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Sample records for adjusted multiple regression

  1. Partial covariate adjusted regression

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2008-01-01

    Covariate adjusted regression (CAR) is a recently proposed adjustment method for regression analysis where both the response and predictors are not directly observed (Şentürk and Müller, 2005). The available data has been distorted by unknown functions of an observable confounding covariate. CAR provides consistent estimators for the coefficients of the regression between the variables of interest, adjusted for the confounder. We develop a broader class of partial covariate adjusted regression (PCAR) models to accommodate both distorted and undistorted (adjusted/unadjusted) predictors. The PCAR model allows for unadjusted predictors, such as age, gender and demographic variables, which are common in the analysis of biomedical and epidemiological data. The available estimation and inference procedures for CAR are shown to be invalid for the proposed PCAR model. We propose new estimators and develop new inference tools for the more general PCAR setting. In particular, we establish the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimators and propose consistent estimators of their asymptotic variances. Finite sample properties of the proposed estimators are investigated using simulation studies and the method is also illustrated with a Pima Indians diabetes data set. PMID:20126296

  2. Prediction in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the concept of prediction via multiple regression (MR) and discusses the assumptions underlying multiple regression analyses. Also discusses shrinkage, cross-validation, and double cross-validation of prediction equations and describes how to calculate confidence intervals around individual predictions. (SLD)

  3. Multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Lynn E

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes multiple linear regression, a statistical approach used to describe the simultaneous associations of several variables with one continuous outcome. Important steps in using this approach include estimation and inference, variable selection in model building, and assessing model fit. The special cases of regression with interactions among the variables, polynomial regression, regressions with categorical (grouping) variables, and separate slopes models are also covered. Examples in microbiology are used throughout. PMID:18450050

  4. R Squared Shrinkage in Multiple Regression Research: An Empirical Evaluation of Use and Impact of Adjusted Effect Formulae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thatcher, Greg W.; Henson, Robin K.

    This study examined research in training and development to determine effect size reporting practices. It focused on the reporting of corrected effect sizes in research articles using multiple regression analyses. When possible, researchers calculated corrected effect sizes and determine if the associated shrinkage could have impacted researcher…

  5. Multiple linear regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  6. Multiple Regression and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression is part of a larger statistical strategy originated by Gauss. The authors raise questions about the theory and suggest some changes that would make room for Mandelbrot and Serendipity.

  7. Weather adjustment using seemingly unrelated regression

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    Seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) is a system estimation technique that accounts for time-contemporaneous correlation between individual equations within a system of equations. SUR is suited to weather adjustment estimations when the estimation is: (1) composed of a system of equations and (2) the system of equations represents either different weather stations, different sales sectors or a combination of different weather stations and different sales sectors. SUR utilizes the cross-equation error values to develop more accurate estimates of the system coefficients than are obtained using ordinary least-squares (OLS) estimation. SUR estimates can be generated using a variety of statistical software packages including MicroTSP and SAS.

  8. Fungible Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.

    2008-01-01

    Every set of alternate weights (i.e., nonleast squares weights) in a multiple regression analysis with three or more predictors is associated with an infinite class of weights. All members of a given class can be deemed "fungible" because they yield identical "SSE" (sum of squared errors) and R[superscript 2] values. Equations for generating…

  9. Cross-Validation, Shrinkage, and Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Kevin

    One aspect of multiple regression--the shrinkage of the multiple correlation coefficient on cross-validation is reviewed. The paper consists of four sections. In section one, the distinction between a fixed and a random multiple regression model is made explicit. In section two, the cross-validation paradigm and an explanation for the occurrence…

  10. Some Simple Computational Formulas for Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lewis R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Short-cut formulas are presented for direct computation of the beta weights, the standard errors of the beta weights, and the multiple correlation coefficient for multiple regression problems involving three independent variables and one dependent variable. (Author)

  11. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  12. Practical Session: Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Three exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. In the first one investigates the influence of several factors on atmospheric pollution. It has been proposed by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr33.pdf) and is based on data coming from 20 cities of U.S. Exercise 2 is an introduction to model selection whereas Exercise 3 provides a first example of analysis of variance. Exercises 2 and 3 have been proposed by A. Dalalyan at ENPC (see Exercises 2 and 3 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_5.pdf).

  13. The Geometry of Enhancement in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.

    2011-01-01

    In linear multiple regression, "enhancement" is said to occur when R[superscript 2] = b[prime]r greater than r[prime]r, where b is a p x 1 vector of standardized regression coefficients and r is a p x 1 vector of correlations between a criterion y and a set of standardized regressors, x. When p = 1 then b [is congruent to] r and enhancement cannot…

  14. Multiple-Instance Regression with Structured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Lane, Terran; Roper, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We present a multiple-instance regression algorithm that models internal bag structure to identify the items most relevant to the bag labels. Multiple-instance regression (MIR) operates on a set of bags with real-valued labels, each containing a set of unlabeled items, in which the relevance of each item to its bag label is unknown. The goal is to predict the labels of new bags from their contents. Unlike previous MIR methods, MI-ClusterRegress can operate on bags that are structured in that they contain items drawn from a number of distinct (but unknown) distributions. MI-ClusterRegress simultaneously learns a model of the bag's internal structure, the relevance of each item, and a regression model that accurately predicts labels for new bags. We evaluated this approach on the challenging MIR problem of crop yield prediction from remote sensing data. MI-ClusterRegress provided predictions that were more accurate than those obtained with non-multiple-instance approaches or MIR methods that do not model the bag structure.

  15. Assumptions of Multiple Regression: Correcting Two Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Matt N.; Gomez Grajales, Carlos Alberto; Kurkiewicz, Dason

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, an article entitled "Four assumptions of multiple regression that researchers should always test" by Osborne and Waters was published in "PARE." This article has gone on to be viewed more than 275,000 times (as of August 2013), and it is one of the first results displayed in a Google search for "regression…

  16. Multiple Linear Regression: A Realistic Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutt, A. T.; Batsell, R. R.

    Examples of the use of Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) techniques are presented. This is done to show how MLR aids data processing and decision-making by providing the decision-maker with freedom in phrasing questions and by accurately reflecting the data on hand. A brief overview of the rationale underlying MLR is given, some basic definitions…

  17. Salience Assignment for Multiple-Instance Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Lane, Terran

    2007-01-01

    We present a Multiple-Instance Learning (MIL) algorithm for determining the salience of each item in each bag with respect to the bag's real-valued label. We use an alternating-projections constrained optimization approach to simultaneously learn a regression model and estimate all salience values. We evaluate this algorithm on a significant real-world problem, crop yield modeling, and demonstrate that it provides more extensive, intuitive, and stable salience models than Primary-Instance Regression, which selects a single relevant item from each bag.

  18. Assessing Longitudinal Change: Adjustment for Regression to the Mean Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2009-01-01

    Pascarella (J Coll Stud Dev 47:508-520, 2006) has called for an increase in use of longitudinal data with pretest-posttest design when studying effects on college students. However, such designs that use multiple measures to document change are vulnerable to an important threat to internal validity, regression to the mean. Herein, we discuss a…

  19. Hierarchical regression for analyses of multiple outcomes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Hamra, Ghassan B; MacLehose, Richard F; Cole, Stephen R; Chu, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    In cohort mortality studies, there often is interest in associations between an exposure of primary interest and mortality due to a range of different causes. A standard approach to such analyses involves fitting a separate regression model for each type of outcome. However, the statistical precision of some estimated associations may be poor because of sparse data. In this paper, we describe a hierarchical regression model for estimation of parameters describing outcome-specific relative rate functions and associated credible intervals. The proposed model uses background stratification to provide flexible control for the outcome-specific associations of potential confounders, and it employs a hierarchical "shrinkage" approach to stabilize estimates of an exposure's associations with mortality due to different causes of death. The approach is illustrated in analyses of cancer mortality in 2 cohorts: a cohort of dioxin-exposed US chemical workers and a cohort of radiation-exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Compared with standard regression estimates of associations, hierarchical regression yielded estimates with improved precision that tended to have less extreme values. The hierarchical regression approach also allowed the fitting of models with effect-measure modification. The proposed hierarchical approach can yield estimates of association that are more precise than conventional estimates when one wishes to estimate associations with multiple outcomes. PMID:26232395

  20. Multiple linear regression for isotopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Alonso, J. I.

    2012-04-01

    There are two typical applications of isotopic measurements: the detection of natural variations in isotopic systems and the detection man-made variations using enriched isotopes as indicators. For both type of measurements accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements are required. For the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes, multicollector ICP-MS instruments are usually applied. In many cases, chemical separation procedures are required before accurate isotope measurements can be performed. The off-line separation of Rb and Sr or Nd and Sm is the classical procedure employed to eliminate isobaric interferences before multicollector ICP-MS measurement of Sr and Nd isotope ratios. Also, this procedure allows matrix separation for precise and accurate Sr and Nd isotope ratios to be obtained. In our laboratory we have evaluated the separation of Rb-Sr and Nd-Sm isobars by liquid chromatography and on-line multicollector ICP-MS detection. The combination of this chromatographic procedure with multiple linear regression of the raw chromatographic data resulted in Sr and Nd isotope ratios with precisions and accuracies typical of off-line sample preparation procedures. On the other hand, methods for the labelling of individual organisms (such as a given plant, fish or animal) are required for population studies. We have developed a dual isotope labelling procedure which can be unique for a given individual, can be inherited in living organisms and it is stable. The detection of the isotopic signature is based also on multiple linear regression. The labelling of fish and its detection in otoliths by Laser Ablation ICP-MS will be discussed using trout and salmon as examples. As a conclusion, isotope measurement procedures based on multiple linear regression can be a viable alternative in multicollector ICP-MS measurements.

  1. Estimation of adjusted rate differences using additive negative binomial regression.

    PubMed

    Donoghoe, Mark W; Marschner, Ian C

    2016-08-15

    Rate differences are an important effect measure in biostatistics and provide an alternative perspective to rate ratios. When the data are event counts observed during an exposure period, adjusted rate differences may be estimated using an identity-link Poisson generalised linear model, also known as additive Poisson regression. A problem with this approach is that the assumption of equality of mean and variance rarely holds in real data, which often show overdispersion. An additive negative binomial model is the natural alternative to account for this; however, standard model-fitting methods are often unable to cope with the constrained parameter space arising from the non-negativity restrictions of the additive model. In this paper, we propose a novel solution to this problem using a variant of the expectation-conditional maximisation-either algorithm. Our method provides a reliable way to fit an additive negative binomial regression model and also permits flexible generalisations using semi-parametric regression functions. We illustrate the method using a placebo-controlled clinical trial of fenofibrate treatment in patients with type II diabetes, where the outcome is the number of laser therapy courses administered to treat diabetic retinopathy. An R package is available that implements the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27073156

  2. Interpretation of Standardized Regression Coefficients in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Jerome D.

    The extent to which standardized regression coefficients (beta values) can be used to determine the importance of a variable in an equation was explored. The beta value and the part correlation coefficient--also called the semi-partial correlation coefficient and reported in squared form as the incremental "r squared"--were compared for variables…

  3. Technological Forecasting with a Multiple Regression Analysis Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luftig, Jeffrey T.; Norton, Willis P.

    1981-01-01

    This article examines simple and multiple regression analysis as forecasting tools, and details the process by which multiple regression analysis may be used to increase the accuracy of the technology forecast. (CT)

  4. What's the Risk? A Simple Approach for Estimating Adjusted Risk Measures from Nonlinear Models Including Logistic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Lawrence C; Norton, Edward C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a general method (called regression risk analysis) to estimate adjusted risk measures from logistic and other nonlinear multiple regression models. We show how to estimate standard errors for these estimates. These measures could supplant various approximations (e.g., adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) that may diverge, especially when outcomes are common. Study Design Regression risk analysis estimates were compared with internal standards as well as with Mantel–Haenszel estimates, Poisson and log-binomial regressions, and a widely used (but flawed) equation to calculate adjusted risk ratios (ARR) from AOR. Data Collection Data sets produced using Monte Carlo simulations. Principal Findings Regression risk analysis accurately estimates ARR and differences directly from multiple regression models, even when confounders are continuous, distributions are skewed, outcomes are common, and effect size is large. It is statistically sound and intuitive, and has properties favoring it over other methods in many cases. Conclusions Regression risk analysis should be the new standard for presenting findings from multiple regression analysis of dichotomous outcomes for cross-sectional, cohort, and population-based case–control studies, particularly when outcomes are common or effect size is large. PMID:18793213

  5. Fuzzy multiple linear regression: A computational approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, C. H.; Huang, X. H.; Fleming, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational approach for performing fuzzy regression. In contrast to Bardossy's approach, the new approach, while dealing with fuzzy variables, closely follows the conventional regression technique. In this approach, treatment of fuzzy input is more 'computational' than 'symbolic.' The following sections first outline the formulation of the new approach, then deal with the implementation and computational scheme, and this is followed by examples to illustrate the new procedure.

  6. A Constrained Linear Estimator for Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Stober, Clintin P.; Dana, Jason; Budescu, David V.

    2010-01-01

    "Improper linear models" (see Dawes, Am. Psychol. 34:571-582, "1979"), such as equal weighting, have garnered interest as alternatives to standard regression models. We analyze the general circumstances under which these models perform well by recasting a class of "improper" linear models as "proper" statistical models with a single predictor. We…

  7. Procedures for adjusting regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using local data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, Anne B.; Lizarraga, Joy S.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical operations termed model-adjustment procedures can be used to incorporate local data into existing regression modes to improve the predication of urban-runoff quality. Each procedure is a form of regression analysis in which the local data base is used as a calibration data set; the resulting adjusted regression models can then be used to predict storm-runoff quality at unmonitored sites. Statistical tests of the calibration data set guide selection among proposed procedures.

  8. Coercively Adjusted Auto Regression Model for Forecasting in Epilepsy EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Faloutsos, Christos; Yang, Hyung-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Recently, data with complex characteristics such as epilepsy electroencephalography (EEG) time series has emerged. Epilepsy EEG data has special characteristics including nonlinearity, nonnormality, and nonperiodicity. Therefore, it is important to find a suitable forecasting method that covers these special characteristics. In this paper, we propose a coercively adjusted autoregression (CA-AR) method that forecasts future values from a multivariable epilepsy EEG time series. We use the technique of random coefficients, which forcefully adjusts the coefficients with −1 and 1. The fractal dimension is used to determine the order of the CA-AR model. We applied the CA-AR method reflecting special characteristics of data to forecast the future value of epilepsy EEG data. Experimental results show that when compared to previous methods, the proposed method can forecast faster and accurately. PMID:23710252

  9. Adjustment of regional regression equations for urban storm-runoff quality using at-site data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barks, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Regional regression equations have been developed to estimate urban storm-runoff loads and mean concentrations using a national data base. Four statistical methods using at-site data to adjust the regional equation predictions were developed to provide better local estimates. The four adjustment procedures are a single-factor adjustment, a regression of the observed data against the predicted values, a regression of the observed values against the predicted values and additional local independent variables, and a weighted combination of a local regression with the regional prediction. Data collected at five representative storm-runoff sites during 22 storms in Little Rock, Arkansas, were used to verify, and, when appropriate, adjust the regional regression equation predictions. Comparison of observed values of stormrunoff loads and mean concentrations to the predicted values from the regional regression equations for nine constituents (chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, total nitrogen as N, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as N, total phosphorus as P, dissolved phosphorus as P, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc) showed large prediction errors ranging from 63 percent to more than several thousand percent. Prediction errors for 6 of the 18 regional regression equations were less than 100 percent and could be considered reasonable for water-quality prediction equations. The regression adjustment procedure was used to adjust five of the regional equation predictions to improve the predictive accuracy. For seven of the regional equations the observed and the predicted values are not significantly correlated. Thus neither the unadjusted regional equations nor any of the adjustments were appropriate. The mean of the observed values was used as a simple estimator when the regional equation predictions and adjusted predictions were not appropriate.

  10. Sample Sizes when Using Multiple Linear Regression for Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knofczynski, Gregory T.; Mundfrom, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    When using multiple regression for prediction purposes, the issue of minimum required sample size often needs to be addressed. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, models with varying numbers of independent variables were examined and minimum sample sizes were determined for multiple scenarios at each number of independent variables. The scenarios…

  11. A Multiple Regression Approach to Normalization of Spatiotemporal Gait Features.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Ferdous; Begg, Rezaul; Lythgo, Noel; Hass, Chris J; Halgamuge, Saman; Ackland, David C

    2016-04-01

    Normalization of gait data is performed to reduce the effects of intersubject variations due to physical characteristics. This study reports a multiple regression normalization approach for spatiotemporal gait data that takes into account intersubject variations in self-selected walking speed and physical properties including age, height, body mass, and sex. Spatiotemporal gait data including stride length, cadence, stance time, double support time, and stride time were obtained from healthy subjects including 782 children, 71 adults, 29 elderly subjects, and 28 elderly Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Data were normalized using standard dimensionless equations, a detrending method, and a multiple regression approach. After normalization using dimensionless equations and the detrending method, weak to moderate correlations between walking speed, physical properties, and spatiotemporal gait features were observed (0.01 < |r| < 0.88), whereas normalization using the multiple regression method reduced these correlations to weak values (|r| <0.29). Data normalization using dimensionless equations and detrending resulted in significant differences in stride length and double support time of PD patients; however the multiple regression approach revealed significant differences in these features as well as in cadence, stance time, and stride time. The proposed multiple regression normalization may be useful in machine learning, gait classification, and clinical evaluation of pathological gait patterns. PMID:26426798

  12. Hierarchical regression for epidemiologic analyses of multiple exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Greenland, S

    1994-01-01

    Many epidemiologic investigations are designed to study the effects of multiple exposures. Most of these studies are analyzed either by fitting a risk-regression model with all exposures forced in the model, or by using a preliminary-testing algorithm, such as stepwise regression, to produce a smaller model. Research indicates that hierarchical modeling methods can outperform these conventional approaches. These methods are reviewed and compared to two hierarchical methods, empirical-Bayes regression and a variant here called "semi-Bayes" regression, to full-model maximum likelihood and to model reduction by preliminary testing. The performance of the methods in a problem of predicting neonatal-mortality rates are compared. Based on the literature to date, it is suggested that hierarchical methods should become part of the standard approaches to multiple-exposure studies. PMID:7851328

  13. Multiple Response Regression for Gaussian Mixture Models with Known Labels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyul; Du, Ying; Sun, Wei; Hayes, D Neil; Liu, Yufeng

    2012-12-01

    Multiple response regression is a useful regression technique to model multiple response variables using the same set of predictor variables. Most existing methods for multiple response regression are designed for modeling homogeneous data. In many applications, however, one may have heterogeneous data where the samples are divided into multiple groups. Our motivating example is a cancer dataset where the samples belong to multiple cancer subtypes. In this paper, we consider modeling the data coming from a mixture of several Gaussian distributions with known group labels. A naive approach is to split the data into several groups according to the labels and model each group separately. Although it is simple, this approach ignores potential common structures across different groups. We propose new penalized methods to model all groups jointly in which the common and unique structures can be identified. The proposed methods estimate the regression coefficient matrix, as well as the conditional inverse covariance matrix of response variables. Asymptotic properties of the proposed methods are explored. Through numerical examples, we demonstrate that both estimation and prediction can be improved by modeling all groups jointly using the proposed methods. An application to a glioblastoma cancer dataset reveals some interesting common and unique gene relationships across different cancer subtypes. PMID:24416092

  14. Direction of Effects in Multiple Linear Regression Models.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Wolfgang; von Eye, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies analyzed asymmetric properties of the Pearson correlation coefficient using higher than second order moments. These asymmetric properties can be used to determine the direction of dependence in a linear regression setting (i.e., establish which of two variables is more likely to be on the outcome side) within the framework of cross-sectional observational data. Extant approaches are restricted to the bivariate regression case. The present contribution extends the direction of dependence methodology to a multiple linear regression setting by analyzing distributional properties of residuals of competing multiple regression models. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the third central moments of estimated regression residuals can be used to decide upon direction of effects. In addition, three different approaches for statistical inference are discussed: a combined D'Agostino normality test, a skewness difference test, and a bootstrap difference test. Type I error and power of the procedures are assessed using Monte Carlo simulations, and an empirical example is provided for illustrative purposes. In the discussion, issues concerning the quality of psychological data, possible extensions of the proposed methods to the fourth central moment of regression residuals, and potential applications are addressed. PMID:26609741

  15. Multiple Linear Regression as a Technique for Predicting College Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Ambrose A.; And Others

    The application of multiple linear regression to the problem of identifying appropriate criterion variables and predicting enrollment in college courses during a period of major rapid decline was studied. Data were gathered on course enrollments for 1972-78 at Kent State University, and five independent variables were selected to determine the…

  16. Interpreting Multiple Linear Regression: A Guidebook of Variable Importance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathans, Laura L.; Oswald, Frederick L.; Nimon, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression (MR) analyses are commonly employed in social science fields. It is also common for interpretation of results to typically reflect overreliance on beta weights, often resulting in very limited interpretations of variable importance. It appears that few researchers employ other methods to obtain a fuller understanding of what…

  17. Analysis and Interpretation of Findings Using Multiple Regression Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, William T.; Leierer, Stephen; Millington, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple regression and correlation (MRC) methods form a flexible family of statistical techniques that can address a wide variety of different types of research questions of interest to rehabilitation professionals. In this article, we review basic concepts and terms, with an emphasis on interpretation of findings relevant to research questions…

  18. Multiple Regression Analyses in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation,…

  19. A Theoretical Note on the Stochastics of Moderated Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisicaro, Sebastiano A.; Tisak, John

    1994-01-01

    Examination of the stochastics of moderated multiple regression (MMR) reveals that MMR is an appropriate technique when predictors are fixed variables and the distribution of errors is normal but is not appropriate when predictors are random variables and the joint distribution of criterion and predictor variables is multivariate normal. (SLD)

  20. Moderated Multiple Regression, Spurious Interaction Effects, and IRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sun-Mee; Waller, Niels G.

    2005-01-01

    Two Monte Carlo studies were conducted to explore the Type I error rates in moderated multiple regression (MMR) of observed scores and estimated latent trait scores from a two-parameter logistic item response theory (IRT) model. The results of both studies showed that MMR Type I error rates were substantially higher than the nominal alpha levels…

  1. Functional Regression Models for Epistasis Analysis of Multiple Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dan; Liang, Meimei; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-01-01

    To date, most genetic analyses of phenotypes have focused on analyzing single traits or analyzing each phenotype independently. However, joint epistasis analysis of multiple complementary traits will increase statistical power and improve our understanding of the complicated genetic structure of the complex diseases. Despite their importance in uncovering the genetic structure of complex traits, the statistical methods for identifying epistasis in multiple phenotypes remains fundamentally unexplored. To fill this gap, we formulate a test for interaction between two genes in multiple quantitative trait analysis as a multiple functional regression (MFRG) in which the genotype functions (genetic variant profiles) are defined as a function of the genomic position of the genetic variants. We use large-scale simulations to calculate Type I error rates for testing interaction between two genes with multiple phenotypes and to compare the power with multivariate pairwise interaction analysis and single trait interaction analysis by a single variate functional regression model. To further evaluate performance, the MFRG for epistasis analysis is applied to five phenotypes of exome sequence data from the NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) to detect pleiotropic epistasis. A total of 267 pairs of genes that formed a genetic interaction network showed significant evidence of epistasis influencing five traits. The results demonstrate that the joint interaction analysis of multiple phenotypes has a much higher power to detect interaction than the interaction analysis of a single trait and may open a new direction to fully uncovering the genetic structure of multiple phenotypes. PMID:27104857

  2. Functional Regression Models for Epistasis Analysis of Multiple Quantitative Traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Futao; Xie, Dan; Liang, Meimei; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, most genetic analyses of phenotypes have focused on analyzing single traits or analyzing each phenotype independently. However, joint epistasis analysis of multiple complementary traits will increase statistical power and improve our understanding of the complicated genetic structure of the complex diseases. Despite their importance in uncovering the genetic structure of complex traits, the statistical methods for identifying epistasis in multiple phenotypes remains fundamentally unexplored. To fill this gap, we formulate a test for interaction between two genes in multiple quantitative trait analysis as a multiple functional regression (MFRG) in which the genotype functions (genetic variant profiles) are defined as a function of the genomic position of the genetic variants. We use large-scale simulations to calculate Type I error rates for testing interaction between two genes with multiple phenotypes and to compare the power with multivariate pairwise interaction analysis and single trait interaction analysis by a single variate functional regression model. To further evaluate performance, the MFRG for epistasis analysis is applied to five phenotypes of exome sequence data from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) to detect pleiotropic epistasis. A total of 267 pairs of genes that formed a genetic interaction network showed significant evidence of epistasis influencing five traits. The results demonstrate that the joint interaction analysis of multiple phenotypes has a much higher power to detect interaction than the interaction analysis of a single trait and may open a new direction to fully uncovering the genetic structure of multiple phenotypes. PMID:27104857

  3. Comparison of the Properties of Regression and Categorical Risk-Adjustment Models

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Richard F.; Muldoon, John H.; Hughes, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical risk-adjustment, the ability to standardize the comparison of individuals with different health needs, is based upon 2 main alternative approaches: regression models and clinical categorical models. In this article, we examine the impact of the differences in the way these models are constructed on end user applications. PMID:26945302

  4. Using Wherry's Adjusted R Squared and Mallow's C (p) for Model Selection from All Possible Regressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen; Mills, Jamie; Keselman, Harvey

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated the use of Mallow's C(p) and Wherry's adjusted R squared (R. Wherry, 1931) statistics to select a final model from a pool of model solutions using computer generated data. Neither statistic identified the underlying regression model any better than, and usually less well than, the stepwise selection method, which itself was poor for…

  5. A multiple regression equation for prediction of posthepatectomy liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, N; Okamoto, E; Kuwata, K; Tanaka, N

    1984-01-01

    This article reports a multiple regression equation for prediction of posthepatectomy liver failure. In phase I, using the correlations between 17 preoperative parameters (Xi) and the postoperative course scored (Y) of the past 36 hepatectomized patients, we proposed the following multiple regression equation: Y = -110 + 0.942 X resection rate (%) + 1.36 X ICG retention rate (%) + 1.17 X patient's age + 5.94 X ICG maximal removal rate (mg/kg/min). With the equation, the calculated Y value (prediction score) of these patients revealed that prediction scores of the eight nonsurvivors with liver failure were more than 50 points while those of the 28 survivors were 50 points or less. In phase II, the relationships between early prognosis and a precalculated prediction score were prospectively found the same as that seen in phase I. These findings indicate that our formula is a useful prognostic index for prediction of posthepatectomy liver failure. PMID:6486915

  6. Procedures for adjusting regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using local data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Sisolak, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Statistical operations termed model-adjustment procedures (MAP?s) can be used to incorporate local data into existing regression models to improve the prediction of urban-runoff quality. Each MAP is a form of regression analysis in which the local data base is used as a calibration data set. Regression coefficients are determined from the local data base, and the resulting `adjusted? regression models can then be used to predict storm-runoff quality at unmonitored sites. The response variable in the regression analyses is the observed load or mean concentration of a constituent in storm runoff for a single storm. The set of explanatory variables used in the regression analyses is different for each MAP, but always includes the predicted value of load or mean concentration from a regional regression model. The four MAP?s examined in this study were: single-factor regression against the regional model prediction, P, (termed MAP-lF-P), regression against P,, (termed MAP-R-P), regression against P, and additional local variables (termed MAP-R-P+nV), and a weighted combination of P, and a local-regression prediction (termed MAP-W). The procedures were tested by means of split-sample analysis, using data from three cities included in the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program: Denver, Colorado; Bellevue, Washington; and Knoxville, Tennessee. The MAP that provided the greatest predictive accuracy for the verification data set differed among the three test data bases and among model types (MAP-W for Denver and Knoxville, MAP-lF-P and MAP-R-P for Bellevue load models, and MAP-R-P+nV for Bellevue concentration models) and, in many cases, was not clearly indicated by the values of standard error of estimate for the calibration data set. A scheme to guide MAP selection, based on exploratory data analysis of the calibration data set, is presented and tested. The MAP?s were tested for sensitivity to the size of a calibration data set. As expected, predictive accuracy of all MAP?s for

  7. Optimization of fixture layouts of glass laser optics using multiple kernel regression.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianhua; Cao, Enhua; Qiao, Hong

    2014-05-10

    We aim to build an integrated fixturing model to describe the structural properties and thermal properties of the support frame of glass laser optics. Therefore, (a) a near global optimal set of clamps can be computed to minimize the surface shape error of the glass laser optic based on the proposed model, and (b) a desired surface shape error can be obtained by adjusting the clamping forces under various environmental temperatures based on the model. To construct the model, we develop a new multiple kernel learning method and call it multiple kernel support vector functional regression. The proposed method uses two layer regressions to group and order the data sources by the weights of the kernels and the factors of the layers. Because of that, the influences of the clamps and the temperature can be evaluated by grouping them into different layers. PMID:24922017

  8. Precipitation interpolation in mountainous regions using multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, L.; Viger, R.; McCabe, G.

    1998-01-01

    Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to spatially interpolate precipitation for simulating runoff in the Animas River basin of southwestern Colorado. MLR equations were defined for each time step using measured precipitation as dependent variables. Explanatory variables used in each MLR were derived for the dependent variable locations from a digital elevation model (DEM) using a geographic information system. The same explanatory variables were defined for a 5 ?? 5 km grid of the DEM. For each time step, the best MLR equation was chosen and used to interpolate precipitation onto the 5 ?? 5 km grid. The gridded values of precipitation provide a physically-based estimate of the spatial distribution of precipitation and result in reliable simulations of daily runoff in the Animas River basin.

  9. Teasing out the effect of tutorials via multiple regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasteen, Stephanie V.

    2012-02-01

    We transformed an upper-division physics course using a variety of elements, including homework help sessions, tutorials, clicker questions with peer instruction, and explicit learning goals. Overall, the course transformations improved student learning, as measured by our conceptual assessment. Since these transformations were multi-faceted, we would like to understand the impact of individual course elements. Attendance at tutorials and homework help sessions was optional, and occurred outside the class environment. In order to identify the impact of these optional out-of-class sessions, given self-selection effects in student attendance, we performed a multiple regression analysis. Even when background variables are taken into account, tutorial attendance is positively correlated with student conceptual understanding of the material - though not with performance on course exams. Other elements that increase student time-on-task, such as homework help sessions and lectures, do not achieve the same impacts.

  10. Multiple regression analyses in the prediction of aerospace instrument costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Linh

    The aerospace industry has been investing for decades in ways to improve its efficiency in estimating the project life cycle cost (LCC). One of the major focuses in the LCC is the cost/prediction of aerospace instruments done during the early conceptual design phase of the project. The accuracy of early cost predictions affects the project scheduling and funding, and it is often the major cause for project cost overruns. The prediction of instruments' cost is based on the statistical analysis of these independent variables: Mass (kg), Power (watts), Instrument Type, Technology Readiness Level (TRL), Destination: earth orbiting or planetary, Data rates (kbps), Number of bands, Number of channels, Design life (months), and Development duration (months). This author is proposing a cost prediction approach of aerospace instruments based on these statistical analyses: Clustering Analysis, Principle Components Analysis (PCA), Bootstrap, and multiple regressions (both linear and non-linear). In the proposed approach, the Cost Estimating Relationship (CER) will be developed for the dependent variable Instrument Cost by using a combination of multiple independent variables. "The Full Model" will be developed and executed to estimate the full set of nine variables. The SAS program, Excel, Automatic Cost Estimating Integrate Tool (ACEIT) and Minitab are the tools to aid the analysis. Through the analysis, the cost drivers will be identified which will help develop an ultimate cost estimating software tool for the Instrument Cost prediction and optimization of future missions.

  11. Regularized logistic regression with adjusted adaptive elastic net for gene selection in high dimensional cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Algamal, Zakariya Yahya; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2015-12-01

    Cancer classification and gene selection in high-dimensional data have been popular research topics in genetics and molecular biology. Recently, adaptive regularized logistic regression using the elastic net regularization, which is called the adaptive elastic net, has been successfully applied in high-dimensional cancer classification to tackle both estimating the gene coefficients and performing gene selection simultaneously. The adaptive elastic net originally used elastic net estimates as the initial weight, however, using this weight may not be preferable for certain reasons: First, the elastic net estimator is biased in selecting genes. Second, it does not perform well when the pairwise correlations between variables are not high. Adjusted adaptive regularized logistic regression (AAElastic) is proposed to address these issues and encourage grouping effects simultaneously. The real data results indicate that AAElastic is significantly consistent in selecting genes compared to the other three competitor regularization methods. Additionally, the classification performance of AAElastic is comparable to the adaptive elastic net and better than other regularization methods. Thus, we can conclude that AAElastic is a reliable adaptive regularized logistic regression method in the field of high-dimensional cancer classification. PMID:26520484

  12. Novel applications of multitask learning and multiple output regression to multiple genetic trait prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, David; Parida, Laxmi

    2016-01-01

    Given a set of biallelic molecular markers, such as SNPs, with genotype values encoded numerically on a collection of plant, animal or human samples, the goal of genetic trait prediction is to predict the quantitative trait values by simultaneously modeling all marker effects. Genetic trait prediction is usually represented as linear regression models. In many cases, for the same set of samples and markers, multiple traits are observed. Some of these traits might be correlated with each other. Therefore, modeling all the multiple traits together may improve the prediction accuracy. In this work, we view the multitrait prediction problem from a machine learning angle: as either a multitask learning problem or a multiple output regression problem, depending on whether different traits share the same genotype matrix or not. We then adapted multitask learning algorithms and multiple output regression algorithms to solve the multitrait prediction problem. We proposed a few strategies to improve the least square error of the prediction from these algorithms. Our experiments show that modeling multiple traits together could improve the prediction accuracy for correlated traits. Availability and implementation: The programs we used are either public or directly from the referred authors, such as MALSAR (http://www.public.asu.edu/~jye02/Software/MALSAR/) package. The Avocado data set has not been published yet and is available upon request. Contact: dhe@us.ibm.com PMID:27307640

  13. Social-psychological adjustment to multiple sclerosis. A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, N A; Matson, R R

    1982-01-01

    This study employs a longitudinal design to analyze the adjustment process of 103 people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and in the middle and later stages of their illness careers. The mean age of the sample at Time 2 is 52 years, and mean duration since diagnosis is 17 years. A highly reliable self concept measure is the indicator of adjustment and changes in adjustment from T1 (1974) to T2 (1981). Four sets of variables are analyzed in their relationship to adjustment: (1) socio-demographic; (2) disease-related; (3) medical; and (4) social-psychological. Females are more likely than males to show positive adjustment (improving self concepts). Hours of employment and living arrangement are also related to the adjustment process. The vast majority of respondents show only slight decline in mobility, but among the disease related variables, number of episodes (exacerbations) in past seven years is the strongest predictor of changes in adjustment. Nearly half the respondents seek medical attention for their M.S. once a year or less, and the choice of health care professional is related to changes in the course of the disease. Subjects with an internal locus of control have more positive adjustment scores. Those who say they cope through acceptance of the disease show improvements in self concept while those reporting religion or family as major coping strategies have decreasing self concepts. Results indicate that the majority make satisfactory adjustment as indicated by maintenance of positive self concepts over the 7 year period, although the disease is chronic and progressive. For patients in the middle and later stages of illness careers, the data suggest comprehensive rehabilitation efforts that enhance autonomy and develop the social-psychological resources of the lifestyle. PMID:7157043

  14. Modeling Pan Evaporation for Kuwait by Multiple Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    Almedeij, Jaber

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation is an important parameter for many projects related to hydrology and water resources systems. This paper constitutes the first study conducted in Kuwait to obtain empirical relations for the estimation of daily and monthly pan evaporation as functions of available meteorological data of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The data used here for the modeling are daily measurements of substantial continuity coverage, within a period of 17 years between January 1993 and December 2009, which can be considered representative of the desert climate of the urban zone of the country. Multiple linear regression technique is used with a procedure of variable selection for fitting the best model forms. The correlations of evaporation with temperature and relative humidity are also transformed in order to linearize the existing curvilinear patterns of the data by using power and exponential functions, respectively. The evaporation models suggested with the best variable combinations were shown to produce results that are in a reasonable agreement with observation values. PMID:23226984

  15. Multiple comparisons for survival data with propensity score adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong; Lu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the practical problem in clinical and observational studies where multiple treatment or prognostic groups are compared and the observed survival data are subject to right censoring. Two possible formulations of multiple comparisons are suggested. Multiple Comparisons with a Control (MCC) compare every other group to a control group with respect to survival outcomes, for determining which groups are associated with lower risk than the control. Multiple Comparisons with the Best (MCB) compare each group to the truly minimum risk group and identify the groups that are either with the minimum risk or the practically minimum risk. To make a causal statement, potential confounding effects need to be adjusted in the comparisons. Propensity score based adjustment is popular in causal inference and can effectively reduce the confounding bias. Based on a propensity-score-stratified Cox proportional hazards model, the approaches of MCC test and MCB simultaneous confidence intervals for general linear models with normal error outcome are extended to survival outcome. This paper specifies the assumptions for causal inference on survival outcomes within a potential outcome framework, develops testing procedures for multiple comparisons and provides simultaneous confidence intervals. The proposed methods are applied to two real data sets from cancer studies for illustration, and a simulation study is also presented. PMID:25663729

  16. Waste generated in high-rise buildings construction: a quantification model based on statistical multiple regression.

    PubMed

    Parisi Kern, Andrea; Ferreira Dias, Michele; Piva Kulakowski, Marlova; Paulo Gomes, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    Reducing construction waste is becoming a key environmental issue in the construction industry. The quantification of waste generation rates in the construction sector is an invaluable management tool in supporting mitigation actions. However, the quantification of waste can be a difficult process because of the specific characteristics and the wide range of materials used in different construction projects. Large variations are observed in the methods used to predict the amount of waste generated because of the range of variables involved in construction processes and the different contexts in which these methods are employed. This paper proposes a statistical model to determine the amount of waste generated in the construction of high-rise buildings by assessing the influence of design process and production system, often mentioned as the major culprits behind the generation of waste in construction. Multiple regression was used to conduct a case study based on multiple sources of data of eighteen residential buildings. The resulting statistical model produced dependent (i.e. amount of waste generated) and independent variables associated with the design and the production system used. The best regression model obtained from the sample data resulted in an adjusted R(2) value of 0.694, which means that it predicts approximately 69% of the factors involved in the generation of waste in similar constructions. Most independent variables showed a low determination coefficient when assessed in isolation, which emphasizes the importance of assessing their joint influence on the response (dependent) variable. PMID:25704604

  17. A Control Chart Based on Cluster-Regression Adjustment for Retrospective Monitoring of Individual Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hong Choon; Alih, Ekele

    2015-01-01

    The tendency for experimental and industrial variables to include a certain proportion of outliers has become a rule rather than an exception. These clusters of outliers, if left undetected, have the capability to distort the mean and the covariance matrix of the Hotelling’s T2 multivariate control charts constructed to monitor individual quality characteristics. The effect of this distortion is that the control chart constructed from it becomes unreliable as it exhibits masking and swamping, a phenomenon in which an out-of-control process is erroneously declared as an in-control process or an in-control process is erroneously declared as out-of-control process. To handle these problems, this article proposes a control chart that is based on cluster-regression adjustment for retrospective monitoring of individual quality characteristics in a multivariate setting. The performance of the proposed method is investigated through Monte Carlo simulation experiments and historical datasets. Results obtained indicate that the proposed method is an improvement over the state-of-art methods in terms of outlier detection as well as keeping masking and swamping rate under control. PMID:25923739

  18. Regression Discontinuity Designs with Multiple Rating-Score Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Robinson, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of a randomized control trial, regression discontinuity (RD) designs can produce plausible estimates of the treatment effect on an outcome for individuals near a cutoff score. In the standard RD design, individuals with rating scores higher than some exogenously determined cutoff score are assigned to one treatment condition; those…

  19. Estimating leaf photosynthetic pigments information by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis and a leaf optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Wang, Hong; Bai, Kaixu; Gao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Leaf pigments are key elements for plant photosynthesis and growth. Traditional manual sampling of these pigments is labor-intensive and costly, which also has the difficulty in capturing their temporal and spatial characteristics. The aim of this work is to estimate photosynthetic pigments at large scale by remote sensing. For this purpose, inverse model were proposed with the aid of stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) analysis. Furthermore, a leaf radiative transfer model (i.e. PROSPECT model) was employed to simulate the leaf reflectance where wavelength varies from 400 to 780 nm at 1 nm interval, and then these values were treated as the data from remote sensing observations. Meanwhile, simulated chlorophyll concentration (Cab), carotenoid concentration (Car) and their ratio (Cab/Car) were taken as target to build the regression model respectively. In this study, a total of 4000 samples were simulated via PROSPECT with different Cab, Car and leaf mesophyll structures as 70% of these samples were applied for training while the last 30% for model validation. Reflectance (r) and its mathematic transformations (1/r and log (1/r)) were all employed to build regression model respectively. Results showed fair agreements between pigments and simulated reflectance with all adjusted coefficients of determination (R2) larger than 0.8 as 6 wavebands were selected to build the SMLR model. The largest value of R2 for Cab, Car and Cab/Car are 0.8845, 0.876 and 0.8765, respectively. Meanwhile, mathematic transformations of reflectance showed little influence on regression accuracy. We concluded that it was feasible to estimate the chlorophyll and carotenoids and their ratio based on statistical model with leaf reflectance data.

  20. Using Robust Standard Errors to Combine Multiple Regression Estimates with Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ryan T.

    2012-01-01

    Combining multiple regression estimates with meta-analysis has continued to be a difficult task. A variety of methods have been proposed and used to combine multiple regression slope estimates with meta-analysis, however, most of these methods have serious methodological and practical limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore the use…

  1. Beyond Multiple Regression: Using Commonality Analysis to Better Understand R[superscript 2] Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warne, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple regression is one of the most common statistical methods used in quantitative educational research. Despite the versatility and easy interpretability of multiple regression, it has some shortcomings in the detection of suppressor variables and for somewhat arbitrarily assigning values to the structure coefficients of correlated…

  2. False Positives in Multiple Regression: Unanticipated Consequences of Measurement Error in the Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shear, Benjamin R.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Type I error rates in multiple regression, and hence the chance for false positive research findings, can be drastically inflated when multiple regression models are used to analyze data that contain random measurement error. This article shows the potential for inflated Type I error rates in commonly encountered scenarios and provides new…

  3. Using regression equations built from summary data in the psychological assessment of the individual case: extension to multiple regression.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John R; Garthwaite, Paul H; Denham, Annie K; Chelune, Gordon J

    2012-12-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because (a) not all psychologists are aware that regression equations can be built not only from raw data but also using only basic summary data for a sample, and (b) the computations involved are tedious and prone to error. In an attempt to overcome these barriers, Crawford and Garthwaite (2007) provided methods to build and apply simple linear regression models using summary statistics as data. In the present study, we extend this work to set out the steps required to build multiple regression models from sample summary statistics and the further steps required to compute the associated statistics for drawing inferences concerning an individual case. We also develop, describe, and make available a computer program that implements these methods. Although there are caveats associated with the use of the methods, these need to be balanced against pragmatic considerations and against the alternative of either entirely ignoring a pertinent data set or using it informally to provide a clinical "guesstimate." Upgraded versions of earlier programs for regression in the single case are also provided; these add the point and interval estimates of effect size developed in the present article. PMID:22449035

  4. Marital Adjustment: A Valuable Resource for the Emotional Health of Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Jennifer; Calder, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Examined relationship of marital adjustment and level of disability of persons with multiple sclerosis (n=104) to emotional adjustment. Found emotional adjustment significantly related to perceived level of marital adjustment, but no relationship found for level of disability. Results suggest, although marital adjustment is important for emotional…

  5. Conflict adjustment through domain-specific multiple cognitive control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chobok; Chung, Chongwook; Kim, Jeounghoon

    2012-03-20

    Cognitive control is required to regulate conflict between relevant and irrelevant information. Although previous neuroimaging studies have focused on response conflict, recent studies suggested that distinct neural networks are recruited in regulating perceptual conflict. The aim of the current study was to distinguish between brain areas involved in detecting and regulating perceptual conflict using a conflict adjustment paradigm. The Stroop color-matching task was combined with an arrow version of the Stroop task in order to independently manipulate perceptual and response conflicts. Behavioral results showed that post-conflict adjustment for perceptual and response conflicts were independent from each other. Imaging results demonstrated that the caudal portion of the dorsal cingulate cortex (cdACC) was selectively associated with the occurrence of perceptual conflict, whereas the left dorsal portion of the premotor cortex (pre-PMd) was selectively associated with both preceding and current perceptual conflict trials. Furthermore, the rostral portion of the dorsal cingulate cortex (rdACC) was selectively linked with response conflict, whereas the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was selectively involved in both preceding and current response conflict trials. We suggest that cdACC is involved in detecting perceptual conflict and left pre-PMd is involved in regulating perceptual conflict, which is analogous to the recruitment of rdACC and left DLPFC in control processes for response conflict. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that multiple independent monitor-controller loops are implemented in the frontal cognitive control system. PMID:22305142

  6. Isolating and Examining Sources of Suppression and Multicollinearity in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckstead, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of suppression (and multicollinearity) in multiple regression analysis complicates interpretation of predictor-criterion relationships. The mathematical conditions that produce suppression in regression analysis have received considerable attention in the methodological literature but until now nothing in the way of an analytic…

  7. Confidence Intervals for an Effect Size Measure in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algina, James; Keselman, H. J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2007-01-01

    The increase in the squared multiple correlation coefficient ([Delta]R[squared]) associated with a variable in a regression equation is a commonly used measure of importance in regression analysis. The coverage probability that an asymptotic and percentile bootstrap confidence interval includes [Delta][rho][squared] was investigated. As expected,…

  8. MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS FOR HINDCASTING AND FORECASTING MIDSUMMER HYPOXIA IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new suite of multiple regression models were developed that describe the relationship between the area of bottom water hypoxia along the northern Gulf of Mexico and Mississippi-Atchafalaya River nitrate concentration, total phosphorus (TP) concentration, and discharge. Variabil...

  9. SOME STATISTICAL ISSUES RELATED TO MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION MODELING OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a fast and effective technique, the multiple linear regression (MLR) method has been widely used in modeling and prediction of beach bacteria concentrations. Among previous works on this subject, however, several issues were insufficiently or inconsistently addressed. Those is...

  10. The performance of automated case-mix adjustment regression model building methods in a health outcome prediction setting.

    PubMed

    Jen, Min-Hua; Bottle, Alex; Kirkwood, Graham; Johnston, Ron; Aylin, Paul

    2011-09-01

    We have previously described a system for monitoring a number of healthcare outcomes using case-mix adjustment models. It is desirable to automate the model fitting process in such a system if monitoring covers a large number of outcome measures or subgroup analyses. Our aim was to compare the performance of three different variable selection strategies: "manual", "automated" backward elimination and re-categorisation, and including all variables at once, irrespective of their apparent importance, with automated re-categorisation. Logistic regression models for predicting in-hospital mortality and emergency readmission within 28 days were fitted to an administrative database for 78 diagnosis groups and 126 procedures from 1996 to 2006 for National Health Services hospital trusts in England. The performance of models was assessed with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) c statistics, (measuring discrimination) and Brier score (assessing the average of the predictive accuracy). Overall, discrimination was similar for diagnoses and procedures and consistently better for mortality than for emergency readmission. Brier scores were generally low overall (showing higher accuracy) and were lower for procedures than diagnoses, with a few exceptions for emergency readmission within 28 days. Among the three variable selection strategies, the automated procedure had similar performance to the manual method in almost all cases except low-risk groups with few outcome events. For the rapid generation of multiple case-mix models we suggest applying automated modelling to reduce the time required, in particular when examining different outcomes of large numbers of procedures and diseases in routinely collected administrative health data. PMID:21556848

  11. An improved multiple linear regression and data analysis computer program package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    NEWRAP, an improved version of a previous multiple linear regression program called RAPIER, CREDUC, and CRSPLT, allows for a complete regression analysis including cross plots of the independent and dependent variables, correlation coefficients, regression coefficients, analysis of variance tables, t-statistics and their probability levels, rejection of independent variables, plots of residuals against the independent and dependent variables, and a canonical reduction of quadratic response functions useful in optimum seeking experimentation. A major improvement over RAPIER is that all regression calculations are done in double precision arithmetic.

  12. Noninvasive spectral imaging of skin chromophores based on multiple regression analysis aided by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Wiswadarma, Aditya; Hase, Yota; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Maeda, Takaaki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-01

    In order to visualize melanin and blood concentrations and oxygen saturation in human skin tissue, a simple imaging technique based on multispectral diffuse reflectance images acquired at six wavelengths (500, 520, 540, 560, 580 and 600nm) was developed. The technique utilizes multiple regression analysis aided by Monte Carlo simulation for diffuse reflectance spectra. Using the absorbance spectrum as a response variable and the extinction coefficients of melanin, oxygenated hemoglobin, and deoxygenated hemoglobin as predictor variables, multiple regression analysis provides regression coefficients. Concentrations of melanin and total blood are then determined from the regression coefficients using conversion vectors that are deduced numerically in advance, while oxygen saturation is obtained directly from the regression coefficients. Experiments with a tissue-like agar gel phantom validated the method. In vivo experiments with human skin of the human hand during upper limb occlusion and of the inner forearm exposed to UV irradiation demonstrated the ability of the method to evaluate physiological reactions of human skin tissue.

