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Sample records for adjuvant arthritis rats

  1. Protective effect of Asarum extract in rats with adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WENQIANG; ZHANG, JUAN; ZHANG, MING; NIE, LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of Asarum extract on rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA) and to determine the underlying mechanism. An AA model was established by injecting Freund’s complete adjuvant into the rats. The degree of toe swelling, arthritis index, spleen index, and the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were measured. In addition, the underlying molecular mechanism was investigated using murine macrophage-derived RAW 264.7 cells. Asarum extract was found to significantly reduce the severity of arthritis by decreasing hind paw swelling, the arthritis index, the spleen index, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 expression levels in plasma. In vitro, Asarum extract inhibited the nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. These results indicate that Asarum extract may be a therapeutic agent for AA and may exert an anti-inflammatory effect by mediating the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:25289073

  2. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  3. Effects and mechanisms of Geniposide on rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Miao-Miao; Wu, Hong; Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Chen, Jin-Yun; Hu, Shun-Li; Shen, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Geniposide (GE), an iridoid glycoside compound, is the major active ingredient of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit which has anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GE on adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats and its possible mechanisms. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with GE at 30, 60 and 120mg/kg from days 18 to 24 after immunization. Lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by MTT. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, IL-4 and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined by ELISA. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phospho-JNK (p-JNK) were detected by Western blot. GE (60, 120mg/kg) significantly relieved the secondary hind paw swelling and arthritis index, along with decreased Th17-cells cytokines and increased Treg-cell cytokines in mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes (MLNL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of AA rats. In addition, GE decreased the expression of p-JNK in MLNL and PBL of AA rats. In vivo study, it was also observed that GE attenuated histopathologic changes of MLN in AA rats. Collectively, GE might exert its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects through inducing Th17 cell immune tolerance and enhancing Treg cell-mediated activities by down-regulating the expression of p-JNK. The mechanisms of GE on JNK signaling in MLNL and PBL may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24583144

  4. Effect of galantamine on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gowayed, Mennatallah A; Refaat, Rowaida; Ahmed, Walid M; El-Abhar, Hanan S

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses cytokine production and macrophage activation, via the interaction of its neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) with the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), present on neurons and inflammatory cells. The present study aimed to verify the potential anti-inflammatory effect of galantamine against experimental arthritis induced in rats. Fourteen days post adjuvant injection, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with three doses of galantamine (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg) or leflunomide (10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks and arthritis progression was assessed by hind paw swelling. Additionally, serum biomarkers, viz., anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (Anti-CCP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Radiological examination of the hind paws was also carried out to evaluate the degree of joint damage. Adjuvant arthritis led to a significant weight loss, marked swelling of the hind paw and alteration in the serum levels of anti-CCP, TNF-α, IL-10 and MCP-1. These alterations were associated with significant radiological changes of the joints. Galantamine, in a dose-dependent manner, reduced significantly all biomarkers of inflammation, with the highest dose showing the best beneficial anti-inflammatory effect that was superior in magnitude to the reference drug leflunomide in most of the studied parameters. In conclusion, these results suggest that galantamine may represent a novel, inexpensive and effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26189022

  5. Effective treatment of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis by celastrol

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, R.; Vidal, B.; Raquel, H.; Neves-Costa, A.; Figueiredo, N.; Gupta, V.; Fonseca, J.E.; Moita, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported an increase in interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-17 levels, and a continuous activation of caspase-1 in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These results suggest that drugs targeting IL-1β regulatory pathways, in addition to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), may constitute promising therapeutic agents in early RA. We have recently used a THP-1 macrophage-like cell line to screen 2320 compounds for those that down-regulate both IL-1β and TNF secretion. Celastrol was one of the most promising therapeutic candidates identified in that study. Our main goal in the present work was to investigate whether administration of celastrol is able to attenuate inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Moreover, since IL-1β is known to play a role in the polarization of Th17 cells, we also investigate whether administration of digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Th17 cells polarization, is able to attenuate inflammation in the same rat model. We found that celastrol administration significantly suppressed joint inflammation. The histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that celastrol-treated rats had a normal joint structure with complete abrogation of the inflammatory infiltrate and cellular proliferation. In contrast, we observed that digoxin administration significantly ameliorated inflammation but only if administrated in the early phase of disease course (after 4 days of disease induction), and it was not efficient at inhibiting the infiltration of immune cells within the joint and in preventing damage. Thus, our results suggest that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties and can constitute a potential anti-inflammatory drug with therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as RA. Furthermore, we find that early inhibition of Th17 cells polarization ameliorates arthritis but it is not as effective as celastrol. PMID:22415021

  6. Suppression and augmentation of rat adjuvant arthritis with monoclonal anti-interferon-gamma antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Wiesenberg, I; Van der Meide, P H; Schellekens, H; Alkan, S

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a monoclonal antibody (MoAb DB-1), which neutralized rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), on the induction and progression of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats induced by intraplantar injection of Freund's complete adjuvant was studied. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with MoAb DB-1 (0.3-5 mg) for various times. Prophylactic treatment with MoAb DB-1, starting 2 days prior to arthritis induction, inhibited oedema in both the injected and non-injected hind paws and delayed joint destruction as shown by radiography. However, despite continued MoAb treatment, the disease progressed. High doses of MoAb DB-1 exacerbated the disease. A control MoAb of the same isotype did not have significant effects on adjuvant arthritis. Therapeutic treatment with the MoAb DB-1 starting 8 days after arthritis induction caused only slight and short-lived inhibitory effects. IFN-gamma appears to be a critical lymphokine for the development of adjuvant arthritis. PMID:12412757

  7. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  8. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism of the heart from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Amanda Caroline; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Amado, Ciomar Aparecida Bersani; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate, in a more extensive way, the oxidative state and parameters related to energy metabolism of the heart tissue of rats using the model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The latter is a model for the human arthritic disease. Measurements were done in the total tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria and cytosolic fraction. The adjuvant-induced arthritis caused several modifications in the oxidative state of the heart which, in general, indicate an increased oxidative stress (+80% reactive oxygen species), protein damage (+53% protein carbonyls) and lipid damage (+63% peroxidation) in the whole tissue. The distribution of these changes over the various cell compartments was frequently unequal. For example, protein carbonyls were increased in the whole tissue and in the cytosol, but not in the mitochondria. No changes in GSH content of the whole tissue were found, but it was increased in the mitochondria (+33%) and decreased in the cytosol (-19%). The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was 77% stimulated by arthritis; the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were diminished by 31, 25 and 35.3%, respectively. In spite of these alterations, no changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity and in the efficiency of energy transduction were found. It can be concluded that the adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats causes oxidative damage to the heart with an unequal intracellular distribution. Compared to the liver and brain the modifications caused by arthritis in the heart are less pronounced on variables such as GSH levels and protein integrity. Possibly this occurs because the antioxidant system of the heart is less impaired by arthritis than that reported for the former tissues. Even so, the modifications caused by arthritis represent an imbalanced situation that probably contributes to the cardiac symptoms of the arthritis disease. PMID:27032477

  9. The influence of simvastatin in rats mandible and femur bone mass under Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Seferos, Nikos; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Kotsiou, Antonia; Rallis, Georgios; Tesseromatis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats has been used widely as a model of rodent arthropathy and polyarthritis followed by osteoporosis, decreased bone formation and increased bone formation. Osteoporosis is characterized by rapid reduce of bone mass affecting more than 100 million people worldwide. Periodontitis a chronic inflammatory, of multifactorian origin disease has been associated with general osteoporosis. Protective bone-specific anabolic and antiresorptive effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have also been evaluated in normal and osteoporotic bone. AIM. The aim of the study was to investigate mandible and femur bone density in Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis rats under the influence of simvastatin. METHODS. Three groups (A, B, C) of 7 Wistar male rats each aged 3 months, (292±48.38 g) were used. A control. Group B and C subjected experimental arthritis via complete Freund's adjuvant injected in right paw. Group C was treated with simvastatin 0.5 mg/kg/daily po 14 days. Femur, mandible were isolated and sizes parameters, biochemical serum findings and BMD were estimated. RESULTS. CFA established by paw diameter, adrenals and spleen weight increase and thymus weight decrease, while biochemical serum findings were also affected. Reduced femur, mandible weight and general bone mass parameters BMD evaluated via DEXA occurred and restored under simvastatin treatment. CONCLUSIONS. CFA induced mandible and femur injuries are repaired by ssimvatatin treatment that could be therapeutically useful.

