 286 sites in the STS-ACC TVT Registry, we examined the association between pre-procedure (baseline) patient health status, as assessed by the KCCQ, and 1-year mortality after TAVR. The KCCQ Overall Summary Score was categorized as very poor: <25, poor: 25–49, fair: 50–74, or good: ≥75. Prior to TAVR, health status was rated as very poor in 28%, poor in 38%, fair in 24%, and good in 10%. Patients with worse health status were more likely to be female and had more comorbidities and higher STS mortality risk scores. Compared with those with good health status prior to TAVR, and after adjusting for a broad range of baseline covariates, patients with very poor health status had a 2-fold increased hazard of death over the first year after TAVR (adjusted HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.58–2.54), while those with poor and fair health status had intermediate outcomes (adjusted HRs 1.54, 95% CI 1.22–1.95 and 1.20, 95% CI 0.94–1.55, respectively). Conclusions In a national, contemporary practice cohort, worse pre-procedure patient health status, as assessed by the KCCQ, was associated with greater long-term mortality after TAVR. These results support the measurement and integration of the KCCQ into mortality risk assessments for patients considering TAVR. PMID:26643740

  8. The association between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-infected individuals on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Sheri D.; Fernandes, Kimberly A.; Brandson, Eirikka K.; Lima, Viviane D.; Anema, Aranka; Bangsberg, David R.; Montaner, Julio S.; Hogg, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Food insecurity is increasingly recognized as a barrier to optimal treatment outcomes but there is little data on this issue. We assessed associations between food insecurity and mortality in HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated individuals in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), and whether body max index (BMI) modified associations. Methods Individuals were recruited from the BC HIV/AIDS drug treatment program in 1998 and 1999, and were followed until June 2007 for outcomes. Food insecurity was measured with the Radimer/Cornell questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine associations between food insecurity, BMI and non-accidental deaths when controlling for confounders. Results Among 1119 participants, 536 (48%) were categorized as food insecure and 160 (14%) were categorized as underweight (BMI <18.5). After a median follow-up time of 8.2 years, 153 individuals (14%) had died from non-accidental deaths. After controlling for adherence, CD4 counts, and socioeconomic variables, people who were food insecure and underweight were nearly two times more likely to die (Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=1.94, 95% Confidence interval [CI]=1.10-3.40) compared with people who were not food insecure or underweight. There was also a trend towards increased risk of mortality among people who were food insecure and not underweight (AHR= 1.40, 95% CI=0.91-2.05). In contrast, people who were underweight but food secure were not more likely to die. Conclusions Food insecurity is a risk factor for mortality among ART-treated individuals in BC, particularly among individuals who are underweight. Innovative approaches to address food insecurity should be incorporated into HIV treatment programs. PMID:19675463

  9. Calcium, magnesium and potassium intake and mortality in women with heart failure: the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Emily B; Shikany, James M; Ahmed, Ali; Snetselaar, Linda G; Martin, Lisa W; Curb, J David; Lewis, Cora E

    2013-07-14

    Although diet is thought to affect the natural history of heart failure (HF), nutrient intake in HF patients has not been well studied. Based on prior research linking high intake of Ca, Mg and K to improved cardiovascular health, we hypothesised that these nutrients would be inversely associated with mortality in people with HF. Of the 161 808 participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), we studied 3340 who experienced a HF hospitalisation. These participants were followed for post-hospitalisation all-cause mortality. Intake was assessed using questionnaires on food and supplement intake. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographics, physical function, co-morbidities and dietary covariates. Over a median of 4·6 years of follow-up, 1433 (42·9 %) of the women died. HR across quartiles of dietary Ca intake were 1·00 (referent), 0·86 (95 % CI 0·73, 1·00), 0·88 (95 % CI 0·75, 1·04) and 0·92 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·11) (P for trend = 0·63). Corresponding HR were 1·00 (referent), 0·86 (95 % CI 0·71, 1·04), 0·88 (95 % CI 0·69, 1·11) and 0·84 (95 % CI 0·63, 1·12) (P for trend = 0·29), across quartiles of dietary Mg intake, and 1·00 (referent), 1·20 (95 % CI 1·01, 1·43), 1·06 (95 % CI 0·86, 1·32) and 1·16 (95 % CI 0·90, 1·51) (P for trend = 0·35), across quartiles of dietary K intake. Results were similar when total (dietary plus supplemental) nutrient intakes were examined. In summary, among WHI participants with incident HF hospitalisation, intakes of Ca, Mg and K were not significantly associated with subsequent mortality.

  10. Seven-year mortality in heart failure patients with undiagnosed diabetes: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and heart failure have adverse clinical outcomes, but the characteristics and prognosis of those with undiagnosed diabetes in this setting has not been established. Methods In total, 400 patients admitted consecutively with acute heart failure were grouped in three glycaemic categories: no diabetes, clinical diabetes (previously reported or with hypoglycaemic treatment) and undiagnosed diabetes. The latter was defined by the presence of at least two measurements of fasting plasma glycaemia ≥ 7 mmol/L before or after the acute episode.Group differences were tested by proportional hazards models in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality during a 7-year follow-up. Results There were 188 (47%) patients without diabetes, 149 (37%) with clinical diabetes and 63 (16%) with undiagnosed diabetes. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes had a lower prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, peripheral vascular disease and previous myocardial infarction than those with clinical diabetes and similar to that of those without diabetes. The adjusted hazards ratios for 7-year total and cardiovascular mortality compared with the group of subjects without diabetes were 1.69 (95% CI: 1.17-2.46) and 2.45 (95% CI: 1.58-3.81) for those with undiagnosed diabetes, and 1.48 (95% CI: 1.10-1.99) and 2.01 (95% CI: 1.40-2.89) for those with clinical diabetes. Conclusions Undiagnosed diabetes is common in patients requiring hospitalization for acute heart failure. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes, despite having a lower cardiovascular risk profile than those with clinical diabetes, show a similar increased mortality. PMID:21569580