  13. Small-Sample Adjustments for Tests of Moderators and Model Fit in Robust Variance Estimation in Meta-Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Pustejovsky, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized experiments are commonly used to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions. The goal of the present investigation is to develop small-sample corrections for multiple contrast hypothesis tests (i.e., F-tests) such as the omnibus test of meta-regression fit or a test for equality of three or more levels of a categorical…

  14. Verification and adjustment of regional regression models for urban storm-runoff quality using data collected in Little Rock, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barks, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Storm-runoff water-quality data were used to verify and, when appropriate, adjust regional regression models previously developed to estimate urban storm- runoff loads and mean concentrations in Little Rock, Arkansas. Data collected at 5 representative sites during 22 storms from June 1992 through January 1994 compose the Little Rock data base. Comparison of observed values (0) of storm-runoff loads and mean concentrations to the predicted values (Pu) from the regional regression models for nine constituents (chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, total nitrogen, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc) shows large prediction errors ranging from 63 to several thousand percent. Prediction errors for six of the regional regression models are less than 100 percent, and can be considered reasonable for water-quality models. Differences between 0 and Pu are due to variability in the Little Rock data base and error in the regional models. Where applicable, a model adjustment procedure (termed MAP-R-P) based upon regression with 0 against Pu was applied to improve predictive accuracy. For 11 of the 18 regional water-quality models, 0 and Pu are significantly correlated, that is much of the variation in 0 is explained by the regional models. Five of these 11 regional models consistently overestimate O; therefore, MAP-R-P can be used to provide a better estimate. For the remaining seven regional models, 0 and Pu are not significanfly correlated, thus neither the unadjusted regional models nor the MAP-R-P is appropriate. A simple estimator, such as the mean of the observed values may be used if the regression models are not appropriate. Standard error of estimate of the adjusted models ranges from 48 to 130 percent. Calibration results may be biased due to the limited data set sizes in the Little Rock data base. The relatively large values of

  15. Variables Associated with Communicative Participation in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Carolyn; Yorkston, Kathryn; Bamer, Alyssa; Britton, Deanna; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore variables associated with self-reported communicative participation in a sample (n = 498) of community-dwelling adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Method: A battery of questionnaires was administered online or on paper per participant preference. Data were analyzed using multiple linear backward stepwise regression. The…

  16. Use of Empirical Estimates of Shrinkage in Multiple Regression: A Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Constance V.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of four empirical techniques to estimate shrinkage in multiple regression was studied through Monte Carlo simulation. None of the techniques provided unbiased estimates of the population squared multiple correlation coefficient, but the normalized jackknife and bootstrap techniques demonstrated marginally acceptable performance with…

  17. Estimating R-squared Shrinkage in Multiple Regression: A Comparison of Different Analytical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Ping; Fan, Xitao

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effectiveness of various analytical formulas for estimating "R" squared shrinkage in multiple regression analysis, focusing on estimators of the squared population multiple correlation coefficient and the squared population cross validity coefficient. Simulation results suggest that the most widely used Wherry (R. Wherry, 1931) formula…

  18. Estimating Statistical Power When Making Adjustments for Multiple Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kristin E.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing focus on the issue of multiple hypotheses testing in education evaluation studies. In these studies, researchers are typically interested in testing the effectiveness of an intervention on multiple outcomes, for multiple subgroups, at multiple points in time or across multiple treatment groups. When…

  19. Planned Hypothesis Tests Are Not Necessarily Exempt from Multiplicity Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frane, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research often involves testing more than one hypothesis at a time, which can inflate the probability that a Type I error (false discovery) will occur. To prevent this Type I error inflation, adjustments can be made to the testing procedure that compensate for the number of tests. Yet many researchers believe that such adjustments are…

  20. Quantile Regression Adjusting for Dependent Censoring from Semi-Competing Risks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruosha; Peng, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we study quantile regression when the response is an event time subject to potentially dependent censoring. We consider the semi-competing risks setting, where time to censoring remains observable after the occurrence of the event of interest. While such a scenario frequently arises in biomedical studies, most of current quantile regression methods for censored data are not applicable because they generally require the censoring time and the event time be independent. By imposing rather mild assumptions on the association structure between the time-to-event response and the censoring time variable, we propose quantile regression procedures, which allow us to garner a comprehensive view of the covariate effects on the event time outcome as well as to examine the informativeness of censoring. An efficient and stable algorithm is provided for implementing the new method. We establish the asymptotic properties of the resulting estimators including uniform consistency and weak convergence. The theoretical development may serve as a useful template for addressing estimating settings that involve stochastic integrals. Extensive simulation studies suggest that the proposed method performs well with moderate sample sizes. We illustrate the practical utility of our proposals through an application to a bone marrow transplant trial. PMID:25574152

  1. Adjustment of regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using data for Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, Anne B.; Patel, Anant R.

    1996-01-01

    Model-adjustment procedures were applied to the combined data bases of storm-runoff quality for Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville, Tennessee, to improve predictive accuracy for storm-runoff quality for urban watersheds in these three cities and throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Data for 45 storms at 15 different sites (five sites in each city) constitute the data base. Comparison of observed values of storm-runoff load and event-mean concentration to the predicted values from the regional regression models for 10 constituents shows prediction errors, as large as 806,000 percent. Model-adjustment procedures, which combine the regional model predictions with local data, are applied to improve predictive accuracy. Standard error of estimate after model adjustment ranges from 67 to 322 percent. Calibration results may be biased due to sampling error in the Tennessee data base. The relatively large values of standard error of estimate for some of the constituent models, although representing significant reduction (at least 50 percent) in prediction error compared to estimation with unadjusted regional models, may be unacceptable for some applications. The user may wish to collect additional local data for these constituents and repeat the analysis, or calibrate an independent local regression model.

  2. Tools to Support Interpreting Multiple Regression in the Face of Multicollinearity

    PubMed Central

    Kraha, Amanda; Turner, Heather; Nimon, Kim; Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Henson, Robin K.

    2012-01-01

    While multicollinearity may increase the difficulty of interpreting multiple regression (MR) results, it should not cause undue problems for the knowledgeable researcher. In the current paper, we argue that rather than using one technique to investigate regression results, researchers should consider multiple indices to understand the contributions that predictors make not only to a regression model, but to each other as well. Some of the techniques to interpret MR effects include, but are not limited to, correlation coefficients, beta weights, structure coefficients, all possible subsets regression, commonality coefficients, dominance weights, and relative importance weights. This article will review a set of techniques to interpret MR effects, identify the elements of the data on which the methods focus, and identify statistical software to support such analyses. PMID:22457655

  3. Modeling of retardance in ferrofluid with Taguchi-based multiple regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Wu, Jyh-Shyang; Sheu, Jer-Jia

    2015-03-01

    The citric acid (CA) coated Fe3O4 ferrofluids are prepared by a co-precipitation method and the magneto-optical retardance property is measured by a Stokes polarimeter. Optimization and multiple regression of retardance in ferrofluids are executed by combining Taguchi method and Excel. From the nine tests for four parameters, including pH of suspension, molar ratio of CA to Fe3O4, volume of CA, and coating temperature, influence sequence and excellent program are found. Multiple regression analysis and F-test on the significance of regression equation are performed. It is found that the model F value is much larger than Fcritical and significance level P <0.0001. So it can be concluded that the regression model has statistically significant predictive ability. Substituting excellent program into equation, retardance is obtained as 32.703°, higher than the highest value in tests by 11.4%.

  4. Adjusting for unmeasured confounding due to either of two crossed factors with a logistic regression model.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Brumback, Babette A; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2016-08-15

    Motivated by an investigation of the effect of surface water temperature on the presence of Vibrio cholerae in water samples collected from different fixed surface water monitoring sites in Haiti in different months, we investigated methods to adjust for unmeasured confounding due to either of the two crossed factors site and month. In the process, we extended previous methods that adjust for unmeasured confounding due to one nesting factor (such as site, which nests the water samples from different months) to the case of two crossed factors. First, we developed a conditional pseudolikelihood estimator that eliminates fixed effects for the levels of each of the crossed factors from the estimating equation. Using the theory of U-Statistics for independent but non-identically distributed vectors, we show that our estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, but that its variance depends on the nuisance parameters and thus cannot be easily estimated. Consequently, we apply our estimator in conjunction with a permutation test, and we investigate use of the pigeonhole bootstrap and the jackknife for constructing confidence intervals. We also incorporate our estimator into a diagnostic test for a logistic mixed model with crossed random effects and no unmeasured confounding. For comparison, we investigate between-within models extended to two crossed factors. These generalized linear mixed models include covariate means for each level of each factor in order to adjust for the unmeasured confounding. We conduct simulation studies, and we apply the methods to the Haitian data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892025

  5. Application of wavelet-based multiple linear regression model to rainfall forecasting in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Guan, H.; Zhang, X.; Simmons, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a wavelet-based multiple linear regression model is applied to forecast monthly rainfall in Australia by using monthly historical rainfall data and climate indices as inputs. The wavelet-based model is constructed by incorporating the multi-resolution analysis (MRA) with the discrete wavelet transform and multiple linear regression (MLR) model. The standardized monthly rainfall anomaly and large-scale climate index time series are decomposed using MRA into a certain number of component subseries at different temporal scales. The hierarchical lag relationship between the rainfall anomaly and each potential predictor is identified by cross correlation analysis with a lag time of at least one month at different temporal scales. The components of predictor variables with known lag times are then screened with a stepwise linear regression algorithm to be selectively included into the final forecast model. The MRA-based rainfall forecasting method is examined with 255 stations over Australia, and compared to the traditional multiple linear regression model based on the original time series. The models are trained with data from the 1959-1995 period and then tested in the 1996-2008 period for each station. The performance is compared with observed rainfall values, and evaluated by common statistics of relative absolute error and correlation coefficient. The results show that the wavelet-based regression model provides considerably more accurate monthly rainfall forecasts for all of the selected stations over Australia than the traditional regression model.

  6. An automatic method for producing robust regression models from hyperspectral data using multiple simple genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykas, Dimitris; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a new method for automatically determining the optimum regression model, which enable the estimation of a parameter. The concept lies on the combination of k spectral pre-processing algorithms (SPPAs) that enhance spectral features correlated to the desired parameter. Initially a pre-processing algorithm uses as input a single spectral signature and transforms it according to the SPPA function. A k-step combination of SPPAs uses k preprocessing algorithms serially. The result of each SPPA is used as input to the next SPPA, and so on until the k desired pre-processed signatures are reached. These signatures are then used as input to three different regression methods: the Normalized band Difference Regression (NDR), the Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and the Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Three Simple Genetic Algorithms (SGAs) are used, one for each regression method, for the selection of the optimum combination of k SPPAs. The performance of the SGAs is evaluated based on the RMS error of the regression models. The evaluation not only indicates the selection of the optimum SPPA combination but also the regression method that produces the optimum prediction model. The proposed method was applied on soil spectral measurements in order to predict Soil Organic Matter (SOM). In this study, the maximum value assigned to k was 3. PLSR yielded the highest accuracy while NDR's accuracy was satisfactory compared to its complexity. MLR method showed severe drawbacks due to the presence of noise in terms of collinearity at the spectral bands. Most of the regression methods required a 3-step combination of SPPAs for achieving the highest performance. The selected preprocessing algorithms were different for each regression method since each regression method handles with a different way the explanatory variables.

  7. Methods for Adjusting U.S. Geological Survey Rural Regression Peak Discharges in an Urban Setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moglen, Glenn E.; Shivers, Dorianne E.

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted of 78 U.S. Geological Survey gaged streams that have been subjected to varying degrees of urbanization over the last three decades. Flood-frequency analysis coupled with nonlinear regression techniques were used to generate a set of equations for converting peak discharge estimates determined from rural regression equations to a set of peak discharge estimates that represent known urbanization. Specifically, urban regression equations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year return periods were calibrated as a function of the corresponding rural peak discharge and the percentage of impervious area in a watershed. The results of this study indicate that two sets of equations, one set based on imperviousness and one set based on population density, performed well. Both sets of equations are dependent on rural peak discharges, a measure of development (average percentage of imperviousness or average population density), and a measure of homogeneity of development within a watershed. Average imperviousness was readily determined by using geographic information system methods and commonly available land-cover data. Similarly, average population density was easily determined from census data. Thus, a key advantage to the equations developed in this study is that they do not require field measurements of watershed characteristics as did the U.S. Geological Survey urban equations developed in an earlier investigation. During this study, the U.S. Geological Survey PeakFQ program was used as an integral tool in the calibration of all equations. The scarcity of historical land-use data, however, made exclusive use of flow records necessary for the 30-year period from 1970 to 2000. Such relatively short-duration streamflow time series required a nonstandard treatment of the historical data function of the PeakFQ program in comparison to published guidelines. Thus, the approach used during this investigation does not fully comply with the

  8. Regression Models for the Analysis of Longitudinal Gaussian Data from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Liam M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a regression model for the joint analysis of longitudinal multiple source Gaussian data. Longitudinal multiple source data arise when repeated measurements are taken from two or more sources, and each source provides a measure of the same underlying variable and on the same scale. This type of data generally produces a relatively large number of observations per subject; thus estimation of an unstructured covariance matrix often may not be possible. We consider two methods by which parsimonious models for the covariance can be obtained for longitudinal multiple source data. The methods are illustrated with an example of multiple informant data arising from a longitudinal interventional trial in psychiatry. PMID:15726666

  9. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) models for predicting stream concentrations of multiple pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Crawford, Charles G.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Watershed Regressions for Pesticides for multiple pesticides (WARP-MP) are statistical models developed to predict concentration statistics for a wide range of pesticides in unmonitored streams. The WARP-MP models use the national atrazine WARP models in conjunction with an adjustment factor for each additional pesticide. The WARP-MP models perform best for pesticides with application timing and methods similar to those used with atrazine. For other pesticides, WARP-MP models tend to overpredict concentration statistics for the model development sites. For WARP and WARP-MP, the less-than-ideal sampling frequency for the model development sites leads to underestimation of the shorter-duration concentration; hence, the WARP models tend to underpredict 4- and 21-d maximum moving-average concentrations, with median errors ranging from 9 to 38% As a result of this sampling bias, pesticides that performed well with the model development sites are expected to have predictions that are biased low for these shorter-duration concentration statistics. The overprediction by WARP-MP apparent for some of the pesticides is variably offset by underestimation of the model development concentration statistics. Of the 112 pesticides used in the WARP-MP application to stream segments nationwide, 25 were predicted to have concentration statistics with a 50% or greater probability of exceeding one or more aquatic life benchmarks in one or more stream segments. Geographically, many of the modeled streams in the Corn Belt Region were predicted to have one or more pesticides that exceeded an aquatic life benchmark during 2009, indicating the potential vulnerability of streams in this region.

  10. Curvilinear Relationships in Special Education Research: How Multiple Regression Analysis Can Be Used To Investigate Nonlinear Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Mary S.

    Researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the advantages of using multiple regression as opposed to analysis of variance (ANOVA) or analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Multiple regression is more versatile and does not force the researcher to throw away variance by categorizing intervally scaled data. Polynomial regression analysis offers the…

  11. A Comparison of Bias and Mean Squared Error in Parameter Estimates of Interaction Effects: Moderated Multiple Regression versus Errors-in-Variables Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lance E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Simulations were used to compare the moderator variable detection capabilities of moderated multiple regression (MMR) and errors-in-variables regression (EIVR). Findings show that EIVR estimates are superior for large samples, but that MMR is better when reliabilities or sample sizes are low. (SLD)

  12. Testing Mediation Using Multiple Regression and Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Secondary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Spencer D.

    2011-01-01

    Mediation analysis in child and adolescent development research is possible using large secondary data sets. This article provides an overview of two statistical methods commonly used to test mediated effects in secondary analysis: multiple regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Two empirical studies are presented to illustrate the…

  13. Using Robust Variance Estimation to Combine Multiple Regression Estimates with Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of robust variance estimation for combining commonly specified multiple regression models and for combining sample-dependent focal slope estimates from diversely specified models. The proposed estimator obviates traditionally required information about the covariance structure of the dependent…

  14. Computational Tools for Probing Interactions in Multiple Linear Regression, Multilevel Modeling, and Latent Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Curran, Patrick J.; Bauer, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Simple slopes, regions of significance, and confidence bands are commonly used to evaluate interactions in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, and the use of these techniques has recently been extended to multilevel or hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and latent curve analysis (LCA). However, conducting these tests and plotting the…

  15. The Use of Multiple Regression and Trend Analysis to Understand Enrollment Fluctuations. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, S. Duke; Greenberg, Barry

    The development of a predictive equation capable of explaining a significant percentage of enrollment variability at Florida International University is described. A model utilizing trend analysis and a multiple regression approach to enrollment forecasting was adapted to investigate enrollment dynamics at the university. Four independent…

  16. Double Cross-Validation in Multiple Regression: A Method of Estimating the Stability of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    In multiple regression analysis, where resulting predictive equation effectiveness is subject to shrinkage, it is especially important to evaluate result replicability. Double cross-validation is an empirical method by which an estimate of invariance or stability can be obtained from research data. A procedure for double cross-validation is…

  17. A Simple and Convenient Method of Multiple Linear Regression to Calculate Iodine Molecular Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure using a student-friendly least-squares multiple linear-regression technique utilizing a function within Microsoft Excel is described that enables students to calculate molecular constants from the vibronic spectrum of iodine. This method is advantageous pedagogically as it calculates molecular constants for ground and excited…

  18. Multiple Regression Analysis of Factors that May Influence Middle School Science Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative multiple regression study was to determine whether a relationship existed between Maryland State Assessment (MSA) reading scores, MSA math scores, gender, ethnicity, age, and MSA science scores. Also examined was if MSA reading scores, MSA math scores, gender, ethnicity, and age can be used in combination or alone…

  19. Use of Multiple Regression to Predict Academic Achievement at a Small Liberal Arts College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    The relationship between academic success at DePauw University and such commonly used predictors as tested ability and academic success in high school was examined. The various subtleties of the multiple regression research method were also examined. Subjects were 1758 students who entered DePauw University during the fall semester of 1973, 1974,…

  20. INTRODUCTION TO A COMBINED MULTIPLE LINEAR REGRESSION AND ARMA MODELING APPROACH FOR BEACH BACTERIA PREDICTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of the processes contributing to beach bacteria concentrations, many researchers rely on statistical modeling, among which multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling is most widely used. Despite its ease of use and interpretation, there may be time dependence...

  1. Predicting Final GPA of Graduate School Students: Comparing Artificial Neural Networking and Simultaneous Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Joan L.

    2006-01-01

    Data from graduate student applications at a large Western university were used to determine which factors were the best predictors of success in graduate school, as defined by cumulative graduate grade point average. Two statistical models were employed and compared: artificial neural networking and simultaneous multiple regression. Both models…

  2. Regression calibration for classical exposure measurement error in environmental epidemiology studies using multiple local surrogate exposures.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Thomas F; Wright, J Michael

    2010-08-01

    Environmental epidemiologic studies are often hierarchical in nature if they estimate individuals' personal exposures using ambient metrics. Local samples are indirect surrogate measures of true local pollutant concentrations which estimate true personal exposures. These ambient metrics include classical-type nondifferential measurement error. The authors simulated subjects' true exposures and their corresponding surrogate exposures as the mean of local samples and assessed the amount of bias attributable to classical and Berkson measurement error on odds ratios, assuming that the logit of risk depends on true individual-level exposure. The authors calibrated surrogate exposures using scalar transformation functions based on observed within- and between-locality variances and compared regression-calibrated results with naive results using surrogate exposures. The authors further assessed the performance of regression calibration in the presence of Berkson-type error. Following calibration, bias due to classical-type measurement error, resulting in as much as 50% attenuation in naive regression estimates, was eliminated. Berkson-type error appeared to attenuate logistic regression results less than 1%. This regression calibration method reduces effects of classical measurement error that are typical of epidemiologic studies using multiple local surrogate exposures as indirect surrogate exposures for unobserved individual exposures. Berkson-type error did not alter the performance of regression calibration. This regression calibration method does not require a supplemental validation study to compute an attenuation factor. PMID:20573838

  3. Effect of Multiple Testing Adjustment in Differential Item Functioning Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye; Oshima, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    In a typical differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, a significance test is conducted for each item. As a test consists of multiple items, such multiple testing may increase the possibility of making a Type I error at least once. The goal of this study was to investigate how to control a Type I error rate and power using adjustment…

  4. Latino risk-adjusted mortality in the men screened for the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Avis J; Eberly, Lynn E; Neaton, James D; Smith, George Davey

    2005-09-15

    Latinos are now the largest minority in the United States, but their distinctive health needs and mortality patterns remain poorly understood. Proportional hazards regressions were used to compare Latino versus White risk- and income-adjusted mortality over 25 years' follow-up from 5,846 Latino and 300,647 White men screened for the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Men were aged 35-57 years and residing in 14 states when screened in 1973-1975. Data on coronary heart disease risk factors, self-reported race/ethnicity, and home addresses were obtained at baseline; income was estimated by linking addresses to census data. Mortality follow-up through 1999 was obtained using the National Death Index. The fully adjusted Latino/White hazard ratio for all-cause mortality was 0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 0.87), based on 1,085 Latino and 73,807 White deaths; this pattern prevailed over time and across states (thus, likely across Latino subgroups). Hazard ratios were significantly greater than one for stroke (hazard ratio = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.68), liver cancer (hazard ratio = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.21, 3.37), and infection (hazard ratio = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.24, 2.32). A substudy found only minor racial/ethnic differences in the quality of Social Security numbers, birth dates, soundex-adjusted names, and National Death Index searches. Results were not likely an artifact of return migration or incomplete mortality data. PMID:16076831

  5. High-Dose Vitamin C Promotes Regression of Multiple Pulmonary Metastases Originating from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Min-Seok; Kim, Ja-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of regression of multiple pulmonary metastases, which originated from hepatocellular carcinoma after treatment with intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C. A 74-year-old woman presented to the clinic for her cancer-related symptoms such as general weakness and anorexia. After undergoing initial transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), local recurrence with multiple pulmonary metastases was found. She refused further conventional therapy, including sorafenib tosylate (Nexavar). She did receive high doses of vitamin C (70 g), which were administered into a peripheral vein twice a week for 10 months, and multiple pulmonary metastases were observed to have completely regressed. She then underwent subsequent TACE, resulting in remission of her primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26256994

  6. Using Regression Equations Built from Summary Data in the Psychological Assessment of the Individual Case: Extension to Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John R.; Garthwaite, Paul H.; Denham, Annie K.; Chelune, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because…

  7. Adjustments to de Leva-anthropometric regression data for the changes in body proportions in elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Ho Hoang, Khai-Long; Mombaur, Katja

    2015-10-15

    Dynamic modeling of the human body is an important tool to investigate the fundamentals of the biomechanics of human movement. To model the human body in terms of a multi-body system, it is necessary to know the anthropometric parameters of the body segments. For young healthy subjects, several data sets exist that are widely used in the research community, e.g. the tables provided by de Leva. None such comprehensive anthropometric parameter sets exist for elderly people. It is, however, well known that body proportions change significantly during aging, e.g. due to degenerative effects in the spine, such that parameters for young people cannot be used for realistically simulating the dynamics of elderly people. In this study, regression equations are derived from the inertial parameters, center of mass positions, and body segment lengths provided by de Leva to be adjustable to the changes in proportion of the body parts of male and female humans due to aging. Additional adjustments are made to the reference points of the parameters for the upper body segments as they are chosen in a more practicable way in the context of creating a multi-body model in a chain structure with the pelvis representing the most proximal segment. PMID:26338096

  8. User's Guide to the Weighted-Multiple-Linear Regression Program (WREG version 1.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, Ken; Chen, Yin-Yu; Kiang, Julie.E.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow is not measured at every location in a stream network. Yet hydrologists, State and local agencies, and the general public still seek to know streamflow characteristics, such as mean annual flow or flood flows with different exceedance probabilities, at ungaged basins. The goals of this guide are to introduce and familiarize the user with the weighted multiple-linear regression (WREG) program, and to also provide the theoretical background for program features. The program is intended to be used to develop a regional estimation equation for streamflow characteristics that can be applied at an ungaged basin, or to improve the corresponding estimate at continuous-record streamflow gages with short records. The regional estimation equation results from a multiple-linear regression that relates the observable basin characteristics, such as drainage area, to streamflow characteristics.

  9. USER'S GUIDE FOR MPTER, A MULTIPLE POINT GAUSSIAN DISPERSION ALGORITHM WITH OPTIONAL TERRAIN ADJUSTMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The information presented in this user's guide is directed to air pollution scientists interested in applying air quality simulation models. MPTER is the designation for Multiple Point source algorithm with TERrain adjustments. This algorithm is useful for estimating air quality ...

  10. Predicting manual arm strength: A direct comparison between artificial neural network and multiple regression approaches.

    PubMed

    La Delfa, Nicholas J; Potvin, Jim R

    2016-02-29

    In ergonomics, strength prediction has typically been accomplished using linked-segment biomechanical models, and independent estimates of strength about each axis of the wrist, elbow and shoulder joints. It has recently been shown that multiple regression approaches, using the simple task-relevant inputs of hand location and force direction, may be a better method for predicting manual arm strength (MAS) capabilities. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) also serve as a powerful data fitting approach, but their application to occupational biomechanics and ergonomics is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to perform a direct comparison between ANN and regression models, by evaluating their ability to predict MAS with identical sets of development and validation MAS data. Multi-directional MAS data were obtained from 95 healthy female participants at 36 hand locations within the reach envelope. ANN and regression models were developed using a random, but identical, sample of 85% of the MAS data (n=456). The remaining 15% of the data (n=80) were used to validate the two approaches. When compared to the development data, the ANN predictions had a much higher explained variance (90.2% vs. 66.5%) and much lower RMSD (9.3N vs. 17.2N), vs. the regression model. The ANN also performed better with the independent validation data (r(2)=78.6%, RMSD=15.1) compared to the regression approach (r(2)=65.3%, RMSD=18.6N). These results suggest that ANNs provide a more accurate and robust alternative to regression approaches, and should be considered more often in biomechanics and ergonomics evaluations. PMID:26876987

  11. [A Case of Spontaneous Regression of Breast Cancer with Multiple Lung Metastases].

    PubMed

    Asano, Yuka; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Goto, Wataru; Kurata, Kento; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous regression of any malignant tumor is a rare event, occurring in about 1 of 60,000-100,000 cases of malignant tumor. We report a case of spontaneous regression of breast cancer with multiple pulmonary metastases. The patient was a 73-year-old woman who complained of a left mammary mass. A tumor, approximately 2.2 cm in diameter, was palpated, and breast cancer was suspected based on ultrasound examination. Histopathological findings of the core needle biopsy specimen indicated invasive ductal carcinoma. The patient underwent partial mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. It was a stage ⅡB (pT2N1 [sn] M0) tumor. CT performed after adjuvant therapy confirmed the presence of multiple pulmonary metastases 6 years after surgery. We started anti-cancer therapy with TS-1; however, it was discontinued because an adverse event occurred. Half a year later, tumor shrinkage was confirmed after a recurrence. Four years and 6 months after the treatment was discontinued, the tumor continued to regress spontaneously. PMID:26805177

  12. [Correlation of dry granulation process parameters and granule quality based on multiple regression analysis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Han-Han; Du, Ruo-Fei; Yang, Jia-Ning; Feng, Yi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, microcrystalline cellulose WJ101 was used as a model material to investigate the effect of various process parameters on granule yield and friability after dry granulation with a single factor and the effect of comprehensive inspection process parameters on the effect of granule yield and friability, then the correlation between process parameters and granule quality was established. The regress equation was established between process parameters and granule yield and friability by multiple regression analysis, the affecting the order of the size of the order of the process parameters on granule yield and friability was: rollers speed > rollers pressure > speed of horizontal feed. Granule yield was positively correlated with pressure and speed of horizontal feed and negatively correlated rollers speed, while friability was on the contrary. By comparison, fitted value and real value, fitted and real value are basically the same of no significant differences (P > 0.05) and with high precision and reliability. PMID:24961115

  13. Genomewide Multiple-Loci Mapping in Experimental Crosses by Iterative Adaptive Penalized Regression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Zou, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Genomewide multiple-loci mapping can be viewed as a challenging variable selection problem where the major objective is to select genetic markers related to a trait of interest. It is challenging because the number of genetic markers is large (often much larger than the sample size) and there is often strong linkage or linkage disequilibrium between markers. In this article, we developed two methods for genomewide multiple loci mapping: the Bayesian adaptive Lasso and the iterative adaptive Lasso. Compared with eight existing methods, the proposed methods have improved variable selection performance in both simulation and real data studies. The advantages of our methods come from the assignment of adaptive weights to different genetic makers and the iterative updating of these adaptive weights. The iterative adaptive Lasso is also computationally much more efficient than the commonly used marginal regression and stepwise regression methods. Although our methods are motivated by multiple-loci mapping, they are general enough to be applied to other variable selection problems. PMID:20157003

  14. Adjusted p-values for SGoF multiple test procedure.

    PubMed

    Castro-Conde, Irene; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2015-01-01

    In the field of multiple comparison procedures, adjusted p-values are an important tool to evaluate the significance of a test statistic while taking the multiplicity into account. In this paper, we introduce adjusted p-values for the recently proposed Sequential Goodness-of-Fit (SGoF) multiple test procedure by letting the level of the test vary on the unit interval. This extends previous research on the SGoF method, which is a method of high interest when one aims to increase the statistical power in a multiple testing scenario. The adjusted p-value is the smallest level at which the SGoF procedure would still reject the given null hypothesis, while controlling for the multiplicity of tests. The main properties of the adjusted p-values are investigated. In particular, we show that they are a subset of the original p-values, being equal to 1 for p-values above a certain threshold. These are very useful properties from a numerical viewpoint, since they allow for a simplified method to compute the adjusted p-values. We introduce a modification of the SGoF method, termed majorant version, which rejects the null hypotheses with adjusted p-values below the level. This modification rejects more null hypotheses as the level increases, something which is not in general the case for the original SGoF. Adjusted p-values for the conservative version of the SGoF procedure, which estimates the variance without assuming that all the null hypotheses are true, are also included. The situation with ties among the p-values is discussed too. Several real data applications are investigated to illustrate the practical usage of adjusted p-values, ranging from a small to a large number of tests. PMID:25323102

  15. Hierarchical Multiple Regression Modelling on Predictors of Behavior and Sexual Practices at Takoradi Polytechnic, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Turkson, Anthony Joe; Otchey, James Eric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various psychosocial studies on health related lifestyles lay emphasis on the fact that the perception one has of himself as being at risk of HIV/AIDS infection was a necessary condition for preventive behaviors to be adopted. Hierarchical Multiple Regression models was used to examine the relationship between eight independent variables and one dependent variable to isolate predictors which have significant influence on behavior and sexual practices. Methods: A Cross-sectional design was used for the study. Structured close-ended interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect primary data. Multistage stratified technique was used to sample views from 380 students from Takoradi Polytechnic, Ghana. A Hierarchical multiple regression model was used to ascertain the significance of certain predictors of sexual behavior and practices. Results: The variables that were extracted from the multiple regression were; for the constant; β=14.202, t=2.279, p=0.023, variable is significant; for the marital status; β=0.092, t=1.996, p<0.05, variable is significant; for the knowledge on AIDs; β= 0.090, t=1.996, p<0.05, variable is significant; for the attitude towards HIV/AIDs; β=0.486, t=10.575, p<0.001, variable is highly significant. Thus, the best fitting model for predicting behavior and sexual practices was a linear combination of the constant, one’s marital status, knowledge on HIV/AIDs and Attitude towards HIV/AIDs., Y (Behavior and sexual practices) = β0 + β1 (Marital status) + β2 (Knowledge on HIV AIDs issues) + β3 (Attitude towards HIV AIDs issues) β0, β1, β2 and β3 are respectively 14.201, 2.038, 0.148 and 0.486; the higher the better. Conclusions: Attitude and behavior change education on HIV/AIDs should be intensified in the institution so that students could adopt better lifestyles. PMID:25946917

  16. Multiple regression approach to optimize drilling operations in the Arabian Gulf area

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Betairi, E.A.; Moussa, M.M.; Al-Otaibi, S.

    1988-03-01

    This paper reports a successful application of multiple regression analysis, supported by a detailed statistical study to verify the Bourgoyne and Young model. The model estimates the optimum penetration rate (ROP), weight on bit (WOB), and rotary speed under the effect of controllable and uncontrollable factors. Field data from three wells in the Arabian Gulf were used and emphasized the validity of this model. The model coefficients are sensitive to the number of points included. The correlation coefficients and multicollinearity sensitivity of each drilling parameter on the ROP are studied.

  17. Using multiple logistic regression and GIS technology to predict landslide hazard in northeast Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlmacher, G.C.; Davis, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Landslides in the hilly terrain along the Kansas and Missouri rivers in northeastern Kansas have caused millions of dollars in property damage during the last decade. To address this problem, a statistical method called multiple logistic regression has been used to create a landslide-hazard map for Atchison, Kansas, and surrounding areas. Data included digitized geology, slopes, and landslides, manipulated using ArcView GIS. Logistic regression relates predictor variables to the occurrence or nonoccurrence of landslides within geographic cells and uses the relationship to produce a map showing the probability of future landslides, given local slopes and geologic units. Results indicated that slope is the most important variable for estimating landslide hazard in the study area. Geologic units consisting mostly of shale, siltstone, and sandstone were most susceptible to landslides. Soil type and aspect ratio were considered but excluded from the final analysis because these variables did not significantly add to the predictive power of the logistic regression. Soil types were highly correlated with the geologic units, and no significant relationships existed between landslides and slope aspect. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiple regression technique for Pth degree polynominals with and without linear cross products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A multiple regression technique was developed by which the nonlinear behavior of specified independent variables can be related to a given dependent variable. The polynomial expression can be of Pth degree and can incorporate N independent variables. Two cases are treated such that mathematical models can be studied both with and without linear cross products. The resulting surface fits can be used to summarize trends for a given phenomenon and provide a mathematical relationship for subsequent analysis. To implement this technique, separate computer programs were developed for the case without linear cross products and for the case incorporating such cross products which evaluate the various constants in the model regression equation. In addition, the significance of the estimated regression equation is considered and the standard deviation, the F statistic, the maximum absolute percent error, and the average of the absolute values of the percent of error evaluated. The computer programs and their manner of utilization are described. Sample problems are included to illustrate the use and capability of the technique which show the output formats and typical plots comparing computer results to each set of input data.

  19. Removal of River-Stage Fluctuations from Well Response Using Multiple-Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2011-11-01

    Many contaminated unconfined aquifers are located in proximity to river systems. In groundwater studies, the physical presence of a river is commonly represented as a transient-head boundary that imposes hydrologic responses within the intersected unconfined aquifer. The periodic fluctuation of river-stage height at the boundary produces associated responses within the adjacent aquifer system, the magnitude of which is a function of the existing well, aquifer, boundary conditions, and river-stage fluctuation characteristics. The presence of well responses induced by the river stage can significantly limit characterization and monitoring of remedial activities within the stress-impacted area. This paper demonstrates the use of a time-domain, multiple-regression, convolution (superposition) method to develop well/aquifer river response function (RRF) relationships. Following RRF development, a multiple-regression deconvolution correction approach can be applied to remove river-stage effects from well water-level responses. Corrected well responses can then be analyzed to improve local aquifer characterization activities in support of optimizing remedial actions, assessing the area-of-influence of remediation activities, and determining mean groundwater flow and contaminant flux to the river system.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Button Bits in Coal Measure Rocks by Using Multiple Regression Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Okan

    2016-02-01

    Electro-hydraulic and jumbo drills are commonly used for underground coal mines and tunnel drives for the purpose of blasthole drilling and rock bolt installations. Not only machine parameters but also environmental conditions have significant effects on drilling. This study characterizes the performance of button bits during blasthole drilling in coal measure rocks by using multiple regression analyses. The penetration rate of jumbo and electro-hydraulic drills was measured in the field by employing bits in different diameters and the specific energy of the drilling was calculated at various locations, including highway tunnels and underground roadways of coal mines. Large block samples were collected from each location at which in situ drilling measurements were performed. Then, the effects of rock properties and machine parameters on the drilling performance were examined. Multiple regression models were developed for the prediction of the specific energy of the drilling and the penetration rate. The results revealed that hole area, impact (blow) energy, blows per minute of the piston within the drill, and some rock properties, such as the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and the drilling rate index (DRI), influence the drill performance.

  1. Prediction of groundwater table and salinity fluctuations with a time series multiple regression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeboonruang, U.

    2013-12-01

    Time series techniques have been extensively applied to research works of many academic disciplines, particularly those concerned with economics and environment. This paper presents application of a time series multiple linear regression technique to a groundwater system to predict groundwater level and salinity fluctuations in a saline area in the northeastern part of Thailand. Surface and groundwater interaction is the major mechanism controlling the shallow subsurface system and salinity of the area. The basic technique is based on the lagged correlation between hydrologic, and hydrogeological and environmental parameters. As a result of a large irrigation project in the area, several regulating gates have been installed to control flooding to the downstream rivers and to provide the upstream areas with sufficient irrigating water. From the lagged correlation analysis, the shallow groundwater and groundwater salinity fluctuation in the irrigating area are shown to be dependent upon the surface water levels at the installed regulated gates and prior rainfall. A set of multiple linear regression equations with lagged time dependent function are then formulated. The dependent variables are groundwater level and groundwater salinity while the independent variables are rainfall rates and water levels measured at the regulating gates. After calibration and verification, the model, as an alternative to the conventional method which requires detailed and continuous variables and is costlier, can be used to forecast and manage future groundwater systems.

  2. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  3. Using the Coefficient of Determination "R"[superscript 2] to Test the Significance of Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinino, Roberto C.; Reis, Edna A.; Bessegato, Lupercio F.

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes the use of the coefficient of determination as a statistic for hypothesis testing in multiple linear regression based on distributions acquired by beta sampling. (Contains 3 figures.)

  4. Correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A multiple regression to identify sources of variations

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, G; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-01-13

    Using whole-genome microarray and LC-MC/MS proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions, we systematically investigate the relationship between mRNA and protein abundunce by a multiple regression approach.

  5. Determining the Spatial and Seasonal Variability in OM/OC Ratios across the U.S. Using Multiple Regression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network are used to estimate organic mass to organic carbon (OM/OC) ratios across the United States by extending previously published multiple regression techniques. Our new methodology addresses com...

  6. Combining multiple regression and principal component analysis for accurate predictions for column ozone in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    This study encompasses columnar ozone modelling in the peninsular Malaysia. Data of eight atmospheric parameters [air surface temperature (AST), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), water vapour (H2Ovapour), skin surface temperature (SSKT), atmosphere temperature (AT), relative humidity (RH), and mean surface pressure (MSP)] data set, retrieved from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), for the entire period (2003-2008) was employed to develop models to predict the value of columnar ozone (O3) in study area. The combined method, which is based on using both multiple regressions combined with principal component analysis (PCA) modelling, was used to predict columnar ozone. This combined approach was utilized to improve the prediction accuracy of columnar ozone. Separate analysis was carried out for north east monsoon (NEM) and south west monsoon (SWM) seasons. The O3 was negatively correlated with CH4, H2Ovapour, RH, and MSP, whereas it was positively correlated with CO, AST, SSKT, and AT during both the NEM and SWM season periods. Multiple regression analysis was used to fit the columnar ozone data using the atmospheric parameter's variables as predictors. A variable selection method based on high loading of varimax rotated principal components was used to acquire subsets of the predictor variables to be comprised in the linear regression model of the atmospheric parameter's variables. It was found that the increase in columnar O3 value is associated with an increase in the values of AST, SSKT, AT, and CO and with a drop in the levels of CH4, H2Ovapour, RH, and MSP. The result of fitting the best models for the columnar O3 value using eight of the independent variables gave about the same values of the R (≈0.93) and R2 (≈0.86) for both the NEM and SWM seasons. The common variables that appeared in both regression equations were SSKT, CH4 and RH, and the principal precursor of the columnar O3 value in both the NEM and SWM seasons was SSKT.

  7. A non linear multiple regression approach for inferring the probability distribution of hydrological model errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, A.

    2006-12-01

    This contribution introduces a statistically based approach for uncertainty assessment in hydrological modeling, in an optimality context. Indeed, in several real world applications, there is the need for the user to select a model that is deemed to be the best possible choice accordingly to a given goodness of fit criteria. In this case, it is extremely important to assess the model uncertainty, intended as the range around the model output within which the measured hydrological variable is expected to fall with a given probability. This indication allows the user to quantify the risk associated to a decision that is based on the model response. The technique proposed here is carried out by inferring the probability distribution of the hydrological model error through a non linear multiple regression approach, depending on an arbitrary number of selected conditioning variables. These may include the current and previous model output as well as internal state variables of the model. The purpose is to indirectly relate the model error to the sources of uncertainty, through the conditioning variables. The method can be applied to any model of arbitrary complexity, included distributed approaches. The probability distribution of the model error is derived in the Gaussian space, through a meta-Gaussian approach. The normal quantile transform is applied in order to make the marginal probability distribution of the model error and the conditioning variables Gaussian. Then the above marginal probability distributions are related through the multivariate Gaussian distribution, whose parameters are estimated via multiple regression. Application of the inverse of the normal quantile transform allows the user to derive the confidence limits of the model output for an assigned significance level. The proposed technique is valid under statistical assumptions, that are essentially those conditioning the validity of the multiple regression in the Gaussian space. Statistical tests

  8. The Impact of Parental Multiple Sclerosis on the Adjustment of Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Judicibus, Margaret A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one parents with multiple sclerosis (MS) participated in a study to investigate the adjustment of their children, 24 boys and 24 girls aged 4 to 16 years. The majority of parents believed that their illness had an effect on their children. The perception of parents regarding their children's problems in the areas of emotions, concentration,…

  9. 48 CFR 552.216-70 - Economic Price Adjustment-FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Economic Price Adjustment... Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.216-70 Economic Price Adjustment—FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts. As prescribed in 516.203-4(a), insert the following clause: Economic Price...

  10. 48 CFR 552.216-70 - Economic Price Adjustment-FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Economic Price Adjustment... Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.216-70 Economic Price Adjustment—FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts. As prescribed in 516.203-4(a), insert the following clause: Economic Price...

  11. Couple Coping and Adjustment to Multiple Sclerosis in Care Receiver-Carer Dyads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakenham, Kenneth I.

    1998-01-01

    The utility of "coping congruency" and "average level of couple coping" in explaining adjustment to multiple sclerosis was examined. Interview and questionnaire data was collected for 45 dyads with a 12-month follow-up. Predictors include Time 1 illness, caregiving, and coping variables. Findings support both concepts for explaining collective and…

  12. 48 CFR 552.216-70 - Economic Price Adjustment-FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Economic Price Adjustment... Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.216-70 Economic Price Adjustment—FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts. As prescribed in 516.203-4(a), insert the following clause: Economic Price...

  13. 48 CFR 552.216-70 - Economic Price Adjustment-FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Economic Price Adjustment... Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.216-70 Economic Price Adjustment—FSS Multiple Award Schedule Contracts. As prescribed in 516.203-4(a), insert the following clause: Economic Price...

  14. Empirical predictive models of daily relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit: Multiple regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Laura E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Clilverd, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The daily maximum relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit can be predicted well with a set of daily averaged predictor variables including previous day's flux, seed electron flux, solar wind velocity and number density, AE index, IMF Bz, Dst, and ULF and VLF wave power. As predictor variables are intercorrelated, we used multiple regression analyses to determine which are the most predictive of flux when other variables are controlled. Empirical models produced from regressions of flux on measured predictors from 1 day previous were reasonably effective at predicting novel observations. Adding previous flux to the parameter set improves the prediction of the peak of the increases but delays its anticipation of an event. Previous day's solar wind number density and velocity, AE index, and ULF wave activity are the most significant explanatory variables; however, the AE index, measuring substorm processes, shows a negative correlation with flux when other parameters are controlled. This may be due to the triggering of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves by substorms that cause electron precipitation. VLF waves show lower, but significant, influence. The combined effect of ULF and VLF waves shows a synergistic interaction, where each increases the influence of the other on flux enhancement. Correlations between observations and predictions for this 1 day lag model ranged from 0.71 to 0.89 (average: 0.78). A path analysis of correlations between predictors suggests that solar wind and IMF parameters affect flux through intermediate processes such as ring current (Dst), AE, and wave activity.

  15. Artificial neural network and multiple regression model for nickel(II) adsorption on powdered activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hema, M; Srinivasan, K

    2011-07-01

    Nickel removal efficiency of powered activated carbons of coconut oilcake, neem oilcake and commercial carbon was investigated by using artificial neural network. The effective parameters for the removal of nickel (%R) by adsorption process, which included the pH, contact time (T), distinctiveness of activated carbon (Cn), amount of activated carbon (Cw) and initial concentration of nickel (Co) were investigated. Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) Back-propagation algorithm is used to train the network. The network topology was optimized by varying number of hidden layer and number of neurons in hidden layer. The model was developed in terms of training; validation and testing of experimental data, the test subsets that each of them contains 60%, 20% and 20% of total experimental data, respectively. Multiple regression equation was developed for nickel adsorption system and the output was compared with both simulated and experimental outputs. Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output was quite higher in the case of regression model when compared with ANN model. The obtained experimental data best fitted with the artificial neural network. PMID:23029923

  16. Genetic-algorithm-based multiple regression with fuzzy inference system for detection of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Steve S H; Nguyen, Hung T

    2011-03-01

    Hypoglycemia or low blood glucose is dangerous and can result in unconsciousness, seizures, and even death. It is a common and serious side effect of insulin therapy in patients with diabetes. Hypoglycemic monitor is a noninvasive monitor that measures some physiological parameters continuously to provide detection of hypoglycemic episodes in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (T1DM). Based on heart rate (HR), corrected QT interval of the ECG signal, change of HR, and the change of corrected QT interval, we develop a genetic algorithm (GA)-based multiple regression with fuzzy inference system (FIS) to classify the presence of hypoglycemic episodes. GA is used to find the optimal fuzzy rules and membership functions of FIS and the model parameters of regression method. From a clinical study of 16 children with T1DM, natural occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes is associated with HRs and corrected QT intervals. The overall data were organized into a training set (eight patients) and a testing set (another eight patients) randomly selected. The results show that the proposed algorithm performs a good sensitivity with an acceptable specificity. PMID:21349796

  17. Establishing multiple regression models for ozone sensitivity analysis to temperature variation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Tsai, Der-Min; Li, Li-Wei

    2013-11-01

    Sensitivity of meteorological variation to air quality has attracted people's attention since climate change became a world issue. The goal of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of ground-level ozone concentrations to temperature variation in Taiwan. Several multivariate regression models were built based on historical data of ozone and meteorological variables at three cities located in northern, mid-western, and southern Taiwan. Results of descriptive statistics indicate that the severe pollution from the highest to the minor conditions following by the order of the southern (Pingtung), mid-western (Fengyuan), and the northern sites (Hsichih). Multiple regression models containing a principal component trigger variable effectively simulated the historical ozone exceedance during 2004-2009. Inclusion of the PC trigger were improved R2 from the lowest 0.38 to the highest 0.58. High probability of detection and critical success index (mostly between 85% and 90%) and low false alarm rates (0-2.6%) were achieved for predicting the high ozone days (≧100 ppb). The results of sensitivity analysis indicated that (1) the ozone sensitivity was positively correlated with the temperature variation, (2) the sensitivity levels were opposite to that of the ozone problem severity, (3) the sensitivity was mostly apparent in ozone seasons, and (4) the sensitivity strongly depended on the seasonality in the urban cities Hischih and Fengyuan, but weakly depended on seasonality in the rural city Pingtung.

  18. Modeling the Philippines' real gross domestic product: A normal estimation equation for multiple linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Jackie D.; Tampis, Razzcelle L.; Mercado, Joseph; Baygan, Aaron Vito M.; Baccay, Edcon B.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this research is to formulate a mathematical model for the Philippines' Real Gross Domestic Product (Real GDP). The following factors are considered: Consumers' Spending (x1), Government's Spending (x2), Capital Formation (x3) and Imports (x4) as the Independent Variables that can actually influence in the Real GDP in the Philippines (y). The researchers used a Normal Estimation Equation using Matrices to create the model for Real GDP and used α = 0.01.The researchers analyzed quarterly data from 1990 to 2013. The data were acquired from the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) resulting to a total of 96 observations for each variable. The data have undergone a logarithmic transformation particularly the Dependent Variable (y) to satisfy all the assumptions of the Multiple Linear Regression Analysis. The mathematical model for Real GDP was formulated using Matrices through MATLAB. Based on the results, only three of the Independent Variables are significant to the Dependent Variable namely: Consumers' Spending (x1), Capital Formation (x3) and Imports (x4), hence, can actually predict Real GDP (y). The regression analysis displays that 98.7% (coefficient of determination) of the Independent Variables can actually predict the Dependent Variable. With 97.6% of the result in Paired T-Test, the Predicted Values obtained from the model showed no significant difference from the Actual Values of Real GDP. This research will be essential in appraising the forthcoming changes to aid the Government in implementing policies for the development of the economy.

  19. Inferring genetic networks from DNA microarray data by multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Tsunoda, T; Takagi, T

    2000-01-01

    Inferring gene regulatory networks by differential equations from the time series data of a DNA microarray is one of the most challenging tasks in the post-genomic era. However, there have been no studies actually inferring gene regulatory networks by differential equations from genome-level data. The reason for this is that the number of parameters in the equations exceeds the number of measured time points. We here succeeded in executing the inference, not by directly determining parameters but by applying multiple regression analysis to our equations. We derived our differential equations and steady state equations from the rate equations of transcriptional reactions in an organism. Verification with a number of genes related to respiration indicated the validity and effectiveness of our method. Moreover, the steady state equations were more appropriate than the differential equations for the microarray data used. PMID:11700593

  20. On-line contextual influences during reading normal text: a multiple-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Pynte, Joel; New, Boris; Kennedy, Alan

    2008-09-01

    On-line contextual influences during reading were examined in a series of multiple-regression analyses conducted on a large-scale corpus of eye-movement data, using Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) to assess the degree of contextual constraints exerted on a given target word by the immediately prior word and by the prior sentence fragment. A decrease in inspection time was observed as contextual constraints increased. Word-level constraints exerted their influence both forward (on both single-fixation and gaze durations) and backward (on gaze duration only). An independent sentence-level effect was only visible in the forward direction, and only for gaze duration. Gaze duration was also sensitive to the depth of embedding of the target word in the syntactic structure. We conclude that both low-level and high-level contextual constraints can translate in the eye-movement record. PMID:18701125

  1. Spontaneous Regression of Multiple Pulmonary Metastases After Radiofrequency Ablation of a Single Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Pramod; Escudier, Bernard; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    We report two cases of spontaneous regression of multiple pulmonary metastases occurring after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of a single lung metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first such cases reported. These two patients presented with lung metastases progressive despite treatment with interleukin-2, interferon, or sorafenib but were safely ablated with percutaneous RFA under computed tomography guidance. Percutaneous RFA allowed control of the targeted tumors for >1 year. Distant lung metastases presented an objective response despite the fact that they received no targeted local treatment. Local ablative techniques, such as RFA, induce the release of tumor-degradation product, which is probably responsible for an immunologic reaction that is able to produce a response in distant tumors.

  2. Ranking contributing areas of salt and selenium in the Lower Gunnison River Basin, Colorado, using multiple linear regression models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linard, Joshua I.