  10. Free radical scavenging activity of Cleome gynandra L. leaves on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Subramanian, S; Kandaswamy, M

    2005-08-01

    The generation of free radicals has been implicated in the causation of several diseases of known and unknown etiologies such as, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, cancer, etc., and compounds that can scavenge free radicals have great potential in ameliorating these disease processes. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Cleome gynandra leaf extract at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. Oral administration of C. gynandra leaf extract significantly increased the levels of lipid peroxides and activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological observations made on the limb tissue. The presence of biologically active ingredients and vital trace elements in the leaves readily account for free radical scavenging property of C. gynandra. PMID:16132687

  11. Antiarthritic activity of a polyherbal formulation against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Petchi, R. Ramesh; Parasuraman, S.; Vijaya, C.; Gopala Krishna, S. V.; Kumar, M. Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To formulate a polyherbal formulation and evaluate its antiarthritic activity against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Glycosmis pentaphylla, Tridax procumbens, and Mangifera indica are well-known plants available throughout India and they are commonly used for the treatment of various diseases including arthritis. The polyherbal formulation was formulated using the ethanol extracts of the stem bark of G. pentaphylla, whole plant of T. procumbens, and leaves of M. indica. The polyherbal formulation contains the ethanol extracts of G. pentaphylla, T. procumbens, and M. indica in the ratio of 2:2:1. The quality of the finished product was evaluated as per the World Health Organization's guidelines for the quality control of herbal materials. Arthritis was induced in female Wistar rats using Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), and the antiarthritic effect of polyherbal formulation was studied at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg. The effects were compared with those of indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At the end of the study, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological analysis. The radiological examination was carried out before terminating the study. Results: Polyherbal formulation showed significant antiarthritic activity at 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, and this effect was comparable with that of indomethacin. The antiarthritic activity of polyherbal formulation is supported by biochemical and hematological analysis. Conclusion: The polyherbal formulation showed signinicant antiarthritic activity against FCA-induced arthritis in female Wistar rats. PMID:26229343

  12. Evaluation of bone targeting salmon calcitonin analogues in rats developing osteoporosis and adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Krishna H; Asghar, Waheed; Newa, Madhuri; Jamali, Fakhreddin; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of the peptide hormone calcitonin have been used in medicine as biologic drug therapies for decades, to treat pathological conditions of excessive bone turnover, such as osteoporosis, where more bones are removed than replaced during bone remodeling. Osteoporosis and other chronic skeletal diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, exact a substantial and growing toll on aging populations worldwide however they respond poor to synthetic biologic drug therapy, due in part to the rapid half-life of elimination, which for calcitonin is 43 minutes. To address those shortcomings, we have developed and synthesized bone-targeting variants of calcitonin as a targeted drug delivery strategy, by conjugation to bisphosphonate drug bone-seeking functional groups in highly specific reaction conditions. To evaluate their in vivo efficacy, bisphosphonate-mediated bone targeting with PEGylated (polyethylene glycol conjugated) and non-PEGylated salmon calcitonin analogues were synthesized and dose escalation was performed in female rats developing Osteoporosis. The bone-targeting calcitonin analogues were also tested in a separate cohort of male rats developing adjuvant-induced arthritis. Ovariectomized female rats developing Osteoporosis were administered daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 5, 10 and 20 IU/kg of calcitonin for 3 months. Adjuvant arthritis was developed in male rats by administering Mycobacterium butyricum through tail base injection. Daily sub-cutaneous injection of analogues equivalent to 20 IU/kg of calcitonin was administered and the rats were measured for visible signs of inflammation to a 21 day endpoint. In both studies, the effect of drug intervention upon bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by measuring the trabecular bone volume percentage and BMD at the proximal tibial metaphysis using in vivo micro-computed tomography. With dose escalation studies, only bone targeting analogue dosed groups

  13. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  14. Quercetin reduced inflammation and increased antioxidant defense in rat adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardi, C; Bauerova, K; Stringa, B; Kuncirova, V; Slovak, L; Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Bezakova, L; Tedesco, I; Acquaviva, A; Bilotto, S; Russo, G L

    2015-10-01

    Novel therapies for rheumatoid arthritis also include the use of naturally occurring compounds possessing antioxidant properties. In the present work, the effects of oral administration of quercetin were investigated in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. The experimental groups were treated with an oral daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. of quercetin for 28 days. Results indicated that quercetin was able to ameliorate all markers of inflammation and oxidative stress measured. Quercetin lowered levels of interleukin-1β, C-reactive protein, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and restored plasma antioxidant capacity. In addition, quercetin inhibited the enzymatic activity of pro-inflammatory 12/15-lipoxygenase in lung and liver and increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 in joint and lung of arthritic rats. Finally, quercetin inhibited the 2-fold increase of NF-қB activity observed in lung, liver and joint after induction of arthritis. PMID:26297952

  15. Lymphoid abnormalities in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. I. Mitogen responsiveness and lymphokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, S C; Daniels, J F; Wilson, R E; Carlson, R P; Lewis, A J

    1984-01-01

    Lewis rats injected in the hind paw with Mycobacterium butyricum develop a severe polyarthritis which shares certain features in common with rheumatoid arthritis in man. Spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rats with this form of arthritic disease proliferate poorly in vitro in response to concanavalin A (con A), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The splenic hyporesponsiveness appears within four days of M. butyricum injection (three to five days prior to the development of detectable arthritis), reaches a peak 16-22 days following injection, and persists for at least 40 days. Buffalo strain rats injected with M. butyricum do not develop arthritis, and their spleen cells respond normally to con A, PHA, and PWM. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) the synthesis of interleukin 1 (IL-1) by spleen or peritoneal macrophages from arthritic Lewis rats equalled or exceeded that of macrophages from normal rats. In contrast splenic T cells from arthritic rats produced reduced amounts of interleukin 2 (IL-2; T cell growth factor) in response to stimulation with PHA or con A. Moreover, con-A-activated spleen cells from arthritic rats failed to bind IL-2 and to respond to this growth factor with increased 3H-TdR uptake as did normal spleen cells. In-vitro treatment of 'arthritic' cells with 10(-5) M indomethacin did not restore to normal their reduced mitogen responsiveness, and spleen cells from normal and arthritic rats were equally sensitive to the inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on con-A-induced proliferative responses. These results indicate that peripheral lymphoid function is compromised in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and that this functional deficit is mediated by aberrant synthesis of and response to IL-2 by T cells of arthritic animals. PMID:6335388

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects and pharmacokinetics study of geniposide on rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Yun; Wu, Hong; Li, Hui; Hu, Shun-Li; Dai, Miao-miao; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of Geniposide (GE), an iridoid glycoside compound extracted from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats and its pharmacokinetic (PK) basis. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with GE (30, 60 and 120mg/kg) from day 17 to 24 after immunization. Fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) proliferation was assessed by MTT. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 were determined using double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPKs) related proteins in FLS was detected by Western blotting. PK profiles were simultaneously detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in AA rat plasma after oral administration of GE on day 17 after immunization. As a result, GE promoted the recovery of arthritis and inhibited the colonic inflammation damage in AA rats by decreasing the expression level of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, increasing the production of IL-10 and inhibiting the expression of phospho-p38 (p-p38) related proteins in FLS. PK parameters (AUC, Cmax and t1/2) tended to be associated with dosage-related decreasing of efficacy index. PMID:25434608

  17. Adjuvant arthritis 50 years on: The impact of the 1956 article by C. M. Pearson, 'Development of arthritis, periarthritis and periostitis in rats given adjuvants'.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M W

    2007-04-01

    The Science Citation Index (Web of Science) has now accumulated over 700 citations to this report published in Proc Soc exp Biol Med 1956; 91: 95-101, including several in 2006. This memoire is a tribute to its author for revealing the opportunities for so much subsequent research in experimental pharmacology and toxicology. For half a century, the adjuvant disease in rats has enormously aided research on drugs to control arthritis and other chronic inflammatory disorders. The adjuvant also triggers many systemic responses beyond the articular tissues. So we are given simultaneously a window to explore the converse phenomenon: namely, how a chronic disease can affect drug efficacy and toxicity. This phenomenon has been variously described as patho-pharmacodynamics, conditional pharmacology/toxicology and 'a right nuisance' ! Nevertheless it has enormous heuristic value for clinical therapeutics.

  18. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  19. Vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated serum homocysteine levels in rat adjuvant arthritis: effect of vitamin E administration.

    PubMed

    Can, Cenk; Cinar, Mehtap G; Koşay, Sezen; Evinç, Akgün

    2002-06-14

    We aimed to study the alterations in serum homocysteine levels and endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxant responses in adjuvant-induced arthritis of the rat and to determine the effects of vitamin E administration on these changes. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant into the paw. 26 days after the induction of arthritis, serum homocysteine levels and relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodiumnitroprusside in thoracic aortas were evaluated. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine were decreased in aortas from arthritic rats, whereas the responses to sodiumnitroprusside were not significantly different when compared to the aortas from control rats. A significant increase was observed in serum homocysteine levels of the arthritic rats in comparison to those of controls. Vitamin E administration (100 mg/kg/day, i.m. for 26 days) to arthritic rats resulted in a significant increase in endothelium-dependent aortic responses to acetylcholine and a significant decrease in serum homocysteine levels with respect to the non-treated arthritic rats. However, in healthy rats, vitamin E treatment significantly decreased the acetylcholine-induced relaxant responses. We conclude that adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat is associated with increased serum homocysteine levels and this is accompanied by a reduction in endothelium-dependent vascular responses in the thoracic aortas. Vitamin E treatment leads to normalization of the increased serum homocysteine levels and improves the endothelium-dependent relaxant responses in this experimental model. PMID:12044840

  20. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-01-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity. PMID:892904

  1. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-08-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity.

