Science.gov

Sample records for adjusted rate ratio

  1. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  2. Vibrato rate adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dromey, Christopher; Carter, Neisha; Hopkin, Arden

    2003-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to document the acoustic changes that occur as singers attempt to increase or decrease their vibrato rate to match target stimuli. Eight advanced singing students produced vowels with vibrato in three registers, both naturally and while attempting to match faster or slower rate stimuli. Slower rates were associated with lower intensity and less steady vibrato. Faster rates involved increased vibrato extent in the chest register and increased intensity in the head register. Singers whose spontaneous vibrato rates were naturally either slower or faster tended to also be relatively slower or faster when matching target rates. This ability to modify rate may have beneficial effects on the artistic quality of the voice for performance. PMID:12825649

  3. 78 FR 62712 - Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... noticing a recent Postal Service filing seeking postal rate adjustments based on exigent circumstances...,'' is ``premised on the recent recession as an exigent event.'' Id. at 1, 2. In Order No. 1059,...

  4. 76 FR 42140 - Rate Adjustment Remand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... the amount of the revenue lost as a result of the exigent circumstances.'' Id. \\6\\ Id. The court... amount of the proposed adjustments precisely to the amount of revenue lost as a result of the exigent... amount of an exigent rate adjustment must match the amount of revenue lost as a result of an...

  5. 76 FR 7883 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... rate adjustment.\\1\\ The Notice concerns the inbound portion of a bilateral agreement with HongKong Post... upon the Postal Service obtaining all regulatory approvals and notifying HongKong Post that all such... Agreement (CPG) Agreement. The Postal Service and HongKong Post, the postal operator for Hong Kong,...

  6. Risk adjustment for a children's capitation rate.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, J P; Sloss, E M; Manning, W G; Keeler, E B

    1993-01-01

    Few capitation arrangements vary premiums by a child's health characteristics, yielding an incentive to discriminate against children with predictably high expenditures from chronic diseases. In this article, we explore risk adjusters for the 35 percent of the variance in annual out-patient expenditure we find to be potentially predictable. Demographic factors such as age and gender only explain 5 percent of such variance; health status measures explain 25 percent, prior use and health status measures together explain 65 to 70 percent. The profit from risk selection falls less than proportionately with improved ability to adjust for risk. Partial capitation rates may be necessary to mitigate skimming and dumping. PMID:10133708

  7. Risk Adjustment for a Children's Capitation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Manning, Willard G.; Keeler, Emmett B.

    1993-01-01

    Few capitation arrangements vary premiums by a child's health characteristics, yielding an incentive to discriminate against children with predictably high expenditures from chronic diseases. In this article, we explore risk adjusters for the 35 percent of the variance in annual outpatient expenditure we find to be potentially predictable. Demographic factors such as age and gender only explain 5 percent of such variance; health status measures explain 25 percent, prior use and health status measures together explain 65 to 70 percent. The profit from risk selection falls less than proportionately with improved ability to adjust for risk. Partial capitation rates may be necessary to mitigate skimming and dumping. PMID:10133708

  8. Adjustable flow rate controller for polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Kenneth M.

    1981-01-01

    An adjustable device for controlling the flow rate of polymer solutions which results in only little shearing of the polymer molecules, said device comprising an inlet manifold, an outlet manifold, a plurality of tubes capable of providing communication between said inlet and outlet manifolds, said tubes each having an internal diameter that is smaller than that of the inlet manifold and large enough to insure that viscosity of the polymer solution passing through each said tube will not be reduced more than about 25 percent, and a valve associated with each tube, said valve being capable of opening or closing communication in that tube between the inlet and outlet manifolds, each said valve when fully open having a diameter that is substantially at least as great as that of the tube with which it is associated.

  9. 5 CFR 9901.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9901... Increases § 9901.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Subject to § 9901.105, the Secretary may set and... factors. (b) The Secretary may determine the effective date of newly set or adjusted band rate...

  10. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Periodic rate adjustments. 154.403 Section 154.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154.403 Periodic rate adjustments....

  11. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  12. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  13. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  14. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  15. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  16. 5 CFR 536.305 - Adjusting an employee's retained rate when a pay schedule is adjusted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... employee's existing position of record. (2) As provided in 5 CFR 531.206, a retained rate adjustment under... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS GRADE AND PAY RETENTION Pay Retention § 536.305 Adjusting an employee's... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjusting an employee's retained...

  17. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.22 Adjusted internal rate of return. The adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... yearly net savings in energy or water and non-fuel or non-water operation and maintenance...

  18. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.22 Adjusted internal rate of return. The adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... yearly net savings in energy or water and non-fuel or non-water operation and maintenance...

  19. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adjusted internal rate of return. 436.22 Section 436.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS... adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation...

  20. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adjusted internal rate of return. 436.22 Section 436.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS... adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation...

  1. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section... Western Area Power Administrations § 903.11 Advance announcement of rate adjustment. The Administrator may... advertisement, and/or by Federal Register publication. Written comments relevant to rate policy and design...

  2. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section... Western Area Power Administrations § 903.11 Advance announcement of rate adjustment. The Administrator may... advertisement, and/or by Federal Register publication. Written comments relevant to rate policy and design...

  3. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section... Western Area Power Administrations § 903.11 Advance announcement of rate adjustment. The Administrator may... advertisement, and/or by Federal Register publication. Written comments relevant to rate policy and design...

  4. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations §...

  5. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section... Western Area Power Administrations § 903.11 Advance announcement of rate adjustment. The Administrator may... advertisement, and/or by Federal Register publication. Written comments relevant to rate policy and design...

  6. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  7. The dangers of underestimating the importance of data adjustments in band ratioing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crippen, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The practical importance of simple data adjustments for path (atmospheric) radiance and sensor calibration offsets prior to band ratioing has often been overlooked or misjudged. This paper describes and demonstrates the critical nature of data adjustments for the production of useful ratio images, including ratio images derived solely from long wavelength bands. A simple bispectral graphic model is used for illustrating and evaluating the impact of data offsets upon ratio images. Orthogonal indices, used as alternatives to band ratios, are shown to be sometimes less sensitive to topographic influences than ratios of unadjusted data but not less sensitive than ratios of properly adjusted data.

  8. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701.322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate...

  9. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate Ranges... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701.322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  10. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjusted internal rate of return. 436.22 Section 436.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.22 Adjusted internal rate of return....

  11. 75 FR 455 - Adjustment of Cable Statutory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Participate. SUMMARY: The Copyright Royalty Judges are announcing the commencement of the proceeding to adjust the rates for the cable statutory license. The Copyright Royalty Judges also are announcing the date... Copyright Royalty Board Adjustment of Cable Statutory License Royalty Rates AGENCY: Copyright Royalty...

  12. 76 FR 53160 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Service and Koninklijke TNT Post BV and TNT Post Pakketservice Benelux BV (TNT Agreement), and the China... the agreement is functionally equivalent to the previously filed TNT and CPG Agreements, and contains...'' and the TNT Agreement does not include rates for a service described as ``Global Confirmation Over...

  13. Maladaptive sex ratio adjustment by a sex-changing shrimp in selective-fishing environments.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Susumu; Yoshino, Kenji; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Kawajiri, Toshifumi; Goshima, Seiji

    2013-05-01

    1. Selective harvesting is acknowledged as a serious concern in efforts to conserve wild animal populations. In fisheries, most studies have focused on gradual and directional changes in the life-history traits of target species. While such changes represent the ultimate response of harvested animals, it is also well known that the life history of target species plastically alters with harvesting. However, research on the adaptive significance of these types of condition-dependent changes has been limited. 2. We explored the adaptive significance of annual changes in the age at sex-change of the protandrous (male-first) hermaphroditic shrimp and examined how selective harvesting affects life-history variation, by conducting field observations across 13 years and a controlled laboratory experiment. In addition, we considered whether plastic responses by the shrimp would be favourable, negligible or negative with respect to the conservation of fishery resources. 3. The age at sex-change and the population structure of the shrimp fluctuated between years during the study period. The results of the field observations and laboratory experiment both indicated that the shrimp could plastically change the timing of sex-change in accordance with the age structure of the population. These findings provide the first concrete evidence of adult sex ratio adjustment by pandalid shrimp, a group that has been treated as a model in the sex allocation theory. 4. The sex ratio adjustment by the shrimp did not always seem to be sufficient, however, as the supplement of females is restricted by their annual somatic growth rate. In addition, adjusted sex ratios are further skewed by the unintentional female-selectivity of fishing activity prior to the breeding season, indicating that the occurrence of males that have postponed sex-change causes sex ratio adjustment to become unfavourable. 5. We conclude that the plastic responses of harvested animals in selective fishing environments

  14. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Periodic rate... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154.403 Periodic rate adjustments. (a) This section applies to the passthrough, on a...

  15. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Periodic rate... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate Changes § 154.403 Periodic rate adjustments. (a) This section applies to the passthrough, on a...

  16. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... National Housing Act. (a) Types of mortgages insurable. The types of adjustable rate mortgages that are... payment, except that, for these types of mortgages, the first adjustment shall be no sooner or later than... secured by a principal dwelling under the Truth in Lending Act, 15 U.S.C. 1601 et seq. (h)...

  17. Estimation of adjusted rate differences using additive negative binomial regression.

    PubMed

    Donoghoe, Mark W; Marschner, Ian C

    2016-08-15

    Rate differences are an important effect measure in biostatistics and provide an alternative perspective to rate ratios. When the data are event counts observed during an exposure period, adjusted rate differences may be estimated using an identity-link Poisson generalised linear model, also known as additive Poisson regression. A problem with this approach is that the assumption of equality of mean and variance rarely holds in real data, which often show overdispersion. An additive negative binomial model is the natural alternative to account for this; however, standard model-fitting methods are often unable to cope with the constrained parameter space arising from the non-negativity restrictions of the additive model. In this paper, we propose a novel solution to this problem using a variant of the expectation-conditional maximisation-either algorithm. Our method provides a reliable way to fit an additive negative binomial regression model and also permits flexible generalisations using semi-parametric regression functions. We illustrate the method using a placebo-controlled clinical trial of fenofibrate treatment in patients with type II diabetes, where the outcome is the number of laser therapy courses administered to treat diabetic retinopathy. An R package is available that implements the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27073156

  18. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate...

  19. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate...

  20. 75 FR 29577 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... rates for the 2011 season in the Federal Register on October 23, 2009 (74 FR 54848), and we will publish... rates for the 2011 season for the San Carlos Irrigation Project (74 FR 40227).) Final Project name Rate... published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2009 (74 FR 54846) to propose adjustments to the...

  1. Pollinating fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi adjusts the offspring sex ratio to other foundresses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao-Yuan; Chen, Zhong-Zheng; Jiang, Zi-Feng; Huang, Da-Wei; Niu, Li-Ming; Fu, Yue-Guan

    2013-04-01

    Local mate competition theory predicts that offspring sex ratio in pollinating fig wasps is female-biased when there is only one foundress, and increased foundress density results in increased offspring sex ratio. Information of other foundresses and clutch size have been suggested to be the main proximate explanations for sex ratio adjustment under local mate competition. Our focus was to show the mechanism of sex ratio adjustment in a pollinating fig wasp, Ceratosolen solmsi Mayr, an obligate pollinator of the functionally dioecious fig, Ficus hispida Linn., with controlled experiments in the field. First, we obtained offspring from one pollinator and offspring at different oviposition sequences, and found that offspring sex ratio decreased with clutch size, and pollinators produced most of their male offspring at the start of bouts, followed by mostly females. Second, we found that offspring sex ratio increased with foundress density, and pollinators did adjust their offspring sex ratio to other females in the oviposition patches. We suggest that when oviposition sites are not limited, pollinators will mainly adjust their offspring sex ratio to other foundresses independent of clutch size changes, whereas adjusting clutch size may be used to adjust sex ratio when oviposition sites are limited.

  2. 38 CFR 3.27 - Automatic adjustment of benefit rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adjustment of benefit rates. (a) Improved pension. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit... income limitation and maximum monthly rates. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit...(b)(1)) (c) Monetary allowance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 18 for certain individuals who are children...

  3. 38 CFR 3.27 - Automatic adjustment of benefit rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adjustment of benefit rates. (a) Improved pension. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit... income limitation and maximum monthly rates. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit...(b)(1)) (c) Monetary allowance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 18 for certain individuals who are children...

  4. 38 CFR 3.27 - Automatic adjustment of benefit rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adjustment of benefit rates. (a) Improved pension. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit... income limitation and maximum monthly rates. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit...(b)(1)) (c) Monetary allowance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 18 for certain individuals who are children...

  5. 38 CFR 3.27 - Automatic adjustment of benefit rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adjustment of benefit rates. (a) Improved pension. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit... income limitation and maximum monthly rates. Whenever there is a cost-of-living increase in benefit...(b)(1)) (c) Monetary allowance under 38 U.S.C. chapter 18 for certain individuals who are children...

  6. A Stochastic Version of the Brass PF Ratio Adjustment of Age-Specific Fertility Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jack; Alcantara, Adélamar; Ruan, Xiaomin

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of age-specific fertility rates based on survey data are known to suffer down-bias associated with incomplete reporting. Previously, William Brass (1964, 1965, 1968) proposed a series of adjustments of such data to reflect more appropriate levels of fertility through comparison with data on children-ever-born by age, a measure of cohort-specific cumulative fertility. His now widely-used Parity/Fertility or PF ratio method makes a number of strong assumptions, which have been the focus of an extended discussion in the literature on indirect estimation. However, while it is clear that the measures used in making adjusted age-specific fertility estimates with this method are captured with statistical uncertainty, little discussion of the nature of this uncertainty around PF-ratio based estimates of fertility has been entertained in the literature. Since both age-specific risk of childbearing and cumulative parity (children ever born) are measured with statistical uncertainty, an unknown credibility interval must surround every PF ratio-based estimate. Using the standard approach, this is unknown, limiting the ability to make statistical comparisons of fertility between groups or to understand stochasticity in population dynamics. This paper makes use of approaches applied to similar problems in engineering, the natural sciences, and decision analysis—often discussed under the title of uncertainty analysis or stochastic modeling—to characterize this uncertainty and to present a new method for making PF ratio-based fertility estimates with 95 percent uncertainty intervals. The implications for demographic analysis, between-group comparisons of fertility, and the field of statistical demography are explored. PMID:21829718

  7. Age-adjusted Labor Force Participation Rates, 1960-2045.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    A proposed new age-adjusted measure for calculating labor force participation rate eliminates the effect of changes in the age distribution. According to the new criterion, increases in women's labor force participation from 1960-2000 would have been even greater of shifts in the age distribution had not occurred. (Contains 12 references.) (JOW)

  8. The Impact of Financial Sophistication on Adjustable Rate Mortgage Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hyrum; Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a financial sophistication scale on adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) borrowing is explored. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis using recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances reveal that ARM borrowing is driven by both the least and most financially sophisticated households but for different reasons. Less…

  9. 76 FR 53982 - New Postal Product and Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...). In Order No. 700, the Commission approved the functionally equivalent HongKong Post Agreement.\\2\\ The..., TNT Agreement, and the HongKong Post Agreement. The Postal Service requests that the China Post 2011... Operators 1 product. Notice at 2. \\2\\ See Docket No. R2011-4, Order Approving Rate Adjustment for...

  10. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section shall apply only to mortgage loans described under sections 203(b), 203(h) and 203(k) of the...; (ii) Three-year adjustable rate mortgages—no sooner than 36 months or later than 42 months; (iii) Five... secured by a principal dwelling under the Truth in Lending Act, 15 U.S.C. 1601 et seq. (h)...

  11. True gender ratios and stereotype rating norms

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Alan; Doehren, Sam; Gygax, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    We present a study comparing, in English, perceived distributions of men and women in 422 named occupations with actual real world distributions. The first set of data was obtained from previous a large-scale norming study, whereas the second set was mostly drawn from UK governmental sources. In total, real world ratios for 290 occupations were obtained for our perceive vs. real world comparison, of which 205 were deemed to be unproblematic. The means for the two sources were similar and the correlation between them was high, suggesting that people are generally accurate at judging real gender ratios, though there were some notable exceptions. Beside this correlation, some interesting patterns emerged from the two sources, suggesting some response strategies when people complete norming studies. We discuss these patterns in terms of the way real world data might complement norming studies in determining gender stereotypicality. PMID:26257681

  12. Judging hospitals by severity-adjusted mortality rates: the influence of the severity-adjustment method.

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, L I; Ash, A S; Shwartz, M; Daley, J; Hughes, J S; Mackiernan, Y D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This research examined whether judgments about a hospital's risk-adjusted mortality performance are affected by the severity-adjustment method. METHODS: Data came from 100 acute care hospitals nationwide and 11880 adults admitted in 1991 for acute myocardial infarction. Ten severity measures were used in separate multivariable logistic models predicting in-hospital death. Observed-to-expected death rates and z scores were calculated with each severity measure for each hospital. RESULTS: Unadjusted mortality rates for the 100 hospitals ranged from 4.8% to 26.4%. For 32 hospitals, observed mortality rates differed significantly from expected rates for 1 or more, but not for all 10, severity measures. Agreement between pairs of severity measures on whether hospitals were flagged as statistical mortality outliers ranged from fair to good. Severity measures based on medical records frequently disagreed with measures based on discharge abstracts. CONCLUSIONS: Although the 10 severity measures agreed about relative hospital performance more often than would be expected by chance, assessments of individual hospital mortality rates varied by different severity-adjustment methods. PMID:8876505

  13. 39 CFR 3010.44 - Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments. 3010.44... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Rate Adjustments for Negotiated Service Agreements (Type 2 Rate Adjustments) § 3010.44 Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments. (a) The Commission will establish a docket for...

  14. 39 CFR 3010.44 - Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments. 3010.44... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Rate Adjustments for Negotiated Service Agreements (Type 2 Rate Adjustments) § 3010.44 Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments. (a) The Commission will establish a docket for...

  15. 39 CFR 3010.44 - Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments 3010.44... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Rate Adjustments for Negotiated Service Agreements (Type 2 Rate Adjustments) § 3010.44 Proceedings for Type 2 rate adjustments (a) The Commission will establish a docket for...

  16. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  17. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  18. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  19. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  20. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  1. Non-quantitative adjustment of offspring sex ratios in pollinating fig wasps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Sun, Bao-Fa; He, Jun-Zhou; Dunn, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Fig wasp is one of the most well known model systems in examining whether or not the parents could adjust their offspring sex ratio to maximize their gene frequency transmission in next generations. Our manipulative experiments showed that, in all of the five pollinator wasps of figs (Agaonidae) that have different averages of foundress numbers per syconium, almost the same proportions of male offspring are produced in the experiment that foundresses deposit one hour then are killed with ether (66.1%–70.1%) and over the lifespan of each foundress (14.0%–21.0%). The foundresses tend to deposit their male eggs prior to female eggs. The observed increase in the proportion of male offspring as a function of foundress number results from density-dependent interference competition among the foundresses. These results showed that the selection of gene frequency transmission through the behavioral adjustment in the evolution of sex ratio does not exist in these five fig wasps. The results here implied that genetic adjustment mechanisms of the sex ratio of fig wasps can only be triggered to be on or off and that the foundresses can not quantitatively adjust their sex ratio according to increased environmental selection pressure. PMID:26293349

  2. Non-quantitative adjustment of offspring sex ratios in pollinating fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Sun, Bao-Fa; He, Jun-Zhou; Dunn, Derek W

    2015-08-21

    Fig wasp is one of the most well known model systems in examining whether or not the parents could adjust their offspring sex ratio to maximize their gene frequency transmission in next generations. Our manipulative experiments showed that, in all of the five pollinator wasps of figs (Agaonidae) that have different averages of foundress numbers per syconium, almost the same proportions of male offspring are produced in the experiment that foundresses deposit one hour then are killed with ether (66.1%-70.1%) and over the lifespan of each foundress (14.0%-21.0%). The foundresses tend to deposit their male eggs prior to female eggs. The observed increase in the proportion of male offspring as a function of foundress number results from density-dependent interference competition among the foundresses. These results showed that the selection of gene frequency transmission through the behavioral adjustment in the evolution of sex ratio does not exist in these five fig wasps. The results here implied that genetic adjustment mechanisms of the sex ratio of fig wasps can only be triggered to be on or off and that the foundresses can not quantitatively adjust their sex ratio according to increased environmental selection pressure.

  3. RATE-ADJUSTMENT ALGORITHM FOR AGGREGATE TCP CONGESTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    P. TINNAKORNSRISUPHAP, ET AL

    2000-09-01

    The TCP congestion-control mechanism is an algorithm designed to probe the available bandwidth of the network path that TCP packets traverse. However, it is well-known that the TCP congestion-control mechanism does not perform well on networks with a large bandwidth-delay product due to the slow dynamics in adapting its congestion window, especially for short-lived flows. One promising solution to the problem is to aggregate and share the path information among TCP connections that traverse the same bottleneck path, i.e., Aggregate TCP. However, this paper shows via a queueing analysis of a generalized processor-sharing (GPS) queue with regularly-varying service time that a simple aggregation of local TCP connections together into a single aggregate TCP connection can result in a severe performance degradation. To prevent such a degradation, we introduce a rate-adjustment algorithm. Our simulation confirms that by utilizing our rate-adjustment algorithm on aggregate TCP, connections which would normally receive poor service achieve significant performance improvements without penalizing connections which already receive good service.

  4. Female starlings adjust primary sex ratio in response to aromatic plants in the nest.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Vicente; Veiga, José P.; Cordero, Pedro J.; Viñuela, Javier; Monaghan, Pat

    2004-01-01

    Adjustment of offspring sex ratios should be favoured by natural selection when parents are capable of facultatively altering brood sex ratios and of recognizing the circumstances that predict the probable fitness benefit of producing sons and daughters. Although experimental studies have shown that female birds may adjust offspring sex ratios in response to changes in their own condition and in the external appearance of their mate, and male attributes other than his external morphology are also thought to act as signals of male quality, it is not known whether females will respond to changes in such signals, in the absence of any change in the appearance of the male himself. Here, we experimentally manipulated a male courtship display, the green plants carried to the nest by male spotless starlings (Sturnus unicolor), without changing any physical attributes of the male himself, and examined whether this influenced female decisions on offspring sex ratio. We found that in an environment in which female starlings were producing more daughters than sons, experimental enhancement of the green nesting material caused females to significantly increase the number of male eggs produced and thereby removed the female bias. This effect was consistent in 2 years and at two localities. This demonstrates that the green material, whose function has long puzzled biologists, conveys important information to the female and that she facultatively adjusts offspring production accordingly. PMID:15347516

  5. Analysis of Case-Parent Trios Using a Loglinear Model with Adjustment for Transmission Ratio Distortion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lam O; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Labbe, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of the two parental alleles to offspring deviating from the Mendelian ratio is termed Transmission Ratio Distortion (TRD), occurs throughout gametic and embryonic development. TRD has been well-studied in animals, but remains largely unknown in humans. The Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) was first proposed to test for association and linkage in case-trios (affected offspring and parents); adjusting for TRD using control-trios was recommended. However, the TDT does not provide risk parameter estimates for different genetic models. A loglinear model was later proposed to provide child and maternal relative risk (RR) estimates of disease, assuming Mendelian transmission. Results from our simulation study showed that case-trios RR estimates using this model are biased in the presence of TRD; power and Type 1 error are compromised. We propose an extended loglinear model adjusting for TRD. Under this extended model, RR estimates, power and Type 1 error are correctly restored. We applied this model to an intrauterine growth restriction dataset, and showed consistent results with a previous approach that adjusted for TRD using control-trios. Our findings suggested the need to adjust for TRD in avoiding spurious results. Documenting TRD in the population is therefore essential for the correct interpretation of genetic association studies. PMID:27630667

  6. Analysis of Case-Parent Trios Using a Loglinear Model with Adjustment for Transmission Ratio Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lam O.; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Labbe, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of the two parental alleles to offspring deviating from the Mendelian ratio is termed Transmission Ratio Distortion (TRD), occurs throughout gametic and embryonic development. TRD has been well-studied in animals, but remains largely unknown in humans. The Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) was first proposed to test for association and linkage in case-trios (affected offspring and parents); adjusting for TRD using control-trios was recommended. However, the TDT does not provide risk parameter estimates for different genetic models. A loglinear model was later proposed to provide child and maternal relative risk (RR) estimates of disease, assuming Mendelian transmission. Results from our simulation study showed that case-trios RR estimates using this model are biased in the presence of TRD; power and Type 1 error are compromised. We propose an extended loglinear model adjusting for TRD. Under this extended model, RR estimates, power and Type 1 error are correctly restored. We applied this model to an intrauterine growth restriction dataset, and showed consistent results with a previous approach that adjusted for TRD using control-trios. Our findings suggested the need to adjust for TRD in avoiding spurious results. Documenting TRD in the population is therefore essential for the correct interpretation of genetic association studies.

  7. Analysis of Case-Parent Trios Using a Loglinear Model with Adjustment for Transmission Ratio Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lam O.; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Labbe, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of the two parental alleles to offspring deviating from the Mendelian ratio is termed Transmission Ratio Distortion (TRD), occurs throughout gametic and embryonic development. TRD has been well-studied in animals, but remains largely unknown in humans. The Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) was first proposed to test for association and linkage in case-trios (affected offspring and parents); adjusting for TRD using control-trios was recommended. However, the TDT does not provide risk parameter estimates for different genetic models. A loglinear model was later proposed to provide child and maternal relative risk (RR) estimates of disease, assuming Mendelian transmission. Results from our simulation study showed that case-trios RR estimates using this model are biased in the presence of TRD; power and Type 1 error are compromised. We propose an extended loglinear model adjusting for TRD. Under this extended model, RR estimates, power and Type 1 error are correctly restored. We applied this model to an intrauterine growth restriction dataset, and showed consistent results with a previous approach that adjusted for TRD using control-trios. Our findings suggested the need to adjust for TRD in avoiding spurious results. Documenting TRD in the population is therefore essential for the correct interpretation of genetic association studies. PMID:27630667

  8. Sex choice in plants: facultative adjustment of the sex ratio in the perennial herb Begonia gracilis.

    PubMed

    López, S; Domínguez, C A

    2003-11-01

    Sex allocation theory predicts that reproducing individuals will increase their fitness by facultatively adjusting their relative investment towards the rarer sex in response to population shifts in operational sex ratio (OSR). The evolution of facultative manipulation of sex ratio depends on the ability of the parents to track the conditions favouring skewed sex allocation and on the mechanism controlling sex allocation. In animals, which have well-developed sensorial mechanisms, facultative adjustment of sex ratios has been demonstrated on many occasions. In this paper, we show that plants have mechanisms that allow them to evaluate the population OSR. We simulated three different conditions of population OSR by manipulating the amount of pollen received by the female flowers of a monoecious herb, and examined the effect of this treatment on the allocation to male vs. female flowers. A shortage of pollen on the stigmas resulted in a more male-skewed sex allocation, whereas plants that experienced a relatively pollen rich environment tended to produce a more female-skewed sex allocation pattern. Our results for Begonia gracilis demonstrate that the individuals of this species are able to respond to the levels of pollination intensity experienced by their female flowers and adjust their patterns of sex allocation in accordance to the expectations of sex allocation theory.

  9. Using sightability-adjusted brood-pair ratios to estimate waterfowl productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pagano, Anthony M.; Amundson, Courtney; Pieron, Matthew R.; Arnold, Todd W.; Kimmel, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, biologists used brood-pair ratios (BPRs) as an index to waterfowl productivity to help guide management decisions and evaluate conservation practices. However, BPRs are biased by imperfect detection probabilities, especially for broods. We conducted roadside surveys for breeding waterfowl pairs on 7–8 study sites in the springs of 2006–2008 in northeastern North Dakota, USA. Later each year, we conducted replicate counts of broods on the same wetlands and used mark–recapture methods to estimate sightability-adjusted BPRs (SA-BPRs). Traditional roadside brood surveys detected only 30–45% of the available broods, depending on species. We explored the potential for using SA-BPRs to measure hen success (i.e., the probability a female hatches ≥1 egg across all nesting attempts) for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and other upland-nesting dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). We found that SA-BPRs explained 40% of the variation in hen success over 5 species of dabbling ducks, and we were able to detect an effect of predator reduction on hen success in combined dabblers, but not in mallards alone. However, we found no relationship between SA-BPRs and mallard fledging rates (hen success × initial brood size × duckling survival). Our results suggest that SA-BPRs can provide a cost-effective alternative to traditional measures of productivity such as nesting success, but not to measures of duckling survival. Nevertheless, SA-BPRs may be useful in areas where traditional measures of waterfowl productivity are logistically or financially challenging.

  10. Peer- and Self-Rated Correlates of a Teacher-Rated Typology of Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, William A., Jr.; Lease, A. Michele; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2007-01-01

    External correlates of a teacher-rated typology of child adjustment developed using the Behavior Assessment System for Children were examined. Participants included 377 elementary school children recruited from 26 classrooms in the southeastern United States. Multivariate analyses of variance and planned comparisons were used to determine whether…

  11. Maladaptive Sex Ratio Adjustment in the Invasive Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Eva J P; Henriques, Gil J B; Michalakis, Yannis; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Sex allocation theory is often hailed as the most successful area of evolutionary theory due to its striking success as a predictor of empirical observations [1]. Most naturally occurring sex ratios can be explained by the principle of equal investment in the sexes [2-4] or by cases of "extraordinary" sex allocation [5]. Deviations from the expected sex ratio are often correlated with weak selection or low environmental predictability (e.g., [6, 7]); true cases of aberrant sex allocation are surprisingly rare [8]. Here, we present a case of long-lasting maladaptive sex allocation, which we discovered in invasive populations of the exclusively sexual brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. A. franciscana was introduced to Southern France roughly 500 generations ago [9]; since then, it has coexisted with the native asexual species Artemia parthenogenetica [10]. Although we expect A. franciscana to produce balanced offspring sex ratios, we regularly observed extremely male-biased sex ratios in invasive A. franciscana, which were significantly correlated to the proportion of asexuals in the overall population. We experimentally proved that both invasive- and native-range A. franciscana overproduced sons when exposed to excess females, without distinguishing between conspecific and asexual females. We conclude that A. franciscana adjust their offspring sex ratio in function of the adult sex ratio but are information limited in the presence of asexual females. Their facultative adjustment trait, which is presumably adaptive in their native range, has thus become maladaptive in the invasive range where asexuals occur. Despite this, it has persisted unchanged for hundreds of generations. PMID:27185556

  12. 39 CFR 3010.26 - Calculation of unused rate adjustment authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... unused rate adjustment authority. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 33834, June 12, 2014. (a... the second notice is filed and interim unused rate adjustment authority will be calculated for the... months before the second notice is filed. (2) Interim unused rate adjustment authority is equal to...

  13. 76 FR 26324 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Section 31 Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... FR 24757 (May 5, 2010). \\7\\ The annual adjustments, as well as the mid-year adjustments required in... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Section 31 Fee Rates I. Background Section 31... Commission to make one final adjustment for fiscal year 2012.\\8\\ \\6\\ Order Making Fiscal Year 2011...

  14. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  15. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  16. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  17. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  18. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  19. 5 CFR 535.105 - Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay... REGULATIONS CRITICAL POSITION PAY AUTHORITY § 535.105 Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay. (a) The rate... head of an agency may set pay initially at any amount up to the rate of pay for level II or level I...

  20. 77 FR 10767 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ..., Telephone: (435) 722-4341. Walker River Irrigation Project Athena Brown, Superintendent, 311 E. Washington... Federal Register on September 20, 2011 (76 FR 58293) to propose adjustments to the irrigation assessment... 203(d) of the Arizona Water Settlements Act (Pub. L. 108-451). Issue: The BIA should not use...

  1. 76 FR 26759 - Rate Adjustments for Indian Irrigation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Federal Register on November 1, 2010 (75 FR 67095) to propose adjustments to the irrigation assessment..., Oregon 97232-4169, Telephone: (503) 231- 6702 Project Name Project/Agency Contacts Fort Hall Dean Fox..., PH: (406) 653-1752 602 6th Avenue North Wolf Point, MT 59201 Wind River Ed Lone Fight,...

  2. Demonization of Divorce: Prevalence Rates and Links to Postdivorce Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J.; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    The meaning-making process can be crucial to individuals as they adjust to their divorce. Demonization is a negative coping response (also known as spiritual struggle) that involves appraising someone or something as related to demonic forces. Individuals may cognitively frame a divorce as the work of Satan in order to understand suffering while…

  3. Adjusting the Adjusted X[superscript 2]/df Ratio Statistic for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Analyses: Does the Model Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Drasgow, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Two Monte Carlo simulation studies investigated the effectiveness of the mean adjusted X[superscript 2]/df statistic proposed by Drasgow and colleagues and, because of problems with the method, a new approach for assessing the goodness of fit of an item response theory model was developed. It has been previously recommended that mean adjusted…

  4. 39 CFR 3010.27 - Application of unused rate adjustment authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... unused rate adjustment authority. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 33834, June 12, 2014. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 33834, June 12, 2014. When the percentage change in rates for a class.... Second, the unused rate adjustment authority generated in the most recent Type 1-A or Type 1-B...

  5. 75 FR 8730 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; FHA- Disclosure of Adjustable Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) Rates AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Housing, HUD. ACTION... of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended). This Notice is soliciting comments from members of the... also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Disclosure of Adjustable Rate Mortgages...

  6. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties... adjust the maximum amount of each civil money penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of...

  7. 77 FR 13663 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Mid-Year Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Mid-Year Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates I. Background Section... Commission by Congress for such fiscal year.''). \\5\\ Id. \\6\\ Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments... fiscal year 2012 calculated by the Commission in its Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments...

  8. A new technology for producing hydrogen and adjustable ratio syngas from coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Shen; Zhi-zhong Wang; Huai-wang Yang; Run-sheng Yao

    2007-12-15

    About 15 billion Nm{sup 3} coke oven gas (COG) is emitted into the air in Shanxi Province in China as air pollutants. It is also a waste of precious chemical resources. In this study, COG was purified respectively by four methods including refrigeration, fiberglass, silica gel, and molecular sieve. Purified COG was separated by a prism membrane into two gas products. One consists mainly of H{sub 2} ({gt}90 vol %) and the other is rich in CH{sub 4} ({gt}60 vol %) with their exact compositions to vary with the membrane separation pressure and outlet gas flow ratio. The gas rich in CH{sub 4} was partially oxidized with oxygen in a high-temperature fixed-bed quartz reactor charged with coke particles of 10 mm size. At 1200-1300{sup o}C, a CH{sub 4} conversion of {gt}99% could be obtained. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the synthesis product gas can be adjusted in the range 0.3-1.4, very favorable for further C1 synthesis. 10 refs., 17 figs., 1t ab.

  9. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  10. Shuttle bit rate synchronizer. [signal to noise ratios and error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, D. C.; Fultz, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A shuttle bit rate synchronizer brassboard unit was designed, fabricated, and tested, which meets or exceeds the contractual specifications. The bit rate synchronizer operates at signal-to-noise ratios (in a bit rate bandwidth) down to -5 dB while exhibiting less than 0.6 dB bit error rate degradation. The mean acquisition time was measured to be less than 2 seconds. The synchronizer is designed around a digital data transition tracking loop whose phase and data detectors are integrate-and-dump filters matched to the Manchester encoded bits specified. It meets the reliability (no adjustments or tweaking) and versatility (multiple bit rates) of the shuttle S-band communication system through an implementation which is all digital after the initial stage of analog AGC and A/D conversion.

  11. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate... section of this subpart, and to revisions on a periodic basis of a gas reimbursement percentage. (b) Where a pipeline recovers fuel use and unaccounted-for natural gas in kind, the fuel...

  12. 75 FR 81817 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Extensions Act, 2011 (H.R. 3082), which I signed into law today (the ``Continuing Appropriations Act''), the...; section 301(a) of Public Law 102-40) at Schedule 3. Sec. 2. Senior Executive Service. The ranges of rates... section 140 of Public Law 97-92) at Schedule 7. Sec. 4. Uniformed Services. The rates of monthly basic...

  13. 78 FR 71501 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... the section 119 compulsory license for the 2010-2014 term. See 75 FR 53198. The rates adopted by the... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... Copyright Royalty Judges announce a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 1% in the royalty rates...

  14. 77 FR 3818 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates I. Background Section 31... Rel. No. 34-64373, Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to the Fee Rates Applicable under... Exchange Act effective on the later of October 1, 2011 or the date of enactment of an Act making a...

  15. 78 FR 25515 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates I. Background Section 31... notice of the new fee rates under Section 31 not later than 30 days after the date on which an Act making... appendix also includes the data used by the Commission in making this adjustment. III. Effective Date...

  16. A Short Form of the Teacher Rating Scale of School Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Lucy R.; Rotenberg, Ken J.

    2007-01-01

    A total of 278 children at Time 1 (144 male and 134 female) from School Years 1 and 2 in the United Kingdom serve as participants. The children complete self-rated scales of school adjustment, and their teachers complete the Teacher Rating Scale of School Adjustment (TRSSA) twice across a 1-year period. At Time 1, children's performance on…

  17. 42 CFR 417.594 - Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR). 417... community rate (ACR). (a) Basic rule. Each HMO or CMP must compute its basic rate as follows: (1) Compute an... must compute its initial rate using either of the following systems: (i) A community rating system...

  18. 42 CFR 417.594 - Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR). 417... community rate (ACR). (a) Basic rule. Each HMO or CMP must compute its basic rate as follows: (1) Compute an... must compute its initial rate using either of the following systems: (i) A community rating system...

  19. 78 FR 80451 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... ] TD31DE13.201 ] TD31DE13.202 ] TD31DE13.203 ] TD31DE13.204 [FR Doc. 2013-31445 Filed 12-30-13; 11:15 a.m... Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs (38 U.S.C. 7306, 7404; section 301(a) of Public Law 102-40... under 37 U.S.C. 1009, and the rate of monthly cadet or midshipman pay (37 U.S.C. 203(c)) are set...

  20. A 5-trial adjusting delay discounting task: Accurate discount rates in less than 60 seconds

    PubMed Central

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Bickel, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who discount delayed rewards at a high rate are more likely to engage in substance abuse, overeating, or problem gambling. Findings such as these suggest the value of methods to obtain an accurate and fast measurement of discount rate that can be easily deployed in variety of settings. In the present study, we developed and evaluated the 5-trial adjusting delay task, a novel method of obtaining discount rate in less than one minute. We hypothesized that discount rates from the 5-trial adjusting delay task would be similar and correlated with discount rates from a lengthier task we have used previously, and that four known effects relating to delay discounting would be replicable with this novel task. To test these hypotheses, the 5-trial adjusting delay task was administered to 111 college students six times to obtain discount rates for six different commodities, along with a lengthier adjusting amount discounting task. We found that discount rates were similar and correlated between the 5-trial adjusting delay task and the adjusting amount task. Each of the four known effects relating to delay discounting was replicated with the 5-trial adjusting delay task to varying degrees. First, discount rates were inversely correlated with amount. Second, discount rates between past and future outcomes were correlated. Third, discount rates were greater for consumable rewards than with money, although we did not control for amount in this comparison. Fourth, discount rates were lower when zero amounts opposing the chosen time point were explicitly described. Results indicate that the 5-trial adjusting delay task is a viable, rapid method to assess discount rate. PMID:24708144

  1. Reliability of Urinary Excretion Rate Adjustment in Measurements of Hippuric Acid in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Nicolli, Annamaria; Chiara, Federica; Gambalunga, Alberto; Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Trevisan, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The urinary excretion rate is calculated based on short-term, defined time sample collections with a known sample mass, and this measurement can be used to remove the variability in urine concentrations due to urine dilution. Adjustment to the urinary excretion rate of hippuric acid was evaluated in 31 healthy volunteers (14 males and 17 females). Urine was collected as short-term or spot samples and tested for specific gravity, creatinine and hippuric acid. Hippuric acid values were unadjusted or adjusted to measurements of specific gravity, creatinine or urinary excretion rate. Hippuric acid levels were partially independent of urinary volume and urinary flow rate, in contrast to specific gravity and creatinine, which were both highly dependent on the hippuric acid level. Accordingly, hippuric acid was independent on urinary specific gravity and creatinine excretion. Unadjusted and adjusted values for specific gravity or creatinine were generally closely correlated, especially in spot samples. Values adjusted to the urinary excretion rate appeared well correlated to those unadjusted and adjusted to specific gravity or creatinine values. Thus, adjustment of crude hippuric acid values to the urinary excretion rate is a valid procedure but is difficult to apply in the field of occupational medicine and does not improve the information derived from values determined in spot urine samples, either unadjusted or adjusted to specific gravity and creatinine. PMID:25019265

  2. 75 FR 75624 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... FR 53198 (August 31, 2010). Section 119(c)(2) requires the Judges annually to adjust these rates ``to... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The...

  3. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  4. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  5. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  6. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  7. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  8. The Impact of Statistically Adjusting for Rater Effects on Conditional Standard Errors of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Mark R.; Harik, Polina; Clauser, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research indicates that the overall reliability of performance ratings can be improved by using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to adjust for rater effects. The present investigation extends previous work by evaluating the impact of OLS adjustment on standard errors of measurement ("SEM") at specific score levels. In addition, a…

  9. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  10. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  11. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  12. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil...

  13. Metabolic rate, respiratory exchange ratio, and apneas during meditation.

    PubMed

    Kesterson, J; Clinch, N F

    1989-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a drop in metabolic rate (MR) causes the apneas observed in some subjects during transcendental meditation (TM). We measured O2 consumption (VO2) and CO2 production (VCO2) in three groups of experienced meditators and one group of nonmeditating controls. Measurements were made before, during, and after TM for the meditators and before, during, and after eyes-closed relaxation for the nonmeditating controls. The three groups of meditators consisted of 1) those showing little change in the frequency of ventilation (f) with meditation, 2) those showing a marked decline in f, and 3) those showing numerous apneas and a marked fall in f. There were significant trial effects but no group or interaction effects for the decline in VO2. Thus we concluded that a drop in MR is not the cause of the apneas. However, there were significant trial and interaction effects for the changes in VCO2 and the respiratory exchange ratio (R), with a significant drop in R for the meditators but not for the controls. We report additional evidence and speculate that the drop in R is a consequence of mild hypoventilation.

  14. 45 CFR 158.330 - Criteria for assessing request for adjustment to the medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the medical loss ratio. 158.330 Section 158.330 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... factors such as surplus level, risked-based capital ratio, net income, and operating or underwriting gain... business, as measured by their risk based capital ratios; (4) The mechanisms, such as guaranteed...

  15. 45 CFR 158.330 - Criteria for assessing request for adjustment to the medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the medical loss ratio. 158.330 Section 158.330 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... factors such as surplus level, risked-based capital ratio, net income, and operating or underwriting gain... business, as measured by their risk based capital ratios; (4) The mechanisms, such as guaranteed...

  16. 75 FR 53198 - Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... rates in the Federal Register. 75 FR 39891 (July 13, 2010). Section 119(c)(1)(D)(ii)(III) provides that... proposed rates as published on July 13, 2010. See 75 FR 39891. List of Subjects in 37 CFR Part 386... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License...

  17. 39 CFR 3010.13 - Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate adjustment filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate... (Type 1-A and 1-B Rate Adjustments) § 3010.13 Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate adjustment... pursuant to appropriate action by the Governors. (e) If planned rate adjustments are found...