    2013-01-01

    Mitigating the effects of salt and selenium on water quality in the Grand Valley and lower Gunnison River Basin in western Colorado is a major concern for land managers. Previous modeling indicated means to improve the models by including more detailed geospatial data and a more rigorous method for developing the models. After evaluating all possible combinations of geospatial variables, four multiple linear regression models resulted that could estimate irrigation-season salt yield, nonirrigation-season salt yield, irrigation-season selenium yield, and nonirrigation-season selenium yield. The adjusted r-squared and the residual standard error (in units of log-transformed yield) of the models were, respectively, 0.87 and 2.03 for the irrigation-season salt model, 0.90 and 1.25 for the nonirrigation-season salt model, 0.85 and 2.94 for the irrigation-season selenium model, and 0.93 and 1.75 for the nonirrigation-season selenium model. The four models were used to estimate yields and loads from contributing areas corresponding to 12-digit hydrologic unit codes in the lower Gunnison River Basin study area. Each of the 175 contributing areas was ranked according to its estimated mean seasonal yield of salt and selenium.

  3. Confidence intervals after multiple imputation: combining profile likelihood information from logistic regressions.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Georg; Ploner, Meinhard; Beyea, Jan

    2013-12-20

    In the logistic regression analysis of a small-sized, case-control study on Alzheimer's disease, some of the risk factors exhibited missing values, motivating the use of multiple imputation. Usually, Rubin's rules (RR) for combining point estimates and variances would then be used to estimate (symmetric) confidence intervals (CIs), on the assumption that the regression coefficients were distributed normally. Yet, rarely is this assumption tested, with or without transformation. In analyses of small, sparse, or nearly separated data sets, such symmetric CI may not be reliable. Thus, RR alternatives have been considered, for example, Bayesian sampling methods, but not yet those that combine profile likelihoods, particularly penalized profile likelihoods, which can remove first order biases and guarantee convergence of parameter estimation. To fill the gap, we consider the combination of penalized likelihood profiles (CLIP) by expressing them as posterior cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) obtained via a chi-squared approximation to the penalized likelihood ratio statistic. CDFs from multiple imputations can then easily be averaged into a combined CDF c , allowing confidence limits for a parameter β  at level 1 - α to be identified as those β* and β** that satisfy CDF c (β*) = α ∕ 2 and CDF c (β**) = 1 - α ∕ 2. We demonstrate that the CLIP method outperforms RR in analyzing both simulated data and data from our motivating example. CLIP can also be useful as a confirmatory tool, should it show that the simpler RR are adequate for extended analysis. We also compare the performance of CLIP to Bayesian sampling methods using Markov chain Monte Carlo. CLIP is available in the R package logistf. PMID:23873477

  4. Screening for ketosis using multiple logistic regression based on milk yield and composition.

    PubMed

    Kayano, Mitsunori; Kataoka, Tomoko

    2015-11-01

    Multiple logistic regression was applied to milk yield and composition data for 632 records of healthy cows and 61 records of ketotic cows in Hokkaido, Japan. The purpose was to diagnose ketosis based on milk yield and composition, simultaneously. The cows were divided into two groups: (1) multiparous, including 314 healthy cows and 45 ketotic cows and (2) primiparous, including 318 healthy cows and 16 ketotic cows, since nutritional status, milk yield and composition are affected by parity. Multiple logistic regression was applied to these groups separately. For multiparous cows, milk yield (kg/day/cow) and protein-to-fat (P/F) ratio in milk were significant factors (P<0.05) for the diagnosis of ketosis. For primiparous cows, lactose content (%), solid not fat (SNF) content (%) and milk urea nitrogen (MUN) content (mg/dl) were significantly associated with ketosis (P<0.01). A diagnostic rule was constructed for each group of cows: (1) 9.978 × P/F ratio + 0.085 × milk yield <10 and (2) 2.327 × SNF - 2.703 × lactose + 0.225 × MUN <10. The sensitivity, specificity and the area under the curve (AUC) of the diagnostic rules were (1) 0.800, 0.729 and 0.811; (2) 0.813, 0.730 and 0.787, respectively. The P/F ratio, which is a widely used measure of ketosis, provided the sensitivity, specificity and AUC values of (1) 0.711, 0.726 and 0.781; and (2) 0.678, 0.767 and 0.738, respectively. PMID:26074408

  5. Screening for ketosis using multiple logistic regression based on milk yield and composition

    PubMed Central

    KAYANO, Mitsunori; KATAOKA, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Multiple logistic regression was applied to milk yield and composition data for 632 records of healthy cows and 61 records of ketotic cows in Hokkaido, Japan. The purpose was to diagnose ketosis based on milk yield and composition, simultaneously. The cows were divided into two groups: (1) multiparous, including 314 healthy cows and 45 ketotic cows and (2) primiparous, including 318 healthy cows and 16 ketotic cows, since nutritional status, milk yield and composition are affected by parity. Multiple logistic regression was applied to these groups separately. For multiparous cows, milk yield (kg/day/cow) and protein-to-fat (P/F) ratio in milk were significant factors (P<0.05) for the diagnosis of ketosis. For primiparous cows, lactose content (%), solid not fat (SNF) content (%) and milk urea nitrogen (MUN) content (mg/dl) were significantly associated with ketosis (P<0.01). A diagnostic rule was constructed for each group of cows: (1) 9.978 × P/F ratio + 0.085 × milk yield <10 and (2) 2.327 × SNF − 2.703 × lactose + 0.225 × MUN <10. The sensitivity, specificity and the area under the curve (AUC) of the diagnostic rules were (1) 0.800, 0.729 and 0.811; (2) 0.813, 0.730 and 0.787, respectively. The P/F ratio, which is a widely used measure of ketosis, provided the sensitivity, specificity and AUC values of (1) 0.711, 0.726 and 0.781; and (2) 0.678, 0.767 and 0.738, respectively. PMID:26074408

  6. Semi-parametric Allelic Tests For Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression And Mahalanobis Distance

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S.; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors. Genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g. MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., 2012], have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. We explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (BAMP), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a SNP (DAMP). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association are compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. Since the allelic approaches assume Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), we propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when HWE is violated and BAMP otherwise. PMID:26493781

  7. Marine Geodatabase and Multiple Regressive Pattern Recognition Technique: A New Approach to Marine Placer Resource Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oommen, T.; Misra, D.; Prakash, A.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Naidu, S.; Kelley, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    The ultramafic rocks of the Red Mountain in Goodnews Bay area of southwest Alaska have been the commercial source of onshore placer Pt since 1926. The proximity of the Red Mountain to the Bering Sea, our geophysical survey revealing the possibility of drowned ultramafic and paleo-drainage channels offshore, and the platinum samples collected by various agencies suggests the availability of a significant quantity of marine Pt accumulations in this region. We have created a comprehensive geodatabase for future Pt prospecting and possible exploration in the offshore regions of Goodnews Bay. Offshore exploration needs a preliminary assessment of the marine Pt resource. We have used several regression techniques such as inverse distance weight, kriging, radial basis function, support vector machines (SVM) and relevant vector machines for our assessment. None of these techniques individually was able to capture the entire Pt data variability obtained from the sampled data. The reason could be simply due to the limitation of the method used or the complexity of the governing processes that influence the accumulation of marine Pt such as glaciations, littoral currents, bathymetry, sea-level transgression, or paleo-drainage processes that are difficult to be quantitatively included in the assessment. To obtain improved accuracy of assessment, we propose a new method called the Multiple Regressive Pattern Recognition Technique (MRPRT). We hypothesize that by using the outputs of the different individual regression techniques as the input for a pattern recognition technique, such as the SVM, we will be able to overcome the shortcomings of these regression methods discussed above. The performance of MRPRT was evaluated using the coefficient of correlation (CC) and the coefficient of efficiency (CE). With MRPRT, the CC of our prediction has improved from 0.57 to 0.77 and the CE from 0.28 to 0.43. Post comparative analysis of the predicted marine Pt resource with the different

  8. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis): a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks) will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks), mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy), post-therapy (15 weeks) and at six months (26 weeks) and twelve months (52 weeks) follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the efficacy, cost

  9. Accounting for data errors discovered from an audit in multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Bryan E; Yu, Chang

    2011-09-01

    A data coordinating team performed onsite audits and discovered discrepancies between the data sent to the coordinating center and that recorded at sites. We present statistical methods for incorporating audit results into analyses. This can be thought of as a measurement error problem, where the distribution of errors is a mixture with a point mass at 0. If the error rate is nonzero, then even if the mean of the discrepancy between the reported and correct values of a predictor is 0, naive estimates of the association between two continuous variables will be biased. We consider scenarios where there are (1) errors in the predictor, (2) errors in the outcome, and (3) possibly correlated errors in the predictor and outcome. We show how to incorporate the error rate and magnitude, estimated from a random subset (the audited records), to compute unbiased estimates of association and proper confidence intervals. We then extend these results to multiple linear regression where multiple covariates may be incorrect in the database and the rate and magnitude of the errors may depend on study site. We study the finite sample properties of our estimators using simulations, discuss some practical considerations, and illustrate our methods with data from 2815 HIV-infected patients in Latin America, of whom 234 had their data audited using a sequential auditing plan. PMID:21281274

  10. A Meta-Regression Method for Studying Etiological Heterogeneity Across Disease Subtypes Classified by Multiple Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Molin; Kuchiba, Aya; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    In interdisciplinary biomedical, epidemiologic, and population research, it is increasingly necessary to consider pathogenesis and inherent heterogeneity of any given health condition and outcome. As the unique disease principle implies, no single biomarker can perfectly define disease subtypes. The complex nature of molecular pathology and biology necessitates biostatistical methodologies to simultaneously analyze multiple biomarkers and subtypes. To analyze and test for heterogeneity hypotheses across subtypes defined by multiple categorical and/or ordinal markers, we developed a meta-regression method that can utilize existing statistical software for mixed-model analysis. This method can be used to assess whether the exposure-subtype associations are different across subtypes defined by 1 marker while controlling for other markers and to evaluate whether the difference in exposure-subtype association across subtypes defined by 1 marker depends on any other markers. To illustrate this method in molecular pathological epidemiology research, we examined the associations between smoking status and colorectal cancer subtypes defined by 3 correlated tumor molecular characteristics (CpG island methylator phenotype, microsatellite instability, and the B-Raf protooncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF), mutation) in the Nurses' Health Study (1980–2010) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). This method can be widely useful as molecular diagnostics and genomic technologies become routine in clinical medicine and public health. PMID:26116215

  11. The mechanical properties of high speed GTAW weld and factors of nonlinear multiple regression model under external transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; He, Youyou

    2013-05-01

    A transverse magnetic field was introduced to the arc plasma in the process of welding stainless steel tubes by high-speed Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding (TIG for short) without filler wire. The influence of external magnetic field on welding quality was investigated. 9 sets of parameters were designed by the means of orthogonal experiment. The welding joint tensile strength and form factor of weld were regarded as the main standards of welding quality. A binary quadratic nonlinear regression equation was established with the conditions of magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas. The residual standard deviation was calculated to adjust the accuracy of regression model. The results showed that, the regression model was correct and effective in calculating the tensile strength and aspect ratio of weld. Two 3D regression models were designed respectively, and then the impact law of magnetic induction on welding quality was researched.

  12. Establishment of In Silico Prediction Models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 Induction in Human Hepatocytes by Multiple Regression Analysis Using Azole Compounds.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Mika; Konno, Yoshihiro; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) via cytochrome P450 (P450) induction are one clinical problem leading to increased risk of adverse effects and the need for dosage adjustments and additional therapeutic monitoring. In silico models for predicting P450 induction are useful for avoiding DDI risk. In this study, we have established regression models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction in human hepatocytes using several physicochemical parameters for a set of azole compounds with different P450 induction as characteristics as model compounds. To obtain a well-correlated regression model, the compounds for CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 induction were independently selected from the tested azole compounds using principal component analysis with fold-induction data. Both of the multiple linear regression models obtained for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction are represented by different sets of physicochemical parameters. The adjusted coefficients of determination for these models were of 0.8 and 0.9, respectively. The fold-induction of the validation compounds, another set of 12 azole-containing compounds, were predicted within twofold limits for both CYP3A4 and CYP2B6. The concordance for the prediction of CYP3A4 induction was 87% with another validation set, 23 marketed drugs. However, the prediction of CYP2B6 induction tended to be overestimated for these marketed drugs. The regression models show that lipophilicity mostly contributes to CYP3A4 induction, whereas not only the lipophilicity but also the molecular polarity is important for CYP2B6 induction. Our regression models, especially that for CYP3A4 induction, might provide useful methods to avoid potent CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 inducers during the lead optimization stage without performing induction assays in human hepatocytes. PMID:27208383

  13. A New Measurement Equivalence Technique Based on Latent Class Regression as Compared with Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Jafari, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurement equivalence is an essential prerequisite for making valid comparisons in mental health questionnaires across groups. In most methods used for assessing measurement equivalence, which is known as Differential Item Functioning (DIF), latent variables are assumed to be continuous. Objective: To compare a new method called Latent Class Regression (LCR) designed for discrete latent variable with the multiple indicators multiple cause (MIMIC) as a continuous latent variable technique to assess the measurement equivalence of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which is a cross deferent subgroup of Iranian nurses. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 771 nurses working in the hospitals of Fars and Bushehr provinces of southern Iran. To identify the Minor Psychiatric Disorders (MPD), the nurses completed self-report GHQ-12 questionnaires and sociodemographic questions. Two uniform-DIF detection methods, LCR and MIMIC, were applied for comparability when the GHQ-12 score was assumed to be discrete and continuous, respectively. Results: The result of fitting LCR with 2 classes indicated that 27.4% of the nurses had MPD. Gender was identified as an influential factor of the level of MPD.LCR and MIMIC agree with detection of DIF and DIF-free items by gender, age, education and marital status in 83.3, 100.0, 91.7 and 83.3% cases, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicated that the GHQ-12 is to a great degree, an invariant measure for the assessment of MPD among nurses. High convergence between the two methods suggests using the LCR approach in cases of discrete latent variable, e.g. GHQ-12 and adequate sample size. PMID:27482129

  14. Spatial disaggregation of carbon dioxide emissions from road traffic based on multiple linear regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yuqin; Lam, Nina S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide emissions at fine spatial scales are critical to both modelers and decision makers dealing with global warming and climate change. Globally, traffic-related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing rapidly. This paper presents a new method based on a multiple linear regression model to disaggregate traffic-related CO 2 emission estimates from the parish-level scale to a 1 × 1 km grid scale. Considering the allocation factors (population density, urban area, income, road density) together, we used a correlation and regression analysis to determine the relationship between these factors and traffic-related CO 2 emissions, and developed the best-fit model. The method was applied to downscale the traffic-related CO 2 emission values by parish (i.e. county) for the State of Louisiana into 1-km 2 grid cells. In the four highest parishes in traffic-related CO 2 emissions, the biggest area that has above average CO 2 emissions is found in East Baton Rouge, and the smallest area with no CO 2 emissions is also in East Baton Rouge, but Orleans has the most CO 2 emissions per unit area. The result reveals that high CO 2 emissions are concentrated in dense road network of urban areas with high population density and low CO 2 emissions are distributed in rural areas with low population density, sparse road network. The proposed method can be used to identify the emission "hot spots" at fine scale and is considered more accurate and less time-consuming than the previous methods.

  15. Merging multiple rainfall information through a bias adjustment procedure using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F.; Chiang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Prediction of extreme rainfall-runoff events is the key issue for flood mitigation. In this study, the effectiveness of merging data obtained from gauges, radars and satellite-derived precipitation products through a bias adjustment procedure is investigated. First, the contribution of rainfall information to hydrological responses is individually evaluated in terms of two scenarios: with and without bias adjustment. Besides, the applicability of the constructed bias adjustment procedure to the removal of observational errors can also be verified by comparing the forecasts obtained from the above two scenarios. Finally, the artificial neural networks (ANN) and the Bayesian approach are conducted to merge multiple rainfall information. Figure 1 shows the error changes of different bias conditions when adjusting the observational biases of gauge measurements. It is clear that the minimum training errors can be found when the values of parameters a and b are 1.1 and 2 in Figure 1(i), respectively. For the same values in the validation phase, the error is also close to an optimal solution. The optimization indicates that the gauge measurements have a bias error of 10% underestimation and a random error of about 2 mm/hr. Results given in Table 1 indicate that all precipitation products are biased and can be appropriately adjusted with an improvement rate, in terms of their contribution to flood forecasting in the testing phase, of about 9% for gauges, 17% for radars and 17% for satellites, respectively. Moreover, this study also demonstrates that the merged rainfall product is more stable and reliable as compared with unmerged rainfall information in terms of its contribution to flood forecasting. This study provides a potential approach for merging multiple rainfall information over mountainous watersheds where observational biases may occur in gauge measurements. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Bias Adjustment, Artificial Neural Network, Data Merge.

  16. PUMA: A Unified Framework for Penalized Multiple Regression Analysis of GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Gabriel E.; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Mezey, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Penalized Multiple Regression (PMR) can be used to discover novel disease associations in GWAS datasets. In practice, proposed PMR methods have not been able to identify well-supported associations in GWAS that are undetectable by standard association tests and thus these methods are not widely applied. Here, we present a combined algorithmic and heuristic framework for PUMA (Penalized Unified Multiple-locus Association) analysis that solves the problems of previously proposed methods including computational speed, poor performance on genome-scale simulated data, and identification of too many associations for real data to be biologically plausible. The framework includes a new minorize-maximization (MM) algorithm for generalized linear models (GLM) combined with heuristic model selection and testing methods for identification of robust associations. The PUMA framework implements the penalized maximum likelihood penalties previously proposed for GWAS analysis (i.e. Lasso, Adaptive Lasso, NEG, MCP), as well as a penalty that has not been previously applied to GWAS (i.e. LOG). Using simulations that closely mirror real GWAS data, we show that our framework has high performance and reliably increases power to detect weak associations, while existing PMR methods can perform worse than single marker testing in overall performance. To demonstrate the empirical value of PUMA, we analyzed GWAS data for type 1 diabetes, Crohns's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, three autoimmune diseases from the original Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Our analysis replicates known associations for these diseases and we discover novel etiologically relevant susceptibility loci that are invisible to standard single marker tests, including six novel associations implicating genes involved in pancreatic function, insulin pathways and immune-cell function in type 1 diabetes; three novel associations implicating genes in pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways in Crohn's disease; and one

  17. Optimization of end-members used in multiple linear regression geochemical mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.

    2015-11-01

    Tracking marine sediment provenance (e.g., of dust, ash, hydrothermal material, etc.) provides insight into contemporary ocean processes and helps construct paleoceanographic records. In a simple system with only a few end-members that can be easily quantified by a unique chemical or isotopic signal, chemical ratios and normative calculations can help quantify the flux of sediment from the few sources. In a more complex system (e.g., each element comes from multiple sources), more sophisticated mixing models are required. MATLAB codes published in Pisias et al. solidified the foundation for application of a Constrained Least Squares (CLS) multiple linear regression technique that can use many elements and several end-members in a mixing model. However, rigorous sensitivity testing to check the robustness of the CLS model is time and labor intensive. MATLAB codes provided in this paper reduce the time and labor involved and facilitate finding a robust and stable CLS model. By quickly comparing the goodness of fit between thousands of different end-member combinations, users are able to identify trends in the results that reveal the CLS solution uniqueness and the end-member composition precision required for a good fit. Users can also rapidly check that they have the appropriate number and type of end-members in their model. In the end, these codes improve the user's confidence that the final CLS model(s) they select are the most reliable solutions. These advantages are demonstrated by application of the codes in two case studies of well-studied datasets (Nazca Plate and South Pacific Gyre).

  18. PUMA: a unified framework for penalized multiple regression analysis of GWAS data.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gabriel E; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Mezey, Jason G

    2013-01-01

    Penalized Multiple Regression (PMR) can be used to discover novel disease associations in GWAS datasets. In practice, proposed PMR methods have not been able to identify well-supported associations in GWAS that are undetectable by standard association tests and thus these methods are not widely applied. Here, we present a combined algorithmic and heuristic framework for PUMA (Penalized Unified Multiple-locus Association) analysis that solves the problems of previously proposed methods including computational speed, poor performance on genome-scale simulated data, and identification of too many associations for real data to be biologically plausible. The framework includes a new minorize-maximization (MM) algorithm for generalized linear models (GLM) combined with heuristic model selection and testing methods for identification of robust associations. The PUMA framework implements the penalized maximum likelihood penalties previously proposed for GWAS analysis (i.e. Lasso, Adaptive Lasso, NEG, MCP), as well as a penalty that has not been previously applied to GWAS (i.e. LOG). Using simulations that closely mirror real GWAS data, we show that our framework has high performance and reliably increases power to detect weak associations, while existing PMR methods can perform worse than single marker testing in overall performance. To demonstrate the empirical value of PUMA, we analyzed GWAS data for type 1 diabetes, Crohns's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, three autoimmune diseases from the original Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Our analysis replicates known associations for these diseases and we discover novel etiologically relevant susceptibility loci that are invisible to standard single marker tests, including six novel associations implicating genes involved in pancreatic function, insulin pathways and immune-cell function in type 1 diabetes; three novel associations implicating genes in pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways in Crohn's disease; and one

  19. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test scores and clinical and sociodemographic correlates in Schizophrenia: multiple logistic regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Masahiro; Koide, Takayoshi; Aleksic, Branko; Okada, Takashi; Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Adachi, Yasunori; Kawano, Naoko; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated what clinical and sociodemographic factors affected Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) factor scores of patients with schizophrenia to evaluate parameters or items of the WCST. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Patients with schizophrenia from three hospitals participated. Participants Participants were recruited from July 2009 to August 2011. 131 Japanese patients with schizophrenia (84 men and 47 women, 43.5±13.8 years (mean±SD)) entered and completed the study. Participants were recruited in the study if they (1) met DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia; (2) were physically healthy and (3) had no mood disorders, substance abuse, neurodevelopmental disorders, epilepsy or mental retardation. We examined their basic clinical and sociodemographic factors (sex, age, education years, age of onset, duration of illness, chlorpromazine equivalent doses and the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) scores). Primary and secondary outcome measures All patients carried out the WCST Keio version. Five indicators were calculated, including categories achieved (CA), perseverative errors in Milner (PEM) and Nelson (PEN), total errors (TE) and difficulties of maintaining set (DMS). From the principal component analysis, we identified two factors (1 and 2). We assessed the relationship between these factor scores and clinical and sociodemographic factors, using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Factor 1 was mainly composed of CA, PEM, PEN and TE. Factor 2 was mainly composed of DMS. The factor 1 score was affected by age, education years and the PANSS negative scale score. The factor 2 score was affected by duration of illness. Conclusions Age, education years, PANSS negative scale score and duration of illness affected WCST factor scores in patients with schizophrenia. Using WCST factor scores may reduce the possibility of type I errors due to multiple comparisons. PMID:23135537

  20. Anomalous particle pinch and scaling of vin/D based on transport analysis and multiple regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.; Kardaun, O.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of density profiles in current tokamaks and ITER require a validated scaling relation for vin/D where vin is the anomalous inward drift velocity and D is the anomalous diffusion coefficient. Transport analysis is necessary for determining the anomalous particle pinch from measured density profiles and for separating the impact of particle sources. A set of discharges in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and ASDEX is analysed using a special version of the 1.5-D BALDUR transport code. Profiles of ρsvin/D with ρs the effective separatrix radius, five other dimensionless parameters and many further quantities in the confinement zone are compiled, resulting in the dataset VIND1.dat, which covers a wide parameter range. Weighted multiple regression is applied to the ASDEX Upgrade subset which leads to a two-term scaling \\rho _sv_in ({x'}) /D ({x'}) =0.0432 [ { ({L_{T_{\\rme}} ({ \\bar {x}'}) / \\rho _s}) ^{-2.58}+7.13 \\, U_L^{1.55} \

  1. A Nonlinear Causality Estimator Based on Non-Parametric Multiplicative Regression

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Nicoletta; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Causal prediction has become a popular tool for neuroscience applications, as it allows the study of relationships between different brain areas during rest, cognitive tasks or brain disorders. We propose a nonparametric approach for the estimation of nonlinear causal prediction for multivariate time series. In the proposed estimator, CNPMR, Autoregressive modeling is replaced by Nonparametric Multiplicative Regression (NPMR). NPMR quantifies interactions between a response variable (effect) and a set of predictor variables (cause); here, we modified NPMR for model prediction. We also demonstrate how a particular measure, the sensitivity Q, could be used to reveal the structure of the underlying causal relationships. We apply CNPMR on artificial data with known ground truth (5 datasets), as well as physiological data (2 datasets). CNPMR correctly identifies both linear and nonlinear causal connections that are present in the artificial data, as well as physiologically relevant connectivity in the real data, and does not seem to be affected by filtering. The Sensitivity measure also provides useful information about the latent connectivity.The proposed estimator addresses many of the limitations of linear Granger causality and other nonlinear causality estimators. CNPMR is compared with pairwise and conditional Granger causality (linear) and Kernel-Granger causality (nonlinear). The proposed estimator can be applied to pairwise or multivariate estimations without any modifications to the main method. Its nonpametric nature, its ability to capture nonlinear relationships and its robustness to filtering make it appealing for a number of applications. PMID:27378901

  2. [Multiple stepwise regression analysis of etiological factors of esophageal cancer in Cixian county].

    PubMed

    Hou, J

    1989-01-01

    Cixian county, one of the high-risk counties of esophageal cancer in the world, has a standardized mortality of 142.19/10(5) population, 1969-1971. The incidence of esophageal cancer had dropped year by year from 1974 to 1982. The significance of the incidence tendency was studied. The results are highly significant (P less than 0.001). The causative factors of esophageal cancer including five independent variables: X1 (number of people taking sanitized water), X2 (number of people on pickled Chinese cabbage), X3 (annual output of fruit), X4 (annual output of fresh vegetable) and X5 (annual output of sweet potato) and one dependent variable Y (morbidity of esophageal cancer) were studied by correlative analysis and multiple stepwise regression. Three correlative factors (X1, X2, and X5) with significant effect on the esophageal cancer were selected from the five suspected factors. The result indicated that taking sanitized water, reducing the number of people on pickled Chinese cabbage, changing the structure of food and keeping the nutrient balance, might decrease the incidence of esophageal cancer. PMID:2789130

  3. [Application of SAS macro to evaluated multiplicative and additive interaction in logistic and Cox regression in clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Nie, Z Q; Ou, Y Q; Zhuang, J; Qu, Y J; Mai, J Z; Chen, J M; Liu, X Q

    2016-05-10

    Conditional logistic regression analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis are commonly used in case control study, but Cox proportional hazard model is often used in survival data analysis. Most literature only refer to main effect model, however, generalized linear model differs from general linear model, and the interaction was composed of multiplicative interaction and additive interaction. The former is only statistical significant, but the latter has biological significance. In this paper, macros was written by using SAS 9.4 and the contrast ratio, attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index were calculated while calculating the items of logistic and Cox regression interactions, and the confidence intervals of Wald, delta and profile likelihood were used to evaluate additive interaction for the reference in big data analysis in clinical epidemiology and in analysis of genetic multiplicative and additive interactions. PMID:27188374

  4. Health Effects of Lesion Localization in Multiple Sclerosis: Spatial Registration and Confounding Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Eloyan, Ani; Shou, Haochang; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sweeney, Elizabeth M.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Reich, Daniel S.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesion localization in multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be associated with the type and severity of adverse health effects. However, several factors hinder statistical analyses of such associations using large MRI datasets: 1) spatial registration algorithms developed for healthy individuals may be less effective on diseased brains and lead to different spatial distributions of lesions; 2) interpretation of results requires the careful selection of confounders; and 3) most approaches have focused on voxel-wise regression approaches. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five registration algorithms and observed that conclusions regarding lesion localization can vary substantially with the choice of registration algorithm. Methods for dealing with confounding factors due to differences in disease duration and local lesion volume are introduced. Voxel-wise regression is then extended by the introduction of a metric that measures the distance between a patient-specific lesion mask and the population prevalence map. PMID:25233361

  5. Latent Variable Regression 4-Level Hierarchical Model Using Multisite Multiple-Cohorts Longitudinal Data. CRESST Report 801

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kilchan

    2011-01-01

    This report explores a new latent variable regression 4-level hierarchical model for monitoring school performance over time using multisite multiple-cohorts longitudinal data. This kind of data set has a 4-level hierarchical structure: time-series observation nested within students who are nested within different cohorts of students. These…

  6. Estimating the Coefficient of Cross-validity in Multiple Regression: A Comparison of Analytical and Empirical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Constance V.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy of three analytical formulas for shrinkage estimation and four empirical techniques were investigated in a Monte Carlo study of the coefficient of cross-validity in multiple regression. Substantial statistical bias was evident for all techniques except the formula of M. W. Brown (1975) and multicross-validation. (SLD)

  7. Structure Coefficients versus Scoring Coefficients as Bases for Interpreting Emergent Variables in Multiple Regression and Related Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard J.

    Interpretation of emergent variables on the basis of structure coefficients (zero order correlations between original and emergent variables) is potentially very misleading and should be avoided in favor of interpretation on the basis of scoring coefficients. This is most apparent in multiple regression analysis and its special case, two-group…

  8. Physical and Cognitive-Affective Factors Associated with Fatigue in Individuals with Fibromyalgia: A Multiple Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Veronica; Brooks, Jessica; Tu, Wei-Mo; Moser, Erin; Lo, Chu-Ling; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to determine the extent to which physical and cognitive-affective factors are associated with fibromyalgia (FM) fatigue. Method: A quantitative descriptive design using correlation techniques and multiple regression analysis. The participants consisted of 302 members of the National Fibromyalgia &…

  9. The Overall Odds Ratio as an Intuitive Effect Size Index for Multiple Logistic Regression: Examination of Further Refinements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huy; Marcus, Justin

    2012-01-01

    This study used Monte Carlo simulation to examine the properties of the overall odds ratio (OOR), which was recently introduced as an index for overall effect size in multiple logistic regression. It was found that the OOR was relatively independent of study base rate and performed better than most commonly used R-square analogs in indexing model…

  10. The Use of Multiple Regression Models to Determine if Conjoint Analysis Should Be Conducted on Aggregate Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, John W.; Newman, Isadore

    1996-01-01

    In a conjoint-analysis consumer-preference study, researchers must determine whether the product factor estimates, which measure consumer preferences, should be calculated and interpreted for each respondent or collectively. Multiple regression models can determine whether to aggregate data by examining factor-respondent interaction effects. This…

  11. Analyzing Regression-Discontinuity Designs with Multiple Assignment Variables: A Comparative Study of Four Estimation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian C.; Steiner, Peter M.; Cook, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    In a traditional regression-discontinuity design (RDD), units are assigned to treatment on the basis of a cutoff score and a continuous assignment variable. The treatment effect is measured at a single cutoff location along the assignment variable. This article introduces the multivariate regression-discontinuity design (MRDD), where multiple…

  12. DETERMINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS USING MULTIPLE REGRESSION WITH OUTLIER DETECTION AND ELIMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the analysis of capillary column Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) data using regression analysis with outlier checking and elimination, COMSTAR, is presented and evaluated. his algorithm determines the best combination of the commercial PCB mixtures which best fits the...

  13. Insights into antioxidant activity of 1-adamantylthiopyridine analogs using multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Monnor, Teerawat; Naruepantawart, Orapan; Janyapaisarn, Sayamon; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-02-12

    A data set of 1-adamantylthiopyridine analogs (1-19) with antioxidant activity, comprising of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, was used for constructing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Molecular structures were geometrically optimized at B3LYP/6-31g(d) level and subjected for further molecular descriptor calculation using Dragon software. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was employed for the development of QSAR models using 3 significant descriptors (i.e. Mor29e, F04[N-N] and GATS5v) for predicting the DPPH activity and 2 essential descriptors (i.e. EEig06r and Mor06v) for predicting the SOD activity. Such molecular descriptors accounted for the effects and positions of substituent groups (R) on the 1-adamantylthiopyridine ring. The results showed that high atomic electronegativity of polar substituent group (R = CO2H) afforded high DPPH activity, while substituent with high atomic van der Waals volumes such as R = Br gave high SOD activity. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) and external test set were used for model validation. Correlation coefficient (QCV) and root mean squared error (RMSECV) of the LOO-CV set for predicting DPPH activity were 0.5784 and 8.3440, respectively, while QExt and RMSEExt of external test set corresponded to 0.7353 and 4.2721, respectively. Furthermore, QCV and RMSECV values of the LOO-CV set for predicting SOD activity were 0.7549 and 5.6380, respectively. The QSAR model's equation was then used in predicting the SOD activity of tested compounds and these were subsequently verified experimentally. It was observed that the experimental activity was more potent than the predicted activity. Structure-activity relationships of significant descriptors governing antioxidant activity are also discussed. The QSAR models investigated herein are anticipated to be useful in the rational design and development of novel compounds with antioxidant activity. PMID

  14. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L.; Zhang, Z.G.; Mouraux, A.; Iannetti, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  15. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  16. Small-Sample Adjustments for Tests of Moderators and Model Fit Using Robust Variance Estimation in Meta-Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Pustejovsky, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses often include studies that report multiple effect sizes based on a common pool of subjects or that report effect sizes from several samples that were treated with very similar research protocols. The inclusion of such studies introduces dependence among the effect size estimates. When the number of studies is large, robust variance…

  17. Spontaneous Regression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Multiple Lung Metastases: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pectasides, Eirini; Miksad, Rebecca; Pyatibrat, Sergey; Srivastava, Amogh; Bullock, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rare event. Here we present a case of spontaneous regression of metastatic HCC. A 53-year-old man with hepatitis C and alcoholic cirrhosis was found to have a large liver mass consistent with HCC based on its radiographic features. Imaging also revealed left portal and hepatic vein thrombosis, as well as multiple lung nodules concerning for metastases. Approximately 2 months after the initial diagnosis, both the primary liver lesion and the lung metastases decreased in size and eventually resolved without any intervention. Thereafter, the left hepatic vein thrombus progressed into the inferior vena cava and the right atrium, and the patient died due to right heart failure. In this case report and literature review, we discuss the potential mechanisms for and review the literature on spontaneous regression of metastatic HCC. PMID:27038447

  18. Regression models for patient-reported measures having ordered categories recorded on multiple occasions

    PubMed Central

    Preisser, J. S.; Phillips, C.; Perin, J.; Schwartz, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The article reviews proportional and partial proportional odds regression for ordered categorical outcomes, such as patient-reported measures, that are frequently used in clinical research in dentistry. Methods The proportional odds regression model for ordinal data is a generalization of ordinary logistic regression for dichotomous responses. When the proportional odds assumption holds for some but not all of the covariates, the lesser known partial proportional odds model is shown to provide a useful extension. Results The ordinal data models are illustrated for the analysis of repeated ordinal outcomes to determine whether the burden associated with sensory alteration following a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy procedure differed for those patients who were given opening exercises only following surgery and those who received sensory retraining exercises in conjunction with standard opening exercises. Conclusions Proportional and partial proportional odds models are broadly applicable to the analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal ordinal data in dental research. PMID:21070317

  19. About the multiple linear regressions applied in studying the solvatochromic effects.

    PubMed

    Dorohoi, Dana-Ortansa

    2010-03-01

    Statistical analysis is applied to study the solvatochromic effects using the solvent parameters (regressors) influencing the spectral shifts in the electronic spectra. The data pointed to eliminate the non-significant parameters and the aberrant points (for which supplemental interactions were neglected in used theories) from those supposed to multi-linear regression. A BASIC program permits to follow these desiderates step by step. In order to exemplify the steps of regression, the wavenumbers of the maximum pi-pi* absorption band of three benzene derivatives in various solvents were used. PMID:20089443

  20. Data for and adjusted regional regression models of volume and quality of urban storm-water runoff in Boise and Garden City, Idaho, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    Previously developed U.S. Geological Survey regional regression models of runoff and 11 chemical constituents were evaluated to assess their suitability for use in urban areas in Boise and Garden City. Data collected in the study area were used to develop adjusted regional models of storm-runoff volumes and mean concentrations and loads of chemical oxygen demand, dissolved and suspended solids, total nitrogen and total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total and dissolved phosphorus, and total recoverable cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. Explanatory variables used in these models were drainage area, impervious area, land-use information, and precipitation data. Mean annual runoff volume and loads at the five outfalls were estimated from 904 individual storms during 1976 through 1993. Two methods were used to compute individual storm loads. The first method used adjusted regional models of storm loads and the second used adjusted regional models for mean concentration and runoff volume. For large storms, the first method seemed to produce excessively high loads for some constituents and the second method provided more reliable results for all constituents except suspended solids. The first method provided more reliable results for large storms for suspended solids.

  1. Multiple Logistic Regression Analysis of Cigarette Use among High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adwere-Boamah, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to predict high school students' cigarette smoking behavior from selected predictors from 2009 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey. The specific target student behavior of interest was frequent cigarette use. Five predictor variables included in the model were: a) race, b) frequency of…

  2. Multiple regression analysis in modelling of carbon dioxide emissions by energy consumption use in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keat, Sim Chong; Chun, Beh Boon; San, Lim Hwee; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2015-04-01

    Climate change due to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is one of the most complex challenges threatening our planet. This issue considered as a great and international concern that primary attributed from different fossil fuels. In this paper, regression model is used for analyzing the causal relationship among CO2 emissions based on the energy consumption in Malaysia using time series data for the period of 1980-2010. The equations were developed using regression model based on the eight major sources that contribute to the CO2 emissions such as non energy, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), diesel, kerosene, refinery gas, Aviation Turbine Fuel (ATF) and Aviation Gasoline (AV Gas), fuel oil and motor petrol. The related data partly used for predict the regression model (1980-2000) and partly used for validate the regression model (2001-2010). The results of the prediction model with the measured data showed a high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9544), indicating the model's accuracy and efficiency. These results are accurate and can be used in early warning of the population to comply with air quality standards.

  3. Point Estimates and Confidence Intervals for Variable Importance in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, D. Roland; Zhu, PengCheng; Decady, Yves J.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of variable importance in linear regression is reviewed, and a measure first justified theoretically by Pratt (1987) is examined in detail. Asymptotic variance estimates are used to construct individual and simultaneous confidence intervals for these importance measures. A simulation study of their coverage properties is reported, and an…

  4. Analyzing Regression-Discontinuity Designs with Multiple Assignment Variables: A Comparative Study of Four Estimation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian C.; Steiner, Peter M.; Cook, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    In a traditional regression-discontinuity design (RDD), units are assigned to treatment and comparison conditions solely on the basis of a single cutoff score on a continuous assignment variable. The discontinuity in the functional form of the outcome at the cutoff represents the treatment effect, or the average treatment effect at the cutoff.…

  5. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence…

  6. The Development and Demonstration of Multiple Regression Models for Operant Conditioning Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanning, Fred; Newman, Isadore

    Based on the assumption that inferential statistics can make the operant conditioner more sensitive to possible significant relationships, regressions models were developed to test the statistical significance between slopes and Y intercepts of the experimental and control group subjects. These results were then compared to the traditional operant…

  7. 48 CFR 52.222-43 - Fair Labor Standards Act and Service Contract Act-Price Adjustment (Multiple Year and Option...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Service Contract Act-Price Adjustment (Multiple Year and Option Contracts). 52.222-43 Section 52... Standards Act and Service Contract Act—Price Adjustment (Multiple Year and Option Contracts). As prescribed...—Price Adjustment (Multiple Year and Option Contracts) (SEP 2009) (a) This clause applies to...

  8. Prediction of the Rock Mass Diggability Index by Using Fuzzy Clustering-Based, ANN and Multiple Regression Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Omid; Torabi, Seyed Rahman; Ataei, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Rock mass classification systems are one of the most common ways of determining rock mass excavatability and related equipment assessment. However, the strength and weak points of such rating-based classifications have always been questionable. Such classification systems assign quantifiable values to predefined classified geotechnical parameters of rock mass. This causes particular ambiguities, leading to the misuse of such classifications in practical applications. Recently, intelligence system approaches such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and neuro-fuzzy methods, along with multiple regression models, have been used successfully to overcome such uncertainties. The purpose of the present study is the construction of several models by using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) method with two data clustering approaches, including fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and subtractive clustering, an ANN and non-linear multiple regression to estimate the basic rock mass diggability index. A set of data from several case studies was used to obtain the real rock mass diggability index and compared to the predicted values by the constructed models. In conclusion, it was observed that ANFIS based on the FCM model shows higher accuracy and correlation with actual data compared to that of the ANN and multiple regression. As a result, one can use the assimilation of ANNs with fuzzy clustering-based models to construct such rigorous predictor tools.

  9. Quantifying components of the hydrologic cycle in Virginia using chemical hydrograph separation and multiple regression analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Nelms, David L.; Pope, Jason P.; Selnick, David L.

    2012-01-01

    This study by the U.S. Geological Survey, prepared in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, quantifies the components of the hydrologic cycle across the Commonwealth of Virginia. Long-term, mean fluxes were calculated for precipitation, surface runoff, infiltration, total evapotranspiration (ET), riparian ET, recharge, base flow (or groundwater discharge) and net total outflow. Fluxes of these components were first estimated on a number of real-time-gaged watersheds across Virginia. Specific conductance was used to distinguish and separate surface runoff from base flow. Specific-conductance data were collected every 15 minutes at 75 real-time gages for approximately 18 months between March 2007 and August 2008. Precipitation was estimated for 1971–2000 using PRISM climate data. Precipitation and temperature from the PRISM data were used to develop a regression-based relation to estimate total ET. The proportion of watershed precipitation that becomes surface runoff was related to physiographic province and rock type in a runoff regression equation. Component flux estimates from the watersheds were transferred to flux estimates for counties and independent cities using the ET and runoff regression equations. Only 48 of the 75 watersheds yielded sufficient data, and data from these 48 were used in the final runoff regression equation. The base-flow proportion for the 48 watersheds averaged 72 percent using specific conductance, a value that was substantially higher than the 61 percent average calculated using a graphical-separation technique (the USGS program PART). Final results for the study are presented as component flux estimates for all counties and independent cities in Virginia.

  10. Path model analyzed with ordinary least squares multiple regression versus LISREL.

    PubMed

    Kline, T J; Klammer, J D

    2001-03-01

    The data of a specified path model using the variables of voice, perceived organizational support, being heard, and procedural justice were subjected to the two separate structural equation modeling analytic techniques--that of ordinary least squares regression and LISREL. A comparison of the results and differences between the analyses is discussed, with the LISREL approach being stronger from both theoretical and statistical perspectives. PMID:11403343

  11. A Qualitative Analysis of Life Course Adjustment to Multiple Morbidity and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie; Taylor, Jessica; Fredland, Nina; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Walker, Janiece; Choban, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of limitations over the life course requires that women re-adapt to environmental barriers that they encounter over time. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to detail the life experiences associated with living with mobility, cognitive, and sensory loss experienced by a woman and her sister who participated in an on-going ethnographic study of mobility impairment in women. In-depth interviews were subjected to thematic, life course analysis. A family case study was interpreted as an exemplar for aging with early onset disability into multiple morbidity, which was described as a series of loss, recovery and re-engagement. Within the case study, the participant suggested that because her functional limitations were not accommodated earlier in life due to societal and family level disadvantage, functional limitations were more difficult to adjust to in later years. PMID:23437442

  12. Clinical evaluation of the DIABETES expert system for decision support by multiple regimen insulin dose adjustment.

    PubMed

    Ambrosiadou, B V; Goulis, D G; Pappas, C

    1996-01-01

    A performance evaluation of the DIABETES rule-based expert system prototype for clinical decision making is presented. The system facilitates multiple insulin regimen and dose adjustment of insulin dependent Type I or II diabetic patients. The study was performed on 600 subjects from two diabetological centres and three diabetological offices of Greek hospitals. The responses of the attendant medical doctors were compared with those of the DIABETES system, with the aid of a specifically devised valuation range (0-5 degrees, 0 indicating full agreement and 5 full disagreement). The capabilities and the weakness of the system in terms of its practicality for decision support in assisting therapy of diabetes mellitus by blood glucose monitoring and subsequent insulin dose adjustment are discussed. The potential benefits of decision support systems for diabetic patient management are seen to be the cost saving they provide in terms of man-hours of verbal instruction by medical experts, the support in terms of objective and consistent decision making, as well as the recording of medical knowledge in the ill-defined field of insulin administration, thus aiding the education and training of medical personnel. PMID:8646833

  13. Regression Equations for Estimation of Annual Peak-Streamflow Frequency for Undeveloped Watersheds in Texas Using an L-moment-Based, PRESS-Minimized, Residual-Adjusted Approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2009-01-01

    Annual peak-streamflow frequency estimates are needed for flood-plain management; for objective assessment of flood risk; for cost-effective design of dams, levees, and other flood-control structures; and for design of roads, bridges, and culverts. Annual peak-streamflow frequency represents the peak streamflow for nine recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 250, and 500 years. Common methods for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged or unmonitored watersheds are regression equations for each recurrence interval developed for one or more regions; such regional equations are the subject of this report. The method is based on analysis of annual peak-streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations (stations). Beginning in 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation and in partnership with Texas Tech University, began a 3-year investigation concerning the development of regional equations to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for undeveloped watersheds in Texas. The investigation focuses primarily on 638 stations with 8 or more years of data from undeveloped watersheds and other criteria. The general approach is explicitly limited to the use of L-moment statistics, which are used in conjunction with a technique of multi-linear regression referred to as PRESS minimization. The approach used to develop the regional equations, which was refined during the investigation, is referred to as the 'L-moment-based, PRESS-minimized, residual-adjusted approach'. For the approach, seven unique distributions are fit to the sample L-moments of the data for each of 638 stations and trimmed means of the seven results of the distributions for each recurrence interval are used to define the station specific, peak-streamflow frequency. As a first iteration of regression, nine weighted-least-squares, PRESS-minimized, multi-linear regression equations are computed using the watershed

  14. Estimation of streamflow, base flow, and nitrate-nitrogen loads in Iowa using multiple linear regression models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen variables, including precipitation, soils and geology, land use, and basin morphologic characteristics, were evaluated to develop Iowa regression models to predict total streamflow (Q), base flow (Qb), storm flow (Qs) and base flow percentage (%Qb) in gauged and ungauged watersheds in the state. Discharge records from a set of 33 watersheds across the state for the 1980 to 2000 period were separated into Qb and Qs. Multiple linear regression found that 75.5 percent of long term average Q was explained by rainfall, sand content, and row crop percentage variables, whereas 88.5 percent of Qb was explained by these three variables plus permeability and floodplain area variables. Qs was explained by average rainfall and %Qb was a function of row crop percentage, permeability, and basin slope variables. Regional regression models developed for long term average Q and Qb were adapted to annual rainfall and showed good correlation between measured and predicted values. Combining the regression model for Q with an estimate of mean annual nitrate concentration, a map of potential nitrate loads in the state was produced. Results from this study have important implications for understanding geomorphic and land use controls on streamflow and base flow in Iowa watersheds and similar agriculture dominated watersheds in the glaciated Midwest. (JAWRA) (Copyright ?? 2005).

  15. Violence against Chinese female sex workers from their stable partners: a hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Xiaoming; Su, Shaobing; Hong, Yan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Tang, Zhenzhu; Shen, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding risk factors that are related to intimate partner violence (IPV) against female sex workers (FSWs) in the context of stable partnerships. Out of the 1,022 FSWs, 743 reported ever having a stable partnership and 430 (more than half) of those reported experiencing IPV. Hierarchical multivariate regression revealed that some characteristics of stable partners (e.g., low education, alcohol use) and relationship stressors (e.g., frequent friction, concurrent partnerships) were independently predictive of IPV against FSWs. Public health professionals who design future violence prevention interventions targeting FSWs need to consider the influence of their stable partners. PMID:24730642

  16. pKa prediction for acidic phosphorus-containing compounds using multiple linear regression with computational descriptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donghai; Du, Ruobing; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2016-07-01

    Ninety-six acidic phosphorus-containing molecules with pKa 1.88 to 6.26 were collected and divided into training and test sets by random sampling. Structural parameters were obtained by density functional theory calculation of the molecules. The relationship between the experimental pKa values and structural parameters was obtained by multiple linear regression fitting for the training set, and tested with the test set; the R(2) values were 0.974 and 0.966 for the training and test sets, respectively. This regression equation, which quantitatively describes the influence of structural parameters on pKa , and can be used to predict pKa values of similar structures, is significant for the design of new acidic phosphorus-containing extractants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218266

  17. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  18. Incorporating missingness for estimation of marginal regression models with multiple source predictors.

    PubMed

    Litman, Heather J; Horton, Nicholas J; Hernández, Bernardo; Laird, Nan M

    2007-02-28

    Multiple informant data refers to information obtained from different individuals or sources used to measure the same construct; for example, researchers might collect information regarding child psychopathology from the child's teacher and the child's parent. Frequently, studies with multiple informants have incomplete observations; in some cases the missingness of informants is substantial. We introduce a Maximum Likelihood (ML) technique to fit models with multiple informants as predictors that permits missingness in the predictors as well as the response. We provide closed form solutions when possible and analytically compare the ML technique to the existing Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) approach. We demonstrate that the ML approach can be used to compare the effect of the informants on response without standardizing the data. Simulations incorporating missingness show that ML is more efficient than the existing GEE method. In the presence of MCAR missing data, we find through a simulation study that the ML approach is robust to a relatively extreme departure from the normality assumption. We implement both methods in a study investigating the association between physical activity and obesity with activity measured using multiple informants (children and their mothers). PMID:16755531

  19. Development of a regression model to predict copper toxicity to Daphnia magna and site-specific copper criteria across multiple surface-water drainages in an arid landscape.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Barry A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    The water effect ratio (WER) procedure developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency is commonly used to derive site-specific criteria for point-source metal discharges into perennial waters. However, experience is limited with this method in the ephemeral and intermittent systems typical of arid climates. The present study presents a regression model to develop WER-based site-specific criteria for a network of ephemeral and intermittent streams influenced by nonpoint sources of Cu in the southwestern United States. Acute (48-h) Cu toxicity tests were performed concurrently with Daphnia magna in site water samples and hardness-matched laboratory waters. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for Cu in site water samples (n=17) varied by more than 12-fold, and the range of calculated WER values was similar. Statistically significant (α=0.05) univariate predictors of site-specific Cu toxicity included (in sequence of decreasing significance) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), hardness/alkalinity ratio, alkalinity, K, and total dissolved solids. A multiple-regression model developed from a combination of DOC and alkalinity explained 85% of the toxicity variability in site water samples, providing a strong predictive tool that can be used in the WER framework when site-specific criteria values are derived. The biotic ligand model (BLM) underpredicted toxicity in site waters by more than 2-fold. Adjustments to the default BLM parameters improved the model's performance but did not provide a better predictive tool compared with the regression model developed from DOC and alkalinity. PMID:24796294

  20. Contextual Atlas Regression Forests: Multiple-Atlas-Based Automated Dose Prediction in Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Chris; Purdie, Thomas G

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy is an integral part of cancer treatment, but to date it remains highly manual. Plans are created through optimization of dose volume objectives that specify intent to minimize, maximize, or achieve a prescribed dose level to clinical targets and organs. Optimization is NP-hard, requiring highly iterative and manual initialization procedures. We present a proof-of-concept for a method to automatically infer the radiation dose directly from the patient's treatment planning image based on a database of previous patients with corresponding clinical treatment plans. Our method uses regression forests augmented with density estimation over the most informative features to learn an automatic atlas-selection metric that is tailored to dose prediction. We validate our approach on 276 patients from 3 clinical treatment plan sites (whole breast, breast cavity, and prostate), with an overall dose prediction accuracies of 78.68%, 64.76%, 86.83% under the Gamma metric. PMID:26660888

  1. Multiple regression and Artificial Neural Network for long-term rainfall forecasting using large scale climate modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekanik, F.; Imteaz, M. A.; Gato-Trinidad, S.; Elmahdi, A.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Multiple regression analysis (MR) to forecast long-term seasonal spring rainfall in Victoria, Australia was investigated using lagged El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) as potential predictors. The use of dual (combined lagged ENSO-IOD) input sets for calibrating and validating ANN and MR Models is proposed to investigate the simultaneous effect of past values of these two major climate modes on long-term spring rainfall prediction. The MR models that did not violate the limits of statistical significance and multicollinearity were selected for future spring rainfall forecast. The ANN was developed in the form of multilayer perceptron using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Both MR and ANN modelling were assessed statistically using mean square error (MSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Pearson correlation (r) and Willmott index of agreement (d). The developed MR and ANN models were tested on out-of-sample test sets; the MR models showed very poor generalisation ability for east Victoria with correlation coefficients of -0.99 to -0.90 compared to ANN with correlation coefficients of 0.42-0.93; ANN models also showed better generalisation ability for central and west Victoria with correlation coefficients of 0.68-0.85 and 0.58-0.97 respectively. The ability of multiple regression models to forecast out-of-sample sets is compatible with ANN for Daylesford in central Victoria and Kaniva in west Victoria (r = 0.92 and 0.67 respectively). The errors of the testing sets for ANN models are generally lower compared to multiple regression models. The statistical analysis suggest the potential of ANN over MR models for rainfall forecasting using large scale climate modes.