  2. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of lymphocyte activation in serum from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Binderup, L; Bramm, E; Arrigoni-Martelli, E

    1978-01-01

    Serum from adjuvant arthritic rats inhibits the concanavalin A- (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide-induced stimulation of lymph node cells, leaving the basal and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation unaffected. Con A-stimulated 3H-thymidine uptake is also inhibited in rat spleen and peripheral blood lymphocytes and in dog peripheral blood lymphocytes. The intensity of the inhibitory activity in serum is positively correlated with the intensity of the secondary lesions of adjuvant arthritis. Inhibitory activity was not found in serum from rats bearing nystatin-induced inflammation. Serum fractionation studies indicated that the inhibitory activity cannot be attributed to low molecular weight alpha2-glycoproteins or to gamma-globulins and alpha2-macroglobulins, but it is present in a fraction migrating with beta-globulins. The inhibitory activity in arthritic rat serum is reduced by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but is unaltered by D-penicillamine. It is suggested that this inhibitory activity is part of the systemic response to an immunologically mediated inflammation. PMID:151867

  3. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  4. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  5. Protective role of theophylline and their interaction with nitric oxide (NO) in adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rishi; Chaudhary, Manju J; Tiwari, Prafulla C; Babu, Suresh; Pant, K K

    2015-12-01

    Theophylline (non-specific PDE inhibitor) and their interactions with nitric oxide modulators were evaluated in adjuvant-induced arthritic model of rats. Wistar rats (200-300g), 8 animals per group were used in the study. The animals were injected with 0.1mL of squalene and 0.2mL of complete Freund's adjuvant on day (0) in sub-planter region of right hind paw controls received only saline. The treatment with theophylline and nitric oxide modulators were done from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis indexes, ankle diameter, paw volume, and body weight were determined to assess RA progression from day (0) to day 28. On day 28 animals were sacrificed and their blood collected for IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine levels and hind paw for pathological analysis. Synovial fluid from joint spaces of CFA inoculated rats was collected to estimate TNF-α level in synovial fluid. The data obtained was analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by the Newman-Keuls post-hoc test. Theophylline (10 and 20mg/kg) significantly decreased adjuvant induced increased arthritis-index, paw volume and ankle diameter (p<0.05 in all parameters) compared to only adjuvant control group. It also reversed adjuvant induced slight decrease in body weight to normalcy. l-Arginine 100mg/kg+theophylline 20mg/kg suppressed TNF-α and elevates IL-10 level as well as reversed adjuvant-induced elevated arthritic parameters as compared to only adjuvant and prednisone group (p<0.001). Synovial TNF-α level of adjuvant only group was several fold higher than its serum level. Treatment with theophylline 20mg/kg significantly reduces synovial TNF-α level as compared to adjuvant only group. Theophylline 20mg/kg+L-NAME 10mg/kg significantly reversed these adjuvant-induced changes in immunological, histopathological and arthritis parameters (p<0.05).

  6. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Xin; Fan, Arthur Yin; Zhou, An-Nan; Moudgil, Kamal D.; Ma, Zhong-Ze; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Fong, Harry HS; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) and its modifications have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for about one hundred years to alleviate pain and inflammation. Aim To investigate the effects of HLXL on complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced multiple-joint arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods Male Lewis rats, 190–210g, were immunized subcutaneously at the base of the tail with 200 µl of heat-killed M. tuberculosis in mineral oil (5 mg/ml). HLXL (2.30g/kg and 4.60g/kg) or vehicle control (n=8 per group) was administered orally (i.g.) once a day between days 16–25 post-CFA injection. The rats were observed for signs of arthritis with arthritic changes (erythema, edema, induration) being scored on a scale of 0 to 4 of increasing severity using a standard scoring system. The maximum arthritis score per rat was 16. A plethysmometer was used to measure edema volume in each paw. Adverse effects of HLXL were monitored by closely observing the animals for unusual behavioral changes. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in local tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on day 25 post-CFA. Results HLXL significantly decreased arthritis scores between days 23–25 in the 2.30g/kg group and 21–25 in the 4.60g/kg group (p<0.05). It reduced paw edema on days 22 and 24 in the 2.30g/kg group and on days 20, 22 and 24 in the 4.60g/kg group compared to control (p<0.05). Local tissue TNF-α and IL-1β levels on day 25 post-CFA injection were significantly (p<0.05) lower in rats treated with HLXL than in control rats. No observable adverse effects were found. Conclusion The data suggest that HLXL produces significant anti-arthritic effects that may be mediated by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, and it appears to be safe. PMID:19100323

  7. Identification and distribution of four metabolites of geniposide in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Hong; Dai, Miao-Miao; Li, Hui; Chen, Jin-Yun; Hu, Shun-Li

    2014-09-01

    Geniposide (GE), also called Jasminoidin, is the major active ingredient of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit, which has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Growing evidences suggested that GE has a great potentiality for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, GE is rapidly metabolized, and we know little about its availability or metabolites in tissues. To elucidate the distribution of GE and its metabolites in tissues, three groups of adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats were given GE (33, 66 and 120 mg/kg) from days 18 to 24, and the biotransformation of GE in plasma, liver, spleen, synovium, urine and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) of rats was investigated by a novel approach named Information-Dependent Acquisition (IDA)-Mediated LC-MS/MS method. As a result, GE and its four major metabolites were detected as follows: GE, G1, G2 in plasma; GE, G2 in MLNs; only GE in liver and synovium; GE, G2, G3 and G4 in spleen; and GE, G1, G2 and G4 in urine. In total four metabolites (G1-G4) involved in the in vivo metabolism processes were identified. The results of this work have demonstrated the IDA-Mediated LC-MS/MS could screen rapidly and reliably the characterization of metabolites from iridoid compounds. PMID:24910002

  8. Topical therapies for rheumatoid arthritis by gel ointments containing indomethacin nanoparticles in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin (IMC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although its clinical use has been limited by its systemic side effects that include gastrointestinal lesions. Therefore, the development of IMC formulations that do not cause gastrointestinal lesions is highly anticipated. In this study, we designed new topical formulations containing IMC solid nanoparticles (IMCnano gel ointment), and investigated their pharmacokinetics. In addition, we demonstrate the preventive effects of this topical application of IMC nanoparticles on inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat (AA rat). The IMCnano gel ointment was prepared using Bead Smash 12 (a bead mill) and additives including 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, methylcellulose and Carbopol 934; the mean particle size of the IMC nanoparticles was 173 ± 91 nm (means ± S.D.). The application of the IMCnano gel ointment attenuated the increase in paw edema of the hind feet of AA rats in comparison with AA rats treated with gel ointment containing IMC microparticles (IMCmicro gel ointment, particle diameter 17.1 ± 11.6 mm, means ± S.D). In addition, the accumulation of IMC from the IMCnano gel ointment in skin tissue was significantly large than for the IMCmicro gel ointment; however, the plasma IMC concentrations were similar for the IMCmicro and IMCnano gel ointments. Our findings suggest that the dermal application of nanoparticles may enable a medication to be applied without high-systemic drug levels, which could provide efficient and effective therapy that spares patients from unwanted side effects. A formulation of a topical drug delivery system using IMC nanoparticles may provide a delivery option for the clinical treatment of RA.

  9. Intramuscular electroporation with the pro-opiomelanocortin gene in rat adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, I-Chuan; Jhao, Chien-Ming; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Wang, Chien-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Yuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Sheng-Han; Huang, Pao-Lin; Yang, Lin-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have an essential role in the intrinsic modulation and control of inflammatory pain, which could be therapeutically useful. In this study, we established a muscular electroporation method for the gene transfer of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in vivo and investigated its effect on inflammatory pain in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis. The gene encoding human POMC was inserted into a modified pCMV plasmid, and 0–200 μg of the plasmid-POMC DNA construct was transferred into the tibialis anterior muscle of rats treated with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) with or without POMC gene transfer by the electroporation method. The safety and efficiency of the gene transfer was assessed with the following parameters: thermal hyperalgesia, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and endorphin levels, paw swelling and muscle endorphin levels at 1, 2 and 3 weeks after electroporation. Serum ACTH and endorphin levels of the group into which the gene encoding POMC had been transferred were increased to about 13–14-fold those of the normal control. These levels peaked 1 week after electroporation and significantly decreased 2 weeks after electroporation. Rats that had received the gene encoding POMC had less thermal hypersensitivity and paw swelling than the non-gene-transferred group at days 3, 5 and 7 after injection with CFA. Our promising results showed that transfer of the gene encoding POMC by electroporation is a new and effective method for its expression in vivo, and the analgesic effects of POMC cDNA with electroporation in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis are reversed by naloxone. PMID:14979933

  10. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  11. 99Tcm-HIG accumulates in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis by binding to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    de Bois, M H; Welling, M; Verwey, C L; de Vries, E; Pauwels, E K; Breedveld, F C; Tak, P P

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the mechanism of accumulation of 99Tcm-labelled non-specific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (99Tcm-HIG) in inflamed synovial tissue (ST) in an experimental animal model of arthritis. Following 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy, the in vivo localization of 99Tcm-HIG in the ST of knee joints of rats with adjuvant arthritis was studied using immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the in vitro binding of 99Tcm-HIG to extracellular matrix proteins was analysed by means of immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy, 99Tcm-HI was detected in the ST of rats with adjuvant arthritis. 99Tcm-HIG was diffusely distributed and not bound to cells. In vitro incubation of 99Tcm-HIG on the ST of rats with adjuvant arthritis revealed binding of 99Tcm-HIG to inflamed, but not to non-inflamed, ST. In addition, specific binding of 99Tcm-HIG to fibronectin, fibrin, collagen type I and III was demonstrated by ELISA. We conclude that the accumulation of 99Tcm-HIG in inflamed ST can be explained by the binding of 99Tcm-HIG to extracellular matrix proteins.