  18. An Adjusted Likelihood Ratio Approach Analysing Distribution of Food Products to Assist the Investigation of Foodborne Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Norström, Madelaine; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Görlach, Franziska Sophie; Nygård, Karin; Hopp, Petter

    2015-01-01

    In order to facilitate foodborne outbreak investigations there is a need to improve the methods for identifying the food products that should be sampled for laboratory analysis. The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of a likelihood ratio approach previously developed on simulated data, to real outbreak data. We used human case and food product distribution data from the Norwegian enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli outbreak in 2006. The approach was adjusted to include time, space smoothing and to handle missing or misclassified information. The performance of the adjusted likelihood ratio approach on the data originating from the HUS outbreak and control data indicates that the adjusted approach is promising and indicates that the adjusted approach could be a useful tool to assist and facilitate the investigation of food borne outbreaks in the future if good traceability are available and implemented in the distribution chain. However, the approach needs to be further validated on other outbreak data and also including other food products than meat products in order to make a more general conclusion of the applicability of the developed approach. PMID:26237468

  19. 75 FR 32228 - Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... adjusted the rates in 1997. 62 FR 55742 (October 28, 1997). In the Satellite Home Viewer Improvement Act of... the former Copyright Royalty Tribunal. 57 FR 129052 (May 1, 1992). When the license was reauthorized... carriers; and the Librarian adopted the respective rates. See 70 FR 17320 (April 6, 2005) and 70 FR...

  20. 75 FR 39891 - Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... carrier statutory license, 17 U.S.C. 119. 75 FR 32228 (June 7, 2010). The law further provides that... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License AGENCY... are publishing for comment negotiated royalty rates for the satellite carrier statutory license of...

  1. 77 FR 47582 - Great Lakes Pilotage Rates-2013 Annual Review and Adjust; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 45539) proposing rate adjustments for pilotage services on the Great Lakes. The charge rate... of proposed rulemaking published in the Federal Register on August 1, 2012 (77 FR 45539) is corrected...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NPRM published August 1, 2012 (77 FR 45539) contains an...

  2. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically? 166.408 Section 166.408 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental...

  3. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically? 166.408 Section 166.408 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental...

  4. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically? 166.408 Section 166.408 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental...

  5. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically? 166.408 Section 166.408 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental...

  6. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically? 166.408 Section 166.408 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental...

  7. 48 CFR 52.222-31 - Construction Wage Rate Requirements-Price Adjustment (Percentage Method).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction Wage Rate... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.222-31 Construction Wage Rate Requirements—Price Adjustment (Percentage Method). As prescribed in 22.407(f), insert the following clause: Construction Wage...

  8. Self-reports and spouse ratings of neuroticism: perspectives on emotional adjustment in couples.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy W; Williams, Paula G

    2015-04-01

    Evidence of reciprocal associations between individual emotional adjustment and the quality of intimate relationships has led to the growing use of interventions that combine a focus on couple issues with a focus on individual emotional functioning. In these approaches, spouse ratings of emotional functioning can provide an important second method of assessment, beyond the much more commonly used self-reports. Although an extensive literature demonstrates substantial convergent correlations between self-reported and spouse-rated emotional adjustment, levels of adjustment evident across these 2 assessment methods are much less commonly compared, especially among couples reporting higher levels of marital distress. Well-documented limitations of both self-reports and spouse ratings suggest that differences--which would not necessarily be evident in correlations between methods--might be common and substantial, perhaps raising complications in couple assessments and intervention. The present study compared self-reports and spouse ratings of neuroticism and its specific components using the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised in a sample of 301 middle-aged and older couples. For overall neuroticism and the specific facets of anxiety, angry hostility, and vulnerability, self-reported levels of negative emotionality were consistently lower than the parallel ratings by spouses, most notably among couples reporting low levels of marital adjustment. Hence, substantial underestimates of negative emotionality obtained through self-reports as compared to ratings by spouses (or overestimates as obtained through spouse ratings) may be common and could complicate couple assessment and intervention. PMID:25844498

  9. 75 FR 24757 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Adjustments to the Fee Rates Applicable Under Section 6(b...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ...), 75 FR 9964 (March 4, 2010). \\10\\ The annual adjustments, as well as the mid-year adjustments required... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Adjustments to the Fee Rates Applicable Under Section 6(b) of... adjustment based on that estimate. The appendix includes the data used by the Commission in making...

  10. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  11. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  12. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  13. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  14. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  15. Maternal adjustment of the sex ratio in broods of the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnathocerus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Tami; Wade, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    We report that females of the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnathocerus cornutus, can plastically adjust the sex ratio in their broods in response to environmental quality. Specifically, females reared in nutritionally poor environments produce broods that are 65% female, on average, with the degree of female-bias in some broods approaching 95%. In addition, females reared in nutritionally poor environments lay significantly more eggs than do females reared on standard medium, which produce broods with an even sex ratio. These effects of the mother's environment on size and sex ratio in broods are manifest even when oviposition occurs in the standard nutritional environment; indeed, the degree of female-bias increases with advancing female age despite the availability of nutritional resources to females at the time of egg laying. Our studies rule out sex-specific differences in viability early in larval development as the mechanism for the bias in sex-ratio of broods, since females reared in nutritionally poor environments have broods with hatchability and larval viability comparable to those of nonstressed females. Our studies also rule out an effect of the sire on the sex ratio in broods, since all male mates were reared on standard medium. We discuss our results in the context of theories for the evolution of plastic sex-ratios in the face of environmental deterioration and discuss how plasticity can resolve a long-standing question about the conditions underlying the evolution of biased sex ratios. PMID:22576817

  16. Computations of adjusted rates and lifetime risks from occupational cohort data: a program package using FORTRAN and GLIM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S Y; Mazumdar, S; Redmond, C K; Dong, M H; Costantino, J P

    1991-02-01

    A program package using FORTRAN and GLIM is presented to compute lifetime risks of dying from a particular cause of death for a worker subjected to specific risk exposures using death rates adjusted for selected covariates (risk factors). Calculations of the exposure index and adjusted rates depend on several commonly used procedures. Tests of homogeneity and trend for adjusted rates are provided. Lifetime risks are calculated in two different ways: adjusting or ignoring competing causes of death.

  17. Use of age-adjusted rates of suicide in time series studies in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F Stephen; Tankersley, William B

    2009-01-01

    Durkheim's modified theory of suicide was examined to explore how consistent it was in predicting Israeli rates of suicide from 1965 to 1997 when using age-adjusted rates rather than crude ones. In this time-series study, Israeli male and female rates of suicide increased and decreased, respectively, between 1965 and 1997. Conforming to Durkheim's modified theory, the Israeli male rate of suicide was lower in years when rates of marriage and birth are higher, while rates of suicide are higher in years when rates of divorce are higher, the opposite to that of Israeli women. The corrected regression coefficients suggest that the Israeli female rate of suicide remained lower in years when rate of divorce is higher, again the opposite suggested by Durkheim's modified theory. These results may indicate that divorce affects the mental health of Israeli women as suggested by their lower rate of suicide. Perhaps the "multiple roles held by Israeli females creates suicidogenic stress" and divorce provides some sense of stress relief, mentally speaking. The results were not as consistent with predictions suggested by Durkheim's modified theory of suicide as were rates from the United States for the same period nor were they consistent with rates based on "crude" suicide data. Thus, using age-adjusted rates of suicide had an influence on the prediction of the Israeli rate of suicide during this period.

  18. 45 CFR 158.330 - Criteria for assessing request for adjustment to the medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the State's insurance commissioner, superintendent, or comparable official may exercise with respect... the medical loss ratio. 158.330 Section 158.330 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS ISSUER USE OF PREMIUM REVENUE: REPORTING AND REBATE...

  19. 45 CFR 158.330 - Criteria for assessing request for adjustment to the medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the State's insurance commissioner, superintendent, or comparable official may exercise with respect... the medical loss ratio. 158.330 Section 158.330 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS ISSUER USE OF PREMIUM REVENUE: REPORTING AND REBATE...

  20. The single match approach to strike rate adjustments in batting performance measures in cricket.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Hermanus H

    2011-01-01

    Batting performance measures containing strike rate adjustments take into account the important fact that if two batsmen had scored the same number of runs in a match, the one with the better strike rate had performed best. But match conditions can influence the batting and bowling performances of cricket players. On a good pitch a batsman can get a good score at a high strike rate, but if the pitch was bad, a similar good score is normally accompanied by a much lower strike rate. The main objective of this study is to propose a method that can be used to make batsmen's scores comparable despite the fact that playing conditions might have been very different. The number of runs scored by a batsman is adjusted by comparing his strike rate with the overall strike rate of all the players in the specific match. These adjusted runs are then used in the most appropriate formula to calculate the average of the batsman. The method is illustrated by using the results of the Indian Premier League 2009 Twenty20 Series played during May and June 2009. The main conclusion is that the traditional average is not the most appropriate measure to compare batsmen's performances after conclusion of a short series. Key pointsIt is unfair to compare the score of a batsman obtained on a good pitch under ideal batting conditions with that of a batsman who had to battle under severe conditions.By comparing a batsman's strike rate with the overall strike rate of the players in the specific match, his score can be adjusted to get a better figure for his true performance.The results demonstrate clearly that the use of adjusted scores lead to rankings that differ from those based on the traditional measures.

  1. [Sex ratio adjustment of a non-pollinating fig wasp species on Ficus semicordata in Xishuangbanna].

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Peng, Yan-Qiong; Guan, Jun-Ming; Yang, Pei; Yang, Da-Rong

    2008-03-01

    Through controlling the number of ovipositing foundresses inside a fig, and combining with the observation of ovipositing behavior and mating behavior, this paper studied the sex ratio of Apocryptophagus sp., a species of non-pollinating fig wasps hosted on Ficus semicordata in Xishuangbanna. The results showed that female Apocryptophagus sp. started to visit the fig on the 3rd day after pollinator Ceratosolen gravelyi oviposited. Apocryptaphagus sp. oviposited on the outside of the fig, and the ovipositing lasted for 2 days. Male Apocryptophagus sp. emerged at the same time with pollinators. The males opened a small hole on the wall of gall where the females developed, and mated with the females. Mated females emerged from their development fig, and left for a new receptive fig. The sex ratio of Apocryptaphagus sp. was in agreement with local mate competition theory, i. e., it was female-biased. Meanwhile, the total number of offspring increased with increasing foundress number. In contrast, the average number of offspring per foundress decreased. At individual level, when a female laid eggs inside a fig, the sex ratio of offspring correlated negatively with the number of offspring.

  2. Movie Ratings and Revenues: Eleven Years of Success Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bruce A.; And Others

    The relation between revenues from motion pictures and the picture ratings (G, PG, R, X) by the Motion Picture Association of America was examined. Successful films were those listed by "Variety" magazine as the top revenue producers for the given year. Data were collected for the years 1969-1979. The analysis showed that years in which fewer…

  3. 39 CFR 3010.12 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be developed from the most recent applicable Commission approved analytical principles. Effective... text, (b)(4), and (e), redesignating paragraphs (b)(9) and (10) as (b)(11) and (12) respectively, and... added and revised text is set forth as follows: § 3010.12 Contents of notice of rate adjustment. (a)...

  4. 76 FR 55139 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates I. Background The... includes the data used by the Commission in making its ``baseline estimate of the aggregate...

  5. 78 FR 54934 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates I. Background The... includes the data used by the Commission in making its ``baseline estimate of the aggregate...

  6. 77 FR 55240 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Registration Fee Rates I. Background The... Commission in making its ``baseline estimate of the aggregate maximum offering price'' for fiscal year...

  7. 48 CFR 52.222-32 - Construction Wage Rate Requirements-Price Adjustment (Actual Method).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include any allowance for any increased cost for which adjustment is being requested. (c) The Contracting... be limited to increases or decreases in wages and fringe benefits as described in paragraph (c) of... DBA craft New WD Hourly rate paid Diff. Actual hrs. Actual units (sq. yard) Increase/sq. yard...

  8. 76 FR 590 - Adjustment or Determination of Compulsory License Rates for Making and Distributing Phonorecords

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ..., starting in the year 2006. A proceeding was commenced in 2006, 71 FR 1454 (January 9, 2006); on ] January... FR 4510 (January 26, 2009). Thus, in accordance with section 804(b)(4), a party may file a petition... Copyright Royalty Board Adjustment or Determination of Compulsory License Rates for Making and...

  9. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with a rate range adjustment. 9701.323 Section 9701.323 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting...

  10. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with a rate range adjustment. 9701.323 Section 9701.323 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting...

  11. ADJUSTABLE OUTPUT RATE CHEMICAL FEEDING EQUIPMENT FOR SWIMMING POOLS. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NUMBER 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THE SCOPE OF THIS STANDARD COVERS ADJUSTABLE OUTPUT RATE CHEMICAL FEEDERS, WHETHER USED FOR SOLUTIONS, SLURRIES OR SOLIDS. IT ALSO INCLUDES AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT SUCH AS PUMPS, STRAINERS, TUBING CONNECTIONS, TANKS, INJECTION FITTINGS AND OTHER REQUIRED COMPONENTS. THE FEEDERS DESCRIBED ARE INTENDED TO BE DESIGNED AND USED SPECIFICALLY FOR CHEMICAL…

  12. Age-Adjustment and Related Epidemiology Rates in Education and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John D.; Kruckman, Laurence; George, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    A quick review of introductory textbooks reveals that while gerontology authors and instructors introduce some aspect of demography and epidemiology data, there is limited focus on age adjustment or other important epidemiology rates. The goal of this paper is to reintroduce a variety of basic epidemiology strategies such as incidence, prevalence,…

  13. Use of GRACE determined secular gravity rates for glacial isostatic adjustment studies in North-America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Wu, Patrick; Sideris, Michael G.; Shum, C. K.

    2008-10-01

    Monthly geopotential spherical harmonic coefficients from the GRACE satellite mission are used to determine their usefulness and limitations for studying glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in North-America. Secular gravity rates are estimated by unweighted least-squares estimation using release 4 coefficients from August 2002 to August 2007 provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR), University of Texas. Smoothing is required to suppress short wavelength noise, in addition to filtering to diminish geographically correlated errors, as shown in previous studies. Optimal cut-off degrees and orders are determined for the destriping filter to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The halfwidth of the Gaussian filter is shown to significantly affect the sensitivity of the GRACE data (with respect to upper mantle viscosity and ice loading history). Therefore, the halfwidth should be selected based on the desired sensitivity. It is shown that increase in water storage in an area south west of Hudson Bay, from the summer of 2003 to the summer of 2006, contributes up to half of the maximum estimated gravity rate. Hydrology models differ in the predictions of the secular change in water storage, therefore even 4-year trend estimates are influenced by the uncertainty in water storage changes. Land ice melting in Greenland and Alaska has a non-negligible contribution, up to one-fourth of the maximum gravity rate. The estimated secular gravity rate shows two distinct peaks that can possibly be due to two domes in the former Pleistocene ice cover: west and south east of Hudson Bay. With a limited number of models, a better fit is obtained with models that use the ICE-3G model compared to the ICE-5G model. However, the uncertainty in interannual variations in hydrology models is too large to constrain the ice loading history with the current data span. For future work in which GRACE will be used to constrain ice loading history and the Earth's radial viscosity profile, it is

  14. The mechanism of sex ratio adjustment in a pollinating fig wasp.

    PubMed

    Raja, Shazia; Suleman, Nazia; Compton, Stephen G; Moore, Jamie C

    2008-07-22

    Sex ratio strategies in species subject to local mate competition (LMC), and in particular their fit to quantitative theoretical predictions, provide insight into constraints upon adaptation. Pollinating fig wasps are widely used in such studies because their ecology resembles theory assumptions, but the cues used by foundresses to assess potential LMC have not previously been determined. We show that Liporrhopalum tentacularis females (foundresses) use their clutch size as a cue. First, we make use of species ecology (foundresses lay multiple clutches, with second clutches smaller than first) to show that increases in sex ratio in multi-foundress figs occur only when foundresses are oviposition site limited, i.e. that there is no direct response to foundress density. Second, we introduce a novel technique to quantify foundress oviposition sequences and show, consistent with the theoretical predictions concerning clutch size-only strategies, that they produce mainly male offspring at the start of bouts, followed by mostly females interspersed by a few males. We then discuss the implications of our findings for our understanding of the limits of the ability of natural selection to produce 'perfect' organisms, and for our understanding of when different cue use patterns evolve. PMID:18430647

  15. The mechanism of sex ratio adjustment in a pollinating fig wasp.

    PubMed

    Raja, Shazia; Suleman, Nazia; Compton, Stephen G; Moore, Jamie C

    2008-07-22

    Sex ratio strategies in species subject to local mate competition (LMC), and in particular their fit to quantitative theoretical predictions, provide insight into constraints upon adaptation. Pollinating fig wasps are widely used in such studies because their ecology resembles theory assumptions, but the cues used by foundresses to assess potential LMC have not previously been determined. We show that Liporrhopalum tentacularis females (foundresses) use their clutch size as a cue. First, we make use of species ecology (foundresses lay multiple clutches, with second clutches smaller than first) to show that increases in sex ratio in multi-foundress figs occur only when foundresses are oviposition site limited, i.e. that there is no direct response to foundress density. Second, we introduce a novel technique to quantify foundress oviposition sequences and show, consistent with the theoretical predictions concerning clutch size-only strategies, that they produce mainly male offspring at the start of bouts, followed by mostly females interspersed by a few males. We then discuss the implications of our findings for our understanding of the limits of the ability of natural selection to produce 'perfect' organisms, and for our understanding of when different cue use patterns evolve.

  16. Parenting stress and external stressors as predictors of maternal ratings of child adjustment.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Monica; Hagekull, Berit

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to disentangle the effects of different kinds of stress on maternal ratings of child externalizing and internalizing problems, social inhibition, and social competence, with a primary focus on parenting stress. The relations were explored in a sample consisting of mothers of 436 children (Mage  = 7 years) in Sweden. Half the sample had had early clinical contacts during infancy due to child regulation problems, and the rest were mothers without known such early contacts. Demographic factors, family stressors, and parenting stress were examined in stress - adjustment models. Family stressors were clinical contact during infancy, current child and parent health problems, recent negative life events, and insufficient social support. Parenting stress as a mediator of the effect of other stressors on rated child adjustment was tested as was social support as a moderator of the effect of parenting stress on adjustment. The results showed that a higher parenting stress level was associated with maternal ratings of more externalizing and internalizing behaviors, more social inhibition, and lower social competence. Other family stressors and background variables were also found to be of importance, mainly for externalizing and internalizing problems and to some extent for social competence. Social inhibition had a unique relation to parenting stress only. Parenting stress mediated effects of other stressors in twelve models, whereas social support had no moderating effect on the link between parenting stress and child adjustment. Thus, parenting stress seems to be an important overarching construct. Clinical implications are proposed.

  17. Sex-ratio adjustment in response to local mate competition is achieved through an alteration of egg size in a haplodiploid spider mite.

    PubMed

    Macke, Emilie; Magalhães, Sara; Bach, Fabien; Olivieri, Isabelle

    2012-11-22

    Sex-ratio adjustments are commonly observed in haplodiploid species. However, the underlying proximate mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated these mechanisms in Tetranychus urticae, a haplodiploid spider mite known to adjust sex ratio in response to the level of local mate competition (LMC). In this species, egg size determines fertilization probability, with larger eggs being more likely to be fertilized, and thus become female. We explored the hypothesis that sex-ratio adjustment is achieved through adjustment of egg size. By using spider mites from a large population, we found that females produced not only a higher proportion of daughters under high levels of LMC, but also larger eggs. Moreover, in populations experimentally evolving under varying levels of LMC, both the proportion of females and the egg size increased with LMC intensity. These results suggest that sex-ratio adjustment in spider mites is mediated by egg size, although the causal relationship remains to be tested.

  18. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  19. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  20. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  1. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  2. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  3. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, E. Keith; Thompson, Charles F.; Sakaluk, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A major component of sex-allocation theory, the Trivers-Willard Model (TWM), posits that sons and daughters are differentially affected by variation in the rearing environment. In many species, the amount of parental care received is expected to have differing effects on the fitness of males and females. When this occurs, the TWM predicts that selection should favour adjustment of the offspring sex ratio in relation to the expected fitness return from offspring. However, evidence for sex-by-environment effects is mixed and little is known about the adaptive significance of producing either sex. Here, we test whether offspring sex ratios vary according to predictions of the TWM in the house wren (Troglodytes aedon, Vieillot). We also test the assumption of a sex-by-environment effect on offspring using two experiments, one in which we manipulated age-differences among nestlings within broods, and another in which we held nestling age constant but manipulated brood size. As predicted, females with high investment ability over-produced sons relative to those with lower ability. Males were also over-produced early within breeding seasons. In our experiments, the body mass of sons was more strongly affected by the sibling-competitive environment and resource availability than that of daughters: males grew heavier than females when reared in good conditions but were lighter than females when in poor conditions. Parents rearing broods with 1:1 sex ratios were more productive than parents rearing broods biased more strongly towards sons or daughters, suggesting that selection favours the production of mixed-sex broods. However, differences in the condition of offspring as neonates persisted to adulthood, and their reproductive success as adults varied with the body mass of sons, but not daughters, prior to independence from parental care. Thus, selection should favour slight but predictable variations in the sex ratio in relation to the quality of offspring that

  4. Persistent sex-by-environment effects on offspring fitness and sex-ratio adjustment in a wild bird population.

    PubMed

    Bowers, E Keith; Thompson, Charles F; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2015-03-01

    A major component of sex-allocation theory, the Trivers-Willard model (TWM), posits that sons and daughters are differentially affected by variation in the rearing environment. In many species, the amount of parental care received is expected to have differing effects on the fitness of males and females. When this occurs, the TWM predicts that selection should favour adjustment of the offspring sex ratio in relation to the expected fitness return from offspring. However, evidence for sex-by-environment effects is mixed, and little is known about the adaptive significance of producing either sex. Here, we test whether offspring sex ratios vary according to predictions of the TWM in the house wren (Troglodytes aedon, Vieillot). We also test the assumption of a sex-by-environment effect on offspring using two experiments, one in which we manipulated age differences among nestlings within broods, and another in which we held nestling age constant but manipulated brood size. As predicted, females with high investment ability overproduced sons relative to those with lower ability. Males were also overproduced early within breeding seasons. In our experiments, the body mass of sons was more strongly affected by the sibling-competitive environment and resource availability than that of daughters: males grew heavier than females when reared in good conditions but were lighter than females when in poor conditions. Parents rearing broods with 1:1 sex ratios were more productive than parents rearing broods biased more strongly towards sons or daughters, suggesting that selection favours the production of mixed-sex broods. However, differences in the condition of offspring as neonates persisted to adulthood, and their reproductive success as adults varied with the body mass of sons, but not daughters, prior to independence from parental care. Thus, selection should favour slight but predictable variations in the sex ratio in relation to the quality of offspring that parents are

  5. Indirect Medical Education and Disproportionate Share Adjustments to Medicare Inpatient Payment Rates

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nguyen Xuan; Sheingold, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    The indirect medical education (IME) and disproportionate share hospital (DSH) adjustments to Medicare's prospective payment rates for inpatient services are generally intended to compensate hospitals for patient care costs related to teaching activities and care of low income populations. These adjustments were originally established based on the statistical relationships between IME and DSH and hospital costs. Due to a variety of policy considerations, the legislated levels of these adjustments may have deviated over time from these “empirically justified levels,” or simply, “empirical levels.” In this paper, we estimate the empirical levels of IME and DSH using 2006 hospital data and 2009 Medicare final payment rules. Our analyses suggest that the empirical level for IME would be much smaller than under current law— about one-third to one-half. Our analyses also support the DSH adjustment prescribed by the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA)—about one-quarter of the pre-ACA level. For IME, the estimates imply an increase in costs of 1.88% for each 10% increase in teaching intensity. For DSH, the estimates imply that costs would rise by 0.52% for each 10% increase in the low-income patient share for large urban hospitals. PMID:22340777

  6. 39 CFR 3010.13 - Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate adjustment filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements of 39 U.S.C. chapter 36, subchapter 1: (1) Whether the planned rate adjustments measured using the... an order announcing its findings. (h) If the planned rate adjustments as amended are found to be... 39 U.S.C. chapter 36, subchapter 1 is provisional and subject to subsequent review....

  7. 39 CFR 3010.13 - Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate adjustment filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of 39 U.S.C. chapter 36, subchapter 1: (1) Whether the planned rate adjustments measured using the... an order announcing its findings. (h) If the planned rate adjustments as amended are found to be... 39 U.S.C. chapter 36, subchapter 1 is provisional and subject to subsequent review....

  8. Role of heart rate in the relation between regional body fat and subendocardial viability ratio in women.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; Hadri, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) is a measure of left ventricular function, specifically; it is an index of myocardial perfusion relative to left ventricular workload. Women have lower SEVR than men, partly due to a faster resting heart rate that reduces diastolic time (i.e., time for myocardial perfusion). It is unclear if body fat relates to SEVR, thus the purpose of this study was to examine the relation between body fat and SEVR in women. Twenty-eight middle-aged (31-45 years) and 31 older (60-80 years) women were examined. Radial artery applanation tonometry was used to calculate SEVR from a synthesized central aortic pressure wave. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess body composition including fat in the trunk, legs, android and gynoid regions. Body fat was not related (P>.05) with SEVR in older women. In middle-aged women, all measures of regional fat were correlated with heart rate (range, r=.49-.59, P≤.01) and SEVR (range, r=.43-.53, P≤.01). Android-to-gynoid ratio was identified as the strongest predictor (r(2) =-.26, P<.01) of SEVR among measures of regional fat. Middle-aged women with lower android-to-gynoid fat ratio had higher SEVR (1.96±0.33 vs 1.66±0.20, P=.009) than women with higher fat ratio, even after adjusting for age, height, daily physical activity, and aortic mean pressure (P=.02). Adjusting for heart rate or diastolic time abolished the difference in SEVR between groups (1.80±0.09 vs 1.82±0.09, P=.56). These results suggest that middle-aged women with a greater distribution of fat in the abdomen have poorer left ventricular function that is dependent on the negative influence of heart rate on diastolic time.

  9. Risk-adjusted melanoma skin cancer incidence rates in Whites (United States).

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray Martell

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a better population-based measure of risk for melanoma skin cancer. A method has been previously proposed for estimating cancer incidence rates for data collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Unlike conventionally reported incidence rates in the USA, this method uses the first primary cancer and adjusts for population-based cancer prevalence to obtain a better measure of cancer risk. The study involves SEER data for white men and women. Conventional melanoma incidence rates overestimate risk for men, increasingly so from 3.3% in the age group of 30-39 years to 11.3% in the age group of 80 years and older. Overestimation in risk for women ranged from 3.3% in the age group of 30-39 years to 8.9% in the age group of 80 years and older. Overestimation of risk was more pronounced when both in-situ and malignant melanomas were considered. Increasing trends in conventional rates were slightly greater than trends in risk-adjusted incidence rates (RAIRs). In 2007, the estimated number of cases with malignant melanoma among the white population based on conventional cancer incidence rates is 37 636 (64 125 including in-situ cases) for men and 28 935 (49 361 including in-situ cases) for women. The estimated number of cases in the USA based on RAIRS is 34 652 [(7.9%); 55 413 (13.6%) including in-situ cases] for male and 27 178 [(6.1%); 44 467 (9.9%) including in-situ cases] for women. We concluded that RAIRs are a better measure of melanoma skin cancer risk and should be used for estimating the number of cancer patients in the USA.

  10. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  11. Variable-ratio versus variable-interval schedules: response rate, resistance to change, and preference.

    PubMed

    Nevin, J A; Randolph; Holland, S; McLean, A P

    2001-07-01

    Two experiments asked whether resistance to change depended on variable-ratio as opposed to variable-interval contingencies of reinforcement and the different response rates they establish. In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained on multiple random-ratio random-interval schedules with equated reinforcer rates. Baseline response rates were disrupted by intercomponent food, extinction, and prefeeding. Resistance to change relative to baseline was greater in the interval component, and the difference was correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher in the ratio component. In Experiment 2, pigeons were trained on multiple variable-ratio variable-interval schedules in one half of each session and on concurrent chains in the other half in which the terminal links corresponded to the multiple-schedule components. The schedules were varied over six conditions, including two with equated reinforcer rates. In concurrent chains, preference strongly overmatched the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates. In multiple schedules, relative resistance to response-independent food during intercomponent intervals, extinction, and intercomponent food plus extinction depended on the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates but was less sensitive than was preference. When reinforcer rates were similar, both preference and relative resistance were greater for the variable-interval schedule, and the differences were correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher on the variable-ratio schedule, confirming the results of Experiment 1. These results demonstrate that resistance to change and preference depend in part on response rate as well as obtained reinforcer rate, and challenge the independence of resistance to change and preference with respect to response rate proposed by behavioral momentum theory.

  12. Variable-ratio versus variable-interval schedules: response rate, resistance to change, and preference.

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, J A; Randolph; Holland, S; McLean, A P

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments asked whether resistance to change depended on variable-ratio as opposed to variable-interval contingencies of reinforcement and the different response rates they establish. In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained on multiple random-ratio random-interval schedules with equated reinforcer rates. Baseline response rates were disrupted by intercomponent food, extinction, and prefeeding. Resistance to change relative to baseline was greater in the interval component, and the difference was correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher in the ratio component. In Experiment 2, pigeons were trained on multiple variable-ratio variable-interval schedules in one half of each session and on concurrent chains in the other half in which the terminal links corresponded to the multiple-schedule components. The schedules were varied over six conditions, including two with equated reinforcer rates. In concurrent chains, preference strongly overmatched the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates. In multiple schedules, relative resistance to response-independent food during intercomponent intervals, extinction, and intercomponent food plus extinction depended on the ratio of obtained reinforcer rates but was less sensitive than was preference. When reinforcer rates were similar, both preference and relative resistance were greater for the variable-interval schedule, and the differences were correlated with the extent to which baseline response rates were higher on the variable-ratio schedule, confirming the results of Experiment 1. These results demonstrate that resistance to change and preference depend in part on response rate as well as obtained reinforcer rate, and challenge the independence of resistance to change and preference with respect to response rate proposed by behavioral momentum theory. PMID:11516115

  13. Achieving high bit rate logical stochastic resonance in a bistable system by adjusting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Gu, Feng-Shou; Feng, Guo-Jin; Yang, Yong-Min; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in a nonlinear bistable system is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments. However, the bit rates of the logical signals are relatively low and not suitable for practical applications. First, we examine the responses of the bistable system with fixed parameters to different bit rate logic input signals, showing that an arbitrary high bit rate LSR in a bistable system cannot be achieved. Then, a normalized transform of the LSR bistable system is introduced through a kind of variable substitution. Based on the transform, it is found that LSR for arbitrary high bit rate logic signals in a bistable system can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the system, setting bias value and amplifying the amplitudes of logic input signals and noise properly. Finally, the desired OR and AND logic outputs to high bit rate logic inputs in a bistable system are obtained by numerical simulations. The study might provide higher feasibility of LSR in practical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51379526).

  14. Rate of responding as a function of ratio requirement when to supplemental feedings are given.

    PubMed

    Duran, C; McSweeney, F K

    1987-12-01

    Pigeons pecked keys or pressed treadles on variable ratio schedules in which they earned their total daily ration of food. Ratio requirements varied in five steps from 15 to 240 responses per reinforcer. Results were generally similar for pecking and pressing. Rates of responding increased with increases in the ratio requirement, but decreased with increases in the obtained rates of reinforcement. The amount of food obtained per session also decreased with increases in the ratio requirement. These results are generally consistent with Hursh's behavioral economics model and with Allison's conservation theory. They are not consistent with theories, such as Herrnstein's, which predict that rates of responding will vary as a direct function of rates of reinforcement.

  15. 5 CFR 591.228 - How does OPM convert the price index plus adjustment factor to a COLA rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How does OPM convert the price index plus... Differential-Nonforeign Areas Cost-Of-Living Allowances § 591.228 How does OPM convert the price index plus adjustment factor to a COLA rate? (a) OPM converts the price index plus the adjustment factor to a COLA...

  16. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  17. Picosecond supercontinuum light source for stroboscopic white-light interferometry with freely adjustable pulse repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Steffen; Durairaj, Vasuki; Shavrin, Igor; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Kaivola, Matti; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    We present a picosecond supercontinuum light source designed for stroboscopic white-light interferometry. This source offers a potential for high-resolution characterization of vibrational fields in electromechanical components with frequencies up to the GHz range. The light source concept combines a gain-switched laser diode, the output of which is amplified in a two-stage fiber amplifier, with supercontinuum generation in a microstructured optical fiber. Implemented in our white-light interferometer setup, optical pulses with optimized spectral properties and below 310 ps duration are used for stroboscopic illumination at freely adjustable repetition rates. The performance of the source is demonstrated by characterizing the surface vibration field of a square-plate silicon MEMS resonator at 3.37 MHz. A minimum detectable vibration amplitude of less than 100 pm is reached.

  18. Compact range reflector analysis using the plane wave spectrum approach with an adjustable sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, James P.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1991-06-01

    An improved method for determining the test zone field of compact range reflectors is presented. The plane wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to obtain the test zone field from knowledge of the reflector aperture field distribution. The method is particularly well suited to the analysis of reflectors with a linearly serrated rim for reduced edge diffraction. Computation of the PWS of the reflector aperture field is facilitated by a closed-form expression for the Fourier transform of a polygonal window function. Inverse transformation in the test zone region is accomplished using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm with a properly adjusted sampling rate (which is a function of both the reflector size and the distance from the reflector). The method is validated by comparison with results obtained using surface current and aperture field integration techniques. The performance of several serrated reflectors is evaluated in order to observe the effects of edge diffraction on the test zone fields.

  19. 34 CFR 668.208 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.208 Section 668.208 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.208 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a) Remaining eligible. You...

  20. 34 CFR 668.189 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.189 Section 668.189 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.189 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a)...

  1. 34 CFR 668.208 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.208 Section 668.208 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.208 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a) Remaining eligible. You...

  2. 34 CFR 668.208 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.208 Section 668.208 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.208 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a) Remaining eligible. You...

  3. 34 CFR 668.208 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.208 Section 668.208 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.208 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a) Remaining eligible. You...

  4. 34 CFR 668.208 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.208 Section 668.208 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.208 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a) Remaining eligible. You...

  5. 34 CFR 668.189 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.189 Section 668.189 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.189 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a)...

  6. 34 CFR 668.189 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.189 Section 668.189 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.189 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a)...

  7. 34 CFR 668.189 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.189 Section 668.189 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.189 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a)...

  8. 34 CFR 668.189 - General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... default rates and for appealing their consequences. 668.189 Section 668.189 Education Regulations of the... EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.189 General requirements for adjusting official cohort default rates and for appealing their consequences. (a)...

  9. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-23

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value.

  10. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value. PMID:27347949

  11. Predicting prey population dynamics from kill rate, predation rate and predator-prey ratios in three wolf-ungulate systems.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Hebblewhite, Mark; Smith, Douglas W; Peterson, Rolf O

    2011-11-01

    1. Predation rate (PR) and kill rate are both fundamental statistics for understanding predation. However, relatively little is known about how these statistics relate to one another and how they relate to prey population dynamics. We assess these relationships across three systems where wolf-prey dynamics have been observed for 41 years (Isle Royale), 19 years (Banff) and 12 years (Yellowstone). 2. To provide context for this empirical assessment, we developed theoretical predictions of the relationship between kill rate and PR under a broad range of predator-prey models including predator-dependent, ratio-dependent and Lotka-Volterra dynamics. 3. The theoretical predictions indicate that kill rate can be related to PR in a variety of diverse ways (e.g. positive, negative, unrelated) that depend on the nature of predator-prey dynamics (e.g. structure of the functional response). These simulations also suggested that the ratio of predator-to-prey is a good predictor of prey growth rate. That result motivated us to assess the empirical relationship between the ratio and prey growth rate for each of the three study sites. 4. The empirical relationships indicate that PR is not well predicted by kill rate, but is better predicted by the ratio of predator-to-prey. Kill rate is also a poor predictor of prey growth rate. However, PR and ratio of predator-to-prey each explained significant portions of variation in prey growth rate for two of the three study sites. 5. Our analyses offer two general insights. First, Isle Royale, Banff and Yellowstone are similar insomuch as they all include wolves preying on large ungulates. However, they also differ in species diversity of predator and prey communities, exploitation by humans and the role of dispersal. Even with the benefit of our analysis, it remains difficult to judge whether to be more impressed by the similarities or differences. This difficulty nicely illustrates a fundamental property of ecological

  12. Predicting prey population dynamics from kill rate, predation rate and predator-prey ratios in three wolf-ungulate systems.

    PubMed

    Vucetich, John A; Hebblewhite, Mark; Smith, Douglas W; Peterson, Rolf O

    2011-11-01

    1. Predation rate (PR) and kill rate are both fundamental statistics for understanding predation. However, relatively little is known about how these statistics relate to one another and how they relate to prey population dynamics. We assess these relationships across three systems where wolf-prey dynamics have been observed for 41 years (Isle Royale), 19 years (Banff) and 12 years (Yellowstone). 2. To provide context for this empirical assessment, we developed theoretical predictions of the relationship between kill rate and PR under a broad range of predator-prey models including predator-dependent, ratio-dependent and Lotka-Volterra dynamics. 3. The theoretical predictions indicate that kill rate can be related to PR in a variety of diverse ways (e.g. positive, negative, unrelated) that depend on the nature of predator-prey dynamics (e.g. structure of the functional response). These simulations also suggested that the ratio of predator-to-prey is a good predictor of prey growth rate. That result motivated us to assess the empirical relationship between the ratio and prey growth rate for each of the three study sites. 4. The empirical relationships indicate that PR is not well predicted by kill rate, but is better predicted by the ratio of predator-to-prey. Kill rate is also a poor predictor of prey growth rate. However, PR and ratio of predator-to-prey each explained significant portions of variation in prey growth rate for two of the three study sites. 5. Our analyses offer two general insights. First, Isle Royale, Banff and Yellowstone are similar insomuch as they all include wolves preying on large ungulates. However, they also differ in species diversity of predator and prey communities, exploitation by humans and the role of dispersal. Even with the benefit of our analysis, it remains difficult to judge whether to be more impressed by the similarities or differences. This difficulty nicely illustrates a fundamental property of ecological

  13. A Distributed Transmission Rate Adjustment Algorithm in Heterogeneous CSMA/CA Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuanglong; Low, Kay Soon; Gunawan, Erry

    2015-01-01

    Distributed transmission rate tuning is important for a wide variety of IEEE 802.15.4 network applications such as industrial network control systems. Such systems often require each node to sustain certain throughput demand in order to guarantee the system performance. It is thus essential to determine a proper transmission rate that can meet the application requirement and compensate for network imperfections (e.g., packet loss). Such a tuning in a heterogeneous network is difficult due to the lack of modeling techniques that can deal with the heterogeneity of the network as well as the network traffic changes. In this paper, a distributed transmission rate tuning algorithm in a heterogeneous IEEE 802.15.4 CSMA/CA network is proposed. Each node uses the results of clear channel assessment (CCA) to estimate the busy channel probability. Then a mathematical framework is developed to estimate the on-going heterogeneous traffics using the busy channel probability at runtime. Finally a distributed algorithm is derived to tune the transmission rate of each node to accurately meet the throughput requirement. The algorithm does not require modifications on IEEE 802.15.4 MAC layer and it has been experimentally implemented and extensively tested using TelosB nodes with the TinyOS protocol stack. The results reveal that the algorithm is accurate and can satisfy the throughput demand. Compared with existing techniques, the algorithm is fully distributed and thus does not require any central coordination. With this property, it is able to adapt to traffic changes and re-adjust the transmission rate to the desired level, which cannot be achieved using the traditional modeling techniques. PMID:25822140

  14. ZSM-5 with controllable acidity as an efficient catalyst for a highly adjustable propene/ethene ratio in the 1-butene cracking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Yang, Di; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yao, Xuting; Liu, Yueming; He, Mingyuan

    2016-09-28

    A facile strategy was proposed to realize the precise control of zeolitic acidity by selective cracking of a silane with an acid site. Modified ZSM-5 with controllable acidity brought about a highly adjustable propene/ethene (P/E) ratio in the 1-butene cracking. PMID:27506458

  15. Attribution of halo merger mass ratio and star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Jo, Jeong-woon; Hwang, Jihe; Youn, Soyoung; Park, Boha

    2016-06-01

    We have used codes for implementing the merger tree algorithm by Cole et al. (2007) and Parkinson et al. (2008) and derived the halo merger mass ratio of protocluster of galaxies across the cosmic time. The authors compare the observed and simulated star formation rates reported by the various groups and derive the star formation rate densities at different red-shifts. This study implies that an investigation of different mass variables should be incorporated into the analysis in order to accurately estimate cumulative star formation rates of galaxies and star formation rate densities as a function of red-shifts.

  16. 77 FR 51681 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... 7 CFR Part 6 Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for...: This document sets forth the revised appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing... for certain dairy product import licenses permanently surrendered by licensees or revoked by...

  17. Intertumor linkage of age-adjusted incidence rate in 15 human neoplasias of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T; Murakami, M; Yokochi, T

    2000-01-01

    We report here that the application of the least square method of Gauss to the log-transformed age-adjusted incidence rate changes in time and space, as tested with either the male-female or the female-male tumor pairs for each of 15 tumor entities, has revealed the presence of intertumor linkage that was conditioning the changes of two cancer risk parameters to let them fit to the equilibrium model with close resemblance to the chemical equilibrium model. The dissimilarity of the cancer risk equilibrium model to the chemical equilibrium model--topological dissociation between the equilibrium model of centripetal force (r = -1.000) and that of centrifugal force (r = +1.000)--was discussed in the light of the concept of the oncogene activation-tumor suppressor gene inactivation. The proposed network hypothesis of human neoplasia found supporting evidence in the corresponding changes of the statistical features of human neoplasias with and without sex discrimination of cancer risk. PMID:10836207

  18. Comparing the Effects of Unknown-Known Ratios on Word Reading Learning versus Learning Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Laurice M.; Nist, Lindsay M.