  2. Prediction of the NO2 concentration data in an urban area using multiple regression and neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Carmelia Mariana; Voiculescu, Mirela; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Georgescu, Lucian Puiu

    2015-12-01

    The probability of exceeding EU limit values for NO2 concentrations has increased in many European cities. Meteorological parameters have an extremely important role in evaluating the dispersion of pollutants in various city areas. This paper focuses on meteorological variations and their impact on urban background NO2 concentrations in the city of Braila for 2009-2013. The dependence between measured NO2 data and meteorological parameters are analyzed using two modeling methods: multiple linear regression and artificial neuronal networks. The dataset calculated using the proposed models indicate that artificial neural networks can be applied in the analysis and forecasting of air quality.

  3. Regression of multiple intracranial meningiomas after cessation of long-term progesterone agonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Sharer, Leroy; Schulder, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates the long-standing use of megestrol acetate, a progesterone agonist, and its association with multiple intracranial meningioma presentation. Discontinuation of megestrol acetate led to shrinkage of multiple tumors and to the complete resolution of one tumor. Histological examination demonstrated that the largest tumor had high (by > 25% of tumor cell nuclei) progesterone-positive expression, including progesterone receptor (PR) isoform B, compared with low expression of PR isoform A; there was no evidence of estrogen receptor expression and only unaccentuated collagen expression. This is the first clinical report illustrating a causal relationship between exogenous hormones and modulation of meningioma biology in situ. PMID:19731987

  4. Use of multiple regression models in the study of sandhopper orientation under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Giovanni M.; Scapini, Felicita

    2003-10-01

    In sandhoppers (Amphipoda; Talitridae), typical dwellers of the supralittoral zone of sandy beaches, orientation with respect to the sun and landscape vision is adapted to the local direction of the shoreline. Variation of this behavioural adaptation can be related to the characteristics of the beach. Measures of orientation with respect to the shoreline direction can thus be made as a tool to assess beach stability versus changeability, once the sources of variation are correctly interpreted. Orientation of animals can be studied by statistical analysis of directions taken after release in nature. In this paper some new tools for exploring directional data are reviewed, with special emphasis on non-parametric smoothers and regression models. Results from a large study concerning one species of sandhoppers, Talitrus saltator (Montagu), from an exposed sandy beach in northeastern Tunisia are presented. Seasonal differences in orientation behaviour were shown with a higher scatter in autumn with respect to spring. The higher scatter shown in autumn depended both on intrinsic (sex) and external (climatic conditions and landscape visibility) factors and was related to the tendency of this species to migrate towards the dune anticipating winter conditions.

  5. Performance and robustness of probabilistic river forecasts computed with quantile regression based on multiple independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoss, F.; Fischbeck, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    This study applies quantile regression (QR) to predict exceedance probabilities of various water levels, including flood stages, with combinations of deterministic forecasts, past forecast errors and rates of water level rise as independent variables. A computationally cheap technique to estimate forecast uncertainty is valuable, because many national flood forecasting services, such as the National Weather Service (NWS), only publish deterministic single-valued forecasts. The study uses data from the 82 river gauges, for which the NWS' North Central River Forecast Center issues forecasts daily. Archived forecasts for lead times of up to 6 days from 2001 to 2013 were analyzed. Besides the forecast itself, this study uses the rate of rise of the river stage in the last 24 and 48 h and the forecast error 24 and 48 h ago as predictors in QR configurations. When compared to just using the forecast as an independent variable, adding the latter four predictors significantly improved the forecasts, as measured by the Brier skill score and the continuous ranked probability score. Mainly, the resolution increases, as the forecast-only QR configuration already delivered high reliability. Combining the forecast with the other four predictors results in a much less favorable performance. Lastly, the forecast performance does not strongly depend on the size of the training data set but on the year, the river gauge, lead time and event threshold that are being forecast. We find that each event threshold requires a separate configuration or at least calibration.

  6. Unwrapping the organizational entry process: disentangling multiple antecedents and their pathways to adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D; Wanberg, Connie R

    2003-10-01

    This 4-wave longitudinal study of newcomers in 7 organizations examined preentry knowledge, proactive personality, and socialization influences as antecedents of both proximal (task mastery, role clarity, work group integration, and political knowledge) and distal (organizational commitment, work withdrawal, and turnover) indicators of newcomer adjustment. Results suggest that preentry knowledge, proactive personality, and socialization influences from the organization, supervisors, and coworkers are independently related to proximal adjustment outcomes, consistent with a theoretical framework highlighting distinct dimensions of organizational and work task adjustment. The proximal adjustment outcomes partially mediated most of the relationships between the antecedents of adjustment and organizational commitment, work withdrawal, and turnover. PMID:14516244

  7. Estimation of nutrients and organic matter in Korean swine slurry using multiple regression analysis of physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Arumuganainar; Choi, Hong Lim

    2011-10-01

    Swine waste land application has increased due to organic fertilization, but excess application in an arable system can cause environmental risk. Therefore, in situ characterizations of such resources are important prior to application. To explore this, 41 swine slurry samples were collected from Korea, and wide differences were observed in the physico-biochemical properties. However, significant (P<0.001) multiple property correlations (R²) were obtained between nutrients with specific gravity (SG), electrical conductivity (EC), total solids (TS) and pH. The different combinations of hydrometer, EC meter, drying oven and pH meter were found useful to estimate Mn, Fe, Ca, K, Al, Na, N and 5-day biochemical oxygen demands (BOD₅) at improved R² values of 0.83, 0.82, 0.77, 0.75, 0.67, 0.47, 0.88 and 0.70, respectively. The results from this study suggest that multiple property regressions can facilitate the prediction of micronutrients and organic matter much better than a single property regression for livestock waste. PMID:21767950

  8. Sequential Processing and the Matching-Stimulus Interval Effect in ERP Components: An Exploration of the Mechanism Using Multiple Regression

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Genevieve Z.; Barry, Robert J.; Gonsalvez, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    In oddball tasks, increasing the time between stimuli within a particular condition (target-to-target interval, TTI; nontarget-to-nontarget interval, NNI) systematically enhances N1, P2, and P300 event-related potential (ERP) component amplitudes. This study examined the mechanism underpinning these effects in ERP components recorded from 28 adults who completed a conventional three-tone oddball task. Bivariate correlations, partial correlations and multiple regression explored component changes due to preceding ERP component amplitudes and intervals found within the stimulus series, rather than constraining the task with experimentally constructed intervals, which has been adequately explored in prior studies. Multiple regression showed that for targets, N1 and TTI predicted N2, TTI predicted P3a and P3b, and Processing Negativity (PN), P3b, and TTI predicted reaction time. For rare nontargets, P1 predicted N1, NNI predicted N2, and N1 predicted Slow Wave (SW). Findings show that the mechanism is operating on separate stages of stimulus-processing, suggestive of either increased activation within a number of stimulus-specific pathways, or very long component generator recovery cycles. These results demonstrate the extent to which matching-stimulus intervals influence ERP component amplitudes and behavior in a three-tone oddball task, and should be taken into account when designing similar studies. PMID:27445774

  9. Databased comparison of Sparse Bayesian Learning and Multiple Linear Regression for statistical downscaling of low flow indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Deepti; St-Hilaire, André; Daigle, Anik; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThis study attempts to compare the performance of two statistical downscaling frameworks in downscaling hydrological indices (descriptive statistics) characterizing the low flow regimes of three rivers in Eastern Canada - Moisie, Romaine and Ouelle. The statistical models selected are Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), an implementation of Sparse Bayesian Learning, and the Automated Statistical Downscaling tool (ASD), an implementation of Multiple Linear Regression. Inputs to both frameworks involve climate variables significantly (α = 0.05) correlated with the indices. These variables were processed using Canonical Correlation Analysis and the resulting canonical variates scores were used as input to RVM to estimate the selected low flow indices. In ASD, the significantly correlated climate variables were subjected to backward stepwise predictor selection and the selected predictors were subsequently used to estimate the selected low flow indices using Multiple Linear Regression. With respect to the correlation between climate variables and the selected low flow indices, it was observed that all indices are influenced, primarily, by wind components (Vertical, Zonal and Meridonal) and humidity variables (Specific and Relative Humidity). The downscaling performance of the framework involving RVM was found to be better than ASD in terms of Relative Root Mean Square Error, Relative Mean Absolute Bias and Coefficient of Determination. In all cases, the former resulted in less variability of the performance indices between calibration and validation sets, implying better generalization ability than for the latter.

  10. A Rapid Model Adaptation Technique for Emotional Speech Recognition with Style Estimation Based on Multiple-Regression HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijima, Yusuke; Nose, Takashi; Tachibana, Makoto; Kobayashi, Takao

    In this paper, we propose a rapid model adaptation technique for emotional speech recognition which enables us to extract paralinguistic information as well as linguistic information contained in speech signals. This technique is based on style estimation and style adaptation using a multiple-regression HMM (MRHMM). In the MRHMM, the mean parameters of the output probability density function are controlled by a low-dimensional parameter vector, called a style vector, which corresponds to a set of the explanatory variables of the multiple regression. The recognition process consists of two stages. In the first stage, the style vector that represents the emotional expression category and the intensity of its expressiveness for the input speech is estimated on a sentence-by-sentence basis. Next, the acoustic models are adapted using the estimated style vector, and then standard HMM-based speech recognition is performed in the second stage. We assess the performance of the proposed technique in the recognition of simulated emotional speech uttered by both professional narrators and non-professional speakers.

  11. Data of multiple regressions analysis between selected biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in Saudi autistic patients.

    PubMed

    El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates data of multiple regression analysis between nine biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and impaired detoxification as two mechanisms recently recorded as autism phenotypes. The presented data was obtained by measuring a panel of markers in 20 autistic patients aged 3-15 years and 20 age and gender matching healthy controls. Levels of GSH, glutathione status (GSH/GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxidoxins (Prxs I and III), glutamate, glutamine, glutamate/glutamine ratio glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in plasma and mercury (Hg) in red blood cells were determined in both groups. In Multiple regression analysis, R (2) values which describe the proportion or percentage of variance in the dependent variable attributed to the variance in the independent variables together were calculated. Moreover, β coefficients values which show the direction either positive or negative and the contribution of the independent variable relative to the other independent variables in explaining the variation of the dependent variable were determined. A panel of inter-related markers was recorded. This paper contains data related to and supporting research articles currently published entitled "Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism" [1], "Novel metabolic biomarkers related to sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia [2], and "A key role for an impaired detoxification mechanism in the etiology and severity of autism spectrum disorders" [3]. PMID:26933667

  12. Multiple logistic regression model of signalling practices of drivers on urban highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puan, Othman Che; Ibrahim, Muttaka Na'iya; Zakaria, Rozana

    2015-05-01

    Giving signal is a way of informing other road users, especially to the conflicting drivers, the intention of a driver to change his/her movement course. Other users are exposed to hazard situation and risks of accident if the driver who changes his/her course failed to give signal as required. This paper describes the application of logistic regression model for the analysis of driver's signalling practices on multilane highways based on possible factors affecting driver's decision such as driver's gender, vehicle's type, vehicle's speed and traffic flow intensity. Data pertaining to the analysis of such factors were collected manually. More than 2000 drivers who have performed a lane changing manoeuvre while driving on two sections of multilane highways were observed. Finding from the study shows that relatively a large proportion of drivers failed to give any signals when changing lane. The result of the analysis indicates that although the proportion of the drivers who failed to provide signal prior to lane changing manoeuvre is high, the degree of compliances of the female drivers is better than the male drivers. A binary logistic model was developed to represent the probability of a driver to provide signal indication prior to lane changing manoeuvre. The model indicates that driver's gender, type of vehicle's driven, speed of vehicle and traffic volume influence the driver's decision to provide a signal indication prior to a lane changing manoeuvre on a multilane urban highway. In terms of types of vehicles driven, about 97% of motorcyclists failed to comply with the signal indication requirement. The proportion of non-compliance drivers under stable traffic flow conditions is much higher than when the flow is relatively heavy. This is consistent with the data which indicates a high degree of non-compliances when the average speed of the traffic stream is relatively high.

  13. A regional classification scheme for estimating reference water quality in streams using land-use-adjusted spatial regression-tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Saad, D.A.; Heisey, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Various approaches are used to subdivide large areas into regions containing streams that have similar reference or background water quality and that respond similarly to different factors. For many applications, such as establishing reference conditions, it is preferable to use physical characteristics that are not affected by human activities to delineate these regions. However, most approaches, such as ecoregion classifications, rely on land use to delineate regions or have difficulties compensating for the effects of land use. Land use not only directly affects water quality, but it is often correlated with the factors used to define the regions. In this article, we describe modifications to SPARTA (spatial regression-tree analysis), a relatively new approach applied to water-quality and environmental characteristic data to delineate zones with similar factors affecting water quality. In this modified approach, land-use-adjusted (residualized) water quality and environmental characteristics are computed for each site. Regression-tree analysis is applied to the residualized data to determine the most statistically important environmental characteristics describing the distribution of a specific water-quality constituent. Geographic information for small basins throughout the study area is then used to subdivide the area into relatively homogeneous environmental water-quality zones. For each zone, commonly used approaches are subsequently used to define its reference water quality and how its water quality responds to changes in land use. SPARTA is used to delineate zones of similar reference concentrations of total phosphorus and suspended sediment throughout the upper Midwestern part of the United States. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  14. Children and adolescents adjustment to parental multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Families are the primary source of support and care for most children. In Western societies, 4 to 12% of children live in households where a parent has a chronic illness. Exposure to early-life stressors, including parenting stress, parental depression and parental chronic disease could lead to harmful changes in children’s social, emotional or behavioural functioning. Little is known about the child living with a parent who has Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We systematically reviewed the literature regarding possible effects of having a parent with MS on the child’s or adolescent's psychosocial adjustment. Methods The following databases: MEDLINE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, ERIC, and ProQuest Digital Dissertations were searched (from 1806 to December 2012). References from relevant articles were also manually searched. Selected studies were evaluated using the Graphic Appraisal Tool for Epidemiology (GATE). Results The search yielded 3133 titles; 70 articles were selected for full text review. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies employed quantitative techniques, of which 13 were cross-sectional and one was longitudinal. Four studies were both qualitative and cross-sectional in design. Only 2 of 18 studies were rated as having high methodological quality. Overall, eight studies reported that children of MS patients exhibited negative psychosocial traits compared with children of “healthy” parents. Specifically for adolescents, greater family responsibilities were linked to lower social relationships and higher distress. Three studies indicated that parental MS was associated with positive adjustment in children and adolescents, such as higher personal competence, while four found no statistically significant differences. Conclusion Although having a parent with MS was often reported to have negative psychosocial effects on children and adolescents, there was a lack of consensus and some positive aspects were

  15. Sequential Monte Carlo tracking of the marginal artery by multiple cue fusion and random forest regression.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Kevin M; Peplinski, Brandon; Kim, Lauren; Wang, Shijun; Lu, Le; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jianfei; Wei, Zhuoshi; Summers, Ronald M

    2015-01-01

    Given the potential importance of marginal artery localization in automated registration in computed tomography colonography (CTC), we have devised a semi-automated method of marginal vessel detection employing sequential Monte Carlo tracking (also known as particle filtering tracking) by multiple cue fusion based on intensity, vesselness, organ detection, and minimum spanning tree information for poorly enhanced vessel segments. We then employed a random forest algorithm for intelligent cue fusion and decision making which achieved high sensitivity and robustness. After applying a vessel pruning procedure to the tracking results, we achieved statistically significantly improved precision compared to a baseline Hessian detection method (2.7% versus 75.2%, p<0.001). This method also showed statistically significantly improved recall rate compared to a 2-cue baseline method using fewer vessel cues (30.7% versus 67.7%, p<0.001). These results demonstrate that marginal artery localization on CTC is feasible by combining a discriminative classifier (i.e., random forest) with a sequential Monte Carlo tracking mechanism. In so doing, we present the effective application of an anatomical probability map to vessel pruning as well as a supplementary spatial coordinate system for colonic segmentation and registration when this task has been confounded by colon lumen collapse. PMID:25461335

  16. Evaluation of a two-part regression calibration to adjust for dietary exposure measurement error in the Cox proportional hazards model: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Agogo, George O; van der Voet, Hilko; Van't Veer, Pieter; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Boshuizen, Hendriek C

    2016-07-01

    Dietary questionnaires are prone to measurement error, which bias the perceived association between dietary intake and risk of disease. Short-term measurements are required to adjust for the bias in the association. For foods that are not consumed daily, the short-term measurements are often characterized by excess zeroes. Via a simulation study, the performance of a two-part calibration model that was developed for a single-replicate study design was assessed by mimicking leafy vegetable intake reports from the multicenter European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. In part I of the fitted two-part calibration model, a logistic distribution was assumed; in part II, a gamma distribution was assumed. The model was assessed with respect to the magnitude of the correlation between the consumption probability and the consumed amount (hereafter, cross-part correlation), the number and form of covariates in the calibration model, the percentage of zero response values, and the magnitude of the measurement error in the dietary intake. From the simulation study results, transforming the dietary variable in the regression calibration to an appropriate scale was found to be the most important factor for the model performance. Reducing the number of covariates in the model could be beneficial, but was not critical in large-sample studies. The performance was remarkably robust when fitting a one-part rather than a two-part model. The model performance was minimally affected by the cross-part correlation. PMID:27003183

  17. Solving Capelin Time Series Ecosystem Problem Using Hybrid ANN-GAs Model and Multiple Linear Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghnam, Karam M.; Sheta, Alaa F.

    2008-06-01

    Development of accurate models is necessary in critical applications such as prediction. In this paper, a solution to the stock prediction problem of the Barents Sea capelin is introduced using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Multiple Linear model Regression (MLR) models. The Capelin stock in the Barents Sea is one of the largest in the world. It normally maintained a fishery with annual catches of up to 3 million tons. The Capelin stock problem has an impact in the fish stock development. The proposed prediction model was developed using an ANNs with their weights adapted using Genetic Algorithm (GA). The proposed model was compared to traditional linear model the MLR. The results showed that the ANN-GA model produced an overall accuracy of 21% better than the MLR model.

  18. Artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression model using principal components to estimate rainfall over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares dos Santos, T.; Mendes, D.; Rodrigues Torres, R.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been devoted to dynamic and statistical downscaling for analysis of both climate variability and climate change. This paper introduces an application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple linear regression (MLR) by principal components to estimate rainfall in South America. This method is proposed for downscaling monthly precipitation time series over South America for three regions: the Amazon; northeastern Brazil; and the La Plata Basin, which is one of the regions of the planet that will be most affected by the climate change projected for the end of the 21st century. The downscaling models were developed and validated using CMIP5 model output and observed monthly precipitation. We used general circulation model (GCM) experiments for the 20th century (RCP historical; 1970-1999) and two scenarios (RCP 2.6 and 8.5; 2070-2100). The model test results indicate that the ANNs significantly outperform the MLR downscaling of monthly precipitation variability.

  19. A multiple linear regression analysis of hot corrosion attack on a series of nickel base turbine alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine an equation for estimating hot corrosion attack for a series of Ni base cast turbine alloys. The U transform (i.e., 1/sin (% A/100) to the 1/2) was shown to give the best estimate of the dependent variable, y. A complete second degree equation is described for the centered" weight chemistries for the elements Cr, Al, Ti, Mo, W, Cb, Ta, and Co. In addition linear terms for the minor elements C, B, and Zr were added for a basic 47 term equation. The best reduced equation was determined by the stepwise selection method with essentially 13 terms. The Cr term was found to be the most important accounting for 60 percent of the explained variability hot corrosion attack.

  20. A Technique for Estimating Intensity of Emotional Expressions and Speaking Styles in Speech Based on Multiple-Regression HSMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takao

    In this paper, we propose a technique for estimating the degree or intensity of emotional expressions and speaking styles appearing in speech. The key idea is based on a style control technique for speech synthesis using a multiple regression hidden semi-Markov model (MRHSMM), and the proposed technique can be viewed as the inverse of the style control. In the proposed technique, the acoustic features of spectrum, power, fundamental frequency, and duration are simultaneously modeled using the MRHSMM. We derive an algorithm for estimating explanatory variables of the MRHSMM, each of which represents the degree or intensity of emotional expressions and speaking styles appearing in acoustic features of speech, based on a maximum likelihood criterion. We show experimental results to demonstrate the ability of the proposed technique using two types of speech data, simulated emotional speech and spontaneous speech with different speaking styles. It is found that the estimated values have correlation with human perception.

  1. Artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression model using principal components to estimate rainfall over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, T. S.; Mendes, D.; Torres, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have been devoted to dynamic and statistical downscaling for analysis of both climate variability and climate change. This paper introduces an application of artificial neural networks (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) by principal components to estimate rainfall in South America. This method is proposed for downscaling monthly precipitation time series over South America for three regions: the Amazon, Northeastern Brazil and the La Plata Basin, which is one of the regions of the planet that will be most affected by the climate change projected for the end of the 21st century. The downscaling models were developed and validated using CMIP5 model out- put and observed monthly precipitation. We used GCMs experiments for the 20th century (RCP Historical; 1970-1999) and two scenarios (RCP 2.6 and 8.5; 2070-2100). The model test results indicate that the ANN significantly outperforms the MLR downscaling of monthly precipitation variability.

  2. Hall-Petch and multiple linear regression equations for the prediction of mechanical properties in gamma-based titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O.; Soboyejo, A.B.O.; Ni, Y.; Mercer, C.

    1997-12-31

    In a recent paper, Mercer and Soboyejo demonstrated the Hall-Petch dependence of basic room- and elevated-temperature (815 C) mechanical properties (0.2% offset strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic elongation to failure and fracture toughness) on the average equiaxed/lamellar grain size. Simple Hall-Petch behavior was shown to occur in a wide range of extruded duplex {alpha}{sub 2}+{gamma} alloys (Ti-48Al, Ti-48Al-1.4Mn Ti-48Al-2Mn and Ti-48Al-1.5Cr). As in steels and other materials, simple Hall-Petch equations were derived for the above properties. However, the Hall-Petch equations did not include the effect of other variables that can affect the basic mechanical properties of gamma alloys. Multiple linear regression equations for the prediction of the combined effects of several (alloying, microstructure and temperature) variables on basic mechanical properties temperature are presented in this paper.

  3. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple weight stepwise regression

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, J. |; Campbell, J.

    1993-10-01

    In many science and engineering applications, there is an interest in predicting the outputs of a process for given levels of inputs. In order to develop a model, one could run the process (or a simulation of the process) at a number of points (a point would be one run at one set of possible input values) and observe the values of the outputs at those points. There observations can be used to predict the values of the outputs for other values of the inputs. Since the outputs are a function of the inputs, we can generate a surface in the space of possible inputs and outputs. This surface is called a response surface. In some cases, collecting data needed to generate a response surface can e very expensive. Thus, in these cases, there is a powerful incentive to minimize the sample size while building better response surfaces. One such case is the semiconductor equipment manufacturing industry. Semiconductor manufacturing equipment is complex and expensive. Depending upon the type of equipment, the number of control parameters may range from 10 to 30 with perhaps 5 to 10 being important. Since a single run can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars, it is very important to have efficient methods for building response surfaces. A current approach to this problem is to do the experiment in two stages. First, a traditional design (such as fractional factorial) is used to screen variables. After deciding which variables are significant, additional runs of the experiment are conducted. The original runs and the new runs are used to build a model with the significant variables. However, the original (screening) runs are not as helpful for building the model as some other points might have been. This paper presents a point selection scheme that is more efficient than traditional designs.

  5. META-ANALYSIS OF GENETIC ASSOCIATION STUDIES AND ADJUSTMENT FOR MULTIPLE TESTING OF CORRELATED SNPS AND TRAITS

    PubMed Central

    Conneely, Karen N.; Boehnke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis has become a key component of well-designed genetic association studies due to the boost in statistical power achieved by combining results across multiple samples of individuals and the need to validate observed associations in independent studies. Meta-analyses of genetic association studies based on multiple SNPs and traits are subject to the same multiple testing issues as single-sample studies, but it is often difficult to adjust accurately for the multiple tests. Procedures such as Bonferroni may control the type I error rate but will generally provide an overly harsh correction if SNPs or traits are correlated. Depending on study design, availability of individual-level data, and computational requirements, permutation testing may not be feasible in a meta-analysis framework. In this paper we present methods for adjusting for multiple correlated tests under several study designs commonly employed in meta-analyses of genetic association tests. Our methods are applicable to both prospective meta-analyses in which several samples of individuals are analyzed with the intent to combine results, and retrospective meta-analyses, in which results from published studies are combined, including situations in which 1) individual-level data are unavailable, and 2) different sets of SNPs are genotyped in different studies due to random missingness or two-stage design. We show through simulation that our methods accurately control the rate of type I error and achieve improved power over multiple testing adjustments that do not account for correlation between SNPs or traits. PMID:20878715

  6. Averaging kernel prediction from atmospheric and surface state parameters based on multiple regression with MOPITT CO and TES-OMI O3 multispectral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Edwards, D. P.; Deeter, M. N.; Fu, D.; Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Arellano, A.

    2013-03-01

    A current obstacle to the Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) used to quantify the potential performance of future atmospheric composition remote sensing systems is a computationally efficient method to define the scene-dependent vertical sensitivity of measurements as expressed by the retrieval averaging kernels (AKs). We present a method for the efficient prediction of AKs for multispectral retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) based on actual retrievals from MOPITT on EOS-Terra and TES and OMI on EOS-Aura, respectively. This employs a multiple regression approach for deriving scene-dependent AKs using predictors based on state parameters such as the thermal contrast between the surface and lower atmospheric layers, trace gas volume mixing ratios (VMR), solar zenith angle, water vapor amount, etc. We first compute the singular vector decomposition (SVD) for individual cloud-free AKs and retain the 1st three ranked singular vectors in order to fit the most significant, orthogonal components of the AK in the subsequent multiple regression on a training set of retrieval cases. The resulting fit coefficients are applied to the predictors from a different test set of retrievals cased to reconstruct predicted AKs, which can then be evaluated against the true test set retrieval AKs. By comparing the VMR profile adjustment resulting from the use of the predicted vs. true AKs, we quantify the CO and O3 VMR profile errors associated with the use of the predicted AKs compared to the true AKs that might be obtained from a computationally expensive full retrieval calculation as part of an OSSE. Similarly, we estimate the errors in CO and O3 VMRs from using a single regional average AK to represent all retrievals, which has been a common approximation in chemical OSSEs performed to-date. For both CO and O3 in the lower troposphere, we find a significant reduction in error when using the predicted AKs as compared to a single average AK. This study

  7. Averaging kernel prediction from atmospheric and surface state parameters based on multiple regression for nadir-viewing satellite measurements of carbon monoxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Edwards, D. P.; Deeter, M. N.; Fu, D.; Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Arellano, A.

    2013-07-01

    A current obstacle to the observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs) used to quantify the potential performance of future atmospheric composition remote sensing systems is a computationally efficient method to define the scene-dependent vertical sensitivity of measurements as expressed by the retrieval averaging kernels (AKs). We present a method for the efficient prediction of AKs for multispectral retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) based on actual retrievals from MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) on the Earth Observing System (EOS)-Terra satellite and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) on EOS-Aura, respectively. This employs a multiple regression approach for deriving scene-dependent AKs using predictors based on state parameters such as the thermal contrast between the surface and lower atmospheric layers, trace gas volume mixing ratios (VMRs), solar zenith angle, water vapor amount, etc. We first compute the singular value decomposition (SVD) for individual cloud-free AKs and retain the first three ranked singular vectors in order to fit the most significant orthogonal components of the AK in the subsequent multiple regression on a training set of retrieval cases. The resulting fit coefficients are applied to the predictors from a different test set of test retrievals cased to reconstruct predicted AKs, which can then be evaluated against the true retrieval AKs from the test set. By comparing the VMR profile adjustment resulting from the use of the predicted vs. true AKs, we quantify the CO and O3 VMR profile errors associated with the use of the predicted AKs compared to the true AKs that might be obtained from a computationally expensive full retrieval calculation as part of an OSSE. Similarly, we estimate the errors in CO and O3 VMRs from using a single regional average AK to represent all retrievals, which has been a common approximation in chemical OSSEs performed to date

  8. Combining different functions to describe milk, fat, and protein yield in goats using Bayesian multiple-trait random regression models.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, H R; Silva, F F; Siqueira, O H G B D; Souza, N O; Junqueira, V S; Resende, M D V; Borquis, R R A; Rodrigues, M T

    2016-05-01

    We proposed multiple-trait random regression models (MTRRM) combining different functions to describe milk yield (MY) and fat (FP) and protein (PP) percentage in dairy goat genetic evaluation by using Bayesian inference. A total of 3,856 MY, FP, and PP test-day records, measured between 2000 and 2014, from 535 first lactations of Saanen and Alpine goats, including their cross, were used in this study. The initial analyses were performed using the following single-trait random regression models (STRRM): third- and fifth-order Legendre polynomials (Leg3 and Leg5), linear B-splines with 3 and 5 knots, the Ali and Schaeffer function (Ali), and Wilmink function. Heterogeneity of residual variances was modeled considering 3 classes. After the selection of the best STRRM to describe each trait on the basis of the deviance information criterion (DIC) and posterior model probabilities (PMP), the functions were combined to compose the MTRRM. All combined MTRRM presented lower DIC values and higher PMP, showing the superiority of these models when compared to other MTRRM based only on the same function assumed for all traits. Among the combined MTRRM, those considering Ali to describe MY and PP and Leg5 to describe FP (Ali_Leg5_Ali model) presented the best fit. From the Ali_Leg5_Ali model, heritability estimates over time for MY, FP. and PP ranged from 0.25 to 0.54, 0.27 to 0.48, and 0.35 to 0.51, respectively. Genetic correlation between MY and FP, MY and PP, and FP and PP ranged from -0.58 to 0.03, -0.46 to 0.12, and 0.37 to 0.64, respectively. We concluded that combining different functions under a MTRRM approach can be a plausible alternative for joint genetic evaluation of milk yield and milk constituents in goats. PMID:27285684

  9. Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    The logistic regression originally is intended to explain the relationship between the probability of an event and a set of covariables. The model's coefficients can be interpreted via the odds and odds ratio, which are presented in introduction of the chapter. The observations are possibly got individually, then we speak of binary logistic regression. When they are grouped, the logistic regression is said binomial. In our presentation we mainly focus on the binary case. For statistical inference the main tool is the maximum likelihood methodology: we present the Wald, Rao and likelihoods ratio results and their use to compare nested models. The problems we intend to deal with are essentially the same as in multiple linear regression: testing global effect, individual effect, selection of variables to build a model, measure of the fitness of the model, prediction of new values… . The methods are demonstrated on data sets using R. Finally we briefly consider the binomial case and the situation where we are interested in several events, that is the polytomous (multinomial) logistic regression and the particular case of ordinal logistic regression.

  10. Development of a modified factor analysis/multiple regression model to apportion suspended particulate matter in a complex urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, Maria T.; Daisey, Joan M.; Lioy, Paul J.

    A modified factor analysis/multiple regression (FA/MR) receptor-oriented source apportionment model has been developed which permits application of FA/MR statistical methods when some of the tracers are not unique to an individual source type. The new method uses factor and regression analyses to apportion non-unique tracer ambient concentrations in situations where there are unique tracers for all sources contributing to the non-unique tracer except one, and ascribes the residual concentration to that source. This value is then used as the source tracer in the final FA/MR apportionment model for ambient paniculate matter. In addition, factor analyses results are complemented with examination of regression residuals in order to optimize the number of identifiable sources. The new method has been applied to identify and apportion the sources of inhalable particulate matter (IPM; D5015 μm), Pb and Fe at a site in Newark, NJ. The model indicated that sulfate/secondary aerosol contributed an average of 25.8 μ -3 (48%) to IPM concentrations, followed by soil resuspension (8.2 μ -3 or 15%), paint spraying/paint pigment (6.7/gmm -3or 13%), fuel oil burning/space heating (4.3 μ -3 or 8 %), industrial emissions (3.6 μm -3 or 7 %) and motor vehicle exhaust (2.7 μ -3 or 15 %). Contributions to ambient Pb concentrations were: motor vehicle exhaust (0.16μm -3or 36%), soil resuspension (0.10μm -3 or 24%), fuel oil burning/space heating (0.08μm -3or 18%), industrial emissions (0.07 μ -3 or 17 %), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.036 μm -3or 9 %) and zinc related sources (0.022 μ -3 or 5 %). Contributions to ambient Fe concentrations were: soil resuspension (0.43μ -3or 51%), paint spraying/paint pigment (0.28 μm -3or 33 %) and industrial emissions (0.15 μ -3or 18 %). The models were validated by comparing partial source profiles calculated from modeling results with the corresponding published source emissions composition.

  11. Land use regression modeling of intra-urban residential variability in multiple traffic-related air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Clougherty, Jane E; Wright, Rosalind J; Baxter, Lisa K; Levy, Jonathan I

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a growing body of literature linking GIS-based measures of traffic density to asthma and other respiratory outcomes. However, no consensus exists on which traffic indicators best capture variability in different pollutants or within different settings. As part of a study on childhood asthma etiology, we examined variability in outdoor concentrations of multiple traffic-related air pollutants within urban communities, using a range of GIS-based predictors and land use regression techniques. Methods We measured fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and elemental carbon (EC) outside 44 homes representing a range of traffic densities and neighborhoods across Boston, Massachusetts and nearby communities. Multiple three to four-day average samples were collected at each home during winters and summers from 2003 to 2005. Traffic indicators were derived using Massachusetts Highway Department data and direct traffic counts. Multivariate regression analyses were performed separately for each pollutant, using traffic indicators, land use, meteorology, site characteristics, and central site concentrations. Results PM2.5 was strongly associated with the central site monitor (R2 = 0.68). Additional variability was explained by total roadway length within 100 m of the home, smoking or grilling near the monitor, and block-group population density (R2 = 0.76). EC showed greater spatial variability, especially during winter months, and was predicted by roadway length within 200 m of the home. The influence of traffic was greater under low wind speed conditions, and concentrations were lower during summer (R2 = 0.52). NO2 showed significant spatial variability, predicted by population density and roadway length within 50 m of the home, modified by site characteristics (obstruction), and with higher concentrations during summer (R2 = 0.56). Conclusion Each pollutant examined displayed somewhat different spatial patterns within urban neighborhoods

  12. Relationships between each part of the spinal curves and upright posture using Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Sebastien; Boudot, Elsa; Houel, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Back pain is a common reason for consultation in primary healthcare clinical practice, and has effects on daily activities and posture. Relationships between the whole spine and upright posture, however, remain unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between each spinal curve and centre of pressure position as well as velocity for healthy subjects. Twenty-one male subjects performed quiet stance in natural position. Each upright posture was then recorded using an optoelectronics system (Vicon Nexus) synchronized with two force plates. At each moment, polynomial interpolations of markers attached on the spine segment were used to compute cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis angle curves. Mean of centre of pressure position and velocity was then computed. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the position and velocity of centre of pressure associated with each part of the spinal curves were defined as best predictors of the lumbar lordosis angle (R(2)=0.45; p=1.65*10-10) and the thoracic kyphosis angle (R(2)=0.54; p=4.89*10-13) of healthy subjects in quiet stance. This study showed the relationships between each of cervical, thoracic, lumbar curvatures, and centre of pressure's fluctuation during free quiet standing using non-invasive full spinal curve exploration. PMID:26970888

  13. Comparing Effects of Biologic Agents in Treating Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Natvig, Bent; Gåsemyr, Jørund; Meland, Nils; Røine, Marianne; Klemp, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients have been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and the newer biologic drugs. We sought to compare and rank the biologics with respect to efficacy. We performed a literature search identifying 54 publications encompassing 9 biologics. We conducted a multiple treatment comparison regression analysis letting the number experiencing a 50% improvement on the ACR score be dependent upon dose level and disease duration for assessing the comparable relative effect between biologics and placebo or DMARD. The analysis embraced all treatment and comparator arms over all publications. Hence, all measured effects of any biologic agent contributed to the comparison of all biologic agents relative to each other either given alone or combined with DMARD. We found the drug effect to be dependent on dose level, but not on disease duration, and the impact of a high versus low dose level was the same for all drugs (higher doses indicated a higher frequency of ACR50 scores). The ranking of the drugs when given without DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest), etanercept, tocilizumab/ abatacept and adalimumab. The ranking of the drugs when given with DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest), tocilizumab, anakinra, rituximab, golimumab/ infliximab/ abatacept, adalimumab/ etanercept. Still, all drugs were effective. All biologic agents were effective compared to placebo, with certolizumab the most effective and adalimumab (without DMARD treatment) and adalimumab/ etanercept (combined with DMARD treatment) the least effective. The drugs were in general more effective, except for etanercept, when given together with DMARDs. PMID:26356639

  14. Crude oil price forecasting based on hybridizing wavelet multiple linear regression model, particle swarm optimization techniques, and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shabri, Ani; Samsudin, Ruhaidah

    2014-01-01

    Crude oil prices do play significant role in the global economy and are a key input into option pricing formulas, portfolio allocation, and risk measurement. In this paper, a hybrid model integrating wavelet and multiple linear regressions (MLR) is proposed for crude oil price forecasting. In this model, Mallat wavelet transform is first selected to decompose an original time series into several subseries with different scale. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) is used in processing subseries data in MLR for crude oil price forecasting. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to adopt the optimal parameters of the MLR model. To assess the effectiveness of this model, daily crude oil market, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), has been used as the case study. Time series prediction capability performance of the WMLR model is compared with the MLR, ARIMA, and GARCH models using various statistics measures. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the individual models in forecasting of the crude oil prices series. PMID:24895666

  15. Crude Oil Price Forecasting Based on Hybridizing Wavelet Multiple Linear Regression Model, Particle Swarm Optimization Techniques, and Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shabri, Ani; Samsudin, Ruhaidah

    2014-01-01

    Crude oil prices do play significant role in the global economy and are a key input into option pricing formulas, portfolio allocation, and risk measurement. In this paper, a hybrid model integrating wavelet and multiple linear regressions (MLR) is proposed for crude oil price forecasting. In this model, Mallat wavelet transform is first selected to decompose an original time series into several subseries with different scale. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) is used in processing subseries data in MLR for crude oil price forecasting. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to adopt the optimal parameters of the MLR model. To assess the effectiveness of this model, daily crude oil market, West Texas Intermediate (WTI), has been used as the case study. Time series prediction capability performance of the WMLR model is compared with the MLR, ARIMA, and GARCH models using various statistics measures. The experimental results show that the proposed model outperforms the individual models in forecasting of the crude oil prices series. PMID:24895666

  16. Multiple regression analysis of reading performance data from twin pairs with reading difficulties and nontwin siblings: the augmented model.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Sally J; Olson, Richard K; Willcutt, Erik G; DeFries, John C

    2012-02-01

    The augmented multiple regression model for the analysis of data from selected twin pairs was extended to facilitate analyses of data from twin pairs and nontwin siblings. Fitting this extended model to data from both selected twin pairs and siblings yields direct estimates of heritability (h2) and the difference between environmental influences shared by members of twin pairs and those of sib or twin-sib pairs (i.e., c2(t) - c2 (s)). When this model was fitted to reading performance data from 293 monozygotic and 436 dizygotic pairs selected for reading difficulties, and 291 of their nontwin siblings, h2 = .48 ± .22, p = .03, and c2 (t) - c2 (s) = .22 ± .12, p = .06. Although the test for differential shared environmental influences is only marginally significant, the results of this analysis suggest that environmental influences on reading performance that are shared by members of twin pairs (.36) may be substantially greater than those for less contemporaneous twin-sibling pairs (.14). PMID:22784461

  17. A parallel implementation of the network identification by multiple regression (NIR) algorithm to reverse-engineer regulatory gene networks.

    PubMed

    Gregoretti, Francesco; Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego; Oliva, Gennaro

    2010-01-01

    The reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks using gene expression profile data has become crucial to gain novel biological knowledge. Large amounts of data that need to be analyzed are currently being produced due to advances in microarray technologies. Using current reverse engineering algorithms to analyze large data sets can be very computational-intensive. These emerging computational requirements can be met using parallel computing techniques. It has been shown that the Network Identification by multiple Regression (NIR) algorithm performs better than the other ready-to-use reverse engineering software. However it cannot be used with large networks with thousands of nodes--as is the case in biological networks--due to the high time and space complexity. In this work we overcome this limitation by designing and developing a parallel version of the NIR algorithm. The new implementation of the algorithm reaches a very good accuracy even for large gene networks, improving our understanding of the gene regulatory networks that is crucial for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:20422008

  18. The use of artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression to predict rate of medical waste generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jahandideh, Sepideh Jahandideh, Samad; Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari; Askarian, Mehrdad; Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi; Hosseini, Somayyeh; Jahandideh, Mina

    2009-11-15

    Prediction of the amount of hospital waste production will be helpful in the storage, transportation and disposal of hospital waste management. Based on this fact, two predictor models including artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were applied to predict the rate of medical waste generation totally and in different types of sharp, infectious and general. In this study, a 5-fold cross-validation procedure on a database containing total of 50 hospitals of Fars province (Iran) were used to verify the performance of the models. Three performance measures including MAR, RMSE and R{sup 2} were used to evaluate performance of models. The MLR as a conventional model obtained poor prediction performance measure values. However, MLR distinguished hospital capacity and bed occupancy as more significant parameters. On the other hand, ANNs as a more powerful model, which has not been introduced in predicting rate of medical waste generation, showed high performance measure values, especially 0.99 value of R{sup 2} confirming the good fit of the data. Such satisfactory results could be attributed to the non-linear nature of ANNs in problem solving which provides the opportunity for relating independent variables to dependent ones non-linearly. In conclusion, the obtained results showed that our ANN-based model approach is very promising and may play a useful role in developing a better cost-effective strategy for waste management in future.

  19. QSAR study of HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors using the genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression (GA-MLR)

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Hamid; Khanzadeh, Marziyeh; Mozaffari, Shahla; Bostanifar, Mohammad Hassan; Avval, Zhila Mohajeri; Aalizadeh, Reza; Pourbasheer, Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study has been employed for predicting the inhibitory activities of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitors. A data set consisted of 72 compounds was selected, and then different types of molecular descriptors were calculated. The whole data set was split into a training set (80 % of the dataset) and a test set (20 % of the dataset) using principle component analysis. The stepwise (SW) and the genetic algorithm (GA) techniques were used as variable selection tools. Multiple linear regression method was then used to linearly correlate the selected descriptors with inhibitory activities. Several validation technique including leave-one-out and leave-group-out cross-validation, Y-randomization method were used to evaluate the internal capability of the derived models. The external prediction ability of the derived models was further analyzed using modified r2, concordance correlation coefficient values and Golbraikh and Tropsha acceptable model criteria's. Based on the derived results (GA-MLR), some new insights toward molecular structural requirements for obtaining better inhibitory activity were obtained. PMID:27065774

  20. ADJUSTMENT FOR HETEROGENEOUS GENETIC AND NON-GENETIC (CO)VARIANCE STRUCTURES ON TEST-DAY MODELS USING A TRANSFORMATION ON RANDOM REGRESSION EFFECT REGRESSORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method of accounting for differences in variation in components of test-day milk production records was developed. This method could improve the accuracy of genetic evaluations. A random regression model is used to analyze the data, then a transformation is applied to the random regression coeffic...

  1. An evaluation of logic regression-based biomarker discovery across multiple intergenic regions for predicting host specificity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shuai; Li, Qiaozhi; Yasui, Yutaka; Banting, Graham; Edge, Thomas A; Topp, Edward; McAllister, Tim A; Neumann, Norman F

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that E. coli appears to display some level of host adaptation and specificity. Recent studies in our laboratory support these findings as determined by logic regression modeling of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in intergenic regions (ITGRs). We sought to determine the degree of host-specific information encoded in various ITGRs across a library of animal E. coli isolates using both whole genome analysis and a targeted ITGR sequencing approach. Our findings demonstrated that ITGRs across the genome encode various degrees of host-specific information. Incorporating multiple ITGRs (i.e., concatenation) into logic regression model building resulted in greater host-specificity and sensitivity outcomes in biomarkers, but the overall level of polymorphism in an ITGR did not correlate with the degree of host-specificity encoded in the ITGR. This suggests that distinct SNPs in ITGRs may be more important in defining host-specificity than overall sequence variation, explaining why traditional unsupervised learning phylogenetic approaches may be less informative in terms of revealing host-specific information encoded in DNA sequence. In silico analysis of 80 candidate ITGRs from publically available E. coli genomes was performed as a tool for discovering highly host-specific ITGRs. In one ITGR (ydeR-yedS) we identified a SNP biomarker that was 98% specific for cattle and for which 92% of all E. coli isolates originating from cattle carried this unique biomarker. In the case of humans, a host-specific biomarker (98% specificity) was identified in the concatenated ITGR sequences of rcsD-ompC, ydeR-yedS, and rclR-ykgE, and for which 78% of E. coli originating from humans carried this biomarker. Interestingly, human-specific biomarkers were dominant in ITGRs regulating antibiotic resistance, whereas in cattle host-specific biomarkers were found in ITGRs involved in stress regulation. These data suggest that evolution towards host

  2. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  3. Multiple regression models of δ13C and δ15N for fish populations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radabaugh, Kara R.; Peebles, Ernst B.

    2014-08-01

    Multiple regression models were created to explain spatial and temporal variation in the δ13C and δ15N values of fish populations on the West Florida Shelf (eastern Gulf of Mexico, USA). Extensive trawl surveys from three time periods were used to acquire muscle samples from seven groundfish species. Isotopic variation (δ13Cvar and δ15Nvar) was calculated as the deviation from the isotopic mean of each fish species. Static spatial data and dynamic water quality parameters were used to create models predicting δ13Cvar and δ15Nvar in three fish species that were caught in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Additional data sets were then used to determine the accuracy of the models for predicting isotopic variation (1) in a different time period (fall 2010) and (2) among four entirely different fish species that were collected during summer 2009. The δ15Nvar model was relatively stable and could be applied to different time periods and species with similar accuracy (mean absolute errors 0.31-0.33‰). The δ13Cvar model had a lower predictive capability and mean absolute errors ranged from 0.42 to 0.48‰. δ15N trends are likely linked to gradients in nitrogen fixation and Mississippi River influence on the West Florida Shelf, while δ13C trends may be linked to changes in algal species, photosynthetic fractionation, and abundance of benthic vs. planktonic basal resources. These models of isotopic variability may be useful for future stable isotope investigations of trophic level, basal resource use, and animal migration on the West Florida Shelf.