  12. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress in adjuvant induced model of arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Shyni, G L; Helen, A

    2009-04-01

    Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae) are traditionally used for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions in the traditional medicine of India. The purpose of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. in adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens (MER) exhibited maximum percentage of oedema inhibition at a dose of 20 mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis. The effect was higher than that of standard drug indomethacin. The activities of cycloxygenase-2 and myeloperoxidase and concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins C & E and reduced glutathione level were increased on treatment with MER. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and haemoglobin and aberrant changes to the C-reactive protein (CRP) and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in MER treated rats. Histopathology of paw tissue showed decreased oedema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with MER. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

  13. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  15. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met) diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05). High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet. PMID:27738392

  16. Therapeutic Effect of Saponin Rich Fraction of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kothavade, Pankaj S.; Bulani, Vipin D.; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M.; Deshpande, Padmini S.; Gawali, Nitin B.; Juvekar, Archana R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Achyranthes aspera Linn. (AA) is used in folklore for the treatment of various inflammatory ailments and arthritis like conditions. Anti-inflammatory activity of saponin rich (SR) fraction of AA has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess the antiarthritic effect of SR fraction of Achyranthes aspera in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Methods. Arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, paw volume, changes in tibiotarsal joint thickness, hyperalgesic parameters, and spleen and thymus index. Haematological, serum, biochemical, and inflammatory cytokine and in vivo antioxidant parameters were measured on the last day of the study. Results. SR fraction significantly suppressed paw swelling and arthritic score and improved the pain threshold in motility and stair climbing tests. There was a reversal in the levels of altered parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide. SR fraction significantly decreased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Moreover, histopathology revealed a significant reduction in synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and bone destruction in the joints. Conclusion. These observations explain the therapeutic benefit of SR fraction of AA in suppressing the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. PMID:26273477

  17. Antioxidant and Angiostatic Effect of Spirulina platensis Suspension in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eman A. I.; Barakat, Bassant M.; Hassan, Ranya

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many degenerative diseases, mainly rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and curative properties and is also competent of acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and recently anti-angiogenic agent. In the present study, the antioxidant and the immunomodulatory effect of Spirulina platensis as well as its anti-angiogenic effect against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat model were tested. Results We found that the development of arthritis was concealed; moreover it successfully inhibited the development of macroscopic as well as microscopic and histopathological lesions in AIA rats when compared to control. Spirulina treated group showed a higher survival rate and moreover, it reduced the clinical score of RA in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Spirulina decreased serum levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, TBARS, VEGF and increased serum levels of GSH compared to the RA non-treated group. Conclusions The present study concluded that Spirulina is able to restrain the changes produced through adjuvant-induced arthritis. The suppressing effect of Spirulina could be attributed, at least in part, to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:25853428

  18. Effect of solid nanoparticle of indomethacin on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We designed new oral formulations containing indomethacin (IMC) solid nanoparticles, and investigate their usefulness by evaluating bioavailability and gastrointestinal lesions. The IMC solid nanoparticles were prepared using methylcellulose (MC), 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), and the bead mill method, and high quality dispersions containing 1.0% IMC nanoparticles were prepared (IMC(nano), particle size: 76 ± 58 nm, means ± S.D.). The fate of serum IMC and the induction of paw edema in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats receiving low-doses IMC(nano) (0.4 mg/kg) were similar to those following the administration of a therapeutic dose of conventional IMC prepared with MC and HPβCD (conventional IMC, 2 mg/kg), and the bioavailability in 0.4 mg/kg IMC(nano) was 5.3-fold higher in comparison with that in 2 mg/kg conventional IMC. IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions in AA rats administered IMC(nano) (8 mg/kg), in consideration of bioavailability, were significantly less than for conventional IMC (40 mg/kg). On the other hand, the toxicity caused by conventional IMC and IMC(nano) was similar in Caco-2 cells. It is possible that the oral administration of IMC solid nanoparticles will show increased effectiveness in treating RA without causing IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions, since the bioavailability is higher than that of conventional IMC. An oral drug delivery system using drug nanoparticles may expand the usage of NSAIDs for therapy in the inflammatory field.

  19. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual extracts were in the following order: water-IS ex. > methanol ex. > butanol ex. > ethyl acetate ex. The water/methanol extract from I. sinclairii remarkably inhibited UV-mediated upregulation of NF-κB activity in transfected HaCaT cells. GAG as a water-soluble alcohol precipitated fraction also produced a noticeable anti-edema effect. This GAG also inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in LAW 264.7 cells, cytokine TNF-α production in splenocytes, and atherogenesis cytokine levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in HUVEC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the histological analysis, the LV dorsal root ganglion, including the articular cartilage, and linked to the paw-treated IS GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Combined treatment with Indomethacin® (5 mg/kg) and IS GAG (10 mg/kg) also more effectively inhibited CFA-induced paw edema at 3 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr to levels comparable to the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Thus, the IS GAG described here holds great promise as an anti-inflammatory drug in the future. PMID:24386520

  20. The effect of curcumin and its nanoformulation on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoling; Sun, YanHua; Liu, Ziliang; Zhang, Mingqin; Li, Chunqing; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induced by the prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses, is one of the most prevalent of all chronic inflammatory joint diseases. Curcumin (CM), a yellow hydrophobic polyphenol derived from the herb turmeric, has various pharmacological activities against many chronic diseases and acts by inhibiting cell proliferation and metastasis and downregulating various factors, including nuclear factor kappa B, interleukin-1β and TNF-α. Given the pathogenesis of RA, we hypothesized that the drug also has antiarthritic effects. The aims of the present study included the following: 1) examining the therapeutic effect of CM administered via intravenous (iv) injection on RA and 2) formulating the drug into oil–water nanoemulsions (Ns) to overcome the low oral bioavailability of CM and achieve oral delivery of the drug. Methods The effect of CM administered through iv injection on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was studied in terms of paw swelling, weight indices of the thymus and spleen, and pathological changes in nuclear factor kappa B expression and inflammatory cytokines. Methotrexate was used as a positive control. The CM-Ns were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizing method and characterized with respect to the particle size and morphology. The stability of the CM-Ns in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids and in vitro release were also investigated. A pharmacokinetic study of the CM-Ns and suspensions in which the plasma levels were determined using an high performance liquid chromatography method and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a statistical moment theory was also performed in rats. Results CM administered via iv injection had a therapeutic effect on RA similar to methotrexate. CM-Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were successfully prepared, and the drug was well encapsulated into the Ns without degradation in simulated GI conditions. The area under the curve (AUC) and Cmax

  1. Urinary metabolite profiling provides potential differentiation to explore the mechanisms of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-Rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-Bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-Juan

    2016-09-01

    To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the perspective of metabolomics, gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) technology was used to observe changes in the metabolic profiles of urine output from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and an experimental group, with eight in each. Rats in the experimental group were induced by intracutaneous innoculation of 0.1 mL Freund's complete adjuvant to right paws. On day 20 after immunization, the metabolic profiles between rat control and experimental groups were compared by combining GC-TOF/MS technology with multivariate statistical approaches, including principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis. Nine potential biomarkers were identified, including 2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid, tartronic acid, dehydroshikimic acid, hippuric acid, adenine, phenaceturic acid, l-dopa, 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and melibiose. The findings indicate that the rats with AA are disturbed in metabolism of purine, amino acid, fat and energy. This study also demonstrates that the dysfunction in a range of biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, which leads to increased oxygen free radicals and inflammation, could cause underlying pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26856389

  2. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  3. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  4. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  5. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  6. Activation of NALP1 inflammasomes in rats with adjuvant arthritis; a novel therapeutic target of carboxyamidotriazole in a model of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Guo, Lei; Yu, Xiaoli; Wu, Danwei; Luo, Lifeng; Zhu, Lingzhi; Chen, Wei; Chen, Chen; Ye, Caiying; Zhang, Dechang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their production is mainly regulated by NF-κB and inflammasomes. Carboxyamidotriazole (CAI) exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activities by decreasing cytokines. Here, we have investigated NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NALP) inflammasomes in a rat model of RA and explored the therapeutic effects of CAI in this model and the involvement of NF-κB and inflammasomes in the actions of CAI. Experimental Approach The anti-arthritic effects of CAI were assessed in the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model in rats, using radiological and histological techniques. NALP1 and NALP3 inflammasomes, NF-κB pathway and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels were measured with Western blots, immunohistochemistry and elisa. Key Results CAI decreased the arthritis index, improved radiological and histological changes, and reduced synovial IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TNF-α levels in rats with AA. Compared with normal rats, the 70 kDa NALP1 isoform was up-regulated, NALP3 was down-regulated, and levels of the 165 kDa NALP1 isoform and the adaptor protein ASC were unchanged in synovial tissue from AA rats. CAI reduced the 70 kDa NALP1 isoform and restored NALP3 levels in AA rats; CAI inhibited caspase-1 activation in AA synovial tissue, but not its enzymic activity in vitro. In addition, CAI reduced expression of p65 NF-κB subunit and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation in AA rats. Conclusion and Implications NALP1 inflammasomes were activated in synovial tissues from AA rats and appeared to be a novel therapeutic target for RA. CAI could have therapeutic value in RA by inhibiting activation of NF-κB and NALP1 inflammasomes and by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25799914

  7. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  8. Prevention of adjuvant arthritis in rats by a nonapeptide from the 65-kD mycobacterial heat shock protein: specificity and mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X D; Gasser, J; Feige, U