    2006-01-01

    An extension of G. L. Cates et al. (2003) investigation was conducted to determine if students' cumulative learning rates would be superior for words read under a traditional drill and practice condition (as they were for spelling in the previous study) than under interspersal conditions of varying ratios of unknown to known words. Participants…

  19. Reinforcer-ratio variation and its effects on rate of adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Landon, J; Davison, M

    2001-01-01

    Six pigeons were trained in sessions that consisted of six or seven concurrent-schedule components, each of which could have a different reinforcer ratio arranged in it. The components were unsignaled and occurred in a random order separated by 10-s blackouts. The overall reinforcer rate arranged in each component was 2.22 reinforcers per minute. In Experiment 1, the range of reinforcer ratios in the seven components was varied from a condition in which the ratios were always 1:1, to a condition in which the ratios varied between concurrent variable-interval 27 s extinction (EXT) and concurrent extinction variable-interval 27 s (ratios of 1:EXT, 9:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:9, EXT:1). In Experiment 2, the range of reinforcer ratios was always 27:1 to 1:27, and the presence and absence of the intermediate reinforcer ratios used in Experiment 1 (9:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:9) were investigated. Log response-allocation ratios in components changed rapidly with increasing numbers of reinforcers in components, and Experiment 1 showed that sensitivity to reinforcement was usually higher when the range of reinforcer ratios was greater. When the range of reinforcer ratios was kept constant in Experiment 2, the presence or absence of less extreme reinforcer ratios had no clear effect on sensitivity. At a local level, individual reinforcers had predictable quantitative effects on response ratios: Successive same-alternative reinforcers in a component had rapidly diminishing effects in both experiments. Reinforcers obtained on the opposite alternative to one or more prior reinforcers always had large effects on preference, and these changes were greater when the range of reinforcer ratios was greater. The effects of such reinforcers in changing preference were enhanced, and produced clear preference reversals, when intermediate reinforcer ratios were absent in Experiment 2. Two processes, one local to reinforcers and one with a longer time course, may be necessary to account for these

  20. Synthesis gas production with an adjustable H{sub 2}/CO ratio through the coal gasification process: effects of coal ranks and methane addition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

    2008-05-15

    Direct production of synthesis gas using coal as a cheap feedstock is attractive but challenging due to its low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas. Three typical U.S. coals of different ranks were tested in a 2.5 in. coal gasifier to investigate their gasification reactivity and adjustability on H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas with or without the addition of methane. Tests indicated that lower-rank coals (lignite and sub-bituminous) have higher gasification reactivity than bituminous coals. The coal gasification reactivity is correlated to its synthesis-gas yield and the total percentage of H{sub 2} and CO in the synthesis gas, but not to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio of coal gasification was found to be correlated to the rank of coals, especially the H/C ratio of coals. Methane addition into the dense phase of the pyrolysis and gasification zone of the cogasification reactor could make the best use of methane in adjusting the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the generated synthesis gas. The maximum methane conversion efficiency, which was likely correlated to its gasification reactivity, could be achieved by 70% on average for all tested coals. The actual catalytic effect of generated coal chars on methane conversion seemed coal-dependent. The coal-gasification process benefits from methane addition and subsequent conversion on the adjustment of the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of synthesis gas. The methane conversion process benefits from the use of coal chars due to their catalytic effects. This implies that there were likely synergistic effects on both. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3

  1. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  2. Growth rate effects on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios constrained by belemnite calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Multiple temperature proxies from single species are important to achieve robust palaeotemperature estimates. Besides the commonly employed oxygen isotope thermometer, also Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios perform well as proxies for calcification temperature in the shells of some species. While salinity changes affect the ratios of earth alkaline elements much less than the δ18O thermometer, metabolic effects may exert a strong control on the expression of element ratios. Such effects are hard to study because biomineralization experiments have to overcome large intraspecific variability and can hardly ever isolate the controls of a single parameter on shell geochemistry. The unique geometry of the belemnite rostrum constitutes an exception to this rule. Its shape, large size, and the visibility of growth increments as bands enable the analysis of multiple, correlatable, high resolution geochemical profiles in a single fossil. The effects of the growth rate variability amongst these profiles on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has been tested here. Within a specimen of Passaloteuthis bisulcata (Early Toarcian, Cleveland Basin, UK), Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca data were obtained from four profiles. With respect to growth rate in the first profile, which was taken as a reference, the relative growth rates in the remaining three profiles varied by a factor of 0.9 to 2.7. Results suggest that relative growth rate is linearly correlated with Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, with a decrease of Mg/Ca by 8 % and increase of Sr/Ca by 6 % per 100 % increase in relative growth rate. The observed trends are consistent with abiogenic precipitation experiments and suggest that crystal precipitation rate exerts a significant, predictable control on the element distribution in biogenic calcite.

  3. Magnesite Step Growth Rates as a Function of the Aqueous Magnesium:Carbonate Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Stack, Andrew G.; Higgins, Steven R.

    2014-10-01

    Step velocities of monolayer-height steps on the (1014) magnesite surface have been measured as functions of the aqueous magnesium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index (SI) using a hydrothermal atomic force microscope (HAFM). At SI ≤ 1.9 and 80-90 °C, step velocities were found to be invariant with changes in the magnesium-to-carbonate ratio, an observation in contrast with standard models for growth and dissolution of ionically-bonded, multi-component crystals. However, at high saturation indices (SI = 2.15), step velocities displayed a ratio dependence, maximized at magnesium-to-carbonate ratios slightly greater than 1:1. Traditional affinity-based models were unable to describe growth rates at the higher saturation index. Step velocities also could not be modeled solely through nucleation of kink sites, in contrast to other minerals whose bonding between constituent ions is also dominantly ionic in nature, such as calcite and barite. Instead, they could be described only by a model that incorporates both kink nucleation and propagation. Based on observed step morphological changes at these higher saturation indices, the step velocity maximum at SI = 2.15 is likely due to the rate of attachment to propagating kink sites overcoming the rate of detachment from kink sites as the latter becomes less significant under far from equilibrium conditions.

  4. Magnesite Step Growth Rates as a Function of the Aqueous Magnesium:Carbonate Ratio

    DOE PAGES

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Stack, Andrew G.; Higgins, Steven R.

    2014-10-01

    Step velocities of monolayer-height steps on the (101⁻4) magnesite surface have been measured as functions of the aqueous magnesium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index (SI) using a hydrothermal atomic force microscope (HAFM). At SI ≤ 1.9 and 80-90 °C, step velocities were found to be invariant with changes in the magnesium-to-carbonate ratio, an observation in contrast with standard models for growth and dissolution of ionically-bonded, multi-component crystals. However, at high saturation indices (SI = 2.15), step velocities displayed a ratio dependence, maximized at magnesium-to-carbonate ratios slightly greater than 1:1. Traditional affinity-based models were unable to describe growth rates at the highermore » saturation index. Step velocities also could not be modeled solely through nucleation of kink sites, in contrast to other minerals whose bonding between constituent ions is also dominantly ionic in nature, such as calcite and barite. Instead, they could be described only by a model that incorporates both kink nucleation and propagation. Based on observed step morphological changes at these higher saturation indices, the step velocity maximum at SI = 2.15 is likely due to the rate of attachment to propagating kink sites overcoming the rate of detachment from kink sites as the latter becomes less significant under far from equilibrium conditions.« less

  5. Study of device use adjusted rates in health care-associated infections after implementation of "bundles" in a closed-model medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Rachmale, Sonal; Kanna, Balavenkatesh

    2010-03-01

    "Bundles" strategies improve health care-associated infection (HCAI) rates in medical intensive care units (MICUs). However, few studies have analyzed HCAI rates adjusted for the device removal component of the bundles. An observational study of adult MICU patients while using bundles to prevent HCAIs associated with endovascular catheters, mechanical ventilation, and urinary tract catheters was conducted. The HCAI rates, unadjusted and adjusted for device use, were calculated using incidence rate ratios (unadjusted IRRs [uIRR] and adjusted IRRs [aIRR], respectively). Among 4550 study patients, HCAIs declined from 47 in 2004 to 10 in 2005, 8 in 2006, and 3 in 2007. Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) rates decreased from 10.77 to 1.67 per 1000 central line days (uIRR, 0.155; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13-0.18; P < .0001). Foley-related urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) decreased from 6.23 to 0.63 per 1000 device days (uIRR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.08-0.19; P < .0001). Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) per 1000 ventilator days diminished from 2.17 to 0.62 (uIRR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.21-0.38; P < .0001). After adjustment for device use, aIRRs of CRBSI (0.14; 95% CI, 0.11-0.18), UTI (0.09; 95% CI, 0.06-0.12), and VAP (0.33; 95% CI, 0.22-0.47) declined significantly (P < .00001). Implementing comprehensive bundle strategies reduces HCAI beyond the impact of device removal.

  6. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... aged enrollees, disabled enrollees, and enrollees who have ESRD. (2) The amount calculated in paragraph... risk adjustment data. This factor is phased as follows: (A) 100 percent of payments for ESRD...

  7. Video-rate scanning two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and ratio imaging with cameleons.

    PubMed

    Fan, G Y; Fujisaki, H; Miyawaki, A; Tsay, R K; Tsien, R Y; Ellisman, M H

    1999-05-01

    A video-rate (30 frames/s) scanning two-photon excitation microscope has been successfully tested. The microscope, based on a Nikon RCM 8000, incorporates a femtosecond pulsed laser with wavelength tunable from 690 to 1050 nm, prechirper optics for laser pulse-width compression, resonant galvanometer for video-rate point scanning, and a pair of nonconfocal detectors for fast emission ratioing. An increase in fluorescent emission of 1.75-fold is consistently obtained with the use of the prechirper optics. The nonconfocal detectors provide another 2.25-fold increase in detection efficiency. Ratio imaging and optical sectioning can therefore be performed more efficiently without confocal optics. Faster frame rates, at 60, 120, and 240 frames/s, can be achieved with proportionally reduced scan lines per frame. Useful two-photon images can be acquired at video rate with a laser power as low as 2.7 mW at specimen with the genetically modified green fluorescent proteins. Preliminary results obtained using this system confirm that the yellow "cameleons" exhibit similar optical properties as under one-photon excitation conditions. Dynamic two-photon images of cardiac myocytes and ratio images of yellow cameleon-2.1, -3.1, and -3.1nu are also presented. PMID:10233058

  8. Video-rate scanning two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and ratio imaging with cameleons.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, G Y; Fujisaki, H; Miyawaki, A; Tsay, R K; Tsien, R Y; Ellisman, M H

    1999-01-01

    A video-rate (30 frames/s) scanning two-photon excitation microscope has been successfully tested. The microscope, based on a Nikon RCM 8000, incorporates a femtosecond pulsed laser with wavelength tunable from 690 to 1050 nm, prechirper optics for laser pulse-width compression, resonant galvanometer for video-rate point scanning, and a pair of nonconfocal detectors for fast emission ratioing. An increase in fluorescent emission of 1.75-fold is consistently obtained with the use of the prechirper optics. The nonconfocal detectors provide another 2.25-fold increase in detection efficiency. Ratio imaging and optical sectioning can therefore be performed more efficiently without confocal optics. Faster frame rates, at 60, 120, and 240 frames/s, can be achieved with proportionally reduced scan lines per frame. Useful two-photon images can be acquired at video rate with a laser power as low as 2.7 mW at specimen with the genetically modified green fluorescent proteins. Preliminary results obtained using this system confirm that the yellow "cameleons" exhibit similar optical properties as under one-photon excitation conditions. Dynamic two-photon images of cardiac myocytes and ratio images of yellow cameleon-2.1, -3.1, and -3.1nu are also presented. PMID:10233058

  9. Co/Ni ratios at taenite/kamacite interfaces and relative cooling rates in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Hoppe, Peter

    2012-05-01

    We report a pilot study of a new technique to use the distribution of Co between kamacite and taenite to infer relative cooling rates of iron meteorites; data of Widge and Goldstein (1977) showed that the distribution is temperature dependent. A plot of the logarithm of the double ratio [(Co/Ni)kamacite/(Co/Ni)taenite] (abbreviated Rαγ) against inverse temperature yields a linear equation showing that the ratio ranges from ˜2.5 at 1080 K to ˜30 at 710 K. Thus, a measurement of Rαγ in the kamacite and taenite near the interface offers information about relative cooling rates; the higher Rαγ, the lower the cooling rate. A major advantage of this technique is that it is mainly affected by the final (low-temperature) cooling rate, just before the sample cooled to the blocking temperature where diffusion became insignificant. To test this method we used the NanoSIMS ion probe to measure Rαγ in two IVA and two IIIAB irons; members of each pair differ by large factors in elemental composition and in published metallographic cooling rates (Yang and Goldstein, 2006; Yang et al., 2008). Despite differing by a factor of 25 in estimated metallographic cooling rate, the two IVA irons showed similar Rαγ values of ˜22. If experimental uncertainties are considered this implies that, at low temperatures, their cooling rates differ by less than a factor of 5 with 95% confidence, i.e., significantly less than the range in metallographic cooling rates. In contrast, the IIIAB irons have different ratios; Rαγ in Haig is 29 whereas that in Cumpas, with a reported cooling rate 4.5 times lower, is 22, the opposite of that expected from the published cooling rates. A reevaluation of the Yang-Goldstein IIIAB data set shows that Haig has anomalous metallographic properties. We suggest that both the high Rαγ in Haig and the systematically low taenite central Ni contents are the result of impact-produced fractures in the taenite that allowed equilibration with kamacite down to

  10. 39 CFR 3010.22 - Calculation of annual limitation when notices of rate adjustment are less than 12 months apart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dividing the sum by 12 (Recent Average). The partial year limitation is then calculated by dividing the Recent Average by the Recent Average from the most recent previous notice of rate adjustment (Previous Recent Average) applicable to each affected class of mail and subtracting 1 from the quotient. The...

  11. Differences in Interaction Patterns of Families with First or Second Grade Sons Rated High or Low in Classroom Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Susan; And Others

    This study attempts to determine whether families with a son rated by his teacher as either "high" or "low" on classroom adjustment (behavior indicative of social maturity and achievement motivation) could be differentiated on the basis of their communicative patterns. It was questioned if significant differences existed in the amount of positive…

  12. 2 CFR 200.411 - Adjustment of previously negotiated indirect (F&A) cost rates containing unallowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adjustment of previously negotiated indirect (F&A) cost rates containing unallowable costs. 200.411 Section 200.411 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...

  13. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  14. Ratio of forbidden transition rates in the ground-state configuration of O ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, De-Ling; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2012-06-01

    Based on a set of “quasicomplete bases,” using the large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method, we calculate the forbidden electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic dipole (M1) transition rates of the transitions 2D5/2,3/2o→4S3/2o of the O ii ground state considering the quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections. Our calculations demonstrate that the Breit interactions are most important among all the QED corrections. The calculated E2 and M1 transition rates converge in a systematical and uniform manner with the extending orbital basis and the calculation uncertainty of 2.5% is achieved by considering the valence- and core-excitation correlations totally. With the converged transition rates, a value of the intensity ratio between the two transitions in high-electron-density limit in planetary nebulas is given, that is, r(∞)=0.363±0.009, which is within the overlap of the different observations and with the least uncertainty up to now. In addition, the E2 and M1 transition rates of two transitions 2P3/2,1/2o→4S3/2o of O ii ground state and the ratio between the two transition rates in high-electron-density limit are calculated and compared with the previous results.

  15. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate.

  16. A study on the optimal hydraulic loading rate and plant ratios in recirculation aquaponic system.

    PubMed

    Endut, Azizah; Jusoh, A; Ali, N; Wan Nik, W B; Hassan, A

    2010-03-01

    The growths of the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated in recirculation aquaponic system (RAS). Fish production performance, plant growth and nutrient removal were measured and their dependence on hydraulic loading rate (HLR) was assessed. Fish production did not differ significantly between hydraulic loading rates. In contrast to the fish production, the water spinach yield was significantly higher in the lower hydraulic loading rate. Fish production, plant growth and percentage nutrient removal were highest at hydraulic loading rate of 1.28 m/day. The ratio of fish to plant production has been calculated to balance nutrient generation from fish with nutrient removal by plants and the optimum ratio was 15-42 gram of fish feed/m(2) of plant growing area. Each unit in RAS was evaluated in terms of oxygen demand. Using specified feeding regime, mass balance equations were applied to quantify the waste discharges from rearing tanks and treatment units. The waste discharged was found to be strongly dependent on hydraulic loading rate. PMID:19819130

  17. The RUBISCO to Photosystem II Ratio Limits the Maximum Photosynthetic Rate in Picocyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Allanach, Jessica R.; Murphy, Cole D.; Roodvoets, Mitchell S.; Campbell, Douglas A.; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are picocyanobacteria predominating in subtropical, oligotrophic marine environments, a niche predicted to expand with climate change. When grown under common low light conditions Synechococcus WH 8102 and Prochlorococcus MED 4 show similar Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I contents normalized to Photosystem II content, while Prochlorococcus MIT 9313 has twice the Cytochrome b6f content and four times the Photosystem I content of the other strains. Interestingly, the Prochlorococcus strains contain only one third to one half of the RUBISCO catalytic subunits compared to the marine Synechococcus strain. The maximum Photosystem II electron transport rates were similar for the two Prochlorococcus strains but higher for the marine Synechococcus strain. Photosystem II electron transport capacity is highly correlated to the molar ratio of RUBISCO active sites to Photosystem II but not to the ratio of cytochrome b6f to Photosystem II, nor to the ratio of Photosystem I: Photosystem II. Thus, the catalytic capacity for the rate-limiting step of carbon fixation, the ultimate electron sink, appears to limit electron transport rates. The high abundance of Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I in MIT 9313, combined with the slower flow of electrons away from Photosystem II and the relatively low level of RUBISCO, are consistent with cyclic electron flow around Photosystem I in this strain. PMID:25658887

  18. Long-term survival rates of gravity-assisted, adjustable differential pressure valves in infants with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Anna-Felicitas; Schulz, Matthias; Schwarz, Karin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of adjustable differential pressure valves with gravity-assisted units in shunt therapy of children with hydrocephalus was reported to be feasible and promising as a way to avoid chronic overdrainage. In this single-center study, the authors' experiences in infants, who have higher rates of shunt complications, are presented. METHODS All data were collected from a cohort of infants (93 patients [37 girls and 56 boys], less than 1 year of age [mean age 4.1 ± 3.1 months]) who received their first adjustable pressure hydrocephalus shunt as either a primary or secondary implant between May 2007 and April 2012. Rates of valve and shunt failure were recorded for a total of 85 months until the end of the observation period in May 2014. RESULTS During a follow-up of 54.2 ± 15.9 months (range 26-85 months), the Kaplan-Meier rate of shunt survival was 69.2% at 1 year and 34.1% at 85 months; the Kaplan-Meier rate of valve survival was 77.8% at 1 year and 56% at 85 months. Survival rates of the shunt were significantly inferior if the patients had previous shunt surgery. During follow-up, 44 valves were exchanged in cases of infection (n = 19), occlusion (n = 14), dysfunction of the adjustment unit (n = 10), or to change the gravitational unit (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS Although a higher shunt complication rate is observed in infant populations compared with older children, reasonable survival rates demonstrate the feasibility of using this sophisticated valve technology. The gravitational unit of this valve is well tolerated and its adjustability offers the flexible application of opening pressure in an unpredictable cohort of patients. This may adequately address overdrainage-related complications from early in treatment.

  19. Greater Heart Rate Responses to Acute Stress Are Associated with Better Post-Error Adjustment in Special Police Cadets.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhuxi; Yuan, Yi; Buchanan, Tony W; Zhang, Kan; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    High-stress jobs require both appropriate physiological regulation and behavioral adjustment to meet the demands of emergencies. Here, we investigated the relationship between the autonomic stress response and behavioral adjustment after errors in special police cadets. Sixty-eight healthy male special police cadets were randomly assigned to perform a first-time walk on an aerial rope bridge to induce stress responses or a walk on a cushion on the ground serving as a control condition. Subsequently, the participants completed a Go/No-go task to assess behavioral adjustment after false alarm responses. Heart rate measurements and subjective reports confirmed that stress responses were successfully elicited by the aerial rope bridge task in the stress group. In addition, greater heart rate increases during the rope bridge task were positively correlated with post-error slowing and had a trend of negative correlation with post-error miss rate increase in the subsequent Go/No-go task. These results suggested that stronger autonomic stress responses are related to better post-error adjustment under acute stress in this highly selected population and demonstrate that, under certain conditions, individuals with high-stress jobs might show cognitive benefits from a stronger physiological stress response. PMID:27428280

  20. Greater Heart Rate Responses to Acute Stress Are Associated with Better Post-Error Adjustment in Special Police Cadets

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhuxi; Yuan, Yi; Buchanan, Tony W.; Zhang, Kan; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    High-stress jobs require both appropriate physiological regulation and behavioral adjustment to meet the demands of emergencies. Here, we investigated the relationship between the autonomic stress response and behavioral adjustment after errors in special police cadets. Sixty-eight healthy male special police cadets were randomly assigned to perform a first-time walk on an aerial rope bridge to induce stress responses or a walk on a cushion on the ground serving as a control condition. Subsequently, the participants completed a Go/No-go task to assess behavioral adjustment after false alarm responses. Heart rate measurements and subjective reports confirmed that stress responses were successfully elicited by the aerial rope bridge task in the stress group. In addition, greater heart rate increases during the rope bridge task were positively correlated with post-error slowing and had a trend of negative correlation with post-error miss rate increase in the subsequent Go/No-go task. These results suggested that stronger autonomic stress responses are related to better post-error adjustment under acute stress in this highly selected population and demonstrate that, under certain conditions, individuals with high-stress jobs might show cognitive benefits from a stronger physiological stress response. PMID:27428280

  1. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... chronic health conditions—(i) General rule. For 2011 and subsequent years, for purposes of the adjustment... chronic health status of similar individuals. Such risk score is used instead of the default risk score... associated with frailty, individuals with multiple, comorbid chronic conditions, and individuals with...

  2. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... chronic health conditions—(i) General rule. For 2011 and subsequent years, for purposes of the adjustment... chronic health status of similar individuals. Such risk score is used instead of the default risk score... associated with frailty, individuals with multiple, comorbid chronic conditions, and individuals with...

  3. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... chronic health conditions—(i) General rule. For 2011 and subsequent years, for purposes of the adjustment... chronic health status of similar individuals. Such risk score is used instead of the default risk score... associated with frailty, individuals with multiple, comorbid chronic conditions, and individuals with...

  4. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... multiple, comorbid chronic conditions, and individuals with a diagnosis of mental illness; and (B) Costs.... (6) Improvements to risk adjustment for special needs individuals with chronic health conditions—(i... risk score that reflects the known underlying risk profile and chronic health status of...

  5. 77 FR 70373 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ...\\ yielded no objections. See 75 FR 53198 (August 31, 2010). Section 119(c)(2) requires the Judges annually... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The...

  6. 76 FR 74703 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...\\ yielded no objections. See 75 FR 53198 (August 31, 2010). Section 119(c)(2) requires the Judges annually... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The...

  7. 78 FR 13521 - Great Lakes Pilotage Rates-2013 Annual Review and Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Accountant CPI Consumer Price Index E.O. Executive Order FR Federal Register GLPA Canadian Great Lakes...--2013 Annual Review and Adjustment'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 45539). We received six comments on..., 5, and 7 have been designated by Presidential Proclamation, pursuant to the Act, to be waters...

  8. 76 FR 57992 - Assessment Rate Adjustment Guidelines for Large and Highly Complex Institutions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... by the FDIC Board on February 7, 2011 (76 FR 10672 (Feb. 25, 2011)). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Adjustment Guidelines for Large Institutions and Insured Foreign Branches in Risk Category I, 72 FR 27122... into a total score.\\4\\ \\2\\ Assessments, Large Bank Pricing, 76 FR 10672 (Feb. 25, 2011) (codified at...

  9. The Beryllium-10(meteoric)/ Beryllium-9 ratio as a new tracer of weathering and erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Wittmann, H.; Dannhaus, N.

    2012-04-01

    A perfect clock of the stability of the Earth surface is one that combines a first isotope the flux of which depends on the release rate during erosion, and a second isotope produced at constant rate. The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be, suggested to serve as proxy for weathering and erosion over the late Cenozoic [1], is such a system. We provide a quantitative framework for its use. In a weathering zone some of the 9Be, present typically in 2ppm concentrations in silicate minerals, is released and partitioned between a reactive phase (adsorbed to clay and hydroxide surfaces, given the high partition coefficients at intermediate pH), and into the dissolved phase. The combined mass flux of both phases is defined by the soil formation rate and a mineral dissolution rate - and is hence proportional to the chemical weathering rate and the denudation rate. At the same time, the surface of the weathering zone is continuously exposed to fallout of meteoric 10Be. This 10Be percolates into the weathering zone where it mixes with dissolved 9Be. Both isotopes may exchange with the adsorbed Be, given that equilibration rate of Be is fast relative to soil residence times. Hence a 10Be/9Be(reactive) ratio results from which the total denudation rate can be calculated. A prerequisite is that the flux of meteoric 10Be is known from field experiments or from global production models [2]. In rivers, when reactive Be and dissolved Be equilibrate, a catchment-wide denudation rate can be determined from both sediment and a sample of filtered river water. We have tested this approach in sediment-bound Be [3] and dissolved Be in water [4] of the Amazon and Orinoco basin. The reactive Be was extracted from sediment by combined hydroxylamine and HCl leaches. In the Amazon trunk stream, the Orinoco, Apure, and La Tigra river 10Be/9Be(dissolved) agrees well with 10Be/9Be(reactive), showing that in most rivers these two phases equilibrate. 10Be/9Be ratios range

  10. Feto-maternal heart rate ratio in pregnant bitches: effect of gestational age and maternal size.

    PubMed

    Alonge, S; Mauri, M; Faustini, M; Luvoni, G C

    2016-10-01

    Few information is available on parameters that can be used to objectively assess the foetal health during canine pregnancy. To identify a reliable parameter for the evaluation of foetal well-being, the effect of pre-gestational maternal bodyweight and gestational age on foetal heart rate (FHR) and on feto-maternal heart rate ratio (FHR/MHR) was investigated. Seventeen client-owned pregnant bitches of different pre-gestational maternal bodyweight were examined by serial echo colour Doppler. Only data from 11 uncomplicated pregnancies were included in the statistical analysis. The relationship between FHR, and FHR/MHR, and independent variables was analysed by polynomial regression (p ≤ .05). The FHR and the FHR/MHR significantly fitted a multiple quadratic regression for all independent variables. They both increased from 35 to 20 days before parturition and then a decreasing pattern followed. Higher values of both parameters were observed in bitches of lowest and highest bodyweight. Patterns of FHR and FHR/MHR were similar, but the ratio better describes the effect of the independent variables on the data. Thus, the highest significance of FHR/MHR compared to FHR alone encourages the application of this ratio to evaluate foetal well-being. The equation derived by the regression analysis of FHR/MHR could be applied in clinical practice to obtain its expected values in healthy pregnancies. PMID:27440379

  11. The independence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys of displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    The majority of high fluence data on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic steels were generated at relatively high displacement rates and relatively low helium/dpa levels that are not characteristic of the conditions anticipated in ITER and other anticipated fusion environments. After reanalyzing the available data, this paper shows that irradiation creep is not directly sensitive to either the helium/dpa ratio or the displacement rate, other than through their possible influence on void swelling, since one component of the irradiation creep rate varies with no correlation to the instantaneous swelling rate. Until recently, however, the non-swelling-related creep component was also thought to exhibit its own strong dependence on displacement rate, increasing at lower fluxes. This perception originally arose from the work of Lewthwaite and Mosedale at temperatures in the 270-350{degrees}C range. More recently this perception was thought to extend to higher irradiation temperatures. It now appears, however, that this interpretation is incorrect, and in fact the steady-state value of the non-swelling component of irradiation creep is actually insensitive to displacement rate. The perceived flux dependence appears to arise from a failure to properly interpret the impact of the transient regime of irradiation creep.

  12. [Clinical usefulness of the new Japanese glomerular filtration rate equation for initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations of vancomycin].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoki; Ueshima, Satoshi; Sato, Tomoaki; Kobiki, Eriko; Kawasaki, Yoichi; Matsunaga, Hisashi; Nakura, Hironori; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    To clarify whether the new Japanese glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equation was able to accurately determine the initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations of vancomycin (VCM), the predictive performance for VCM concentrations using the eGFR and Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equations was compared. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical records of 90 patients with MRSA infection whose trough and peak VCM concentrations had been determined. The predicted VCM initial and individualized dosage adjustment concentrations were performed with the 2-compartment linear model using pharmacokinetic parameter means and their individual values via Bayesian estimation, respectively. The prediction error (PE) and its absolute value (APE) between the observed and predicted VCM concentrations were calculated as indices of bias and accuracy in predictive performance, respectively. In the initial dosage adjustment of VCM, the PE value, calculated with the eGFR equation in trough and peak VCM concentrations of patients whose BMI were 18.5 kg/m(2) and higher, was significantly smaller than that calculated with the CG equation. In particular, both PE and APE values obtained from the eGFR calculated concentrations from nonelderly patients (younger than 65 years old) were significantly improved compared with those from the CG equation. In the individualized dosage adjustment of VCM, the eGFR equation gave a significantly smaller PE value in nonelderly patients' trough concentrations than the CG equation. These findings provide useful information for adjusting the VCM dosage to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy in patients with MRSA infection.

  13. Algae/Bacteria Ratio in High-Rate Ponds Used for Waste Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oron, Gideon; Shelef, Gedaliah; Levi, Anna; Meydan, Arie; Azov, Yossef

    1979-01-01

    Algae, bacteria, and zooplankton were counted in samples drawn from 120- and 150-m2 high-rate algae ponds (those used for wastewater treatment). The fraction of nondegraded organic matter was estimated by comparing the ratio of biological and chemical oxygen demands and the bacterial, algal, and zooplankton counts to volatile suspended solids. With pond effluent quality at an acceptable level (around 18 mg of dissolved biological oxygen demand), the algae/bacteria ratio was around 1:100 or even higher, the zooplankton count was negligible, and the bacterial concentration was approximately 1011 cells per liter by direct count. The data for bacteria exceeded those of earlier studies by one to three orders of magnitude. PMID:16345441

  14. Effect of nitroimidazoles on the oxygen consumption rate and respiratory control ratio of beef heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.F.; Ting, L.; Subjeck, J.R.; Johnson, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    The neurotoxic effect of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has seriously compromised their clinical effectiveness. The authors compare here the effect of MISO and DMM on oxygen consumption in purified beef heart mitochondria. MISO has been found to significantly increase the oxygen consumption rate and decrease the respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria when incubated in the presence of the NAD+ dependent substrate, ..beta..-hydroxybutyrate. DMM has a similar but less pronounced effect than MISO on these respiratory parameters. When mitochondria were incubated in the presence of these radiosensitizers for 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, the oxygen consumption rate was decreased when succinate, a FAD dependent substrate, was added following the incubation. This decrease, which is both time and dosage dependent, is equivalent for MISO and DMM.

  15. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  16. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrP(Sc) is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrP(C). PrP(C) has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrP(Sc), the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrP(C) molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrP(C) were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrP(C) was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrP(Sc) was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrP(C) significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  17. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrPSc is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrPC. PrPC has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrPSc, the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrPSc glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrPC molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrPC were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrPC was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrPSc was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrPC significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  18. Sandwich mixer-reactor: influence of the diffusion coefficient and flow rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-02-01

    A sandwich mixer consists of mixing two solutions in a channel, one central laminar flow being sandwiched between two outer flow solutions. The present numerical study considers the convection-diffusion of two reacting species A and B, provided respectively by the two incoming solutions. The simulations show how the diffusion coefficient, flow rate and species concentration ratios influence, via the transversal diffusion length and reaction kinetics, the reaction extent at the end of the sandwich mixer. First, this extent can be enhanced up to 60% if the species with the lowest diffusion coefficient is located in the outer solutions where the flow velocity is small compared to that of the central part (higher residence time). Secondly, decreasing the outer flow rates (to confine the reaction close to the walls) and increasing the local concentration to keep the same flux ratio improve the extent by 300%. Comparison with a bi-lamination passive mixer, with an ideal mixer and an electro-osmotic driven flow mixer is presented. These conclusions are also demonstrated for consecutive reactions, showing an amplification of the effects described above. The results are also presented versus the residence time in the mixer-reactor to show the time window for which the gain is appreciable.

  19. Effects of local extrinsic mortality rate, crime and sex ratio on preventable death in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Uggla, Caroline; Mace, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Individual investment in health varies greatly within populations and results in significant differences in the risk of preventable death. Life history theory predicts that individuals should alter their investment in health (somatic maintenance) in response to ecological cues that shift the perceived fitness payoffs to such investments. However, previous research has failed to isolate the effects of different ecological factors on preventable death, and has often relied on macro-level data without individual controls. Here, we test some key predictions concerning the local ecology—that higher extrinsic mortality rate (EMR), crime rate and mate-scarcity (male/female-biased sex ratio) at the ward-level—will be associated with a higher risk of preventable death. Methodology: We use census-based data from Northern Ireland (n = 927 150) on preventable death during an 8.7-year period from the 2001 Census and run Cox regressions for (i) accident/suicide or alcohol-related death and (ii) deaths from preventable diseases, for men and women separately, controlling for a wide range of individual variables. Results: We find evidence of ward-level EMR and crime rate being positively associated with preventable death among men, particularly men with low socioeconomic position. There was a tentative relationship between male-biased sex ratio and preventable death among women, but not among men. Conclusion and implications: Both behaviours that might lead to ‘risky’ death and health neglect might be adaptive responses to local ecologies. Efforts to reduce crime might be as effective as those to reduce extrinsic mortality, and both could have positive effects on various health behaviours. PMID:26338679

  20. 75 FR 7580 - Proposed Rate Adjustment for Kerr-Philpott System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... and approved Rate Schedules VA-1-A, VA-2-A, VA-3-A, VA-4-A, CP&L-1-A, CP&L-2-A, CP&L-3-A, CP&L-4-A, AP... arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Rate Schedule CP&L-1-B Available... Carolinas). Rate Schedule CP&L-2-B Available to public bodies and cooperatives in North Carolina to...

  1. Passive scalar mixing: Analytic study of time scale ratio, variance, and mix rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Some very reasonable approximations, consistent with numerical and experimental evidence, were applied to the skewness and palinstrophy coefficients in the dissipation equations to produce a simple closed moment model for mixing. Such a model, first suggested on the grounds of a Taylor microscale self-similarity of the scalar field, was studied numerically by Gonzalez and Fall ["The approach to self-preservation of scalar fluctuation decay in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 654 (1998)]. Here, in a somewhat old fashioned and physically meaningful style, analytic solutions to the four coupled nonlinear moment equations for mixing by decaying and forced stationary turbulence, are given. Analytic expressions for the variance ⟨c2⟩, the mixing rate ɛc, and the time scale ratio r(t ) are derived and compared in different mixing situations. The solutions show the sensitive dependence on the initial relative length ratio as studied experimentally by Warhaft and Lumley ["An experimental study of the decay of temperature fluctuations in grid-generated turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 88, 659 (1978)], and simulated by Eswaran and Pope ["Direct numerical simulation of the turbulent mixing of a passive scalar," Phys. Fluids 31, 506 (1988)]. The length scale ratio saturation effect predicted by Durbin ["Analysis of the decay of temperature fluctuations in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 1328 (1982)], resolving the apparent contradiction with the results of Sreenivasan, Tavoularis, and Corrsin ["Temperature fluctuations and scales in grid generated turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 100, 597 (1980)] is predicted. For stationary turbulence the solutions indicate, in contradistinction to the power law "stirring" result predicted by a stochastic Lagrangian analysis, that the mixing is asymptotically exponential as shown in the phenomenological analysis of Corrsin ["The isotropic turbulent mixer," AIChE J. 10, 870 (1964)]. That the time scale ratio solution also depends on

  2. Secondary Students' Quantification of Ratio and Rate: A Framework for Reasoning about Change in Covarying Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heather Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Contributing to a growing body of research addressing secondary students' quantitative and covariational reasoning, the multiple case study reported in this article investigated secondary students' quantification of ratio and rate. This article reports results from a study investigating students' quantification of rate and ratio as…

  3. 75 FR 78690 - Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-2013 Proposed Transmission Rate Adjustments Public Hearing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    .... During the workshops, BPA staff presented and discussed information about costs, load and resource forecasting, generation inputs pricing, segmentation, revenue forecasts, load forecasts, risk analysis and... to flexibly serve their retail load. Point-to-Point (PTP-12) rate--The PTP rate is a contract...

  4. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Teacher Ratings of Child Adjustment and Behavioral Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Ellen W.; Rivers, Lanee; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines similarities and differences in teacher ratings of behavioral problems and adaptive skills between a sample of 320 students from Anguilla, BWI and 315 children from the United States of America using the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992). The study also compared teacher ratings of…

  5. Effect of fertility on secondary sex ratio and twinning rate in Sweden, 1749-1870.

    PubMed

    Fellman, Johan; Eriksson, Aldur W

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the effect of total fertility rate (TFR) and crude birth rate (CBR) on the number of males per 100 females at birth, also called the secondary sex ratio (SR), and on the twinning rate (TWR). Earlier studies have noted regional variations in TWR and racial differences in the SR. Statistical analyses have shown that comparisons between SRs demand large data sets because random fluctuations in moderate data are marked. Consequently, reliable results presuppose national birth data. Here, we analyzed historical demographic data and their regional variations between counties in Sweden. We built spatial models for the TFR in 1860 and the CBR in 1751-1870, and as regressors we used geographical coordinates for the provincial capitals of the counties. For both variables, we obtained significant spatial variations, albeit of different patterns and power. The SR among the live-born in 1749-1869 and the TWR in 1751-1860 showed slight spatial variations. The influence of CBR and TFR on the SR and TWR was examined and statistical significant effects were found. PMID:25427449

  6. Case fatality ratio and mortality rate trends of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Tom, S; Galbraith, J C; Valiquette, L; Jacobsson, G; Collignon, P; Schønheyder, H C; Søgaard, M; Kennedy, K J; Knudsen, J D; Ostergaard, C; Lyytikäinen, O; Laupland, K B

    2014-10-01

    Lethal outcomes can be expressed as a case fatality ratio (CFR) or as a mortality rate per 100 000 population per year (MR). Population surveillance for community-onset methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia was conducted in Canada, Australia, Sweden and Denmark to evaluate 30-day CFR and MR trends between 2000 and 2008. The CFR was 20.3% (MSSA 20.2%, MRSA 22.3%) and MR was 3.4 (MSSA 3.1, MRSA 0.3) per 100 000 per year. Although MSSA CFR was stable the MSSA MR increased; MRSA CFR decreased while its MR remained low during the study. Community-onset S. aureus bacteraemia, particularly MSSA, is associated with major disease burden. This study highlights complementary information provided by evaluating both CFR and MR.

  7. Comparison of hurricane exposure methods and associations with county fetal death rates, adjusting for environmental quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects of hurricanes are increasing as coastal populations grow and events become more severe. Hurricane exposure during pregnancy can influence fetal death rates through mechanisms related to healthcare, infrastructure disruption, nutrition, and injury. Estimation of hu...

  8. Using a detailed uncertainty analysis to adjust mapped rates of forest disturbance derived from Landsat time series data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, W. B.; Yang, Z.; Stehman, S.; Huang, C.; Healey, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Forest ecosystem process models require spatially and temporally detailed disturbance data to accurately predict fluxes of carbon or changes in biodiversity over time. A variety of new mapping algorithms using dense Landsat time series show great promise for providing disturbance characterizations at an annual time step. These algorithms provide unprecedented detail with respect to timing, magnitude, and duration of individual disturbance events, and causal agent. But all maps have error and disturbance maps in particular can have significant omission error because many disturbances are relatively subtle. Because disturbance, although ubiquitous, can be a relatively rare event spatially in any given year, omission errors can have a great impact on mapped rates. Using a high quality reference disturbance dataset, it is possible to not only characterize map errors but also to adjust mapped disturbance rates to provide unbiased rate estimates with confidence intervals. We present results from a national-level disturbance mapping project (the North American Forest Dynamics project) based on the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) with annual Landsat time series and uncertainty analyses that consist of three basic components: response design, statistical design, and analyses. The response design describes the reference data collection, in terms of the tool used (TimeSync), a formal description of interpretations, and the approach for data collection. The statistical design defines the selection of plot samples to be interpreted, whether stratification is used, and the sample size. Analyses involve derivation of standard agreement matrices between the map and the reference data, and use of inclusion probabilities and post-stratification to adjust mapped disturbance rates. Because for NAFD we use annual time series, both mapped and adjusted rates are provided at an annual time step from ~1985-present. Preliminary evaluations indicate that VCT captures most of the higher

  9. 77 FR 29259 - Adjustment of Determination of Compulsory License Rates for Mechanical and Digital Phonorecords

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... the section 115 license on January 9, 2006, 71 FR 1454, and their final determination of said rates and terms was published in the Federal Register on January 26, 2009. 74 FR 4510. Therefore, the next.... 76 FR 590 (January 5, 2011). Petitions to Participate were received from: Microsoft...

  10. 75 FR 51191 - Great Lakes Pilotage Rates-2011 Annual Review and Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...'' then click on the balloon shape in the ``Actions'' column. If you submit your comments by mail or hand... in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D. Public Meeting We do not plan... was published on April 3, 2006 (71 FR 16501). Since then, rates have been reviewed under Appendix...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.334 - Setting and adjusting locality and special rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... special rate supplements. 9701.334 Section 9701.334 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Locality...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.334 - Setting and adjusting locality and special rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... special rate supplements. 9701.334 Section 9701.334 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Locality...

  13. 75 FR 14150 - Proposed Rate Adjustment, Public Forum, and Opportunities for Public Review and Comment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... rate for the sale of power from the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System of Projects (75 FR 12740... April 29, 2010. The address of the forum was established as the Sheraton Gateway Atlanta Airport.... Southeastern is changing the address of the forum to Atlanta Airport Hilton, 1031 Virginia Avenue, Atlanta,...

  14. Automatic learning rate adjustment for self-supervising autonomous robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    Described is an application in which an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) controls the positioning of a robot arm with five degrees of freedom by using visual feedback provided by two cameras. This application and the specific ANN model, local liner maps, are based on the work of Ritter, Martinetz, and Schulten. We extended their approach by generating a filtered, average positioning error from the continuous camera feedback and by coupling the learning rate to this error. When the network learns to position the arm, the positioning error decreases and so does the learning rate until the system stabilizes at a minimum error and learning rate. This abolishes the need for a predetermined cooling schedule. The automatic cooling procedure results in a closed loop control with no distinction between a learning phase and a production phase. If the positioning error suddenly starts to increase due to an internal failure such as a broken joint, or an environmental change such as a camera moving, the learning rate increases accordingly. Thus, learning is automatically activated and the network adapts to the new condition after which the error decreases again and learning is 'shut off'. The automatic cooling is therefore a prerequisite for the autonomy and the fault tolerance of the system.

  15. Work Adjustment Theory: An Empirical Test Using a Fuzzy Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesketh, Beryl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A fuzzy graphic rating scale elicited work preferences and job perceptions of 166 (of 170) Australian bank employees. Correspondence between preferences and perceptions correlated significantly with job satisfaction. Satisfaction and performance related to tenure intentions; this relation was higher for poorer performers. (SK)

  16. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  17. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Garland, Cedric F; Gorham, Edward D; Mohr, Sharif B

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  18. A comparison of pressure ulcer prevalence rates in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany, adjusted for population characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tannen, Antje; Bours, Gerrie; Halfens, Ruud; Dassen, Theo

    2006-12-01

    Annual pressure ulcer surveys in the Netherlands and Germany have shown remarkable differences in prevalence rates. We explored the differences between the two populations, and the degree to which these differences were associated with differences in prevalence. To this end, data from 48 Dutch and 45 German facilities (n = 9772) from 2003 were analyzed. The prevalence of pressure ulcers (excluding grade 1) was 12.5% in the Netherlands and 4.3% in Germany. After adjusting for age, sex, and other risk factors, the probability of developing a pressure ulcer of stage 2 or higher in Dutch nursing homes was three times greater than in German homes.

  19. Rate-ratio asymptotic analysis of autoignition of n-heptane in laminar nonpremixed flows

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, K.; Peters, N.; Paczko, G.