  4. Predicting punching acceleration from selected strength and power variables in elite karate athletes: a multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Kobal, Ronaldo; Gil, Saulo; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between punching acceleration and selected strength and power variables in 19 professional karate athletes from the Brazilian National Team (9 men and 10 women; age, 23 ± 3 years; height, 1.71 ± 0.09 m; and body mass [BM], 67.34 ± 13.44 kg). Punching acceleration was assessed under 4 different conditions in a randomized order: (a) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum speed (FS), (b) fixed distance aiming to attain maximum impact (FI), (c) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum speed, and (d) self-selected distance aiming to attain maximum impact. The selected strength and power variables were as follows: maximal dynamic strength in bench press and squat-machine, squat and countermovement jump height, mean propulsive power in bench throw and jump squat, and mean propulsive velocity in jump squat with 40% of BM. Upper- and lower-body power and maximal dynamic strength variables were positively correlated to punch acceleration in all conditions. Multiple regression analysis also revealed predictive variables: relative mean propulsive power in squat jump (W·kg-1), and maximal dynamic strength 1 repetition maximum in both bench press and squat-machine exercises. An impact-oriented instruction and a self-selected distance to start the movement seem to be crucial to reach the highest acceleration during punching execution. This investigation, while demonstrating strong correlations between punching acceleration and strength-power variables, also provides important information for coaches, especially for designing better training strategies to improve punching speed. PMID:24276310

  5. Evaluation of the multiple linear regression method to monitor respiratory mechanics in ventilated neonates and young children.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, J M; Peslin, R; Duvivier, C

    1992-07-01

    A potentially useful method to monitor respiratory mechanics in artificially ventilated patients consists of analyzing the relationship between tracheal pressure (P), lung volume (V), and gas flow (V) by multiple linear regression (MLR) using a suitable model. Contrary to other methods, it does not require any particular flow waveform and, therefore, may be used with any ventilator. This approach was evaluated in three neonates and seven young children admitted into an intensive care unit for respiratory disorders of various etiologies. P and V were measured and digitized at a sampling rate of 40 Hz for periods of 20-48 s. After correction of P for the non-linear resistance of the endotracheal tube, the data were first analyzed with the usual linear monoalveolar model: P = PO + E.V + R.V where E and R are total respiratory elastance and resistance, and PO is the static recoil pressure at end-expiration. A good fit of the model to the data was seen in five of ten children. PO, E, and R were reproducible within cycles, and consistent with the patient's age and condition; the data obtained with two ventilatory modes were highly correlated. In the five instances in which the simple model did not fit the data well, they were reanalyzed with more sophisticated models allowing for mechanical non-homogeneity or for non-linearity of R or E. While several models substantially improved the fit, physiologically meaningful results were only obtained when R was allowed to change with lung volume. We conclude that the MLR method is adequate to monitor respiratory mechanics, even when the usual model is inadequate. PMID:1437330

  6. Predicting Distribution and Inter-Annual Variability of Tropical Cyclone Intensity from a Stochastic, Multiple-Linear Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Tippett, M. K.; Sobel, A. H.; Camargo, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We are working towards the development of a new statistical-dynamical downscaling system to study the influence of climate on tropical cyclones (TCs). The first step is development of an appropriate model for TC intensity as a function of environmental variables. We approach this issue with a stochastic model consisting of a multiple linear regression model (MLR) for 12-hour intensity forecasts as a deterministic component, and a random error generator as a stochastic component. Similar to the operational Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS), MLR relates the surrounding environment to storm intensity, but with only essential predictors calculated from monthly-mean NCEP reanalysis fields (potential intensity, shear, etc.) and from persistence. The deterministic MLR is developed with data from 1981-1999 and tested with data from 2000-2012 for the Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Western North Pacific, Indian Ocean, and Southern Hemisphere basins. While the global MLR's skill is comparable to that of the operational statistical models (e.g., SHIPS), the distribution of the predicted maximum intensity from deterministic results has a systematic low bias compared to observations; the deterministic MLR creates almost no storms with intensities greater than 100 kt. The deterministic MLR can be significantly improved by adding the stochastic component, based on the distribution of random forecasting errors from the deterministic model compared to the training data. This stochastic component may be thought of as representing the component of TC intensification that is not linearly related to the environmental variables. We find that in order for the stochastic model to accurately capture the observed distribution of maximum storm intensities, the stochastic component must be auto-correlated across 12-hour time steps. This presentation also includes a detailed discussion of the distributions of other TC-intensity related quantities, as well as the inter

  7. Prediction of the processing factor for pesticides in apple juice by principal component analysis and multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Martin, L; Mezcua, M; Ferrer, C; Gil Garcia, M D; Malato, O; Fernandez-Alba, A R

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to establish a mathematical function that correlates pesticide residue levels in apple juice with the levels of the pesticides applied on the raw fruit, taking into account some of their physicochemical properties such as water solubility, the octanol/water partition coefficient, the organic carbon partition coefficient, vapour pressure and density. A mixture of 12 pesticides was applied to an apple tree; apples were collected after 10 days of application. After harvest, apples were treated with a mixture of three post-harvest pesticides and the fruits were then processed in order to obtain apple juice following a routine industrial process. The pesticide residue levels in the apple samples were analysed using two multi-residue methods based on LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS. The concentration of pesticides was determined in samples derived from the different steps of processing. The processing factors (the coefficient between residue level in the processed commodity and the residue level in the commodity to be processed) obtained for the full juicing process were found to vary among the different pesticides studied. In order to investigate the relationships between the levels of pesticide residue found in apple juice samples and their physicochemical properties, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using two sets of samples (one of them using experimental data obtained in this work and the other including the data taken from the literature). In both cases the correlation was found between processing factors of pesticides in the apple juice and the negative logarithms (base 10) of the water solubility, octanol/water partition coefficient and organic carbon partition coefficient. The linear correlation between these physicochemical properties and the processing factor were established using a multiple linear regression technique. PMID:23281800

  8. Child Sexual Abuse and Adult Romantic Adjustment: Comparison of Single- and Multiple-Indicator Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbout, Natacha; Sabourin, Stephane; Lussier, Yvan

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the usefulness of single- and multiple-indicator strategies in a model examining the role of child sexual abuse (CSA) to predict later marital satisfaction through attachment and psychological distress. The sample included 1,092 women and men from a nonclinical population in cohabiting or marital relationships. The single-item…

  9. Multiple Social Identities and Adjustment in Young Adults from Ethnically Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Yip, Tiffany; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A person-centered approach was used to determine how identification across multiple social domains (ethnic, American, family, religious) was associated with distinct identity clusters. Utilizing data from 222 young adults from European, Filipino, Latin, and Asian American backgrounds, four clusters were found (Many Social Identities, Blended/Low…

  10. Spontaneous regression of multiple pulmonary nodules in a patient with unclassified renal cell carcinoma following laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UEDA, KOSUKE; SUEKANE, SHIGETAKA; MITANI, TOMOTARO; CHIKUI, KATSUAKI; EJIMA, KAZUHISA; SUYAMA, SHUNSUKE; NAKIRI, MAKOTO; NISHIHARA, KIYOAKI; MATSUO, MITSUNORI; IGAWA, TSUKASA

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is rare, but well-documented in clear cell RCC. However, there are no reports on spontaneous regression of unclassified RCC. Since the radiological findings of pulmonary infarcts and inflammatory pseudotumors are similar to those of metastases from RCC, a definitive diagnosis is difficult without performing a histological examination. A 56-year-old woman underwent medical examination by a physician. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 22-mm mass with a cystic area in the right kidney, as well as multiple enlarged lymph nodes in the common iliac, external iliac and groin areas, bilaterally. A chest CT revealed multiple pulmonary nodules bilaterally, the largest measuring 15 mm. Since the right renal tumor was suspected to be an RCC, laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed. The final pathological diagnosis of the renal tumor was unclassified RCC. One month following surgery, a CT scan revealed spontaneous regression of the pulmonary nodules. We herein present a rare case of spontaneous regression of pulmonary nodules in a patient with unclassified RCC following laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous regression in unclassified RCC. PMID:27330764

  11. Partial Least Squares Regression Can Aid in Detecting Differential Abundance of Multiple Features in Sets of Metagenomic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    It is now feasible to examine the composition and diversity of microbial communities (i.e., “microbiomes”) that populate different human organs and orifices using DNA sequencing and related technologies. To explore the potential links between changes in microbial communities and various diseases in the human body, it is essential to test associations involving different species within and across microbiomes, environmental settings and disease states. Although a number of statistical techniques exist for carrying out relevant analyses, it is unclear which of these techniques exhibit the greatest statistical power to detect associations given the complexity of most microbiome datasets. We compared the statistical power of principal component regression, partial least squares regression, regularized regression, distance-based regression, Hill's diversity measures, and a modified test implemented in the popular and widely used microbiome analysis methodology “Metastats” across a wide range of simulated scenarios involving changes in feature abundance between two sets of metagenomic samples. For this purpose, simulation studies were used to change the abundance of microbial species in a real dataset from a published study examining human hands. Each technique was applied to the same data, and its ability to detect the simulated change in abundance was assessed. We hypothesized that a small subset of methods would outperform the rest in terms of the statistical power. Indeed, we found that the Metastats technique modified to accommodate multivariate analysis and partial least squares regression yielded high power under the models and data sets we studied. The statistical power of diversity measure-based tests, distance-based regression and regularized regression was significantly lower. Our results provide insight into powerful analysis strategies that utilize information on species counts from large microbiome data sets exhibiting skewed frequency distributions

  12. Partial Least Squares Regression Can Aid in Detecting Differential Abundance of Multiple Features in Sets of Metagenomic Samples.

    PubMed

    Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    It is now feasible to examine the composition and diversity of microbial communities (i.e., "microbiomes") that populate different human organs and orifices using DNA sequencing and related technologies. To explore the potential links between changes in microbial communities and various diseases in the human body, it is essential to test associations involving different species within and across microbiomes, environmental settings and disease states. Although a number of statistical techniques exist for carrying out relevant analyses, it is unclear which of these techniques exhibit the greatest statistical power to detect associations given the complexity of most microbiome datasets. We compared the statistical power of principal component regression, partial least squares regression, regularized regression, distance-based regression, Hill's diversity measures, and a modified test implemented in the popular and widely used microbiome analysis methodology "Metastats" across a wide range of simulated scenarios involving changes in feature abundance between two sets of metagenomic samples. For this purpose, simulation studies were used to change the abundance of microbial species in a real dataset from a published study examining human hands. Each technique was applied to the same data, and its ability to detect the simulated change in abundance was assessed. We hypothesized that a small subset of methods would outperform the rest in terms of the statistical power. Indeed, we found that the Metastats technique modified to accommodate multivariate analysis and partial least squares regression yielded high power under the models and data sets we studied. The statistical power of diversity measure-based tests, distance-based regression and regularized regression was significantly lower. Our results provide insight into powerful analysis strategies that utilize information on species counts from large microbiome data sets exhibiting skewed frequency distributions obtained

  13. Enhancing multiple-point geostatistical modeling: 1. Graph theory and pattern adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, higher-order geostatistical methods have been used for modeling of a wide variety of large-scale porous media, such as groundwater aquifers and oil reservoirs. Their popularity stems from their ability to account for qualitative data and the great flexibility that they offer for conditioning the models to hard (quantitative) data, which endow them with the capability for generating realistic realizations of porous formations with very complex channels, as well as features that are mainly a barrier to fluid flow. One group of such models consists of pattern-based methods that use a set of data points for generating stochastic realizations by which the large-scale structure and highly-connected features are reproduced accurately. The cross correlation-based simulation (CCSIM) algorithm, proposed previously by the authors, is a member of this group that has been shown to be capable of simulating multimillion cell models in a matter of a few CPU seconds. The method is, however, sensitive to pattern's specifications, such as boundaries and the number of replicates. In this paper the original CCSIM algorithm is reconsidered and two significant improvements are proposed for accurately reproducing large-scale patterns of heterogeneities in porous media. First, an effective boundary-correction method based on the graph theory is presented by which one identifies the optimal cutting path/surface for removing the patchiness and discontinuities in the realization of a porous medium. Next, a new pattern adjustment method is proposed that automatically transfers the features in a pattern to one that seamlessly matches the surrounding patterns. The original CCSIM algorithm is then combined with the two methods and is tested using various complex two- and three-dimensional examples. It should, however, be emphasized that the methods that we propose in this paper are applicable to other pattern-based geostatistical simulation methods.

  14. Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2010-09-01

    A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

  15. Level of education and multiple sclerosis risk after adjustment for known risk factors: The EnvIMS study

    PubMed Central

    Bjørnevik, Kjetil; Riise, Trond; Cortese, Marianna; Holmøy, Trygve; Kampman, Margitta T; Magalhaes, Sandra; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Wolfson, Christina; Pugliatti, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have found a higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) among people with a low level of education. This has been suggested to reflect an effect of smoking and lower vitamin D status in the social class associated with lower levels of education. Objective: The objective of this paper is to investigate the association between level of education and MS risk adjusting for the known risk factors smoking, infectious mononucleosis, indicators of vitamin D levels and body size. Methods: Within the case-control study on Environmental Factors In MS (EnvIMS), 953 MS patients and 1717 healthy controls from Norway reported educational level and history of exposure to putative environmental risk factors. Results: Higher level of education were associated with decreased MS risk (p trend = 0.001) with an OR of 0.53 (95% CI 0.41–0.68) when comparing those with the highest and lowest level of education. This association was only moderately reduced after adjusting for known risk factors (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44–0.83). The estimates remained similar when cases with disease onset before age 28 were excluded. Conclusion: These findings suggest that factors related to lower socioeconomic status other than established risk factors are associated with MS risk. PMID:26014605

  16. Multiple correlation and regression analysis of the relationship between the amplitude and spectral characteristics of proton events and the parameters of microwave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Logachev, Iu. I.; Stolpovskii, V. G.; Mel'Nikov, V. F.

    1988-12-01

    The relationship between microwave bursts and solar-cosmic-ray (SCR) events is investigated on the basis of multiple correlation and regression analysis. Prognoz 5 and 6 and Venera 11 and 14 data are used in the investigation. It is shown that the main features of this relationship can be understood by taking into account differences in the dynamics of electrons and protons in flare arches, without assuming SCR particle acceleration in the second flare phase.

  17. Multiple Linear Regression Analysis of Factors Affecting Real Property Price Index From Case Study Research In Istanbul/Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denli, H. H.; Koc, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of real properties depending on standards is difficult to apply in time and location. Regression analysis construct mathematical models which describe or explain relationships that may exist between variables. The problem of identifying price differences of properties to obtain a price index can be converted into a regression problem, and standard techniques of regression analysis can be used to estimate the index. Considering regression analysis for real estate valuation, which are presented in real marketing process with its current characteristics and quantifiers, the method will help us to find the effective factors or variables in the formation of the value. In this study, prices of housing for sale in Zeytinburnu, a district in Istanbul, are associated with its characteristics to find a price index, based on information received from a real estate web page. The associated variables used for the analysis are age, size in m2, number of floors having the house, floor number of the estate and number of rooms. The price of the estate represents the dependent variable, whereas the rest are independent variables. Prices from 60 real estates have been used for the analysis. Same price valued locations have been found and plotted on the map and equivalence curves have been drawn identifying the same valued zones as lines.

  18. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for the adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth: Comparison between multiple linear regression and neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Brasquet, C.; Bourges, B.; Le Cloirec, P.

    1999-12-01

    The adsorption of 55 organic compounds is carried out onto a recently discovered adsorbent, activated carbon cloth. Isotherms are modeled using the Freundlich classical model, and the large database generated allows qualitative assumptions about the adsorption mechanism. However, to confirm these assumptions, a quantitative structure-property relationship methodology is used to assess the correlations between an adsorbability parameter (expressed using the Freundlich parameter K) and topological indices related to the compounds molecular structure (molecular connectivity indices, MCI). This correlation is set up by mean of two different statistical tools, multiple linear regression (MLR) and neural network (NN). A principal component analysis is carried out to generate new and uncorrelated variables. It enables the relations between the MCI to be analyzed, but the multiple linear regression assessed using the principal components (PCs) has a poor statistical quality and introduces high order PCs, too inaccurate for an explanation of the adsorption mechanism. The correlations are thus set up using the original variables (MCI), and both statistical tools, multiple linear regression and neutral network, are compared from a descriptive and predictive point of view. To compare the predictive ability of both methods, a test database of 10 organic compounds is used.

  19. Predicting the Surface Quality of Face Milled Aluminium Alloy Using a Multiple Regression Model and Numerical Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, K.; Simunovic, G.; Saric, T.

    2013-10-01

    The surface roughness is a very significant indicator of surface quality. It represents an essential exploitation requirement and influences technological time and costs, i.e. productivity. For that reason, the main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of face milling cutting parameters (number of revolution, feed rate and depth of cut) on the surface roughness of aluminium alloy. Hence, a statistical (regression) model has been developed to predict the surface roughness by using the methodology of experimental design. Central composite design is chosen for fitting response surface. Also, numerical optimization considering two goals simultaneously (minimum propagation of error and minimum roughness) was performed throughout the experimental region. In this way, the settings of cutting parameters causing the minimum variability in response were determined for the estimated variations of the significant regression factors.

  20. Investigating the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships for Antibody Recognition of Two Immunoassays for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Multiple Regression Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Li; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Dai, Shu-Gui

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants found in the environment. Immunoassays represent useful analytical methods to complement traditional analytical procedures for PAHs. Cross-reactivity (CR) is a very useful character to evaluate the extent of cross-reaction of a cross-reactant in immunoreactions and immunoassays. The quantitative relationships between the molecular properties and the CR of PAHs were established by stepwise multiple linear regression, principal component regression and partial least square regression, using the data of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The objective is to find the most important molecular properties that affect the CR, and predict the CR by multiple regression methods. The results show that the physicochemical, electronic and topological properties of the PAH molecules have an integrated effect on the CR properties for the two ELISAs, among which molar solubility (Sm) and valence molecular connectivity index (3χv) are the most important factors. The obtained regression equations for RisC kit are all statistically significant (p < 0.005) and show satisfactory ability for predicting CR values, while equations for RaPID kit are all not significant (p > 0.05) and not suitable for predicting. It is probably because that the RisC immunoassay employs a monoclonal antibody, while the RaPID kit is based on polyclonal antibody. Considering the important effect of solubility on the CR values, cross-reaction potential (CRP) is calculated and used as a complement of CR for evaluation of cross-reactions in immunoassays. Only the compounds with both high CR and high CRP can cause intense cross-reactions in immunoassays. PMID:23012547

  1. ``Regressed experts'' as a new state in teachers' professional development: lessons from Computer Science teachers' adjustments to substantial changes in the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Neomi; Ben-David Kolikant, Yifat; Beeri, Catriel

    2012-09-01

    Due to a program reform in Israel, experienced CS high-school teachers faced the need to master and teach a new programming paradigm. This situation served as an opportunity to explore the relationship between teachers' content knowledge (CK) and their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This article focuses on three case studies, with emphasis on one of them. Using observations and interviews, we examine how the teachers, we observed taught and what development of their teaching occurred as a result of their teaching experience, if at all. Our findings suggest that this situation creates a new hybrid state of teachers, which we term "regressed experts." These teachers incorporate in their professional practice some elements typical of novices and some typical of experts. We also found that these teachers' experience, although established when teaching a different CK, serve as a leverage to improve their knowledge and understanding of aspects of the new content.

  2. Use of principal-component, correlation, and stepwise multiple-regression analyses to investigate selected physical and hydraulic properties of carbonate-rock aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin

    1993-01-01

    Correlation analysis in conjunction with principal-component and multiple-regression analyses were applied to laboratory chemical and petrographic data to assess the usefulness of these techniques in evaluating selected physical and hydraulic properties of carbonate-rock aquifers in central Pennsylvania. Correlation and principal-component analyses were used to establish relations and associations among variables, to determine dimensions of property variation of samples, and to filter the variables containing similar information. Principal-component and correlation analyses showed that porosity is related to other measured variables and that permeability is most related to porosity and grain size. Four principal components are found to be significant in explaining the variance of data. Stepwise multiple-regression analysis was used to see how well the measured variables could predict porosity and (or) permeability for this suite of rocks. The variation in permeability and porosity is not totally predicted by the other variables, but the regression is significant at the 5% significance level. ?? 1993.

  3. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively. PMID:26414425

  4. Multiple-trait random regression models for the estimation of genetic parameters for milk, fat, and protein yield in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Borquis, Rusbel Raul Aspilcueta; Neto, Francisco Ribeiro de Araujo; Baldi, Fernando; Hurtado-Lugo, Naudin; de Camargo, Gregório M F; Muñoz-Berrocal, Milthon; Tonhati, Humberto

    2013-09-01

    In this study, genetic parameters for test-day milk, fat, and protein yield were estimated for the first lactation. The data analyzed consisted of 1,433 first lactations of Murrah buffaloes, daughters of 113 sires from 12 herds in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, with calvings from 1985 to 2007. Ten-month classes of lactation days were considered for the test-day yields. The (co)variance components for the 3 traits were estimated using the regression analyses by Bayesian inference applying an animal model by Gibbs sampling. The contemporary groups were defined as herd-year-month of the test day. In the model, the random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, and residual. The fixed effects were contemporary group and number of milkings (1 or 2), the linear and quadratic effects of the covariable age of the buffalo at calving, as well as the mean lactation curve of the population, which was modeled by orthogonal Legendre polynomials of fourth order. The random effects for the traits studied were modeled by Legendre polynomials of third and fourth order for additive genetic and permanent environment, respectively, the residual variances were modeled considering 4 residual classes. The heritability estimates for the traits were moderate (from 0.21-0.38), with higher estimates in the intermediate lactation phase. The genetic correlation estimates within and among the traits varied from 0.05 to 0.99. The results indicate that the selection for any trait test day will result in an indirect genetic gain for milk, fat, and protein yield in all periods of the lactation curve. The accuracy associated with estimated breeding values obtained using multi-trait random regression was slightly higher (around 8%) compared with single-trait random regression. This difference may be because to the greater amount of information available per animal. PMID:23831097

  5. Improved spatial regression analysis of diffusion tensor imaging for lesion detection during longitudinal progression of multiple sclerosis in individual subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilan; Qiu, Xing; Zhu, Tong; Tian, Wei; Hu, Rui; Ekholm, Sven; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-03-01

    Subject-specific longitudinal DTI study is vital for investigation of pathological changes of lesions and disease evolution. Spatial Regression Analysis of Diffusion tensor imaging (SPREAD) is a non-parametric permutation-based statistical framework that combines spatial regression and resampling techniques to achieve effective detection of localized longitudinal diffusion changes within the whole brain at individual level without a priori hypotheses. However, boundary blurring and dislocation limit its sensitivity, especially towards detecting lesions of irregular shapes. In the present study, we propose an improved SPREAD (dubbed improved SPREAD, or iSPREAD) method by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filtering method, which provides edge-preserving image smoothing through a nonlinear scale space approach. The statistical inference based on iSPREAD was evaluated and compared with the original SPREAD method using both simulated and in vivo human brain data. Results demonstrated that the sensitivity and accuracy of the SPREAD method has been improved substantially by adapting nonlinear anisotropic filtering. iSPREAD identifies subject-specific longitudinal changes in the brain with improved sensitivity, accuracy, and enhanced statistical power, especially when the spatial correlation is heterogeneous among neighboring image pixels in DTI.

  6. Improved spatial regression analysis of diffusion tensor imaging for lesion detection during longitudinal progression of multiple sclerosis in individual subjects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilan; Qiu, Xing; Zhu, Tong; Tian, Wei; Hu, Rui; Ekholm, Sven; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific longitudinal DTI study is vital for investigation of pathological changes of lesions and disease evolution. Spatial Regression Analysis of Diffusion tensor imaging (SPREAD) is a non-parametric permutation-based statistical framework that combines spatial regression and resampling techniques to achieve effective detection of localized longitudinal diffusion changes within the whole brain at individual level without a priori hypotheses. However, boundary blurring and dislocation limit its sensitivity, especially towards detecting lesions of irregular shapes. In the present study, we propose an improved SPREAD (dubbed improved SPREAD, or iSPREAD) method by incorporating a three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filtering method, which provides edge-preserving image smoothing through a nonlinear scale space approach. The statistical inference based on iSPREAD was evaluated and compared with the original SPREAD method using both simulated and in vivo human brain data. Results demonstrated that the sensitivity and accuracy of the SPREAD method has been improved substantially by adapting nonlinear anisotropic filtering. iSPREAD identifies subject-specific longitudinal changes in the brain with improved sensitivity, accuracy, and enhanced statistical power, especially when the spatial correlation is heterogeneous among neighboring image pixels in DTI. PMID:26948513

  7. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  8. Study relationship between inorganic and organic coal analysis with gross calorific value by multiple regression and ANFIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chelgani, S.C.; Hart, B.; Grady, W.C.; Hower, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between maceral content plus mineral matter and gross calorific value (GCV) for a wide range of West Virginia coal samples (from 6518 to 15330 BTU/lb; 15.16 to 35.66MJ/kg) has been investigated by multivariable regression and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The stepwise least square mathematical method comparison between liptinite, vitrinite, plus mineral matter as input data sets with measured GCV reported a nonlinear correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.83. Using the same data set the correlation between the predicted GCV from the ANFIS model and the actual GCV reported a R2 value of 0.96. It was determined that the GCV-based prediction methods, as used in this article, can provide a reasonable estimation of GCV. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. Prediction of acute in vivo toxicity of some amine and amide drugs to rats by multiple linear regression, partial least squares and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Mahani, Mohamad Khayatzadeh; Chaloosi, Marzieh; Maragheh, Mohamad Ghanadi; Khanchi, Ali Reza; Afzali, Daryoush

    2007-09-01

    The oral acute in vivo toxicity of 32 amine and amide drugs was related to their structural-dependent properties. Genetic algorithm-partial least-squares and stepwise variable selection was applied to select of meaningful descriptors. Multiple linear regression (MLR), artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square (PLS) models were created with selected descriptors. The predictive ability of all three models was evaluated and compared on a set of five drugs, which were not used in modeling steps. Average errors of 0.168, 0.169 and 0.259 were obtained for MLR, ANN and PLS, respectively. PMID:17878584

  10. Ridge Regression: A Regression Procedure for Analyzing Correlated Independent Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Ernest A.

    Ridge regression is presented as an analytic technique to be used when predictor variables in a multiple linear regression situation are highly correlated, a situation which may result in unstable regression coefficients and difficulties in interpretation. Ridge regression avoids the problem of selection of variables that may occur in stepwise…

  11. Forecasting hourly PM(10) concentration in Cyprus through artificial neural networks and multiple regression models: implications to local environmental management.

    PubMed

    Paschalidou, Anastasia K; Karakitsios, Spyridon; Kleanthous, Savvas; Kassomenos, Pavlos A

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, two types of artificial neural network (NN) models using the multilayer perceptron (MLP) and the radial basis function (RBF) techniques, as well as a model based on principal component regression analysis (PCRA), are employed to forecast hourly PM(10) concentrations in four urban areas (Larnaca, Limassol, Nicosia and Paphos) in Cyprus. The model development is based on a variety of meteorological and pollutant parameters corresponding to the 2-year period between July 2006 and June 2008, and the model evaluation is achieved through the use of a series of well-established evaluation instruments and methodologies. The evaluation reveals that the MLP NN models display the best forecasting performance with R (2) values ranging between 0.65 and 0.76, whereas the RBF NNs and the PCRA models reveal a rather weak performance with R (2) values between 0.37-0.43 and 0.33-0.38, respectively. The derived MLP models are also used to forecast Saharan dust episodes with remarkable success (probability of detection ranging between 0.68 and 0.71). On the whole, the analysis shows that the models introduced here could provide local authorities with reliable and precise predictions and alarms about air quality if used on an operational basis. PMID:20652425

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Adjusting to Multiple Sclerosis (The saMS Trial): Does CBT Work and for Whom Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss-Morris, Rona; Dennison, Laura; Landau, Sabine; Yardley, Lucy; Silber, Eli; Chalder, Trudie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aims were (a) to test the effectiveness of a nurse-led cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program to assist adjustment in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) and (b) to determine moderators of treatment including baseline distress, social support (SS), and treatment preference. Method: Ninety-four ambulatory people with MS…

  13. Computing options for multiple-trait test-day random regression models while accounting for heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, I; Tsuruta, S; Misztal, I

    2010-06-01

    Data included 90,242,799 test day records from first, second and third parities of 5,402,484 Holstein cows and 9,326,754 animals in the pedigree. Additionally, daily temperature humidity indexes (THI) from 202 weather stations were available. The fixed effects included herd test day, age at calving, milking frequency and days in milk classes (DIM). Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment and herd-year and were fit as random regressions. Covariates included linear splines with four knots at 5, 50, 200 and 305 DIM and a function of THI. Mixed model equations were solved using an iteration on data program with a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Preconditioners used were diagonal (D), block diagonal due to traits (BT) and block diagonal due to traits and correlated effects (BTCORR). One run included BT with a 'diagonalized' model in which the random effects were reparameterized for diagonal (co)variance matrices among traits (BTDIAG). Memory requirements were 8.7 Gb for D, 10.4 Gb for BT and BTDIAG, and 24.3 Gb for BTCORR. Computing times (rounds) were 14 days (952) for D, 10.7 days (706) for BT, 7.7 days (494) for BTDIAG and 4.6 days (289) for BTCORR. The convergence pattern was strongly influenced by the choice of fixed effects. When sufficient memory is available, the option BTCORR is the fastest and simplest to implement; the next efficient method, BTDIAG, requires additional steps for diagonalization and back-diagonalization. PMID:20536641

  14. Recognition of extensive freshwater and brackish marshes and of multiple transgressions and regressions: The Holocene wetlands of the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, H.I. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive and closely spaced cores (204) were analyzed to find detailed facies (microfacies) and paleoenvironments in the subsurface sediments along the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean. To determine detailed facies and paleoenvironments, several composite methods were employed: traditional lithological analysis, botanical identification, macro- and micro-paleontological analysis, grain size analysis, organic and inorganic content, water content, mineral composition, particulate plant, and C-14 dating. Twenty-two sedimentary microfacies were identified in the surface and subsurface sediments of the study area. Most of the lower section of the Holocene sediments contained freshwater and brackish marsh microfacies which alternated or intercalated with fluvial microfacies or brackish tidal flat/tidal stream microfacies. After tides encroached upon the freshwater marshes and swamps, several events of transgression and regression were recorded in the stratigraphic section. Finally, saline paleoenvironments predominated at the top section of subsurface sediments. Within saline facies, three subgroups of salt marsh microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies were identified: high salt marsh sub-microfacies, middle salt marsh sub-microfacies, and low salt marsh sub-microfacies. The major controlling factors of these paleoenvironmental changes were local relative sea-level fluctuations, sediment supply, pre-Holocene configuration, fluvial activity, groundwater influence, climatic change, sediment compaction, tectonics, isostasy and biological competition. Ten events of transgression and regression in some areas were found in about 2,000 years, but other areas apparently contained no evidence of multiple events of transgression and regression. Some other areas showed one or two distinctive events of transgression and regression. Therefore, further investigation is necessary to understand the details of these records.

  15. Adjustment of Measurements with Multiplicative Errors: Error Analysis, Estimates of the Variance of Unit Weight, and Effect on Volume Estimation from LiDAR-Type Digital Elevation Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  16. Adjustment of measurements with multiplicative errors: error analysis, estimates of the variance of unit weight, and effect on volume estimation from LiDAR-type digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  17. Internal correction of spectral interferences and mass bias for selenium metabolism studies using enriched stable isotopes in combination with multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Martínez-Sierra, Justo Giner; Gammelgaard, Bente; Alonso, J Ignacio García

    2012-03-01

    The analytical methodology for the in vivo study of selenium metabolism using two enriched selenium isotopes has been modified, allowing for the internal correction of spectral interferences and mass bias both for total selenium and speciation analysis. The method is based on the combination of an already described dual-isotope procedure with a new data treatment strategy based on multiple linear regression. A metabolic enriched isotope ((77)Se) is given orally to the test subject and a second isotope ((74)Se) is employed for quantification. In our approach, all possible polyatomic interferences occurring in the measurement of the isotope composition of selenium by collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS are taken into account and their relative contribution calculated by multiple linear regression after minimisation of the residuals. As a result, all spectral interferences and mass bias are corrected internally allowing the fast and independent quantification of natural abundance selenium ((nat)Se) and enriched (77)Se. In this sense, the calculation of the tracer/tracee ratio in each sample is straightforward. The method has been applied to study the time-related tissue incorporation of (77)Se in male Wistar rats while maintaining the (nat)Se steady-state conditions. Additionally, metabolically relevant information such as selenoprotein synthesis and selenium elimination in urine could be studied using the proposed methodology. In this case, serum proteins were separated by affinity chromatography while reverse phase was employed for urine metabolites. In both cases, (74)Se was used as a post-column isotope dilution spike. The application of multiple linear regression to the whole chromatogram allowed us to calculate the contribution of bromine hydride, selenium hydride, argon polyatomics and mass bias on the observed selenium isotope patterns. By minimising the square sum of residuals for the whole chromatogram, internal correction of spectral interferences and mass

  18. Correlation and simple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Eberly, Lynn E

    2007-01-01

    This chapter highlights important steps in using correlation and simple linear regression to address scientific questions about the association of two continuous variables with each other. These steps include estimation and inference, assessing model fit, the connection between regression and ANOVA, and study design. Examples in microbiology are used throughout. This chapter provides a framework that is helpful in understanding more complex statistical techniques, such as multiple linear regression, linear mixed effects models, logistic regression, and proportional hazards regression. PMID:18450049

  19. An improved approach for measuring the impact of multiple CO2 conductances on the apparent photorespiratory CO2 compensation point through slope-intercept regression.

    PubMed

    Walker, Berkley J; Skabelund, Dane C; Busch, Florian A; Ort, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis, which are essential for understanding the impact of photosynthesis to changing environments, depend on accurate parameterizations. One such parameter, the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point can be measured from the intersection of several CO2 response curves measured under sub-saturating illumination. However, determining the actual intersection while accounting for experimental noise can be challenging. Additionally, leaf photosynthesis model outcomes are sensitive to the diffusion paths of CO2 released from the mitochondria. This diffusion path of CO2 includes both chloroplastic as well as cell wall resistances to CO2 , which are not readily measurable. Both the difficulties of determining the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point and the impact of multiple intercellular resistances to CO2 can be addressed through application of slope-intercept regression. This technical report summarizes an improved framework for implementing slope-intercept regression to evaluate measurements of the photorespiratory CO2 compensation point. This approach extends past work to include the cases of both Rubisco and Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)-limited photosynthesis. This report further presents two interactive graphical applications and a spreadsheet-based tool to allow users to apply slope-intercept theory to their data. PMID:27103099

  20. Fundamental Analysis of the Linear Multiple Regression Technique for Quantification of Water Quality Parameters from Remote Sensing Data. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H., III

    1977-01-01

    Constituents with linear radiance gradients with concentration may be quantified from signals which contain nonlinear atmospheric and surface reflection effects for both homogeneous and non-homogeneous water bodies provided accurate data can be obtained and nonlinearities are constant with wavelength. Statistical parameters must be used which give an indication of bias as well as total squared error to insure that an equation with an optimum combination of bands is selected. It is concluded that the effect of error in upwelled radiance measurements is to reduce the accuracy of the least square fitting process and to increase the number of points required to obtain a satisfactory fit. The problem of obtaining a multiple regression equation that is extremely sensitive to error is discussed.

  1. Verifying the performance of artificial neural network and multiple linear regression in predicting the mean seasonal municipal solid waste generation rate: A case study of Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Sama; Karimi-Jashni, Ayoub

    2016-02-01

    Predicting the mass of solid waste generation plays an important role in integrated solid waste management plans. In this study, the performance of two predictive models, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was verified to predict mean Seasonal Municipal Solid Waste Generation (SMSWG) rate. The accuracy of the proposed models is illustrated through a case study of 20 cities located in Fars Province, Iran. Four performance measures, MAE, MAPE, RMSE and R were used to evaluate the performance of these models. The MLR, as a conventional model, showed poor prediction performance. On the other hand, the results indicated that the ANN model, as a non-linear model, has a higher predictive accuracy when it comes to prediction of the mean SMSWG rate. As a result, in order to develop a more cost-effective strategy for waste management in the future, the ANN model could be used to predict the mean SMSWG rate. PMID:26482809

  2. An R package to compute commonality coefficients in the multiple regression case: an introduction to the package and a practical example.

    PubMed

    Nimon, Kim; Lewis, Mitzi; Kane, Richard; Haynes, R Michael

    2008-05-01

    Multiple regression is a widely used technique for data analysis in social and behavioral research. The complexity of interpreting such results increases when correlated predictor variables are involved. Commonality analysis provides a method of determining the variance accounted for by respective predictor variables and is especially useful in the presence of correlated predictors. However, computing commonality coefficients is laborious. To make commonality analysis accessible to more researchers, a program was developed to automate the calculation of unique and common elements in commonality analysis, using the statistical package R. The program is described, and a heuristic example using data from the Holzinger and Swineford (1939) study, readily available in the MBESS R package, is presented. PMID:18522056

  3. Multiple regression and inverse moments improve the characterization of the spatial scaling behavior of daily streamflows in the Southeast United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, William H.; Over, Thomas M.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial structure of daily streamflow is essential for managing freshwater resources, especially in poorly-gaged regions. Spatial scaling assumptions are common in flood frequency prediction (e.g., index-flood method) and the prediction of continuous streamflow at ungaged sites (e.g. drainage-area ratio), with simple scaling by drainage area being the most common assumption. In this study, scaling analyses of daily streamflow from 173 streamgages in the southeastern US resulted in three important findings. First, the use of only positive integer moment orders, as has been done in most previous studies, captures only the probabilistic and spatial scaling behavior of flows above an exceedance probability near the median; negative moment orders (inverse moments) are needed for lower streamflows. Second, assessing scaling by using drainage area alone is shown to result in a high degree of omitted-variable bias, masking the true spatial scaling behavior. Multiple regression is shown to mitigate this bias, controlling for regional heterogeneity of basin attributes, especially those correlated with drainage area. Previous univariate scaling analyses have neglected the scaling of low-flow events and may have produced biased estimates of the spatial scaling exponent. Third, the multiple regression results show that mean flows scale with an exponent of one, low flows scale with spatial scaling exponents greater than one, and high flows scale with exponents less than one. The relationship between scaling exponents and exceedance probabilities may be a fundamental signature of regional streamflow. This signature may improve our understanding of the physical processes generating streamflow at different exceedance probabilities. 

  4. A flexible mixed-effect negative binomial regression model for detecting unusual increases in MRI lesion counts in individual multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yumi; Zhao, Yinshan; Petkau, John

    2015-06-15

    We develop a new modeling approach to enhance a recently proposed method to detect increases of contrast-enhancing lesions (CELs) on repeated magnetic resonance imaging, which have been used as an indicator for potential adverse events in multiple sclerosis clinical trials. The method signals patients with unusual increases in CEL activity by estimating the probability of observing CEL counts as large as those observed on a patient's recent scans conditional on the patient's CEL counts on previous scans. This conditional probability index (CPI), computed based on a mixed-effect negative binomial regression model, can vary substantially depending on the choice of distribution for the patient-specific random effects. Therefore, we relax this parametric assumption to model the random effects with an infinite mixture of beta distributions, using the Dirichlet process, which effectively allows any form of distribution. To our knowledge, no previous literature considers a mixed-effect regression for longitudinal count variables where the random effect is modeled with a Dirichlet process mixture. As our inference is in the Bayesian framework, we adopt a meta-analytic approach to develop an informative prior based on previous clinical trials. This is particularly helpful at the early stages of trials when less data are available. Our enhanced method is illustrated with CEL data from 10 previous multiple sclerosis clinical trials. Our simulation study shows that our procedure estimates the CPI more accurately than parametric alternatives when the patient-specific random effect distribution is misspecified and that an informative prior improves the accuracy of the CPI estimates. PMID:25784219

  5. When does female multiple mating evolve to adjust inbreeding? Effects of inbreeding depression, direct costs, mating constraints, and polyandry as a threshold trait.

    PubMed

    Duthie, A Bradley; Bocedi, Greta; Reid, Jane M

    2016-09-01

    Polyandry is often hypothesized to evolve to allow females to adjust the degree to which they inbreed. Multiple factors might affect such evolution, including inbreeding depression, direct costs, constraints on male availability, and the nature of polyandry as a threshold trait. Complex models are required to evaluate when evolution of polyandry to adjust inbreeding is predicted to arise. We used a genetically explicit individual-based model to track the joint evolution of inbreeding strategy and polyandry defined as a polygenic threshold trait. Evolution of polyandry to avoid inbreeding only occurred given strong inbreeding depression, low direct costs, and severe restrictions on initial versus additional male availability. Evolution of polyandry to prefer inbreeding only occurred given zero inbreeding depression and direct costs, and given similarly severe restrictions on male availability. However, due to its threshold nature, phenotypic polyandry was frequently expressed even when strongly selected against and hence maladaptive. Further, the degree to which females adjusted inbreeding through polyandry was typically very small, and often reflected constraints on male availability rather than adaptive reproductive strategy. Evolution of polyandry solely to adjust inbreeding might consequently be highly restricted in nature, and such evolution cannot necessarily be directly inferred from observed magnitudes of inbreeding adjustment. PMID:27464756

  6. Influence of Parenting Styles on the Adjustment and Academic Achievement of Traditional College Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Gregory P.; Bartholomae, Suzanne; McKenry, Patrick C.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the relationship between parenting styles and academic achievement and adjustment of traditional college freshmen (N=101). Multiple regression models indicate that authoritative parenting style was positively related to student's academic adjustment. Self-esteem was significantly predictive of social, personal-emotional, goal…

  7. Relationship between Multiple Sources of Perceived Social Support and Psychological and Academic Adjustment in Early Adolescence: Comparisons across Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueger, Sandra Yu; Malecki, Christine Kerres; Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated gender differences in the relationship between sources of perceived support (parent, teacher, classmate, friend, school) and psychological and academic adjustment in a sample of 636 (49% male) middle school students. Longitudinal data were collected at two time points in the same school year. The study provided…

  8. Comparison of Methods for Adjusting Incorrect Assignments of Items to Subtests: Oblique Multiple Group Method versus Confirmatory Common Factor Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuive, Ilse; Kiers, Henk A. L.; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    2009-01-01

    A common question in test evaluation is whether an a priori assignment of items to subtests is supported by empirical data. If the analysis results indicate the assignment of items to subtests under study is not supported by data, the assignment is often adjusted. In this study the authors compare two methods on the quality of their suggestions to…

  9. Non-destructive evaluation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves by simple and multiple regression analysis of RGB image components.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, M; Mele, G; Pulvento, C; Lavini, A; d'Andria, R; Jacobsen, S-E

    2014-06-01

    Leaf chlorophyll content provides valuable information about physiological status of plants; it is directly linked to photosynthetic potential and primary production. In vitro assessment by wet chemical extraction is the standard method for leaf chlorophyll determination. This measurement is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Over the years alternative methods, rapid and non-destructive, have been explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the applicability of a fast and non-invasive field method for estimation of chlorophyll content in quinoa and amaranth leaves based on RGB components analysis of digital images acquired with a standard SLR camera. Digital images of leaves from different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth were acquired directly in the field. Mean values of each RGB component were evaluated via image analysis software and correlated to leaf chlorophyll provided by standard laboratory procedure. Single and multiple regression models using RGB color components as independent variables have been tested and validated. The performance of the proposed method was compared to that of the widely used non-destructive SPAD method. Sensitivity of the best regression models for different genotypes of quinoa and amaranth was also checked. Color data acquisition of the leaves in the field with a digital camera was quick, more effective, and lower cost than SPAD. The proposed RGB models provided better correlation (highest R (2)) and prediction (lowest RMSEP) of the true value of foliar chlorophyll content and had a lower amount of noise in the whole range of chlorophyll studied compared with SPAD and other leaf image processing based models when applied to quinoa and amaranth. PMID:24442792

  10. Estimating Dbh of Trees Employing Multiple Linear Regression of the best Lidar-Derived Parameter Combination Automated in Python in a Natural Broadleaf Forest in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, C. A. G.; Carcellar, B. G., III; Paringit, E. C.; Argamosa, R. J. L.; Faelga, R. A. G.; Posilero, M. A. V.; Zaragosa, G. P.; Dimayacyac, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Diameter-at-Breast-Height Estimation is a prerequisite in various allometric equations estimating important forestry indices like stem volume, basal area, biomass and carbon stock. LiDAR Technology has a means of directly obtaining different forest parameters, except DBH, from the behavior and characteristics of point cloud unique in different forest classes. Extensive tree inventory was done on a two-hectare established sample plot in Mt. Makiling, Laguna for a natural growth forest. Coordinates, height, and canopy cover were measured and types of species were identified to compare to LiDAR derivatives. Multiple linear regression was used to get LiDAR-derived DBH by integrating field-derived DBH and 27 LiDAR-derived parameters at 20m, 10m, and 5m grid resolutions. To know the best combination of parameters in DBH Estimation, all possible combinations of parameters were generated and automated using python scripts and additional regression related libraries such as Numpy, Scipy, and Scikit learn were used. The combination that yields the highest r-squared or coefficient of determination and lowest AIC (Akaike's Information Criterion) and BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) was determined to be the best equation. The equation is at its best using 11 parameters at 10mgrid size and at of 0.604 r-squared, 154.04 AIC and 175.08 BIC. Combination of parameters may differ among forest classes for further studies. Additional statistical tests can be supplemented to help determine the correlation among parameters such as Kaiser- Meyer-Olkin (KMO) Coefficient and the Barlett's Test for Spherecity (BTS).

  11. Mediating Effects of Relationships with Mentors on College Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student adjustment to college and relational health with peers, mentors, and the community. Data were collected from 80 undergraduate students completing their first semester of course work at a large university in the mid-South. A series of simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that…

  12. A Comparison of Seven Cox Regression-Based Models to Account for Heterogeneity Across Multiple HIV Treatment Cohorts in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Giganti, Mark J.; Luz, Paula M.; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Cesar, Carina; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted a slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives. PMID:25647087

  13. A Comparison of Seven Cox Regression-Based Models to Account for Heterogeneity Across Multiple HIV Treatment Cohorts in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Giganti, Mark J; Luz, Paula M; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Cesar, Carina; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2015-05-01

    Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted a slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives. PMID:25647087

  14. Incorporating multiple interventions in meta-analysis: an evaluation of the mixed treatment comparison with the adjusted indirect comparison

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Christopher; Ghement, Isabella; Eyawo, Oghenowede; Guyatt, Gordon H; Mills, Edward J

    2009-01-01

    Background Comparing the effectiveness of interventions is now a requirement for regulatory approval in several countries. It also aids in clinical and public health decision-making. However, in the absence of head-to-head randomized trials (RCTs), determining the relative effectiveness of interventions is challenging. Several methodological options are now available. We aimed to determine the comparative validity of the adjusted indirect comparisons of RCTs with the mixed treatment comparison approach. Methods Using systematic searching, we identified all meta-analyses evaluating more than 3 interventions for a similar disease state with binary outcomes. We abstracted data on each clinical trial including population n and outcomes. We conducted fixed effects meta-analysis of each intervention versus mutual comparator and then applied the adjusted indirect comparison. We conducted a mixed treatment meta-analysis on all trials and compared the point estimates and 95% confidence/credible intervals (CIs/CrIs) to determine important differences. Results We included data from 7 reviews that met our inclusion criteria, allowing a total of 51 comparisons. According to the a priori consistency rule, we found 2 examples where the analytic comparisons were statistically significant using the mixed treatment comparison over the adjusted indirect comparisons and 1 example where this was vice versa. We found 6 examples where the direction of effect differed according to the indirect comparison method chosen and we found 9 examples where the confidence intervals were importantly different between approaches. Conclusion In most analyses, the adjusted indirect comparison yields estimates of relative effectiveness equal to the mixed treatment comparison. In less complex indirect comparisons, where all studies share a mutual comparator, both approaches yield similar benefits. As comparisons become more complex, the mixed treatment comparison may be favoured. PMID:19772573

  15. Development of multiple linear regression models as predictive tools for fecal indicator concentrations in a stretch of the lower Lahn River, Germany.

    PubMed

    Herrig, Ilona M; Böer, Simone I; Brennholt, Nicole; Manz, Werner

    2015-11-15

    Since rivers are typically subject to rapid changes in microbiological water quality, tools are needed to allow timely water quality assessment. A promising approach is the application of predictive models. In our study, we developed multiple linear regression (MLR) models in order to predict the abundance of the fecal indicator organisms Escherichia coli (EC), intestinal enterococci (IE) and somatic coliphages (SC) in the Lahn River, Germany. The models were developed on the basis of an extensive set of environmental parameters collected during a 12-months monitoring period. Two models were developed for each type of indicator: 1) an extended model including the maximum number of variables significantly explaining variations in indicator abundance and 2) a simplified model reduced to the three most influential explanatory variables, thus obtaining a model which is less resource-intensive with regard to required data. Both approaches have the ability to model multiple sites within one river stretch. The three most important predictive variables in the optimized models for the bacterial indicators were NH4-N, turbidity and global solar irradiance, whereas chlorophyll a content, discharge and NH4-N were reliable model variables for somatic coliphages. Depending on indicator type, the extended mode models also included the additional variables rainfall, O2 content, pH and chlorophyll a. The extended mode models could explain 69% (EC), 74% (IE) and 72% (SC) of the observed variance in fecal indicator concentrations. The optimized models explained the observed variance in fecal indicator concentrations to 65% (EC), 70% (IE) and 68% (SC). Site-specific efficiencies ranged up to 82% (EC) and 81% (IE, SC). Our results suggest that MLR models are a promising tool for a timely water quality assessment in the Lahn area. PMID:26318647

  16. Multiple regression analysis to assess the role of plankton on the distribution and speciation of mercury in water of a contaminated lagoon.

    PubMed

    Stoichev, T; Tessier, E; Amouroux, D; Almeida, C M; Basto, M C P; Vasconcelos, V M

    2016-11-15

    Spatial and seasonal variation of mercury species aqueous concentrations and distributions was carried out during six sampling campaigns at four locations within Laranjo Bay, the most mercury-contaminated area of the Aveiro Lagoon (Portugal). Inorganic mercury (IHg(II)) and methylmercury (MeHg) were determined in filter-retained (IHgPART, MeHgPART) and filtered (<0.45μm) fractions (IHg(II)DISS, MeHgDISS). The concentrations of IHgPART depended on site and on dilution with downstream particles. Similar processes were evidenced for MeHgPART, however, its concentrations increased for particles rich in phaeophytin (Pha). The concentrations of MeHgDISS, and especially those of IHg(II)DISS, increased with Pha concentrations in the water. Multiple regression models are able to depict MeHgPART, IHg(II)DISS and MeHgDISS concentrations with salinity and Pha concentrations exhibiting additive statistical effects and allowing separation of possible addition and removal processes. A link between phytoplankton/algae and consumers' grazing pressure in the contaminated area can be involved to increase concentrations of IHg(II)DISS and MeHgPART. These processes could lead to suspended particles enriched with MeHg and to the enhancement of IHg(II) and MeHg availability in surface waters and higher transfer to the food web. PMID:27484944

  17. Logistic regression analysis of multiple noninvasive tests for the prediction of the presence and extent of coronary artery disease in men

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Chaitman, B.R.; Lam, J.; Lesperance, J.; Dupras, G.; Fines, P.; Cherkaoui, O.; Robert, P.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1985-08-01

    The incremental diagnostic yield of clinical data, exercise ECG, stress thallium scintigraphy, and cardiac fluoroscopy to predict coronary and multivessel disease was assessed in 171 symptomatic men by means of multiple logistic regression analyses. When clinical variables alone were analyzed, chest pain type and age were predictive of coronary disease, whereas chest pain type, age, a family history of premature coronary disease before age 55 years, and abnormal ST-T wave changes on the rest ECG were predictive of multivessel disease. The percentage of patients correctly classified by cardiac fluoroscopy (presence or absence of coronary artery calcification), exercise ECG, and thallium scintigraphy was 9%, 25%, and 50%, respectively, greater than for clinical variables, when the presence or absence of coronary disease was the outcome, and 13%, 25%, and 29%, respectively, when multivessel disease was studied; 5% of patients were misclassified. When the 37 clinical and noninvasive test variables were analyzed jointly, the most significant variable predictive of coronary disease was an abnormal thallium scan and for multivessel disease, the amount of exercise performed. The data from this study provide a quantitative model and confirm previous reports that optimal diagnostic efficacy is obtained when noninvasive tests are ordered sequentially. In symptomatic men, cardiac fluoroscopy is a relatively ineffective test when compared to exercise ECG and thallium scintigraphy.