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that Lewis rats were completely protected from adjuvant arthritis by pretreatment with a nonapeptide (residues 180-188) of the 65-kD mycobacterial heat shock protein. Here we address questions of specificity and mechanism(s) of protection. We demonstrate that complete protection against adjuvant arthritis can only be achieved by pre-immunization with the nonapeptide, while pretreatment with either the octapeptide (residues 181-188) of the 65-kD heat shock protein or unrelated immunogenic peptides failed to affect adjuvant arthritis. Interestingly, pretreatment with the nonapeptide of the 65-kD heat shock protein did not protect Lewis rats from type II collagen-induced arthritis. These results demonstrate that protection is both epitope and disease specific. Co-injection of the nonapeptide with mycobacterial antigen even at a weight ratio of 5:1 (nonapeptide:mycobacteria) failed to influence the disease, suggesting that the role of the nonapeptide is not as a 'blocking peptide'. T cells from rats immunized with nonapeptide respond to the nonapeptide as well as to mycobacteria in vitro, and adoptively transfer protection to naive recipients. The data indicate that the nonapeptide-induced protection may result from a T cell-mediated specific suppression. PMID:1370776

  9. Profiling of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, p38 and JAK inhibitors in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    Balagué, C; Pont, M; Prats, N; Godessart, N

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Translational animal models are essential in the prediction of the efficacy and side effects of new chemical entities. We have carried out a thorough study of three distinct disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model in the rat and critically appraised the results in the context of the reported clinical experience in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Teriflunomide – a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitor; AL8697 – a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor; and tofacitinib – a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; were selected as representatives of their class and dose-response studies carried out using a therapeutic 10-day administration scheme in arthritic rats. Paw swelling and body weight were periodically monitored, and joint radiology and histology, lymph organ weight and haematological and biochemical parameters evaluated at study completion. KEY RESULTS All three drugs demonstrated beneficial effects on paw swelling, bone lesions and splenomegalia, with p38 inhibition providing the best anti-inflammatory effect and JAK inhibition the best DMARD effect. Leukopenia, body weight loss and gastrointestinal toxicity were dose-dependently observed with teriflunomide treatment. p38 MAPK inhibition induced leukocytosis and increased total plasma cholesterol. JAK inhibition, normalized platelet, reticulocyte and neutrophil counts, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels while inducing lymphopenia and cholesterolemia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This multiparametric approach can reveal specific drug properties and provide translational information. Whereas the complex profile for p38 inhibition in AIA is not observed in human RA, immunosuppressants such as DHODH and JAK inhibitors show DMARD properties and side effects seen in both AIA and RA. PMID:22229697

  10. Differences in osteoclast formation between proximal and distal tibial osteoporosis in rats with adjuvant arthritis: inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Shu, Goukei; Yamamoto, Kaname; Nagashima, Masakazu

    2006-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis commonly suffer both systemic and periarticular osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are inhibitors of bone resorption, and several derivatives have been developed for treatment of enhanced bone resorption. We aimed to characterize osteoclast formation in two different sites, the proximal tibial and distal tibial areas, in rats with adjuvant arthritis, and to investigate the impact of amino or non-amino types of bisphosphonate. Adjuvant arthritis was initiated in rats while administering daily injections of either etidronate, a non-amino BP, or alendronate, an amino BP, for 3 weeks. On the day following the last injection, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the proximal tibia to assess systemic osteoporosis and in the distal tibia for periarticular osteoporosis using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subsequently, bone marrow cells from either end of the tibia were collected and incubated for 7 days before staining and counting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. In the rats with adjuvant arthritis, BMD of either end of the tibia was lower than in normal rats. Although etidronate prevented bone mineral loss at both ends, distal loss was significantly less than proximal. In contrast, alendronate significantly inhibited mineral loss primarily in the proximal area. Large osteoclasts, defined as having five or more nuclei, formed preferentially in the proximal tibia, while small osteoclasts with fewer than four nuclei were found mainly distally. The suppressive effect of alendronate was greater on the large osteoclasts, while etidronate had a greater effect on the small osteoclasts. These results show that the size and multinuclearity of osteoclasts and the number of osteoclasts formed are different in the distal and proximal areas of the tibia, and that alendronate and etidronate may suppress different types of osteoclasts as discriminated by the number of nuclei. PMID:17164994

  11. Reexamination of the difference in susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis among LEW/Crj, Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats.

    PubMed

    Banik, Ratan Kumar; Kasai, Masanori; Mizumura, Kazue

    2002-04-01

    The present investigations were performed to assess the differences among rat colonies commonly used for neurophysiological research regarding the development of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Inflammatory signs including edema in the paw fluctuated remarkably among individual Wistar (Slc/Wistar/ST) and Sprague-Dawley (Slc/SD) rats, while the inflammatory signs of Lewis (LEW/Crj) rats appeared earlier and was severer and more consistent than Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats. Edema in the hind paw developed in 100% of LEW/Crj rats with the lowest dose of CFA (0.6 mg/rat) used as compared with 64% of Slc/Wistar/ST (CFA 1 mg/rat) and 38% of Slc/SD rats (CFA 1.2 mg/rat). Retardation of weight gain was observed in Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats in contrast to a severe weight decrease in inflamed LEW/Crj rats after the development of arthritis.

  12. Bone-protective effects of nonviral gene therapy with folate-chitosan DNA nanoparticle containing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Julio C; Wang, Huijie; Jreyssaty, Christian; Benderdour, Mohamed; Lavigne, Patrick; Qiu, Xingpin; Winnik, Francoise M; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dai, Kerong; Shi, Qin

    2008-07-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), is a natural blocker of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1. Using a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined the protective effects of IL-1Ra in bone metabolism in vivo after folate-mediated nonviral gene delivery. We detected secreted human IL-1Ra protein in serum and cultured primary osteoblasts of rats that were treated with chitosan-IL-1Ra and folate-IL-1Ra-chitosan nanoparticles, respectively. In vivo, IL-1Ra gene delivery significantly reverted alterations in bone turnover observed in arthritic animals by modulating the level of osteocalcin (OC) as well as the activities of alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. The protective effects of these nanoparticles were evident from the decrease in the expression levels of interleukine-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) as well as osteoclast number and other histopathological findings. Compared to naked DNA and chitosan-DNA, folate-chitosan-DNA nanoparticles were less cytotoxic and enhanced IL-1Ra protein synthesis in vitro and offered a better protection against inflammation and abnormal bone metabolism in vivo. Nonviral gene therapy with folate-chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the IL-1 Ra gene seemed to protect against bone damage and inflammation in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model.

  13. Diurnal rhythms in ornithine decarboxylase activity and norepinephrine and acetylcholine synthesis in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen of young and aged rats during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, D P; Brusco, L I; Selgas, L; Esquifino, A I

    1998-04-13

    Aging has been associated with attenuation of amplitude and changes in period of many circadian rhythms. The present study was carried out to examine, in young (50 days old) and old (18 months old) rats, whether 24-h rhythms of cell proliferation (as assessed by measuring ornithine decarboxylase activity) and of presynaptic adrenergic and cholinergic markers change in lymph nodes and spleen during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis. Groups of young and old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied the day before, and on days 6, 12 and 18 after Freund's adjuvant injection. On day 16 after adjuvant injection, inflammation of hind paws, mainly in the ankle joints, was less marked in old than in young rats. Lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase activity exhibited significant 24-h variations with maximal activity during daily hours. Before treatment, enzyme activity values were significantly lower in old rats in both tissues examined. During the immune reaction, lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase augmented 8-10-fold, with progressively smaller amplitude of daily variations as arthritis developed. In every case, mesor and amplitude of ornithine decarboxylase activity were lowest in old rats. Submaxillary lymph node and splenic tyrosine hydroxylase activity attained maximal values at night. At every time interval after mycobacterium adjuvant injection, amplitude and mesor of tyrosine hydroxylase activity rhythm were lowest in old rats. A maximum in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis occurred at the afternoon. On day 6 and 12 after Freund's adjuvant injection, lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis was significantly smaller in old rats. Day-night differences in submaxillary lymph node or splenic ornithine decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase activities, or in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis, of rats treated with the adjuvant's vehicle, did not differ significantly from those seen in untreated controls. The results are

  14. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P < 0.05), respectively. The present study proves the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  15. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSNs) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What's more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and in vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating the NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis.

  16. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  17. Effects of the selective EP4 antagonist, CJ-023,423 on chronic inflammation and bone destruction in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takako; Murata, Yoko; Taniguchi, Kana; Murase, Akio; Nii, Aisuke

    2008-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a potent pro-inflammatory mediator. We have recently discovered CJ-023,423, a highly selective antagonist of EP4 receptors, one of the PGE2 receptors. This agent is suitable for exploring the effects of blocking EP4 receptors following oral administration in rats. In this study, CJ-023,423 was used in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) to investigate the role of the EP4 receptor in chronic inflammation and bone destruction. These effects were compared with those of rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. CJ-023,423 had significant inhibitory effects on paw swelling, inflammatory biomarkers, synovial inflammation and bone destruction in AIA rats. In particular, the inhibitory effect on paw swelling in AIA rats was comparable to that of rofecoxib. These results suggest that PGE2 acting via the EP4 receptor is involved in the development of chronic inflammation and bone destruction, particularly with respect to oedema in AIA rats. This is the first study to confirm the in-vivo effects of EP4 receptor blockade on inflammation and bone destruction in AIA rats with a small-molecule compound.