  11. Reducing our environmental footprint and improving our health: greenhouse gas emission and land use of usual diet and mortality in EPIC-NL: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Food choices influence health status, but also have a great impact on the environment. The production of animal-derived foods has a high environmental burden, whereas the burden of refined carbohydrates, vegetables and fruit is low. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of greenhouse gas emission (GHGE) and land use of usual diet with mortality risk, and to estimate the effect of a modelled meat substitution scenario on health and the environment. Methods The usual diet of 40011 subjects in the EPIC-NL cohort was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. GHGE and land use of food products were based on life cycle analysis. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) were calculated to determine relative mortality risk. In the modelled meat-substitution scenario, one-third (35 gram) of the usual daily meat intake (105 gram) was substituted by other foods. Results During a follow-up of 15.9 years, 2563 deaths were registered. GHGE and land use of the usual diet were not associated with all-cause or with cause-specific mortality. Highest vs. lowest quartile of GHGE and land use adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were respectively 1.00 (95% CI: 0.86-1.17) and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.89-1.23). Modelled substitution of 35 g/d of meat with vegetables, fruit-nuts-seeds, pasta-rice-couscous, or fish significantly increased survival rates (6-19%), reduced GHGE (4-11%), and land use (10-12%). Conclusions There were no significant associations observed between dietary-derived GHGE and land use and mortality in this Dutch cohort. However, the scenario-study showed that substitution of meat with other major food groups was associated with a lower mortality risk and a reduced environmental burden. Especially when vegetables, fruit-nuts-seeds, fish, or pasta-rice-couscous replaced meat. PMID:24708803

  12. Blood pressure and risk of all-cause mortality in advanced chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis: the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; McCulloch, Charles E; Rahman, Mahboob; Kusek, John W; Anderson, Amanda H; Xie, Dawei; Townsend, Raymond R; Lora, Claudia M; Wright, Jackson; Go, Alan S; Ojo, Akinlolu; Alper, Arnold; Lustigova, Eva; Cuevas, Magda; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of hemodialysis patients have shown a U-shaped association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mortality. These studies have largely relied on dialysis-unit SBP measures and have not evaluated whether this U-shape also exists in advanced chronic kidney disease, before starting hemodialysis. We determined the association between SBP and mortality at advanced chronic kidney disease and again after initiation of hemodialysis. This was a prospective study of Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants with advanced chronic kidney disease followed through initiation of hemodialysis. We studied the association between SBP and mortality when participants (1) had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 (n=1705), (2) initiated hemodialysis and had dialysis-unit SBP measures (n=403), and (3) initiated hemodialysis and had out-of-dialysis-unit SBP measured at a Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study visit (n=326). Cox models were adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and dialysis parameters. A quadratic term for SBP was included to test for a U-shaped association. At advanced chronic kidney disease, there was no association between SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.02 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.07] per every 10 mm Hg increase). Among participants who started hemodialysis, a U-shaped association between dialysis-unit SBP and mortality was observed. In contrast, there was a linear association between out-of-dialysis-unit SBP and mortality (hazard ratio, 1.26 [95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.40] per every 10 mm Hg increase). In conclusion, more efforts should be made to obtain out-of-dialysis-unit SBP, which may merit more consideration as a target for clinical management and in interventional trials.

  13. Effect of Urate-Lowering Therapy on All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hyperuricemic Patients without Gout: A Case-Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiunn-Horng; Lan, Joung-Liang; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Liang, Wen-Miin; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Tsay, Gregory J; Yeh, Wen-Ting; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2015-01-01

    Objectives An increased risk of mortality in patients with hyperuricemia has been reported. We examined (1) the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in untreated hyperuricemic patients who did not receive urate-lowering therapy (ULT), and (2) the impact of ULT on mortality risk in patients with hyperuricemia. Methods In this retrospective case-matched cohort study during a mean follow-up of 6.4 years, 40,118 Taiwanese individuals aged ≥17 years who had never used ULT and who had never had gout were examined. The mortality rate was compared between 3,088 hyperuricemic patients who did not receive ULT and reference subjects (no hyperuricemia, no gout, no ULT) matched for age and sex (1:3 hyperuricemic patients/reference subjects), and between 1,024 hyperuricemic patients who received ULT and 1,024 hyperuricemic patients who did not receive ULT (matched 1:1 based on their propensity score and the index date of ULT prescription). Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to estimate the respective risk of all-cause and CVD (ICD-9 code 390–459) mortality. Results After adjustment, hyperuricemic patients who did not receive ULT had increased risks of all-cause (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.97–1.59) and CVD (2.13; 1.34–3.39) mortality relative to the matched reference subjects. Hyperuricemic patients treated with ULT had a lower risk of all-cause death (0.60; 0.41–0.88) relative to hyperuricemic patients who did not receive ULT. Conclusion Under-treatment of hyperuricemia has serious negative consequences. Hyperuricemic patients who received ULT had potentially better survival than patients who did not. PMID:26683302

  14. Muscle Quality and Myosteatosis: Novel Associations With Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Ilse; Murphy, Rachel A.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Visser, Marjolein; Launer, Lenore; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Lang, Thomas F.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle composition may affect mortality risk, but prior studies have been limited to specific samples or less precise determination of muscle composition. We evaluated associations of thigh muscle composition, determined using computed tomography imaging, and knee extension strength with mortality risk among 4,824 participants aged 76.4 (standard deviation (SD), 5.5) years from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (2002–2006). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios. After 8.8 years of follow-up, there were 1,942 deaths. For men, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 11% and 22%. Each SD-increment increase in intermuscular adipose tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with higher mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.22) and HR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30), respectively). For women, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 12% and 19%. Greater intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with an 8% higher mortality risk (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16). This study shows that muscle composition is associated with mortality risk. These results also show the importance of improving muscle strength and area and lowering muscle adipose tissue infiltration. PMID:26643983