    2006-07-15

    A rate-ratio asymptotic analysis is carried out to elucidate the mechanisms of autoignition of n-heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}) in laminar, nonpremixed flows. It has been previously established that autoignition of n-heptane takes place in three distinct regimes. These regimes are called the low-temperature regime, the intermediate-temperature regime, and the high-temperature regime. The present analysis considers the high-temperature regime. A reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism made up of two global steps is used in the analysis. The reduced mechanism is deduced from a skeletal mechanism made up of 16 elementary reactions. The skeletal mechanism is derived from a short mechanism made up of 30 elementary reactions. The short mechanism is deduced from a detailed mechanism made up of 56 elementary reactions. In the reduced mechanism, the first global step represents a sequence of fast reactions starting from the rate-limiting elementary reaction between n-heptane and HO{sub 2}. In this global step C{sub 7}H{sub 16} is consumed and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) is formed. The second global step represents a sequence of fast reactions starting from the rate-limiting elementary reaction in which H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is consumed and OH is formed. A key aspect of the second global step is that the sequence of fast reactions gives rise to consumption of fuel only without net consumption of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. This makes the chemical system autocatalytic. The unsteady flamelet equations are used to predict the onset of autoignition. In the flamelet equations a conserved scalar quantity, Z, is used as the independent variable. On the oxidizer side of the mixing layer Z=0, and on the fuel side Z=1. The practical case where the temperature of the oxidizer stream, T{sub 2}, is much greater than the temperature of the fuel stream is considered. Therefore autoignition is presumed to take place close to Z=0. Balance equations are written for C{sub 7}H{sub 16} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2

  20. Do mothers prefer helpers or smaller litters? Birth sex ratio and litter size adjustment in cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus)

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Rebecca A; Fletcher, Alison W

    2015-01-01

    Sex allocation theory has been a remarkably productive field in behavioral ecology with empirical evidence regularly supporting quantitative theoretical predictions. Across mammals in general and primates in particular, however, support for the various hypotheses has been more equivocal. Population-level sex ratio biases have often been interpreted as supportive, but evidence for small-scale facultative adjustment has rarely been found. The helper repayment (HR) also named the local resource enhancement (LRE) hypothesis predicts that, in cooperatively breeding species, mothers invest more in the sex which assists with rearing future offspring and that this bias will be more pronounced in mothers who require extra assistance (i.e., due to inexperience or a lack of available alloparents). We tested these hypotheses in captive cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) utilizing the international studbook and birth records obtained through a questionnaire from ISIS-registered institutions. Infant sex, litter size, mother's age, parity, and group composition (presence of nonreproductive subordinate males and females) were determined from these records. The HR hypothesis was supported over the entire population, which was significantly biased toward males (the “helpful” sex). We found little support for helper repayment at the individual level, as primiparous females and those in groups without alloparents did not exhibit more extreme tendencies to produce male infants. Primiparous females were, however, more likely to produce singleton litters. Singleton births were more likely to be male, which suggests that there may be an interaction between litter size adjustment and sex allocation. This may be interpreted as supportive of the HR hypothesis, but alternative explanations at both the proximate and ultimate levels are possible. These possibilities warrant further consideration when attempting to understand the ambiguous results of primate sex ratio studies so far

  1. Tribological development of TiCN coatings by adjusting the flowing rate of reactive gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Momeni, Soroush

    2016-03-01

    TiCN coatings were deposited by means of direct current magnetron sputtering of Ti targets in presence of N2 and C2H2 reactive gases. The microstructure, composition, mechanical and tribological properties of the deposited thin films were analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), nanoindentation, ball-on-disc, scratch test, and three dimensional (3D) optical microscopy. The obtained results presents a reproducible processing route for tailoring microstructure, mechanical and tribological behavior of TiCN coatings by controlling flowing rate of the reactive gases.

  2. The relationship between safety climate and injury rates across industries: the need to adjust for injury hazards.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon S; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Ho, Michael; Chen, Peter Y

    2006-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that strong safety climates (shared perceptions of safe conducts at work) are associated with lower workplace-injury rates, but they rarely control for differences in industry hazards. Based on 33 companies, we assessed its association with injury rates using three rate based injury measures (claims per 100 employees, claims per 100,000 h worked, and claims per 1 million US dollars payroll), which were derived from workers' compensation injury claims. Linear regression models were used to test the predictability of safety climate on injury rates, followed by controlling for differences in hazard across industries gauged by national industry-specific injury rates. In the unadjusted model, company level safety climate were negatively and significantly associated with injury rates. However, all of the above associations were no longer apparent when controlling for the hazardousness of the specific industry. These findings may be due to over adjustment of hazard risk, or the overwhelming effects of industry specific hazards relative to safety climate effects that could not be differentiated with the statistical power in our study. Industry differences in hazard, conceptualized as one type of injury risk, however need to be considered when testing the association between safety climate and injury across different industries. PMID:16430845

  3. Measuring awareness in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: development of the Memory Awareness Rating Scale--adjusted.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Rachel M; Oyebode, Jan R; Clare, Linda

    2006-04-01

    Variations in level of awareness among people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may impact on well-being for the person with dementia and their carer, and may influence outcomes of cognitive rehabilitation interventions. Awareness has often been assessed using discrepancies between self and proxy rating or between self-rating and objective task performance, with the latter considered to be preferable. Measures are available that are suitable for people with mild AD, for example the Memory Awareness Rating Scale (MARS). However, these may be less appropriate for people whose impairments are more advanced and who consequently have more difficulty with the objective task component. In order to provide a measure suitable for people with moderate AD, an adjusted Memory Awareness Rating Scale (MARSA) was developed by altering the objective task component of the MARS. The MARSA was piloted with 41 participants with mild to moderate AD. It was found to be suitable for use with a broader group of participants than the MARS. The component ratings were found to have good internal consistency. The component ratings and the two indices of awareness had high test-retest reliability. The extension of the original measure offers the opportunity to consider awareness throughout the course of the disease and provides a basis for longitudinal investigations of awareness.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of sex ratios may explain natural variation in self-fertilization rates.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Amy; Rodríguez López, Carlos Marcelino; Moran, Paloma; Breen, James; Swain, Martin; Megias, Manuel; Hegarty, Matthew; Wilkinson, Mike; Pawluk, Rebecca; Consuegra, Sofia

    2015-11-22

    Self-fertilization (selfing) favours reproductive success when mate availability is low, but renders populations more vulnerable to environmental change by reducing genetic variability. A mixed-breeding strategy (alternating selfing and outcrossing) may allow species to balance these needs, but requires a system for regulating sexual identity. We explored the role of DNA methylation as a regulatory system for sex-ratio modulation in the mixed-mating fish Kryptolebias marmoratus. We found a significant interaction between sexual identity (male or hermaphrodite), temperature and methylation patterns when two selfing lines were exposed to different temperatures during development. We also identified several genes differentially methylated in males and hermaphrodites that represent candidates for the temperature-mediated sex regulation in K. marmoratus. We conclude that an epigenetic mechanism regulated by temperature modulates sexual identity in this selfing species, providing a potentially widespread mechanism by which environmental change may influence selfing rates. We also suggest that K. marmoratus, with naturally inbred populations, represents a good vertebrate model for epigenetic studies. PMID:26559950

  5. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of solid biodegradable polymer microneedle arrays with adjustable aspect ratio for transdermal drug delivery using acupuncture microneedles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Taewan; Jea Park, Sung; Kim, Dong Sung

    2014-11-01

    Polymer microneedle arrays (MNAs) have received much attention for their use in transdermal drug delivery and microneedle therapy systems due to the advantages they offer, such as low cost, good mechanical properties, and a versatile choice of materials. Here, we present a simple and cost-effective method for the fabrication of a biodegradable polymer MNA in which the aspect ratio of each microneedle is adjustable using commercially available acupuncture microneedles. In our process, a master template with acupuncture microneedles, whose shape will be the final MNA, was carefully prepared by fixing them onto a plastic substrate with selectively drilled holes which, in turn, determine the aspect ratios of the microneedles. A polylactic acid (PLA; a biodegradable polymer) MNA was fabricated by a micromolding process with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold containing the cavity of the microneedles, which was obtained by the PDMS replica molding against the master template. The mechanical force and degradation behavior of the replicated PLA MNA were characterized with the help of a compression test and an accelerated degradation test, respectively. Finally, the transdermal drug delivery performance of the PLA MNA was successfully simulated by two different methods of penetration and staining, using the skin of a pig cadaver. These results indicated that the proposed method can be effectively used for the fabrication of polymer MNAs which can be used in various microneedle applications.

  6. Stochastic variation in sex ratios in infant mortality rates due to small samples in provisioned Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) populations.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in infant mortality in provisioned Japanese macaque populations were examined using 10 data sets from five populations. The results indicate that there was no available data set in which a sex difference in infant mortality was statistically significant. To examine whether the observed sex ratios in infant mortality rates could be the product of stochastic variation in small samples, a correlation between sample size and the magnitude of sex ratios in infant mortality rates was also examined. Notably, the magnitude of sex ratios in infant mortality rates declined significantly as sample sizes increased. These results suggest that previously reported marked sex ratios in infant mortality could be the product of stochastic variation in small samples.

  7. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE-DRIVEN ASSESSMENT OF MYOCARDIAL ELASTICITY USING THE DISPLACEMENT RATIO RATE (DRR) METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rouze, Ned C.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive method of characterizing myocardial stiffness could have significant implications in diagnosing cardiac disease. Acoustic radiation force (ARF)–driven techniques have demonstrated their ability to discern elastic properties of soft tissue. For the purpose of myocardial elasticity imaging, a novel ARF-based imaging technique, the displacement ratio rate (DRR) method, was developed to rank the relative stiffnesses of dynamically varying tissue. The basis and performance of this technique was demonstrated through numerical and phantom imaging results. This new method requires a relatively small temporal (<1 ms) and spatial (tenths of mm2) sampling window and appears to be independent of applied ARF magnitude. The DRR method was implemented in two in vivo canine studies, during which data were acquired through the full cardiac cycle by imaging directly on the exposed epicardium. These data were then compared with results obtained by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave velocimetry, with the latter being used as the gold standard. Through the cardiac cycle, velocimetry results portray a range of shear wave velocities from 0.76–1.97 m/s, with the highest velocities observed during systole and the lowest observed during diastole. If a basic shear wave elasticity model is assumed, such a velocity result would suggest a period of increased stiffness during systole (when compared with diastole). Despite drawbacks of the DRR method (i.e., sensitivity to noise and limited stiffness range), its results predicted a similar cyclic stiffness variation to that offered by velocimetry while being insensitive to variations in applied radiation force. PMID:21645966

  8. Implications for the False-positive Rate in Kepler Planet Systems from Transit Duration Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert C.; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Confirming transiting exoplanet candidates through traditional follow-up methods is challenging, especially for faint host stars. Most of Kepler's validated planets relied on statistical methods to separate true planets from false-positives. Multiple transiting planet systems (MTPS) have been previously shown to have low false-positive rates and over 851 planets in MTPSs have been statistically validated so far (Lissauer et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2014). We show that the period-normalized transit duration ratio (ξ) offers additional information that can be used to establish the planetary nature of these systems. We briefly discuss the observed distribution of ξ for the Q1-Q16 Kepler Candidate Search. We also utilize ξ to develop a Bayesian statistical framework combined with Monte Carlo methods to determine which pairs of planet candidates in a MTPS are consistent with the planet hypothesis for a sample of 676 MTPSs that include both candidate and confirmed planets. This analysis proves to be efficient and advantageous in that it only requires catalog-level bulk candidate properties and galactic population modeling to compute the probabilities of a myriad of stellar blend scenarios, without needing additional observational follow-up. Our results agree with the previous results of a low false-positive rate in the Kepler MTPSs. Out of our sample of 1,358 pairs of candidates, we find that about 100 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star, over 800 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 of being a MTPS associated with the target star or another star blended in the photometric aperture. Further more, we find that well over a 1,000 pairs have a probability greater than 0.99 to be planetary in nature, either orbiting the same star or separately orbiting two different stars in the aperture. This implies, independently of any other estimates, that most of the MTPSs detected by Kepler are very likely to be planetary in

  9. Adaptive upstream rate adjustment by RSOA-ONU depending on different injection power of seeding light in standard-reach and long-reach PON systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C. H.; Chow, C. W.; Shih, F. Y.; Pan, C. L.

    2012-08-01

    The wavelength division multiplexing-time division multiplexing (WDM-TDM) passive optical network (PON) using reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)-based colorless optical networking units (ONUs) is considered as a promising candidate for the realization of fiber-to-the-home (FTTH). And this architecture is actively considered by Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) for the realization of FTTH in Taiwan. However, different fiber distances and optical components would introduce different power budgets to different ONUs in the PON. Besides, due to the aging of optical transmitter (Tx), the power decay of the distributed optical carrier from the central office (CO) could also reduce the injection power into each ONU. The situation will be more severe in the long-reach (LR) PON, which is considered as an option for the future access. In this work, we investigate a WDM-TDM PON using RSOA-based ONU for upstream data rate adjustment depending on different continuous wave (CW) injection powers. Both standard-reach (25 km) and LR (100 km) transmissions are evaluated. Moreover, a detail analysis of the upstream signal bit-error rate (BER) performances at different injection powers, upstream data rates, PON split-ratios under stand-reach and long-reach is presented.

  10. On the Primacy of Molecular Processes in Determining Response Rates under Variable-Ratio and Variable-Interval Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanno, Takayuki; Sakagami, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on variables that may account for response-rate differences under variable-ratio (VR) and variable-interval (VI) schedules of reinforcement. Four rats were exposed to VR, VI, tandem VI differential- reinforcement-of-high-rate, regulated-probability-interval, and negative-feedback schedules of reinforcement that provided the same…

  11. Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio Is Associated With Reduced 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability and QTc Prolongation in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grübler, Martin R.; Kienreich, Katharina; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hartaigh, Bríain Ó.; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; März, Winfried; Schmid, Johannes; Oberreither, Eva-Maria; Wetzel, Julia; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aldosterone is considered to exert direct effects on the myocardium and the sympathetic nervous system. Both QT time and heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) are considered to be markers of arrhythmic risk and autonomous dysregulation. In this study, we investigated the associations between aldosterone, QT time, and HRV in patients with arterial hypertension. We recruited 477 hypertensive patients (age: 60.2 ± 10.2 years; 52.3% females) with a mean systolic/diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) value of 128 ± 12.8/77.1 ± 9.2 mmHg and with a median of 2 (IQR: 1–3) antihypertensive agents. Patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Medical University of Graz, Austria. Blood samples, 24-hour HRV derived from 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and ECG's were obtained. Plasma aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations were measured by means of a radioimmunoassay. Twenty-four-hour urine specimens were collected in parallel with ABPM. Mean QTc was 423.3 ± 42.0 milliseconds for males and 434.7 ± 38.3 milliseconds for females. Mean 24H-HR and 24H-HRV was 71.9 ± 9.8 and 10.0 ± 3.6 bpm, respectively. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, ABPM, and current medication, aldosterone to active renin ratio (AARR) was significantly associated with the QTc interval, a marker for cardiac repolarization abnormalities (mean = 426 ± 42.4 milliseconds; β-coefficient = 0.121; P = 0.03) as well as with the 24-hour heart rate variability a surrogate for autonomic dysfunction (median = 9.67 [IQR = 7.38–12.22 bpm]; β-coefficient = −0.133; P = 0.01). In hypertensive patients, AARR is significantly related to QTc prolongation as well as HRV. Further studies investigating the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker and aldosterone synthase inhibitors on QTc and HRV are warranted

  12. Struvite precipitation in anaerobic swine lagoon liquid: effect of pH and Mg:P ratio and determination of rate constant.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nathan O; Mikkelsen, Robert L; Hesterberg, Dean L

    2003-09-01

    Because of increased concern about surface water eutrophication from nutrient-enriched agricultural runoff, many swine producers are encouraged to decrease application rates of waste-based P. Precipitation and subsequent removal of magnesium ammonium phosphate (MgNH(4)PO(4) x 6H(2)O), commonly known as struvite, is a promising mechanism for N and P removal from anaerobic swine lagoon effluent. The objectives of this research were to (i) quantify the effects of adjusting pH and Mg:P ratio on struvite precipitation and (ii) determine the rate constant pH effect for struvite precipitation in anaerobic swine lagoon liquid. Concentrations of PO(4)-P in liquid from two anaerobic swine lagoons were determined after 24 h of equilibration for a pH range of 7.5-9.5 and Mg:P ratios between 1:1 and 1.6:1. Struvite formation reduced the PO(4)-P concentration in the effluents to as low as 2 mgl(-1). Minimum concentrations of PO(4)-P occurred between pH 8.9 and 9.25 at all Mg:P ratios. Struvite precipitation decreased PO(4)-P concentrations by 85% within 20 min at pH 9.0 for an initial Mg:P ratio of 1.2:1. The rate of PO(4)-P decrease was described by a first-order kinetic model, with rate constants of 3.7, 7.9, and 12.3 h(-1) at pH 8.4, 8.7 and 9.0 respectively. Our results indicate that induced struvite formation is a technically feasible method to remove N and P from swine lagoon liquid and it may allow swine producers to recover nutrients for off-farm sale.

  13. Movie Ratings and the Content of Adult Videos: The Sex-Violence Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ni; Linz, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Quantifies sexual, violent, sexually violent, and prosocial behaviors in a sample of R-rated and X-rated videocassettes. Finds the predominant behavior in both X- and XXX-rated videos is sexual. Finds the predominant behavior in R-rated videos was violence followed by prosocial behavior. (RS)

  14. On the use of pulsed reduced dose rate for improvement of the therapeutic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Karl H., V.

    This work demonstrates three related aspects of the efficacy, delivery, and verification of pulsed reduced dose rate radiotherapy (PRDR). PRDR is a method of irradiation designed to minimize radiation-related toxicities in patients undergoing reirradiation for loco-regional reoccurrence of glioblastoma. PRDR uses 0.2GyX10fx daily doses delivered over a 30-minute time span. Under PRDR treatments, a subset of patients have had an unexpectedly positive response to treatment. It was a primary goal of this project to determine if low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity was a contributor to the increased radio-response from these patients. This was done through the use of human T98G glioma and HT29 colorectal cells, and V79.379-A Chinese hamster fibroblasts with drug inhibition of the p53 and PI3K pathways. Radiation was delivered with a medical linear accelerator in either 2Gy acute doses or through PRDR. Methods used to analyze the effect of these techniques included clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, and western blots. Comparison of survival ratios demonstrated no decrease in efficacy for either the standard T98G or HT29 cell lines when using PRDR as compared to an acute dose. T98G with PI3K inhibition and V79.397-A cells demonstrated a decreased efficacy of treatment using PRDR relative to an acute dose. These results suggest an equivalency in tumor treatment with a possible improvement in normal tissue toxicities for the PRDR method. An additional method of delivering PRDR through the use of Tomotherapy was proposed and demonstrated to be accurate. Tomotherapy planning forces the short leaf open times for individual MLC projections from low dose fractionation closed, resulting in an undeliverable plan due to the loss of a large number of usable projections. Application of a virtual grid with directional blocking allows for the output from useable segments to be above this threshold, resulting in a deliverable treatment plan. Finally, analysis was performed on a proposed QA

  15. Analysis of an employment of a gear ratio rate in CVT control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegożek, W.; Szczepka, M.

    2016-09-01

    Continuously variable transmissions(CVTs) potentially ensure the selection of such a gear ratio that scooter fuel consumption can reach minimum value. Traditionally these CVT gearboxes are mechanically controlled, causing a gear ratio to be an engine revs function. This solution does not ensure optimum gear ratio. In this paper the solution for fuel optimal control problem is presented. The results obtained during brake stand research of scooter powertrains show the significant values of brake specific fuel consumption for the velocity that is maximum for a scooter according to highway code. With the introduction of CVT gearbox in which the selection of gear ratio can be controlled according to the worked out strategy the solution for fuel consumption problem is possible. Electromechanical actuators ensure the selection of a gear ratio independently of engine revs. Such type of construction solution makes working out the suitable control strategy that ensures decreasing of scooter fuel consumption possible. Presented strategies do not use precise optimization techniques. The CVT efficiency has a strong influence on transient operation. In the paper the control strategy owing to which fuel consumption decreases by over 40% is presented. The strategy was worked out on the basis of fuel consumption map for a defined scooter exploitation model. The possibilities of realization of the worked out strategy were tested on the brake test stand.

  16. Fructose-maltodextrin ratio in a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution differentially affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate, gut comfort, and performance.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Wendy J; Rowlands, David S

    2011-01-01

    Solutions containing multiple carbohydrates utilizing different intestinal transporters (glucose and fructose) show enhanced absorption, oxidation, and performance compared with single-carbohydrate solutions, but the impact of the ratio of these carbohydrates on outcomes is unknown. In a randomized double-blind crossover, 10 cyclists rode 150 min at 50% peak power, then performed an incremental test to exhaustion, while ingesting artificially sweetened water or one of three carbohydrate-salt solutions comprising fructose and maltodextrin in the respective following concentrations: 4.5 and 9% (0.5-Ratio), 6 and 7.5% (0.8-Ratio), and 7.5 and 6% (1.25-Ratio). The carbohydrates were ingested at 1.8 g/min and naturally (13)C-enriched to permit evaluation of oxidation rate by mass spectrometry and indirect calorimetry. Mean exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates were 1.04, 1.14, and 1.05 g/min (coefficient of variation 20%) in 0.5-, 0.8-, and 1.25-Ratios, respectively, representing likely small increases in 0.8-Ratio of 11% (90% confidence limits; ± 4%) and 10% (± 4%) relative to 0.5- and 1.25-Ratios, respectively. Comparisons of fat and total and endogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates between solutions were unclear. Relative to 0.5-Ratio, there were moderate improvements to peak power with 0.8- (3.6%; 99% confidence limits ± 3.5%) and 1.25-Ratio (3.0%; ± 3.7%) but unclear with water (0.4%; ± 4.4%). Increases in stomach fullness, abdominal cramping, and nausea were lowest with the 0.8- followed by the 1.25-Ratio solution. At high carbohydrate-ingestion rate, greater benefits to endurance performance may result from ingestion of 0.8- to 1.25-Ratio fructose-maltodextrin solutions. Small perceptible improvements in gut comfort favor the 0.8-Ratio and provide a clearer suggestion of mechanism than the relationship with exogenous carbohydrate oxidation.

  17. Progress in quantifying rates and product ratios of microbial denitrification using stable isotope approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Giesemann, Anette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Rohe, Lena; Flessa, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Although it is known since long that microbial denitrification plays a central role in N cycling in soils due to loss of nutrient N, emissions of N2O and lowering of N leaching, few data at the field scale are available due to the difficulty in measurement. In recent years, stable isotope signatures of N2O such as δ18O, average δ15N (δ15Nbulk) and 15N site preference (SP = difference in δ15N between the central and peripheral N positions of the asymmetric N2O molecule) have been used to constrain the atmospheric N2O budget and to characterize N2O turnover processes including N2O production and reduction by microbial denitrification. However, the use of this approach to study N2O dynamics in soils requires knowledge of isotope fractionation factors for the various partial processes involved, e.g. N2O production by nitrification or fungal/bacterial denitrification, and N2O reduction by bacterial denitrification. Here we present recent progress on the principles of isotope fractionation modeling to estimate N2O reduction and on the role of microbial groups and their specific impact on isotope values. Moreover, we report and discuss approaches to determine isotope values of produced N2O prior to its reduction as well as enrichment factors of N2O reduction. Finally, a variety of results from lab and field studies will be shown were N2O reduction estimates by isotope fractionation modeling are validated by independent measurements using 15N tracing or He/O2 incubations. Methodical improvements to increase sensitivity of the 15N tracing approach will be briefly addressed. We conclude that up to now SP of soil-emitted N2O proved to be suitable to constrain the product ratio of denitrification if N2O fluxes are dominated by bacterial denitrification. Although this approach is not yet precise enough for robust quantification of N2 fluxes, improved precision can be obtained in future, if further progress in understanding the control of fractionation factors of production

  18. Running Head: Control and Adjustment of the Rate of Photosynthesis Above Present CO{sub 2} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-12-01

    The adjustment of photosynthesis to different environmental conditions and especially to elevated CO{sub 2} is often characterized in terms of changes in the processes that establish (limit) the net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate. At slightly above present ambient pCO{sub 2} light-saturated photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} depart limitation by the catalytic capacity of tissue rubisco content. An hypothesis attributing this departure to limited thylakoid reaction/electron transport capacity is widely accepted, although we find no experimental evidence in the literature supporting this proposition.. The results of several tests point to the conclusion that the capacity of the thyiakoid reactions cannot be generally responsible for the deviation from rubisco limitation. This conclusion leaves a significant gap in the interpretation of gas exchange responses to CO{sub 2}. Since the inputs to the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (CO{sub 2} and photon-capture/electron-transport products) do not limit photosynthesis on the shoulder of the A=f(c{sub i}) curve, the control of photosynthesis can be characterized as: due to feedback. Several characteristics of gas exchange and fluorescence that occur when steady-states in this region are perturbed by changes in CO{sub 2} or O{sub 2} suggest significant regulation by conditions other than directly by substrate RuBP levels. A strong candidate to explain these responses is the triose-phosphate flux/ inorganic phosphate regulatory sequence, although not all of the gas exchange characteristics expected with ''TPU-limitation'' are present (e.g. oxygen-insensitive photosynthesis). Interest in nitrogen allocation between rubisco and light capture/electron transport as the basis for photosynthetic adjustment to elevated CO{sub 2} may need to be reconsidered as a result of these findings. Contributors to the feedback regulation of photosynthesis (which may include sucrose phosphate synthase and fructose bisphosphatase activities

  19. Late Quaternary incision rates in the southern French Alps from river longitudinal profiles inversion: climatic forcing and internal adjustments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Carole; Cassol, Davide; Rolland, Yann; Saillard, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Southern French Alps, and especially the external crystalline massifs, show evidences of rapid river incision featured by deeply incised gorges and widespread active landslides. The onset of rapid incision is not precisely dated, but cosmogenic nuclide dating of river polished profiles evidences rapid incision (of the order of 2-3 mm.yr-1) since 20 ka. These data suggest that it may be related to temperature and runoff increase due to glacier melting after le last glacial maximum (LGM). In this study, we use river longitudinal profiles from tributaries of the Tinée River, in the Argentera-Mercantour crystalline massif, to determine recent incision rate (IR) variations through time with the inversion method of Goren et al. (2014). Overall, the background IR is of approximately 5 mm.yr-1, in agreement with recent IR estimates from cosmogenic nuclide dating in the Tinée River. Incision rate histories of all tributaries show periodic pulses of large IR that could be correlated to quaternary interglacials and interstadials, based on the comparison with global temperature curves. However, some tributaries show very large IR in the Holocene period, whereas others show a recent (post 10 ka) IR decrease. We suggest that local internal adjustments, possibly in relation with meander migration of the main stem, are responsible for these different behaviors.

  20. Ratio of hadronic decay rates of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) and the {rho}{pi} puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. F.; Li, X. H.

    2001-06-01

    The so-called {rho}{pi} puzzle of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) decays is examined using the experimental data available to date. Two different approaches were taken to estimate the ratio of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) hadronic decay rates. While one of the estimates could not yield the exact ratio of {psi}(2S) to J/{psi} inclusive hadronic decay rates, the other, based on a computation of the inclusive ggg decay rate for {psi}(2S)(J/{psi}) by subtracting other decay rates from the total decay rate, differs by two standard deviations from the naive prediction of perturbative QCD, even though its central value is nearly twice as large as what was naively expected. A comparison between this ratio, upon making corrections for specific exclusive two-body decay modes, and the corresponding experimental data confirms the puzzles in J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) decays. We find from our analysis that the exclusively reconstructed hadronic decays of the {psi}(2S) account for only a small fraction of its total decays, and a ratio exceeding the above estimate should be expected to occur for a considerable number of the remaining decay channels. We also show that the recent new results from the BES experiment provide crucial tests of various theoretical models proposed to explain the puzzle.

  1. Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio, and Coal Fineness Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill; Roger Demler; Robert G. Mudry

    2006-03-01

    To minimize program cost, additional testing was performed in concert with EPRI-funded testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility in late July. The major focus of this effort was noise reduction. As it turned out, the main source of the noise proved to be related to electrical grounding issues and the adjustments needed to address these problems took most of the test period. Once those changes were in place, a very limited quantity of high quality data was obtained and an excellent correlation between the dynamic signature and coal flow was obtained. Additional data were then collected during August. Unfortunately, the sensor signal for the August data collection proved to be extremely weak. Therefore, Airflow Sciences will collect additional laboratory data in October before proceeding with the collection of field data. This will allow the calibration to be expanded to include a wider range of flow conditions and improve the potential applicability to data to be collected at the coal plants.

  2. 42 CFR 484.220 - Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels. 484.220 Section 484.220 Public Health... Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels... case-mix using a case-mix index to explain the relative resource utilization of different patients....

  3. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed.

  4. 45 CFR 800.203 - Medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical loss ratio. 800.203 Section 800.203 Public... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.203 Medical loss ratio. (a) Required medical loss ratio. An MSPP issuer must attain: (1) The medical loss ratio...

  5. 45 CFR 800.203 - Medical loss ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical loss ratio. 800.203 Section 800.203 Public... PROGRAM Premiums, Rating Factors, Medical Loss Ratios, and Risk Adjustment § 800.203 Medical loss ratio. (a) Required medical loss ratio. An MSPP issuer must attain: (1) The medical loss ratio...

  6. 75 FR 66271 - Assessment Dividends, Assessment Rates and Designated Reserve Ratio

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... negative $20.9 billion in December 2009, despite high assessment rates and, in the most recent crisis... industry trade group representatives uniformly favored steady, predictable assessments and found high... applicable to all insured depository institutions (IDIs) need be set only high enough to reach 1.15...

  7. Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yan; Gou Bingcong; Chen Feng

    2011-09-28

    Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon are calculated by the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included using first-order perturbation theory. Calculated Auger channel energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution Auger spectrum in the 300-keV C{sup +}{yields} CH{sub 4} collision experiment. It is found that Auger decay of these five-electron core-excited states gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 238-280 eV.

  8. Frequency and load ratio effects on critical strain energy release rate Gc thresholds of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, richard S.; Odom, Edwin M.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composite laminates of T300/BP907 and AS6/HST-7 were axial-tension fatigue tested. Tests were conducted at 5 and 10 Hz, and at loading ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.5. Edge delamination was monitored as a function of number of fatigue cycles by monitoring stiffness reduction during fatigue testing. Delamination was confirmed and documented using dye-enhanced X-ray and optical photography. Critical strain energy release rates were then calculated. The composites delaminated readily, with loading ratio having a significant influence. Frequency effects were negligible.

  9. The Effects of Resonant Relaxation and Relativistic Precession on the Rate of Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Michael; Miller, M.; Richardson, D.; Trenti, M.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals (EMRIs), during which a stellar-mass compact object in close orbit around a supermassive black hole gradually loses energy and angular momentum through the emission of gravitational radiation, are likely to be key sources of long-wavelength gravitational waves. Because the expected wavelengths fall in the band to which the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna will be most sensitive, these events should be detectable and thus provide a probe of the strong-field limit of gravity. Despite many years of study of EMRIs, there exist key uncertainties in relevant processes such as resonant relaxation. We present preliminary simulations of the center of a typical galaxy using a tree N-body code, and discuss the implications of our results for resonant relaxation in relativistic gravity. This work was funded in part by NASA grant NNX08AH29G.

  10. The Effect of Compression Ratio, Fuel Octane Rating, and Ethanol Content on Spark-Ignition Engine Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Leone, Thomas G; Anderson, James E; Davis, Richard S; Iqbal, Asim; Reese, Ronald A; Shelby, Michael H; Studzinski, William M

    2015-09-15

    Light-duty vehicles (LDVs) in the United States and elsewhere are required to meet increasingly challenging regulations on fuel economy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as criteria pollutant emissions. New vehicle trends to improve efficiency include higher compression ratio, downsizing, turbocharging, downspeeding, and hybridization, each involving greater operation of spark-ignited (SI) engines under higher-load, knock-limited conditions. Higher octane ratings for regular-grade gasoline (with greater knock resistance) are an enabler for these technologies. This literature review discusses both fuel and engine factors affecting knock resistance and their contribution to higher engine efficiency and lower tailpipe CO2 emissions. Increasing compression ratios for future SI engines would be the primary response to a significant increase in fuel octane ratings. Existing LDVs would see more advanced spark timing and more efficient combustion phasing. Higher ethanol content is one available option for increasing the octane ratings of gasoline and would provide additional engine efficiency benefits for part and full load operation. An empirical calculation method is provided that allows estimation of expected vehicle efficiency, volumetric fuel economy, and CO2 emission benefits for future LDVs through higher compression ratios for different assumptions on fuel properties and engine types. Accurate "tank-to-wheel" estimates of this type are necessary for "well-to-wheel" analyses of increased gasoline octane ratings in the context of light duty vehicle transportation. PMID:26237538

  11. The Effect of Compression Ratio, Fuel Octane Rating, and Ethanol Content on Spark-Ignition Engine Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Leone, Thomas G; Anderson, James E; Davis, Richard S; Iqbal, Asim; Reese, Ronald A; Shelby, Michael H; Studzinski, William M

    2015-09-15

    Light-duty vehicles (LDVs) in the United States and elsewhere are required to meet increasingly challenging regulations on fuel economy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as criteria pollutant emissions. New vehicle trends to improve efficiency include higher compression ratio, downsizing, turbocharging, downspeeding, and hybridization, each involving greater operation of spark-ignited (SI) engines under higher-load, knock-limited conditions. Higher octane ratings for regular-grade gasoline (with greater knock resistance) are an enabler for these technologies. This literature review discusses both fuel and engine factors affecting knock resistance and their contribution to higher engine efficiency and lower tailpipe CO2 emissions. Increasing compression ratios for future SI engines would be the primary response to a significant increase in fuel octane ratings. Existing LDVs would see more advanced spark timing and more efficient combustion phasing. Higher ethanol content is one available option for increasing the octane ratings of gasoline and would provide additional engine efficiency benefits for part and full load operation. An empirical calculation method is provided that allows estimation of expected vehicle efficiency, volumetric fuel economy, and CO2 emission benefits for future LDVs through higher compression ratios for different assumptions on fuel properties and engine types. Accurate "tank-to-wheel" estimates of this type are necessary for "well-to-wheel" analyses of increased gasoline octane ratings in the context of light duty vehicle transportation.

  12. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Top Five Causes of Cancer Death,(†) by Race/Hispanic Ethnicity - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the top five causes of cancer deaths for the total population were lung, colorectal, female breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. The non-Hispanic black population had the highest age-adjusted death rates for each of these five cancers, followed by non-Hispanic white and Hispanic groups. The age-adjusted death rate for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in all groups, was 42.1 per 100,000 standard population for the total population, 45.4 for non-Hispanic white, 45.7 for non-Hispanic black, and 18.3 for Hispanic populations. PMID:27632152

  13. Mineralization of biogenic materials in the water masses of the South Atlantic Ocean. II: Stoichiometric ratios and mineralization rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Álvarez, M.; Brea, S.; Mèmery, L.; Messias, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    The variability of nitrate (N), phosphate (P), silicate (Si) and Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU) due to water mass mixing was objectively separated from the variability due to mineralization of biogenic materials in the western and eastern South Atlantic Ocean on basis of the constrained Optimum MultiParameter (OMP) analysis implemented in the companion manuscript. Using a consensus linear regression model, AOU/N/P/Si mineralization ratios and the corresponding oxygen utilisation rates (OURs) were obtained for the realm of each water mass defined after the OMP analysis. Combining these results with a stoichiometric model, the organic carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios and the biochemical composition (carbohydrates + lipids, proteins and phosphorus compounds) of the mineralized material, were derived. The vertical variability of the AOU/N, AOU/P and AOU/C mineralization ratios pointed to a significant fractionation during the mineralization of sinking organic matter. This fractionation was confirmed by preferential consumption of organic phosphorous compounds and proteins in shallower levels, which produced an increase of the C/N ratio of the mineralised materials of 0.5 ± 0.2 mol C mol N-1 every 1000 dbar. OURs in the twilight zone decreased quadratically with the C/N molar ratio of the mineralised material and exponentially with pressure (p, in 103 dbar) according to the following regression equation: Ln (OUR) = 6.2(±1.2) - 2.0(±0.7) * Ln (C/N) - 0.6(±0.2) * p (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.006, n = 8). This variability in the rates and stoichiometric ratios of the biogenic material mineralization compromises our capacity to predict the ocean biogeochemistry response to global change, including the CO2 uptake and storage and the corresponding feedback mechanisms.

  14. Rate-equation analysis for the frequency-chirp-to-modulated-power ratio of a semiconductor-diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Welford, D.R.

    1985-11-01

    An expression for the frequency chirp to modulated power ratio (CPR) is derived from a rate-equation analysis of the small-signal, injection-current modulation in a semiconductor diode laser. The model includes the effect of lateral carrier diffusion across the active region of the laser diode. The modulation-frequency dependence of the CPR is flat from dc to a few hundred megahertz, beyond which it is proportional to the modulation frequency.

  15. A rate equation analysis for the frequency chirp to modulated power ratio of a semiconductor diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Welford, D.

    1985-11-01

    An expression for the frequency chirp to modulated power ratio (CPR) is derived from a rate equation analysis of the small-signal, injection current modulation in a semiconductor diode laser. The model includes the effect of lateral carrier diffusion across the active region of the laser diode. The modulation frequency dependence of the CPR is flat from dc to a few hundred megahertz, beyond which it is proportional to the modulation frequency.

  16. The dependence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys on displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    Before the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep can be confidently determined, analysis of creep data requires that the various creep and non-creep strains be separated, as well as separating the transient, steady-state, and swelling-driven components of creep. When such separation is attained, it appears that the steady-state creep compliance, B{sub o}, is not a function of displacement rate, as has been previously assumed. It also appears that the formation and growth of helium bubbles under high helium generation conditions can lead to a significant enhancement of the irradiation creep coefficient. This is a transient influence that disappears as void swelling begins to dominate the total strain, but this transient can increase the apparent creep compliance by 100--200% at relatively low ({le}20) dpa levels.

  17. SENSOR FOR INDIVIDUAL BURNER CONTROL OF FIRING RATE, FUEL-AIR RATIO, AND COAL FINENESS CORRELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill; Roger Demler; Robert G. Mudry

    2005-01-01

    Additional calibration data were collected in the Coal Flow Test Facility early in this reporting period. These data comprised a total of 181 tests for stud and magnetic accelerometer mounts, with two mounting locations relative to two different pipe elbows, and including some tests with out-of-plane elbows upstream of the test section to produce coal ''roping''. The results found in analyzing these new data were somewhat disappointing: correlations for coal flow rate for a given mount type and mounting location were less accurate than desired, and degraded badly when data from other locations were included in the same analysis. Reviewing all of the data files (from both the earlier testing and recent calibration testing) disclosed a significant fraction of cases with several forms of noise. Eliminating these cases improved the correlations somewhat, but the number of cases that remained did not permit general conclusions to be drawn. It was finally learned that yet another type of noise is present in some data files, producing a strong effect on the correlation accuracy. The cases not subject to this noise correlated very well. It would be desirable to collect additional data in the Coal Flow Test Facility prior to moving on to field data collection, a change in program direction that would require a no-cost time extension.

  18. Geochemical information and isotopic ratios in pinpointing the rates of contamination processes generated at mine sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Kaisa; Kittilä, Anniina; Backnäs, Soile; Pasanen, Antti; Hendriksson, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water is an important fingerprinting method for tracing recharge sources, distribution processes and possible hydraulic connections of mine waters. However, since, the isotopes alone do not indicate the contamination derived from mining activities; also a set of geochemical analysis of harmful substance in water is acquired. This complex approach will allow a detailed insight in migration of potentially harmful substances, their reactions, mixing and dilution in ground and surface waters. The data can be applied also when comparing geogenic and anthropogenic emissions. Isotopic methods are rather new approach to estimate mining related emissions in Finland and thus, a novel approach of isotopic methods for investigation and monitoring of migration of harmful substances from mine sites are tested in two mine sites in Finland. The aim of this study is to assess the emission sources, flow paths and interaction between mine waters, groundwater and surface waters. A set of isotopic data, including S, Li, Mg, U, Sr, Pb, O, and H, will be combined with chemical information and physical parameters of water in order to assess the source and extent of possible contamination as well as the rates of processes that generate or at best attenuate the contamination. The results obtained from water analyses and field measurements will be used in hydrogeochemical modelling for the prediction of chemical transformation and long-term impacts of mining at study site and its surroundings.

  19. SENSOR FOR INDIVIDUAL BURNER CONTROL OF FIRING RATE, FUEL-AIR RATIO, AND COAL FINENESS CORRELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill; Roger Demler; Robert G. Mudry

    2005-04-01

    A no-cost time extension was requested, to permit additional laboratory testing prior to undertaking field data collection. This was received in this reporting period. To minimize program cost, this additional testing is planned to be performed in concert with EPRI-funded testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility. Since the EPRI schedule was undecided, a hiatus occurred in the test effort. Instead, a significant effort was exerted to analyze the available laboratory test data to see whether the source and nature of noise behaviors could be identified, or whether the key flow information could be extracted even in the presence of the noise. One analysis approach involved filtering the data numerically to reject dynamics outside of various frequency bands. By varying the center frequency and width of the band, the effect of signal frequency on flow dynamics could be examined. Essentially equivalent results were obtained for all frequency bands that excluded a neighborhood of the transducer resonance, indicating that there is little advantage to be gained by limiting the experimental frequency window. Another approach examined the variation of the dynamics over a series of 1-second windows of data, producing an improvement in the prediction of coal flow rate. Yet another approach compared the dynamics of a series of 1-second windows to those of a series of 5-second windows, producing still better results. These results will be developed further in the next reporting period, which should also include further laboratory testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility.

  20. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Virginia M; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Rothenberg, Stephen J; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J; Steuerwald, Amy J; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-07-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary.

  1. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. PMID:24815335

  2. 75 FR 9964 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2010 Mid-Year Adjustment to the Fee Rates Applicable Under Sections 31(b...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... FR 21018 (May 6, 2009). Based on data provided by the national securities exchanges and the national... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2010 Mid-Year Adjustment to the Fee Rates Applicable Under Sections 31(b... amount of sales for fiscal year 2010 calculated by the Commission in its Order Making Fiscal 2010...

  3. Effect of C/N ratio, aeration rate and moisture content on ammonia and greenhouse gas emission during the composting.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Yuanqiu

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous emission (N2O, CH4 and NH3) from composting can be an important source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air pollution. A laboratory scale orthogonal experiment was conducted to estimate the effects of C/N ratio, aeration rate and initial moisture content on gaseous emission during the composting of pig faeces from Chinese Ganqinfen system. The results showed that about 23.9% to 45.6% of total organic carbon (TOC) was lost in the form of CO2 and 0.8% to 7.5% of TOC emitted as CH4. Most of the nitrogen was lost in the form of NH3, which account for 9.6% to 32.4% of initial nitrogen. N2O was also an important way of nitrogen losses and 1.5% to 7.3% of initial total nitrogen was lost as it. Statistic analysis showed that the aeration rate is the most important factor which could affect the NH3 (p = 0.0189), CH4 (p = 0.0113) and N2O (p = 0.0493) emissions significantly. Higher aeration rates reduce the CH4 emission but increase the NH3 and N2O losses. C/N ratio could affect the NH3 (p = 0.0442) and CH4 (p = 0.0246) emissions significantly, but not the N2O. Lower C/N ratio caused higher NH3 and CH4 emissions. The initial moisture content can not influence the gaseous emission significantly. Most treatments were matured after 37 days, except a trial with high moisture content and a low C/N ratio.