  18. Trichilia monadelpha bark extracts inhibit carrageenan-induced foot-oedema in the 7-day old chick and the oedema associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ainooson, G K; Owusu, G; Woode, E; Ansah, C; Annan, K

    2012-01-01

    Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Meliaceae) bark extract is used in African traditional medicine for the management of various disease conditions including inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous (TWE), alcoholic (TAE) and petroleum ether extract (TPEE) of T. monadelpha using the 7-day old chick-carrageenan footpad oedema (acute inflammation) and the adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats (chronic inflammation). TWE and TPEE significantly inhibited the chick-carrageenan footpad oedema with maximal inhibitions of 57.79±3.92 and 63.83±12 respectively, but TAE did not. The reference anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and dexamethasone) inhibited the chick-carrageenan-induced footpad oedema, with maximal inhibitions of 64.92±2.03 and 71.85±15.34 respectively. Furthermore, all the extracts and the reference anti-inflammatory agents (diclofenac, dexamethasone, methotrexate) inhibited the inflammatory oedema associated with adjuvant arthritis with maximal inhibitions of 64.41±5.56, 57.04±8.57, 62.18±2.56%, for TWE, TAE and TPEE respectively and 80.28±5.79, 85.75±2.96, 74.68±3.03% for diclofenac, dexamethasone and methotrexate respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant bark confirmed the presence of a large array of plant constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids, all of which may be potential sources of phyto-antiinflammatory agents. In conclusion, our work suggests that T. monadelpha is a potential source of antiinflammatory agents.

  19. Changes in mRNA expression of ABC and SLC transporters in liver and intestines of the adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Uno, Satoshi; Uraki, Misato; Ito, Ayami; Shinozaki, Yuki; Yamada, Ayano; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effects of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) on the amounts of mRNA of 12 types of rat ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters in the liver and small intestine, 7 (D7) and 21 days (D21) after the injection of adjuvant. There were no significant differences in mRNA levels of ABC and SLC transporters between the livers of AA and control rats on D7, except in the case of Mdr1a. However, levels of Mdr1a, Mrp2 and Oatp SLC transporters were significantly lower in AA than in the control livers on D21. In contrast, the mRNA levels of several ABC and SLC transporters, especially Mrp2, Bcrp, LAT2 and Oatp1a5, were significantly lower in the small intestines of AA rats compared with the controls on D7, though there were no significant differences by D21. The time-dependent alterations in mRNA levels of the pregnane X receptor, but not the constitutive androstane receptor, in the liver and intestine were similar to the changes in mRNA levels of most transporters examined. The present study showed that AA was associated with reduced mRNA expression of several ABC and SLC transporters in the liver and small intestine, but that the time courses of the effects of AA on mRNA expression differed between the liver and small intestine. These results raise the possibility of a functional change of the transporters of liver and intestine in AA rats.

  20. The histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine, inhibits the articular osteopenia in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis by suppressing the osteoclast differentiation induced by histamine.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Yonekawa, Taeko; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yano, Shingo; Ueno, Koichi

    2003-05-01

    The effects of cimetidine on rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) and rat osteoclast differentiation were studied. For the in vivo experiments, AA was induced by injections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA either subcutaneously into the base of the tail or into the right hind paw. The osteoclast differentiation was assessed by estimating the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells in the bone marrow culture. Cimetidine, at the dose of 25 mg/kg body weight, reduced the paw swelling by 70% (P<0.01). Cimetidine, at 10 microM concentration, inhibited 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25[OH](2)D(3)) and histamine mediated osteoclast differentiations by 40% (P<0.01) and 60% (P<0.001), respectively. Dimaprit, at 0.3 microM, stimulated the cell differentiation by 100% (P<0.01). Mepyramine reduced osteoclast differentiation, but the reduction was not statistically significant. Measurements of bone mineral density of the femur indicated that 5 mg/kg of cimetidine treated animals had 30% (P<0.01) higher mineral density in comparison with that of the AA control group that received no cimetidine. These results suggest that histamine is a potent inducer of osteoclast differentiation, at least in part, through the histamine H(2)-receptor, and cimetidine has a preventive effect on articular destruction and accompanying inflammation in arthritic rats. These observations may provide critical insights into the pathogenesis of the bone pathology seen in patients with RA.

  1. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically.

  2. Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206-211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. PMID:26763139

  4. Targeting TNF-α and NF-κB Activation by Bee Venom: Role in Suppressing Adjuvant Induced Arthritis and Methotrexate Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Samar F.; El-Bakly, Wesam M.; Arafa, Hossam M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2013-01-01

    Low dose methotrexate is the cornerstone for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine such as bee venom. The combination of natural products with modern medicine poses the possibility of potential interaction between the two groups and needs investigation. The present study was aimed to investigate the modulatory effect of bee venom acupuncture on efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of methotrexate. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritic rats were treated for 3 weeks with methotrexate and/or bee venom. Arthritic score, ankle diameter, paw volume and tissue expression of NF-κB and TNF-α were determined to assess anti-arthritic effects, while anti-nociceptive effects were assessed by gait score and thermal hyperalgesia. Methotrexate toxicity was assessed by measuring serum TNF-α, liver enzymes and expression of NF-κB in liver. Combination therapy of bee venom with methotrexate significantly improved arthritic parameters and analgesic effect as compared to methotrexate alone. Bee venom ameliorated serum TNF-α and liver enzymes elevations as well as over expression of NF-κB in liver induced by methotrexate. Histological examination supported the results. And for the first time bee venom acupuncture was approved to increase methotrexate bioavailability with a significant decrease in its elimination. Conclusion: bee venom potentiates the anti-arthritic effects of methotrexate, possibly by increasing its bioavailability. Also, it provides a potent anti-nociceptive effect. Furthermore, bee venom protects against methotrexate induced hepatotoxicity mostly due to its inhibitory effect on TNF-α and NF-κB. PMID:24278124

  5. Effects of one minute and ten minutes of walking activity in rats with arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant on pain and edema symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Raquel Pinheiro; Bressan, Elisângela; Silva, Tatiane Morgana da; Gevaerd, Monique da Silva; Tonussi, Carlos Rogério; Domenech, Susana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two protocols of exercise on nociception, edema and cell migration in rats with CFA-induced arthritis. Female Wistar rats (200 - 250 g, n = 50) was monoarthritis-induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; Mycobacterium butyricum, 0.5 mg/mL; 50 μL) into the right knee joint (TF; n = 24) or right ankle joint (TT; n = 26). Incapacitation was measured by the paw elevation time (TEP; s) in 1-min periods of observation. The edema of the knee or ankle joints was evaluated by the variation of the articular diameter (DA, cm) and by the paw volume variation (EP, mL), respectively. Both were measured during 10 consecutive days. Two protocols of exercise were performed: (a) in the constant exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 6) performing 1 minute of daily exercise on the cylinder; (b) variable exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 7), the exercise increased by 1 minute per day. The control groups (TF, n = 12; TT, n = 13) didn't perform the exercise. After 10 days, the animals were euthanized for total (CT; cells/mm3) and differential leukocyte counts (mononuclear - MON, and polymorphonuclear - PMN, cells/mm3) of the articular inflammatory exudate. The variable exercise protocol inhibited incapacitation and edema for both joints. However, cell migration decreased only in the TF.The constant exercise reduced edema in both joints, and cell migration was decreased in the TT. However, the incapacitation was not reduced. Variable exercise seemed to be more effective in reducing the inflammatory parameters than constant exercise.

  6. Efficacy of Combined Ultrasound-and-Microbubbles-Mediated Diclofenac Gel Delivery to Enhance Transdermal Permeation in Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Chung, Huan-Yu; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2016-08-01

    A previous study that investigated the effect of ultrasound (US) on the transdermal permeation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac found that therapeutic US can increase circulation in an inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Transdermal drug delivery has recently been demonstrated by US combined with microbubbles (MB) contrast agent (henceforth referred to as "US-MB"). The present study evaluated the efficacy of US-MB-mediated diclofenac delivery for treating adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats. RA was induced by injecting 100 μL of complete Freund's adjuvant into the ankle joint of male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) that were randomly divided into five treatment groups: (i) carbopol gel alone (the control [group C]), (ii) diclofenac-carbopol gel (group D), (iii) US plus carbopol gel (group U), (iv) US plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DU) and (v) US-MB plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DUB). The ankle width was measured over 10 d using high-frequency (40-MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler-mode imaging, covering the period before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of the induced RA showed synovitis and neovascularity. Only a small amount of neovascularity was observed after treatment. The recovery rate on day 10 was significantly higher in group DUB (97.7% ± 2.7%, mean ± standard deviation [SD]) than in groups C (1.0% ± 2.7%), D (37.5% ± 4.6%), U (75.5% ± 4.2%) and DU (87.3% ± 5.2%) (p < 0.05). The results obtained indicate that combining US and MB can increase the skin permeability and thereby enhance the delivery of diclofenac sodium gel and thereby inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounding the arthritic ankle. Color Doppler-mode imaging revealed that US-MB treatment induced a rapid reduction in synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area. PMID:27181685

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect and low ulcerogenic activity of etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Yoshida, Eri; Matsui, Masami; Ukai, Yojiro; Yano, Junichi

    2003-06-01

    Adjuvant arthritic rats are known to be more susceptible to gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) than are normal rats. We compared the relative gastric safety profile of etodolac with those of meloxicam, diclofenac sodium and indometacin in adjuvant arthritic rats and normal rats or mice. As a measure of the safety profiles of NSAIDs, we used the safety index, the ratio of the dose that elicits gastric mucosal lesions to the effective dose as an anti-inflammatory or analgesic compound. The anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects of NSAIDs were assessed by paw swelling in adjuvant arthritic rats, and either carrageenin-induced paw edema or brewer's yeast-induced hyperalgesia, as well as acetic acid-induced writhing, in normal rats or mice. In addition, we also investigated the effects of these NSAIDs on human COX-1 and COX-2 activity. Etodolac and other NSAIDs inhibited paw swelling and caused gastric mucosal lesions in adjuvant arthritic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Etodolac showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index among these NSAIDs in arthritic rats. In normal rats, etodolac also showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index, except when its effects were assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing. Etodolac and meloxicam showed selectivity for human COX-2 over COX-1. In contrast, diclofenac sodium and indometacin were selective for COX-1. These results suggest that etodolac, a COX-2 selective NSAID, has anti-inflammatory effects with a better safety profile for the stomach than do non-selective NSAIDs, including diclofenac sodium and indometacin, in adjuvant arthritic as well as normal rats.