  15. Individual joblessness, contextual unemployment, and mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Tapia Granados, José A; House, James S; Ionides, Edward L; Burgard, Sarah; Schoeni, Robert S

    2014-08-01

    Longitudinal studies at the level of individuals find that employees who lose their jobs are at increased risk of death. However, analyses of aggregate data find that as unemployment rates increase during recessions, population mortality actually declines. We addressed this paradox by using data from the US Department of Labor and annual survey data (1979-1997) from a nationally representative longitudinal study of individuals-the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Using proportional hazards (Cox) regression, we analyzed how the hazard of death depended on 1) individual joblessness and 2) state unemployment rates, as indicators of contextual economic conditions. We found that 1) compared with the employed, for the unemployed the hazard of death was increased by an amount equivalent to 10 extra years of age, and 2) each percentage-point increase in the state unemployment rate reduced the mortality hazard in all individuals by an amount equivalent to a reduction of 1 year of age. Our results provide evidence that 1) joblessness strongly and significantly raises the risk of death among those suffering it, and 2) periods of higher unemployment rates, that is, recessions, are associated with a moderate but significant reduction in the risk of death among the entire population.

  16. Change of Nutritional Status Assessed Using Subjective Global Assessment Is Associated With All-Cause Mortality in Incident Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Eun; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Han, In Mee; Han, Seung Gyu; Park, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung H; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam-Ho; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2016-02-01

    Subjective global assessment (SGA) is associated with mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. However, little is known whether improvement or deterioration of nutritional status after dialysis initiation influences the clinical outcome. We aimed to elucidate the association between changes in nutritional status determined by SGA during the first year of dialysis and all-cause mortality in incident ESRD patients. This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study. Incident dialysis patients with available SGA data at both baseline and 12 months after dialysis commencement (n = 914) were analyzed. Nutritional status was defined as well nourished (WN, SGA A) or malnourished (MN, SGA B or C). The patients were divided into 4 groups according to the change in nutritional status between baseline and 12 months after dialysis commencement: group 1, WN to WN; group 2, MN to WN; group 3, WN to MN; and group 4, MN to MN. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to clarify the association between changes in nutritional status and mortality. Being in the MN group at 12 months after dialysis initiation, but not at baseline, was a significant risk factor for mortality. There was a significant difference in the 3-year survival rates among the groups (group 1, 92.2%; group 2, 86.0%; group 3, 78.2%; and group 4, 63.5%; log-rank test, P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that the mortality risk was significantly higher in group 3 than in group 1 (hazard ratio [HR] 2.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-6.03, P = 0.01) whereas the mortality risk was significantly lower in group 2 compared with group 4 (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17-0.71, P < 0.01) even after adjustment for confounding factors. Moreover, mortality risk of group 3 was significantly higher than in group 2 (HR 2.89, 95% CI 1.22-6.81, P = 0.02); there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2. The changes in nutritional status assessed by SGA during the first

  17. Mid-arm muscle circumference as a significant predictor of all-cause mortality in male individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Wei; Lin, Yuan-Yung; Kao, Tung-Wei; Lin, Chien-Ming; Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Chung-Ching; Peng, Tao-Chun; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Background Emerging evidences indicate that mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) is one of the anthropometric indicators that reflect health and nutritional status, but its correlative effectiveness in all-cause mortality prediction of United States individuals remains uncertain. Methods and findings design We investigated the joint association between MAMC and all-cause mortality in the US general population. A population-based longitudinal study of 6,769 participants aged 40 to 90 years in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All participants were divided into two groups based on the gender: male and female group; each group was then divided into three subgroups depending on their MAMC level. The tertiles were as follows: T1 (18<27.3), T2 (27.3<29.6), T3 (29.6≤40.0) cm in the male group and T1 (15<22.3), T2 (22.3<24.6), T3 (24.6≤44.0) cm in the female group. Multivariable Cox regression analyses and Kaplan–Meier survival probabilities were utilized to jointly relate all-cause mortality risk to different MAMC level. For all-cause mortality in male participants, multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69–0.98; p = 0.033) for MAMC of 27.3–29.6 cm compared with 18–27.3 cm, and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61–0.95; p = 0.018) for MAMC of 29.6–40 cm compared with 18–27.3 cm. For all-cause mortality in female participants, multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69–1.02; p = 0.075) for MAMC of 22.3–24.6 cm compared with 15–22.3 cm, and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.75–1.17; p = 0.583) for MAMC of 24.6–44 cm compared with 15–22.3 cm. Conclusion Results support a lower MAMC is associated with a higher mortality risk in male individuals. PMID:28196081

  18. Personality Change Influences Mortality in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Avron

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that high neuroticism is associated with early mortality. However, recent work suggests that people's level of neuroticism changes over long periods of time. We hypothesized that such changes in trait neuroticism affect mortality risk. Growth-curve parameters (levels and slopes) that quantified the trajectories of neuroticism change over 12 years were used to predict 18-year risk of mortality among 1,663 aging men. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate mortality risk from level and slope parameters, controlling for objective and subjective health, depression, and age. Although a parallel analysis of extraversion showed no significant effects, level and slope of neuroticism interacted in their effect on mortality. Men who had both a high average level of neuroticism and an increasing level of neuroticism over time had much lower survival than men without that combination. These findings suggest that it is not just the level of personality traits, but their direction of change, that is related to mortality. PMID:17576273