  18. Racial identity and reflected appraisals as influences on Asian Americans' racial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A N; Helms, J E

    2001-08-01

    J. E. Helms's (1990) racial identity psychodiagnostic model was used to examine the contribution of racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals to the development of healthy racial adjustment of Asian American university students (N = 188). Racial adjustment was operationally defined as collective self-esteem and awareness of anti-Asian racism. Multiple regression analyses suggested that racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals were significantly predictive of Asian Americans' racial adjustment. Implications for counseling and future research are discussed. PMID:11506069

  19. Robust Regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Cabral, Ricardo; De la Torre, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Discriminative methods (e.g., kernel regression, SVM) have been extensively used to solve problems such as object recognition, image alignment and pose estimation from images. These methods typically map image features ( X) to continuous (e.g., pose) or discrete (e.g., object category) values. A major drawback of existing discriminative methods is that samples are directly projected onto a subspace and hence fail to account for outliers common in realistic training sets due to occlusion, specular reflections or noise. It is important to notice that existing discriminative approaches assume the input variables X to be noise free. Thus, discriminative methods experience significant performance degradation when gross outliers are present. Despite its obvious importance, the problem of robust discriminative learning has been relatively unexplored in computer vision. This paper develops the theory of robust regression (RR) and presents an effective convex approach that uses recent advances on rank minimization. The framework applies to a variety of problems in computer vision including robust linear discriminant analysis, regression with missing data, and multi-label classification. Several synthetic and real examples with applications to head pose estimation from images, image and video classification and facial attribute classification with missing data are used to illustrate the benefits of RR. PMID:26761740

  20. CALORIMETER-BASED ADJUSTMENT OF MULTIPLICITY DETERMINED 240PU EFF KNOWN-A ANALYSIS FOR THE ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2012-02-21

    In nuclear material processing facilities, it is often necessary to balance the competing demands of accuracy and throughput. While passive neutron multiplicity counting is the preferred method for relatively fast assays of plutonium, the presence of low-Z impurities (fluorine, beryllium, etc.) rapidly erodes the assay precision of passive neutron counting techniques, frequently resulting in unacceptably large total measurement uncertainties. Conversely, while calorimeters are immune to these impurity effects, the long count times required for high accuracy can be a hindrance to efficiency. The higher uncertainties in passive neutron measurements of impure material are driven by the resulting large (>>2) {alpha}-values, defined as the ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission neutron emission ratio. To counter impurity impacts for high-{alpha} materials, a known-{alpha} approach may be adopted. In this method, {alpha} is determined for a single item using a combination of gamma-ray and calorimetric measurements. Because calorimetry is based on heat output, rather than a statistical distribution of emitted neutrons, an {alpha}-value determined in this way is far more accurate than one determined from passive neutron counts. This fixed {alpha} value can be used in conventional multiplicity analysis for any plutonium-bearing item having the same chemical composition and isotopic distribution as the original. With the results of single calorimeter/passive neutron/gamma-ray measurement, these subsequent items can then be assayed with high precision and accuracy in a relatively short time, despite the presence of impurities. A calorimeter-based known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis technique is especially useful when requiring rapid, high accuracy, high precision measurements of multiple plutonium bearing items having a common source. The technique has therefore found numerous applications at the Savannah River Site. In each case, a plutonium (or mixed U/Pu) bearing item is divided

  1. Taking into account latency, amplitude, and morphology: improved estimation of single-trial ERPs by wavelet filtering and multiple linear regression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L.; Liang, M.; Mouraux, A.; Wise, R. G.; Hu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Across-trial averaging is a widely used approach to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of event-related potentials (ERPs). However, across-trial variability of ERP latency and amplitude may contain physiologically relevant information that is lost by across-trial averaging. Hence, we aimed to develop a novel method that uses 1) wavelet filtering (WF) to enhance the SNR of ERPs and 2) a multiple linear regression with a dispersion term (MLRd) that takes into account shape distortions to estimate the single-trial latency and amplitude of ERP peaks. Using simulated ERP data sets containing different levels of noise, we provide evidence that, compared with other approaches, the proposed WF+MLRd method yields the most accurate estimate of single-trial ERP features. When applied to a real laser-evoked potential data set, the WF+MLRd approach provides reliable estimation of single-trial latency, amplitude, and morphology of ERPs and thereby allows performing meaningful correlations at single-trial level. We obtained three main findings. First, WF significantly enhances the SNR of single-trial ERPs. Second, MLRd effectively captures and measures the variability in the morphology of single-trial ERPs, thus providing an accurate and unbiased estimate of their peak latency and amplitude. Third, intensity of pain perception significantly correlates with the single-trial estimates of N2 and P2 amplitude. These results indicate that WF+MLRd can be used to explore the dynamics between different ERP features, behavioral variables, and other neuroimaging measures of brain activity, thus providing new insights into the functional significance of the different brain processes underlying the brain responses to sensory stimuli. PMID:21880936

  2. Investigation of the relationship between very warm days in Romania and large-scale atmospheric circulation using multiple linear regression approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, N.; Cuculeanu, V.; Stefan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the frequency of very warm days (TX90p) in Romania and large-scale atmospheric circulation for winter (December-February) and summer (June-August) between 1962 and 2010. In order to achieve this, two catalogues from COST733Action were used to derive daily circulation types. Seasonal occurrence frequencies of the circulation types were calculated and have been utilized as predictors within the multiple linear regression model (MLRM) for the estimation of winter and summer TX90p values for 85 synoptic stations covering the entire Romania. A forward selection procedure has been utilized to find adequate predictor combinations and those predictor combinations were tested for collinearity. The performance of the MLRMs has been quantified based on the explained variance. Furthermore, the leave-one-out cross-validation procedure was applied and the root-mean-squared error skill score was calculated at station level in order to obtain reliable evidence of MLRM robustness. From this analysis, it can be stated that the MLRM performance is higher in winter compared to summer. This is due to the annual cycle of incoming insolation and to the local factors such as orography and surface albedo variations. The MLRM performances exhibit distinct variations between regions with high performance in wintertime for the eastern and southern part of the country and in summertime for the western part of the country. One can conclude that the MLRM generally captures quite well the TX90p variability and reveals the potential for statistical downscaling of TX90p values based on circulation types.

  3. Linear and nonlinear modeling of antifungal activity of some heterocyclic ring derivatives using multiple linear regression and Bayesian-regularized neural networks.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Fernández, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Antifungal activity was modeled for a set of 96 heterocyclic ring derivatives (2,5,6-trisubstituted benzoxazoles, 2,5-disubstituted benzimidazoles, 2-substituted benzothiazoles and 2-substituted oxazolo(4,5-b)pyridines) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and Bayesian-regularized artificial neural network (BRANN) techniques. Inhibitory activity against Candida albicans (log(1/C)) was correlated with 3D descriptors encoding the chemical structures of the heterocyclic compounds. Training and test sets were chosen by means of k-Means Clustering. The most appropriate variables for linear and nonlinear modeling were selected using a genetic algorithm (GA) approach. In addition to the MLR equation (MLR-GA), two nonlinear models were built, model BRANN employing the linear variable subset and an optimum model BRANN-GA obtained by a hybrid method that combined BRANN and GA approaches (BRANN-GA). The linear model fit the training set (n = 80) with r2 = 0.746, while BRANN and BRANN-GA gave higher values of r2 = 0.889 and r2 = 0.937, respectively. Beyond the improvement of training set fitting, the BRANN-GA model was superior to the others by being able to describe 87% of test set (n = 16) variance in comparison with 78 and 81% the MLR-GA and BRANN models, respectively. Our quantitative structure-activity relationship study suggests that the distributions of atomic mass, volume and polarizability have relevant relationships with the antifungal potency of the compounds studied. Furthermore, the ability of the six variables selected nonlinearly to differentiate the data was demonstrated when the total data set was well distributed in a Kohonen self-organizing neural network (KNN). PMID:16205958

  4. Using multiple calibration sets to improve the quantitative accuracy of partial least squares (PLS) regression on open-path fourier transform infrared (OP/FT-IR) spectra of ammonia over wide concentration ranges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A technique of using multiple calibration sets in partial least squares regression (PLS) was proposed to improve the quantitative determination of ammonia from open-path Fourier transform infrared spectra. The spectra were measured near animal farms, and the path-integrated concentration of ammonia...

  5. Social Support, Self-Esteem, and Stress as Predictors of Adjustment to University among First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Laura J.; Reid, Graham J.; Shupak, Naomi; Cribbie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the joint effects of stress, social support, and self-esteem on adjustment to university. First-year undergraduate students (N = 115) were assessed during the first semester and again 10 weeks later, during the second semester of the academic year. Multiple regressions predicting adjustment to university from perceived…

  6. Evaluation of a multiple regression model for the forecasting of the concentrations of NOx and PM10 in Athens and Helsinki.

    PubMed

    Vlachogianni, A; Kassomenos, P; Karppinen, Ari; Karakitsios, S; Kukkonen, Jaakko

    2011-03-15

    Forecasting models based on stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) have been developed for Athens and Helsinki. The predictor variables were the hourly concentrations of pollutants (NO, NO(2), NO(x), CO, O(3), PM(2.5) and PM(10)) and the meteorological variables (ambient temperature, wind speed/direction, and relative humidity) and in case of Helsinki also Monin-Obukhov length and mixing height of the present day. The variables to be forecasted are the maximum hourly concentrations of PM(10) and NO(x), and the daily average PM(10) concentrations of the next day. The meteorological pre-processing model MPP-FMI was used for computing the Monin-Obukhov length and the mixing height. The limitations of such statistical models include the persistence of both the meteorological and air quality situation; the model cannot account for rapid changes (on a temporal scale of hours or less than a day) that are commonly associated, e.g., with meteorological fronts, or episodes of a long-range transport origin. We have selected the input data for the model from one urban background and one urban traffic station both in Athens and Helsinki, in 2005. We have used various statistical evaluation parameters to analyze the performance of the models, and inter-compared the performance of the predictions for both cities. Forecasts from the MLR model were also compared to those from an Artificial Neural Network model (ANN) to investigate, if there are substantial gains that might justify the additional computational effort. The best predictor variables for both cities were the concentrations of NO(x) and PM(10) during the evening hours as well as wind speed, and the Monin-Obukhov length. In Athens, the index of agreement (IA) for NO(x) ranged from 0.77 to 0.84 and from 0.69 to 0.72, in the warm and cold periods of the year. In Helsinki, the corresponding values of IA ranged from 0.32 to 0.82 and from 0.67 to 0.86 for the warm and cold periods. In case of Helsinki the model accuracy was

  7. New Insights into Trace Element Partitioning in Amphibole from Multiple Regression Analysis, with Application to the Magma Plumbing System of Mt. Lamington (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Humphreys, M.; Cooper, G.; Davidson, J.; Macpherson, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new multiple regression (MR) analysis of published amphibole-melt trace element partitioning data, with the aim of retrieving robust relationships between amphibole crystal-chemical compositions and trace element partition coefficients (D). We examined experimental data for calcic amphiboles of kaersutite, pargasite, tschermakite (Tsch), magnesiohornblende (MgHbl) and magnesiohastingsite (MgHst) compositions crystallized from basanitic-rhyolitic melts (n = 150). The MR analysis demonstrates the varying significance of amphibole major element components assigned to different crystallographic sites (T, M1-3, M4, A) as independent variables in controlling D, and it allows us to retrieve statistically significant relationships for REE, Y, Rb, Sr, Pb, Ti, Zr, Nb (n > 25, R2 > 0.6, p-value < 0.05). For example, DLREE are controlled by SiT, M1-3 site components and CaM4, whereas DMREE-HREE are controlled solely by M1-3 site components. Our overall results for the REE are supported by application of the lattice strain model (Blundy & Wood, 1994). A significant advantage of our study over previous work linking D to melt polymerization (e.g. Tiepolo et al., 2007) is the ability to reconstruct melt compositions from in situ amphibole compositional analyses and published D data. We applied our MR analysis to Mt. Lamington (PNG), where Mg-Hst in quenched mafic enclaves are juxtaposed with MgHbl-Tsch phenocrysts from andesitic host lavas. The results indicate that MgHbl-Tsch are crystallized from a cool, rhyolitic melt (800-900±50 ºC, 70-77±5 wt % SiO2; Ridolfi & Renzulli 2012) with lower Rb and Sr and higher Pb, relative to a hot, andesitic-dacitic melt (950-1,000±50 ºC; 60-70±5 wt % SiO2) where MgHst are crystallized. REE and Nb contents are similar in both types of melts despite higher REE and Nb in MgHbl-Tsch. Therefore, the REE compositional disparity between MgHst and MgHbl-Tsch is driven by the difference in the DREE, rather than the melt REE

  8. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  9. Building Regression Models: The Importance of Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Points out reasons for using graphical methods to teach simple and multiple regression analysis. Argues that a graphically oriented approach has considerable pedagogic advantages in the exposition of simple and multiple regression. Shows that graphical methods may play a central role in the process of building regression models. (Author/LS)

  10. The Contribution of Schooling to the Cognitive Development of Secondary Education Students in Cyprus: An Application of Regression Discontinuity with Multiple Cut-Off Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Luyten, Hans

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study in which the basic regression-discontinuity approach to assess the effect of 1 year of schooling is extended. The data analysis covers the 6 grades of secondary education in Cyprus and thus assesses the contribution of secondary education to the cognitive development of 12- to 18-year-old students. A…

  11. Novel Multiplexer to Enable Multiple-Module Imaging with Adjustable High Spatial Resolution and Predetermined Display Bandwidth for Array Medical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Titus, A H; Qu, B; Huang, Y; Wang, W; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a custom multiple-module multiplexer integrated circuit (MMMIC) that enables the combination of discrete Electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCD) based imaging modules to improve medical imaging systems. It is highly desirable to have flexible imaging systems that provide high spatial resolution over a specific region of interest (ROI) and a field of view (FOV) large enough to encompass areas of clinical interest. Also, such systems should be dynamic, i.e. should be able to maintain a specified acquisition bandwidth irrespective of the size of the imaged FOV. The MMMIC achieves these goals by 1) multiplexing the outputs of an array of imaging modules to enable a larger FOV, 2) enabling a number of binning modes for adjustable high spatial resolution, and 3) enabling selection of a subset of modules in the array to achieve ROI imaging at a predetermined display bandwidth. The MMMIC design also allows multiple MMMICs to be connected to control larger arrays. The prototype MMMIC was designed and fabricated in the ON-SEMI 0.5μm CMOS process through MOSIS (www.mosis.org). It has three 12-bit inputs, a single 12-bit output, three input enable bits, and one output enable, so that one MMMIC can control the output from three discrete imager arrays. The modular design of the MMMIC enables four identical chips, connected in a two-stage sequential arrangement, to readout a 3×3 collection of individual imaging modules. The first stage comprises three MMMICs (each connected to three of the individual imaging module), and the second stage is a single MMMIC whose 12-bit output is then sent via a CameraLink interface to the system computer. The prototype MMMIC was successfully tested using digital outputs from two EMCCD-based detectors to be used in an x-ray imaging array detector system.Finally, we show how the MMMIC can be used to extend an imaging system to include any arbitrary (M×N) array of imaging modules enabling a large FOV along with ROI imaging

  12. A field operational test on valve-regulated lead-acid absorbent-glass-mat batteries in micro-hybrid electric vehicles. Part II. Results based on multiple regression analysis and tear-down analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Karspeck, T.; Ott, C.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Stoermer, A. O.

    2011-03-01

    In the first part of this work [1] a field operational test (FOT) on micro-HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) and conventional vehicles was introduced. Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries in absorbent glass mat (AGM) technology and flooded batteries were applied. The FOT data were analyzed by kernel density estimation. In this publication multiple regression analysis is applied to the same data. Square regression models without interdependencies are used. Hereby, capacity loss serves as dependent parameter and several battery-related and vehicle-related parameters as independent variables. Battery temperature is found to be the most critical parameter. It is proven that flooded batteries operated in the conventional power system (CPS) degrade faster than VRLA-AGM batteries in the micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). A smaller number of FOT batteries were applied in a vehicle-assigned test design where the test battery is repeatedly mounted in a unique test vehicle. Thus, vehicle category and specific driving profiles can be taken into account in multiple regression. Both parameters have only secondary influence on battery degradation, instead, extended vehicle rest time linked to low mileage performance is more serious. A tear-down analysis was accomplished for selected VRLA-AGM batteries operated in the MHPS. Clear indications are found that pSoC-operation with periodically fully charging the battery (refresh charging) does not result in sulphation of the negative electrode. Instead, the batteries show corrosion of the positive grids and weak adhesion of the positive active mass.

  13. Disability and Coping as Predictors of Psychological Adjustment to Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revenson, Tracey A.; Felton, Barbara J.

    1989-01-01

    Examined degree to which self-reported functional disability and coping efforts contributed to psychological adjustment among 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients over six months. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that increases in disability were related to decreased acceptance of illness and increased negative affect, while coping…

  14. Native American Racial Identity Development and College Adjustment at Two-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a series of simultaneous multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between racial identity development and college adjustment for a sample of 76 Choctaw community college students in the South. Results indicated that 3 of the 4 racial identity statuses (dissonance, immersion-emersion, and…

  15. Urinary arsenic concentration adjustment factors and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Nermell, Barbro; Lindberg, Anna-Lena; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Berglund, Marika; Persson, Lars Ake; El Arifeen, Shams; Vahter, Marie

    2008-02-01

    This study aims at evaluating the suitability of adjusting urinary concentrations of arsenic, or any other urinary biomarker, for variations in urine dilution by creatinine and specific gravity in a malnourished population. We measured the concentrations of metabolites of inorganic arsenic, creatinine and specific gravity in spot urine samples collected from 1466 individuals, 5-88 years of age, in Matlab, rural Bangladesh, where arsenic-contaminated drinking water and malnutrition are prevalent (about 30% of the adults had body mass index (BMI) below 18.5 kg/m(2)). The urinary concentrations of creatinine were low; on average 0.55 g/L in the adolescents and adults and about 0.35 g/L in the 5-12 years old children. Therefore, adjustment by creatinine gave much higher numerical values for the urinary arsenic concentrations than did the corresponding data expressed as microg/L, adjusted by specific gravity. As evaluated by multiple regression analyses, urinary creatinine, adjusted by specific gravity, was more affected by body size, age, gender and season than was specific gravity. Furthermore, urinary creatinine was found to be significantly associated with urinary arsenic, which further disqualifies the creatinine adjustment. PMID:17900556

  16. Regression: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Regression, another mechanism studied by Sigmund Freud, has had much research, e.g., hypnotic regression, frustration regression, schizophrenic regression, and infra-human-animal regression (often directly related to fixation). Many investigators worked with hypnotic age regression, which has a long history, going back to Russian reflexologists.…

  17. Confidence Intervals, Power Calculation, and Sample Size Estimation for the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient under the Fixed and Random Regression Models: A Computer Program and Useful Standard Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Jorge L.; Stafford, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a computer package written for Mathematica, the purpose of which is to perform a number of difficult iterative functions with respect to the squared multiple correlation coefficient under the fixed and random models. These functions include computation of the confidence interval upper and lower bounds, power calculation, calculation of…

  18. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  19. Retro-regression--another important multivariate regression improvement.

    PubMed

    Randić, M

    2001-01-01

    We review the serious problem associated with instabilities of the coefficients of regression equations, referred to as the MRA (multivariate regression analysis) "nightmare of the first kind". This is manifested when in a stepwise regression a descriptor is included or excluded from a regression. The consequence is an unpredictable change of the coefficients of the descriptors that remain in the regression equation. We follow with consideration of an even more serious problem, referred to as the MRA "nightmare of the second kind", arising when optimal descriptors are selected from a large pool of descriptors. This process typically causes at different steps of the stepwise regression a replacement of several previously used descriptors by new ones. We describe a procedure that resolves these difficulties. The approach is illustrated on boiling points of nonanes which are considered (1) by using an ordered connectivity basis; (2) by using an ordering resulting from application of greedy algorithm; and (3) by using an ordering derived from an exhaustive search for optimal descriptors. A novel variant of multiple regression analysis, called retro-regression (RR), is outlined showing how it resolves the ambiguities associated with both "nightmares" of the first and the second kind of MRA. PMID:11410035

  20. A comparison of confounding adjustment methods with an application to early life determinants of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Kleinman, K; Gillman, M W

    2014-12-01

    We implemented six confounding adjustment methods: (1) covariate-adjusted regression, (2) propensity score (PS) regression, (3) PS stratification, (4) PS matching with two calipers, (5) inverse probability weighting and (6) doubly robust estimation to examine the associations between the body mass index (BMI) z-score at 3 years and two separate dichotomous exposure measures: exclusive breastfeeding v. formula only (n=437) and cesarean section v. vaginal delivery (n=1236). Data were drawn from a prospective pre-birth cohort study, Project Viva. The goal is to demonstrate the necessity and usefulness, and approaches for multiple confounding adjustment methods to analyze observational data. Unadjusted (univariate) and covariate-adjusted linear regression associations of breastfeeding with BMI z-score were -0.33 (95% CI -0.53, -0.13) and -0.24 (-0.46, -0.02), respectively. The other approaches resulted in smaller n (204-276) because of poor overlap of covariates, but CIs were of similar width except for inverse probability weighting (75% wider) and PS matching with a wider caliper (76% wider). Point estimates ranged widely, however, from -0.01 to -0.38. For cesarean section, because of better covariate overlap, the covariate-adjusted regression estimate (0.20) was remarkably robust to all adjustment methods, and the widths of the 95% CIs differed less than in the breastfeeding example. Choice of covariate adjustment method can matter. Lack of overlap in covariate structure between exposed and unexposed participants in observational studies can lead to erroneous covariate-adjusted estimates and confidence intervals. We recommend inspecting covariate overlap and using multiple confounding adjustment methods. Similar results bring reassurance. Contradictory results suggest issues with either the data or the analytic method. PMID:25171142

  1. A comparison of confounding adjustment methods with an application to early life determinants of childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Ken; Gillman, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    We implemented 6 confounding adjustment methods: 1) covariate-adjusted regression, 2) propensity score (PS) regression, 3) PS stratification, 4) PS matching with two calipers, 5) inverse-probability-weighting, and 6) doubly-robust estimation to examine the associations between the BMI z-score at 3 years and two separate dichotomous exposure measures: exclusive breastfeeding versus formula only (N = 437) and cesarean section versus vaginal delivery (N = 1236). Data were drawn from a prospective pre-birth cohort study, Project Viva. The goal is to demonstrate the necessity and usefulness, and approaches for multiple confounding adjustment methods to analyze observational data. Unadjusted (univariate) and covariate-adjusted linear regression associations of breastfeeding with BMI z-score were −0.33 (95% CI −0.53, −0.13) and −0.24 (−0.46, −0.02), respectively. The other approaches resulted in smaller N (204 to 276) because of poor overlap of covariates, but CIs were of similar width except for inverse-probability-weighting (75% wider) and PS matching with a wider caliper (76% wider). Point estimates ranged widely, however, from −0.01 to −0.38. For cesarean section, because of better covariate overlap, the covariate-adjusted regression estimate (0.20) was remarkably robust to all adjustment methods, and the widths of the 95% CIs differed less than in the breastfeeding example. Choice of covariate adjustment method can matter. Lack of overlap in covariate structure between exposed and unexposed participants in observational studies can lead to erroneous covariate-adjusted estimates and confidence intervals. We recommend inspecting covariate overlap and using multiple confounding adjustment methods. Similar results bring reassurance. Contradictory results suggest issues with either the data or the analytic method. PMID:25171142

  2. Canonical variate regression.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chongliang; Liu, Jin; Dey, Dipak K; Chen, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In many fields, multi-view datasets, measuring multiple distinct but interrelated sets of characteristics on the same set of subjects, together with data on certain outcomes or phenotypes, are routinely collected. The objective in such a problem is often two-fold: both to explore the association structures of multiple sets of measurements and to develop a parsimonious model for predicting the future outcomes. We study a unified canonical variate regression framework to tackle the two problems simultaneously. The proposed criterion integrates multiple canonical correlation analysis with predictive modeling, balancing between the association strength of the canonical variates and their joint predictive power on the outcomes. Moreover, the proposed criterion seeks multiple sets of canonical variates simultaneously to enable the examination of their joint effects on the outcomes, and is able to handle multivariate and non-Gaussian outcomes. An efficient algorithm based on variable splitting and Lagrangian multipliers is proposed. Simulation studies show the superior performance of the proposed approach. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in an [Formula: see text] intercross mice study and an alcohol dependence study. PMID:26861909

  3. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth: multiple-regression modeling of observational clinical data from The National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Benjamin, Paul; Flink, Håkan; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Johnson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. We used actual clinical data to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with restoration of enamel caries, while accounting for other factors. Methods We combined data from a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network observational study of consecutive restorations placed in previously unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and practice/demographic data from 229 participating network dentists. Analysis of variance and logistic regression, using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and variable selection within blocks, were used to test the hypothesis that patient, dentist, and practice characteristics were associated with variations in enamel restorations of occlusal and proximal caries compared to dentin lesions, accounting for dentist and patient clustering. Results Network dentists from 5 regions placed 6,891 restorations involving occlusal and/or proximal caries lesions. Enamel restorations accounted for 16% of enrolled occlusal caries lesions and 6% of enrolled proximal caries lesions. Enamel occlusal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by patient age and race/ethnicity, dentist use of caries risk assessment, network region, and practice type. Enamel proximal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by dentist race/ethnicity, network region, and practice type. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Identifying patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with enamel caries restorations can guide strategies to improve provider adherence to evidence-based clinical recommendations. PMID:25000667

  4. Stepwise versus Hierarchical Regression: Pros and Cons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mitzi

    2007-01-01

    Multiple regression is commonly used in social and behavioral data analysis. In multiple regression contexts, researchers are very often interested in determining the "best" predictors in the analysis. This focus may stem from a need to identify those predictors that are supportive of theory. Alternatively, the researcher may simply be interested…

  5. Regression Analysis: Legal Applications in Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frizell, Julie A.; Shippen, Benjamin S., Jr.; Luna, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews multiple regression analysis, describes how its results should be interpreted, and instructs institutional researchers on how to conduct such analyses using an example focused on faculty pay equity between men and women. The use of multiple regression analysis will be presented as a method with which to compare salaries of…

  6. The Regression Trunk Approach to Discover Treatment Covariate Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusseldorp, Elise; Meulman, Jacqueline J.

    2004-01-01

    The regression trunk approach (RTA) is an integration of regression trees and multiple linear regression analysis. In this paper RTA is used to discover treatment covariate interactions, in the regression of one continuous variable on a treatment variable with "multiple" covariates. The performance of RTA is compared to the classical method of…

  7. Adjustment disorder

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum ...

  8. Regression and Data Mining Methods for Analyses of Multiple Rare Variants in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 Mini-Exome Data

    PubMed Central

    Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Brennan, Jennifer S.; Bull, Shelley B; Culverhouse, Robert; Kim, Yoonhee; Jiang, Yuan; Jung, Jeesun; Li, Qing; Lamina, Claudia; Liu, Ying; Mägi, Reedik; Niu, Yue S.; Simpson, Claire L.; Wang, Libo; Yilmaz, Yildiz E.; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Zhaogong

    2012-01-01

    Group 14 of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 examined several issues related to analysis of complex traits using DNA sequence data. These issues included novel methods for analyzing rare genetic variants in an aggregated manner (often termed collapsing rare variants), evaluation of various study designs to increase power to detect effects of rare variants, and the use of machine learning approaches to model highly complex heterogeneous traits. Various published and novel methods for analyzing traits with extreme locus and allelic heterogeneity were applied to the simulated quantitative and disease phenotypes. Overall, we conclude that power is (as expected) dependent on locus-specific heritability or contribution to disease risk, large samples will be required to detect rare causal variants with small effect sizes, extreme phenotype sampling designs may increase power for smaller laboratory costs, methods that allow joint analysis of multiple variants per gene or pathway are more powerful in general than analyses of individual rare variants, population-specific analyses can be optimal when different subpopulations harbor private causal mutations, and machine learning methods may be useful for selecting subsets of predictors for follow-up in the presence of extreme locus heterogeneity and large numbers of potential predictors. PMID:22128066

  9. Cactus: An Introduction to Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2008-01-01

    When the author first used "VisiCalc," the author thought it a very useful tool when he had the formulas. But how could he design a spreadsheet if there was no known formula for the quantities he was trying to predict? A few months later, the author relates he learned to use multiple linear regression software and suddenly it all clicked into…

  10. Kernel Continuum Regression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hee; Liu, Yufeng

    2013-12-01

    The continuum regression technique provides an appealing regression framework connecting ordinary least squares, partial least squares and principal component regression in one family. It offers some insight on the underlying regression model for a given application. Moreover, it helps to provide deep understanding of various regression techniques. Despite the useful framework, however, the current development on continuum regression is only for linear regression. In many applications, nonlinear regression is necessary. The extension of continuum regression from linear models to nonlinear models using kernel learning is considered. The proposed kernel continuum regression technique is quite general and can handle very flexible regression model estimation. An efficient algorithm is developed for fast implementation. Numerical examples have demonstrated the usefulness of the proposed technique. PMID:24058224

  11. Simultaneous determination of hydroquinone, resorcinol, phenol, m-cresol and p-cresol in untreated air samples using spectrofluorimetry and a custom multiple linear regression-successive projection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E; Lista, Adriana G; Fragoso, Wallace D; Pontes, Márcio J C; Araújo, Mário C U; Band, Beatriz S Fernández

    2010-12-15

    In this study, a novel, simple, and efficient spectrofluorimetric method to determine directly and simultaneously five phenolic compounds (hydroquinone, resorcinol, phenol, m-cresol and p-cresol) in air samples is presented. For this purpose, variable selection by the successive projections algorithm (SPA) is used in order to obtain simple multiple linear regression (MLR) models based on a small subset of wavelengths. For comparison, partial least square (PLS) regression is also employed in full-spectrum. The concentrations of the calibration matrix ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 mg L(-1) for hydroquinone, from 0.05 to 0.6 mg L(-1) for resorcinol, and from 0.05 to 0.4 mg L(-1) for phenol, m-cresol and p-cresol; incidentally, such ranges are in accordance with the Argentinean environmental legislation. To verify the accuracy of the proposed method a recovery study on real air samples of smoking environment was carried out with satisfactory results (94-104%). The advantage of the proposed method is that it requires only spectrofluorimetric measurements of samples and chemometric modeling for simultaneous determination of five phenols. With it, air is simply sampled and no pre-treatment sample is needed (i.e., separation steps and derivatization reagents are avoided) that means a great saving of time. PMID:21111140

  12. Climate variations and salmonellosis transmission in Adelaide, South Australia: a comparison between regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Bi, Peng; Hiller, Janet

    2008-01-01

    This is the first study to identify appropriate regression models for the association between climate variation and salmonellosis transmission. A comparison between different regression models was conducted using surveillance data in Adelaide, South Australia. By using notified salmonellosis cases and climatic variables from the Adelaide metropolitan area over the period 1990-2003, four regression methods were examined: standard Poisson regression, autoregressive adjusted Poisson regression, multiple linear regression, and a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model. Notified salmonellosis cases in 2004 were used to test the forecasting ability of the four models. Parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit and forecasting ability of the four regression models were compared. Temperatures occurring 2 weeks prior to cases were positively associated with cases of salmonellosis. Rainfall was also inversely related to the number of cases. The comparison of the goodness-of-fit and forecasting ability suggest that the SARIMA model is better than the other three regression models. Temperature and rainfall may be used as climatic predictors of salmonellosis cases in regions with climatic characteristics similar to those of Adelaide. The SARIMA model could, thus, be adopted to quantify the relationship between climate variations and salmonellosis transmission.

  13. Adjustable microforceps.

    PubMed

    Bao, J Y

    1991-04-01

    The commonly used microforceps have a much greater opening distance and spring resistance than needed. A piece of plastic ring or rubber band can be used to adjust the opening distance and reduce most of the spring resistance, making the user feel more comfortable and less fatigued. PMID:2051437

  14. Regression Computer Programs for Setwise Regression and Three Related Analysis of Variance Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John D.; Lindem, Alfred C.

    Four computer programs using the general purpose multiple linear regression program have been developed. Setwise regression analysis is a stepwise procedure for sets of variables; there will be as many steps as there are sets. Covarmlt allows a solution to the analysis of covariance design with multiple covariates. A third program has three…

  15. LRGS: Linear Regression by Gibbs Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2016-02-01

    LRGS (Linear Regression by Gibbs Sampling) implements a Gibbs sampler to solve the problem of multivariate linear regression with uncertainties in all measured quantities and intrinsic scatter. LRGS extends an algorithm by Kelly (2007) that used Gibbs sampling for performing linear regression in fairly general cases in two ways: generalizing the procedure for multiple response variables, and modeling the prior distribution of covariates using a Dirichlet process.

  16. Observational Studies: Matching or Regression?

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Ruta; Logan, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    In observational studies with an aim of assessing treatment effect or comparing groups of patients, several approaches could be used. Often, baseline characteristics of patients may be imbalanced between groups, and adjustments are needed to account for this. It can be accomplished either via appropriate regression modeling or, alternatively, by conducting a matched pairs study. The latter is often chosen because it makes groups appear to be comparable. In this article we considered these 2 options in terms of their ability to detect a treatment effect in time-to-event studies. Our investigation shows that a Cox regression model applied to the entire cohort is often a more powerful tool in detecting treatment effect as compared with a matched study. Real data from a hematopoietic cell transplantation study is used as an example. PMID:26712591

  17. Interquantile Shrinkage in Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liewen; Wang, Huixia Judy; Bondell, Howard D.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional analysis using quantile regression typically focuses on fitting the regression model at different quantiles separately. However, in situations where the quantile coefficients share some common feature, joint modeling of multiple quantiles to accommodate the commonality often leads to more efficient estimation. One example of common features is that a predictor may have a constant effect over one region of quantile levels but varying effects in other regions. To automatically perform estimation and detection of the interquantile commonality, we develop two penalization methods. When the quantile slope coefficients indeed do not change across quantile levels, the proposed methods will shrink the slopes towards constant and thus improve the estimation efficiency. We establish the oracle properties of the two proposed penalization methods. Through numerical investigations, we demonstrate that the proposed methods lead to estimations with competitive or higher efficiency than the standard quantile regression estimation in finite samples. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. PMID:24363546

  18. Survival Data and Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    We start this chapter by introducing some basic elements for the analysis of censored survival data. Then we focus on right censored data and develop two types of regression models. The first one concerns the so-called accelerated failure time models (AFT), which are parametric models where a function of a parameter depends linearly on the covariables. The second one is a semiparametric model, where the covariables enter in a multiplicative form in the expression of the hazard rate function. The main statistical tool for analysing these regression models is the maximum likelihood methodology and, in spite we recall some essential results about the ML theory, we refer to the chapter "Logistic Regression" for a more detailed presentation.

  19. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  20. A comparative evaluation of methods of adjusting GPA for differences in grade assignment practices.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pui-Wa; Bassiri, Dina; Schulz, E Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Numerous methods have been proposed for constructing an adjusted grade point average (adjusted-GPA) that controls for differences in grading standards across college courses and departments. Compared to the raw GPA, adjusted-GPA measures are generally more predictable from preadmissions variables, such as standardized tests and high school achievement. Relative rankings of students on adjusted-GPA measures are also more consistent with their relative standings within courses. This study compared the performance of 4 polytomous IRT and 3 linear models for constructing adjusted-GPA measures. Unlike previous studies, the regression weights of predictor variables and the course parameter estimates used to compute adjusted-GPA were cross-validated. Adjusted-GPA retained noticeable advantages over raw GPA on cross-validation. The largest advantages were seen in the multiple correlation of adjusted-GPA with preadmission variables, when adjusted-GPA was constructed with the rating scale and partial credit IRT models. The cross-validity of adjusted-GPA was the weakest with the graded response model. PMID:12700432

  1. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  2. Orthogonal Regression and Equivariance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankmeyer, Eric

    Ordinary least-squares regression treats the variables asymmetrically, designating a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. When it is not obvious how to make this distinction, a researcher may prefer to use orthogonal regression, which treats the variables symmetrically. However, the usual procedure for orthogonal regression is…

  3. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  4. Ratios as a size adjustment in morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, G H; Gelvin, B R; Hartman, S E

    1993-08-01

    Simple ratios in which a measurement variable is divided by a size variable are commonly used but known to be inadequate for eliminating size correlations from morphometric data. Deficiencies in the simple ratio can be alleviated by incorporating regression coefficients describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables. Recommendations have included: 1) subtracting the regression intercept to force the bivariate relationship through the origin (intercept-adjusted ratios); 2) exponentiating either the measurement or the size variable using an allometry coefficient to achieve linearity (allometrically adjusted ratios); or 3) both subtracting the intercept and exponentiating (fully adjusted ratios). These three strategies for deriving size-adjusted ratios imply different data models for describing the bivariate relationship between the measurement and size variables (i.e., the linear, simple allometric, and full allometric models, respectively). Algebraic rearrangement of the equation associated with each data model leads to a correctly formulated adjusted ratio whose expected value is constant (i.e., size correlation is eliminated). Alternatively, simple algebra can be used to derive an expected value function for assessing whether any proposed ratio formula is effective in eliminating size correlations. Some published ratio adjustments were incorrectly formulated as indicated by expected values that remain a function of size after ratio transformation. Regression coefficients incorporated into adjusted ratios must be estimated using least-squares regression of the measurement variable on the size variable. Use of parameters estimated by any other regression technique (e.g., major axis or reduced major axis) results in residual correlations between size and the adjusted measurement variable. Correctly formulated adjusted ratios, whose parameters are estimated by least-squares methods, do control for size correlations. The size-adjusted

  5. Interpersonal Communication and Sexual Adjustment: The Role of Understanding and Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Purnine, Daniel M.; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of interpersonal communication on sexual adjustment in cohabiting heterosexual couples was investigated. Male and female partners from 76 heterosexual couples independently completed measures of their own and their partners’ sexual preferences, as well as measures of sexual and general relationship adjustment, sexual difficulties, marital role preferences, depression, and social desirability. Results indicated that sexual satisfaction in both partners was associated with men’s understanding of their partner’s preferences and agreement between their preferences. The influential role of men’s understanding was supported by hierarchical regression, convergent and discriminant evidence, and multiple regression models that accounted for 51% and 63% of variance in men’s and women’s sexual satisfaction. General relationship adjustment of both partners was associated with women’s understanding of men’s marital role preferences. An explanation of Understanding’s function is proposed, accounting for gender differences within and across sexual and general realms of relating. PMID:9420363

  6. Multinomial logistic regression ensembles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyewon; Ahn, Hongshik; Moon, Hojin; Kodell, Ralph L; Chen, James J

    2013-05-01

    This article proposes a method for multiclass classification problems using ensembles of multinomial logistic regression models. A multinomial logit model is used as a base classifier in ensembles from random partitions of predictors. The multinomial logit model can be applied to each mutually exclusive subset of the feature space without variable selection. By combining multiple models the proposed method can handle a huge database without a constraint needed for analyzing high-dimensional data, and the random partition can improve the prediction accuracy by reducing the correlation among base classifiers. The proposed method is implemented using R, and the performance including overall prediction accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for each category is evaluated on two real data sets and simulation data sets. To investigate the quality of prediction in terms of sensitivity and specificity, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) is also examined. The performance of the proposed model is compared to a single multinomial logit model and it shows a substantial improvement in overall prediction accuracy. The proposed method is also compared with other classification methods such as the random forest, support vector machines, and random multinomial logit model. PMID:23611203

  7. Hybrid fuzzy regression with trapezoidal fuzzy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghnia, T.; Danesh, S.; Maleki, A.

    2011-12-01

    In this regard, this research deals with a method for hybrid fuzzy least-squares regression. The extension of symmetric triangular fuzzy coefficients to asymmetric trapezoidal fuzzy coefficients is considered as an effective measure for removing unnecessary fuzziness of the linear fuzzy model. First, trapezoidal fuzzy variable is applied to derive a bivariate regression model. In the following, normal equations are formulated to solve the four parts of hybrid regression coefficients. Also the model is extended to multiple regression analysis. Eventually, method is compared with Y-H.O. chang's model.

  8. A novel multiple drug release system in vitro based on adjusting swelling core of emulsion electrospun nanofibers with core-sheath structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhou; Li, Zong; Shao, Pengyu; Hao, Shilei; Wang, Wei; Yang, Qian; Wang, Bochu

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a novel drug delivery system with the swelling core for differential release of multiple drugs by emulsion electrospinning, in which the aqueous phase is composed of polyvinyl alcohol and the oil phase consists of poly(ε-caprolactone). The microscopy images indicate that the W/O nanofibers with swelling core structure are successfully prepared and the model drugs, Rhodamine B and bovine serum albumin, were encapsulated in the fibers. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that this core-sheath structure could significantly alleviate the initial drug burst release and provided a differential diffusion pathway to release. It could be found that the postponement of the maximum accumulated release of bovine serum albumin was found due to the presence of sodium citrate and different types of polyvinyl alcohol. This study would provide a basis for optimization of encapsulation conditions to control the release of multiple agents and ultimately be applied in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25280686

  9. Harmonic regression and scale stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Haberman, Shelby J

    2013-10-01

    Monitoring a very frequently administered educational test with a relatively short history of stable operation imposes a number of challenges. Test scores usually vary by season, and the frequency of administration of such educational tests is also seasonal. Although it is important to react to unreasonable changes in the distributions of test scores in a timely fashion, it is not a simple matter to ascertain what sort of distribution is really unusual. Many commonly used approaches for seasonal adjustment are designed for time series with evenly spaced observations that span many years and, therefore, are inappropriate for data from such educational tests. Harmonic regression, a seasonal-adjustment method, can be useful in monitoring scale stability when the number of years available is limited and when the observations are unevenly spaced. Additional forms of adjustments can be included to account for variability in test scores due to different sources of population variations. To illustrate, real data are considered from an international language assessment. PMID:24092490

  10. The Relation of Marital Adjustment and Family Functions With Quality of Life in Women

    PubMed Central

    Basharpoor, Sajjad; Sheykholeslami, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Given the immense importance of marital relationships in the quality of life, this research was conducted in order to investigate the relationships between marital adjustment and family functions with quality of life in women. The design of the current study was correlational. Seven hundred and thirty women were selected randomly among all women living in the province of Western Azerbaijan (Iran) and participated in this study. The sample responded to the Family Assessment Device, Dyadic Adjustment scale and Quality of Life questionnaire, individually in their homes. Collected data were analyzed by Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. The results showed that all dimensions of family functions and dyadic adjustment were positively correlated with quality of life in women. Results of multiple regression also revealed that 33 percent of total quality of life can be explained by family functions and 24 percent of this variable can be explained by dyadic adjustment. Our study demonstrated that women’s quality of life was affected by family functions and marital adjustment in family. PMID:27247668

  11. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  12. Morse-Smale Regression

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Samuel; Rübel, Oliver; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel partition-based regression approach that incorporates topological information. Partition-based regression typically introduce a quality-of-fit-driven decomposition of the domain. The emphasis in this work is on a topologically meaningful segmentation. Thus, the proposed regression approach is based on a segmentation induced by a discrete approximation of the Morse-Smale complex. This yields a segmentation with partitions corresponding to regions of the function with a single minimum and maximum that are often well approximated by a linear model. This approach yields regression models that are amenable to interpretation and have good predictive capacity. Typically, regression estimates are quantified by their geometrical accuracy. For the proposed regression, an important aspect is the quality of the segmentation itself. Thus, this paper introduces a new criterion that measures the topological accuracy of the estimate. The topological accuracy provides a complementary measure to the classical geometrical error measures and is very sensitive to over-fitting. The Morse-Smale regression is compared to state-of-the-art approaches in terms of geometry and topology and yields comparable or improved fits in many cases. Finally, a detailed study on climate-simulation data demonstrates the application of the Morse-Smale regression. Supplementary materials are available online and contain an implementation of the proposed approach in the R package msr, an analysis and simulations on the stability of the Morse-Smale complex approximation and additional tables for the climate-simulation study. PMID:23687424

  13. Morse–Smale Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Samuel; Rubel, Oliver; Bremer, Peer -Timo; Pascucci, Valerio; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-19

    This paper introduces a novel partition-based regression approach that incorporates topological information. Partition-based regression typically introduces a quality-of-fit-driven decomposition of the domain. The emphasis in this work is on a topologically meaningful segmentation. Thus, the proposed regression approach is based on a segmentation induced by a discrete approximation of the Morse–Smale complex. This yields a segmentation with partitions corresponding to regions of the function with a single minimum and maximum that are often well approximated by a linear model. This approach yields regression models that are amenable to interpretation and have good predictive capacity. Typically, regression estimates are quantified by their geometrical accuracy. For the proposed regression, an important aspect is the quality of the segmentation itself. Thus, this article introduces a new criterion that measures the topological accuracy of the estimate. The topological accuracy provides a complementary measure to the classical geometrical error measures and is very sensitive to overfitting. The Morse–Smale regression is compared to state-of-the-art approaches in terms of geometry and topology and yields comparable or improved fits in many cases. Finally, a detailed study on climate-simulation data demonstrates the application of the Morse–Smale regression. Supplementary Materials are available online and contain an implementation of the proposed approach in the R package msr, an analysis and simulations on the stability of the Morse–Smale complex approximation, and additional tables for the climate-simulation study.

  14. An optimization model for regional air pollutants mitigation based on the economic structure adjustment and multiple measures: A case study in Urumqi city, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Xie, Yulei; Huang, Guohe; Dong, Changjuan; Yin, Jianguang

    2016-11-01

    A model based on economic structure adjustment and pollutants mitigation was proposed and applied in Urumqi. Best-worst case analysis and scenarios analysis were performed in the model to guarantee the parameters accuracy, and to analyze the effect of changes of emission reduction styles. Results indicated that pollutant-mitigations of electric power industry, iron and steel industry, and traffic relied mainly on technological transformation measures, engineering transformation measures and structure emission reduction measures, respectively; Pollutant-mitigations of cement industry relied mainly on structure emission reduction measures and technological transformation measures; Pollutant-mitigations of thermal industry relied mainly on the four mitigation measures. They also indicated that structure emission reduction was a better measure for pollutants mitigation of Urumqi. Iron and steel industry contributed greatly in SO2, NOx and PM (particulate matters) emission reduction and should be given special attention in pollutants emission reduction. In addition, the scales of iron and steel industry should be reduced with the decrease of SO2 mitigation amounts. The scales of traffic and electric power industry should be reduced with the decrease of NOx mitigation amounts, and the scales of cement industry and iron and steel industry should be reduced with the decrease of PM mitigation amounts. The study can provide references of pollutants mitigation schemes to decision-makers for regional economic and environmental development in the 12th Five-Year Plan on National Economic and Social Development of Urumqi. PMID:27454097

  15. Comparison of a neural net-based QSAR algorithm (PCANN) with Hologram- and multiple linear regression-based QSAR approaches: application to 1,4-dihydropyridine-based calcium channel antagonists.

    PubMed

    Viswanadhan, V N; Mueller, G A; Basak, S C; Weinstein, J N

    2001-01-01

    A QSAR algorithm (PCANN) has been developed and applied to a set of calcium channel blockers which are of special interest because of their role in cardiac disease and also because many of them interact with P-glycoprotein, a membrane protein associated with multidrug resistance to anticancer agents. A database of 46 1,4-dihydropyridines with known Ca2+ channel binding affinities was employed for the present analysis. The QSAR algorithm can be summarized as follows: (1) a set of 90 graph theoretic and information theoretic descriptors representing various structural and topological characteristics was calculated for each of the 1,4-dihydropyridines and (2) principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress these 90 into the eight best orthogonal composite descriptors for the database. These eight sufficed to explain 96% of the variance in the original descriptor set. (3) Two important empirical descriptors, the Leo-Hansch lipophilic constant and the Hammet electronic parameter, were added to the list of eight. (4) The 10 resulting descriptors were used as inputs to a back-propagation neural network whose output was the predicted binding affinity. (5) The predictive ability of the network was assessed by cross-validation. A comparison of the present approach with two other QSAR approaches (multiple linear regression using the same variables and a Hologram QSAR model) is made and shows that the PCANN approach can yield better predictions, once the right network configuration is identified. The present approach (PCANN) may prove useful for rapid assessment of the potential for biological activity when dealing with large chemical libraries. PMID:11410024

  16. Penalized count data regression with application to hospital stay after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Ma, Shuangge; Zappitelli, Michael; Parikh, Chirag; Wang, Ching-Yun; Devarajan, Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery may lead to poor outcomes such as acute kidney injury (AKI) and prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). Plasma and urine biomarkers may help with early identification and prediction of these adverse clinical outcomes. In a recent multi-center study, 311 children undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled to evaluate multiple biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of AKI and other clinical outcomes. LOS is often analyzed as count data, thus Poisson regression and negative binomial (NB) regression are common choices for developing predictive models. With many correlated prognostic factors and biomarkers, variable selection is an important step. The present paper proposes new variable selection methods for Poisson and NB regression. We evaluated regularized regression through penalized likelihood function. We first extend the elastic net (Enet) Poisson to two penalized Poisson regression: Mnet, a combination of minimax concave and ridge penalties; and Snet, a combination of smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD) and ridge penalties. Furthermore, we extend the above methods to the penalized NB regression. For the Enet, Mnet, and Snet penalties (EMSnet), we develop a unified algorithm to estimate the parameters and conduct variable selection simultaneously. Simulation studies show that the proposed methods have advantages with highly correlated predictors, against some of the competing methods. Applying the proposed methods to the aforementioned data, it is discovered that early postoperative urine biomarkers including NGAL, IL18, and KIM-1 independently predict LOS, after adjusting for risk and biomarker variables. PMID:24742430

  17. Adjustment of geochemical background by robust multivariate statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional analyses of exploration geochemical data assume that the background is a constant or slowly changing value, equivalent to a plane or a smoothly curved surface. However, it is better to regard the geochemical background as a rugged surface, varying with changes in geology and environment. This rugged surface can be estimated from observed geological, geochemical and environmental properties by using multivariate statistics. A method of background adjustment was developed and applied to groundwater and stream sediment reconnaissance data collected from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Source-rock lithology appears to be a dominant factor controlling the chemical composition of groundwater or stream sediments. The most efficacious adjustment procedure is to regress uranium concentration on selected geochemical and environmental variables for each lithologic unit, and then to delineate anomalies by a common threshold set as a multiple of the standard deviation of the combined residuals. Robust versions of regression and RQ-mode principal components analysis techniques were used rather than ordinary techniques to guard against distortion caused by outliers Anomalies delineated by this background adjustment procedure correspond with uranium prospects much better than do anomalies delineated by conventional procedures. The procedure should be applicable to geochemical exploration at different scales for other metals. ?? 1985.