  8. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:25637446

  9. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  10. Determination of geniposide in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method and its application to oral bioavailability and plasma protein binding ability studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Hong; Xu, Guo-Bing; Dai, Miao-Miao; Hu, Shun-Li; Sun, Liang-Liang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Rong; Li, Shu-Pin; Li, Guo-Qiang

    2015-04-10

    A specific, sensitive and high throughput ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was established and validated to assay geniposide (GE), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma: application to pharmacokinetic and oral bioavailability studies and plasma protein binding ability. Plasma samples were processed by de-proteinised with ice-cold methanol and separated on an ACQUITY UPLC™ HSS C18 column (100 mm × 2.1mm i.d., 1.8 μm particle size) at a gradient flow rate of 0.2 mL/min using acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water as mobile phase, and the total run time was 9 min. Mass detection was performed in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with negative electro-spray ionization includes the addition of paeoniflorin (Pae) as an internal standard (IS). The mass transition ion-pair was followed as m/z 387.4 → 122.4 for GE and m/z 479.4 → 449.0 for IS. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 2-50,000 ng/mL with lower limit of quantification of 2 ng/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD, %) of the assay were less than 8.4%, and the accuracy was within ± 6.4% in terms of relative error (RE). Extraction recovery, matrix effect and stability were satisfactory in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma. The UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of GE after oral administration of depurated GE at 33, 66, 132 mg/kg and intravenous injection at 33, 66, 132 mg/kg in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In addition, it was found that GE has rapid absorption and elimination, low absolute bioavailability, high plasma protein binding ability in AA rats after oral administration within the tested dosage range. It suggested that GE showed slow distribution into the intra- and extracellular space, and the binding rate was not proportionally dependent on plasma concentration of GE when the concentration of GE was

  11. Antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Pistia stratiotes in adjuvant-induced arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George A; Boampong, Johnson N

    2012-01-01

    Background Pistia stratiotes has been used effectively to treat a number of inflammatory conditions. This study aims to determine the antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes. Methods Arthritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats, paw swelling was measured, and arthritis indices were estimated in rats treated with aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes (AQ PSE and ET PSE, respectively), methotrexate, diclofenac, dexamethasone, and normal saline-treated rats. Radiologic imaging, hematological assessment of red and white blood cells, C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, as well as histopathological studies were also done. The data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 5. Results The 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses of AQ PSE and the 30 and 100 mg/kg doses of ET PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) reduction in ipsilateral paw swelling, similar to the effects of methotrexate, dexamethasone, and diclofenac. Only the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.01) reduction in contralateral paw swelling. Arthritic indices reduced significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) at all drug doses, except for the 100 and 300 mg/kg doses of ET PSE. White blood cell levels decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) in arthritic rats treated with the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE and those treated with methotrexate. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.01–0.001) lower in all the treatment groups except for the rats treated with AQ PSE 300 mg/kg and ET PSE 100 and 300 mg/kg doses. The arthritic animals treated with 30 mg/kg of the aqueous extract showed no inflammatory changes in the ipsilateral paw, while the contralateral paw showed only foci of mild chronic inflammatory changes, as seen with the reference drug treatment in histopathological studies. Conclusion This study establishes that aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. stratiotes have antiarthritic

  12. Treatment of adjuvant arthritis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and peptide derived from heat shock protein 65.

    PubMed

    Brendolan, Andrea; Higuchi, Masanori; Sibley, Richard; Strober, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats is induced by the subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil, and the predominant T cell immune reactivity is against the heat shock protein 65 derived peptide 176-190. We treated Lewis rats with human recombinant G-CSF followed by (i.v) administration of peptide 176-190 after induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA), and observed decreased disease severity, joint destruction, new bone formation and joint ankylosis. Treatment with G-CSF alone was also effective, but to a lesser extent. In addition, we found that splenocytes from rats treated with G-CSF had reduced antigen presenting capacity compared with splenocytes from vehicle treated rats. Primed lymph node cells from G-CSF plus peptide treated rats showed a marked reduction in proliferation and secretion of IFN-gamma after stimulation with the heat shock protein peptide in vitro as compared to controls.

  13. Margaritaria discoidea (Euphorbiaceae) stem bark extract attenuates allergy and Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Obiri, David D.; Osafo, Newman; Oppong-Sarfo, Joshua; Prah, Jude K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various parts of Margaritaria discoidea find use in traditional medicine in the treatment of pain and oedema. This study evaluated the anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of a 70% (v/v) aqueous ethanol extract of the stem bark of Margaritaria discoidea, MDE in rodents. Materials and Methods: Systemic anaphylaxis was induced by the injection of compound 48/80 into mice and their survival rate was monitored to evaluate the anti-allergic action of the extract. The effect of MDE assessed on the maximal and total oedema responses in the mouse carrageenan-induced paw oedema was used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of the extract while the Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis model was employed to study the anti-arthritic effects of MDE. Results: MDE dose-dependently increased the time for compound 48/80-induced mortality in mice. MDE suppressed the mean maximal swelling and the total paw swellings induced over 6 h in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. MDE caused a reduction in serum levels of TNFα and IL-6 and significantly suppressed Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis. Conclusion: Margaritaria discoidea suppresses allergy and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in mice. In addition it attenuates Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis through a reduction in serum levels of TNFα and IL-6 in rats. PMID:24761122

  14. Sex hormone adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M

    2000-11-01

    RA is an autoimmune rheumatic disorder resulting from the combination of several predisposing factors, including the relation between epitopes of possible triggering agents and histocompatibility epitopes, the status of the stress response system, and the sex hormone status. Estrogens are implicated as enhancers of humoral immunity, and androgens and progesterone are natural immune suppressors. Sex hormone concentrations have been evaluated in RA patients before glucocorticoid therapy and have frequently been found to be altered, especially in premenopausal women and male patients. In particular, low levels of gonadal and adrenal androgens (testosterone and DHT, DHEA and DHEAS) and a reduced androgen:estrogen ratio have been detected in body fluids (i.e., blood, synovial fluid, smears, saliva) of male and female RA patients. These observations support a possible pathogenic role for the decreased levels of the immune-suppressive androgens. Exposure to environmental estrogens (estrogenic xenobiotics), genetic polymorphisms of genes coding for hormone metabolic enzymes or receptors, and gonadal disturbances related to stress system activation (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis) and physiologic hormonal perturbations such as during aging, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, the postpartum period, and menopause may interfere with the androgen:estrogen ratio. Sex hormones might exert their immune-modulating effects, at least in RA synovitis, because synovial macrophages, monocytes, and lymphocytes possess functional androgen and estrogen receptors and may metabolize gonadal hormones. The molecular basis for sex hormone adjuvant therapy in RA is thus experimentally substantiated. By considering the well-demonstrated immune-suppressive activities exerted by androgens, male hormones and their derivatives seem to be the most promising therapeutic approach. Recent studies have shown positive effects of androgen replacement therapy at least in male RA patients

  15. Serum IL-10 involved in morphine tolerance development during adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zaringhalam, Jalal; Hormozi, Asef; Tekieh, Elaheh; Razavi, Jafar; Khanmohammad, Ramin; Golabi, Sahar

    2014-06-01

    Opioid receptors play an important role in modulation of hyperalgesia in inflamed tissues, but chronic morphine application induces such side effects as tolerance. There is near communications between cytokines and mu opioid receptor expression. This study was aimed to assess the role of serum IL-10 in morphine tolerance development during adjuvant-induced arthritis. Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced on day 0 by single injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the rats' hindpaw. Hyperalgesia, edema, and spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) variations were assessed on 0, 7, 14, and 21 days of the study. For assessment of the morphine tolerance development, morphine effective dose (4 mg/kg) was administered from the 14th day after CFA injection and continued until the morphine post-dose paw withdrawal latency (PWL); it did not significantly differ from the baseline. For assessment of the effects of IL-10 on tolerance induction, a neutralizing dose (ND50) of anti-IL-10 was administered daily during different stages of the study. AA induction in the right hindpaw of rats resulted in unilateral inflammation and hyperalgesia within 21 days of the study. Anti-IL-10 antibody administration in the AA rats induced marked elevation of hyperalgesia compared to the AA control group. Our data also indicated that morphine effective anti-hyperalgesic dose significantly decreased in the AA rats compared to the control group, which this symptom was aligned with spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) expression increase during AA. Moreover, there was a significant difference in morphine tolerance induction between the AA and control rats, and our results also demonstrated that IL-10 played an important role in tolerance-induction process. It can be concluded that morphine tolerance slowly progressed when administered morphine effective dose was reduced during AA chronic inflammation. On the other hand, it seems that increased level of serum IL-10 may affect morphine tolerance