  19. Significantly greater reduction in breast cancer mortality from post-diagnosis running than walking.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of these analyses is to test prospectively whether post-diagnosis running and walking differ significantly in their association with breast cancer mortality. Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to compare breast cancer mortality to baseline exercise energy expenditure (METs, 1 MET-hour ≅1 km run) in 272 runners and 714 walkers previously diagnosed with breast cancer from the National Runners' and Walkers' Health Studies when adjusted for age, race, menopause, family history, breastfeeding and oral contraceptive use. Diagnosis occurred (mean ± SD) 7.9 ± 7.3 years before baseline. Forty-six women (13 runners and 33 walkers) died from breast cancer during 9.1-year mortality surveillance. For the 986 runners and walkers combined, breast cancer mortality decreased an average of 23.9% MET-hours/day [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.9-38.3%; p = 0.004]. There was a significantly greater decrease in risk for running than walking (risk per MET-hours/day run vs. walked: p = 0.03). For the 272 runners analyzed separately, breast cancer mortality decreased an average of 40.9% per MET-hours/day run (95% CI: 19.3-60.0%, p = 0.0004). When analyzed by categories of running energy expenditure, breast cancer mortality was 87.4% lower for the 1.8-3.6 MET-hours/day category (95% CI: 41.3-98.2% lower, p = 0.008) and 95.4% lower for the ≥3.6 MET-hours/day category (95% CI: 71.9-100% lower, p = 0.0004) compared to the <1.07 MET-hours/day category. In contrast, the 714 walkers showed a nonsignificant 4.6% decrease in breast cancer mortality per MET-hours/day walked (95% CI: 27.3% decreased risk to 21.3% increased risk, p = 0.71). These results suggest that post-diagnosis running is associated with significantly lower breast cancer mortality than post-diagnosis walking.

  20. Incense Use and Cardiovascular Mortality among Chinese in Singapore: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Maggie L.; Ang, Li-Wei; Yu, Mimi C.; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incense burning is common in many parts of the world. Although it is perceived that particulate matter from incense smoke is deleterious to health, there is no epidemiologic evidence linking domestic exposure to cardiovascular mortality. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to incense burning and cardiovascular mortality in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Methods: We enrolled a total of 63,257 Singapore Chinese 45–74 years of age during 1993–1998. All participants were interviewed in person to collect information about lifestyle behaviors, including the practice of burning incense at home. We identified cardiovascular deaths via record linkage with the nationwide death registry through 31 December 2011. Results: In this cohort, 76.9% were current incense users, and most of the current users (89.9%) had burned incense daily for ≥ 20 years. Relative to noncurrent users, current users had a 12% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality [multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.20]. The HR was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.37) for mortality due to stroke and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.21) for mortality due to coronary heart disease. The association between current incense use and cardiovascular mortality appeared to be limited to participants without a history of cardiovascular disease at baseline (HR = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.26) but not linked to those with a history (HR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.17). In addition, the association was stronger in never-smokers (HR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.23) and former smokers (HR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.42) than in current smokers (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.22). Conclusions: Long-term exposure to incense burning in the home environment was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in the study population. Citation: Pan A, Clark ML, Ang LW, Yu MC, Yuan JM, Koh WP. 2014. Incense use and cardiovascular mortality among Chinese in Singapore: The Singapore Chinese Health

  1. Dietary intake of vitamin K is inversely associated with mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Juanola-Falgarona, Martí; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramón; Ros, Emili; Fitó, Montserrat; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Basora, Josep; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Fernández-Ballart, Joan; Bulló, Mònica

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin K has been related to cardiovascular disease and cancer risk. However, data on total mortality are scarce. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the dietary intake of different types of vitamin K and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular disease risk. A prospective cohort analysis was conducted in 7216 participants from the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) study (median follow-up of 4.8 y). Energy and nutrient intakes were evaluated using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire. Dietary vitamin K intake was calculated annually using the USDA food composition database and other published sources. Deaths were ascertained by an end-point adjudication committee unaware of the dietary habits of participants after they had reviewed medical records and linked up to the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were fitted to assess the RR of mortality. Energy-adjusted baseline dietary phylloquinone intake was inversely associated with a significantly reduced risk of cancer and all-cause mortality after controlling for potential confounders (HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.96; and HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.90, respectively). In longitudinal assessments, individuals who increased their intake of phylloquinone or menaquinone during follow-up had a lower risk of cancer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.95; and HR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.64, respectively) and all-cause mortality (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.73; and HR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.73, respectively) than individuals who decreased or did not change their intake. Also, individuals who increased their intake of dietary phylloquinone had a lower risk of cardiovascular mortality risk (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.86). However, no association between changes in menaquinone intake and cardiovascular mortality was observed (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.29). An increase in dietary intake of vitamin K is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular

  2. Shift work and overall and cause-specific mortality in the Danish nurse cohort.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Karlsen, Sashia; Stayner, Leslie; Andersen, Johnni; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

    2017-03-01

    Objectives Evidence of an effect of shift work on all-cause and cause-specific mortality is inconsistent. This study aims to examine whether shift work is associated with increased all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Methods We linked 28 731 female nurses (age ≥44 years), recruited in 1993 or 1999 from the Danish nurse cohort where they reported information on shift work (night, evening, rotating, or day), to the Danish Register of Causes of Death to identify deaths up to 2013. We used Cox regression models with age as the underlying scale to examine the associations between night, evening, and rotating shift work (compared to day shift work) and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in models adjusted for potentially confounding variables. Results Of 18 015 nurses included in this study, 1616 died during the study time period from the following causes: cardiovascular disease (N=217), cancer (N= 945), diabetes (N=20), Alzheimer's disease or dementia (N=33), and psychiatric diseases (N=67). We found that working night [hazard ratio (HR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval 95% CI) 1.05-1.51] or evening (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.11-1.49) shifts was associated with a significant increase in all-cause mortality when compared to working day shift. We found a significant association of night shift work with cardiovascular disease (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.09-2.69) and diabetes (HR 12.0, 95% CI 3.17-45.2, based on 8 cases) and none with overall cancer mortality (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.81-1.35) or mortality from psychiatric diseases (HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.47-2.92). Finally, we found strong association between evening (HR 4.28, 95% CI 1.62-11.3) and rotating (HR 5.39, 95% CI 2.35-12.3) shift work and mortality from Alzheimer's disease and dementia (based on 8 and 14 deaths among evening and rotating shift workers, respectively). Conclusions Women working night and evening shifts have increased all-cause, cardiovascular, diabetes, and Alzheimer's and dementia mortality.