  4. The effect of organic loading rate on VFA/COD ratio for methane production from an EGSB reactor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yuan, Linjiang; Liu, Wenhui

    2015-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) on VFA/COD ratio for continuous production of methane using an expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactor for 200 d. Reactor performances were studied in treating high OLRs ranging from 4.91 +/- 0.54 to 16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1)d(-1) of glucose-based synthetic wastewater in a mesophilic condition. Results showed that performance of anaerobic fermentation system was distinctly influenced by OLR in terms of organic removal efficiency, VFA yield, methane production rate and system stability.Acetic and propionic acids accounted for 80-90% of total VFA, and presented highest VFA concentration and composition of VFA showed minor changes with OLR variation. Moreover, an increase in OLR increased VFA/COD ratio in the whole operation period and high VFA/COD ratio could inhibit methanogenesis at high OLR (16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1) d(-1)). PMID:26364485

  5. The effect of organic loading rate on VFA/COD ratio for methane production from an EGSB reactor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yuan, Linjiang; Liu, Wenhui

    2015-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) on VFA/COD ratio for continuous production of methane using an expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactor for 200 d. Reactor performances were studied in treating high OLRs ranging from 4.91 +/- 0.54 to 16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1)d(-1) of glucose-based synthetic wastewater in a mesophilic condition. Results showed that performance of anaerobic fermentation system was distinctly influenced by OLR in terms of organic removal efficiency, VFA yield, methane production rate and system stability.Acetic and propionic acids accounted for 80-90% of total VFA, and presented highest VFA concentration and composition of VFA showed minor changes with OLR variation. Moreover, an increase in OLR increased VFA/COD ratio in the whole operation period and high VFA/COD ratio could inhibit methanogenesis at high OLR (16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1) d(-1)).

  6. Powder flow studies III: tensile strength, consolidation ratio, flow rate, and capsule-filling-weight variation relationships.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, Z T; Yang, I C

    1981-08-01

    The tensile strength of consolidated powder beds was studied by applying a series of loads to the surface of the powder beds in a tensile tester. The results were plotted as tensile strength versus consolidation pressure. The linearity of these plots suggests a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation pressure. The following plots gave linear relationships: (1) tensile strength versus consolidation ratio, (b) tensile strength versus coefficient of variation of the filled weight of the capsules, and (c) logarithm of the tensile strength versus logarithm of the flow rate. These results suggest a direct relationship between tensile strength and consolidation ratio and their usefulness in studying powder flow. The physical significance of the empirical equation used in consolidation studies was explored. A comparison of the empirical equation with a theoretically derived equation, under certain assumptions, suggests that the consolidation ratio is a function of the ratio of the initial volume to the net volume and a function of the coefficient of Rankine. The coefficient of Rankine is a function of the angle of internal friction in the static powder bed.

  7. Rate equation model of laser induced bias in uranium isotope ratios measured by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Prussin, S. G.; Savina, M. R.; Willingham, D. G.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-12-07

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of the 235U/238U ratio to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. In application, isotope standards are used to identify and correct bias in measured isotope ratios, but understanding laser-induced bias from first-principles can improve the precision and accuracy of experimental measurements. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variations in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. The model uses atomic data and empirical descriptions of laser performance to estimate the laser-induced bias expected in experimental measurements of the 235U/238U ratio. Empirical corrections are also included to account for ionization processes that are difficult to calculate from first principles with the available atomic data. As a result, development of this model has highlighted several important considerations for properly interpreting experimental results.

  8. Transient secondary organic aerosol formation from limonene ozonolysis in indoor environments: impacts of air exchange rates and initial concentration ratios.

    PubMed

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S

    2014-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) results from the oxidation of reactive organic gases (ROGs) and is an indoor particle source. The aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, quantifies the SOA forming potential of ROGs and is the ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. The AMF depends on the organic aerosol concentration, as well as the prevalence of later generation reactions. AMFs have been measured in unventilated chambers or steady-state flow through chambers. However, indoor settings have outdoor air exchange, and indoor SOA formation often occurs when ROGs are transiently emitted, for instance from emissions of cleaning products. Herein, we quantify "transient AMFs" from ozonolysis of pulse-emitted limonene in a ventilated chamber, for 18 experiments at low (0.28 h(-1)), moderate (0.53 h(-1)), and high (0.96 h(-1)) air exchange rates (AER) with varying initial ozone-limonene ratios. Transient AMFs increased with the amount of ROG reacted; AMFs also increased with decreasing AERs and increasing initial ozone-limonene ratios, which together likely promoted more ozone reactions with the remaining exocyclic bond of oxidized limonene products in the SOA phase. Knowing the AER and initial ozone-limonene ratio is crucial to predict indoor transient SOA behavior accurately.

  9. Rate equation model of laser induced bias in uranium isotope ratios measured by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Prussin, S. G.; Savina, M. R.; Willingham, D. G.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-12-07

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of the 235U/238U ratio to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. In application, isotope standards are used to identify and correct bias in measured isotope ratios, but understanding laser-induced bias from first-principles can improve the precision and accuracy of experimental measurements. A rate equationmore » model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variations in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. The model uses atomic data and empirical descriptions of laser performance to estimate the laser-induced bias expected in experimental measurements of the 235U/238U ratio. Empirical corrections are also included to account for ionization processes that are difficult to calculate from first principles with the available atomic data. As a result, development of this model has highlighted several important considerations for properly interpreting experimental results.« less

  10. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  11. Effects of mix ratio, moisture content and aeration rate on sulfur odor emissions during pig manure composting.

    PubMed

    Zang, Bing; Li, Shuyan; Michel, Frederick; Li, Guoxue; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Difang; Li, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Sulfur compounds in swine manure can cause odor emissions during composting if conditions are not conducive to their rapid oxidation and degradation. In this study, the effects of controllable composting process variables on sulfur odor emissions were investigated. These included pig manure to corn stalk mix ratio (0.7:1, 1.5:1 and 2.2:1dw basis), initial moisture content (60%, 65%, 70% and 75%) and aeration rate (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0m(3)m(-3)h(-1)). The compounds measured were carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, ethyl mercaptan, diethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide (Me2S) and dimethyl disulfide (Me2SS). The results showed that total sulfur losses ranged from 3.9% to 18.3% after 26days of composting. Me2S and Me2SS were the primary (>59.61%) sulfur compounds released during this period. After turning, emission rates of both Me2S and Me2SS increased. Emissions of the other six sulfur compounds were low and inconsistent during composting. Within the compost, feedstock mix ratio significantly influenced the concentration of Me2SS, while aeration rate significantly affected Me2S concentration (p<0.05). Moisture content did not have a significant effect on the concentrations of either of these two compounds. Concentrations of sulfur odor compounds were the lowest at the highest aeration rate. Therefore, high aeration rates during the thermophilic phase, especially after turning, are recommended to minimize sulfur odors produced during swine manure composting. PMID:27363616

  12. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Yuan, Xin; Anderson, James M; Santangelo, George M

    2016-09-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov.

  13. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, B. Ian; Yuan, Xin; Santangelo, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov. PMID:27599104

  14. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Yuan, Xin; Anderson, James M; Santangelo, George M

    2016-09-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov. PMID:27599104

  15. Fission Rate Ratios of FCA-IX Assemblies as Integral Experiment for Assessment of TRU's Fission Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2016-03-01

    At the fast critical assembly (FCA) of JAEA, central fission rate ratios for TRU such as 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, and 244Cm were measured in the seven uraniumfueled assemblies (FCA-IX assemblies) with systematically changed neutron spectra. The FCA-IX assemblies were constructed with simplicity both in geometry and composition. By virtue of these FCA-IX assemblies where the simple combinations of uranium fuel and diluent (graphite and stainless steel) in their core regions were systematically varied, the neutron spectra of them cover from the intermediate to fast one. Taking their advantages, benchmark models with respect to the central fission rate ratios had been recently developed for the evaluation of the TRU's fission cross sections. As an application of these benchmark models, the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library JENDL-4.0 was utilized by a Monte Carlo calculation code. Several results show large discrepancies between the calculation and experimental values. The benchmark models would be well suited for the evaluation and modification of the nuclear data for the TRU's fission cross sections.

  16. Risk adjustment models for interhospital comparison of CS rates using Robson’s ten group classification system and other socio-demographic and clinical variables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Caesarean section (CS) rate is a quality of health care indicator frequently used at national and international level. The aim of this study was to assess whether adjustment for Robson’s Ten Group Classification System (TGCS), and clinical and socio-demographic variables of the mother and the fetus is necessary for inter-hospital comparisons of CS rates. Methods The study population includes 64,423 deliveries in Emilia-Romagna between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, classified according to theTGCS. Poisson regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted hospital relative risks of CS compared to a reference category. Analyses were carried out in the overall population and separately according to the Robson groups (groups I, II, III, IV and V–X combined). Adjusted relative risks (RR) of CS were estimated using two risk-adjustment models; the first (M1) including the TGCS group as the only adjustment factor; the second (M2) including in addition demographic and clinical confounders identified using a stepwise selection procedure. Percentage variations between crude and adjusted RRs by hospital were calculated to evaluate the confounding effect of covariates. Results The percentage variations from crude to adjusted RR proved to be similar in M1 and M2 model. However, stratified analyses by Robson’s classification groups showed that residual confounding for clinical and demographic variables was present in groups I (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and III (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and to a minor extent in groups II (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour). Conclusions The TGCS classification is useful for

  17. 48 CFR 52.222-30 - Construction Wage Rate Requirements-Price Adjustment (None or Separately Specified Method).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to workers subject to the Construction Wage Rate Requirements statute. (End of clause) ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction Wage Rate... PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.222-30 Construction Wage Rate...

  18. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Suicide Rates* for Females and Males, by Method(†) - National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000 and 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    From 2000 to 2014, the age-adjusted suicide rate increased from 4.0 to 5.8 per 100,000 for females and from 17.7 to 20.7 for males. Suicide rates by specific method (firearm, poisoning, suffocation, or other methods) also increased, with the greatest increase seen for suicides by suffocation. During the 15-year period, the rate of suicide by suffocation more than doubled for females from 0.7 to 1.6 and increased from 3.4 to 5.6 for males. In 2014, among females, suicide by poisoning had the highest rate (1.9), and among males, suicide by firearm had the highest rate (11.4). PMID:27197046

  19. Adjustable Nyquist-rate System for Single-Bit Sigma-Delta ADC with Alternative FIR Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Vincent; Dadouche, Foudil; Berviller, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new smart and compact system dedicated to control the output sampling frequency of an analogue-to-digital converters (ADC) based on single-bit sigma-delta (ΣΔ) modulator. This system dramatically improves the spectral analysis capabilities of power network analysers (power meters) by adjusting the ADC's sampling frequency to the input signal's fundamental frequency with a few parts per million accuracy. The trade-off between straightforwardness and performance that motivated the choice of the ADC's architecture are preliminary discussed. It particularly comes along with design considerations of an ultra-steep direct-form FIR that is optimised in terms of size and operating speed. Thanks to compact standard VHDL language description, the architecture of the proposed system is particularly suitable for application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) implementation-oriented low-power and low-cost power meter applications. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) prototyping and experimental results validate the adjustable sampling frequency concept. They also show that the system can perform better in terms of implementation and power capabilities compared to dedicated IP resources.

  20. BPA exposure during in vitro oocyte maturation results in dose-dependent alterations to embryo development rates, apoptosis rate, sex ratio and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Jacqueline; Mahboubi, Kiana; MacLusky, Neil; King, W Allan; Favetta, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the oocyte's environment can negatively affect embryo development. Oocyte quality, which can determine embryonic viability, is easily perturbed, thus factors affecting normal oocyte maturation are a concern. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical that elicits a variety of reproductive effects. BPA has previously been found to disrupt meiosis, however the embryonic effects in mammals are not well documented. Here, bovine oocytes were matured in vitro with and without BPA treatment. Resulting embryos exhibited decreased embryonic development rates, increased apoptosis, and a skewed sex ratio. Gene expression in blastocysts was not altered, whereas treatment with 15ng/mL BPA resulted in increased expression of several of the genes studies, however this increase was largely due to a vehicle effect. BPA exposure during oocyte maturation in vitro can therefore, in a dose-dependent way, decrease oocyte and embryo quality and developmental potential and affect gene expression of developmentally important transcripts.

  1. Glomerular Filtration Rate and Urine Albumin to Creatinine Ratio Associated With Hearing Impairment Among Korean Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yunji; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, June; Lee, Joo Kyung; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Nam, Hyo-Yun; Nam, Ga-Eun; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Woo; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) with hearing impairment among diabetic adults in Korea. The study was based on data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011 to 2012. Participants were 1206 diabetic adults, aged over 19 years, who completed audiometric testing supervised by nationally certified clinicians. Hearing impairment was defined in three grades: no hearing impairment (pure-tone average 0–25 dB), slight hearing impairment (26–40 dB), and disabling hearing impairment (>40 dB) in the better ear at frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 kHz. Using logistic regression, risk of hearing impairment was assessed after having controlled for confounding factors. Higher levels of ACR and lower levels of eGFR correlated with an increase in percentage of disabling hearing impairment both unilaterally and bilaterally (P < 0.001). Controlling for possible confounding covariates, odds ratios for hearing impairment showed tendency to increase in higher ACR groups (P for trend = 0.029). Similar pattern was examined between eGFR and hearing impairment (P for trend = 0.006). Odds ratios were 1.981 (1.146, 3.424) for ACR Q4 and 2.773 (1.286, 5.983) for eGFR < 60 mL/min. Fall in eGFR and rise in ACR correlated with severity of hearing impairment. The association existed independently of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, drinking, exercise, new onset of diabetes, education, income, mental stress, noise exposure, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27124027

  2. 76 FR 5811 - Adjusted Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) Rate for the First Quarter of Fiscal Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... percentage which bears the same ratio to 45 per centum as the square of the per capita income of such State bears to the square of the per capita income of the continental United States (including Alaska) and...) and 1101(a)(8)(B), and statistics from the Department of Commerce of average income per person in...

  3. Implementation of intensity ratio change and line-of-sight rate change algorithms for imaging infrared trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viau, C. R.

    2012-06-01

    The use of the intensity change and line-of-sight (LOS) change concepts have previously been documented in the open-literature as techniques used by non-imaging infrared (IR) seekers to reject expendable IR countermeasures (IRCM). The purpose of this project was to implement IR counter-countermeasure (IRCCM) algorithms based on target intensity and kinematic behavior for a generic imaging IR (IIR) seeker model with the underlying goal of obtaining a better understanding of how expendable IRCM can be used to defeat the latest generation of seekers. The report describes the Intensity Ratio Change (IRC) and LOS Rate Change (LRC) discrimination techniques. The algorithms and the seeker model are implemented in a physics-based simulation product called Tactical Engagement Simulation Software (TESS™). TESS is developed in the MATLAB®/Simulink® environment and is a suite of RF/IR missile software simulators used to evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of countermeasures against various classes of guided threats. The investigation evaluates the algorithm and tests their robustness by presenting the results of batch simulation runs of surface-to-air (SAM) and air-to-air (AAM) IIR missiles engaging a non-maneuvering target platform equipped with expendable IRCM as self-protection. The report discusses how varying critical parameters such track memory time, ratio thresholds and hold time can influence the outcome of an engagement.

  4. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials.

  5. Surface Modification Energized by Focused Ion Beam: The Influence of Etch Rates & Aspect Ratio on Ripple Wavelengths.

    SciTech Connect

    MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-11-15

    Ion beams have been used to modify surface topography, producing nanometer-scale modulations (and even subnanometer ripples in this work) that have potential uses ranging from designing self-assembly structures, to controlling stiction of micromachined surfaces, to providing imprint templates for patterned media. Modern computer-controlled Focused Ion Beam tools enable alternating submicron patterned zones of such ion-eroded surfaces, as well as dramatically increasing the rate of ion beam processing. The DualBeam FIB/SEM also expedites process development while minimizing the use of materials that may be precious (Diamond) and/or produce hazardous byproducts (Beryllium). A FIB engineer can prototype a 3-by-3-by-3 matrix of variables in tens of minutes and consume as little as zeptoliters of material; whereas traditional ion beam processing would require tens of days and tens of precious wafers. Saturation wavelengths have been reported for ripples on materials such as single crystal silicon or diamond ({approx}200nm); however this work achieves wavelengths >400nm on natural diamond. Conversely, Be can provide a stable and ordered 2-dimensional array of <40nm periodicity; and ripples <0.4nm are also fabricated on carbon surfaces and quantified by HR-TEM and electron diffraction. Rippling is a function of material, ion beam, and angle; but is also controlled by chemical environment, redeposition, and aspect ratio. Ideally a material exhibits a constant yield (atoms sputtered off per incident ion); however, pragmatic FIB processes, coupled with the direct metrological feedback in a DualBeam tool, reveal etch rates do not remain constant for nanometer-scale processing. Control of rippling requires controlled metrology, and robust software tools are developed to enhance metrology. In situ monitoring of the influence of aspect ratio and redeposition at the micron scale correlates to the rippling fundamentals that occur at the nanometer scale and are controlled by the

  6. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Return Method Rate of return for a period may be calculated by computing the net performance divided by the beginning net asset value for each trading day in the period and compounding each daily rate of... commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor may present to the Commission proposals regarding...

  7. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Return Method Rate of return for a period may be calculated by computing the net performance divided by the beginning net asset value for each trading day in the period and compounding each daily rate of... commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor may present to the Commission proposals regarding...

  8. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Return Method Rate of return for a period may be calculated by computing the net performance divided by the beginning net asset value for each trading day in the period and compounding each daily rate of... commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor may present to the Commission proposals regarding...

  9. 75 FR 70744 - Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-2013 Proposed Power Rate Adjustments Public Hearing and Opportunities for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... information about costs, load and resource forecasting, generation inputs pricing, segmentation, revenue... Public customers serving new large single loads. BPA is forecasting no sales at the NR rate in the... governed by BPA's Procedures Governing Bonneville Power Administration Rate Hearings, 51 FR ] 7611...

  10. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Return Method Rate of return for a period may be calculated by computing the net performance divided by the beginning net asset value for each trading day in the period and compounding each daily rate of... commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor may present to the Commission proposals regarding...

  11. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Return Method Rate of return for a period may be calculated by computing the net performance divided by the beginning net asset value for each trading day in the period and compounding each daily rate of... commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor may present to the Commission proposals regarding...

  12. Direct investigation of the ablation rate evolution during laser drilling of high-aspect-ratio micro-holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Sibillano, Teresa; Columbo, Lorenzo L.; Di Niso, Francesca; Ancona, Antonio; Dabbicco, Maurizio; De Lucia, Francesco; Lugarà, Pietro M.; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2012-03-01

    The recent development of ultrafast laser ablation technology in precision micromachining has dramatically increased the demand for reliable and real-time detection systems to characterize the material removal process. In particular, the laser percussion drilling of metals is lacking of non-invasive techniques able to monitor into the depth the spatial- and time-dependent evolution all through the ablation process. To understand the physical interaction between bulk material and high-energy light beam, accurate in-situ measurements of process parameters such as the penetration depth and the removal rate are crucial. We report on direct real time measurements of the ablation front displacement and the removal rate during ultrafast laser percussion drilling of metals by implementing a contactless sensing technique based on optical feedback interferometry. High aspect ratio micro-holes were drilled onto steel plates with different thermal properties (AISI 1095 and AISI 301) and Aluminum samples using 120-ps/110-kHz pulses delivered by a microchip laser fiber amplifier. Percussion drilling experiments have been performed by coaxially aligning the diode laser probe beam with the ablating laser. The displacement of the penetration front was instantaneously measured during the process with a resolution of 0.41 μm by analyzing the sawtooth-like induced modulation of the interferometric signal out of the detector system.

  13. Calcite growth rates as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio, saturation index and strontium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N; Grantham, Ms. Meg; Stack, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    Using in situ atomic force microscopy, the growth rates of the obtuse and acute step orientations on the calcite surface were measured at two saturation indices as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and aqueous strontium concentration. The amount of strontium required to inhibit growth was found to correlate with the aqueous calcium concentration, but did not correlate with carbonate. This suggests that strontium inhibits attachment of calcium ions to the reactive sites on the calcite surface. Strontium/calcium cation exchange selectivity coefficients for those sites, Kex, of 1.09 0.09 and 1.44 0.19 are estimated for the obtuse and acute step orientations, respectively. The implication of this finding is that to avoid poisoning calcite growth, the concentration of calcium should be higher than the quotient of the strontium concentration and Kex, regardless of saturation state. Additionally, analytical models of nucleation and propagation of steps are expanded from previous work to capture growth rates of these steps at multiple saturation indices and the effect of strontium. This work will have broader implications for naturally occurring or engineered calcite growth, such as to sequester subsurface strontium contamination.

  14. 5 CFR 9701.337 - Treatment of employees whose rate of pay falls below the minimum adjusted rate of their band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Locality and Special Rate Supplements § 9701.337 Treatment of employees whose rate of pay...

  15. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Loebner, Keith T K; Underwood, Thomas C; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated. PMID:26133835

  16. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Loebner, Keith T K; Underwood, Thomas C; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  17. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith T. K.; Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  18. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Loebner, Keith T. K. Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-15

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  19. Growth Rate of Calcite Steps as a Function of Aqueous Calcium-to-Carbonate Ratio: Independent Attachment and Detachment of Calcium and Carbonate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G; Grantham, Ms. Meg

    2010-01-01

    Growth rates of monolayer-height steps on the {1014} calcite surface have been measured as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio. The maximum growth rates of the two common crystallographic orientations were found to deviate from the ideal stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, and dissolution features were observed under supersaturated solutions containing high calcium-to-carbonate ratios. To explain these phenomena, a theory is applied that treats the rates of attachment and detachment of aqueous calcium and carbonate ions separately. The resultant attachment rate constants are 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the water exchange rate of the constituent aqueous ions, suggesting that ligand-exchange processes may directly drive attachment. The broader implication is that the saturation state alone is not adequate to fully describe the rates of the multiple, independent reactions that occur on mineral surfaces under these conditions.

  20. [Structural adjustment, cultural adjustment?].

    PubMed

    Dujardin, B; Dujardin, M; Hermans, I

    2003-12-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have been conducted and many articles published about Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs). These studies mainly describe the characteristics of SAPs and analyse their economic consequences as well as their effects upon a variety of sectors: health, education, agriculture and environment. However, very few focus on the sociological and cultural effects of SAPs. Following a summary of SAP's content and characteristics, the paper briefly discusses the historical course of SAPs and the different critiques which have been made. The cultural consequences of SAPs are introduced and are described on four different levels: political, community, familial, and individual. These levels are analysed through examples from the literature and individual testimonies from people in the Southern Hemisphere. The paper concludes that SAPs, alongside economic globalisation processes, are responsible for an acute breakdown of social and cultural structures in societies in the South. It should be a priority, not only to better understand the situation and its determining factors, but also to intervene and act with strategies that support and reinvest in the social and cultural sectors, which is vital in order to allow for individuals and communities in the South to strengthen their autonomy and identify.

  1. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  2. Landscape-scale estimation of denitrification rates and nitrous oxide to dinitrogen ratio at Georgia and Pennsylvania LTAR sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, C. J.; Groffman, P. M.; Strickland, T.; Kleinman, P. J. A.; Bosch, D. D.; Bryant, R.

    2015-12-01

    Denitrification results in a significant loss of plant-available nitrogen from agricultural systems and contributes to climate change, due to the emissions of both the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and environmentally benign dinitrogen (N2). However total quantities of the gases emitted and the ratio of N2:N2O are often not clearly understood, because N2 emissions cannot be directly measured in the field because of the high background level of N2 in the atmosphere. While variability in soil conditions across landscapes, especially water content and aeration, is believed to greatly impact both total denitrification rates and N2:N2O, the measurement limitations have prevented a clear understanding of landscape-scale emissions of denitrification products. The Cary Institute has developed an approach where soil core are maintained in a sealed system with an N2-free airstream, allowing emitted N2 and N2O emissions to be measured without interference from atmospheric N2. Emissions of the gases are measured under a range of oxygen concentrations and soil water contents. Laboratory responses can then be correlated with measured field conditions at the sampling points and resulting emission estimates extrapolated to the field-scale. Measurements are currently being conducted on peanut/cotton rotations, dairy forage rotations (silage corn/alfalfa), and bioenergy crops (switchgrass and miscanthus) at Long Term Agricultural Research (LTAR) sites at Tifton, GA and University Park, PA.

  3. Adjustment on the Type I Error Rate for a Clinical Trial Monitoring for both Intermediate and Primary Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In many clinical trials, a single endpoint is used to answer the primary question and forms the basis for monitoring the experimental therapy. Many trials are lengthy in duration and investigators are interested in using an intermediate endpoint for an accelerated approval, but will rely on the primary endpoint (such as, overall survival) for the full approval of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration. We have designed a clinical trial where both intermediate (progression-free survival, (PFS)) and primary endpoints (overall survival, (OS)) are used for monitoring the trial so the overall type I error rate is preserved at the pre-specified alpha level of 0.05. A two-stage procedure is used. In the first stage, the Bonferroni correction was used where the global type I error rate was allocated to each of the endpoints. In the next stage, the O’Brien-Fleming approach was used to design the boundary for the interim and final analysis for each endpoint. Data were generated assuming several parametric copulas with exponential marginals. Different degrees of dependence, as measured by Kendall’s τ, between OS and PFS were assumed: 0 (independence) 0.3, 0.5 and 0.70. This approach is applied to an example in a prostate cancer trial. PMID:24466469

  4. Evaluation of boron isotope ratio as a pH proxy in the deep sea coral Desmophyllum dianthus: Evidence of physiological pH adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Huang, K.-F.; You, C.-F.; Sikes, E. L.; Sherrell, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    The boron isotope ratio (δ11B) of foraminifers and tropical corals has been proposed to record seawater pH. To test the veracity and practicality of this potential paleo-pH proxy in deep sea corals, samples of skeletal material from twelve archived modern Desmophyllum dianthus (D. dianthus) corals from a depth range of 274-1470 m in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern Oceans, ambient pH range 7.57-8.05, were analyzed for δ11B. The δ11B values for these corals, spanning a range from 23.56 to 27.88, are found to be related to seawater borate δ11B by the linear regression: δ11Bcoral=(0.76±0.28) δ11Bborate+(14.67±4.19) (1 standard error (SE)). The D. dianthus δ11B values are greater than those measured in tropical corals, and suggest substantial physiological modification of pH in the calcifying space by a value that is an inverse function of seawater pH. This mechanism partially compensates for the range of ocean pH and aragonite saturation at which this species grows, enhancing aragonite precipitation and suggesting an adaptation mechanism to low pH environments in intermediate and deep waters. Consistent with the findings of Trotter et al. (2011) for tropical surface corals, the data suggest an inverse correlation between the magnitude of a biologically driven pH offset recorded in the coral skeleton, and the seawater pH, described by the equation: ΔpH=pH recorded by coral-seawater pH=-(0.75±0.12) pHw+(6.88±0.93) (1 SE). Error analysis based on 95% confidence interval(CI) and the standard deviation of the regression residuals suggests that the uncertainty of seawater pH reconstructed from δ11Bcoral is ±0.07 to 0.12 pH units. This study demonstrates the applicability of δ11B in D. dianthus to record ambient seawater pH and holds promise for reconstructing oceanic pH distribution and history using fossil corals.

  5. Demographic structure, sex ratio and growth rates of southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) on the spawning ground.

    PubMed

    Farley, Jessica H; Eveson, J Paige; Davis, Tim L O; Andamari, Retno; Proctor, Craig H; Nugraha, Budi; Davies, Campbell R

    2014-01-01

    The demographics of the southern bluefin tuna (SBT) Thunnus maccoyii spawning stock were examined through a large-scale monitoring program of the Indonesian longline catch on the spawning ground between 1995 and 2012. The size and age structure of the spawning population has undergone significant changes since monitoring began. There has been a reduction in the relative abundance of larger/older SBT in the catch since the early 2000s, and a corresponding decrease in mean length and age, but there was no evidence of a significant truncation of the age distribution. Pulses of young SBT appear in the catches in the early- and mid-2000s and may be the first evidence of increased recruitment into the spawning stock since 1995. Fish in these two recruitment pulses were spawned around 1991 and 1997. Size-related variations in sex ratio were also observed with female bias for fish less than 170 cm FL and male bias for fish greater than 170 cm FL. This trend of increasing proportion of males with size above 170 cm FL is likely to be related to sexual dimorphism in growth rates as male length-at-age is greater than that for females after age 10 years. Mean length-at-age of fish aged 8-10 years was greater for both males and females on the spawning ground than off the spawning ground, suggesting that size may be the dominant factor determining timing of maturation in SBT. In addition to these direct results, the data and samples from this program have been central to the assessment and management of this internationally harvested stock.

  6. Demographic Structure, Sex Ratio and Growth Rates of Southern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) on the Spawning Ground

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Jessica H.; Eveson, J. Paige; Davis, Tim L. O.; Andamari, Retno; Proctor, Craig H.; Nugraha, Budi; Davies, Campbell R.

    2014-01-01

    The demographics of the southern bluefin tuna (SBT) Thunnus maccoyii spawning stock were examined through a large-scale monitoring program of the Indonesian longline catch on the spawning ground between 1995 and 2012. The size and age structure of the spawning population has undergone significant changes since monitoring began. There has been a reduction in the relative abundance of larger/older SBT in the catch since the early 2000s, and a corresponding decrease in mean length and age, but there was no evidence of a significant truncation of the age distribution. Pulses of young SBT appear in the catches in the early- and mid-2000s and may be the first evidence of increased recruitment into the spawning stock since 1995. Fish in these two recruitment pulses were spawned around 1991 and 1997. Size-related variations in sex ratio were also observed with female bias for fish less than 170 cm FL and male bias for fish greater than 170 cm FL. This trend of increasing proportion of males with size above 170 cm FL is likely to be related to sexual dimorphism in growth rates as male length-at-age is greater than that for females after age 10 years. Mean length-at-age of fish aged 8–10 years was greater for both males and females on the spawning ground than off the spawning ground, suggesting that size may be the dominant factor determining timing of maturation in SBT. In addition to these direct results, the data and samples from this program have been central to the assessment and management of this internationally harvested stock. PMID:24797529

  7. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P < 0.01) while the pH-dependent exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P < 0.01). In summary, our study verified that a simplified qCEST analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system.

  8. Stratification ratios in a rainfed Mediterranean Vertisol in wheat under different tillage, rotation and N fertilization rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Semiarid Mediterranean climatic conditions and intensive tillage systems accelerate soil organic matter losses. Therefore, assessing agricultural practices that enhance storage of soil organic matter is needed. Stratification of soil properties with soil depth, expressed as a ratio, could indicate s...

  9. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  10. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  11. On the Inference of the Cosmic-ray Ionization Rate ζ from the HCO+-to-DCO+ Abundance Ratio: The Effect of Nuclear Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Le Gal, Romane; Öberg, Karin I.; Hincelin, Ugo; Herbst, Eric

    2016-10-01

    The chemistry of dense interstellar regions was analyzed using a time-dependent gas–grain astrochemical simulation and a new chemical network that incorporates deuterated chemistry, taking into account nuclear spin states for the hydrogen chemistry and its deuterated isotopologues. With this new network, the utility of the [HCO+]/[DCO+] abundance ratio as a probe of the cosmic-ray ionization rate has been re-examined, with special attention paid to the effect of the initial value of the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of molecular hydrogen. After discussing the use of the probe for cold cores, we compare our results with previous theoretical and observational results for a molecular cloud close to the supernova remnant W51C, which is thought to have an enhanced cosmic-ray ionization rate ζ caused by the nearby γ-ray source. In addition, we attempt to use our approach to estimate the cosmic-ray ionization rate for L1174, a dense core with an embedded star. Beyond the previously known sensitivity of [HCO+]/[DCO+] to ζ, we demonstrate its additional dependence on the initial OPR and, secondarily, on the age of the source, its temperature, and its density. We conclude that the usefulness of the [HCO+]/[DCO+] abundance ratio in constraining the cosmic-ray ionization rate in dense regions increases with the age of the source and the ionization rate as the ratio becomes far less sensitive to the initial value of the OPR.

  12. Reliable likelihood ratios for statistical model-based voice activity detector with low false-alarm rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younggwan; Suh, Youngjoo; Kim, Hoirin

    2011-12-01

    The role of the statistical model-based voice activity detector (SMVAD) is to detect speech regions from input signals using the statistical models of noise and noisy speech. The decision rule of SMVAD is based on the likelihood ratio test (LRT). The LRT-based decision rule may cause detection errors because of statistical properties of noise and speech signals. In this article, we first analyze the reasons why the detection errors occur and then propose two modified decision rules using reliable likelihood ratios (LRs). We also propose an effective weighting scheme considering spectral characteristics of noise and speech signals. In the experiments proposed in this study, with almost no additional computations, the proposed methods show significant performance improvement in various noise conditions. Experimental results also show that the proposed weighting scheme provides additional performance improvement over the two proposed SMVADs.

  13. Impact of the New Jersey all-payer rate-setting system: an analysis of financial ratios.

    PubMed

    Rosko, M D

    1989-01-01

    Although prospective payment may contain costs, many analysts are concerned about the unintended consequences of rate regulation. This article presents the results of a case-study analysis of the New Jersey rate-setting programs during the period 1977-1985. Using measures of profitability, liquidity, and leverage, data for New Jersey, the Northeast, and the United States as a whole are used to contrast the impact of two forms of prospective payment. After attempting alternative cost-containment methods, the New Jersey Department of Health implemented an all-payer system in which prospective rates of compensation were established for DRGs. The new rate-setting system was designed to control costs, improve access to care, maintain quality of services, ensure financial viability of efficient providers, and limit the payment differentials associated with cost shifting. The results of this study have a number of implications for the evaluation of all-payer rate regulation. First, although the New Jersey all-payer system was more successful than the partial-payer program in restraining the rate of increase in cost per case, savings were achieved without adversely affecting the viability of regulated hospitals. Second, the large differentials among payers that were associated with the partial-payer program were reduced dramatically by the all-payer program. Third, using the financial position of inner-city hospitals relative to suburban hospitals as a measure of equity, the all-payer system appeared to be a fairer method of regulating rates.

  14. The Transport and Fate of Helium in Martensitic Steels at Fusion Relevant He/DPA Ratios and DPA Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Gelles, David S.; Miao, Pifeng; Oliver, Brian M.

    2007-08-01

    Understanding, modeling and managing the effects of He and displacement damage on microstructural evolution and property changes are primary objectives of fusion materials research. We recently implemented an approach for producing controlled He-to-dpa ratios under neutron irradiation using a novel α-implantation technique. Thin 1-4 µm NiAl coatings were deposited on Eurofer-97 TEM discs to produce a uniform He deposition zone of 6 to 8 µm. The test matrix is aimed at characterizing the transport, fate and consequences of He and He-to-dpa ratio variation on alloys with a wide range of starting microstructure. We explore the effect He-to-dpa ratio and temperature on the microstructure of conventionally processed Eurofer-97. Bubbles were found at all irradiation temperatures, with estimated maximum diameters of ~12, 6.9 and 1.4 nm at 500°C (~9 dpa and 372 appm He), 400°C (~3.9 dpa and 82 appm He) and 300°C (~3.9 dpa and 89 appm He), respectively.

  15. Relationship between RNA/DNA ratio, growth rate and accumulation of selenium in the cells of wheat leaves under the influence of minerals analcime and trepel.

    PubMed

    Martynenko, O I; Kyrylenko, T K; Zaimenko, N V; Antonyuk, M M; Stepanyugin, A V; Plodnik, D P; Hovorun, D M

    2014-01-01

    We studied specific effects of different doses of natural minerals--analcime (An) and trepel (Tr)--on the growth rate, selenium (Se) content and functional activity of the genome of wheat leaves measured by the RNA/DNA ratio. Our results show that under the influence of An and Tr, especially at low doses (25 mg/100 g sand), there is a significant increase in the content of Se, increased growth rate of leaves of wheat seedlings and decreased RNA/DNA ratio. We have found significant correlations between studied parameters. Our findings suggest that the RNA/DNA ratio can be used as a convenient, reliable indicator of the biological activity of minerals An and Tr, and for quantitative express-estimation of their impact on plant organisms.

  16. Relative Metallographic Cooling Rates: Can They be Measured Using Co/Ni Ratios at Taenite/Kamacite Interfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Yang, J.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2012-09-01

    The relative cooling rates of IVA and IIIAB irons obtained recently by Wasson and Hoppe must be treated with much caution as they were obtained with inadequate spatial resloution and a flowed phase diagram and methodology.

  17. Nonlinear Conte-Zbilut-Federici (CZF) Method of Computing LF/HF Ratio: A More Reliable Index of Changes in Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Bond Jr, Vernon; Curry, Bryan H; Kumar, Krishna; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Gorantla, Vasavi R; Kadur, Kishan; Millis, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acupuncture treatments are safe and effective for a wide variety of diseases involving autonomic dysregulation. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive method for assessing sympathovagal balance. The low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) spectral power ratio is an index of sympathovagal influence on heart rate and of cardiovascular health. This study tests the hypothesis that from rest to 30% to 50% of peak oxygen consumption, the nonlinear Conte-Zbilut-Federici (CZF) method of computing the LF/HF ratio is a more reliable index of changes in the HRV than linear methods are. Methods: The subjects of this study were 10 healthy young adults. Electrocardiogram RR intervals were measured during 6-minute periods of rest and aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer at 30% and 50% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Results: The frequency domain CZF computations of the LF/HF ratio and the time domain computations of the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) decreased sequentially from rest to 30% VO2peak (P < 0.001) to 50% VO2peak (P < 0.05). The SDNN and the CZF computations of the LF/HF ratio were positively correlated (Pearson’s r = 0.75, P < 0.001). fast Fourier transform (FFT), autoregressive (AR) and Lomb periodogram computations of the LF/HF ratio increased only from rest to 50% VO2peak. Conclusion: Computations of the LF/HF ratio by using the nonlinear CZF method appear to be more sensitive to changes in physical activity than computations of the LF/HF ratio by using linear methods. Future studies should determine whether the CZF computation of the LF/HF ratio improves evaluations of pharmacopuncture and other treatment modalities. PMID:27695629

  18. Nonlinear Conte-Zbilut-Federici (CZF) Method of Computing LF/HF Ratio: A More Reliable Index of Changes in Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Bond Jr, Vernon; Curry, Bryan H; Kumar, Krishna; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Gorantla, Vasavi R; Kadur, Kishan; Millis, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acupuncture treatments are safe and effective for a wide variety of diseases involving autonomic dysregulation. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive method for assessing sympathovagal balance. The low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) spectral power ratio is an index of sympathovagal influence on heart rate and of cardiovascular health. This study tests the hypothesis that from rest to 30% to 50% of peak oxygen consumption, the nonlinear Conte-Zbilut-Federici (CZF) method of computing the LF/HF ratio is a more reliable index of changes in the HRV than linear methods are. Methods: The subjects of this study were 10 healthy young adults. Electrocardiogram RR intervals were measured during 6-minute periods of rest and aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer at 30% and 50% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Results: The frequency domain CZF computations of the LF/HF ratio and the time domain computations of the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) decreased sequentially from rest to 30% VO2peak (P < 0.001) to 50% VO2peak (P < 0.05). The SDNN and the CZF computations of the LF/HF ratio were positively correlated (Pearson’s r = 0.75, P < 0.001). fast Fourier transform (FFT), autoregressive (AR) and Lomb periodogram computations of the LF/HF ratio increased only from rest to 50% VO2peak. Conclusion: Computations of the LF/HF ratio by using the nonlinear CZF method appear to be more sensitive to changes in physical activity than computations of the LF/HF ratio by using linear methods. Future studies should determine whether the CZF computation of the LF/HF ratio improves evaluations of pharmacopuncture and other treatment modalities.

  19. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  20. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  1. Unravelling the correlation between the aspect ratio of nanotubular structures and their electrochemical performance to achieve high-rate and long-life lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanyan; Deng, Jiyang; Qi, Dianpeng; Leow, Wan Ru; Wei, Jiaqi; Yin, Shengyan; Dong, Zhili; Yazami, Rachid; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    The fundamental understanding of the relationship between the nanostructure of an electrode and its electrochemical performance is crucial for achieving high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, the relationship between the nanotubular aspect ratio and electrochemical performance of LIBs is elucidated for the first time. The stirring hydrothermal method was used to control the aspect ratio of viscous titanate nanotubes, which were used to fabricate additive-free TiO2 -based electrode materials. We found that the battery performance at high charging/discharging rates is dramatically boosted when the aspect ratio is increased, due to the optimization of electronic/ionic transport properties within the electrode materials. The proof-of-concept LIBs comprising nanotubes with an aspect ratio of 265 can retain more than 86 % of their initial capacity over 6000 cycles at a high rate of 30 C. Such devices with supercapacitor-like rate performance and battery-like capacity herald a new paradigm for energy storage systems.

  2. Effects of temperature and host stage on the parasitization rate and offspring sex ratio of Aenasius bambawalei Hayat in Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Xia, Tianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and host stage are important factors that determine the successful development of parasitoids. Aenasius bambawalei Hayat (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a primary parasitoid of the newly invasive mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). The effects of temperature on the parasitic characteristics of A. bambawalei have seldom been investigated. In the study, we explored the effects of temperature, exposure time, and host stage on the parasitization rate and offspring sex ratio (female to male) of A. bambawalei under laboratory conditions. The laboratory results showed that the successful parasitization rate of A. bambawalei increased with higher temperatures and older host stages. When the parasitoids were exposed to 36 °C for 24 h, the parasitization rate of female adults (52%) was nearly two times that of 3rd instar nymphs. Additionally, heat stress duration and host stage resulted in an increase in the offspring sex ratio of A. bambawalei. When A. bambawalei was exposed to 36 °C for 24 h, the offspring sex ratio increased dramatically to 81.78% compared with those exposed for 12 h, and it increased to 45.34% compared with those exposed for 16 h. The offspring sex ratio was clearly higher when the host stage was an adult female mealybug Our findings provide important guidance for the mass rearing and field releases of A. bambawalei for the management of P. solenopsis in the future. PMID:26788437

  3. Learning Rates and Known-to-Unknown Flash-Card Ratios: Comparing Effectiveness While Holding Instructional Time Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Bethany E.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Black, Michelle P.; Yaw, Jared; Booher, Joshua; Delisle, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Using alternating treatments designs, we compared learning rates across 2 computer-based flash-card interventions (3?min each): a traditional drill intervention with 15 unknown words and an interspersal intervention with 12 known words and 3 unknown words. Each student acquired more words under the traditional drill intervention. Discussion…

  4. Modification of classical Spitzer ion-electron energy transfer rate for large ratios of ion to electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Todd H.; Catto, Peter J.

    1995-06-01

    Corrections to the classical Spitzer heat transfer rate between ions and electrons are calculated for the case when the ion temperature Ti is significantly higher than the electron temperature Te. It is found that slow electrons are partially depleted by their interactions with the ions, resulting in a decrease in the heat transfer in comparison with the Spitzer rate, which assumes perfectly Maxwellian electrons. The heat transfer steadily decreases from the classical value as Ti/Te increases; for Ti/Te values of several hundred, the heat transfer rate drops to around 60%-80% of the Spitzer result. A useful expression for the heat transfer correction factor in the case when all of the ion species are at the temperature Ti is found to be Pie/(Pie)Spitzer ≊[1+(me/mi)(Ti/Te)]3/2 exp{-[3.5∑i (Z2ini/ne)(me/mi) (Ti/Te)]2/3}. This expression is quite accurate for values of ∑i (Z2ini/ne)(mp/mi)(Ti/Te) less than about 50 (where mp is the proton mass), although it underestimates the heat transfer rate for larger values of Ti/Te, and one must resort to the more accurate but more complex analytical results derived in the paper. In the event that the ion distribution is non-Maxwellian, Ti in the correction factor should be replaced by 2/3, where is the mean ion energy.