  18. Boosted Beta Regression

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Matthias; Wickler, Florian; Maloney, Kelly O.; Mitchell, Richard; Fenske, Nora; Mayr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1). Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures. PMID:23626706

  19. George: Gaussian Process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    George is a fast and flexible library, implemented in C++ with Python bindings, for Gaussian Process regression useful for accounting for correlated noise in astronomical datasets, including those for transiting exoplanet discovery and characterization and stellar population modeling.

  20. Multivariate Regression with Calibration*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method named calibrated multivariate regression (CMR) for fitting high dimensional multivariate regression models. Compared to existing methods, CMR calibrates the regularization for each regression task with respect to its noise level so that it is simultaneously tuning insensitive and achieves an improved finite-sample performance. Computationally, we develop an efficient smoothed proximal gradient algorithm which has a worst-case iteration complexity O(1/ε), where ε is a pre-specified numerical accuracy. Theoretically, we prove that CMR achieves the optimal rate of convergence in parameter estimation. We illustrate the usefulness of CMR by thorough numerical simulations and show that CMR consistently outperforms other high dimensional multivariate regression methods. We also apply CMR on a brain activity prediction problem and find that CMR is as competitive as the handcrafted model created by human experts. PMID:25620861

  1. Regression versus No Regression in the Autistic Disorder: Developmental Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernabei, P.; Cerquiglini, A.; Cortesi, F.; D' Ardia, C.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental regression is a complex phenomenon which occurs in 20-49% of the autistic population. Aim of the study was to assess possible differences in the development of regressed and non-regressed autistic preschoolers. We longitudinally studied 40 autistic children (18 regressed, 22 non-regressed) aged 2-6 years. The following developmental…

  2. An Effect Size for Regression Predictors in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aloe, Ariel M.; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2012-01-01

    A new effect size representing the predictive power of an independent variable from a multiple regression model is presented. The index, denoted as r[subscript sp], is the semipartial correlation of the predictor with the outcome of interest. This effect size can be computed when multiple predictor variables are included in the regression model…

  3. Practical Session: Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    An exercise is proposed to illustrate the logistic regression. One investigates the different risk factors in the apparition of coronary heart disease. It has been proposed in Chapter 5 of the book of D.G. Kleinbaum and M. Klein, "Logistic Regression", Statistics for Biology and Health, Springer Science Business Media, LLC (2010) and also by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr341.pdf). This example is based on data given in the file evans.txt coming from http://www.sph.emory.edu/dkleinb/logreg3.htm#data.

  4. The Application of the Ten Group Classification System (TGCS) in Caesarean Delivery Case Mix Adjustment. A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Maso, Gianpaolo; Alberico, Salvatore; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ronfani, Luca; Montico, Marcella; Businelli, Caterina; Soini, Valentina; Piccoli, Monica; Gigli, Carmine; Domini, Daniele; Fiscella, Claudio; Casarsa, Sara; Zompicchiatti, Carlo; De Agostinis, Michela; D'Atri, Attilio; Mugittu, Raffaela; La Valle, Santo; Di Leonardo, Cristina; Adamo, Valter; Smiroldo, Silvia; Frate, Giovanni Del; Olivuzzi, Monica; Giove, Silvio; Parente, Maria; Bassini, Daniele; Melazzini, Simona; Guaschino, Secondo; De Seta, Francesco; Demarini, Sergio; Travan, Laura; Marchesoni, Diego; Rossi, Alberto; Simon, Giorgio; Zicari, Sandro; Tamburlini, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Background Caesarean delivery (CD) rates are commonly used as an indicator of quality in obstetric care and risk adjustment evaluation is recommended to assess inter-institutional variations. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the Ten Group classification system (TGCS) can be used in case-mix adjustment. Methods Standardized data on 15,255 deliveries from 11 different regional centers were prospectively collected. Crude Risk Ratios of CDs were calculated for each center. Two multiple logistic regression models were herein considered by using: Model 1- maternal (age, Body Mass Index), obstetric variables (gestational age, fetal presentation, single or multiple, previous scar, parity, neonatal birth weight) and presence of risk factors; Model 2- TGCS either with or without maternal characteristics and presence of risk factors. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves of the multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of each model. The null hypothesis that Areas under ROC Curve (AUC) were not different from each other was verified with a Chi Square test and post hoc pairwise comparisons by using a Bonferroni correction. Results Crude evaluation of CD rates showed all centers had significantly higher Risk Ratios than the referent. Both multiple logistic regression models reduced these variations. However the two methods ranked institutions differently: model 1 and model 2 (adjusted for TGCS) identified respectively nine and eight centers with significantly higher CD rates than the referent with slightly different AUCs (0.8758 and 0.8929 respectively). In the adjusted model for TGCS and maternal characteristics/presence of risk factors, three centers had CD rates similar to the referent with the best AUC (0.9024). Conclusions The TGCS might be considered as a reliable variable to adjust CD rates. The addition of maternal characteristics and risk factors to TGCS substantially increase the predictive

  5. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive connection.…

  6. Modern Regression Discontinuity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a detailed discussion of the theory and practice of modern regression discontinuity (RD) analysis for estimating the effects of interventions or treatments. Part 1 briefly chronicles the history of RD analysis and summarizes its past applications. Part 2 explains how in theory an RD analysis can identify an average effect of…

  7. CORRELATION AND REGRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Webcast entitled Statistical Tools for Making Sense of Data, by the National Nutrient Criteria Support Center, N-STEPS (Nutrients-Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership. The section "Correlation and Regression" provides an overview of these two techniques in the context of nut...

  8. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma regression

    PubMed Central

    Brodeur, Garrett M.; Bagatell, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic and biological studies of neuroblastoma have shed light on the dramatic heterogeneity in the clinical behaviour of this disease, which spans from spontaneous regression or differentiation in some patients, to relentless disease progression in others, despite intensive multimodality therapy. This evidence also suggests several possible mechanisms to explain the phenomena of spontaneous regression in neuroblastomas, including neurotrophin deprivation, humoral or cellular immunity, loss of telomerase activity and alterations in epigenetic regulation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of spontaneous regression might help to identify optimal therapeutic approaches for patients with these tumours. Currently, the most druggable mechanism is the delayed activation of developmentally programmed cell death regulated by the tropomyosin receptor kinase A pathway. Indeed, targeted therapy aimed at inhibiting neurotrophin receptors might be used in lieu of conventional chemotherapy or radiation in infants with biologically favourable tumours that require treatment. Alternative approaches consist of breaking immune tolerance to tumour antigens or activating neurotrophin receptor pathways to induce neuronal differentiation. These approaches are likely to be most effective against biologically favourable tumours, but they might also provide insights into treatment of biologically unfavourable tumours. We describe the different mechanisms of spontaneous neuroblastoma regression and the consequent therapeutic approaches. PMID:25331179

  9. Bayesian ARTMAP for regression.

    PubMed

    Sasu, L M; Andonie, R

    2013-10-01

    Bayesian ARTMAP (BA) is a recently introduced neural architecture which uses a combination of Fuzzy ARTMAP competitive learning and Bayesian learning. Training is generally performed online, in a single-epoch. During training, BA creates input data clusters as Gaussian categories, and also infers the conditional probabilities between input patterns and categories, and between categories and classes. During prediction, BA uses Bayesian posterior probability estimation. So far, BA was used only for classification. The goal of this paper is to analyze the efficiency of BA for regression problems. Our contributions are: (i) we generalize the BA algorithm using the clustering functionality of both ART modules, and name it BA for Regression (BAR); (ii) we prove that BAR is a universal approximator with the best approximation property. In other words, BAR approximates arbitrarily well any continuous function (universal approximation) and, for every given continuous function, there is one in the set of BAR approximators situated at minimum distance (best approximation); (iii) we experimentally compare the online trained BAR with several neural models, on the following standard regression benchmarks: CPU Computer Hardware, Boston Housing, Wisconsin Breast Cancer, and Communities and Crime. Our results show that BAR is an appropriate tool for regression tasks, both for theoretical and practical reasons. PMID:23665468

  10. Changes in social adjustment with cognitive processing therapy: effects of treatment and association with PTSD symptom change.

    PubMed

    Monson, Candice M; Macdonald, Alexandra; Vorstenbosch, Valerie; Shnaider, Philippe; Goldstein, Elizabeth S R; Ferrier-Auerbach, Amanda G; Mocciola, Katharine E

    2012-10-01

    The current study sought to determine if different spheres of social adjustment, social and leisure, family, and work and income improved immediately following a course of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) when compared with those on a waiting list in a sample of 46 U.S. veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We also sought to determine whether changes in different PTSD symptom clusters were associated with changes in these spheres of social adjustment. Overall social adjustment, extended family relationships, and housework completion significantly improved in the CPT versus waiting-list condition, η(2) = .08 to .11. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that improvements in total clinician-rated PTSD symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social and housework adjustment. When changes in reexperiencing, avoidance, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal were all in the model accounting for changes in total social adjustment, improvements in emotional numbing symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social, extended family, and housework adjustment (β = .38 to .55). In addition, improvements in avoidance symptoms were associated with improvements in housework adjustment (β = .30), but associated with declines in extended family adjustment (β = -.34). Results suggest that it is important to consider the extent to which PTSD treatments effectively reduce specific types of symptoms, particularly emotional numbing and avoidance, to generally improve social adjustment. PMID:23073971

  11. A new bivariate negative binomial regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faroughi, Pouya; Ismail, Noriszura

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces a new form of bivariate negative binomial (BNB-1) regression which can be fitted to bivariate and correlated count data with covariates. The BNB regression discussed in this study can be fitted to bivariate and overdispersed count data with positive, zero or negative correlations. The joint p.m.f. of the BNB1 distribution is derived from the product of two negative binomial marginals with a multiplicative factor parameter. Several testing methods were used to check overdispersion and goodness-of-fit of the model. Application of BNB-1 regression is illustrated on Malaysian motor insurance dataset. The results indicated that BNB-1 regression has better fit than bivariate Poisson and BNB-2 models with regards to Akaike information criterion.

  12. Using Regression Analysis: A Guided Tour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Fred Ames

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use and interpretation of multiple regression analysis with computer programs and presents a flow chart of the process. A general explanation of the flow chart is provided, followed by an example showing the development of a linear equation which could be used in estimating manufacturing overhead cost. (Author/LRW)

  13. Commonality Analysis for the Regression Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Kavita

    Commonality analysis is a procedure for decomposing the coefficient of determination (R superscript 2) in multiple regression analyses into the percent of variance in the dependent variable associated with each independent variable uniquely, and the proportion of explained variance associated with the common effects of predictors in various…

  14. A New Sample Size Formula for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.; Barcikowski, Robert S.

    The focus of this research was to determine the efficacy of a new method of selecting sample sizes for multiple linear regression. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study both empirical predictive power rates and empirical statistical power rates of the new method and seven other methods: those of C. N. Park and A. L. Dudycha (1974); J. Cohen…

  15. Moving the Bar: Transformations in Linear Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Janet

    The assumption that is most important to the hypothesis testing procedure of multiple linear regression is the assumption that the residuals are normally distributed, but this assumption is not always tenable given the realities of some data sets. When normal distribution of the residuals is not met, an alternative method can be initiated. As an…

  16. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  17. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  18. Parental warmth, control, and indulgence and their relations to adjustment in Chinese children: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Liu, M; Li, D

    2000-09-01

    A sample of children, initially 12 years old, in the People's Republic of China participated in this 2-year longitudinal study. Data on parental warmth, control, and indulgence were collected from children's self-reports. Information concerning social, academic, and psychological adjustment was obtained from multiple sources. The results indicated that parenting styles might be a function of child gender and change with age. Regression analyses revealed that parenting styles of fathers and mothers predicted different outcomes. Whereas maternal warmth had significant contributions to the prediction of emotional adjustment, paternal warmth significantly predicted later social and school achievement. It was also found that paternal, but not maternal, indulgence significantly predicted children's adjustment difficulties. The contributions of the parenting variables might be moderated by the child's initial conditions. PMID:11025932

  19. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  20. Fast Censored Linear Regression

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YIJIAN

    2013-01-01

    Weighted log-rank estimating function has become a standard estimation method for the censored linear regression model, or the accelerated failure time model. Well established statistically, the estimator defined as a consistent root has, however, rather poor computational properties because the estimating function is neither continuous nor, in general, monotone. We propose a computationally efficient estimator through an asymptotics-guided Newton algorithm, in which censored quantile regression methods are tailored to yield an initial consistent estimate and a consistent derivative estimate of the limiting estimating function. We also develop fast interval estimation with a new proposal for sandwich variance estimation. The proposed estimator is asymptotically equivalent to the consistent root estimator and barely distinguishable in samples of practical size. However, computation time is typically reduced by two to three orders of magnitude for point estimation alone. Illustrations with clinical applications are provided. PMID:24347802

  1. Prediction of lip response to orthodontic treatment using a multivariable regression model

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Amin; Sadeghian, Saeid; Abbasi, Safieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: This was a retrospective cephalometric study to develop a more precise estimation of soft tissue changes related to underlying tooth movment than simple relatioship betweenhard and soft tissues. Materials and Methods: The lateral cephalograms of 61 adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment (31 = premolar extraction, 31 = nonextraction) were obtained, scanned and digitized before and immediately after the end of treatment. Hard and soft tissues, angular and linear measures were calculated by Viewbox 4.0 software. The changes of the values were analyzed using paired t-test. The accuracy of predictions of soft tissue changes were compared with two methods: (1) Use of ratios of the means of soft tissue to hard tissue changes (Viewbox 4.0 Software), (2) use of stepwise multivariable regression analysis to create prediction equations for soft tissue changes at superior labial sulcus, labrale superius, stomion superius, inferior labial sulcus, labrale inferius, stomion inferius (all on a horizontal plane). Results: Stepwise multiple regressions to predict lip movements showed strong relations for the upper lip (adjusted R2 = 0.92) and the lower lip (adjusted R2 = 0.91) in the extraction group. Regression analysis showed slightly weaker relations in the nonextraction group. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, multiple regression technique was slightly more accurate than the ratio of mean prediction (Viewbox4.0 software) and appears to be useful in the prediction of soft tissue changes. As the variability of the predicted individual outcome seems to be relatively high, caution should be taken in predicting hard and soft tissue positional changes. PMID:26962314

  2. Meteorological adjustment of yearly mean values for air pollutant concentration comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.; Neustadter, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    Using multiple linear regression analysis, models which estimate mean concentrations of Total Suspended Particulate (TSP), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide as a function of several meteorologic variables, two rough economic indicators, and a simple trend in time are studied. Meteorologic data were obtained and do not include inversion heights. The goodness of fit of the estimated models is partially reflected by the squared coefficient of multiple correlation which indicates that, at the various sampling stations, the models accounted for about 23 to 47 percent of the total variance of the observed TSP concentrations. If the resulting model equations are used in place of simple overall means of the observed concentrations, there is about a 20 percent improvement in either: (1) predicting mean concentrations for specified meteorological conditions; or (2) adjusting successive yearly averages to allow for comparisons devoid of meteorological effects. An application to source identification is presented using regression coefficients of wind velocity predictor variables.

  3. Orthogonal Regression: A Teaching Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A well-known approach to linear least squares regression is that which involves minimizing the sum of squared orthogonal projections of data points onto the best fit line. This form of regression is known as orthogonal regression, and the linear model that it yields is known as the major axis. A similar method, reduced major axis regression, is…

  4. Incremental hierarchical discriminant regression.

    PubMed

    Weng, Juyang; Hwang, Wey-Shiuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents incremental hierarchical discriminant regression (IHDR) which incrementally builds a decision tree or regression tree for very high-dimensional regression or decision spaces by an online, real-time learning system. Biologically motivated, it is an approximate computational model for automatic development of associative cortex, with both bottom-up sensory inputs and top-down motor projections. At each internal node of the IHDR tree, information in the output space is used to automatically derive the local subspace spanned by the most discriminating features. Embedded in the tree is a hierarchical probability distribution model used to prune very unlikely cases during the search. The number of parameters in the coarse-to-fine approximation is dynamic and data-driven, enabling the IHDR tree to automatically fit data with unknown distribution shapes (thus, it is difficult to select the number of parameters up front). The IHDR tree dynamically assigns long-term memory to avoid the loss-of-memory problem typical with a global-fitting learning algorithm for neural networks. A major challenge for an incrementally built tree is that the number of samples varies arbitrarily during the construction process. An incrementally updated probability model, called sample-size-dependent negative-log-likelihood (SDNLL) metric is used to deal with large sample-size cases, small sample-size cases, and unbalanced sample-size cases, measured among different internal nodes of the IHDR tree. We report experimental results for four types of data: synthetic data to visualize the behavior of the algorithms, large face image data, continuous video stream from robot navigation, and publicly available data sets that use human defined features. PMID:17385628

  5. Steganalysis using logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubenko, Ivans; Ker, Andrew D.

    2011-02-01

    We advocate Logistic Regression (LR) as an alternative to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers commonly used in steganalysis. LR offers more information than traditional SVM methods - it estimates class probabilities as well as providing a simple classification - and can be adapted more easily and efficiently for multiclass problems. Like SVM, LR can be kernelised for nonlinear classification, and it shows comparable classification accuracy to SVM methods. This work is a case study, comparing accuracy and speed of SVM and LR classifiers in detection of LSB Matching and other related spatial-domain image steganography, through the state-of-art 686-dimensional SPAM feature set, in three image sets.

  6. Regression Segmentation for M³ Spinal Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Zhen, Xiantong; Tay, KengYeow; Osman, Said; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Clinical routine often requires to analyze spinal images of multiple anatomic structures in multiple anatomic planes from multiple imaging modalities (M(3)). Unfortunately, existing methods for segmenting spinal images are still limited to one specific structure, in one specific plane or from one specific modality (S(3)). In this paper, we propose a novel approach, Regression Segmentation, that is for the first time able to segment M(3) spinal images in one single unified framework. This approach formulates the segmentation task innovatively as a boundary regression problem: modeling a highly nonlinear mapping function from substantially diverse M(3) images directly to desired object boundaries. Leveraging the advancement of sparse kernel machines, regression segmentation is fulfilled by a multi-dimensional support vector regressor (MSVR) which operates in an implicit, high dimensional feature space where M(3) diversity and specificity can be systematically categorized, extracted, and handled. The proposed regression segmentation approach was thoroughly tested on images from 113 clinical subjects including both disc and vertebral structures, in both sagittal and axial planes, and from both MRI and CT modalities. The overall result reaches a high dice similarity index (DSI) 0.912 and a low boundary distance (BD) 0.928 mm. With our unified and expendable framework, an efficient clinical tool for M(3) spinal image segmentation can be easily achieved, and will substantially benefit the diagnosis and treatment of spinal diseases. PMID:25361503

  7. A new method for dealing with measurement error in explanatory variables of regression models.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Laurence S; Fainberg, Vitaly; Kipnis, Victor; Midthune, Douglas; Carroll, Raymond J

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a new method, moment reconstruction, of correcting for measurement error in covariates in regression models. The central idea is similar to regression calibration in that the values of the covariates that are measured with error are replaced by "adjusted" values. In regression calibration the adjusted value is the expectation of the true value conditional on the measured value. In moment reconstruction the adjusted value is the variance-preserving empirical Bayes estimate of the true value conditional on the outcome variable. The adjusted values thereby have the same first two moments and the same covariance with the outcome variable as the unobserved "true" covariate values. We show that moment reconstruction is equivalent to regression calibration in the case of linear regression, but leads to different results for logistic regression. For case-control studies with logistic regression and covariates that are normally distributed within cases and controls, we show that the resulting estimates of the regression coefficients are consistent. In simulations we demonstrate that for logistic regression, moment reconstruction carries less bias than regression calibration, and for case-control studies is superior in mean-square error to the standard regression calibration approach. Finally, we give an example of the use of moment reconstruction in linear discriminant analysis and a nonstandard problem where we wish to adjust a classification tree for measurement error in the explanatory variables. PMID:15032787

  8. Spontaneous hypnotic age regression: case report.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D; Rosenfeld, A

    1984-12-01

    Age regression--reliving the past as though it were occurring in the present, with age appropriate vocabulary, mental content, and affect--can occur with instruction in highly hypnotizable individuals, but has rarely been reported to occur spontaneously, especially as a primary symptom. The psychiatric presentation and treatment of a 16-year-old girl with spontaneous age regressions accessible and controllable with hypnosis and psychotherapy are described. Areas of overlap and divergence between this patient's symptoms and those found in patients with hysterical fugue and multiple personality syndrome are also discussed. PMID:6501240

  9. Heritability Estimation using Regression Models for Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Seung; Paik, Myunghee Cho; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Dong, Chuanhui; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-01

    Heritability estimates a polygenic effect on a trait for a population. Reliable interpretation of heritability is critical in planning further genetic studies to locate a gene responsible for the trait. This study accommodates both single and multiple trait cases by employing regression models for correlation parameter to infer the heritability. Sharing the properties of regression approach, the proposed methods are exible to incorporate non-genetic and/or non-additive genetic information in the analysis. The performances of the proposed model are compared with those using the likelihood approach through simulations and carotid Intima Media Thickness analysis from Northern Manhattan family Study. PMID:22457844

  10. Physically Abused Children’s Adjustment at the Transition to School: Child, Parent, and Family Factors

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Karen Appleyard; Haskett, Mary E.; Loehman, Jessisca; Rose, Roderick A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood physical abuse predicts emotional/behavioral, self-regulatory, and social problems. Yet factors from multiple ecological levels contribute to children’s adjustment. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which the social-emotional adjustment of physically abused children in first grade would be predicted by a set of child-, parent-, and family-level predictors in kindergarten. Drawing on a short-term longitudinal study of 92 physically abused children and their primary caregivers, the current study used linear regression to examine early childhood child (i.e., gender, IQ, child perceptions of maternal acceptance), parent (i.e., parental mental health), and family relationship (i.e., sensitive parenting, hostile parenting, family conflict) factors as predictors of first grade internalizing and externalizing symptomatology, emotion dysregulation, and negative peer interactions. We used a multi-method, multi-informant approach to measuring predictors and children’s adjustment. Internalizing symptomatology was significantly predicted by child IQ, parental mental health, and family conflict. Externalizing symptomatology and emotion dysregulation were predicted by child IQ. Although a large proportion of variance in measures of adjustment was accounted for by the set of predictors, few individual variables were unique predictors of child adjustment. Variability in the predictors of adjustment for physically abused children underscores the need for individualized treatment approaches. PMID:26401095

  11. Thriving, Managing, and Struggling: A Mixed Methods Study of Adolescent African Refugees’ Psychosocial Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Weine, Stevan Merrill; Ware, Norma; Tugenberg, Toni; Hakizimana, Leonce; Dahnweih, Gonwo; Currie, Madeleine; Wagner, Maureen; Levin, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this mixed method study was to characterize the patterns of psychosocial adjustment among adolescent African refugees in U.S. resettlement. Methods A purposive sample of 73 recently resettled refugee adolescents from Burundi and Liberia were followed for two years and qualitative and quantitative data was analyzed using a mixed methods exploratory design. Results Protective resources identified were the family and community capacities that can promote youth psychosocial adjustment through: 1) Finances for necessities; 2) English proficiency; 3) Social support networks; 4) Engaged parenting; 5) Family cohesion; 6) Cultural adherence and guidance; 7) Educational support; and, 8) Faith and religious involvement. The researchers first inductively identified 19 thriving, 29 managing, and 25 struggling youths based on review of cases. Univariate analyses then indicated significant associations with country of origin, parental education, and parental employment. Multiple regressions indicated that better psychosocial adjustment was associated with Liberians and living with both parents. Logistic regressions showed that thriving was associated with Liberians and higher parental education, managing with more parental education, and struggling with Burundians and living parents. Qualitative analysis identified how these factors were proxy indicators for protective resources in families and communities. Conclusion These three trajectories of psychosocial adjustment and six domains of protective resources could assist in developing targeted prevention programs and policies for refugee youth. Further rigorous longitudinal mixed-methods study of adolescent refugees in U.S. resettlement are needed. PMID:24205467

  12. Ridge regression processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  13. Computing measures of explained variation for logistic regression models.

    PubMed

    Mittlböck, M; Schemper, M

    1999-01-01

    The proportion of explained variation (R2) is frequently used in the general linear model but in logistic regression no standard definition of R2 exists. We present a SAS macro which calculates two R2-measures based on Pearson and on deviance residuals for logistic regression. Also, adjusted versions for both measures are given, which should prevent the inflation of R2 in small samples. PMID:10195643

  14. Efficient Regressions via Optimally Combining Quantile Information*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhibiao; Xiao, Zhijie

    2014-01-01

    We develop a generally applicable framework for constructing efficient estimators of regression models via quantile regressions. The proposed method is based on optimally combining information over multiple quantiles and can be applied to a broad range of parametric and nonparametric settings. When combining information over a fixed number of quantiles, we derive an upper bound on the distance between the efficiency of the proposed estimator and the Fisher information. As the number of quantiles increases, this upper bound decreases and the asymptotic variance of the proposed estimator approaches the Cramér-Rao lower bound under appropriate conditions. In the case of non-regular statistical estimation, the proposed estimator leads to super-efficient estimation. We illustrate the proposed method for several widely used regression models. Both asymptotic theory and Monte Carlo experiments show the superior performance over existing methods. PMID:25484481

  15. Recursive Algorithm For Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, S. V.

    1988-01-01

    Order of model determined easily. Linear-regression algorithhm includes recursive equations for coefficients of model of increased order. Algorithm eliminates duplicative calculations, facilitates search for minimum order of linear-regression model fitting set of data satisfactory.

  16. Regression Commonality Analysis: A Technique for Quantitative Theory Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), it is common for social and behavioral science researchers to rely predominately on beta weights when evaluating how predictors contribute to a regression model. Presenting an underutilized statistical technique, this article describes how organizational researchers can use commonality…

  17. Quantile Regression in the Study of Developmental Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Logan, Jessica A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Linear regression analysis is one of the most common techniques applied in developmental research, but only allows for an estimate of the average relations between the predictor(s) and the outcome. This study describes quantile regression, which provides estimates of the relations between the predictor(s) and outcome, but across multiple points of…

  18. The Importance of Structure Coefficients in Regression Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce; Borrello, Gloria M.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple regression analysis is frequently being employed in experimental and non-experimental research. However, when data include predictor variables that are correlated, some regression results can become difficult to interpret. This paper presents a study to provide a demonstration that structure coefficients may be useful in these cases.…

  19. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  20. Adjustable sutures in children.

    PubMed

    Engel, J Mark; Guyton, David L; Hunter, David G

    2014-06-01

    Although adjustable sutures are considered a standard technique in adult strabismus surgery, most surgeons are hesitant to attempt the technique in children, who are believed to be unlikely to cooperate for postoperative assessment and adjustment. Interest in using adjustable sutures in pediatric patients has increased with the development of surgical techniques specific to infants and children. This workshop briefly reviews the literature supporting the use of adjustable sutures in children and presents the approaches currently used by three experienced strabismus surgeons. PMID:24924284

  1. Climate Change Projections Using Regional Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, V. W.; Gyawali, R.; Watkins, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    A typical approach to project climate change impacts on water resources systems is to downscale general circulation model (GCM) or regional climate model (RCM) outputs as forcing data for a watershed model. With downscaled climate model outputs becoming readily available, multi-model ensemble approaches incorporating mutliple GCMs, multiple emissions scenarios and multiple initializations are increasingly being used. While these multi-model climate ensembles represent a range of plausible futures, different hydrologic models and methods may complicate impact assessment. In particular, associated loss, flow routing, snowmelt and evapotranspiration computation methods can markedly increase hydrological modeling uncertainty. Other challenges include properly calibrating and verifying the watershed model and maintaining a consistent energy budget between climate and hydrologic models. An alternative approach, particularly appealing for ungauged basins or locations where record lengths are short, is to directly predict selected streamflow quantiles from regional regression equations that include physical basin characteristics as well as meteorological variables output by climate models (Fennessey 2011). Two sets of regional regression models are developed for the Great Lakes states using ordinary least squares and weighted least squares regression. The regional regression modeling approach is compared with physically based hydrologic modeling approaches for selected Great Lakes watersheds using downscaled outputs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) as inputs to the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM) and the U.S. Army Corps Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS).

  2. Least-Squares Linear Regression and Schrodinger's Cat: Perspectives on the Analysis of Regression Residuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.

    The analysis of regression residuals and detection of outliers are discussed, with emphasis on determining how deviant an individual data point must be to be considered an outlier and the impact that multiple suspected outlier data points have on the process of outlier determination and treatment. Only bivariate (one dependent and one independent)…

  3. The comparison of robust partial least squares regression with robust principal component regression on a real

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Esra; Gunay, Suleyman

    2013-10-01

    One of the problems encountered in Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) is multicollinearity, which causes the overestimation of the regression parameters and increase of the variance of these parameters. Hence, in case of multicollinearity presents, biased estimation procedures such as classical Principal Component Regression (CPCR) and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) are then performed. SIMPLS algorithm is the leading PLSR algorithm because of its speed, efficiency and results are easier to interpret. However, both of the CPCR and SIMPLS yield very unreliable results when the data set contains outlying observations. Therefore, Hubert and Vanden Branden (2003) have been presented a robust PCR (RPCR) method and a robust PLSR (RPLSR) method called RSIMPLS. In RPCR, firstly, a robust Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method for high-dimensional data on the independent variables is applied, then, the dependent variables are regressed on the scores using a robust regression method. RSIMPLS has been constructed from a robust covariance matrix for high-dimensional data and robust linear regression. The purpose of this study is to show the usage of RPCR and RSIMPLS methods on an econometric data set, hence, making a comparison of two methods on an inflation model of Turkey. The considered methods have been compared in terms of predictive ability and goodness of fit by using a robust Root Mean Squared Error of Cross-validation (R-RMSECV), a robust R2 value and Robust Component Selection (RCS) statistic.

  4. Bayesian Spatial Quantile Regression

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Brian J.; Fuentes, Montserrat; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act and has been linked with several adverse health effects, including mortality. Due to the strong dependence on weather conditions, ozone may be sensitive to climate change and there is great interest in studying the potential effect of climate change on ozone, and how this change may affect public health. In this paper we develop a Bayesian spatial model to predict ozone under different meteorological conditions, and use this model to study spatial and temporal trends and to forecast ozone concentrations under different climate scenarios. We develop a spatial quantile regression model that does not assume normality and allows the covariates to affect the entire conditional distribution, rather than just the mean. The conditional distribution is allowed to vary from site-to-site and is smoothed with a spatial prior. For extremely large datasets our model is computationally infeasible, and we develop an approximate method. We apply the approximate version of our model to summer ozone from 1997–2005 in the Eastern U.S., and use deterministic climate models to project ozone under future climate conditions. Our analysis suggests that holding all other factors fixed, an increase in daily average temperature will lead to the largest increase in ozone in the Industrial Midwest and Northeast. PMID:23459794

  5. Bayesian Spatial Quantile Regression.

    PubMed

    Reich, Brian J; Fuentes, Montserrat; Dunson, David B

    2011-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the six criteria pollutants regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act and has been linked with several adverse health effects, including mortality. Due to the strong dependence on weather conditions, ozone may be sensitive to climate change and there is great interest in studying the potential effect of climate change on ozone, and how this change may affect public health. In this paper we develop a Bayesian spatial model to predict ozone under different meteorological conditions, and use this model to study spatial and temporal trends and to forecast ozone concentrations under different climate scenarios. We develop a spatial quantile regression model that does not assume normality and allows the covariates to affect the entire conditional distribution, rather than just the mean. The conditional distribution is allowed to vary from site-to-site and is smoothed with a spatial prior. For extremely large datasets our model is computationally infeasible, and we develop an approximate method. We apply the approximate version of our model to summer ozone from 1997-2005 in the Eastern U.S., and use deterministic climate models to project ozone under future climate conditions. Our analysis suggests that holding all other factors fixed, an increase in daily average temperature will lead to the largest increase in ozone in the Industrial Midwest and Northeast. PMID:23459794

  6. Conduct problems, depressive symptomatology and their co-occurring presentation in childhood as predictors of adjustment in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ingoldsby, Erin M; Kohl, Gwynne O; McMahon, Robert J; Lengua, Liliana

    2006-10-01

    The present study investigated patterns in the development of conduct problems (CP), depressive symptoms, and their co-occurrence, and relations to adjustment problems, over the transition from late childhood to early adolescence. Rates of depressive symptoms and CP during this developmental period vary by gender; yet, few studies involving non-clinical samples have examined co-occurring problems and adjustment outcomes across boys and girls. This study investigates the manifestation and change in CP and depressive symptom patterns in a large, multisite, gender-and ethnically-diverse sample of 431 youth from 5th to 7th grade. Indicators of CP, depressive symptoms, their co-occurrence, and adjustment outcomes were created from multiple reporters and measures. Hypotheses regarding gender differences were tested utilizing both categorical (i.e., elevated symptom groups) and continuous analyses (i.e., regressions predicting symptomatology and adjustment outcomes). Results were partially supportive of the dual failure model (Capaldi, 1991, 1992), with youth with co-occurring problems in 5th grade demonstrating significantly lower academic adjustment and social competence two years later. Both depressive symptoms and CP were risk factors for multiple negative adjustment outcomes. Co-occurring symptomatology and CP demonstrated more stability and was associated with more severe adjustment problems than depressive symptoms over time. Categorical analyses suggested that, in terms of adjustment problems, youth with co-occurring symptomatology were generally no worse off than those with CP-alone, and those with depressive symptoms-alone were similar over time to those showing no symptomatology at all. Few gender differences were noted in the relations among CP, depressive symptoms, and adjustment over time. PMID:16967336

  7. Linear regression in astronomy. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, Takashi; Feigelson, Eric D.; Akritas, Michael G.; Babu, Gutti Jogesh

    1990-01-01

    Five methods for obtaining linear regression fits to bivariate data with unknown or insignificant measurement errors are discussed: ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression of Y on X, OLS regression of X on Y, the bisector of the two OLS lines, orthogonal regression, and 'reduced major-axis' regression. These methods have been used by various researchers in observational astronomy, most importantly in cosmic distance scale applications. Formulas for calculating the slope and intercept coefficients and their uncertainties are given for all the methods, including a new general form of the OLS variance estimates. The accuracy of the formulas was confirmed using numerical simulations. The applicability of the procedures is discussed with respect to their mathematical properties, the nature of the astronomical data under consideration, and the scientific purpose of the regression. It is found that, for problems needing symmetrical treatment of the variables, the OLS bisector performs significantly better than orthogonal or reduced major-axis regression.

  8. Psychological Adjustment in Young Korean American Adolescents and Parental Warmth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjung

    2008-01-01

    Problem: The relation between parental warmth and psychological adjustment is not known for young Korean American adolescents. Methods: 103 adolescents' perceived parental warmth and psychological adjustment were assessed using, respectively, the Parental Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire and the Child Personality Assessment Questionnaire. Findings: Low perceived maternal and paternal warmth were positively related to adolescents' overall poor psychological adjustment and almost all of its attributes. When maternal and paternal warmth were entered simultaneously into the regression equation, only low maternal warmth was related to adolescents' poor psychological adjustment. Conclusion: Perceived parental warmth is important in predicting young adolescents' psychological adjustment as suggested in the parental acceptance-rejection theory. PMID:19885379

  9. Characterizing and estimating rice brown spot disease severity using stepwise regression, principal component regression and partial least-square regression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan-yu; Huang, Jing-feng; Shi, Jing-jing; Tao, Rong-xiang; Zhou, Wan; Zhang, Li-Li

    2007-10-01

    Detecting plant health conditions plays a key role in farm pest management and crop protection. In this study, measurement of hyperspectral leaf reflectance in rice crop (Oryzasativa L.) was conducted on groups of healthy and infected leaves by the fungus Bipolaris oryzae (Helminthosporium oryzae Breda. de Hann) through the wavelength range from 350 to 2,500 nm. The percentage of leaf surface lesions was estimated and defined as the disease severity. Statistical methods like multiple stepwise regression, principal component analysis and partial least-square regression were utilized to calculate and estimate the disease severity of rice brown spot at the leaf level. Our results revealed that multiple stepwise linear regressions could efficiently estimate disease severity with three wavebands in seven steps. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) for training (n=210) and testing (n=53) dataset were 6.5% and 5.8%, respectively. Principal component analysis showed that the first principal component could explain approximately 80% of the variance of the original hyperspectral reflectance. The regression model with the first two principal components predicted a disease severity with RMSEs of 16.3% and 13.9% for the training and testing dataset, respectively. Partial least-square regression with seven extracted factors could most effectively predict disease severity compared with other statistical methods with RMSEs of 4.1% and 2.0% for the training and testing dataset, respectively. Our research demonstrates that it is feasible to estimate the disease severity of rice brown spot using hyperspectral reflectance data at the leaf level. PMID:17910117

  10. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Reynolds, Marion R.; Woodall, William H.

    2009-02-26

    We consider the monitoring of clinical outcomes, where each patient has a di®erent risk of death prior to undergoing a health care procedure.We propose a risk-adjusted survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring clinical outcomes where the primary endpoint is a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart to the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden decrease in the odds of death than the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is not too high. We also discuss the implementation of a prospective monitoring scheme using the RAST CUSUM chart.

  11. Evaluating differential effects using regression interactions and regression mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This paper focuses on understanding regression mixture models, a relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their formulation, and their assumptions are compared using Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. The capabilities of regression mixture models are described and specific issues to be addressed when conducting regression mixtures are proposed. The paper aims to clarify the role that regression mixtures can take in the estimation of differential effects and increase awareness of the benefits and potential pitfalls of this approach. Regression mixture models are shown to be a potentially effective exploratory method for finding differential effects when these effects can be defined by a small number of classes of respondents who share a typical relationship between a predictor and an outcome. It is also shown that the comparison between regression mixture models and interactions becomes substantially more complex as the number of classes increases. It is argued that regression interactions are well suited for direct tests of specific hypotheses about differential effects and regression mixtures provide a useful approach for exploring effect heterogeneity given adequate samples and study design. PMID:26556903

  12. Adjusted hospital death rates: a potential screen for quality of medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, R W; Brook, R H; Rogers, W H

    1987-01-01

    Increased economic pressure on hospitals has accelerated the need to develop a screening tool for identifying hospitals that potentially provide poor quality care. Based upon data from 93 hospitals and 205,000 admissions, we used a multiple regression model to adjust the hospitals crude death rate. The adjustment process used age, origin of patient from the emergency department or nursing home, and a hospital case mix index based on DRGs (diagnostic related groups). Before adjustment, hospital death rates ranged from 0.3 to 5.8 per 100 admissions. After adjustment, hospital death ratios ranged from 0.36 to 1.36 per 100 (actual death rate divided by predicted death rate). Eleven hospitals (12 per cent) were identified where the actual death rate exceeded the predicted death rate by more than two standard deviations. In nine hospitals (10 per cent), the predicted death rate exceeded the actual death rate by a similar statistical margin. The 11 hospitals with higher than predicted death rates may provide inadequate quality of care or have uniquely ill patient populations. The adjusted death rate model needs to be validated and generalized before it can be used routinely to screen hospitals. However, the remaining large differences in observed versus predicted death rates lead us to believe that important differences in hospital performance may exist. PMID:3113272

  13. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  14. Quantile regression for climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasinghe, Dilhani Shalika

    Quantile regression is a developing statistical tool which is used to explain the relationship between response and predictor variables. This thesis describes two examples of climatology using quantile regression.Our main goal is to estimate derivatives of a conditional mean and/or conditional quantile function. We introduce a method to handle autocorrelation in the framework of quantile regression and used it with the temperature data. Also we explain some properties of the tornado data which is non-normally distributed. Even though quantile regression provides a more comprehensive view, when talking about residuals with the normality and the constant variance assumption, we would prefer least square regression for our temperature analysis. When dealing with the non-normality and non constant variance assumption, quantile regression is a better candidate for the estimation of the derivative.

  15. Transfer Learning Based on Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we address the problem of classification of remote sensing images in the framework of transfer learning with a focus on domain adaptation. The main novel contribution is a method for transductive transfer learning in remote sensing on the basis of logistic regression. Logistic regression is a discriminative probabilistic classifier of low computational complexity, which can deal with multiclass problems. This research area deals with methods that solve problems in which labelled training data sets are assumed to be available only for a source domain, while classification is needed in the target domain with different, yet related characteristics. Classification takes place with a model of weight coefficients for hyperplanes which separate features in the transformed feature space. In term of logistic regression, our domain adaptation method adjusts the model parameters by iterative labelling of the target test data set. These labelled data features are iteratively added to the current training set which, at the beginning, only contains source features and, simultaneously, a number of source features are deleted from the current training set. Experimental results based on a test series with synthetic and real data constitutes a first proof-of-concept of the proposed method.

  16. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  17. Controlling Type I Error Rates in Assessing DIF for Logistic Regression Method Combined with SIBTEST Regression Correction Procedure and DIF-Free-Then-DIF Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Lin; Liu, Tien-Hsiang; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous item bias test (SIBTEST) method regression procedure and the differential item functioning (DIF)-free-then-DIF strategy are applied to the logistic regression (LR) method simultaneously in this study. These procedures are used to adjust the effects of matching true score on observed score and to better control the Type I error…

  18. Longitudinal Adjustment Trajectories of International Students and Their Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirai, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of international students in U.S. universities, the course of adjustment of international students has not been adequately tested and only one study to date has examined multiple trajectories of international students' adjustment. Therefore, the first goal of the current study was to explore multiple trajectories of…

  19. Assessing risk factors for periodontitis using regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo Pereira, J. A.; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is indispensable to assess the associations and interactions between different factors and the risk of periodontitis. Among others, regression analysis is a statistical technique widely used in healthcare to investigate and model the relationship between variables. In our work we study the impact of socio-demographic, medical and behavioral factors on periodontal health. Using regression, linear and logistic models, we can assess the relevance, as risk factors for periodontitis disease, of the following independent variables (IVs): Age, Gender, Diabetic Status, Education, Smoking status and Plaque Index. The multiple linear regression analysis model was built to evaluate the influence of IVs on mean Attachment Loss (AL). Thus, the regression coefficients along with respective p-values will be obtained as well as the respective p-values from the significance tests. The classification of a case (individual) adopted in the logistic model was the extent of the destruction of periodontal tissues defined by an Attachment Loss greater than or equal to 4 mm in 25% (AL≥4mm/≥25%) of sites surveyed. The association measures include the Odds Ratios together with the correspondent 95% confidence intervals.

  20. Ecological Regression and Voting Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, David A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The use of ecological regression in voting rights cases is discussed in the context of a lawsuit against Los Angeles County (California) in 1990. Ecological regression assumes that systematic voting differences between precincts are explained by ethnic differences. An alternative neighborhood model is shown to lead to different conclusions. (SLD)

  1. Logistic Regression: Concept and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokluk, Omay

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of logistic regression analysis is classification of individuals in different groups. The aim of the present study is to explain basic concepts and processes of binary logistic regression analysis intended to determine the combination of independent variables which best explain the membership in certain groups called dichotomous…

  2. Adjusting the Chain Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloc, Z.; Korf, J.; Kavan, P.

    The adjustment (modification) deals with gear chains intermediating (transmitting) motion transfer between the sprocket wheels on parallel shafts. The purpose of the adjustments of chain gear is to remove the unwanted effects by using the chain guide on the links (sliding guide rail) ensuring a smooth fit of the chain rollers into the wheel tooth gap.

  3. Adjustment to Recruit Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Betty S.

    The thesis examines problems of adjustment encountered by new recruits entering the military services. Factors affecting adjustment are discussed: the recruit training staff and environment, recruit background characteristics, the military's image, the changing values and motivations of today's youth, and the recruiting process. Sources of…

  4. Fungible weights in logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2016-06-01

    In this article we develop methods for assessing parameter sensitivity in logistic regression models. To set the stage for this work, we first review Waller's (2008) equations for computing fungible weights in linear regression. Next, we describe 2 methods for computing fungible weights in logistic regression. To demonstrate the utility of these methods, we compute fungible logistic regression weights using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (2010) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, and we illustrate how these alternate weights can be used to evaluate parameter sensitivity. To make our work accessible to the research community, we provide R code (R Core Team, 2015) that will generate both kinds of fungible logistic regression weights. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651981

  5. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  6. Approximate and Pseudo-Likelihood Analysis for Logistic Regression Using External Validation Data to Model Log Exposure

    PubMed Central

    KUPPER, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    A common goal in environmental epidemiologic studies is to undertake logistic regression modeling to associate a continuous measure of exposure with binary disease status, adjusting for covariates. A frequent complication is that exposure may only be measurable indirectly, through a collection of subject-specific variables assumed associated with it. Motivated by a specific study to investigate the association between lung function and exposure to metal working fluids, we focus on a multiplicative-lognormal structural measurement error scenario and approaches to address it when external validation data are available. Conceptually, we emphasize the case in which true untransformed exposure is of interest in modeling disease status, but measurement error is additive on the log scale and thus multiplicative on the raw scale. Methodologically, we favor a pseudo-likelihood (PL) approach that exhibits fewer computational problems than direct full maximum likelihood (ML) yet maintains consistency under the assumed models without necessitating small exposure effects and/or small measurement error assumptions. Such assumptions are required by computationally convenient alternative methods like regression calibration (RC) and ML based on probit approximations. We summarize simulations demonstrating considerable potential for bias in the latter two approaches, while supporting the use of PL across a variety of scenarios. We also provide accessible strategies for obtaining adjusted standard errors to accompany RC and PL estimates. PMID:24027381

  7. Neural network and principal component regression in non-destructive soluble solids content assessment: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Chia, Kim-seng; Abdul Rahim, Herlina; Abdul Rahim, Ruzairi

    2012-02-01

    Visible and near infrared spectroscopy is a non-destructive, green, and rapid technology that can be utilized to estimate the components of interest without conditioning it, as compared with classical analytical methods. The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of artificial neural network (ANN) (a nonlinear model) and principal component regression (PCR) (a linear model) based on visible and shortwave near infrared (VIS-SWNIR) (400-1000 nm) spectra in the non-destructive soluble solids content measurement of an apple. First, we used multiplicative scattering correction to pre-process the spectral data. Second, PCR was applied to estimate the optimal number of input variables. Third, the input variables with an optimal amount were used as the inputs of both multiple linear regression and ANN models. The initial weights and the number of hidden neurons were adjusted to optimize the performance of ANN. Findings suggest that the predictive performance of ANN with two hidden neurons outperforms that of PCR. PMID:22302428

  8. Neural network and principal component regression in non-destructive soluble solids content assessment: a comparison*

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Kim-seng; Abdul Rahim, Herlina; Abdul Rahim, Ruzairi

    2012-01-01

    Visible and near infrared spectroscopy is a non-destructive, green, and rapid technology that can be utilized to estimate the components of interest without conditioning it, as compared with classical analytical methods. The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of artificial neural network (ANN) (a nonlinear model) and principal component regression (PCR) (a linear model) based on visible and shortwave near infrared (VIS-SWNIR) (400–1000 nm) spectra in the non-destructive soluble solids content measurement of an apple. First, we used multiplicative scattering correction to pre-process the spectral data. Second, PCR was applied to estimate the optimal number of input variables. Third, the input variables with an optimal amount were used as the inputs of both multiple linear regression and ANN models. The initial weights and the number of hidden neurons were adjusted to optimize the performance of ANN. Findings suggest that the predictive performance of ANN with two hidden neurons outperforms that of PCR. PMID:22302428

  9. Modeling data for pancreatitis in presence of a duodenal diverticula using logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineva, S.; Prodanova, K.; Mlachkova, D.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of a periampullary duodenal diverticulum (PDD) is often observed during upper digestive tract barium meal studies and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). A few papers reported that the diverticulum had something to do with the incidence of pancreatitis. The aim of this study is to investigate if the presence of duodenal diverticula predisposes to the development of a pancreatic disease. A total 3966 patients who had undergone ERCP were studied retrospectively. They were divided into 2 groups-with and without PDD. Patients with a duodenal diverticula had a higher rate of acute pancreatitis. The duodenal diverticula is a risk factor for acute idiopathic pancreatitis. A multiple logistic regression to obtain adjusted estimate of odds and to identify if a PDD is a predictor of acute or chronic pancreatitis was performed. The software package STATISTICA 10.0 was used for analyzing the real data.

  10. Splines for Diffeomorphic Image Regression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nikhil; Niethammer, Marc

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a method for splines on diffeomorphisms for image regression. In contrast to previously proposed methods to capture image changes over time, such as geodesic regression, the method can capture more complex spatio-temporal deformations. In particular, it is a first step towards capturing periodic motions for example of the heart or the lung. Starting from a variational formulation of splines the proposed approach allows for the use of temporal control points to control spline behavior. This necessitates the development of a shooting formulation for splines. Experimental results are shown for synthetic and real data. The performance of the method is compared to geodesic regression. PMID:25485370

  11. SLIT ADJUSTMENT CLAMP

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, K.R.

    1959-07-01

    An electrode support which permits accurate alignment and adjustment of the electrode in a plurality of planes and about a plurality of axes in a calutron is described. The support will align the slits in the electrode with the slits of an ionizing chamber so as to provide for the egress of ions. The support comprises an insulator, a leveling plate carried by the insulator and having diametrically opposed attaching screws screwed to the plate and the insulator and diametrically opposed adjusting screws for bearing against the insulator, and an electrode associated with the plate for adjustment therewith.

  12. CMS Frailty Adjustment Model

    PubMed Central

    Kautter, John; Pope, Gregory C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors document the development of the CMS frailty adjustment model, a Medicare payment approach that adjusts payments to a Medicare managed care organization (MCO) according to the functional impairment of its community-residing enrollees. Beginning in 2004, this approach is being applied to certain organizations, such as Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), that specialize in providing care to the community-residing frail elderly. In the future, frailty adjustment could be extended to more Medicare managed care organizations. PMID:25372243

  13. Learning regulatory programs by threshold SVD regression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Xiao, Luo; Wong, Wing Hung

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a statistical model for the regulation of global gene expression by multiple regulatory programs and propose a thresholding singular value decomposition (T-SVD) regression method for learning such a model from data. Extensive simulations demonstrate that this method offers improved computational speed and higher sensitivity and specificity over competing approaches. The method is used to analyze microRNA (miRNA) and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. The analysis yields previously unidentified insights into the combinatorial regulation of gene expression by noncoding RNAs, as well as findings that are supported by evidence from the literature. PMID:25331876

  14. Abstract Expression Grammar Symbolic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korns, Michael F.

    This chapter examines the use of Abstract Expression Grammars to perform the entire Symbolic Regression process without the use of Genetic Programming per se. The techniques explored produce a symbolic regression engine which has absolutely no bloat, which allows total user control of the search space and output formulas, which is faster, and more accurate than the engines produced in our previous papers using Genetic Programming. The genome is an all vector structure with four chromosomes plus additional epigenetic and constraint vectors, allowing total user control of the search space and the final output formulas. A combination of specialized compiler techniques, genetic algorithms, particle swarm, aged layered populations, plus discrete and continuous differential evolution are used to produce an improved symbolic regression sytem. Nine base test cases, from the literature, are used to test the improvement in speed and accuracy. The improved results indicate that these techniques move us a big step closer toward future industrial strength symbolic regression systems.