  3. All-cause mortality risk in elderly individuals with disabilities: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Chiang, Sheng-Ta; Yang, Hui-Fang; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chan, James Yi-Hsin; Kao, Tung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Disability is considered an important issue that affects the elderly population. This study aimed to explore the relationship between disability and all-cause mortality in US elderly individuals. Design Retrospective and longitudinal designs. Setting Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2002) conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Participants A total of 1834 participants in the age range 60–84 years from NHANES 1999–2002. Main outcome measures We acquired five major domains of disability (activities of daily living (ADL), general physical activities (GPA), instrumental ADL (IADL), lower extremity mobility (LEM) and leisure and social activities (LSA)) through self-reporting. We applied an extended-model approach with Cox (proportional hazards) regression analysis to investigate the relationship between different features of disability and all-cause mortality risk in the study population. Results During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 77 deaths occurred. An increased risk of all-cause mortality was identified in elderly individuals with disability after adjustment for potential confounders (HR 2.23; 95% CI 1.29 to 3.85; p=0.004). Participants with more than one domain of disability were associated with a higher risk of mortality (ptrend=0.047). Adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for each domain of disability were 2.53 (1.49 to 4.31), 1.99 (0.93 to 4.29), 1.74 (0.72 to 4.16), 1.57 (0.76 to 3.27) and 1.52 (0.93 to 2.48) for LEM, LSA, ADL, IADL and GPA, respectively. Conclusions The results of this study support an increased association between disability and all-cause mortality in the elderly in the USA. Disability in LEM may be a good predictor of high risk of all-cause mortality in elderly subjects. PMID:27625055

  4. A High Dietary Glycemic Index Increases Total Mortality in a Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Estruch, Ramón; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Schröder, Helmut; Álvarez-Pérez, Jacqueline; Ruiz-López, María Dolores; Artacho, Reyes; Ros, Emilio; Bulló, Mónica; Covas, María-Isabel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Objective Different types of carbohydrates have diverse glycemic response, thus glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) are used to assess this variation. The impact of dietary GI and GL in all-cause mortality is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the association between dietary GI and GL and risk of all-cause mortality in the PREDIMED study. Material and Methods The PREDIMED study is a randomized nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention based on community-dwelling men and women at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected at baseline and yearly using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). We assigned GI values of each item by a 5-step methodology, using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Deaths were ascertained through contact with families and general practitioners, review of medical records and consultation of the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% CI for mortality, according to quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL. To assess repeated measures of exposure, we updated GI and GL intakes from the yearly FFQs and used Cox models with time-dependent exposures. Results We followed 3,583 non-diabetic subjects (4.7 years of follow-up, 123 deaths). As compared to participants in the lowest quartile of baseline dietary GI, those in the highest quartile showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR = 2.15 (95% CI: 1.15–4.04); P for trend  = 0.012]. In the repeated-measures analyses using as exposure the yearly updated information on GI, we observed a similar association. Dietary GL was associated with all-cause mortality only when subjects were younger than 75 years. Conclusions High dietary GI was positively associated with all-cause mortality in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25250626

  5. One-year Mortality after an Acute Coronary Event and its Clinical Predictors: The ERICO Study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Itamar Souza; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Brandão, Rodrigo Martins; Santos, Rafael Caire de Oliveira; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Sitnik, Débora; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Pastore, Carlos Alberto; Samesima, Nelson; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Bensenor, Isabela Martins

    2015-01-01

    Background Information about post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) survival have been mostly short-term findings or based on specialized, cardiology referral centers. Objectives To describe one-year case-fatality rates in the Strategy of Registry of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ERICO) cohort, and to study baseline characteristics as predictors. Methods We analyzed data from 964 ERICO participants enrolled from February 2009 to December 2012. We assessed vital status by telephone contact and official death certificate searches. The cause of death was determined according to the official death certificates. We used log-rank tests to compare the probabilities of survival across subgroups. We built crude and adjusted (for age, sex and ACS subtype) Cox regression models to study if the ACS subtype or baseline characteristics were independent predictors of all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Results We identified 110 deaths in the cohort (case-fatality rate, 12.0%). Age [Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.04 per 10 year increase; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.75–2.38], non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (HR = 3.82 ; 95%CI = 2.21–6.60) or ST elevation myocardial infarction (HR = 2.59; 95%CI = 1.38–4.89) diagnoses, and diabetes (HR = 1.78; 95%CI = 1.20‑2.63) were significant risk factors for all-cause mortality in the adjusted models. We found similar results for cardiovascular mortality. A previous coronary artery disease diagnosis was also an independent predictor of all-cause mortality (HR = 1.61; 95%CI = 1.04–2.50), but not for cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion We found an overall one-year mortality rate of 12.0% in a sample of post-ACS patients in a community, non-specialized hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Age, ACS subtype, and diabetes were independent predictors of poor one‑year survival for overall and cardiovascular-related causes. PMID:25993485

  6. Dietary soy intake is not associated with risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in Singapore Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Talaei, Mohammad; Koh, Woon-Puay; van Dam, Rob M; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pan, An