  5. 47 CFR 61.47 - Adjustments to the SBI; pricing bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...,” calculated as the ratio of the base period demand for the rate element “i” priced at the existing rate, to... index adjustment requires that the demand for the new service during the base period must be included in... the SBI for the service category designated in § 61.42(e)(2)(vi) by one minus the resulting ratio....

  6. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  7. The rate and pattern of bed incision and bank adjustment on the Colorado River in Glen Canyon downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, 1956-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, P.E.; Schmidt, J.C.; Topping, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963 transformed the Colorado River by reducing the magnitude and duration of spring floods, increasing the magnitude of base flows, and trapping fine sediment delivered from the upper watershed. These changes caused the channel downstream in Glen Canyon to incise, armor, and narrow. This study synthesizes over 45 yr of channel-change measurements and demonstrates that the rate and style of channel adjustment are directly related to both natural processes associated with sediment deficit and human decisions about dam operations. Although bed lowering in lower Glen Canyon began when the first cofferdam was installed in 1959, most incision occurred in 1965 in conjunction with 14 pulsed high flows that scoured an average of 2.6 m of sediment from the center of the channel. The average grain size of bed material has increased from 0.25 mm in 1956 to over 20 mm in 1999. The magnitude of incision at riffles decreases with distance downstream from the dam, while the magnitude of sediment evacuation from pools is spatially variable and extends farther downstream. Analysis of bed-material mobility indicates that the increase in bed-material grain size and reduction in reach-average gradient are consistent with the transformation of an adjustable-bed alluvial river to a channel with a stable bed that is rarely mobilized. Decreased magnitude of peak discharges in the post-dam regime coupled with channel incision and the associated downward shifts of stage-discharge relations have caused sandbar and terrace erosion and the transformation of previously active sandbars and gravel bars to abandoned deposits that are no longer inundated. Erosion has been concentrated in a few pre-dam terraces that eroded rapidly for brief periods and have since stabilized. The abundance of abandoned deposits decreases downstream in conjunction with decreasing magnitude of shift in the stage-discharge relations. In the downstream part of the study area where riffles

  8. Minute ventilation at different compression to ventilation ratios, different ventilation rates, and continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation in a newborn manikin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In newborn resuscitation the recommended rate of chest compressions should be 90 per minute and 30 ventilations should be delivered each minute, aiming at achieving a total of 120 events per minute. However, this recommendation is based on physiological plausibility and consensus rather than scientific evidence. With focus on minute ventilation (Mv), we aimed to compare today’s standard to alternative chest compression to ventilation (C:V) ratios and different ventilation rates, as well as to continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation. Methods Two investigators performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a newborn manikin with a T-piece resuscitator and manual chest compressions. The C:V ratios 3:1, 9:3 and 15:2, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation (120 compressions and 40 ventilations per minute) were performed in a randomised fashion in series of 10 × 2 minutes. In addition, ventilation only was performed at three different rates (40, 60 and 120 ventilations per minute, respectively). A respiratory function monitor measured inspiration time, tidal volume and ventilation rate. Mv was calculated for the different interventions and the Mann–Whitney test was used for comparisons between groups. Results Median Mv per kg in ml (interquartile range) was significantly lower at the C:V ratios of 9:3 (140 (134–144)) and 15:2 (77 (74–83)) as compared to 3:1 (191(183–199)). With ventilation only, there was a correlation between ventilation rate and Mv despite a negative correlation between ventilation rate and tidal volumes. Continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation gave higher Mv as compared to coordinated compressions and ventilations at a C:V ratio of 3:1. Conclusions In this study, higher C:V ratios than 3:1 compromised ventilation dynamics in a newborn manikin. However, higher ventilation rates, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation gave higher Mv

  9. Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Coal Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio and Coal Fineness Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill; Roger Demler

    2004-06-01

    The project's overall objective is to develop a commercially viable dynamic signature based sensing system that is used to infer the flow rate and fineness of pulverized coal. This eighteen month effort will focus on developments required to transfer the measurement system from the laboratory to a field ready prototype system. This objective will be achieved through the completion of the laboratory development of the sensor and data algorithm followed by full scale field tests of a portable measurement system. The sensing system utilizes accelerometers attached externally to coal feeder pipes. Raw data is collected from the impingement of the coal particles as well as the acoustic noise generated from the flow and is transformed into characteristic signatures through proper calibration that are meaningful to the operator. The laboratory testing will use a portable version of the sensing system to collect signature data from a variety of flow conditions including coal flow rates, flow orientations, and coal particle characteristics. This work will be conducted at the Coal Flow Measurement Laboratory that is sponsored by EPRI and operated by Airflow Sciences. The data will be used to enhance the algorithm and neural network required to perform real time analysis of the nonspecific signature data. The system will be installed at two full scale power plants to collect data in a real time operating scenario. These short term duration tests will evaluate the ability of the algorithm to accurately infer coal flow rates and determine if the measurement system can be used effectively in an active control loop for combustion diagnostics and burner balancing. At the completion of this project, prototype versions of both a portable system and a permanent installation will be available for final packaging and commercialization by one of the team members. Both types of systems will be marketed for conducting combustion diagnostics and balancing of individual flows to pulverized

  10. SENSOR FOR INDIVIDUAL BURNER CONTROL OF COAL FIRING RATE, FUEL-AIR RATIO AND COAL FINENESS CORRELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill

    2004-02-01

    The project's overall objective is to development a commercially viable dynamic signature based sensing system that is used to infer the flow rate and fineness of pulverized coal. This eighteen month effort will focus on developments required to transfer the measurement system from the laboratory to a field ready prototype system. This objective will be achieved through the completion of the laboratory development of the sensor and data algorithm followed by full scale field tests of a portable measurement system. The sensing system utilizes accelerometers attached externally to coal feeder pipes. Raw data is collected from the impingement of the coal particles as well as the acoustic noise generated from the flow and is transformed into characteristic signatures through proper calibration that are meaningful to the operator. The laboratory testing will use a portable version of the sensing system to collect signature data from a variety of flow conditions including coal flow rates, flow orientations, and coal particle characteristics. This work will be conducted at the Coal Flow Measurement Laboratory that is sponsored by EPRI and operated by Airflow Sciences. The data will be used to enhance the algorithm and neural network required to perform real time analysis of the non-specific signature data. The system will be installed at two full scale power plants to collect data in a real time operating scenario. These short term duration tests will evaluate the ability of the algorithm to accurately infer coal flow rates and determine if the measurement system can be used effectively in an active control loop for combustion diagnostics and burner balancing. At the completion of this project, prototype versions of both a portable system and a permanent installation will be available for final packaging and commercialization by one of the team members. Both types of systems will be marketed for conducting combustion diagnostics and balancing of individual flows to

  11. Modification of classical Spitzer ion--electron energy transfer rate for large ratios of ion to electron temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, T.H.; Catto, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    Corrections to the classical Spitzer heat transfer rate between ions and electrons are calculated for the case when the ion temperature {ital T}{sub {ital i}} is significantly higher than the electron temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}}. It is found that slow electrons are partially depleted by their interactions with the ions, resulting in a decrease in the heat transfer in comparison with the Spitzer rate, which assumes perfectly Maxwellian electrons. The heat transfer steadily decreases from the classical value as {ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}} increases; for {ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}} values of several hundred, the heat transfer rate drops to around 60%--80% of the Spitzer result. A useful expression for the heat transfer correction factor in the case when all of the ion species are at the temperature {ital T}{sub {ital i}} is found to be {ital P}{sub {ital ie}}/({ital P}{sub {ital ie}}){sub Spitzer} {approx}[1+({ital m}{sub {ital e}}/{ital m}{sub {ital i}})({ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}})]{sup 3/2} exp{l_brace}{minus}[3.5{summation}{sub {ital i}} ({ital Z}{sup 2}{sub {ital i}}{ital n}{sub {ital i}}/{ital n}{sub {ital e}})({ital m}{sub {ital e}}/{ital m}{sub {ital i}}) ({ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}})]{sup 2/3}{r_brace}. This expression is quite accurate for values of {summation}{sub {ital i}} ({ital Z}{sup 2}{sub {ital i}}{ital n}{sub {ital i}}/{ital n}{sub {ital e}})({ital m}{sub {ital p}}/{ital m}{sub {ital i}})({ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}}) less than about 50 (where {ital m}{sub {ital p}} is the proton mass), although it underestimates the heat transfer rate for larger values of {ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital T}{sub {ital e}}, and one must resort to the more accurate but more complex analytical results derived in the paper. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Males Aged 15-44 Years, by the Five Leading Causes of Death(†) - United States, 1999 and 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The age-adjusted death rate for males aged 15-44 years was 10% lower in 2014 (156.6 per 100,000 population) than in 1999 (174.1). Among the five leading causes of death, the age-adjusted rates for three were lower in 2014 than in 1999: cancer (from 17.1 to 12.8; 25% decline), heart disease (20.1 to 17.0; 15% decline), and homicide (15.7 to 13.8; 12% decline). The age-adjusted death rates for two of the five causes were higher in 2014 than in 1999: suicide (20.1 to 22.5; 12% increase), and unintentional injuries (from 48.7 to 51.0; 5% increase). PMID:27513718

  13. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Females Aged 15-44 Years, by the Five Leading Causes of Death(†) - United States, 1999 and 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The age-adjusted death rate for females aged 15-44 years was 5% lower in 2014 (82.1 per 100,000 population) than in 1999 (86.5). Among the five leading causes of death, the age-adjusted rates of three were lower in 2014 than in 1999: cancer (from 19.6 to 15.3, a 22% decline), heart disease (8.9 to 8.2, an 8% decline), and homicide (4.2 to 2.8, a 33% decline). The age-adjusted death rates for two of the five causes were higher in 2014 than in 1999: unintentional injuries (from 17.0 to 20.1, an 18% increase) and suicide (4.8 to 6.5, a 35% increase). Unintentional injuries replaced cancer as the leading cause of death in this demographic group. PMID:27362608

  14. Effects of feedstock ratio and organic loading rate on the anaerobic mesophilic co-digestion of rice straw and cow manure.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Liu, Shengchu; Mi, Li; Li, Zhidong; Yuan, Yuexiang; Yan, Zhiying; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of feedstock ratio and organic loading rate (OLR) on the anaerobic mesophilic co-digestion of rice straw (RS) and cow manure (CM), batch tests (2.5L) were carried out at volatile solid (VS) ratios of 0:1, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, and 1:0 (RS/CM), and continuous bench experiments (40 L) were carried out at OLRs of 3.0, 3.6, 4.2, 4.8, 6.0, 8.0, and 12.0 kg VS/(m(3) d) with optimal VS ratio. The optimal VS ratio was found to be 1:1. Stable and efficient co-digestion with average specific biogas production of 383.5L/kg VS and volumetric biogas production rate of 2.30 m(3)/(m(3) d) was obtained at an OLR of 6 kg VS/(m(3) d). Anaerobic co-digestion was severely inhibited by the accumulation of volatile fatty acids instead of ammonia when the OLR was 12 kg VS/(m(3) d). Further, significant foaming was observed at OLR ⩾ 8 kg VS/(m(3) d). PMID:25909453

  15. Quantitative response relationships between nitrogen transformation rates and nitrogen functional genes in a tidal flow constructed wetland under C/N ratio constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Wei; Ji, Guodong

    2014-11-01

    The present study explored treatment performance and nitrogen removal mechanisms of a novel tidal flow constructed wetland (TF CW) under C/N ratios ranging from two to 12. High and stable COD (83-95%), [Formula: see text] (63-80%), and TN (50-82%) removal efficiency were simultaneously achieved in our single-stage TF CW without costly aeration. Results showed that a C/N ratio exceeding six was required to achieve complete denitrification without [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] accumulation in the system. Molecular biological analyses revealed aerobic ammonia oxidation was the dominant [Formula: see text] removal pathway when the C/N ratio was less than or equal to six. However, when the C/N ratio was greater than six, anammox was notably enhanced, resulting in another primary [Formula: see text] removal pathway, in addition to the aerobic ammonia oxidation. Quantitative response relationships between nitrogen transformation rates and nitrogen functional genes were established, and these relationships confirmed that different nitrogen transformation processes were coupled at the molecular level (functional genes), and collaboratively contributed to nitrogen removal in the TF CW. Specifically, [Formula: see text] transformation rates were collectively determined by amoA, nxrA, anammox, narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ; and TN removal was influenced primarily by amoA and anammox.

  16. Association Between Contrast Media Volume-Glomerular Filtration Rate Ratio and Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Celik, Omer; Ozturk, Derya; Akin, Fatih; Ayca, Burak; Yalcın, Ahmet Arif; Erturk, Mehmet; Bıyık, Ismail; Ayaz, Ahmet; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Enhos, Asım; Aslan, Serkan

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that contrast media volume-estimated glomerular filtration rate (CV-e-GFR) ratio may be a predictor of contrast media-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). We investigated the associations between CV-e-GFR ratio and CI-AKI in 597 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). An absolute ≥0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine compared with baseline levels within 48 hours after the procedure was considered as CI-AKI; 78 (13.1%) of the 597 patients experienced CI-AKI. The amount of contrast during procedure was higher in the CI-AKI group than in those without CI-AKI (153 vs 135 mL, P = .003). The CV-e-GFR ratio was significantly higher in patients with CI-AKI than without (2.3 vs 1.5, P < .001). In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of CI-AKI were low left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .018, odds ratio [OR] = 0.966), e-GFR <60 mL/min (P = .012, OR = 2.558), and CV-e-GFR >2 (P < .001, OR = 5.917). In conclusion, CV-e-GFR ratio is significantly associated with CI-AKI after pPCI.

  17. Summit CO2 emission rates by the CO2/SO2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, during a period of sustained inflation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hager, S.A.; Gerlach, T.M.; Wallace, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June–July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO2emission rates with synchronous CO2/SO2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995–1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO2/SO2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  18. Summit CO 2 emission rates by the CO 2/SO 2 ratio method at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaíi, during a period of sustained inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, S. A.; Gerlach, T. M.; Wallace, P. J.

    2008-11-01

    The emission rate of carbon dioxide escaping from the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaíi, proved highly variable, averaging 4900 ± 2000 metric tons per day (t/d) in June-July 2003 during a period of summit inflation. These results were obtained by combining over 90 measurements of COSPEC-derived SO 2 emission rates with synchronous CO 2/SO 2 ratios of the volcanic gas plume along the summit COSPEC traverse. The results are lower than the CO 2 emission rate of 8500 ± 300 t/d measured by the same method in 1995-1999 during a period of long-term summit deflation [Gerlach, T.M., McGee, K.A., Elias, T., Sutton, A.J. and Doukas, M.P., 2002. Carbon dioxide emission rate of Kīlauea Volcano: Implications for primary magma and the summit reservoir. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth, 107(B9): art. no.-2189.]. Analysis of the data indicates that the emission rates of the present study likely reflect changes in the magma supply rate and residence time in the summit reservoir. It is also likely that emission rates during the inflation period were heavily influenced by SO 2 pulses emitted adjacent to the COSPEC traverse, which biased CO 2/SO 2 ratios towards low values that may be unrepresentative of the global summit gas plume. We conclude that the SO 2 pulses are consequences of summit re-inflation under way since 2003 and that CO 2 emission rates remain comparable to, but more variable than, those measured prior to re-inflation.

  19. The thickness history of the northern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet: an assessment of glacial isostatic adjustment models, sea-level measurements, and vertical land motion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A.

    2014-12-01

    The fit of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) model predictions to 24 relative sea-level histories and an additional 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates constrains the thickness and volume history of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet. The predictions of the best-fit GIA model indicate respective peak ice thicknesses west and east of Hudson Bay of 3.4-3.6 km and approximately 4 km. These values represent, respectively, a large decrease, and a moderate increase, to the load thickness compared to ICE-5G. This result is generally consistent with other GIA studies focussing on space-geodetic constraints. The large reduction to the ice load west of Hudson Bay also reduces the vertical mantle response along the margins of the load centre, which improves the fit to relative sea-level data from the southern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The fit of GIA model predictions to relative sea-level data from the Baffin Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet indicate peak ice thicknesses there of 1.2-1.3 km, a modest reduction compared to ICE-5G. On Baffin Island, the modelled elastic crustal response of the Earth to present-day ice mass changes is large. Accounting for this effect improves the agreement between GPS measurements of vertical crustal motion and the GIA model predictions. However, work is needed to incorporate more detailed observations and modelling of present-day changes to glaciers and ice caps. Overall, the fit to the data is most strongly improved in the region west of Hudson Bay (the χ2 RSL misfit is reduced by a factor of ~4) although the entire revised reconstruction for the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet provides an improved fit to both the regional RSL data (the cumulative χ2 misfit is reduced by a factor of >2) and the GPS data (the RMS misfit is reduced by a factor of 9).

  20. 25 CFR 171.565 - How will I know if BIA plans to adjust my annual operation and maintenance assessment rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing, and Collections § 171.565 How will I know if BIA plans to adjust my annual operation...

  1. Hydrothermal atomic force microscopy observations of barite step growth rates as a function of the aqueous barium-to-sulfate ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2016-06-01

    The rate of growth of ionic minerals from solutions with varying aqueous cation:anion ratios may result in significant errors in mineralization rates predicted by commonly-used affinity-based rate equations. To assess the potential influence of solute stoichiometry on barite growth, step velocities on the barite (0 0 1) surface have been measured at 108 °C using hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) at moderate supersaturation and as a function of the aqueous barium:sulfate ratio (r). Barite growth hillocks at r ∼ 1 were bounded by < 1 2 0 > steps, however at r < 1, kink site densities increased, steps followed a direction vicinal to < 1 2 0 > , and the [0 1 0] steps developed. At r > 1, steps roughened and rounded as the kink site density increased. Step velocities peaked at r = 1 and decreased roughly symmetrically as a function of r, indicating the attachment rates of barium and sulfate ions are similar under these conditions. We hypothesize that the differences in our observations at high and low r arise from differences in the attachment rate constants for the obtuse and acute < 1 2 0 > steps. Based on results at low r, the data suggests the attachment rate constant for barium ions is similar for obtuse and acute steps. Based on results at high r, the data suggests the attachment rate constant for sulfate is greater for obtuse steps than acute steps. Utilizing a step growth model developed by Stack and Grantham (2010) the experimental step velocities as a function of r were readily fit while attempts to fit the data using a model developed by Zhang and Nancollas (1998) were less successful.

  2. The Impact of Mass Segregation and Star Formation on the Rates of Gravitational-wave Sources from Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-10-01

    Compact stellar objects inspiraling into massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei are some of the most promising gravitational-wave (GWs) sources for next-generation GW detectors. The rates of such extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) depend on the dynamics and distribution of compact objects (COs) around the MBH. Here, we study the impact of mass-segregation processes on EMRI rates. In particular, we provide the expected mass function (MF) of EMRIs, given an initial MF of stellar black holes (SBHs), and relate it to the mass-dependent detection rate of EMRIs. We then consider the role of star formation (SF) on the distribution of COs and its implication on EMRI rates. We find that the existence of a wide spectrum of SBH masses leads to the overall increase of EMRI rates and to high rates of the EMRIs from the most massive SBHs. However, it also leads to a relative quenching of EMRI rates from lower-mass SBHs, and together produces a steep dependence of the EMRI MF on the highest-mass SBHs. SF history plays a relatively small role in determining the EMRI rates of SBHs, since most of them migrate close to the MBH through mass segregation rather than forming in situ. However, the EMRI rate of neutron stars (NSs) can be significantly increased when they form in situ close to the MBH, as they can inspiral before relaxation processes significantly segregate them outward. A reverse but weaker effect of decreasing the EMRI rates from NSs and white dwarfs occurs when SF proceeds far from the MBH.

  3. Organic loading rate and food-to-microorganism ratio shape prokaryotic diversity in a demo-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Araújo, Juliana C; Almeida, Paulo G S; Chernicharo, Carlos A L; Sanz, José L; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the microbial community in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating domestic wastewater (DW) during two different periods of organic loading rate (OLR) and food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratio. 16S rDNA clone libraries were generated, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses were performed. Fluctuations in the OLR and F/M ratio affected the abundance and the composition of the UASB prokaryotic community, mainly at the species level, as well as the performance of the UASB reactor. The qPCR analysis suggested that there was a decrease in the bacterial cell number during the rainy season, when the OLR and F/M ratio were lower. However, the bacterial diversity was higher during this time, suggesting that the community degraded more diversified substrates. The diversity and the abundance of the archaeal community were higher when the F/M ratio was lower. Shifts in the methanogenic community composition might have influenced the route of methane production, with methane produced by acetotrophic methanogens (dry season), and by hydrogenotrophic, methylotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens (rainy season). This study revealed higher levels of bacterial diversity, metabolic specialization and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of the DW UASB reactor during the rainy season.

  4. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, H.H.

    1988-03-11

    Abstract and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus. 3 figs.

  5. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  6. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing (137)CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The (137)Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the (137)CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the (137)Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the (137)Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  7. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing 137CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The 137Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the 137CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the 137Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the 137Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  8. Effects of understory vegetation and litter on plant nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), N:P ratio and their relationships with growth rate of indigenous seedlings in subtropical plantations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai; Liu, Zhanfeng; Yang, Long

    2013-01-01

    Establishing seedlings in subtropical plantations is very important for forest health, succession and management. Information on seedling nutrient concentrations is essential for both the selection of suitable indigenous tree species to accelerate succession of the established plantation and sustainable forest management. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of nitrogen ([N]), phosphorus ([P]), and N:P ratio in leaves, stems and roots of seedlings of three indigenous tree species (Castanopsis chinensis, Michelia chapensis and Psychotria rubra) transplanted with removing or retaining understory vegetation and litter at two typical subtropical forest plantations (Eucalyptus plantation and native species plantation). We also measured the relative growth rate (RGR) of seedling height, and developed the relationships between RGR and leaf [N], [P] and N:P ratio. Results showed that treatments of understory vegetation and associated litter (i.e. removal or retained) generally had no significant effects on leaf [N], [P], N:P ratio and RGR of the transplanted tree seedlings for the experimental period. But among different species, there were significant differences in nutrient concentrations. M. chapensis and P. rubra had higher [N] and [P] compared to C. chinensis. [N] and [P] also varied among different plant tissues with much higher values in leaves than in roots for all indigenous species. RGR of indigenous tree seedlings was mostly positively correlated with leaf [N] and [P], but negatively correlated with leaf N:P ratio. Considering the low [P] and high N:P ratio observed in the introduced indigenous tree seedlings, we propose that the current experimental plantations might be P limited for plant growth.

  9. Effects of understory vegetation and litter on plant nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), N:P ratio and their relationships with growth rate of indigenous seedlings in subtropical plantations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai; Liu, Zhanfeng; Yang, Long

    2013-01-01

    Establishing seedlings in subtropical plantations is very important for forest health, succession and management. Information on seedling nutrient concentrations is essential for both the selection of suitable indigenous tree species to accelerate succession of the established plantation and sustainable forest management. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of nitrogen ([N]), phosphorus ([P]), and N:P ratio in leaves, stems and roots of seedlings of three indigenous tree species (Castanopsis chinensis, Michelia chapensis and Psychotria rubra) transplanted with removing or retaining understory vegetation and litter at two typical subtropical forest plantations (Eucalyptus plantation and native species plantation). We also measured the relative growth rate (RGR) of seedling height, and developed the relationships between RGR and leaf [N], [P] and N:P ratio. Results showed that treatments of understory vegetation and associated litter (i.e. removal or retained) generally had no significant effects on leaf [N], [P], N:P ratio and RGR of the transplanted tree seedlings for the experimental period. But among different species, there were significant differences in nutrient concentrations. M. chapensis and P. rubra had higher [N] and [P] compared to C. chinensis. [N] and [P] also varied among different plant tissues with much higher values in leaves than in roots for all indigenous species. RGR of indigenous tree seedlings was mostly positively correlated with leaf [N] and [P], but negatively correlated with leaf N:P ratio. Considering the low [P] and high N:P ratio observed in the introduced indigenous tree seedlings, we propose that the current experimental plantations might be P limited for plant growth. PMID:24386340

  10. Effects of Understory Vegetation and Litter on Plant Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), N∶P Ratio and Their Relationships with Growth Rate of Indigenous Seedlings in Subtropical Plantations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai; Liu, Zhanfeng; Yang, Long

    2013-01-01

    Establishing seedlings in subtropical plantations is very important for forest health, succession and management. Information on seedling nutrient concentrations is essential for both the selection of suitable indigenous tree species to accelerate succession of the established plantation and sustainable forest management. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of nitrogen ([N]), phosphorus ([P]), and N∶P ratio in leaves, stems and roots of seedlings of three indigenous tree species (Castanopsis chinensis, Michelia chapensis and Psychotria rubra) transplanted with removing or retaining understory vegetation and litter at two typical subtropical forest plantations (Eucalyptus plantation and native species plantation). We also measured the relative growth rate (RGR) of seedling height, and developed the relationships between RGR and leaf [N], [P] and N∶P ratio. Results showed that treatments of understory vegetation and associated litter (i.e. removal or retained) generally had no significant effects on leaf [N], [P], N∶P ratio and RGR of the transplanted tree seedlings for the experimental period. But among different species, there were significant differences in nutrient concentrations. M. chapensis and P. rubra had higher [N] and [P] compared to C. chinensis. [N] and [P] also varied among different plant tissues with much higher values in leaves than in roots for all indigenous species. RGR of indigenous tree seedlings was mostly positively correlated with leaf [N] and [P], but negatively correlated with leaf N∶P ratio. Considering the low [P] and high N∶P ratio observed in the introduced indigenous tree seedlings, we propose that the current experimental plantations might be P limited for plant growth. PMID:24386340

  11. Zeta Sperm Selection Improves Pregnancy Rate and Alters Sex Ratio in Male Factor Infertility Patients: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Sekhavati, Mohammad Hadi; Gourabi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Selection of sperm for intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is usually considered as the ultimate technique to alleviate male-factor infertility. In routine ICSI, selection is based on morphology and viability which does not necessarily preclude the chance injection of DNA-damaged or apoptotic sperm into the oocyte. Sperm with high negative surface electrical charge, named “Zeta potential”, are mature and more likely to have intact chromatin. In addition, X-bearing spermatozoa carry more negative charge. Therefore, we aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of Zeta procedure with routine sperm selection in infertile men candidate for ICSI. Materials and Methods From a total of 203 ICSI cycles studied, 101 cycles were allocated to density gradient centrifugation (DGC)/Zeta group and the remaining 102 were included in the DGC group in this prospective study. Clinical outcomes were com- pared between the two groups. The ratios of Xand Y bearing sperm were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods in 17 independent semen samples. Results In the present double-blind randomized clinical trial, a significant increase in top quality embryos and pregnancy rate were observed in DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group. Moreover, sex ratio (XY/XX) at birth significantly was lower in the DGC/Zeta group compared to DGC group despite similar ratio of X/Y bearings sper- matozoa following Zeta selection. Conclusion Zeta method not only improves the percentage of top embryo quality and pregnancy outcome but also alters the sex ratio compared to the conventional DGC method, despite no significant change in the ratio of Xand Ybearing sperm population (Registration number: IRCT201108047223N1). PMID:27441060

  12. Oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation find their sites of expression in the changes in time and space of the age-adjusted cancer incidence rate.

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T; Murakami, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation is to elucidate the relation between the distribution pattern of the age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) changes in time and space of 15 tumors of bothe sexes and the locations of centers of centripetal-(oncogene type) and centrifugal-(tumoe suppressor gene type) forces. The fitness of the observed log AAIR data sets to the oncogene type- and the tumor suppressor gene type-equilibrium models and the locations of 2 force centers were calculated by applying the least square method of Gauss to log AAIR pair data series with and without topological data manipulations, which are so designed as to let log AAIR pair data series fit to 2 variant (x, y) frameworks, the Rect-coordinates and the Para-coordinates. The 2 variant (x, y) coordinates are defined each as an (x, y) framework with its X axis crossed at a right angle to the regression line of the original log AAIR data (the Rect-coordinates) and as another framework with its X axis run in parallel with the regression line of the original log AAIR pair data series (the Para-coordinates). The fitness test of log AAIR data series to either the oncogene activation type equilibrium model (r = -1.000) or the tumor suppressor gene inactivation type (r = 1.000) was conducted for each of the male-female type pair data and the female-male type data, for each of log AAIR changes in space and log AAIR changes in time, and for each of the 3 (x, y) frameworks in a given neoplasia of both sexes. The results obtained are given as follows: 1) The positivity rates of the fitness test to the oncogene type equilibrium model and the tumor suppressor gene type model were each 63.3% and 56.7% with the log AAIR changes in space, and 73.3% and 73.3% with log AAIR changes in time, as tested in 15 human neoplasias of both sexes. 2) Evidence was presented to indicate that the clearance of oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation is the sine qua non premise of carciniogenesis. 3) The r

  13. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the authors calculated…

  14. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. Methods: In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the…

  15. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. T.; Grim, Joel Q.; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, S.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E.; Rowe, E.; Buliga, V. M.; Burger, A.

    2013-09-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ηeh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  16. 75 FR 72581 - Assessments, Assessment Base and Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ...\\ The 2009 assessments rule established the following initial base assessment rate schedule: \\3\\ 74 FR... for Comment on Assessment Dividends, Assessment Rates and Designated Reserve Ratio, 75 FR 66271. III... adjustments. \\7\\ 74 FR 9525. Unsecured Debt Adjustment All other things equal, greater amounts of...

  17. Fractal Analysis and Hurst Parameter for Intrapartum Fetal Heart Rate Variability Analysis: A Versatile Alternative to Frequency Bands and LF/HF Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Doret, Muriel; Spilka, Jiří; Chudáček, Václav; Gonçalves, Paulo; Abry, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background The fetal heart rate (FHR) is commonly monitored during labor to detect early fetal acidosis. FHR variability is traditionally investigated using Fourier transform, often with adult predefined frequency band powers and the corresponding LF/HF ratio. However, fetal conditions differ from adults and modify spectrum repartition along frequencies. Aims This study questions the arbitrariness definition and relevance of the frequency band splitting procedure, and thus of the calculation of the underlying LF/HF ratio, as efficient tools for characterizing intrapartum FHR variability. Study Design The last 30 minutes before delivery of the intrapartum FHR were analyzed. Subjects Case-control study. A total of 45 singletons divided into two groups based on umbilical cord arterial pH: the Index group with pH ≤ 7.05 (n = 15) and Control group with pH > 7.05 (n = 30). Outcome Measures Frequency band-based LF/HF ratio and Hurst parameter. Results This study shows that the intrapartum FHR is characterized by fractal temporal dynamics and promotes the Hurst parameter as a potential marker of fetal acidosis. This parameter preserves the intuition of a power frequency balance, while avoiding the frequency band splitting procedure and thus the arbitrary choice of a frequency separating bands. The study also shows that extending the frequency range covered by the adult-based bands to higher and lower frequencies permits the Hurst parameter to achieve better performance for identifying fetal acidosis. Conclusions The Hurst parameter provides a robust and versatile tool for quantifying FHR variability, yields better acidosis detection performance compared to the LF/HF ratio, and avoids arbitrariness in spectral band splitting and definitions. PMID:26322889

  18. A Q-Switched All-Solid-State Single-Longitudinal-Mode Laser with Adjustable Pulse-Width and High Repetition Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Shi-Zhong; Hou, Xia; Wei, Hui; Chen, Wei-Biao

    2006-01-01

    A single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) laser-diode pumped Nd: YAG laser with adjustable pulse width is developed by using the techniques of pre-lasing and changing polarization of birefingent crystal. The Q-switching voltage is triggered by the peak of the pre-lasing pulse to achieve the higher stability of output pulse energy. The output energy of more than 1 mJ is obtained with output energy stability of 3% (rms) at 100 Hz. The pulse-width can be adjusted from 30 ns to 300 ns by changing the Q-switching voltage. The probability of putting out single-longitudinal-mode pulses is almost 100%. The laser can be run over four hours continually without mode hopping.

  19. Oxygen consumption rates in hovering hummingbirds reflect substrate-dependent differences in P/O ratios: carbohydrate as a 'premium fuel'.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kenneth C; Altshuler, Douglas L; Suarez, Raul K

    2007-06-01

    The stoichiometric relationship of ATP production to oxygen consumption, i.e. the P/O ratio, varies depending on the nature of the metabolic substrate used. The latest estimates reveal a P/O ratio approximately 15% higher when glucose is oxidized compared with fatty acid oxidation. Because the energy required to produce aerodynamic lift for hovering is independent of the metabolic fuel oxidized, we hypothesized that the rate of oxygen consumption, VO2, should decline as the respiratory quotient, RQ (VCO2/VO2), increases from 0.71 to 1.0 as hummingbirds transition from a fasted to a fed state. Here, we show that hovering VO2 values in rufous (Selasphorus rufus) and Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) are significantly greater when fats are metabolized (RQ=0.71) than when carbohydrates are used (RQ=1.0). Because hummingbirds gained mass during our experiments, making mass a confounding variable, we estimated VO2 per unit mechanical power output. Expressed in this way, the difference in VO2 when hummingbirds display an RQ=0.71 (fasted) and an RQ=1.0 (fed) is between 16 and 18%, depending on whether zero or perfect elastic energy storage is assumed. These values closely match theoretical expectations, indicating that a combination of mechanical power estimates and ;indirect calorimetry', i.e. the measurement of rates of gas exchange, enables precise estimates of ATP turnover and metabolic flux rates in vivo. The requirement for less oxygen when oxidizing carbohydrate suggests that carbohydrate oxidation may facilitate hovering flight in hummingbirds at high altitude.

  20. A calibration of the production rate ratio P-21/P-26 by low energy secondry neutrons: Identification of Ne spallation components at the 10(exp 6) atoms/g level in terrestrial samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, TH.; Niedermann, S.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The spallation ratio (Ne-22/Ne-21)(sub c) from Si was determined as 1.243 plus or minus 0.022 in a terrestrial quartz sample. We carried out a calibration of the in-situ production rate ratio P-21/P-26 in quartz samples for which Be-10 and Al-26 production rates were previously measured. A ratio P-21/P-26 of 0.67 plus or minus 0.12 is obtained.

  1. On the rotation rates and axis ratios of the smallest known near-Earth asteroids-The archetypes of the Asteroid Redirect Mission targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Patrick; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2015-06-01

    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) has been proposed with the aim to capture a small asteroid a few meters in size and redirect it into an orbit around the Moon. There it can be investigated at leisure by astronauts aboard an Orion or other spacecraft. The target for the mission has not yet been selected, and there are very few potential targets currently known. Though sufficiently small near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are thought to be numerous, they are also difficult to detect and characterize with current observational facilities. Here we collect the most up-to-date information on near-Earth asteroids in this size range to outline the state of understanding of the properties of these small NEAs. Observational biases certainly mean that our sample is not an ideal representation of the true population of small NEAs. However our sample is representative of the eventual target list for the ARM mission, which will be compiled under very similar observational constraints unless dramatic changes are made to the way near-Earth asteroids are searched for and studied. We collect here information on 88 near-Earth asteroids with diameters less than 60 m and with high quality light curves. We find that the typical rotation period is 40 min. Relatively few axis ratios are available for such small asteroids, so we also considered the 92 smallest NEAs with known axis ratios. This sample includes asteroids with diameters up to 300 m. The mean and median axis ratios were 1.43 and 1.29, respectively. Rotation rates much faster than the spin barrier are seen, reaching below 30 s, and implying that most of these bodies are monoliths. Non-principal axis rotation is uncommon. Axial ratios often reach values as high as two, though no undisputed results reach above three. We find little correlation of axis ratio with size. The most common spectral type in the sample of small NEAs is S-type (> 90 %), with only a handful of C and X types known.

  2. Modelling the role of electron attachment rates on column density ratios for C n H‑/C n H (n=4,6,8) in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Grassi, T.; Wester, R.

    2016-10-01

    The fairly recent detection of a variety of anions in the interstellar molecular clouds have underlined the importance of realistically modelling the processes governing their abundance. To pursue this task, our earlier calculations for the radiative electron attachment (REA) rates for C4H‑, C6H‑, and C8H‑ are employed in the present work, within a broad network of other concurrent reactions, to generate the corresponding column density ratios of anion/neutral (A/N) relative abundances. The latter are then compared with those obtained in recent years from observational measurements. The calculations involved the time-dependent solutions of a large network of chemical processes over an extended time interval and included a series of runs in which the values of REA rates were repeatedly scaled over several orders of magnitude. Macroscopic parameters for the Clouds’ modelling were also varied to cover a broad range of physical environments. It was found that, within the range and quality of the processes included in the present network,and selected from state-of-the-art astrophysical databases, the REA values required to match the observed A/N ratios needed to be reduced by orders of magnitude for C4H‑ case, while the same rates for C6H‑ and C8H‑ only needed to be scaled by much smaller factors. The results suggest that the generally proposed formation of interstellar anions by REA mechanism is overestimated by current models for the C4H‑ case, for which is likely to be an inefficient path to formation. This path is thus providing a rather marginal contribution to the observed abundances of C4H‑, the latter being more likely to originate from other chemical processes in the network, as we discuss in some detail in the present work. Possible physical reasons for the much smaller differences against observations found instead for the values of the (A/N) ratios in two other, longer members of the series are put forward and analysed within the

  3. Inherited structural cytogenetic abnormalities detected incidentally in fetuses diagnosed prenatally: frequency, parental-age associations, sex-ratio trends, and comparisons with rates of mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Hook, E B; Schreinemachers, D M; Willey, A M; Cross, P K

    1984-01-01

    Rates of structural chromosome abnormalities were analyzed in 24,951 fetuses studied prenatally in which there were no grounds to suspect an inherited abnormality. In about one in 200 prenatal cytogenetic diagnoses, an unexpected structural abnormality was found. The observed rate was 5.3 per 1,000, of which 1.7 per 1,000 were unbalanced and 3.6 per 1,000 balanced. The rate of inherited abnormalities was 3.1-3.7 per 1,000 (0.4-0.9 per 1,000 for unbalanced abnormalities and 2.6-2.8 per 1,000 for balanced abnormalities). The rate of mutants in this series was, by contrast, 1.6-2.2 per 1,000 (0.8-1.2 per 1,000 for unbalanced abnormalities and 0.8-1.0 per 1,000 for balanced abnormalities). The rate of balanced Robertsonian translocation carriers was 0.6 per 1,000 (about 0.25 per 1,000 for mutants and 0.35 per 1,000 for inherited abnormalities), and for other balanced abnormalities, 3.0 per 1,000 (about 0.6 per 1,000 for mutants and 2.4 per 1,000 for inherited abnormalities). The rates of unbalanced Robertsonian translocations was about 0.1 per 1,000, almost all of which were mutants. For supernumerary rearrangements, the rate was 0.9 per 1,000 (about 0.4 per 1,000 inherited and 0.5 per 1,000 mutant). The rates of all unbalanced (nonmosaic) inherited abnormalities (4.0-5.2 per 10,000) were intermediate between higher rates estimated in all conceptuses (9.1-15.8 per 10,000) and rates observed in newborns (1.5-2.5 per 10,000). This trend is probably attributable to fetal mortality associated with unbalanced rearrangements. The rates of balanced (nonmosaic) inherited abnormalities (26.0-28.0 per 10,000), however, were considerably higher than the rates in all conceptuses (13-16.7 per 10,000) or in all live births (12.2-16.0 per 10,000). The major difference was in the rate of inversions. The use of "banding" methods in the studies of amniocentesis but not in most of the live births or abortus studies probably contributes to at least some of these differences. One trend in

  4. Glomerular Filtration Rate and Urine Albumin to Creatinine Ratio Associated With Hearing Impairment Among Korean Adults With Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yunji; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, June; Lee, Joo Kyung; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Nam, Hyo-Yun; Nam, Ga-Eun; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Woo; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Yong-Gyu

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) with hearing impairment among diabetic adults in Korea. The study was based on data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011 to 2012. Participants were 1206 diabetic adults, aged over 19 years, who completed audiometric testing supervised by nationally certified clinicians. Hearing impairment was defined in three grades: no hearing impairment (pure-tone average 0-25 dB), slight hearing impairment (26-40 dB), and disabling hearing impairment (>40 dB) in the better ear at frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 kHz. Using logistic regression, risk of hearing impairment was assessed after having controlled for confounding factors. Higher levels of ACR and lower levels of eGFR correlated with an increase in percentage of disabling hearing impairment both unilaterally and bilaterally (P < 0.001). Controlling for possible confounding covariates, odds ratios for hearing impairment showed tendency to increase in higher ACR groups (P for trend = 0.029). Similar pattern was examined between eGFR and hearing impairment (P for trend = 0.006). Odds ratios were 1.981 (1.146, 3.424) for ACR Q4 and 2.773 (1.286, 5.983) for eGFR < 60 mL/min. Fall in eGFR and rise in ACR correlated with severity of hearing impairment. The association existed independently of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, drinking, exercise, new onset of diabetes, education, income, mental stress, noise exposure, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27124027

  5. Storm/Quiet Ratio Comparisons Between TIMED/SABER NO (sup +)(v) Volume Emission Rates and Incoherent Scatter Radar Electron Densities at E-Region Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, J. R.; Mertens, C. J.; Bilitza, D.; Xu, X.; Russell, J. M., III; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband infrared limb emission at 4.3 microns is measured by the TIMED/SABER instrument. At night, these emission observations at E-region altitudes are used to derive the so called NO+(v) Volume Emission Rate (VER). NO+(v) VER can be derived by removing the background CO2(v3) 4.3 microns radiance contribution using SABER-based non-LTE radiation transfer models, and by performing a standard Abel inversion on the residual radiance. SABER observations show that NO+(v) VER is significantly enhanced during magnetic storms in accordance with increased ionization of the neutral atmosphere by auroral electron precipitation, followed by vibrational excitation of NO+ (i.e., NO+(v)) from fast exothermic ion-neutral reactions, and prompt infrared emission at 4.3 m. Due to charge neutrality, the NO+(v) VER enhancements are highly correlated with electron density enhancements, as observed for example by Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR). In order to characterize the response of the storm-time E-region from both SABER and ISR measurements, a Storm/Quiet ratio (SQR) quantity is defined as a function of altitude. For SABER, the SQR is the ratio of the storm-to-quiet NO+(v) VER. SQR is the storm-to-quiet ratio of electron densities for ISR. In this work, we compare SABER and ISR SQR values between 100 to 120 km. Results indicate good agreement between these measurements. SQR values are intended to be used as a correction factor to be included in an empirical storm-time correction to the International Reference Ionosphere model at E-region altitudes.