  15. Time-Warped Geodesic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Singh, Nikhil; Kwitt, Roland; Niethammer, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We consider geodesic regression with parametric time-warps. This allows, for example, to capture saturation effects as typically observed during brain development or degeneration. While highly-flexible models to analyze time-varying image and shape data based on generalizations of splines and polynomials have been proposed recently, they come at the cost of substantially more complex inference. Our focus in this paper is therefore to keep the model and its inference as simple as possible while allowing to capture expected biological variation. We demonstrate that by augmenting geodesic regression with parametric time-warp functions, we can achieve comparable flexibility to more complex models while retaining model simplicity. In addition, the time-warp parameters provide useful information of underlying anatomical changes as demonstrated for the analysis of corpora callosa and rat calvariae. We exemplify our strategy for shape regression on the Grassmann manifold, but note that the method is generally applicable for time-warped geodesic regression. PMID:25485368

  16. Basis Selection for Wavelet Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A wavelet basis selection procedure is presented for wavelet regression. Both the basis and the threshold are selected using cross-validation. The method includes the capability of incorporating prior knowledge on the smoothness (or shape of the basis functions) into the basis selection procedure. The results of the method are demonstrated on sampled functions widely used in the wavelet regression literature. The results of the method are contrasted with other published methods.

  17. Regression methods for spatial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakowitz, S. J.; Szidarovszky, F.

    1982-01-01

    The kriging approach, a parametric regression method used by hydrologists and mining engineers, among others also provides an error estimate the integral of the regression function. The kriging method is explored and some of its statistical characteristics are described. The Watson method and theory are extended so that the kriging features are displayed. Theoretical and computational comparisons of the kriging and Watson approaches are offered.

  18. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  19. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  20. Shrinkage regression-based methods for microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing values commonly occur in the microarray data, which usually contain more than 5% missing values with up to 90% of genes affected. Inaccurate missing value estimation results in reducing the power of downstream microarray data analyses. Many types of methods have been developed to estimate missing values. Among them, the regression-based methods are very popular and have been shown to perform better than the other types of methods in many testing microarray datasets. Results To further improve the performances of the regression-based methods, we propose shrinkage regression-based methods. Our methods take the advantage of the correlation structure in the microarray data and select similar genes for the target gene by Pearson correlation coefficients. Besides, our methods incorporate the least squares principle, utilize a shrinkage estimation approach to adjust the coefficients of the regression model, and then use the new coefficients to estimate missing values. Simulation results show that the proposed methods provide more accurate missing value estimation in six testing microarray datasets than the existing regression-based methods do. Conclusions Imputation of missing values is a very important aspect of microarray data analyses because most of the downstream analyses require a complete dataset. Therefore, exploring accurate and efficient methods for estimating missing values has become an essential issue. Since our proposed shrinkage regression-based methods can provide accurate missing value estimation, they are competitive alternatives to the existing regression-based methods. PMID:24565159

  1. Background stratified Poisson regression analysis of cohort data

    PubMed Central

    Langholz, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Background stratified Poisson regression is an approach that has been used in the analysis of data derived from a variety of epidemiologically important studies of radiation-exposed populations, including uranium miners, nuclear industry workers, and atomic bomb survivors. We describe a novel approach to fit Poisson regression models that adjust for a set of covariates through background stratification while directly estimating the radiation-disease association of primary interest. The approach makes use of an expression for the Poisson likelihood that treats the coefficients for stratum-specific indicator variables as ‘nuisance’ variables and avoids the need to explicitly estimate the coefficients for these stratum-specific parameters. Log-linear models, as well as other general relative rate models, are accommodated. This approach is illustrated using data from the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and data from a study of underground uranium miners. The point estimate and confidence interval obtained from this ‘conditional’ regression approach are identical to the values obtained using unconditional Poisson regression with model terms for each background stratum. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed approach allows estimation of background stratified Poisson regression models of non-standard form, such as models that parameterize latency effects, as well as regression models in which the number of strata is large, thereby overcoming the limitations of previously available statistical software for fitting background stratified Poisson regression models. PMID:22193911

  2. Background stratified Poisson regression analysis of cohort data.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Langholz, Bryan

    2012-03-01

    Background stratified Poisson regression is an approach that has been used in the analysis of data derived from a variety of epidemiologically important studies of radiation-exposed populations, including uranium miners, nuclear industry workers, and atomic bomb survivors. We describe a novel approach to fit Poisson regression models that adjust for a set of covariates through background stratification while directly estimating the radiation-disease association of primary interest. The approach makes use of an expression for the Poisson likelihood that treats the coefficients for stratum-specific indicator variables as 'nuisance' variables and avoids the need to explicitly estimate the coefficients for these stratum-specific parameters. Log-linear models, as well as other general relative rate models, are accommodated. This approach is illustrated using data from the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and data from a study of underground uranium miners. The point estimate and confidence interval obtained from this 'conditional' regression approach are identical to the values obtained using unconditional Poisson regression with model terms for each background stratum. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed approach allows estimation of background stratified Poisson regression models of non-standard form, such as models that parameterize latency effects, as well as regression models in which the number of strata is large, thereby overcoming the limitations of previously available statistical software for fitting background stratified Poisson regression models. PMID:22193911

  3. Spontaneous regression in advanced squamous cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon Hee; Park, Bo Mi; Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Ju Ock; Jung, Sung Soo; Park, Hee Sun; Moon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of malignant tumors is rare especially of lung tumor and biological mechanism of such remission has not been addressed. We report the case of a 79-year-old Korean patient with non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell cancer with a right hilar tumor and multiple lymph nodes, lung to lung metastasis that spontaneously regressed without any therapies. He has sustained partial remission state for one year and eight months after the first histological diagnosis. PMID:27076978

  4. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  5. Standardized Regression Coefficients as Indices of Effect Sizes in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Rae Seon

    2011-01-01

    When conducting a meta-analysis, it is common to find many collected studies that report regression analyses, because multiple regression analysis is widely used in many fields. Meta-analysis uses effect sizes drawn from individual studies as a means of synthesizing a collection of results. However, indices of effect size from regression analyses…

  6. An Explanation of the Effectiveness of Latent Semantic Indexing by Means of a Bayesian Regression Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Roger E.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of the use of Latent Semantic Indexing to determine relevancy in information retrieval focuses on statistical regression and Bayesian methods. Topics include keyword searching; a multiple regression model; how the regression model can aid search methods; and limitations of this approach, including complexity, linearity, and…

  7. A Unified Approach to Power Calculation and Sample Size Determination for Random Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2007-01-01

    The underlying statistical models for multiple regression analysis are typically attributed to two types of modeling: fixed and random. The procedures for calculating power and sample size under the fixed regression models are well known. However, the literature on random regression models is limited and has been confined to the case of all…

  8. Multiple Linear Regression Analysis: Results and Discussion II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meleca, C. Benjamin

    1970-01-01

    Student background (biology and science) and aptitudes (verbal and mathematical) studied as predictors of achievement in audio-tutorial and conventional biology programs. Overall achievement was higher in audio-tutorial group, background variables differed in effectiveness as predictors for the two groups. (EB)

  9. Norming Clinical Questionnaires with Multiple Regression: The Pain Cognition List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaires for measuring patients' feelings or beliefs are commonly used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, clinical decision making, or treatment evaluation. Raw scores of a patient can be evaluated by comparing them with norms based on a reference population. Using the Pain Cognition List (PCL-2003) as an example, this article…

  10. Dissociating Conflict Adaptation from Feature Integration: A Multiple Regression Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notebaert, Wim; Verguts, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Congruency effects are typically smaller after incongruent than after congruent trials. One explanation is in terms of higher levels of cognitive control after detection of conflict (conflict adaptation; e.g., M. M. Botvinick, T. S. Braver, D. M. Barch, C. S. Carter, & J. D. Cohen, 2001). An alternative explanation for these results is based on…

  11. Demosaicing Based on Directional Difference Regression and Efficient Regression Priors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiqing; Timofte, Radu; Van Gool, Luc

    2016-08-01

    Color demosaicing is a key image processing step aiming to reconstruct the missing pixels from a recorded raw image. On the one hand, numerous interpolation methods focusing on spatial-spectral correlations have been proved very efficient, whereas they yield a poor image quality and strong visible artifacts. On the other hand, optimization strategies, such as learned simultaneous sparse coding and sparsity and adaptive principal component analysis-based algorithms, were shown to greatly improve image quality compared with that delivered by interpolation methods, but unfortunately are computationally heavy. In this paper, we propose efficient regression priors as a novel, fast post-processing algorithm that learns the regression priors offline from training data. We also propose an independent efficient demosaicing algorithm based on directional difference regression, and introduce its enhanced version based on fused regression. We achieve an image quality comparable to that of the state-of-the-art methods for three benchmarks, while being order(s) of magnitude faster. PMID:27254866

  12. Modeling Polytomous Item Responses Using Simultaneously Estimated Multinomial Logistic Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn J.; Verkuilen, Jay; Peyton, Buddy L.

    2010-01-01

    Survey items with multiple response categories and multiple-choice test questions are ubiquitous in psychological and educational research. We illustrate the use of log-multiplicative association (LMA) models that are extensions of the well-known multinomial logistic regression model for multiple dependent outcome variables to reanalyze a set of…

  13. The Covariance Adjustment Approaches for Combining Incomparable Cox Regressions Caused by Unbalanced Covariates Adjustment: A Multivariate Meta-Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehesh, Tania; Zare, Najaf; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Univariate meta-analysis (UM) procedure, as a technique that provides a single overall result, has become increasingly popular. Neglecting the existence of other concomitant covariates in the models leads to loss of treatment efficiency. Our aim was proposing four new approximation approaches for the covariance matrix of the coefficients, which is not readily available for the multivariate generalized least square (MGLS) method as a multivariate meta-analysis approach. Methods. We evaluated the efficiency of four new approaches including zero correlation (ZC), common correlation (CC), estimated correlation (EC), and multivariate multilevel correlation (MMC) on the estimation bias, mean square error (MSE), and 95% probability coverage of the confidence interval (CI) in the synthesis of Cox proportional hazard models coefficients in a simulation study. Result. Comparing the results of the simulation study on the MSE, bias, and CI of the estimated coefficients indicated that MMC approach was the most accurate procedure compared to EC, CC, and ZC procedures. The precision ranking of the four approaches according to all above settings was MMC ≥ EC ≥ CC ≥ ZC. Conclusion. This study highlights advantages of MGLS meta-analysis on UM approach. The results suggested the use of MMC procedure to overcome the lack of information for having a complete covariance matrix of the coefficients. PMID:26413142

  14. Rural to Urban Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Jane A.

    Personal interviews with 100 former farm operators living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, were conducted in an attempt to understand the nature of the adjustment process caused by migration from rural to urban surroundings. Requirements for inclusion in the study were that respondents had owned or operated a farm for at least 3 years, had left their…

  15. Self adjusting inclinometer

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    An inclinometer utilizing synchronous demodulation for high resolution and electronic offset adjustment provides a wide dynamic range without any moving components. A device encompassing a tiltmeter and accompanying electronic circuitry provides quasi-leveled tilt sensors that detect highly resolved tilt change without signal saturation.

  16. Self Adjusting Sunglasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Corning Glass Works' Serengeti Driver sunglasses are unique in that their lenses self-adjust and filter light while suppressing glare. They eliminate more than 99% of the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. The frames are based on the NASA Anthropometric Source Book.

  17. Regression modelling of Dst index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnowski, Aleksei

    We developed a new approach to the problem of real-time space weather indices forecasting using readily available data from ACE and a number of ground stations. It is based on the regression modelling method [1-3], which combines the benefits of empirical and statistical approaches. Mathematically it is based upon the partial regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulations to deduce the empirical relationships in the system. The typical elapsed time per forecast is a few seconds on an average PC. This technique can be easily extended to other indices like AE and Kp. The proposed system can also be useful for investigating physical phenomena related to interactions between the solar wind and the magnetosphere -it already helped uncovering two new geoeffective parameters. 1. Parnowski A.S. Regression modeling method of space weather prediction // Astrophysics Space Science. — 2009. — V. 323, 2. — P. 169-180. doi:10.1007/s10509-009-0060-4 [arXiv:0906.3271] 2. Parnovskiy A.S. Regression Modeling and its Application to the Problem of Prediction of Space Weather // Journal of Automation and Information Sciences. — 2009. — V. 41, 5. — P. 61-69. doi:10.1615/JAutomatInfScien.v41.i5.70 3. Parnowski A.S. Statistically predicting Dst without satellite data // Earth, Planets and Space. — 2009. — V. 61, 5. — P. 621-624.

  18. Spontaneous regression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lewison, E F

    1976-11-01

    The dramatic but rare regression of a verified case of breast cancer in the absence of adequate, accepted, or conventional treatment has been observed and documented by clinicians over the course of many years. In my practice limited to diseases of the breast, over the past 25 years I have observed 12 patients with a unique and unusual clinical course valid enough to be regarded as spontaneous regression of breast cancer. These 12 patients, with clinically confirmed breast cancer, had temporary arrest or partial remission of their disease in the absence of complete or adequate treatment. In most of these cases, spontaneous regression could not be equated ultimately with permanent cure. Three of these case histories are summarized, and patient characteristics of pertinent clinical interest in the remaining case histories are presented and discussed. Despite widespread doubt and skepticism, there is ample clinical evidence to confirm the fact that spontaneous regression of breast cancer is a rare phenomenon but is real and does occur. PMID:799758

  19. Regression Models of Atlas Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Models of object appearance based on principal components analysis provide powerful and versatile tools in computer vision and medical image analysis. A major shortcoming is that they rely entirely on the training data to extract principal modes of appearance variation and ignore underlying variables (e.g., subject age, gender). This paper introduces an appearance modeling framework based instead on generalized multi-linear regression. The training of regression appearance models is controlled by independent variables. This makes it straightforward to create model instances for specific values of these variables, which is akin to model interpolation. We demonstrate the new framework by creating an appearance model of the human brain from MR images of 36 subjects. Instances of the model created for different ages are compared with average shape atlases created from age-matched sub-populations. Relative tissue volumes vs. age in models are also compared with tissue volumes vs. subject age in the original images. In both experiments, we found excellent agreement between the regression models and the comparison data. We conclude that regression appearance models are a promising new technique for image analysis, with one potential application being the representation of a continuum of mutually consistent, age-specific atlases of the human brain. PMID:19694260

  20. Quantile Regression with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guixian

    2009-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model are frequently used in survival data analysis. They are powerful, yet have limitation due to their model assumptions. Quantile regression offers a semiparametric approach to model data with possible heterogeneity. It is particularly powerful for censored responses, where the…

  1. Regression models of atlas appearance.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    Models of object appearance based on principal components analysis provide powerful and versatile tools in computer vision and medical image analysis. A major shortcoming is that they rely entirely on the training data to extract principal modes of appearance variation and ignore underlying variables (e.g., subject age, gender). This paper introduces an appearance modeling framework based instead on generalized multi-linear regression. The training of regression appearance models is controlled by independent variables. This makes it straightforward to create model instances for specific values of these variables, which is akin to model interpolation. We demonstrate the new framework by creating an appearance model of the human brain from MR images of 36 subjects. Instances of the model created for different ages are compared with average shape atlases created from age-matched sub-populations. Relative tissue volumes vs. age in models are also compared with tissue volumes vs. subject age in the original images. In both experiments, we found excellent agreement between the regression models and the comparison data. We conclude that regression appearance models are a promising new technique for image analysis, with one potential application being the representation of a continuum of mutually consistent, age-specific atlases of the human brain. PMID:19694260

  2. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  3. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed.

  4. Hierarchical Adaptive Regression Kernels for Regression with Functional Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Dawn B.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Ruppert, David

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new method for regression using a parsimonious and scientifically interpretable representation of functional predictors. Our approach is designed for data that exhibit features such as spikes, dips, and plateaus whose frequency, location, size, and shape varies stochastically across subjects. We propose Bayesian inference of the joint functional and exposure models, and give a method for efficient computation. We contrast our approach with existing state-of-the-art methods for regression with functional predictors, and show that our method is more effective and efficient for data that include features occurring at varying locations. We apply our methodology to a large and complex dataset from the Sleep Heart Health Study, to quantify the association between sleep characteristics and health outcomes. Software and technical appendices are provided in online supplemental materials. PMID:24293988

  5. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  6. Transferability and Generalizability of Regression Models of Ultrafine Particles in Urban Neighborhoods in the Boston Area

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to assess air pollutant exposure, but limited evidence exists on whether location-specific LUR models are applicable to other locations (transferability) or general models are applicable to smaller areas (generalizability). We tested transferability and generalizability of spatial-temporal LUR models of hourly particle number concentration (PNC) for Boston-area (MA, U.S.A.) urban neighborhoods near Interstate 93. Four neighborhood-specific regression models and one Boston-area model were developed from mobile monitoring measurements (34–46 days/neighborhood over one year each). Transferability was tested by applying each neighborhood-specific model to the other neighborhoods; generalizability was tested by applying the Boston-area model to each neighborhood. Both the transferability and generalizability of models were tested with and without neighborhood-specific calibration. Important PNC predictors (adjusted-R2 = 0.24–0.43) included wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic volume, and distance from the highway edge. Direct model transferability was poor (R2 < 0.17). Locally-calibrated transferred models (R2 = 0.19–0.40) and the Boston-area model (adjusted-R2 = 0.26, range: 0.13–0.30) performed similarly to neighborhood-specific models; however, some coefficients of locally calibrated transferred models were uninterpretable. Our results show that transferability of neighborhood-specific LUR models of hourly PNC was limited, but that a general model performed acceptably in multiple areas when calibrated with local data. PMID:25867675

  7. Transferability and generalizability of regression models of ultrafine particles in urban neighborhoods in the Boston area.

    PubMed

    Patton, Allison P; Zamore, Wig; Naumova, Elena N; Levy, Jonathan I; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L

    2015-05-19

    Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to assess air pollutant exposure, but limited evidence exists on whether location-specific LUR models are applicable to other locations (transferability) or general models are applicable to smaller areas (generalizability). We tested transferability and generalizability of spatial-temporal LUR models of hourly particle number concentration (PNC) for Boston-area (MA, U.S.A.) urban neighborhoods near Interstate 93. Four neighborhood-specific regression models and one Boston-area model were developed from mobile monitoring measurements (34-46 days/neighborhood over one year each). Transferability was tested by applying each neighborhood-specific model to the other neighborhoods; generalizability was tested by applying the Boston-area model to each neighborhood. Both the transferability and generalizability of models were tested with and without neighborhood-specific calibration. Important PNC predictors (adjusted-R(2) = 0.24-0.43) included wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic volume, and distance from the highway edge. Direct model transferability was poor (R(2) < 0.17). Locally-calibrated transferred models (R(2) = 0.19-0.40) and the Boston-area model (adjusted-R(2) = 0.26, range: 0.13-0.30) performed similarly to neighborhood-specific models; however, some coefficients of locally calibrated transferred models were uninterpretable. Our results show that transferability of neighborhood-specific LUR models of hourly PNC was limited, but that a general model performed acceptably in multiple areas when calibrated with local data. PMID:25867675

  8. Joint regression analysis and AMMI model applied to oat improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A.; Oliveira, T. A.; Mejza, S.

    2012-09-01

    In our work we present an application of some biometrical methods useful in genotype stability evaluation, namely AMMI model, Joint Regression Analysis (JRA) and multiple comparison tests. A genotype stability analysis of oat (Avena Sativa L.) grain yield was carried out using data of the Portuguese Plant Breeding Board, sample of the 22 different genotypes during the years 2002, 2003 and 2004 in six locations. In Ferreira et al. (2006) the authors state the relevance of the regression models and of the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interactions (AMMI) model, to study and to estimate phenotypic stability effects. As computational techniques we use the Zigzag algorithm to estimate the regression coefficients and the agricolae-package available in R software for AMMI model analysis.

  9. Regression Verification Using Impact Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, John; Person, Suzette J.; Rungta, Neha; Thachuk, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Regression verification techniques are used to prove equivalence of syntactically similar programs. Checking equivalence of large programs, however, can be computationally expensive. Existing regression verification techniques rely on abstraction and decomposition techniques to reduce the computational effort of checking equivalence of the entire program. These techniques are sound but not complete. In this work, we propose a novel approach to improve scalability of regression verification by classifying the program behaviors generated during symbolic execution as either impacted or unimpacted. Our technique uses a combination of static analysis and symbolic execution to generate summaries of impacted program behaviors. The impact summaries are then checked for equivalence using an o-the-shelf decision procedure. We prove that our approach is both sound and complete for sequential programs, with respect to the depth bound of symbolic execution. Our evaluation on a set of sequential C artifacts shows that reducing the size of the summaries can help reduce the cost of software equivalence checking. Various reduction, abstraction, and compositional techniques have been developed to help scale software verification techniques to industrial-sized systems. Although such techniques have greatly increased the size and complexity of systems that can be checked, analysis of large software systems remains costly. Regression analysis techniques, e.g., regression testing [16], regression model checking [22], and regression verification [19], restrict the scope of the analysis by leveraging the differences between program versions. These techniques are based on the idea that if code is checked early in development, then subsequent versions can be checked against a prior (checked) version, leveraging the results of the previous analysis to reduce analysis cost of the current version. Regression verification addresses the problem of proving equivalence of closely related program

  10. Estimating the exceedance probability of rain rate by logistic regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Long S.; Kedem, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the fraction of an area with rain intensity above a fixed threshold is highly correlated with the area-averaged rain rate. To estimate the fractional rainy area, a logistic regression model, which estimates the conditional probability that rain rate over an area exceeds a fixed threshold given the values of related covariates, is developed. The problem of dependency in the data in the estimation procedure is bypassed by the method of partial likelihood. Analyses of simulated scanning multichannel microwave radiometer and observed electrically scanning microwave radiometer data during the Global Atlantic Tropical Experiment period show that the use of logistic regression in pixel classification is superior to multiple regression in predicting whether rain rate at each pixel exceeds a given threshold, even in the presence of noisy data. The potential of the logistic regression technique in satellite rain rate estimation is discussed.

  11. A method for the selection of a functional form for a thermodynamic equation of state using weighted linear least squares stepwise regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, R. T.; Stewart, R. B.; Crain, R. W., Jr.; Rose, G. L.; Myers, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for establishing a rational choice of the terms to be included in an equation of state with a large number of adjustable coefficients. The methods presented were developed for use in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen. However, a general application of the methods is possible in studies involving the determination of an optimum polynomial equation for fitting a large number of data points. The data considered in the least squares problem are experimental thermodynamic pressure-density-temperature data. Attention is given to a description of stepwise multiple regression and the use of stepwise regression in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen.

  12. Validity Shrinkage in Ridge Regression: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faden, Vivian; Bobko, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Ridge regression offers advantages over ordinary least squares estimation when a validity shrinkage criterion is considered. Comparisons of cross-validated multiple correlations indicate that ridge estimation is superior when the predictors are multicollinear, the number of predictors is large relative to sample size, and the population multiple…

  13. Default Bayes Factors for Model Selection in Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a Bayes factor solution for inference in multiple regression. Bayes factors are principled measures of the relative evidence from data for various models or positions, including models that embed null hypotheses. In this regard, they may be used to state positive evidence for a lack of an effect, which is not possible…

  14. Psychosocial adjustment to ALS: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Matuz, Tamara; Birbaumer, Niels; Hautzinger, Martin; Kübler, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    For the current study the Lazarian stress-coping theory and the appendant model of psychosocial adjustment to chronic illness and disabilities (Pakenham, 1999) has shaped the foundation for identifying determinants of adjustment to ALS. We aimed to investigate the evolution of psychosocial adjustment to ALS and to determine its long-term predictors. A longitudinal study design with four measurement time points was therefore, used to assess patients' quality of life, depression, and stress-coping model related aspects, such as illness characteristics, social support, cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies during a period of 2 years. Regression analyses revealed that 55% of the variance of severity of depressive symptoms and 47% of the variance in quality of life at T2 was accounted for by all the T1 predictor variables taken together. On the level of individual contributions, protective buffering, and appraisal of own coping potential accounted for a significant percentage in the variance in severity of depressive symptoms, whereas problem management coping strategies explained variance in quality of life scores. Illness characteristics at T2 did not explain any variance of both adjustment outcomes. Overall, the pattern of the longitudinal results indicated stable depressive symptoms and quality of life indices reflecting a successful adjustment to the disease across four measurement time points during a period of about two years. Empirical evidence is provided for the predictive value of social support, cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies, but not illness parameters such as severity and duration for adaptation to ALS. The current study contributes to a better conceptualization of adjustment, allowing us to provide evidence-based support beyond medical and physical intervention for people with ALS. PMID:26441696

  15. Improving phylogenetic regression under complex evolutionary models.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Florent; Davies, T Jonathan; Georges, Damien; Lavergne, Sébastien; Thuiller, Wilfried; Peres-NetoO, Pedro R

    2016-02-01

    Phylogenetic Generalized Least Square (PGLS) is the tool of choice among phylogenetic comparative methods to measure the correlation between species features such as morphological and life-history traits or niche characteristics. In its usual form, it assumes that the residual variation follows a homogenous model of evolution across the branches of the phylogenetic tree. Since a homogenous model of evolution is unlikely to be realistic in nature, we explored the robustness of the phylogenetic regression when this assumption is violated. We did so by simulating a set of traits under various heterogeneous models of evolution, and evaluating the statistical performance (type I error [the percentage of tests based on samples that incorrectly rejected a true null hypothesis] and power [the percentage of tests that correctly rejected a false null hypothesis]) of classical phylogenetic regression. We found that PGLS has good power but unacceptable type I error rates. This finding is important since this method has been increasingly used in comparative analyses over the last decade. To address this issue, we propose a simple solution based on transforming the underlying variance-covariance matrix to adjust for model heterogeneity within PGLS. We suggest that heterogeneous rates of evolution might be particularly prevalent in large phylogenetic trees, while most current approaches assume a homogenous rate of evolution. Our analysis demonstrates that overlooking rate heterogeneity can result in inflated type I errors, thus misleading comparative analyses. We show that it is possible to correct for this bias even when the underlying model of evolution is not known a priori. PMID:27145604

  16. Mapping geogenic radon potential by regression kriging.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, László; Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Szatmári, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Horváth, Ákos

    2016-02-15

    Radon ((222)Rn) gas is produced in the radioactive decay chain of uranium ((238)U) which is an element that is naturally present in soils. Radon is transported mainly by diffusion and convection mechanisms through the soil depending mainly on the physical and meteorological parameters of the soil and can enter and accumulate in buildings. Health risks originating from indoor radon concentration can be attributed to natural factors and is characterized by geogenic radon potential (GRP). Identification of areas with high health risks require spatial modeling, that is, mapping of radon risk. In addition to geology and meteorology, physical soil properties play a significant role in the determination of GRP. In order to compile a reliable GRP map for a model area in Central-Hungary, spatial auxiliary information representing GRP forming environmental factors were taken into account to support the spatial inference of the locally measured GRP values. Since the number of measured sites was limited, efficient spatial prediction methodologies were searched for to construct a reliable map for a larger area. Regression kriging (RK) was applied for the interpolation using spatially exhaustive auxiliary data on soil, geology, topography, land use and climate. RK divides the spatial inference into two parts. Firstly, the deterministic component of the target variable is determined by a regression model. The residuals of the multiple linear regression analysis represent the spatially varying but dependent stochastic component, which are interpolated by kriging. The final map is the sum of the two component predictions. Overall accuracy of the map was tested by Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation. Furthermore the spatial reliability of the resultant map is also estimated by the calculation of the 90% prediction interval of the local prediction values. The applicability of the applied method as well as that of the map is discussed briefly. PMID:26706761

  17. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  18. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  19. Regression analysis of networked data

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Song, Peter X.-K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns regression methodology for assessing relationships between multi-dimensional response variables and covariates that are correlated within a network. To address analytical challenges associated with the integration of network topology into the regression analysis, we propose a hybrid quadratic inference method that uses both prior and data-driven correlations among network nodes. A Godambe information-based tuning strategy is developed to allocate weights between the prior and data-driven network structures, so the estimator is efficient. The proposed method is conceptually simple and computationally fast, and has appealing large-sample properties. It is evaluated by simulation, and its application is illustrated using neuroimaging data from an association study of the effects of iron deficiency on auditory recognition memory in infants. PMID:27279658

  20. Adolescent suicide attempts and adult adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Brière, Frédéric N.; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Klein, Daniel; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent suicide attempts are disproportionally prevalent and frequently of low severity, raising questions regarding their long-term prognostic implications. In this study, we examined whether adolescent attempts were associated with impairments related to suicidality, psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning in adulthood (objective 1) and whether these impairments were better accounted for by concurrent adolescent confounders (objective 2). Method 816 adolescents were assessed using interviews and questionnaires at four time points from adolescence to adulthood. We examined whether lifetime suicide attempts in adolescence (by T2, mean age 17) predicted adult outcomes (by T4, mean age 30) using linear and logistic regressions in unadjusted models (objective 1) and adjusting for sociodemographic background, adolescent psychopathology, and family risk factors (objective 2). Results In unadjusted analyses, adolescent suicide attempts predicted poorer adjustment on all outcomes, except those related to social role status. After adjustment, adolescent attempts remained predictive of axis I and II psychopathology (anxiety disorder, antisocial and borderline personality disorder symptoms), global and social adjustment, risky sex, and psychiatric treatment utilization. However, adolescent attempts no longer predicted most adult outcomes, notably suicide attempts and major depressive disorder. Secondary analyses indicated that associations did not differ by sex and attempt characteristics (intent, lethality, recurrence). Conclusions Adolescent suicide attempters are at high risk of protracted and wide-ranging impairments, regardless of the characteristics of their attempt. Although attempts specifically predict (and possibly influence) several outcomes, results suggest that most impairments reflect the confounding contributions of other individual and family problems or vulnerabilites in adolescent attempters. PMID:25421360

  1. Shape regression for vertebra fracture quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael Tillge; de Bruijne, Marleen; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    Accurate and reliable identification and quantification of vertebral fractures constitute a challenge both in clinical trials and in diagnosis of osteoporosis. Various efforts have been made to develop reliable, objective, and reproducible methods for assessing vertebral fractures, but at present there is no consensus concerning a universally accepted diagnostic definition of vertebral fractures. In this project we want to investigate whether or not it is possible to accurately reconstruct the shape of a normal vertebra, using a neighbouring vertebra as prior information. The reconstructed shape can then be used to develop a novel vertebra fracture measure, by comparing the segmented vertebra shape with its reconstructed normal shape. The vertebrae in lateral x-rays of the lumbar spine were manually annotated by a medical expert. With this dataset we built a shape model, with equidistant point distribution between the four corner points. Based on the shape model, a multiple linear regression model of a normal vertebra shape was developed for each dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation. The reconstructed shape was calculated for each dataset using these regression models. The average prediction error for the annotated shape was on average 3%.

  2. Regression Models For Saffron Yields in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. H, Sanaeinejad; S. N, Hosseini

    Saffron is an important crop in social and economical aspects in Khorassan Province (Northeast of Iran). In this research wetried to evaluate trends of saffron yield in recent years and to study the relationship between saffron yield and the climate change. A regression analysis was used to predict saffron yield based on 20 years of yield data in Birjand, Ghaen and Ferdows cities.Climatologically data for the same periods was provided by database of Khorassan Climatology Center. Climatologically data includedtemperature, rainfall, relative humidity and sunshine hours for ModelI, and temperature and rainfall for Model II. The results showed the coefficients of determination for Birjand, Ferdows and Ghaen for Model I were 0.69, 0.50 and 0.81 respectively. Also coefficients of determination for the same cities for model II were 0.53, 0.50 and 0.72 respectively. Multiple regression analysisindicated that among weather variables, temperature was the key parameter for variation ofsaffron yield. It was concluded that increasing temperature at spring was the main cause of declined saffron yield during recent years across the province. Finally, yield trend was predicted for the last 5 years using time series analysis.

  3. A Gibbs sampler for multivariate linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2016-04-01

    Kelly described an efficient algorithm, using Gibbs sampling, for performing linear regression in the fairly general case where non-zero measurement errors exist for both the covariates and response variables, where these measurements may be correlated (for the same data point), where the response variable is affected by intrinsic scatter in addition to measurement error, and where the prior distribution of covariates is modelled by a flexible mixture of Gaussians rather than assumed to be uniform. Here, I extend the Kelly algorithm in two ways. First, the procedure is generalized to the case of multiple response variables. Secondly, I describe how to model the prior distribution of covariates using a Dirichlet process, which can be thought of as a Gaussian mixture where the number of mixture components is learned from the data. I present an example of multivariate regression using the extended algorithm, namely fitting scaling relations of the gas mass, temperature, and luminosity of dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters as a function of their mass and redshift. An implementation of the Gibbs sampler in the R language, called LRGS, is provided.

  4. Multivariate Regression with Block-structured Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Saier

    We study the problem of predicting multiple responses with a common set of predicting variables. Applying generalized Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) criterion on the responses altogether is practically equivalent to OLS estimation on the responses separately. Possible correlations between the response variables are overlooked. In order to take advantage of these interrelationships, Reduced-Rank Regression (RRR) imposes rank constraint on the coefficient matrix. RRR constructs latent factors from the original predicting variables, and the latent factors are the effective predictors. RRR reduces number of parameters to be estimated, and improves estimation efficiency. In the present work, we explore a novel regression model to incorporate "block-structured" predicting variables, where the predictors can be naturally partitioned into several groups or blocks. Variables in the same block share similar characteristics. It is reasonable to assume that in addition to an overall impact, predictors also have block-specific effects on the responses. Furthermore, we impose rank constraints on the coefficient matrices. In our framework, we construct two types of latent factors that drive the variation in the responses. We have joint factors, which are formed by all predictors across all blocks; and individual factors, which are formed by variables within individual blocks. The proposed method exceeds RRR in terms of prediction accuracy and ease of interpretation in the presence of block structure in the predicting variables.

  5. Parental Psychological Control and Adolescent Adjustment: The Role of Adolescent Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Criss, Michael M.; Houltberg, Benjamin J.; Silk, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective This study investigated associations between parental psychological control and aggressive behavior and depressive symptoms among adolescents from predominantly disadvantaged backgrounds. The indirect effects of psychological control on adolescent adjustment through adolescent emotion regulation (anger and sadness regulation) were examined as well as the moderating effects of adolescent emotion regulation. Design 206 adolescents (ages 10–18) reported on parental psychological control and their own depressive symptoms, and parents and adolescents reported on adolescent emotion regulation and aggressive behavior. Indirect effect models were tested using structural equation modeling; moderating effects were tested using hierarchical multiple regression. Results The associations between parental psychological control and adolescent aggressive behavior and depressive symptoms were indirect through adolescents’ anger regulation. Moderation analyses indicated that the association between parental psychological control and adolescent depressive symptoms was stronger among adolescents with poor sadness regulation and the association between psychological control and aggressive behavior was stronger among older adolescents with poor anger regulation. Conclusions Psychological control is negatively associated with adolescent adjustment, particularly among adolescents who have difficulty regulating emotions. Emotion regulation is one mechanism through which psychological control is linked to adolescent adjustment, particularly anger dysregulation, and this pattern holds for both younger and older adolescents and for both boys and girls. PMID:25057264

  6. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. PMID:24815335

  7. The Impact of Financial Sophistication on Adjustable Rate Mortgage Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hyrum; Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a financial sophistication scale on adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) borrowing is explored. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis using recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances reveal that ARM borrowing is driven by both the least and most financially sophisticated households but for different reasons. Less…

  8. Effects of Relational Authenticity on Adjustment to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Holman, Rachel L.; Lancaster, Chloe; Gotay, Stephanie G.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the association between relational health and student adjustment to college. Data were collected from 138 undergraduate students completing their 1st semester at a large university in the mid-southern United States. Regression analysis indicated that higher levels of relational authenticity were a predictor of success during…

  9. Quality Reporting of Multivariable Regression Models in Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Real, Jordi; Forné, Carles; Roso-Llorach, Albert; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controlling for confounders is a crucial step in analytical observational studies, and multivariable models are widely used as statistical adjustment techniques. However, the validation of the assumptions of the multivariable regression models (MRMs) should be made clear in scientific reporting. The objective of this study is to review the quality of statistical reporting of the most commonly used MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression) that were applied in analytical observational studies published between 2003 and 2014 by journals indexed in MEDLINE. Review of a representative sample of articles indexed in MEDLINE (n = 428) with observational design and use of MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression). We assessed the quality of reporting about: model assumptions and goodness-of-fit, interactions, sensitivity analysis, crude and adjusted effect estimate, and specification of more than 1 adjusted model. The tests of underlying assumptions or goodness-of-fit of the MRMs used were described in 26.2% (95% CI: 22.0–30.3) of the articles and 18.5% (95% CI: 14.8–22.1) reported the interaction analysis. Reporting of all items assessed was higher in articles published in journals with a higher impact factor. A low percentage of articles indexed in MEDLINE that used multivariable techniques provided information demonstrating rigorous application of the model selected as an adjustment method. Given the importance of these methods to the final results and conclusions of observational studies, greater rigor is required in reporting the use of MRMs in the scientific literature. PMID:27196467

  10. Predictive Equations Using Regression Analysis of Pulmonary Function for Healthy Children in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ya-Nan; Wang, Jing; Dong, Guang-Hui; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Liu, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Yang; Ren, Wan-Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Zhao, Ya-Dong; He, Qin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background There have been few published studies on spirometric reference values for healthy children in China. We hypothesize that there would have been changes in lung function that would not have been precisely predicted by the existing spirometric reference equations. The objective of the study was to develop more accurate predictive equations for spirometric reference values for children aged 9 to 15 years in Northeast China. Methodology/Principal Findings Spirometric measurements were obtained from 3,922 children, including 1,974 boys and 1,948 girls, who were randomly selected from five cities of Liaoning province, Northeast China, using the ATS (American Thoracic Society) and ERS (European Respiratory Society) standards. The data was then randomly split into a training subset containing 2078 cases and a validation subset containing 1844 cases. Predictive equations used multiple linear regression techniques with three predictor variables: height, age and weight. Model goodness of fit was examined using the coefficient of determination or the R2 and adjusted R2. The predicted values were compared with those obtained from the existing spirometric reference equations. The results showed the prediction equations using linear regression analysis performed well for most spirometric parameters. Paired t-tests were used to compare the predicted values obtained from the developed and existing spirometric reference equations based on the validation subset. The t-test for males was not statistically significant (p>0.01). The predictive accuracy of the developed equations was higher than the existing equations and the predictive ability of the model was also validated. Conclusion/Significance We developed prediction equations using linear regression analysis of spirometric parameters for children aged 9–15 years in Northeast China. These equations represent the first attempt at predicting lung function for Chinese children following the ATS/ERS Task Force 2005

  11. Protective emotional regulation processes towards adjustment in infertile patients.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Galhardo, Ana; Cunha, Marina; Matos, Marcela

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about emotional regulation processes of psychological flexibility/acceptance, self-compassion, and coping styles in infertility and the way they may exert a protective function towards depression. The aim of the current study was to explore how these emotion regulation processes are related to depression and to the sense of self-efficacy to deal with infertility in infertile patients. Gender differences were also considered. One hundred couples without known fertility problems and 100 couples with an infertility diagnosis completed the instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, Coping Styles Questionnaire, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, Self-Compassion Scale and Infertility Self-efficacy Scale. Infertile couples presented statistically significantly higher scores on depression and lower scores in psychological flexibility/acceptance and self-compassion than the control group. This pattern was particularly identified in women who also tended to use less an emotional/detached coping style and to perceive themselves as less confident to deal with infertility than men. Multiple regression analysis showed that psychological flexibility/acceptance was a significant predictor of depressive symptoms in men and women with infertility. Emotional regulation processes, such as psychological flexibility/acceptance and self-compassion, seem to be relevant to the understanding of depressive symptoms and psychological adjustment to infertility, suggesting that these issues should be addressed in a therapeutic context with these couples. PMID:22309792

  12. Regression Discontinuity Design: Simulation and Application in Two Cardiovascular Trials with Continuous Outcomes.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Lingsma, Hester F; de Craen, Anton J M; Nieboer, Daan; Mooijaart, Simon P; Richard, Edo; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2016-07-01

    In epidemiology, the regression discontinuity design has received increasing attention recently and might be an alternative to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate treatment effects. In regression discontinuity, treatment is assigned above a certain threshold of an assignment variable for which the treatment effect is adjusted in the analysis. We performed simulations and a validation study in which we used treatment effect estimates from an RCT as the reference for a prospectively performed regression discontinuity study. We estimated the treatment effect using linear regression adjusting for the assignment variable both as linear terms and restricted cubic spline and using local linear regression models. In the first validation study, the estimated treatment effect from a cardiovascular RCT was -4.0 mmHg blood pressure (95% confidence interval: -5.4, -2.6) at 2 years after inclusion. The estimated effect in regression discontinuity was -5.9 mmHg (95% confidence interval: -10.8, -1.0) with restricted cubic spline adjustment. Regression discontinuity showed different, local effects when analyzed with local linear regression. In the second RCT, regression discontinuity treatment effect estimates on total cholesterol level at 3 months after inclusion were similar to RCT estimates, but at least six times less precise. In conclusion, regression discontinuity may provide similar estimates of treatment effects to RCT estimates, but requires the assumption of a global treatment effect over the range of the assignment variable. In addition to a risk of bias due to wrong assumptions, researchers need to weigh better recruitment against the substantial loss in precision when considering a study with regression discontinuity versus RCT design. PMID:27031038

  13. Gene-Based Association Analysis for Censored Traits Via Fixed Effect Functional Regressions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Yan, Qi; Ding, Ying; Weeks, Daniel E; Lu, Zhaohui; Ren, Haobo; Cook, Richard J; Xiong, Momiao; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Genetic studies of survival outcomes have been proposed and conducted recently, but statistical methods for identifying genetic variants that affect disease progression are rarely developed. Motivated by our ongoing real studies, here we develop Cox proportional hazard models using functional regression (FR) to perform gene-based association analysis of survival traits while adjusting for covariates. The proposed Cox models are fixed effect models where the genetic effects of multiple genetic variants are assumed to be fixed. We introduce likelihood ratio test (LRT) statistics to test for associations between the survival traits and multiple genetic variants in a genetic region. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed Cox RF LRT statistics have well-controlled type I error rates. To evaluate power, we compare the Cox FR LRT with the previously developed burden test (BT) in a Cox model and sequence kernel association test (SKAT), which is based on mixed effect Cox models. The Cox FR LRT statistics have higher power than or similar power as Cox SKAT LRT except when 50%/50% causal variants had negative/positive effects and all causal variants are rare. In addition, the Cox FR LRT statistics have higher power than Cox BT LRT. The models and related test statistics can be useful in the whole genome and whole exome association studies. An age-related macular degeneration dataset was analyzed as an example. PMID:26782979

  14. Heteroscedastic transformation cure regression models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chyong-Mei; Chen, Chen-Hsin

    2016-06-30

    Cure models have been applied to analyze clinical trials with cures and age-at-onset studies with nonsusceptibility. Lu and Ying (On semiparametric transformation cure model. Biometrika 2004; 91:331?-343. DOI: 10.1093/biomet/91.2.331) developed a general class of semiparametric transformation cure models, which assumes that the failure times of uncured subjects, after an unknown monotone transformation, follow a regression model with homoscedastic residuals. However, it cannot deal with frequently encountered heteroscedasticity, which may result from dispersed ranges of failure time span among uncured subjects' strata. To tackle the phenomenon, this article presents semiparametric heteroscedastic transformation cure models. The cure status and the failure time of an uncured subject are fitted by a logistic regression model and a heteroscedastic transformation model, respectively. Unlike the approach of Lu and Ying, we derive score equations from the full likelihood for estimating the regression parameters in the proposed model. The similar martingale difference function to their proposal is used to estimate the infinite-dimensional transformation function. Our proposed estimating approach is intuitively applicable and can be conveniently extended to other complicated models when the maximization of the likelihood may be too tedious to be implemented. We conduct simulation studies to validate large-sample properties of the proposed estimators and to compare with the approach of Lu and Ying via the relative efficiency. The estimating method and the two relevant goodness-of-fit graphical procedures are illustrated by using breast cancer data and melanoma data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887342

  15. Regression analysis of cytopathological data

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; McLarty, J.W.; Fortson, N.; Anderson, K.

    1982-12-01

    Epithelial cells from the human body are frequently labelled according to one of several ordered levels of abnormality, ranging from normal to malignant. The label of the most abnormal cell in a specimen determines the score for the specimen. This paper presents a model for the regression of specimen scores against continuous and discrete variables, as in host exposure to carcinogens. Application to data and tests for adequacy of model fit are illustrated using sputum specimens obtained from a cohort of former asbestos workers.

  16. Birthweight Related Factors in Northwestern Iran: Using Quantile Regression Method

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Ramazan; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Zayeri, Farid; Shoghli, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Birthweight is one of the most important predicting indicators of the health status in adulthood. Having a balanced birthweight is one of the priorities of the health system in most of the industrial and developed countries. This indicator is used to assess the growth and health status of the infants. The aim of this study was to assess the birthweight of the neonates by using quantile regression in Zanjan province. Methods: This analytical descriptive study was carried out using pre-registered (March 2010 - March 2012) data of neonates in urban/rural health centers of Zanjan province using multiple-stage cluster sampling. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regressions andquantile regression method and SAS 9.2 statistical software. Results: From 8456 newborn baby, 4146 (49%) were female. The mean age of the mothers was 27.1±5.4 years. The mean birthweight of the neonates was 3104 ± 431 grams. Five hundred and seventy-three patients (6.8%) of the neonates were less than 2500 grams. In all quantiles, gestational age of neonates (p<0.05), weight and educational level of the mothers (p<0.05) showed a linear significant relationship with the i of the neonates. However, sex and birth rank of the neonates, mothers age, place of residence (urban/rural) and career were not significant in all quantiles (p>0.05). Conclusion: This study revealed the results of multiple linear regression and quantile regression were not identical. We strictly recommend the use of quantile regression when an asymmetric response variable or data with outliers is available. PMID:26925889

  17. A rotor optimization using regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giansante, N.

    1984-01-01

    The design and development of helicopter rotors is subject to the many design variables and their interactions that effect rotor operation. Until recently, selection of rotor design variables to achieve specified rotor operational qualities has been a costly, time consuming, repetitive task. For the past several years, Kaman Aerospace Corporation has successfully applied multiple linear regression analysis, coupled with optimization and sensitivity procedures, in the analytical design of rotor systems. It is concluded that approximating equations can be developed rapidly for a multiplicity of objective and constraint functions and optimizations can be performed in a rapid and cost effective manner; the number and/or range of design variables can be increased by expanding the data base and developing approximating functions to reflect the expanded design space; the order of the approximating equations can be expanded easily to improve correlation between analyzer results and the approximating equations; gradients of the approximating equations can be calculated easily and these gradients are smooth functions reducing the risk of numerical problems in the optimization; the use of approximating functions allows the problem to be started easily and rapidly from various initial designs to enhance the probability of finding a global optimum; and the approximating equations are independent of the analysis or optimization codes used.

  18. Continuously adjustable Pulfrich spectacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2011-03-01

    A number of Pulfrich 3-D movies and TV shows have been produced, but the standard implementation has inherent drawbacks. The movie and TV industries have correctly concluded that the standard Pulfrich 3-D implementation is not a useful 3-D technique. Continuously Adjustable Pulfrich Spectacles (CAPS) is a new implementation of the Pulfrich effect that allows any scene containing movement in a standard 2-D movie, which are most scenes, to be optionally viewed in 3-D using inexpensive viewing specs. Recent scientific results in the fields of human perception, optoelectronics, video compression and video format conversion are translated into a new implementation of Pulfrich 3- D. CAPS uses these results to continuously adjust to the movie so that the viewing spectacles always conform to the optical density that optimizes the Pulfrich stereoscopic illusion. CAPS instantly provides 3-D immersion to any moving scene in any 2-D movie. Without the glasses, the movie will appear as a normal 2-D image. CAPS work on any viewing device, and with any distribution medium. CAPS is appropriate for viewing Internet streamed movies in 3-D.

  19. Subsea adjustable choke valves

    SciTech Connect

    Cyvas, M.K. )

    1989-08-01

    With emphasis on deepwater wells and marginal offshore fields growing, the search for reliable subsea production systems has become a high priority. A reliable subsea adjustable choke is essential to the realization of such a system, and recent advances are producing the degree of reliability required. Technological developments have been primarily in (1) trim material (including polycrystalline diamond), (2) trim configuration, (3) computer programs for trim sizing, (4) component materials, and (5) diver/remote-operated-vehicle (ROV) interfaces. These five facets are overviewed and progress to date is reported. A 15- to 20-year service life for adjustable subsea chokes is now a reality. Another factor vital to efficient use of these technological developments is to involve the choke manufacturer and ROV/diver personnel in initial system conceptualization. In this manner, maximum benefit can be derived from the latest technology. Major areas of development still required and under way are listed, and the paper closes with a tabulation of successful subsea choke installations in recent years.

  20. Relations between life satisfaction, adjustment to illness, and emotional distress in a sample of men with ischemic cardiopathy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, María Angeles; Sanjuan, Pilar; Pérez-García, Ana M; Rueda, Beatriz

    2011-05-01

    Fifty-two men who had suffered a first episode ischemic heart disease reported their degree of life satisfaction, the strategies they used to adjust to the illness, and the symptoms of anxiety and depression they felt. The multiple regression analyses carried out indicated that emotional distress was associated with a lower level of life satisfaction. In the analyses of anxiety symptoms, the use of negative adjustment strategies was also a significant predictor. Lastly, a significant Life Satisfaction x Type of Adjustment interaction was obtained. According to this, the patients who felt more satisfaction with their lives used more positive strategies to adjust to the illness and fewer negative ones, than the group of patients who were less satisfied. In conclusion, life satisfaction predicts emotional wellbeing of patients with ischemic heart disease and it enhances the implementation of appropriate strategies to cope with the disease. Moreover, although life satisfaction has been considered a stable measure, we suggest it may change as the experience of illness limits individuals' important goals. PMID:21568192