    2014-06-01

    Although soy food has been recommended because of its presumed cardiovascular benefits, the long-term prospective association between habitual soy food intake and cardiovascular disease mortality remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the relation of soy protein and isoflavone intake with the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged and older Chinese adults residing in Singapore. The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based study that recruited 63,257 Chinese adults aged 45-74 y from 1993 to 1998. Usual diet was measured at recruitment by using a validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire, and mortality information was identified via registry linkage until 31 December 2011. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs, with adjustment for potential confounders. The median intake was 5.2 g/d for soy protein, 15.8 mg/d for soy isoflavones, and 87.4 g/d for soy expressed as tofu equivalents. We documented 4780 cardiovascular deaths during 890,473 person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and other dietary factors, soy protein intake was not significantly associated with cardiovascular disease mortality: HRs (95% CIs) were 1.00 (reference), 1.02 (0.94, 1.11), 1.02 (0.93, 1.11), and 1.06 (0.97, 1.17) for increasing quartiles of soy protein (P-trend = 0.24). Similarly, no significant association was observed for soy isoflavones and total tofu equivalents and when deaths from coronary heart disease (n = 2697) and stroke (n = 1298) were considered separately. When stratified by sex, HRs for cardiovascular disease mortality across quartiles of soy protein were 1.00, 1.00, 1.05, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.31) in men (P-trend = 0.02) and 1.00, 1.01, 0.96, and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.10) in women (P-trend = 0.31), although the interaction was not significant (P-interaction = 0.12). In conclusion, soy intake was not significantly associated with risk of cardiovascular disease mortality

  7. Diabetes Mellitus and Mortality after Acute Coronary Syndrome as a First or Recurrent Cardiovascular Event

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M.; Abbas, Afroze; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Kilcullen, Niamh; Das, Raj; Morrell, Christine; Barth, Julian H.; Kearney, Mark T.; Hall, Alistair S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is associated with adverse cardiovascular prognosis. However, the risk associated with DM may vary between individuals according to their overall cardiovascular risk burden. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether DM is associated with poor outcome in patients presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) according to the index episode being a first or recurrent cardiovascular event. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort study involving 2499 consecutively admitted patients with confirmed ACS in 11 UK hospitals during 2003. Usual care was provided for all participants. Demographic factors, co-morbidity and treatment (during admission and at discharge) factors were recorded. The primary outcome was all cause mortality (median 2 year follow up), compared for cohorts with and without DM according to their prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease status. Adjusted analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Within the entire cohort, DM was associated with an unadjusted 45% increase in mortality. However, in patients free of a history of CVD, mortality of those with and without DM was similar (18.8% and 19.7% respectively; p = 0.74). In the group with CVD, mortality of patients with DM was significantly higher than those without DM (46.7% and 33.2% respectively; p<0.001). The age and sex adjusted interaction between DM and CVD in predicting mortality was highly significant (p = 0.002) and persisted after accounting for comorbidities and treatment factors (p = 0.006). Of patients free of CVD, DM was associated with smaller elevation of Troponin I (p<0.001). However in patients with pre-existing CVD Troponin I was similar (p = 0.992). Conclusions DM is only associated with worse outcome after ACS in patients with a pre-existing history of CVD. Differences in the severity of myocyte necrosis may account for this. Further investigation is required

  8. Oxidative DNA Damage and Mortality in Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Watanabe, Makoto; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimbürger, Olof; Bárány, Peter; Anderstam, Björn; Eriksson, Monica; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background and Aims: Increased oxidative stress in dialysis patients is thought to contribute to increased mortality; however, confirmatory data are scarce. We analyzed the serum concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative stress, in relation to mortality in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. ♦ Methods: Serum 8-OHdG, interleukin 6 (IL-6), other biochemical markers, Davies comorbidity score, and protein-energy wasting (PEW) were assessed in 303 prevalent patients treated with HD (n = 220; age: 63 ± 14 years) or PD (n = 83; age: 64 ± 14 years). Mortality was assessed after a median follow-up of 31 months. ♦ Results: The median (25th – 75th percentile) concentration of 8-OHdG was higher in HD than in PD patients: 1.3 ng/mL (0.9 – 1.8 ng/mL) versus 0.5 ng/mL (0.4 – 0.6 ng/mL), p < 0.001. The HD modality (standard β = 0.57, p < 0.001) and dialysis vintage (standard β = 0.12, p = 0.02) were independent predictors of serum 8-OHdG in a multivariable linear regression model including age, sex, body mass index, dialysis modality (HD or PD), preceding time on dialysis (dialysis vintage), PEW, comorbidity score, IL-6, and use of angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers or statins. During follow-up, 107 patients died. In multivariable Cox regression models including all 303 patients and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, dialysis modality, dialysis vintage, and comorbidity score, 8-OHdG was significantly associated with all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.40; 95% confidence limits: 1.05, 1.87 for 1 standard deviation increase of 8-OHdG). In subgroup analyses according to dialysis modality, 8-OHdG was associated with mortality in HD patients but not in PD patients. ♦ Conclusions: Oxidative stress as assessed by 8-OHdG is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in dialysis patients. This association was seen in HD patients, but no such

  9. Sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Edwards, Meghan K.; Sng, Eveleen; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of accelerometer-assessed sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 5536), with follow-up through 2011. Sedentary behavior was objectively measured over 7 days via accelerometry. Results: When expressing sedentary behavior as a 60 min/day increase, the hazard ratio across the models ranged from 1.07-1.40 (P < 0.05). There was evidence of an interaction effect between sedentary behavior and total physical activity on residual-specific mortality (Hazard ratiointeraction [HR] = 0.9989; 95% CI: 0.9982-0.9997; P = 0.008). Conclusion: Sedentary behavior was independently associated with residual-specific mortality. However, there was evidence to suggest that residual-specific mortality risk was a function of sedentary behavior and total physical activity. These findings highlight the need for future work to not only examine the association between sedentary behavior and health independent of total physical activity, but evaluate whether there is a joint effect of these two parameters on health. PMID:27766237