  6. Ab initio study of the ClO + NH2 reaction: prediction of the total rate constant and product branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Lin, M C

    2007-05-17

    The mechanism for ClO + NH2 has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital and transition-state theory calculations. The species involved have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) level and their energies have been refined by single-point calculations with the modified Gaussian-2 method, G2M(CC2). Ten stable isomers have been located and a detailed potential energy diagram is provided. The rate constants and branching ratios for the low-lying energy channel products including HCl + HNO, Cl + NH2O, and HOCl + 3NH (X(3)Sigma(-)) are calculated. The result shows that formation of HCl + HNO is dominant below 1000 K; over 1000 K, Cl + NH2O products become dominant. However, the formation of HOCl + 3NH (X(3)Sigma(-)) is unimportant below 1500 K. The pressure-independent individual and total rate constants can be expressed as k1(HCl + HNO) = 4.7 x 10(-8)(T(-1.08)) exp(-129/T), k(2)(Cl + NH2O) = 1.7 x 10(-9)(T(-0.62)) exp(-24/T), k3(HOCl + NH) = 4.8 x 10(-29)(T5.11) exp(-1035/T), and k(total) = 5.0 x 10(-9)(T(-0.67)) exp(-1.2/T), respectively, with units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in the temperature range of 200-2500 K.

  7. Relative Citation Ratio of Top Twenty Macedonian Biomedical Scientists in PubMed: A New Metric that Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level

    PubMed Central

    Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze relative citation ratio (RCR) of top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists with a new metric that uses citation rates to measure influence at the article level. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists were identified by GoPubMed on the base of the number of deposited abstracts in PubMed, corrected with the data from previously published paper, and completed with the Macedonian biomedical scientists working in countries outside the Republic of Macedonia, but born or previously worked in the country. iCite was used as a tool to access a dashboard of bibliometrics for papers associated with a portfolio. RESULTS: The biggest number of top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists has RCR lower than one. Only four Macedonian biomedical scientists have bigger RCR in comparison with those in PubMed. The most prominent RCR of 2.29 has Rosoklija G. RCR of the most influenced individual papers deposited in PubMed has shown the biggest value for the paper of Efremov D (35.19). This paper has the biggest number of authors (860). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to accept top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists as an example of new metric that uses citation rates to measure influence at the article level, rather than qualification of the best Macedonian biomedical scientists. PMID:27335586

  8. SELECTION EFFECTS IN GAMMA-RAY BURST CORRELATIONS: CONSEQUENCES ON THE RATIO BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Dainotti, M. G.; Shigehiro, N.; Vecchio, R. Del; Capozziello, S. E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2015-02-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the L{sub X} -T{sub a}{sup ∗} (hereafter LT) correlation between the X-ray luminosity L{sub X} (T{sub a} ) at the end of the plateau phase, T{sub a} , and the rest-frame time T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of L{sub X} and T{sub a}{sup ∗}. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al. showing that in both cases the intrinsic slope of the LT correlation is ≈ – 1.0. This method is general and therefore relevant for investigating whether or not any other GRB correlation is generated by the biases themselves. Moreover, because the farthest GRBs and star-forming galaxies probe the reionization epoch, we evaluate the redshift-dependent ratio Ψ(z) = (1 + z){sup α} of the GRB rate to the star formation rate. We found a modest evolution –0.2 ≤ α ≤ 0.5 consistent with a Swift GRB afterglow plateau in the redshift range 0.99 < z < 9.4.

  9. Time-adjusted variable resistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Timing mechanism was developed effecting extremely precisioned highly resistant fixed resistor. Switches shunt all or portion of resistor; effective resistance is varied over time interval by adjusting switch closure rate.

  10. Sialylation of prion protein controls the rate of prion amplification, the cross-species barrier, the ratio of PrPSc glycoform and prion infectivity.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; D'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-09-01

    The central event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) into the disease-associated, transmissible form (PrP(Sc)). Pr(PC) is a sialoglycoprotein that contains two conserved N-glycosylation sites. Among the key parameters that control prion replication identified over the years are amino acid sequence of host PrP(C) and the strain-specific structure of PrPSc. The current work highlights the previously unappreciated role of sialylation of PrP(C) glycans in prion pathogenesis, including its role in controlling prion replication rate, infectivity, cross-species barrier and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. The current study demonstrates that undersialylated PrP(C) is selected during prion amplification in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCAb) at the expense of oversialylated PrP(C). As a result, PMCAb-derived PrP(Sc) was less sialylated than brain-derived PrP(Sc). A decrease in PrPSc sialylation correlated with a drop in infectivity of PMCAb-derived material. Nevertheless, enzymatic de-sialylation of PrP(C) using sialidase was found to increase the rate of PrP(Sc) amplification in PMCAb from 10- to 10,000-fold in a strain-dependent manner. Moreover, de-sialylation of PrP(C) reduced or eliminated a species barrier of for prion amplification in PMCAb. These results suggest that the negative charge of sialic acid controls the energy barrier of homologous and heterologous prion replication. Surprisingly, the sialylation status of PrP(C) was also found to control PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. A decrease in Pr(PC) sialylation levels resulted in a higher percentage of the diglycosylated glycoform in PrP(Sc). 2D analysis of charge distribution revealed that the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C) differed from that of spleen-derived PrP(C). Knocking out lysosomal sialidase Neu1 did not change the sialylation status of brain-derived PrP(C), suggesting that Neu1 is not responsible for desialylation of Pr

  11. Effects of Si/Al ratio on the distribution of framework Al and on the rates of alkane monomolecular cracking and dehydrogenation in H-MFI.

    PubMed

    Janda, Amber; Bell, Alexis T

    2013-12-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Si/Al ratio on the locations of exchangeable cations in H-MFI and on the monomolecular cracking and dehydrogenation reactions of n-butane. On the basis of UV-visible spectroscopic analysis of Co(II) exchanged into MFI, it was inferred that the fraction of Co(II) (and, by extension, Brønsted protons) located at channel intersections relative to straight and sinusoidal channels increases with increasing Al content. Concurrently, turnover frequencies for all monomolecular reactions, and the selectivities to dehydrogenation versus cracking and to terminal cracking versus central cracking, generally increased. The changes in selectivity with Al content are consistent with the finding that the transition-state geometry for dehydrogenation is bulky and resembles a product state, and should therefore exhibit a stronger preference to occur at channel intersections relative to cracking. Increases in turnover frequencies are attributed partly to increases in intrinsic activation entropies that compensate for concurrent increases in intrinsic activation energies, most strongly for dehydrogenation and terminal cracking, resulting in increased selectivity to these reactions at higher Al content. This interpretation contrasts with the view that intrinsic activation barriers are constant. It is also observed that isobutene inhibits the rate of n-butane dehydrogenation. Theoretical calculations indicate that this effect originates from adsorption of isobutene at the channel intersections. Because cracking reaction rates are not affected by the presence of isobutene, this result suggests that the preference of dehydrogenation to occur at channel intersections is much stronger than the preference for cracking to occur at these locations. PMID:24237304

  12. Measurement of the dmud quartet-to-doublet molecular formation rate ratio (lambdaq : lambdad) and the mu d hyperfine rate (lambdaqd) using the fusion neutrons from mu- stops in D2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raha, Nandita

    The MuSun experiment will determine the microd capture rate (micro - + d → n + n + nue) from the doublet hyperfine state Lambdad, of the muonic deuterium atom in the 1S ground state to a precision of 1.5%. Modern effective field theories (EFT) predict that an accurate measurement of Lambdad would determine the two-nucleon weak axial current. This will help in understanding all weak nuclear interactions such as the stellar thermonuclear proton-proton fusion reactions, the neutrino reaction nu + d (which explores the solar neutrino oscillation problem). It will also help us understand weak nuclear interactions involving more than two nucleons---double beta decay---as they do involve a two-nucleon weak axial current term. The experiment took place in the piE3 beam-line of Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) using a muon beam generated from 2.2 mA proton beam---which is the highest intensity beam in the world. The muons first passed through entrance scintillator and multiwire proportional chamber for determining thier entrance timing and position respectively. Then they were stopped in a cryogenic time projection chamber (cryo-TPC) filled with D2 gas. This was surrounded by plastic scintillators and multiwire proportional chambers for detecting the decay electrons and an array of eight liquid scintillators for detecting neutrons. Muons in deuterium get captured to form microd atoms in the quartet and doublet spin states. These atoms undergo nuclear capture from these hyperfine states respectively. There is a hyperfine transition rate from quartet-to-doublet state---lambdaqd along with dmicrod molecular formation which further undergoes a fusion reaction with the muon acting as a catalyst (MCF). The goal of this dissertation is to measure the dmicro d quartet-to-doublet rate ratio (lambdaq : lambdad) and microd hyperfine rate (lambda qd) using the fusion neutrons from micro. stops in D2 gas. The dmicrod molecules undergo MCF reactions from the doublet and the quartet state

  13. A crossover adjustment for improving sea surface height mapping from in-situ high rate ship-borne GNSS data using PPP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Dong, Zhenghua; Tan, Zhengguang; Liu, Xin; Chen, Chuanfa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-08-01

    Ship-borne global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technique can overcome the weakness of satellite altimetry and tide gauge in measuring sea surface heights (SSHs) over coastal seas. Ship-borne GNSS technique can be used to calibrate SSHs determined by the satellite altimetry and tide gauge. The ship-borne GNSS data are processed with the single-epoch precise point positioning (PPP) method to estimate SSHs which are filtered by the Gaussian filter to weaken and/or remove effects of sea wind and wave field. Tidal corrections are also taken into consideration to improve SSHs. One crossover adjustment method is put forward to calculate the bias and drift along the ship route and assess the accuracy of SSHs. We processed the in-situ ship-borne GPS data over the offshore sea around Keelung to compute precisely SSHs with the single-epoch PPP. Statistical results of SSH differences of crossover points indicate that the root mean squares error of SSHs determined by the ship-borne GPS is up to level of 12.9 cm over the offshore sea ~30 km far away to land.

  14. Adjustment versus no adjustment when using adjustable sutures in strabismus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liebermann, Laura; Hatt, Sarah R.; Leske, David A.; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term postoperative outcomes when performing an adjustment to achieve a desired immediate postoperative alignment versus simply tying off at the desired immediate postoperative alignment when using adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery. Methods We retrospectively identified 89 consecutive patients who underwent a reoperation for horizontal strabismus using adjustable sutures and also had a 6-week and 1-year outcome examination. In each case, the intent of the surgeon was to tie off and only to adjust if the patient was not within the intended immediate postoperative range. Postoperative success was predefined based on angle of misalignment and diplopia at distance and near. Results Of the 89 patients, 53 (60%) were adjusted and 36 (40%) were tied off. Success rates were similar between patients who were simply tied off immediately after surgery and those who were adjusted. At 6 weeks, the success rate was 64% for the nonadjusted group versus 81% for the adjusted group (P = 0.09; difference of 17%; 95% CI, −2% to 36%). At 1 year, the success rate was 67% for the nonadjusted group versus 77% for the adjusted group (P = 0.3; difference of 11%; 95% CI, −8% to 30%). Conclusions Performing an adjustment to obtain a desired immediate postoperative alignment did not yield inferior long-term outcomes to those obtained by tying off to obtain that initial alignment. If patients were who were outside the desired immediate postoperative range had not been not adjusted, it is possible that their long-term outcomes would have been worse, therefore, overall, an adjustable approach may be superior to a nonadjustable approach. PMID:23415035

  15. The impact of realistic models of mass segregation on the event rate of extreme-mass ratio inspirals and cusp re-growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Preto, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    One of the most interesting sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for LISA is the inspiral of compact objects on to a massive black hole (MBH), commonly referred to as an 'extreme-mass ratio inspiral' (EMRI). The small object, typically a stellar black hole, emits significant amounts of GW along each orbit in the detector bandwidth. The slowly, adiabatic inspiral of these sources will allow us to map spacetime around MBHs in detail, as well as to test our current conception of gravitation in the strong regime. The event rate of this kind of source has been addressed many times in the literature and the numbers reported fluctuate by orders of magnitude. On the other hand, recent observations of the Galactic centre revealed a dearth of giant stars inside the inner parsec relative to the numbers theoretically expected for a fully relaxed stellar cusp. The possibility of unrelaxed nuclei (or, equivalently, with no or only a very shallow cusp, or core) adds substantial uncertainty to the estimates. Having this timely question in mind, we run a significant number of direct-summation N-body simulations with up to half a million particles to calibrate a much faster orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck code. We show that, under quite generic initial conditions, the time required for the growth of a relaxed, mass segregated stellar cusp is shorter than a Hubble time for MBHs with M• <~ 5 × 106 Modot (i.e. nuclei in the range of LISA). We then investigate the regime of strong mass segregation (SMS) for models with two different stellar mass components. Given the most recent stellar mass normalization for the inner parsec of the Galactic centre, SMS has the significant impact of boosting the EMRI rates by a factor of ~10 in comparison to what would result from a 7/4-Bahcall and Wolf cusp resulting in ~250 events per Gyr per Milky Way type galaxy. Such an intrinsic rate should translate roughly into ~102-7 × 102 sbh's (EMRIs detected by LISA over a mission lifetime of 2 or 5 years

  16. Maternal Condition but Not Corticosterone Is Linked to Offspring Sex Ratio in a Passerine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Lindsay J.; Evans, Neil P.; Heidinger, Britt J.; Adams, Aileen; Arnold, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of offspring sex ratio adjustment in a range of species, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unknown. Elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT) is associated with factors that can favour brood sex ratio adjustment, such as reduced maternal condition, food availability and partner attractiveness. Therefore, the steroid hormone has been suggested to play a key role in sex ratio manipulation. However, despite correlative and causal evidence CORT is linked to sex ratio manipulation in some avian species, the timing of adjustment varies between studies. Consequently, whether CORT is consistently involved in sex-ratio adjustment, and how the hormone acts as a mechanism for this adjustment remains unclear. Here we measured maternal baseline CORT and body condition in free-living blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) over three years and related these factors to brood sex ratio and nestling quality. In addition, a non-invasive technique was employed to experimentally elevate maternal CORT during egg laying, and its effects upon sex ratio and nestling quality were measured. We found that maternal CORT was not correlated with brood sex ratio, but mothers with elevated CORT fledged lighter offspring. Also, experimental elevation of maternal CORT did not influence brood sex ratio or nestling quality. In one year, mothers in superior body condition produced male biased broods, and maternal condition was positively correlated with both nestling mass and growth rate in all years. Unlike previous studies maternal condition was not correlated with maternal CORT. This study provides evidence that maternal condition is linked to brood sex ratio manipulation in blue tits. However, maternal baseline CORT may not be the mechanistic link between the maternal condition and sex ratio adjustment. Overall, this study serves to highlight the complexity of sex ratio adjustment in birds and the difficulties associated with identifying sex biasing mechanisms. PMID:25347532

  17. 5 CFR 9701.336 - Treatment of employees whose pay does not fall below the minimum adjusted rate of their band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Locality and Special Rate Supplements § 9701.336 Treatment of employees whose pay does not...

  18. [Hemodynamic benefits of AV interval adjustment and heart rate increase during exercise in dual-chamber pacing as determined by Doppler].

    PubMed

    Sancho-Tello, M J; Salvador, A; Olagüe, J

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the relative significance of ventricular rate increase and AV delay on exercise cardiac output, we have studied 10 patients (8 male and 2 female, 16-59 years) with complete chronic heart block treated with AV sequential pacing. Cardiac output variations (delta CO) were estimated by pulsed Doppler comparisons of the aortic flow velocity in the supine position, at rest and during bicycle exercise. The following pacing programs were tested: DDD with AV intervals of 50, 100 and 150 ms (DDD50 o DDDD100, DDD150), VVI at 70 ppm (VVI70), and VVI at the maximal available rate in this pacing mode-113 or 130 ppm depending on the PM type (VVIM). Exercise measurements in DDD mode were taken when that rate was reached. The delta CO was calculated as a percent change of the product flow velocity integral x heart rate, from that obtained with VVI70 mode at rest. At rest, the delta CO obtained with DDD pacing was 20.4 +/- 14.7% and the optimal AV delay was 50 ms in 1 patient, 100 ms in 3 patients and 150 ms in six. During exercise, the delta CO was higher in DDD and VVIM modes (82.0 +/- 30.8% and 56.2 +/- 37.6%, respectively; p less than 0.01) than in VVI70 mode (20.4 +/- 10.4%; p less than 0.005), the greatest delta CO was reached at DDD mode in 8 out of 10 patients (p less than 0.03). The optimal AV delays were 50 ms in 5 patients, 100 ms in 4 patients and 150 ms in one. Thus, DDD pacing with the optimal AV delay seems to obtain greater haemodynamic benefits during exercise than does rate-responsive pacing; the optimal exercise AV delay varies from patient to patient and is usually less than 150 ms. PMID:2236802

  19. An index of unhealthy lifestyle is associated with coronary heart disease mortality rates for small areas in England after adjustment for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, P; Allender, S; Rayner, M; Goldacre, M

    2011-03-01

    Indices of socio-economic deprivation are often used as a proxy for differences in the health behaviours of populations within small areas, but these indices are a measure of the economic environment rather than the health environment. Sets of synthetic estimates of the ward-level prevalence of low fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity, raised blood pressure, raised cholesterol and smoking were combined to develop an index of unhealthy lifestyle. Multi-level regression models showed that this index described about 50% of the large-scale geographic variation in CHD mortality rates in England, and substantially adds to the ability of an index of deprivation to explain geographic variations in CHD mortality rates.

  20. Controlling Type I Error Rate in Evaluating Differential Item Functioning for Four DIF Methods: Use of Three Procedures for Adjustment of Multiple Item Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye

    2010-01-01

    In DIF studies, a Type I error refers to the mistake of identifying non-DIF items as DIF items, and a Type I error rate refers to the proportion of Type I errors in a simulation study. The possibility of making a Type I error in DIF studies is always present and high possibility of making such an error can weaken the validity of the assessment.…

  1. A frequency-locked and frequency-doubled, hybrid Q-switched Yb:KYW laser at 515 nm with a widely adjustable repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjörnhammar, S.; Zukauskas, A.; Canalias, C.; Pasiskevicius, V.; Laurell, F.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a compact wavelength-stabilized, frequency-doubled Yb-doped double-tungstate laser with widely tunable repetition rate, spanning from 35 Hz to 3 kHz obtained by hybrid Q-switching. The Q-switching unit consisted of a combination of a passive Cr:YAG crystal and an opto-mechanical active intensity modulator. The fundamental wavelength was locked at 1029 nm with a volume Bragg grating, and the pulse length and energy were 42 ns and 250 µJ, respectively. As the laser was stabilized with the VBG and the opto-mechanical modulator, the frequency instability was reduced six times from free running down to 0.29 %. Frequency doubling was done extra-cavity in PPKTP, and a repetition rate-independent conversion efficiency of 63 % was obtained. The controllable repetition rate together with stable temporal and spatial characteristics makes this laser a suitable candidate in many biology-related experiments, as a pump source for in vivo excitation of fluorophores, e.g., pumping of "living lasers" and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy.

  2. Occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in air and precipitation of the Pearl River Delta, South China: annual washout ratios and depositional rates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Zhong; Guan, Yu-Feng; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2009-12-15

    On the basis of a one-year (from October 2006 to September 2007) sampling campaign, 34 air samples and 23 bulk precipitation samples were collected in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China and analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Fifteen tri- to deca-BDE congeners (sum of which is defined as Sigma15PBDE) were detected in more than 70% of the samples. In three urban-rural regions, Sigma15PBDE concentrations ranged from 77 to 372 pg/m3 in air (particulate + vapor) and 1.98 to 15.5 ng/L in rain (particle+dissolved) from Dongguan, from 195 to 1450 pg/m3 in air and 4.71 to 17.2 ng/L in rain from Shunde, and from 23.7 to 148 ng/L in rain from Guangzhou. Among the BDE congeners, BDE-209 was the predominant component. Linear correlations between the gas-particle partition coefficients (Kp) and the subcooled vapor pressures (P(O/L)) of individual BDE congeners were observed for both the wet and dry seasons, but the slopes (-0.572 to -0.525) of the fitted equations all substantially deviated from equilibrium condition (slope = -1). The total washout ratio by bulk rainfalls was determined to be 2 x 103 for tri-BDEs and 6 x 104 for BDE-209. The estimated annual dry and wet depositional rates were 6720 and 2460 kg/yr, respectively, for BDE-209, and 7270 and 2940 kg/yr for Sigma15PBDE in the PRD, indicating a dominant pathway for PBDEs input into the PRD soil and aquatic environments.

  3. Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

  4. [The new atherogenic plasma index reflects the triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol ratio, the lipoprotein particle size and the cholesterol esterification rate: changes during lipanor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dobiásová, M; Frohlich, J

    2000-03-01

    The new atherogenic plasma index (AIP) is a logarithmic transformation of the ratio of the molar triglyceride (TG) concentration and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). AIP correlates closely with the size of LDL particles (r = 0.8) and esterification rate of plasma cholesterol devoid of apo B lipoproteins (FERHDL), r = 0.9 which are considered at present the most sensitive indicators of the atherogenic plasma profile. AIP was recommended by the authors, based on analysis of results of 11 previous studies (1156 subjects) where FERHDL and plasma lipid parameters were investigated in different groups of people who differed as to the atherogenic risk. The AIP index was moreover used for evaluation of a clinical study comprising 609 patients with hyperlipidaemia, who were treated for three months with ciprofibrate (Lipanor). The mean AIP values of non-risk groups (plasma from umbilical blood, children, healthy women etc.) equalled zero or were lower, while with an increasing atherogenic risk (men, women after the menopause) AIP reached positive values, incl. high positive values in risk groups (plasma of diabetic subjects, patients with HLP, patients with positive angiography, myocardial infarction etc.). In all groups women had lower AIP values as compared with males. In patients after Lipanor therapy the AIP declined (from 0.58 +/- 0.17 to 0.33_0.18 in men, from 0.50 +/- 0.18 to 0.21 +/- 0.19 in women). If we consider AIP values from negative ones to 0.15 as "safe" from the aspect of atherogenicity, before Lipanor treatment these "safe" levels were recorded in 1.5% men and in 5.2% women and after treatment in 32% men and 48% women. The results indicate, that AIP which reflects the plasma lipoprotein profile quantifies the relations between TG and HDL-C and thus can be an objective indicator of the atherogenic risk and effectiveness of treatment and it is useful because it can be assessed in any surgery. PMID:11048517

  5. The rate ratio of injury and aggressive incident for alcohol alone, cocaine alone and simultaneous use before the event: A case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Macdonald, Scott; Borges, Guilherme; Joordens, Chantele; Stockwell, Tim; Ye, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (i) To estimate the Rate Ratio (RR) of use of alcohol alone, cocaine alone, and both substances simultaneously on acute injury or an aggressive incident, (ii) To compare the RRs for simultaneous use within 3 or 6 hours of the event; and (iii) To compare the RRs of two measures of exposure, “hours of feeling effects” versus estimates based on self-reported quantity and frequency of use. Methods The study employed a case-crossover design with the frequency approach. Clients (N=616) in substance abuse treatment for alcohol or cocaine issues from 2009 to 2012 completed a self-administered questionnaire on their substance use within 3 and 6 hours before a recent injury or physically aggressive incident. Clients also reported detailed quantity and frequency information in relation to their typical substance use, as well as information on “feeling effects”. The RR of acute harms due to substance use was estimated using the Mantel-Haenszel estimator. Results In the 6-hour window before the event, use of cocaine alone, alcohol alone and simultaneous alcohol and cocaine use were each significantly (P <0.05) related to a recent injury and aggressive incident. Simultaneous use was not significantly greater than use of either drug alone. Estimates of RR based on simultaneous use for a 3-hour window before the event were consistently larger than those based on a 6-hour window, and comparisons were significant (P <0.05) for an aggressive incident but not an injury. With reference to the two measures of exposure, three of eight comparisons of RRs were significantly larger for feeling the effects of the substance in comparison to quantity and frequency of substance use. Conclusion These findings are consistent with increased likelihood of harms related to the acute effects of alcohol alone, cocaine alone or simultaneous use. The results are suggestive that the acute effects of these drugs may be better measured within a 3-hour time window than a 6-hour window

  6. Amikacin-Fosfomycin at a Five-to-Two Ratio: Characterization of Mutation Rates in Microbial Strains Causing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia and Interactions with Commonly Used Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Paul R.; Abuan, Tammy; Walters, Kathie-Anne; Flamm, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    The amikacin-fosfomycin inhalation system (AFIS), a combination of antibiotics administered with an in-line nebulizer delivery system, is being developed for adjunctive treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The in vitro characterization of amikacin-fosfomycin (at a 5:2 ratio) described here included determining resistance selection rates for pathogens that are representative of those commonly associated with VAP (including multidrug-resistant strains) and evaluating interactions with antibiotics commonly used intravenously to treat VAP. Spontaneous resistance to amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) was not observed for most strains tested (n, 10/14). Four strains had spontaneously resistant colonies (frequencies, 4.25 × 10−8 to 3.47 × 10−10), for which amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) MICs were 2- to 8-fold higher than those for the original strains. After 7 days of serial passage, resistance (>4-fold increase over the baseline MIC) occurred in fewer strains (n, 4/14) passaged in the presence of amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) than with either amikacin (n, 7/14) or fosfomycin (n, 12/14) alone. Interactions between amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) and 10 comparator antibiotics in checkerboard testing against 30 different Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacterial strains were synergistic (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] index, ≤0.5) for 6.7% (n, 10/150) of combinations tested. No antagonism was observed. Synergy was confirmed by time-kill methodology for amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) plus cefepime (against Escherichia coli), aztreonam (against Pseudomonas aeruginosa), daptomycin (against Enterococcus faecalis), and azithromycin (against Staphylococcus aureus). Amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) was bactericidal at 4-fold the MIC for 7 strains tested. The reduced incidence of development of resistance to amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) compared with that for amikacin or fosfomycin alone, and the lack of negative interactions with commonly used intravenous antibiotics, further supports

  7. Amikacin-fosfomycin at a five-to-two ratio: characterization of mutation rates in microbial strains causing ventilator-associated pneumonia and interactions with commonly used antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, A Bruce; Rhomberg, Paul R; Abuan, Tammy; Walters, Kathie-Anne; Flamm, Robert K

    2014-07-01

    The amikacin-fosfomycin inhalation system (AFIS), a combination of antibiotics administered with an in-line nebulizer delivery system, is being developed for adjunctive treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The in vitro characterization of amikacin-fosfomycin (at a 5:2 ratio) described here included determining resistance selection rates for pathogens that are representative of those commonly associated with VAP (including multidrug-resistant strains) and evaluating interactions with antibiotics commonly used intravenously to treat VAP. Spontaneous resistance to amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) was not observed for most strains tested (n, 10/14). Four strains had spontaneously resistant colonies (frequencies, 4.25 × 10(-8) to 3.47 × 10(-10)), for which amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) MICs were 2- to 8-fold higher than those for the original strains. After 7 days of serial passage, resistance (>4-fold increase over the baseline MIC) occurred in fewer strains (n, 4/14) passaged in the presence of amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) than with either amikacin (n, 7/14) or fosfomycin (n, 12/14) alone. Interactions between amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) and 10 comparator antibiotics in checkerboard testing against 30 different Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacterial strains were synergistic (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] index, ≤ 0.5) for 6.7% (n, 10/150) of combinations tested. No antagonism was observed. Synergy was confirmed by time-kill methodology for amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) plus cefepime (against Escherichia coli), aztreonam (against Pseudomonas aeruginosa), daptomycin (against Enterococcus faecalis), and azithromycin (against Staphylococcus aureus). Amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) was bactericidal at 4-fold the MIC for 7 strains tested. The reduced incidence of development of resistance to amikacin-fosfomycin (5:2) compared with that for amikacin or fosfomycin alone, and the lack of negative interactions with commonly used intravenous antibiotics, further supports

  8. A whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk protein percentage in Israeli-Holstein cattle, by means of selective milk DNA pooling in a daughter design, using an adjusted false discovery rate criterion.

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, M O; Lipkin, E; Khutoreskaya, G; Tchourzyna, E; Soller, M; Friedmann, A

    2001-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling was employed in a daughter design to screen all bovine autosomes for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting estimated breeding value for milk protein percentage (EBVP%). Milk pools prepared from high and low daughters of each of seven sires were genotyped for 138 dinucleotide microsatellites. Shadow-corrected estimates of sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low pools. An adjusted false discovery rate (FDR) method was employed to calculate experimentwise significance levels and empirical power. Significant associations with milk protein percentage were found for 61 of the markers (adjusted FDR = 0.10; estimated power, 0.68). The significant markers appear to be linked to 19--28 QTL. Mean allele substitution effects of the putative QTL averaged 0.016 (0.009--0.028) in units of the within-sire family standard deviation of EBVP% and summed to 0.460 EBVP%. Overall QTL heterozygosity was 0.40. The identified QTL appear to account for all of the variation in EBVP% in the population. Through use of selective DNA pooling, 4400 pool data points provided the statistical power of 600,000 individual data points. PMID:11290723

  9. Convective adjustment in baroclinic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Local convection in planetary atmospheres is generally considered to result from the action of gravity on small regions of anomalous density. That in rotating baroclinic fluids the total potential energy for small scale convection contains a centrifugal as well as a gravitational contribution is shown. Convective adjustment in such an atmosphere results in the establishment of near adiabatic lapse rates of temperature along suitably defined surfaces of constant angular momentum, rather than in the vertical. This leads in general to sub-adiabatic vertical lapse rates. That such an adjustment actually occurs in the earth's atmosphere is shown by example and the magnitude of the effect for several other planetary atmospheres is estimated.

  10. The Effects of Base Rate, Selection Ratio, Sample Size, and Reliability of Predictors on Predictive Efficiency Indices Associated with Logistic Regression Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderstrom, Irina R.; Leitner, Dennis W.

    While it is imperative that attempts be made to assess the predictive accuracy of any prediction model, traditional measures of predictive accuracy have been criticized as suffering from "the base rate problem." The base rate refers to the relative frequency of occurrence of the event being studied in the population of interest, and the problem…

  11. 76 FR 22157 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... flats that include, in or on the mailpiece, a two dimensional barcode readable by mobile smart phones.... Id. The Postal Service requires that the barcode must be two dimensional, and notes that one dimensional barcodes, though readable by smart phones, are not eligible to receive the discount. Id....

  12. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  13. The development and initial validation of a virtual dripping sweat rate and a clothing wetness ratio for use in predictive heat strain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Kuwabara, K.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-08-01

    This paper applies the heat balance equation (HBE) for clothed subjects as a linear function of mean skin temperature ( t sk ) by a new sweating efficiency ( η sw ) and an approximation for the thermoregulatory sweat rate. The equation predicting t sk in steady state conditions was derived as the solution of the HBE and used for a predictive heat strain scale. The heat loss from the wet clothing (WCL) area was identified with a new variable of `virtual dripping sweat rate VDSR' ( S wdr ). This is a subject's un-evaporated sweat rate in dry clothing from the regional sweat rate exceeding the maximum evaporative capacity, and adds the moisture to the clothing, reducing the intrinsic clothing insulation. The S wdr allowed a mass balance analysis of the wet clothing area identified as clothing wetness ( w cl ). The w cl was derived by combining the HBE at the WCL surface from which the evaporation rate and skin heat loss from WCL region are given. Experimental results on eight young male subjects wearing typical summer clothing, T-shirt and trousers verified the model for predicting t sk with WCL thermal resistance ( R cl,w ) identified as 25 % of dry clothing ( R cl,d ).

  14. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  15. Using the Cumulative Common Log-Odds Ratio to Identify Differential Item Functioning of Rating Scale Items in the Exercise and Sport Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Myers, Nicholas D.

    2007-01-01

    One aspect of construct validity is the extent to which the measurement properties of a rating scale are invariant across the groups being compared. An increasingly used method for assessing between-group differences in the measurement properties of items of a scale is the framework of differential item functioning (DIF). In this paper we…

  16. Effect of wheat dried distillers grains and enzyme supplementation on growth rates, feed conversion ratio and beef fatty acid profile in feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    He, Z X; He, M L; Zhao, Y L; Xu, L; Walker, N D; Beauchemin, K A; McAllister, T A; Yang, W Z

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the effect of wheat dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS) inclusion, and (2) dietary feed enzyme (FE; Econase XT) supplementation in a finishing diet containing wheat DDGS on fatty acid profile of the pars costalis diaphragmatis muscle of beef cattle. A total of 160 crossbred yearling steers with initial BW of 495 ± 38 kg were blocked by BW and randomized into 16 pens (10 head/pen). The pens were randomly assigned to one of the four treatments: (1) control (CON; 10% barley silage and 90% barley grain-based concentrate, dry matter (DM) basis); (2) diet containing 30% wheat DDGS in place of barley grain without FE (WDG); (3) WDG diet supplemented with low FE (WDGL; 1 ml FE/kg DM); and (4) WDG diet supplemented with high FE (2 ml FE/kg DM). The pars costalis diaphragmatis muscle samples were collected from cattle at slaughter at the end of the finishing period (120 days) with a targeted live weight of 650 kg. No differences in organic matter intake, final BW and average daily gain were observed among treatments. However, steers fed WDG had greater (P<0.01) feed conversion ratio than those fed CON, and increasing FE application in wheat DDGS-based diets tended (P<0.10) to linearly decrease feed conversion ratio. In assessing the effects of including WDG diets without FE, concentration of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in muscle tended to be greater (P<0.10) for steers fed WDG than steers fed CON. In addition, inclusion of wheat DDGS into the diet increased (P<0.05) concentration of CLA and vaccenic acid (VA) in muscle and also resulted in a higher (P<0.05) ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFA compared with that from steers fed CON diet. Increasing FE application in wheat DDGS-based diets did not modify the concentrations of individual or total fatty acids. These results suggest that inclusion of wheat DDGS in finishing diets may improve fatty acid profile of beef muscle which could benefit human health.

  17. Ergonomic evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard

    SciTech Connect

    Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Shih, M.; Rempel, D.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard based on subjective preference and observed joint angles during typing. Thirty five keyboard users were asked to use the Apple adjustable keyboard for 7--14 days and rate the various characteristics of the keyboard. Our findings suggest that the most preferred opening angles range from 11--20{degree}. The mean ulnar deviation on the Apple Adjustable keyboard is 11{degree}, compared to 16{degree} on the standard keyboard. The mean extension was decreased from 24{degree} to 16{degree} when using the adjustable keyboard. When asked to subjectively rate the adjustable keyboard in comparison to the standard, the average subject felt that the Apple Adjustable Keyboard was more comfortable and easier to use than the standard flat keyboard.

  18. Changed Plasma Levels of Zinc and Copper to Zinc Ratio and Their Possible Associations with Parent- and Teacher-Rated Symptoms in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Viktorinova, Alena; Ursinyova, Monika; Trebaticka, Jana; Uhnakova, Iveta; Durackova, Zdenka; Masanova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with alterations in the metabolism of some trace elements which may participate in the pathogenesis of this disorder. The aims of the present study were to investigate the trace element status (copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), copper to zinc ratio (Cu/Zn ratio), selenium (Se), and lead (Pb)) of ADHD children and compare them with the control group. Associations between examined elements and ratings of ADHD symptoms were also assessed. Fifty-eight ADHD children and 50 healthy children (aged 6-14 years) were included in the study. The concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Se in the plasma and Pb in the whole blood were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. We found lower Zn level (p = 0.0005) and higher Cu/Zn ratio (p = 0.015) in ADHD children when compared with the control group. Copper levels in ADHD children were higher than those in the control group, but not significantly (p > 0.05). No significant differences in levels of Se and Pb between both groups were found. Zinc levels correlated with parent-rated score for inattention (r = -0.231, p = 0.029) as well as with teacher-rated score for inattention (r = -0.328, p = 0.014). Cu/Zn ratio correlated with teacher-rated score for inattention (r = 0.298, p = 0.015). Significant associations of Se and Pb with parent- and teacher-rated symptoms were not observed. The results of this study indicate that there are alterations in plasma levels of Cu and Zn as well as significant relationships to symptoms of ADHD.

  19. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    PubMed

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K < T < 2425 K behind shock waves. NCN radicals and H atoms were generated by the thermal decomposition of NCN3 and C2H5I, respectively. NCN concentration-time profiles were measured by sensitive narrow-line-width laser absorption at a wavelength of λ = 329.1302 nm. The obtained rate constants are best represented by the combination of two Arrhenius expressions, k2/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 3.49 × 10(14) exp(-33.3 kJ mol(-1)/RT) + 1.07 × 10(13) exp(+10.0 kJ mol(-1)/RT), with a small uncertainty of ±20% at T = 1600 K and ±30% at the upper and lower experimental temperature limits.The two Arrhenius terms basically can be attributed to the contributions of reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  20. Tracing the flow rate and mixing ratio of the Changjiang diluted water in the northwestern Pacific marginal seas using radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hojun; Kim, Guebuem; Kim, Jeonghyun; Park, Gwanserk; Song, Ki-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    We measured Ra isotopes (223Ra and 228Ra) in surface seawater of the northwestern Pacific marginal seas to trace the flow rate and mixing of the Changjiang diluted water (CDW) in the summer of 2012. Based on the horizontal distribution of 223Ra activities, the arrival time of CDW from the river mouth to 450 km offshore northeast was estimated to be 20-35 days, which is similar to that determined in previous studies. Moreover, we successfully calculated the relative contribution of CDW at each sampling station using a salinity and 228Ra diagram. Using this unique method, we found that the relative contribution of CDW was more than 30% in most surface seawaters of the northern East China Sea, the Yellow Sea, and the southern sea off Korea. Our results suggest that CDW is of high significance in the biogeochemistry of surface seawater of these northwestern Pacific marginal seas during the summer monsoon period.

  1. Physiological adjustments of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa) to a boom-or-bust economy: standard fasting metabolic rate, total evaporative water loss, and changes in the sizes of organs during food and water restriction.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephane; Mesochina, Pascal; Williams, Joseph B

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that desert ungulates adjust their physiology in response to long-term food and water restriction, we established three groups of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa): one that was provided food and water (n = 6; CTRL) ad lib. for 4 mo, one that received ad lib. food and water for the same period but was deprived of food and water for the last 4.5 d (n = 6; EXPT(1)), and one that was exposed to 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, an experimental regime designed to mimic conditions in a natural desert setting (n = 6; EXPT(2)). At the end of the 4-mo experiment, we measured standard fasting metabolic rate (SFMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) of all sand gazelles and determined lean dry mass of organs of gazelles in CTRL and EXPT(2). Gazelles in CTRL had a mean SFMR of 2,524 +/- 194 kJ d(-1), whereas gazelles in EXPT(1) and EXPT(2) had SFMRs of 2,101+/- 232 and 1,365 +/- 182 kJ d(-1), respectively, values that differed significantly when we controlled for differences in body mass. Gazelles had TEWLs of 151.1 +/- 18.2, 138.5 +/- 17.53, and 98.4 +/- 27.2 g H(2)O d(-1) in CTRL, EXPT(1), and EXPT(2), respectively. For the latter group, mass-independent TEWL was 27.1% of the value for CTRL. We found that normally hydrated sand gazelles had a low mass-adjusted TEWL compared with other arid-zone ungulates: 13.6 g H(2)O kg(-0.898) d(-1), only 17.1% of allometric predictions, the lowest ever measured in an arid-zone ungulate. After 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, dry lean mass of liver, heart, and muscle of gazelles in EXPT(2) was significantly less than that of these same organs in CTRL, even when we controlled for body mass decrease. Decreases in the dry lean mass of liver explained 70.4% of the variance of SFMR in food- and water-restricted gazelles. As oxygen demands decreased because of reduced organ sizes, gazelles lost less evaporative water, probably because of a decreased respiratory water loss. PMID

  2. Physiological adjustments of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa) to a boom-or-bust economy: standard fasting metabolic rate, total evaporative water loss, and changes in the sizes of organs during food and water restriction.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephane; Mesochina, Pascal; Williams, Joseph B

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that desert ungulates adjust their physiology in response to long-term food and water restriction, we established three groups of sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa): one that was provided food and water (n = 6; CTRL) ad lib. for 4 mo, one that received ad lib. food and water for the same period but was deprived of food and water for the last 4.5 d (n = 6; EXPT(1)), and one that was exposed to 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, an experimental regime designed to mimic conditions in a natural desert setting (n = 6; EXPT(2)). At the end of the 4-mo experiment, we measured standard fasting metabolic rate (SFMR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) of all sand gazelles and determined lean dry mass of organs of gazelles in CTRL and EXPT(2). Gazelles in CTRL had a mean SFMR of 2,524 +/- 194 kJ d(-1), whereas gazelles in EXPT(1) and EXPT(2) had SFMRs of 2,101+/- 232 and 1,365 +/- 182 kJ d(-1), respectively, values that differed significantly when we controlled for differences in body mass. Gazelles had TEWLs of 151.1 +/- 18.2, 138.5 +/- 17.53, and 98.4 +/- 27.2 g H(2)O d(-1) in CTRL, EXPT(1), and EXPT(2), respectively. For the latter group, mass-independent TEWL was 27.1% of the value for CTRL. We found that normally hydrated sand gazelles had a low mass-adjusted TEWL compared with other arid-zone ungulates: 13.6 g H(2)O kg(-0.898) d(-1), only 17.1% of allometric predictions, the lowest ever measured in an arid-zone ungulate. After 4 mo of progressive food and water restriction, dry lean mass of liver, heart, and muscle of gazelles in EXPT(2) was significantly less than that of these same organs in CTRL, even when we controlled for body mass decrease. Decreases in the dry lean mass of liver explained 70.4% of the variance of SFMR in food- and water-restricted gazelles. As oxygen demands decreased because of reduced organ sizes, gazelles lost less evaporative water, probably because of a decreased respiratory water loss.

  3. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulatory Information System (IRIS) ratios found in §§ 400.170(d)(1)(ii) and 400.170(d)(2) (i), (ii), (iii...)(1)(i) is calculated the same as the Gross Premium to Surplus IRIS ratio, with Gross Premium adjusted... formulated by FCIC and is calculated the same as the One-Year Change to Surplus IRIS ratio but for a...

  4. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Regulatory Information System (IRIS) ratios found in §§ 400.170(d)(1)(ii) and 400.170(d)(2) (i), (ii), (iii...)(1)(i) is calculated the same as the Gross Premium to Surplus IRIS ratio, with Gross Premium adjusted... formulated by FCIC and is calculated the same as the One-Year Change to Surplus IRIS ratio but for a...

  5. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulatory Information System (IRIS) ratios found in §§ 400.170(d)(1)(ii) and 400.170(d)(2) (i), (ii), (iii...)(1)(i) is calculated the same as the Gross Premium to Surplus IRIS ratio, with Gross Premium adjusted... formulated by FCIC and is calculated the same as the One-Year Change to Surplus IRIS ratio but for a...

  6. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Regulatory Information System (IRIS) ratios found in §§ 400.170(d)(1)(ii) and 400.170(d)(2) (i), (ii), (iii...)(1)(i) is calculated the same as the Gross Premium to Surplus IRIS ratio, with Gross Premium adjusted... formulated by FCIC and is calculated the same as the One-Year Change to Surplus IRIS ratio but for a...

  7. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulatory Information System (IRIS) ratios found in §§ 400.170(d)(1)(ii) and 400.170(d)(2) (i), (ii), (iii...)(1)(i) is calculated the same as the Gross Premium to Surplus IRIS ratio, with Gross Premium adjusted... formulated by FCIC and is calculated the same as the One-Year Change to Surplus IRIS ratio but for a...

  8. Precision Adjustable Liquid Regulator (ALR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, R.; Parker, M.

    2004-10-01

    A passive mechanical regulator has been developed for the control of fuel or oxidizer flow to a 450N class bipropellant engine for use on commercial and interplanetary spacecraft. There are several potential benefits to the propulsion system, depending on mission requirements and spacecraft design. This system design enables more precise control of main engine mixture ratio and inlet pressure, and simplifies the pressurization system by transferring the function of main engine flow rate control from the pressurization/propellant tank assemblies, to a single component, the ALR. This design can also reduce the thermal control requirements on the propellant tanks, avoid costly Qualification testing of biprop engines for missions with more stringent requirements, and reduce the overall propulsion system mass and power usage. In order to realize these benefits, the ALR must meet stringent design requirements. The main advantage of this regulator over other units available in the market is that it can regulate about its nominal set point to within +/-0.85%, and change its regulation set point in flight +/-4% about that nominal point. The set point change is handled actively via a stepper motor driven actuator, which converts rotary into linear motion to affect the spring preload acting on the regulator. Once adjusted to a particular set point, the actuator remains in its final position unpowered, and the regulator passively maintains outlet pressure. The very precise outlet regulation pressure is possible due to new technology developed by Moog, Inc. which reduces typical regulator mechanical hysteresis to near zero. The ALR requirements specified an outlet pressure set point range from 225 to 255 psi, and equivalent water flow rates required were in the 0.17 lb/sec range. The regulation output pressure is maintained at +/-2 psi about the set point from a P (delta or differential pressure) of 20 to over 100 psid. Maximum upstream system pressure was specified at 320 psi

  9. Association between genetic taste sensitivity, 2D:4D ratio, dental caries prevalence, and salivary flow rate in 6-14-year-old children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Chintamaneni Raja; Radhika, Doppalapudi; Prabhat, Mpv; Bhavana, Sujana mulk; Sai Madhavi, Nallamilli

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between genetic taste sensitivity, dietary preferences and salivary flow rate in 6‒14-year-old children for identification of individuals at higher risk of developing dental caries. Methods. A total of 500 children 6‒14 years of age, of both genders, who reported to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, were included. Propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out and the subjects whose perception was bitter were grouped as tasters, whereas those who were unable to perceive any taste were grouped as non-tasters. The 2D:4D ratio was obtained by measuring the length ratio of index finger to ring finger with the help of a digital Vernier caliper. Evaluation of dietary preferences was carried out using a 24-hour dietary recall and accordingly they were categorized as sweet likers and dislikers. The salivary flow rate was estimated by collecting unstimulated saliva by spitting method. Data were analyzed with Student’s t-test and chi-squared test. Results. The results suggested a positive relation between low digit ratio (2D:4D), non-tasters, sweet likers and high caries index among the participants with a highly significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.000). Tasters had high mean of USSR (0.48) than non-tasters (0.29), which was statistically significant. Conclusion. The present research revealed a positive correlation between all the parameters evaluated. Therefore an individual considered as non-taster by PROP was a sweet liker with low 2D:4D ratio, reduced salivary flow rate and high caries index.

  10. Association between genetic taste sensitivity, 2D:4D ratio, dental caries prevalence, and salivary flow rate in 6-14-year-old children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Chintamaneni Raja; Radhika, Doppalapudi; Prabhat, Mpv; Bhavana, Sujana mulk; Sai Madhavi, Nallamilli

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between genetic taste sensitivity, dietary preferences and salivary flow rate in 6‒14-year-old children for identification of individuals at higher risk of developing dental caries. Methods. A total of 500 children 6‒14 years of age, of both genders, who reported to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, were included. Propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out and the subjects whose perception was bitter were grouped as tasters, whereas those who were unable to perceive any taste were grouped as non-tasters. The 2D:4D ratio was obtained by measuring the length ratio of index finger to ring finger with the help of a digital Vernier caliper. Evaluation of dietary preferences was carried out using a 24-hour dietary recall and accordingly they were categorized as sweet likers and dislikers. The salivary flow rate was estimated by collecting unstimulated saliva by spitting method. Data were analyzed with Student’s t-test and chi-squared test. Results. The results suggested a positive relation between low digit ratio (2D:4D), non-tasters, sweet likers and high caries index among the participants with a highly significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.000). Tasters had high mean of USSR (0.48) than non-tasters (0.29), which was statistically significant. Conclusion. The present research revealed a positive correlation between all the parameters evaluated. Therefore an individual considered as non-taster by PROP was a sweet liker with low 2D:4D ratio, reduced salivary flow rate and high caries index. PMID:27651879

  11. Association between genetic taste sensitivity, 2D:4D ratio, dental caries prevalence, and salivary flow rate in 6-14-year-old children: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chintamaneni Raja; Radhika, Doppalapudi; Prabhat, Mpv; Bhavana, Sujana Mulk; Sai Madhavi, Nallamilli

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between genetic taste sensitivity, dietary preferences and salivary flow rate in 6‒14-year-old children for identification of individuals at higher risk of developing dental caries. Methods. A total of 500 children 6‒14 years of age, of both genders, who reported to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, were included. Propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out and the subjects whose perception was bitter were grouped as tasters, whereas those who were unable to perceive any taste were grouped as non-tasters. The 2D:4D ratio was obtained by measuring the length ratio of index finger to ring finger with the help of a digital Vernier caliper. Evaluation of dietary preferences was carried out using a 24-hour dietary recall and accordingly they were categorized as sweet likers and dislikers. The salivary flow rate was estimated by collecting unstimulated saliva by spitting method. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and chi-squared test. Results. The results suggested a positive relation between low digit ratio (2D:4D), non-tasters, sweet likers and high caries index among the participants with a highly significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.000). Tasters had high mean of USSR (0.48) than non-tasters (0.29), which was statistically significant. Conclusion. The present research revealed a positive correlation between all the parameters evaluated. Therefore an individual considered as non-taster by PROP was a sweet liker with low 2D:4D ratio, reduced salivary flow rate and high caries index. PMID:27651879

  12. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  13. Inexplicably female-biased sex ratios in Melittobia wasps.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun; Kamimura, Yoshitaka; West, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    The sex ratio behavior of parasitoid wasps in the genus Melittobia is scandalous. In contrast to the prediction of Hamilton's local mate competition theory, and the behavior of numerous other species, their extremely female-biased sex ratios (1-5% males) change little in response to the number of females that lay eggs on a patch. We examined the mating structure and fitness consequences of adjusting the sex ratio in M. australica and found that (1) the rate of inbreeding did not differ from that expected with random mating within each patch; (2) the fitness of females that produced less female-biased sex ratios (10 or 20% males) was greater than that of females who produced the sex ratio normally observed in M. australica. These results suggest that neither assortative mating nor asymmetrical competition between males can explain the extreme sex ratios. More generally, the finding that the sex ratios produced by females led to a decrease in their fitness suggests that the existing theory fails to capture a key aspect of the natural history of Melittobia, and emphasizes the importance of examining the fitness consequences of different sex ratio strategies, not only whether observed sex ratios correlate with theoretical predictions.

  14. The ratio of growth differentiation factor 9: bone morphogenetic protein 15 mRNA expression is tightly co-regulated and differs between species over a wide range of ovulation rates.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Janet L; McNatty, Kenneth P

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the species-specific ovulation-rate phenotypes may be influenced by differences in the expression levels of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) mRNA and protein. The aim of this study was to compare GDF9 and BMP15 mRNA levels in individual denuded oocytes (DO) from a range of single (i.e. cow, red deer), single-to-triple (i.e. sheep) and high (i.e. pig, mouse, rat) ovulation-rate species. Compared to all other species studied, GDF9 mRNA levels were lower in DO of cows and deer, whilst BMP15 levels were highest in DO of pigs. There was no detectable expression of either GDF9 or BMP15 mRNA in CC from any species. The ratio of GDF9:BMP15 mRNA expression was highly correlated (R(2)>0.80) within each species but differed markedly between species (P<0.01). Thus, we conclude that the ratio of GDF9:BMP15 mRNA is species-specific across a wide range of ovulation-rate phenotypes.

  15. THE HIDDEN 'AGN MAIN SEQUENCE': EVIDENCE FOR A UNIVERSAL BLACK HOLE ACCRETION TO STAR FORMATION RATE RATIO SINCE z {approx} 2 PRODUCING AN M{sub BH}-M{sub *} RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Bethermin, M.; Elbaz, D.; Juneau, S.; Pannella, M.; Sargent, M. T.; Hickox, R. C.

    2012-07-10

    Using X-ray stacking analyses we estimate the average amounts of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth taking place in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2 as a function of galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}). We find that the average SMBH growth rate follows remarkably similar trends with M{sub *} and redshift as the average star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies (i.e., M-dot{sub BH} {proportional_to} M{sub *}{sup 0.86{+-}0.39} for the z {approx} 1 sample and M-dot{sub BH} {proportional_to} M{sub *}{sup 1.05{+-}0.36} for the z {approx} 2 sample). It follows that the ratio of SMBH growth rate to SFR is (1) flat with respect to M{sub *}, (2) not evolving with redshift, and (3) close to the ratio required to maintain/establish an SMBH to stellar mass ratio of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3} as also inferred from today's M{sub BH}-M{sub Bulge} relationship. We interpret this as evidence that SMBHs have, on average, grown in step with their host galaxies since at least z {approx} 2, irrespective of host galaxy mass and active galactic nucleus triggering mechanism. As such, we suggest that the same secular processes that drive the bulk of star formation are also responsible for the majority of SMBH growth. From this, we speculate that it is the availability of gas reservoirs that regulate both cosmological SMBH growth and star formation.

  16. Rate constants and branching ratios for the dissociative recombination of C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} and C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, M.; Ehlerding, A.; Geppert, W.D.; Hellberg, F.; Kalhori, S.; Thomas, R.D.; Djuric, N.; Oesterdahl, F.; Angelova, G.; Semaniak, J.; Novotny, O.; Arnold, S.T.; Viggiano, A.A.

    2005-04-15

    Product branching ratios and thermal rate coefficients for the dissociative recombination of C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} and C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +} have been measured in the ion storage ring CRYRING. The results for C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} are believed to be slightly more accurate than those obtained earlier for C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +}. Only the C-C bond breaking channels could be measured for C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +} and were found to be in excellent agreement with earlier data.

  17. SLIT ADJUSTMENT CLAMP

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, K.R.

    1959-07-01

    An electrode support which permits accurate alignment and adjustment of the electrode in a plurality of planes and about a plurality of axes in a calutron is described. The support will align the slits in the electrode with the slits of an ionizing chamber so as to provide for the egress of ions. The support comprises an insulator, a leveling plate carried by the insulator and having diametrically opposed attaching screws screwed to the plate and the insulator and diametrically opposed adjusting screws for bearing against the insulator, and an electrode associated with the plate for adjustment therewith.

  18. Risk Adjustment and the Assessment of Disparities in Dialysis Mortality Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, John; Wolfe, Robert; Bell, Sarah; Sun, Rena; Messana, Joseph; Shearon, Tempie; Ashby, Valarie; Padilla, Robin; Zhang, Min; Turenne, Marc; Pearson, Jeffrey; Dahlerus, Claudia; Li, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) reported by Medicare compare mortality at individual dialysis facilities with the national average, and are currently adjusted for race. However, whether the adjustment for race obscures or clarifies disparities in quality of care for minority groups is unknown. Cox model-based SMRs were computed with and without adjustment for patient race for 5920 facilities in the United States during 2010. The study population included virtually all patients treated with dialysis during this period. Without race adjustment, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had better survival outcomes; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had overall mortality rates approximately 7% lower than expected. After adjusting for within-facility racial differences, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had poorer survival outcomes among black and non-black patients; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had mortality rates approximately 6% worse than expected. In conclusion, accounting for within-facility racial differences in the computation of SMR helps to clarify disparities in quality of health care among patients with ESRD. The adjustment that accommodates within-facility comparisons is key, because it could also clarify relationships between patient characteristics and health care provider outcomes in other settings.

  19. Negative Control Outcomes and the Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, DB; Keil, A; Tchetgen, Tchetgen E; Cooper, GS

    2016-01-01

    In occupational cohort mortality studies, epidemiologists often compare the observed number of deaths in the cohort to the expected number obtained by multiplying person-time accrued in the study cohort by the mortality rate in an external reference population. Interpretation of the result may be difficult due to non-comparability of the occupational cohort and reference population. We describe an approach to estimate an adjusted standardized mortality ratio (aSMR) to control for bias due to unmeasured differences between the occupational cohort and the reference population. The approach draws on methods developed for the use of negative control outcomes. Conditions necessary for unbiased estimation are described, as well as looser conditions necessary for bias reduction. The approach is illustrated using data on bladder cancer mortality among male Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. The SMR for bladder cancer was elevated among hourly-paid males (SMR=1.90; 1.27, 2.72) but not among monthly-paid males (SMR=0.96; 0.67, 1.33). After indirect adjustment using the proposed approach, the mortality ratios were similar in magnitude among hourly- and monthly-paid men (aSMR=2.22; 1.52, 3.24; and, aSMR=1.99; 1.43, 2.76, respectively). The proposed adjusted SMR offers a complement to typical standardized mortality ratio analyses. PMID:26172862

  20. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  1. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  2. An estimate of hydrothermal fluid residence times and vent chimney growth rates based on 210Pb Pb ratios and mineralogic studies of sulfides dredged from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadko, D.; Koski, R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Bouse, R.

    1985-01-01

    The 210Pb Pb ratios across two sulfide samples dredged from the Juan de Fuca Ridge are used to estimate the growth rate of the sulfide material and the residence time of the hydrothermal fluid within the oceanic crust from the onset of basalt alteration. 210Pb is added to the hydrothermal fluid by two processes: (1) high-temperature alteration of basalt and (2) if the residence time of the fluid is on the order of the 22.3-year half-life of 210Pb, by in-situ growth from 222Rn (Krishnaswami and Turekian, 1982). Stable lead is derived only from the alteration of basalt. The 210Pb Pb ratio across one sample was ??? 0.5 dpm/10-6 g Pb, and across the other it was ??? 0.4 dpm/10-6 g Pb. These values are quite close to the 238U Pb ratios of basalts from the area, suggesting that the residence time of the hydrothermal fluid from the onset of basalt alteration is appreciably less than the mean life of 210Pb, i.e., the time required for ingrowth from the radon. An apparent growth rate of 1.2 cm/yr is derived from the slope of the 210Pb Pb curve for one of the samples. This is consistent with its mineralogy and texture which suggest an accretionary pattern of development. There is no obvious sequential growth pattern, and virtually no gradient in 210Pb Pb across the second sample. This is consistent with alteration of the original 210Pb Pb distribution by extensive remobilization reactions which are inferred from the mineralogic and textural relationships of the sample. ?? 1985.

  3. Progressive Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Peter R.; Posadas-Sanchez, Diana; Johansen, Espen Borgå; Thrailkill, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pigeons’ pecks produced grain under progressive ratio (PR) schedules, whose response requirements increased systematically within sessions. Experiment 1 compared arithmetic (AP) and geometric (GP) progressions. Response rates increased as a function of the component ratio requirement, then decreased linearly (AP) or asymptotically (GP). Experiment 2 found the linear decrease in AP rates to be relatively independent of step size. Experiment 3 showed pausing to be controlled by the prior component length, which predicted the differences between PR and regressive ratio schedules found in Experiment 4. When the longest component ratios were signaled by different key colors, rates at moderate ratios increased, demonstrating control by forthcoming context. Models for response rate and pause duration described performance on AP schedules; GP schedules required an additional parameter representing the contextual reinforcement. PMID:19159161

  4. 75 FR 4592 - January 2010 Pay Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... INFORMATION: On December 23, 2009, the President signed Executive Order 13525 (74 FR 69231), which implemented...: The President adjusted the rates of basic pay and locality payments for certain categories of Federal... authorized to receive locality payments. Executive Order 13525 establishes the range of rates of basic...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt....

  6. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt....

  7. Physiological adjustment to salt stress in Jatropha curcas is associated with accumulation of salt ions, transport and selectivity of K+, osmotic adjustment and K+/Na+ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, E N; Silveira, J A G; Rodrigues, C R F; Viégas, R A

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed the capacity of Jatropha curcas to physiologically adjust to salinity. Seedlings were exposed to increasing NaCl concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100 mm) for 15 days. Treatment without NaCl was adopted as control. Shoot dry weight was strongly reduced by NaCl, reaching values of 35% to 65% with 25 to 100 mm NaCl. The shoot/root ratio was only affected with 100 mm NaCl. Relative water content (RWC) increased only with 100 mm NaCl, while electrolyte leakage (EL) was much enhanced with 50 mm NaCl. The Na(+) transport rate to the shoot was more affected with 50 and 100 mm NaCl. In parallel, Cl(-) transport rate increased with 75 and 100 mm NaCl, while K(+) transport rate fell from 50 mm to 100 mm NaCl. In roots, Na(+) and Cl(-) transport rates fell slightly only in 50 mm (to Na(+)) and 50 and 100 mm (to Cl(-)) NaCl, while K(+) transport rate fell significantly with increasing NaCl. In general, our data demonstrate that J. curcas seedlings present changes in key physiological processes that allow this species to adjust to salinity. These responses are related to accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and roots, K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis, transport of K(+) and selectivity (K-Na) in roots, and accumulation of organic solutes contributing to osmotic adjustment of the species. PMID:25865670

  8. 42 CFR 419.43 - Adjustments to national program payment and beneficiary copayment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Payment adjustment for certain cancer hospitals.—(1) General rule. CMS provides for a payment adjustment... (PCR) before the cancer hospital payment adjustment (as determined by the Secretary at cost report...-cost ratio (PCR) before the cancer hospital payment adjustment (as determined by the Secretary at...

  9. Simple, Internally Adjustable Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Valve containing simple in-line, adjustable, flow-control orifice made from ordinary plumbing fitting and two allen setscrews. Construction of valve requires only simple drilling, tapping, and grinding. Orifice installed in existing fitting, avoiding changes in rest of plumbing.

  10. Self Adjusting Sunglasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Corning Glass Works' Serengeti Driver sunglasses are unique in that their lenses self-adjust and filter light while suppressing glare. They eliminate more than 99% of the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. The frames are based on the NASA Anthropometric Source Book.

  11. Rural to Urban Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Jane A.

    Personal interviews with 100 former farm operators living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, were conducted in an attempt to understand the nature of the adjustment process caused by migration from rural to urban surroundings. Requirements for inclusion in the study were that respondents had owned or operated a farm for at least 3 years, had left their…

  12. Self adjusting inclinometer

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    An inclinometer utilizing synchronous demodulation for high resolution and electronic offset adjustment provides a wide dynamic range without any moving components. A device encompassing a tiltmeter and accompanying electronic circuitry provides quasi-leveled tilt sensors that detect highly resolved tilt change without signal saturation.

  13. 12 CFR 615.5210 - Risk-adjusted assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Capital Adequacy § 615.5210 Risk-adjusted assets. (a... comprises “risk-adjusted assets,” the denominator for computation of the permanent capital ratio. (b... institution must deduct from capital and assets the face amount of the position (dollar-for-dollar...

  14. Negative Control Outcomes and the Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Keil, Alexander P; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Cooper, Glinda

    2015-09-01

    In occupational cohort mortality studies, epidemiologists often compare the observed number of deaths in the cohort to the expected number obtained by multiplying person-time accrued in the study cohort by the mortality rate in an external reference population. Interpretation of the result may be difficult due to noncomparability of the occupational cohort and reference population with respect to unmeasured risk factors for the outcome of interest. We describe an approach to estimate an adjusted standardized mortality ratio (aSMR) to control for such bias. The approach draws on methods developed for the use of negative control outcomes. Conditions necessary for unbiased estimation are described, as well as looser conditions necessary for bias reduction. The approach is illustrated using data on bladder cancer mortality among male Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. The SMR for bladder cancer was elevated among hourly-paid males (SMR = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3, 2.7) but not among monthly-paid males (SMR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.67, 1.3). After indirect adjustment using the proposed approach, the mortality ratios were similar in magnitude among hourly- and monthly-paid men (aSMR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 3.2; and, aSMR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4, 2.8, respectively). The proposed adjusted SMR offers a complement to typical SMR analyses. PMID:26172862

  15. Negative Control Outcomes and the Analysis of Standardized Mortality Ratios.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Keil, Alexander P; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Cooper, Glinda

    2015-09-01

    In occupational cohort mortality studies, epidemiologists often compare the observed number of deaths in the cohort to the expected number obtained by multiplying person-time accrued in the study cohort by the mortality rate in an external reference population. Interpretation of the result may be difficult due to noncomparability of the occupational cohort and reference population with respect to unmeasured risk factors for the outcome of interest. We describe an approach to estimate an adjusted standardized mortality ratio (aSMR) to control for such bias. The approach draws on methods developed for the use of negative control outcomes. Conditions necessary for unbiased estimation are described, as well as looser conditions necessary for bias reduction. The approach is illustrated using data on bladder cancer mortality among male Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. The SMR for bladder cancer was elevated among hourly-paid males (SMR = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3, 2.7) but not among monthly-paid males (SMR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.67, 1.3). After indirect adjustment using the proposed approach, the mortality ratios were similar in magnitude among hourly- and monthly-paid men (aSMR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 3.2; and, aSMR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4, 2.8, respectively). The proposed adjusted SMR offers a complement to typical SMR analyses.

  16. Age-adjusted dengue haemorrhagic fever morbidity in Thailand 1983-1987.

    PubMed

    Kitayaporn, D; Singhasivanon, P; Vasuvat, C

    1989-06-01

    Age-adjusted morbidity rates of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in Thailand during the period 1983-1987 were analysed. The 1983 data were used as standard baseline rates. The age-adjusted rates showed increasing trend in the disease morbidity, i.e., 60.2, 138.2, 159.6, 55.2 and 344.7 (per 100,000 capita) respectively. These rates were consistently higher than the crude rates. The Standardised Morbidity Ratios (SMRs) as compared with the baseline 1983 were 1.00, 2.30, 2.65, 0.92 and 5.73 respectively. Regional comparisons revealed annual increases in Bangkok areas, other Central provinces, the North and the Northeast with fluctuations observed in the South. The epidemic was most of the time higher in the Central provinces other than Bangkok areas. The authors suggest that age-adjusted rates (or possibly sex) should be applied in the study of DHF morbidity data, since there were discrepancies in the age distribution among different regions of the country.

  17. Transitional and steady-state choice behavior under an adjusting-delay schedule.

    PubMed

    Torres, L Valencia; Araújo, S da Costa; Sanchez, C M Olarte; Body, S; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E

    2011-01-01

    Twelve rats made repeated choices on an adjusting-delay schedule between a smaller reinforcer (A) that was delivered immediately after a response and a larger reinforcer (B) that was delivered after a delay which increased or decreased by 20% depending on the subject's choices in successive blocks of trials. In two phases of the experiment (100 sessions and 40 sessions), reinforcer sizes were selected which enabled theoretical parameters expressing the rate of delay discounting and sensitivity to reinforcer size to be estimated from the ratio of the indifference delays obtained in the two phases. Indifference delays, calculated from adjusting delays in the last 10 sessions of each phase, were shorter when the sizes of A and B were 14 and 25 µl of a 0.6 M sucrose solution than when they were 25 and 100 µl of the same solution. The ratio of the indifference delays was significantly smaller than that predicted on the basis of an assumed linear relation between reinforcer size and instantaneous reinforcer value, consistent with a previous proposal that this relation may be hyperbolic in form. Estimates of the rate of delay discounting based on the ratio of the two indifference delays (mean, 0.08 s(-1)) were similar to values obtained previously using different intertemporal choice protocols. Estimates of the size-sensitivity parameter (mean 113 µl) were similar to estimates recently derived from performance on progressive-ratio schedules. In both phases of the experiment, adjusting delays in successive blocks of trials were analyzed using the Fourier transform. The power spectrum obtained from individual rats had a dominant frequency that corresponded to a period of oscillation of the adjusting delay between 30 and 100 trial blocks (mean, 78). Power in the dominant frequency band was highest in the early sessions of the first phase and declined with extended training. It is suggested that this experimental protocol may have utility in neurobehavioral studies of

  18. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  19. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1982-09-14

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  20. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1980-01-15

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  1. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1982-09-07

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  2. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  3. The {sup 18}O:{sup 16}O of dissolved oxygen in rivers and lakes in the Amazon Basin: Determining the ratio of respiration to photosynthesis rates in freshwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Quay, P.D.; Wilbur, D.O.; Richey, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    The concentration and {sup 18}O:{sup 16}O ratio of dissolved oxygen were measured for 23 rivers and lakes of the Amazon Basin during 1988, 1990, and 1991. With only two exceptions, the rivers and lakes had dissolved oxygen concentrations that were at 20-90% of atmospheric saturation levels. The {delta}{sup 18}O of the dissolved oxygen ranged from 15 to 30% (vs. SMOW). The {delta}{sup 18}O for the lakes were the lowest at 15-23%. {delta}{sup 18}O < 24.2{per_thousand} (the atmospheric equilibrium value) are the result of photosynthetic oxygen input. The {delta}{sup 18}O of the rivers, in contrast, ranged from 24 to 30{per_thousand} > 24.2{per_thousand} resulted from respiration. Despite this clear difference between the {delta}{sup 18}O for rivers and lakes, these water bodies had similar levels of oxygen undersaturation. The {delta}{sup 18}O and dissolved oxygen concentrations are used to determine the ratio of community respiration (R) to gross photosynthesis (P) rates. R:P varied between {approximately}1 and 1.5 for lakes and between 1.5 and 4 for rivers. For all rivers and lakes, the measured {delta}{sup 18}O indicated the presence of photosynthetically produced oxygen, with the highest proportion occurring in lakes. The {delta}{sup 18}O of dissolved oxygen is a unique tracer of photosynthetic oxygen and provides, through a determination of R:P, a means of quantifying the heterotrophic state of freshwaters. 29 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. The Association of State Rate Review Authority with Health Insurance Premiums.

    PubMed

    Ticse, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    Key findings. (1) Adjusted premiums in the individual market in states with prior approval authority combined with loss ratio requirements were lower in 2010-2013 than premiums in states with no rate review authority or file-and-use regulations only. (2) Adjusted premiums declined modestly in prior approval states while premiums increased in states with no rate review authority or with file-and-use regulations only. (3) The findings suggest that states with prior approval authority and loss ratio requirements constrained increases in health insurance premiums. PMID:26470403

  5. Transition state theory thermal rate constants and RRKM-based branching ratios for the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction based on multi-state and multi-reference ab initio calculations of interest for the Titan's chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Chanda-Malis; Zvereva-Loëte, Natalia; Scribano, Yohann; Bussery-Honvault, Béatrice

    2012-10-30

    Multireference single and double configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations including Davidson (+Q) or Pople (+P) corrections have been conducted in this work for the reactants, products, and extrema of the doublet ground state potential energy surface involved in the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction. Such highly correlated ab initio calculations are then compared with previous PMP4, CCSD(T), W1, and DFT/B3LYP studies. Large relative differences are observed in particular for the transition state in the entrance channel resolving the disagreement between previous ab initio calculations. We confirm the existence of a small but positive potential barrier (3.86 ± 0.84 kJ mol(-1) (MR-AQCC) and 3.89 kJ mol(-1) (MRCI+P)) in the entrance channel of the title reaction. The correlation is seen to change significantly the energetic position of the two minima and five saddle points of this system together with the dissociation channels but not their relative order. The influence of the electronic correlation into the energetic of the system is clearly demonstrated by the thermal rate constant evaluation and it temperature dependance by means of the transition state theory. Indeed, only MRCI values are able to reproduce the experimental rate constant of the title reaction and its behavior with temperature. Similarly, product branching ratios, evaluated by means of unimolecular RRKM theory, confirm the NH production of Umemoto et al., whereas previous works based on less accurate ab initio calculations failed. We confirm the previous findings that the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction proceeds via an insertion-dissociation mechanism and that the dominant product channels are CH(2)NH + H and CH(3) + NH.

  6. Role of Osmotic Adjustment in Plant Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gebre, G.M.

    2001-01-11

    clones (P. trichocurpa Torr. & Gray x P: deltoides Bartr., TD and P. deltoides x P. nigra L., DN), we determined the TD clone, which was more productive during the first three years, had slightly lower osmotic potential than the DN clone, and also indicated a small osmotic adjustment compared with the DN hybrid. However, the productivity differences were negligible by the fifth growing season. In a separate study with several P. deltoides clones, we did not observe a consistent relationship between growth and osmotic adjustment. Some clones that had low osmotic potential and osmotic adjustment were as productive as another clone that had high osmotic potential. The least productive clone also had low osmotic potential and osmotic adjustment. The absence of a correlation may have been partly due to the fact that all clones were capable of osmotic adjustment and had low osmotic potential. In a study involving an inbred three-generation TD F{sub 2} pedigree (family 331), we did not observe a correlation between relative growth rate and osmotic potential or osmotic adjustment. However, when clones that exhibited osmotic adjustment were analyzed, there was a negative correlation between growth and osmotic potential, indicating clones with lower osmotic potential were more productive. This was observed only in clones that were exposed to drought. Although the absolute osmotic potential varied by growing environment, the relative ranking among progenies remains generally the same, suggesting that osmotic potential is genetically controlled. We have identified a quantitative trait locus for osmotic potential in another three-generation TD F{sub 2} pedigree (family 822). Unlike the many studies in agricultural crops, most of the forest tree studies were not based on plants exposed to severe stress to determine the role of osmotic adjustment. Future studies should consider using clones that are known to be productive but have contrasting osmotic adjustment capability as well as

  7. Social Phobia and Difficulties in Occupational Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruch, Monroe A.; Fallon, Melissa; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines whether social phobics differ from nonanxious controls in occupational adjustment. Results indicated that social phobics were underemployed and believed that their supervisor would rate them as less dependable. Social phobics were more anxious when starting their current job but did not differ in job satisfaction. Discusses results…

  8. The Second Child: Family Transition and Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Robert B., Jr.

    Synthesizing the methodologies of developmental psychology, family sociology, and systems theory, this 15-month longitudinal study examined familial role adjustments in 41 suburban families after the birth of a second child. Using interviews, observations, and rating scales, the study examined families during the third trimester of the second…

  9. Effect of Wound Classification on Risk-Adjustment in American College of Surgeons NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Mila H.; Cohen, Mark E.; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Latus, Melissa S.; Scholl, Lisa M.; Schwab, Bradley J.; Byrd, Claudia M.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Hall, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical wound classification has been used in risk-adjustment models. However, it can be subjective and potentially improperly bias hospital quality comparisons. The objective is to examine the effect of wound classification on hospital performance risk-adjustment models. Study Design Retrospective review of the 2011 ACS NSQIP database was conducted for wound classification categories: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. To assess the influence of wound classification on risk-adjustment, two models were developed for each outcome: one including and one excluding wound classification. For each model, hospital postoperative complications were estimated using hierarchical multivariable regression methods. Absolute changes in hospital rank, correlations of odds-ratios, and outlier status agreement between models were examined. Results Of the 442,149 cases performed in 315 hospitals: 53.6% were classified as clean; 34.2% clean/contaminated; 6.7% contaminated; and 5.5% dirty/infected. The surgical site infection (SSI) rate was highest in dirty/infected (8.5%) and lowest in clean (1.8%) cases. For overall SSI, the absolute change in risk-adjusted hospital performance rank between models including vs. excluding wound classification was minimal (mean 4.5 out of 315 positions). The correlations between odds ratios of the two performance models were nearly perfect (R=0.9976, P<0.0001), and outlier status agreement was excellent (Kappa=0.9508, P<0.0001). Similar findings were observed in models of subgroups of SSI and other postoperative outcomes. Conclusions In circumstances where alternate information is available for risk-adjustment, there appear to be minimal differences in performance models that include vs. exclude wound classification. Therefore, ACS NSQIP is critically evaluating the continued use of wound classification in hospital performance risk-adjustment models. PMID:25053222

  10. Subsea adjustable choke valves

    SciTech Connect

    Cyvas, M.K. )

    1989-08-01

    With emphasis on deepwater wells and marginal offshore fields growing, the search for reliable subsea production systems has become a high priority. A reliable subsea adjustable choke is essential to the realization of such a system, and recent advances are producing the degree of reliability required. Technological developments have been primarily in (1) trim material (including polycrystalline diamond), (2) trim configuration, (3) computer programs for trim sizing, (4) component materials, and (5) diver/remote-operated-vehicle (ROV) interfaces. These five facets are overviewed and progress to date is reported. A 15- to 20-year service life for adjustable subsea chokes is now a reality. Another factor vital to efficient use of these technological developments is to involve the choke manufacturer and ROV/diver personnel in initial system conceptualization. In this manner, maximum benefit can be derived from the latest technology. Major areas of development still required and under way are listed, and the paper closes with a tabulation of successful subsea choke installations in recent years.

  11. Adolescent Mothers' Adjustment to Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Valerie Jarvis; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined adolescent mothers' adjustment to parenting, self-esteem, social support, and perceptions of baby. Subjects (n=52) responded to questionnaires at two time periods approximately six months apart. Mothers with higher self-esteem at Time 1 had better adjustment at Time 2. Adjustment was predicted by Time 2 variables; contact with baby's…

  12. Assessing the Efficacy of Adjustable Moving Averages Using ASEAN-5 Currencies.

    PubMed

    Chan Phooi M'ng, Jacinta; Zainudin, Rozaimah

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the trends in the exchange rate markets of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia (IDR), Malaysia (MYR), the Philippines (PHP), Singapore (SGD), and Thailand (THB)) through the application of dynamic moving average trading systems. This research offers evidence of the usefulness of the time-varying volatility technical analysis indicator, Adjustable Moving Average (AMA') in deciphering trends in these ASEAN-5 exchange rate markets. This time-varying volatility factor, referred to as the Efficacy Ratio in this paper, is embedded in AMA'. The Efficacy Ratio adjusts the AMA' to the prevailing market conditions by avoiding whipsaws (losses due, in part, to acting on wrong trading signals, which generally occur when there is no general direction in the market) in range trading and by entering early into new trends in trend trading. The efficacy of AMA' is assessed against other popular moving-average rules. Based on the January 2005 to December 2014 dataset, our findings show that the moving averages and AMA' are superior to the passive buy-and-hold strategy. Specifically, AMA' outperforms the other models for the United States Dollar against PHP (USD/PHP) and USD/THB currency pairs. The results show that different length moving averages perform better in different periods for the five currencies. This is consistent with our hypothesis that a dynamic adjustable technical indicator is needed to cater for different periods in different markets.

  13. Assessing the Efficacy of Adjustable Moving Averages Using ASEAN-5 Currencies.

    PubMed

    Chan Phooi M'ng, Jacinta; Zainudin, Rozaimah

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the trends in the exchange rate markets of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia (IDR), Malaysia (MYR), the Philippines (PHP), Singapore (SGD), and Thailand (THB)) through the application of dynamic moving average trading systems. This research offers evidence of the usefulness of the time-varying volatility technical analysis indicator, Adjustable Moving Average (AMA') in deciphering trends in these ASEAN-5 exchange rate markets. This time-varying volatility factor, referred to as the Efficacy Ratio in this paper, is embedded in AMA'. The Efficacy Ratio adjusts the AMA' to the prevailing market conditions by avoiding whipsaws (losses due, in part, to acting on wrong trading signals, which generally occur when there is no general direction in the market) in range trading and by entering early into new trends in trend trading. The efficacy of AMA' is assessed against other popular moving-average rules. Based on the January 2005 to December 2014 dataset, our findings show that the moving averages and AMA' are superior to the passive buy-and-hold strategy. Specifically, AMA' outperforms the other models for the United States Dollar against PHP (USD/PHP) and USD/THB currency pairs. The results show that different length moving averages perform better in different periods for the five currencies. This is consistent with our hypothesis that a dynamic adjustable technical indicator is needed to cater for different periods in different markets. PMID:27574972

  14. Assessing the Efficacy of Adjustable Moving Averages Using ASEAN-5 Currencies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the trends in the exchange rate markets of the ASEAN-5 countries (Indonesia (IDR), Malaysia (MYR), the Philippines (PHP), Singapore (SGD), and Thailand (THB)) through the application of dynamic moving average trading systems. This research offers evidence of the usefulness of the time-varying volatility technical analysis indicator, Adjustable Moving Average (AMA′) in deciphering trends in these ASEAN-5 exchange rate markets. This time-varying volatility factor, referred to as the Efficacy Ratio in this paper, is embedded in AMA′. The Efficacy Ratio adjusts the AMA′ to the prevailing market conditions by avoiding whipsaws (losses due, in part, to acting on wrong trading signals, which generally occur when there is no general direction in the market) in range trading and by entering early into new trends in trend trading. The efficacy of AMA′ is assessed against other popular moving-average rules. Based on the January 2005 to December 2014 dataset, our findings show that the moving averages and AMA′ are superior to the passive buy-and-hold strategy. Specifically, AMA′ outperforms the other models for the United States Dollar against PHP (USD/PHP) and USD/THB currency pairs. The results show that different length moving averages perform better in different periods for the five currencies. This is consistent with our hypothesis that a dynamic adjustable technical indicator is needed to cater for different periods in different markets. PMID:27574972

  15. Assessing the necessity of the standardized infection ratio for reporting central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Saman, Daniel M; Kavanagh, Kevin T

    2013-01-01

    This brief article presents results that support the contention that risk adjustment via the standardized infection ratio (SIR) for the reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) may be no more predictive than standard rate adjustments utilizing CLABSIs per central line days (i.e., CLABSI rates). Recent data posted on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Hospital Compare website showed that nearly 70% of 1721 reporting hospitals with at least 1000 central line days had five or fewer infections during 2011. These hospitals had 39.3% of the total central line days and a significantly lower SIR than poorer performing hospitals with six or more CLABSIs (p<0.0001). In addition, 19 hospitals are presented which had central line days between 9000 to over 22,000 that also had zero to three CLABSIs. Some of these hospitals were university referral centers and inner city facilities. There was great variation of CLABSI cases among US hospitals. Evidence is mounting that all hospitals should be able to achieve a near zero incidence of CLABSIs and that these infections may in fact be near 'never events', which begs whether risk adjustment with the SIR is needed and whether it adds more information than does rate adjustment using CLABSI rates.

  16. Age-adjusted recipient pretransplantation telomere length and treatment-related mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Rodrigo T.; Busson, Marc; Abrams, Jeffrey; Adoui, Nadir; Robin, Marie; Larghero, Jérôme; Dhedin, Nathalie; Xhaard, Alienor; Clave, Emmanuel; Charron, Dominique; Toubert, Antoine; Loiseau, Pascale; Socié, Gérard; Young, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    Telomere attrition induces cell senescence and apoptosis. We hypothesized that age-adjusted pretransplantation telomere length might predict treatment-related mortality (TRM) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Between 2000 and 2005, 178 consecutive patients underwent HSCT from HLA-identical sibling donors after myeloablative conditioning regimens, mainly for hematologic malignancies (n = 153). Blood lymphocytes' telomere length was measured by real-time quantitative PCR before HSCT. Age-adjusted pretransplantation telomere lengths were analyzed for correlation with clinical outcomes. After age adjustment, patients' telomere-length distribution was similar among all 4 quartiles except for disease stage. There was no correlation between telomere length and engraftment, GVHD, or relapse. The overall survival was 62% at 5 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 54-70). After a median follow-up of 51 months (range, 1-121 months), 43 patients died because of TRM. The TRM rate inversely correlated with telomere length. TRM in patients in the first (lowest telomere length) quartile was significantly higher than in patients with longer telomeres (P = .017). In multivariate analysis, recipients' age (hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% CI, .0-1.1; P = .0001) and age-adjusted telomere length (hazard ratio, 0.4; 95% CI; 0.2-0.8; P = .01) were independently associated with TRM. In conclusion, age-adjusted recipients' telomere length is an independent biologic marker of TRM after HSCT. PMID:22948043

  17. Adjustment and war bereavement - some considerations.

    PubMed

    Purisman, R; Maoz, B

    1977-03-01

    Forty-seven parents from 25 families who had lost a son in the War of Attrition of 1969-1970 were interviewed in the course of this study. The interviews took place 2-3 years after the bereavement. The purpose of the study was an assessment of personal adjustment of bereaved parents, and an examination of background and behavioural characteristics which might differentiate between parents making a better and less good adjustment to the loss of a son. To this end data were collected via semistructured interviews. Non-objective variables: religiosity, social interpersonal relationships and adjustment were rated by independent judges. Reliability of interjudge agreement ranged from 0-67 to 1-00. Hypotheses were tested using correlation matrices. The hypothesis stating a positive relationship of high religiosity and good adjustment was not confirmed. The results suggest a very significant relationship between good adjustment and level of education (r = 0-668, alpha less than 0-01). Level of education was responsible for most of the variance and thus made impossible an answer regarding the relationship between religiosity and recovery after bereavement. To elucidate religiosity's function in adjustment, control of education level would be necessary. While this was not done in the present study, a further research plan was suggested. The hypothesis stating a positive correlational relationship between adjustment and interpersonal skills as reflected in social contacts and marital relations was confirmed (r = 0-735, r = 0-573, alpha less than 0-01). The findings of this study suggest that individuals who have suffered a severe stress, may gain strength, encouragement and compensation when their life style includes higher educational level and satisfying interactions with other people.

  18. Calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves from harvest age ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Otis, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined results from the first national-scale effort to estimate mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) age ratios and developed a simple, efficient, and generalizable methodology for calibrating estimates. Our method predicted age classes of unknown-age wings based on backward projection of molt distributions from fall harvest collections to preseason banding. We estimated 1) the proportion of late-molt individuals in each age class, and 2) the molt rates of juvenile and adult birds. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated our estimator was minimally biased. We estimated model parameters using 96,811 wings collected from hunters and 42,189 birds banded during preseason from 68 collection blocks in 22 states during the 2005–2007 hunting seasons. We also used estimates to derive a correction factor, based on latitude and longitude of samples, which can be applied to future surveys. We estimated differential vulnerability of age classes to harvest using data from banded birds and applied that to harvest age ratios to estimate population age ratios. Average, uncorrected age ratio of known-age wings for states that allow hunting was 2.25 (SD 0.85) juveniles:adult, and average, corrected ratio was 1.91 (SD 0.68), as determined from harvest age ratios from an independent sample of 41,084 wings collected from random hunters in 2007 and 2008. We used an independent estimate of differential vulnerability to adjust corrected harvest age ratios and estimated the average population age ratio as 1.45 (SD 0.52), a direct measure of recruitment rates. Average annual recruitment rates were highest east of the Mississippi River and in the northwestern United States, with lower rates between. Our results demonstrate a robust methodology for calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves and represent the first large-scale estimates of recruitment for the species. Our methods can be used by managers to correct future harvest survey data to generate recruitment estimates for use in

  19. Models of ratio schedule performance.

    PubMed

    Bizo, L A; Killeen, P R

    1997-07-01

    Predictions of P. R. Killeen's (1994) mathematical principles of reinforcement were tested for responding on ratio reinforcement schedules. The type of response key, the number of sessions per condition, and first vs. second half of a session had negligible effects on responding. Longer reinforcer durations and larger grain types engendered more responding, affecting primarily the parameter alpha (specific activation). Key pecking was faster than treadle pressing, affecting primarily the parameter delta (response time). Longer intertrial intervals led to higher overall response rates and shorter postreinforcement pauses and higher running rates, and ruled out some competing explanations. The treadle data required a distinction between the energetic requirements and rate-limiting properties of extended responses. The theory was extended to predict pause durations and run rates on ratio schedules.

  20. 7 CFR 6.34 - Adjustment of Appendices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adjustment of Appendices. 6.34 Section 6.34 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture IMPORT QUOTAS AND FEES Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing § 6.34 Adjustment of Appendices. (a) Whenever a historical license (Appendix 1) is not issued...