  10. Gender Differences in Appropriate Shocks and Mortality among Patients with Primary Prophylactic Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conen, David; Arendacká, Barbora; Röver, Christian; Bergau, Leonard; Munoz, Pascal; Wijers, Sofieke; Sticherling, Christian; Zabel, Markus; Friede, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Some but not all prior studies have shown that women receiving a primary prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) have a lower risk of death and appropriate shocks than men. Purpose To evaluate the effect of gender on the risk of appropriate shock, all-cause mortality and inappropriate shock in contemporary studies of patients receiving a primary prophylactic ICD. Data Source PubMed, LIVIVO, Cochrane CENTRAL between 2010 and 2016. Study Selection Studies providing at least 1 gender-specific risk estimate for the outcomes of interest. Data Extraction Abstracts were screened independently for potentially eligible studies for inclusion. Thereby each abstract was reviewed by at least two authors. Data Synthesis Out of 680 abstracts retained by our search strategy, 20 studies including 46’657 patients had gender-specific information on at least one of the relevant endpoints. Mean age across the individual studies varied between 58 and 69 years. The proportion of women enrolled ranged from 10% to 30%. Across 6 available studies, women had a significantly lower risk of first appropriate shock compared with men (pooled multivariable adjusted hazard ratio 0.62 (95% CI [0.44; 0.88]). Across 14 studies reporting multivariable adjusted gender-specific hazard ratio estimates for all-cause mortality, women had a lower risk of death than men (pooled hazard ratio 0.75 (95% CI [0.66; 0.86]). There was no statistically significant difference for the incidence of first inappropriate shocks (3 studies, pooled hazard ratio 0.99 (95% CI [0.56; 1.73]). Limitations Individual patient data were not available for most studies. Conclusion In this large contemporary meta-analysis, women had a significantly lower risk of appropriate shocks and death than men, but a similar risk of inappropriate shocks. These data may help to select patients who benefit from primary prophylactic ICD implantation. PMID:27618617

  11. Trends in colorectal cancer mortality in Europe: retrospective analysis of the WHO mortality database

    PubMed Central

    Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Pizot, Cécile; Boniol, Magali; Malvezzi, Matteo; Boniol, Mathieu; Negri, Eva; Bota, Maria; Jenkins, Mark A; Bleiberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in colorectal cancer mortality in 34 European countries between 1970 and 2011. Design Retrospective trend analysis. Data source World Health Organization mortality database. Population Deaths from colorectal cancer between 1970 and 2011. Profound changes in screening and treatment efficiency took place after 1988; therefore, particular attention was paid to the evolution of colorectal cancer mortality in the subsequent period. Main outcomes measures Time trends in rates of colorectal cancer mortality, using joinpoint regression analysis. Rates were age adjusted using the standard European population. Results From 1989 to 2011, colorectal cancer mortality increased by a median of 6.0% for men and decreased by a median of 14.7% for women in the 34 European countries. Reductions in colorectal cancer mortality of more than 25% in men and 30% in women occurred in Austria, Switzerland, Germany, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Luxembourg, and Ireland. By contrast, mortality rates fell by less than 17% in the Netherlands and Sweden for both sexes. Over the same period, smaller or no declines occurred in most central European countries. Substantial mortality increases occurred in Croatia, the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia, and Romania for both sexes and in most eastern European countries for men. In countries with decreasing mortality, reductions were more important for women of all ages and men younger than 65 years. In the 27 European Union member states, colorectal cancer mortality fell by 13.0% in men and 27.0% in women, compared with corresponding reductions of 39.8% and 38.8% in the United States. Conclusion Over the past 40 years, there has been considerable disparity in the level of colorectal cancer mortality between European countries, as well as between men and women and age categories. Countries with the largest reductions in colorectal cancer mortality are characterised by better accessibility to screening

  12. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Mortality among Survivors of Myocardial Infarction: Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Burnett, Richard T.; Copes, Ray; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Brook, Robert D.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Jerrett, Michael; Martin, Randall V.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Kopp, Alexander; Tu, Jack V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are at increased risk of dying within several hours to days following exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Little is known, however, about the influence of long-term (months to years) air pollution exposure on survival after AMI. Objective: We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine the impact of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) on post-AMI survival. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 8,873 AMI patients who were admitted to 1 of 86 hospital corporations across Ontario, Canada in 1999–2001. Mortality follow-up for this cohort extended through 2011. Cumulative time-weighted exposures to PM2.5 were derived from satellite observations based on participants’ annual residences during follow-up. We used standard and multilevel spatial random-effects Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Between 1999 and 2011, we identified 4,016 nonaccidental deaths, of which 2,147 were from any cardiovascular disease, 1,650 from ischemic heart disease, and 675 from AMI. For each 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR10) of nonaccidental mortality was 1.22 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.45]. The association with PM2.5 was robust to sensitivity analyses and appeared stronger for cardiovascular-related mortality: ischemic heart (HR10 = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.83) and AMI (HR10 = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.40). We estimated that 12.4% of nonaccidental deaths (or 497 deaths) could have been averted if the lowest measured concentration in an urban area (4 μg/m3) had been achieved at all locations over the course of the study. Conclusions: Long-term air pollution exposure adversely affects the survival of AMI patients. Citation: Chen H, Burnett RT, Copes R, Kwong JC, Villeneuve PJ, Goldberg MS, Brook RD, van Donkelaar A, Jerrett M, Martin RV, Brook JR, Kopp A, Tu JV. 2016. Ambient fine

  13. Short-term mortality risk of serum potassium levels in acute heart failure following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Krogager, Maria Lukács; Eggers-Kaas, Lotti; Aasbjerg, Kristian; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Søgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aims Diuretic treatment is often needed in acute heart failure following myocardial infarction (MI) and carries a risk of abnormal potassium levels. We examined the relation between different levels of potassium and mortality. Methods and results From Danish national registries we identified 2596 patients treated with loop diuretics after their first MI episode where potassium measurement was available within 3 months. All-cause mortality was examined according to seven predefined potassium levels: hypokalaemia <3.5 mmol/L, low normal potassium 3.5–3.8 mmol/L, normal potassium 3.9–4.2 mmol/L, normal potassium 4.3–4.5 mmol/L, high normal potassium 4.6–5.0 mmol/L, mild hyperkalaemia 5.1–5.5 mmol/L, and severe hyperkalaemia: >5.5 mmol/L. Follow-up was 90 days and using normal potassium 3.9–4.2 mmol/L as a reference, we estimated the risk of death with a multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model. After 90 days, the mortality rates in the seven potassium intervals were 15.7, 13.6, 7.3, 8.1, 10.6, 15.5, and 38.3%, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted risk for death was statistically significant for patients with hypokalaemia [hazard ratio (HR): 1.91, confidence interval (95%CI): 1.14–3.19], and mild and severe hyperkalaemia (HR: 2, CI: 1.25–3.18 and HR: 5.6, CI: 3.38–9.29, respectively). Low and high normal potassium were also associated with increased mortality (HR: 1.84, CI: 1.23–2.76 and HR: 1.55, CI: 1.09–2.22, respectively). Conclusion Potassium levels outside the interval 3.9–4.5 mmol/L were associated with a substantial risk of death in patients requiring diuretic treatment after an MI. PMID:27418967

  14. Health Care Wide Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... Electrical Ergonomics Fire Hazards Glutaraldehyde Hazardous Chemicals Infection Seasonal Flu MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms MRSA - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Latex Allergy Legionnaires' Disease Needlesticks Noise Mercury Inappropriate PPE Slips/ ...

  15. Hazardous Waste Generators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many industries generate hazardous waste. EPA regulates hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to ensure these wastes are managed in ways that are protective of human health and the environment.

  16. Hazardous Waste Permitting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To provide RCRA hazardous waste permitting regulatory information and resources permitted facilities, hazardous waste generators, and permit writers. To provide the public with information on how they can be involved in the permitting process.

  17. Relative risks of chronic kidney disease for mortality and end-stage renal disease across races are similar.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chi Pang; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Islam, Muhammad; Katz, Ronit; McClellan, William; Peralta, Carmen A; Wang, HaiYan; de Zeeuw, Dick; Astor, Brad C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera

    2014-10-01

    Some suggest race-specific cutpoints for kidney measures to define and stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), but evidence for race-specific clinical impact is limited. To address this issue, we compared hazard ratios of estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) and albuminuria across races using meta-regression in 1.1 million adults (75% Asians, 21% Whites, and 4% Blacks) from 45 cohorts. Results came mainly from 25 general population cohorts comprising 0.9 million individuals. The associations of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria with mortality and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were largely similar across races. For example, in Asians, Whites, and Blacks, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for eGFR 45-59 versus 90-104 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were 1.3 (1.2-1.3), 1.1 (1.0-1.2), and 1.3 (1.1-1.7) for all-cause mortality, 1.6 (1.5-1.7), 1.4 (1.2-1.7), and 1.4 (0.7-2.9) for cardiovascular mortality, and 27.6 (11.1-68.7), 11.2 (6.0-20.9), and 4.1 (2.2-7.5) for ESRD, respectively. The corresponding hazard ratios for urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio 30-299 mg/g or dipstick 1+ versus an albumin-to-creatinine ratio under 10 or dipstick negative were 1.6 (1.4-1.8), 1.7 (1.5-1.9), and 1.8 (1.7-2.1) for all-cause mortality, 1.7 (1.4-2.0), 1.8 (1.5-2.1), and 2.8 (2.2-3.6) for cardiovascular mortality, and 7.4 (2.0-27.6), 4.0 (2.8-5.9), and 5.6 (3.4-9.2) for ESRD, respectively. Thus, the relative mortality or ESRD risks of lower eGFR and higher albuminuria were largely similar among three major races, supporting similar clinical approach to CKD definition and staging, across races.

  18. Mortality Associated with Night and Weekend Admissions to ICU with On-Site Intensivist Coverage: Results of a Nine-Year Cohort Study (2006-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Brunot, Vincent; Landreau, Liliane; Corne, Philippe; Platon, Laura; Besnard, Noémie; Buzançais, Aurèle; Daubin, Delphine; Serre, Jean Emmanuel; Molinari, Nicolas; Klouche, Kada

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between mortality and time of admission to ICU has been extensively studied but remains controversial. We revaluate the impact of time of admission on ICU mortality by retrospectively investigating a recent (2006–2014) and large ICU cohort with on-site intensivist coverage. Patients and Methods All adults (≥ 18 years) admitted to a tertiary care medical ICU were included in the study. Patients' characteristics, medical management, and mortality were prospectively collected. Patients were classified according to their admission time: week working days on- and off-hours, and weekends. ICU mortality was the primary outcome and adjusted Hazard-ratios (HR) of death were analysed by multivariate Cox model. Results 2,428 patients were included: age 62±18 years; male: 1,515 (62%); and median SAPSII score: 38 (27–52). Overall ICU mortality rate was 13.7%. Admissions to ICU occurred during open-hours in 680 cases (28%), during night-time working days in 1,099 cases (45%) and during weekends in 649 cases (27%). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar between groups except that patients admitted during the second part of night (00:00 to 07:59) have a significantly higher SAPS II score than others. ICU mortality was comparable between patients admitted during different time periods but was significantly higher for those admitted during the second part of the night. Multivariate analysis showed however that admission during weeknights and weekends was not associated with an increased ICU mortality as compared with open-hours admissions. Conclusion Time of admission, especially weeknight and weekend (off-hour admissions), did not influence the prognosis of ICU patients. The higher illness severity of patients admitted during the second part of the night (00:00–07:59) may explain the observed increased mortality. PMID:28033395