  16. Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

    1987-07-01

    An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

  17. Modulation of Adjuvant Arthritis by Cellular and Humoral Immunity to Hsp65.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene Y; Durai, Malarvizhi; Mia, Younus; Kim, Hong R; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved, and their expression is upregulated in cells by heat and other stressful stimuli. These proteins play a vital role in preserving the structural and functional integrity of cells under stress. Despite the ubiquitous expression of Hsps in an individual, the immune system is not fully tolerant to them. In fact, Hsps are highly immunogenic in nature, and immune response to these proteins is observed in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Studies on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as observations in patients with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have unraveled immunoregulatory attributes of self-Hsp65-directed immunity. Notable features of Hsp65 immunity in AA include protection rather than disease induction following immunization of Lewis rats with self (rat)-Hsp65; the diversification of T cell response to mycobacterial Hsp65 during the course of AA and its association with spontaneous induction of response to self-Hsp65; the cross-reactive T cells recognizing foreign and self homologs of Hsp65 and their role in disease suppression in rats; the suppressive effect of antibodies to Hsp65 in AA; and the use of Hsp65, its peptides, or altered peptide ligands in controlling autoimmune pathology. The results of studies in the AA model have relevance to RA and JIA. We believe that these insights into Hsp65 immunity would not only advance our understanding of the disease process in RA/JIA, but also lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27379088

  18. Evaluation of antiarthritic activity of isoeugenol in adjuvant induced arthritis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-08-01

    Isoeugenol, a component of clover oil, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect on experimentally induced adjuvant arthritis in rats. Induction of arthritis in adjuvant exposed rats was confirmed by appearance of several physical symptoms such as redness, swelling and stiffness of paws, radiographic analysis revealing joint damage, soft tissue swelling of the footpad, histopathologic changes and expression of proinflammatory enzymes and mediators in the joint tissue. Treatment of rats with isoeugenol, however, conferred a significant protection against almost all the investigated parameters. Isoeugenol significantly and dose dependently attenuated arthritic index, paw circumference, joint stiffness and the levels of proinflammatory mediators. Exposure to isoeugenol inhibited the release of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines the including PGE(2) and TNFα from lipopolysaccharide primed macrophages. Isoeugenol also showed a significant analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced writhing model. Further, unlike most antiarthritic drugs, isoeugenol had no damaging effect on gastric mucosa, which makes it a favorable antiarthritic drug. Thus, the results obtained in the present study indicate isoeugenol to possess a promising antiarthritic activity and further advocate the efficacy of natural products as antiarthritic therapeutics.

  19. Differential clinical efficacy of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies in rat adjuvant arthritis is paralleled by differential influence on NF-κB binding activity and TNF-α secretion of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohlers, Dirk; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Franch, Angels; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Bräuer, Rolf; Emmrich, Frank; Kinne, Raimund W

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the differential effects of three anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (with distinct epitope specifities) in the treatment of rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) and on T-cell function and signal transduction. Rat AA was preventively treated by intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD4 mAbs W3/25, OX35, and RIB5/2 (on days -1, 0, 3, and 6, i.e. 1 day before AA induction, on the day of induction [day 0], and thereafter). The effects on T-cell reactivity in vivo (delayed-type hypersensitivity), ex vivo (ConA-induced proliferation), and in vitro (mixed lymphocyte culture) were assessed. The in vitro effects of anti-CD4 preincubation on T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3-induced cytokine production and signal transduction were also analyzed. While preventive treatment with OX35 and W3/25 significantly ameliorated AA from the onset, treatment with RIB5/2 even accelerated the onset of AA by approximately 2 days (day 10), and ameliorated the arthritis only in the late phase (day 27). Differential clinical effects at the onset of AA were paralleled by a differential influence of the mAbs on T-cell functions, i.e. in comparison with OX35 and W3/25, the 'accelerating' mAb RIB5/2 failed to increase the delayed-type hypersentivity (DTH) to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, increased the in vitro tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion, and more strongly induced NF-κB binding activity after anti-CD4 preincubation and subsequent TCR/CD3-stimulation. Depending on their epitope specificity, different anti-CD4 mAbs differentially influence individual proinflammatory functions of T cells. This fine regulation may explain the differential efficacy in the treatment of AA and may contribute to the understanding of such treatments in other immunopathologies. PMID:12010568

  20. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  1. Mechanism of Xinfeng Capsule on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Analysis of Urinary Metabolomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-juan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the potential effects of Xinfeng capsule (XFC) on urine metabolic profiling in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS). GC-TOF/MS technology was combined with multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). These methods were used to distinguish the healthy group, untreated group, and XFC treated group and elucidate potential biomarkers. Nine potential biomarkers such as hippuric acid, adenine, and L-dopa were identified as potential biomarkers, indicating that purine metabolism, fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and energy metabolism were disturbed in AA rats. This study demonstrated that XFC is efficacious for RA and explained its potential metabolomics mechanism. PMID:26989506

  2. TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1-type cytokine production and inhibits the progression of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Y; Yamane, M; Sohda, T; Makino, H

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that TAK-603, a new anti-rheumatic drug, is more effective in animal models in which cellular immunity plays a central role. Here, we studied the effect of the drug on Th1 cytokines, which are dominantly produced in this type of immune reaction, in an in vitro system and an in vivo model. We established Th1- and Th2-dominant T-cell lines, and studied the effect of TAK-603 on their cytokine production. Th1 cell lines were BALB/c mouse allo-reactive T cells and C57BL mouse mite antigen-reactive T cells, and the Th2 cell line was BALB/c mouse ovalbumin-reactive T cells. TAK-603 suppressed the production of Th1 cytokines [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and not that of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5) in these cell lines. Furthermore, selective suppression of Th1 cytokine production was also observed in the T-cell clones obtained from the ovalbumin-reactive T-cell line. To investigate the effect on cytokine production in animal models of arthritis, we analysed the expression of cytokine messenger RNA using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In adjuvant arthritis rats, Th1-dominant cytokine production was observed both in the arthritic joint and the spleen, and the time-course paralleled the progression of arthritis. On the other hand, in type-II collagen-induced arthritis, in which TAK-603 has little effect, Th1-dominant cytokine production was not observed and Th2 cytokines were shown to be more important. The adjuvant arthritis rats treated with TAK-603 (6.25 mg/kg/day, per os) showed significantly lower cytokine mRNA expression both locally and systemically. These data suggest that TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1 cytokine production, which is consistent with its effect on cellular immunity in animal models. Images Figure 4 PMID:9370927

  3. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors reduce anti-Mycobacterium antibodies in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Turull, A; Queralt, J

    2000-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis, induced by Mycobacterium butyricum, is an experimental immunopathy that shares many features of human rheumatoid arthritis and, as such, is one of the most widely used models for studying the anti-inflammatory activity of compounds. In rats with adjuvant induced arthritis, IgG antibodies to M. butyricum have been detected and autoantigens that cross react with mycobacteria may be involved in the pathogenesis of adjuvant arthritis. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities of two cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, flosulide and L-745,337, at doses of 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day, were examined in adjuvant arthritic rats. After 14 days of treatment, a clear dose-dependent inhibition of plantar edema was seen for both flosulide (ID50 lower than 0.1 mg/kg) and L-745,337 (ID50 = 0.4 mg/kg). Plasma levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum antibodies were also decreased by both drugs. In each case the maximal immunosuppressive effect was observed at doses lower than 5 mg/kg. The non-selective COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin (1 mg/kg) decreased paw edema by 65% and the levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum by 45%. Neither cyclooxygenase selective inhibitors nor indomethacin decreased the delayed hypersensitivity reaction induced by M. butyricum. Thus, in vivo inhibition of COX-2 inhibited articular swelling and also the humoral immune response to Mycobacterium.

  4. Adjuvant-activity of `diphtheroid' organisms isolated from the joints of cases of rhemumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    White, R. G.; Gordon, J.

    1970-01-01

    Two isolates of `diphtheroid' organisms from the joints of cases of rheumatoid arthritis were found to possess a surface network of filaments (125 Å wide) resembling the adjuvant-active peptidoglycolipid filaments of mycobacteria and some Nocardia spp. Tests for adjuvant activity in guinea-pigs showed that both isolates possessed the ability to induce delayed-type hypersensitivity to a simultaneously injected immunogen (ovalbumin) and to increase serum anti-ovalbumin levels (in particular γ2-immunoglobulin). The relationship of adjuvant-active bacilli to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 1 PMID:5477931

  5. N-feruloylserotonin in preventive combination therapy with methotrexate reduced inflammation in adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kuncirova, Viera; Ponist, Silvester; Mihalova, Danica; Drafi, Frantisek; Nosal, Radomir; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Gardi, Concetta; Harmatha, Juraj; Hradkova, Iveta; Bauerova, Katarina

    2014-12-01

    Many of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs often have side effects at high doses and/or during long-term administration. Increased efficacy without increased toxicity is expected for combination therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT) and methotrexate (MTX) in monotherapy and in combination therapy on disease progression and inflammation in arthritic rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of Mycobacterium butyricum in incomplete Freund's adjuvant in Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy animals, arthritic animals without any drug administration, arthritic animals with administration of N-f-5HT in the oral daily dose of 15 mg/kg b.w., arthritic animals with administration of MTX in the oral dose of 0.3 mg/kg b.w. twice a week and arthritic animals treated with the combination of N-f-5HT and MTX. N-f-5HT in monotherapy reduced only activation of NF-κB and did not have any significant effect on other parameters monitored. Low-dose treatment of MTX decreased the level of IL-1β and MCP-1 on day 14 and activation of NF-κB in liver without significant effect on other parameters. N-f-5HT and MTX combination showed both the anti-arthritic (hind paw volume and arthritic score) and anti-inflammatory effect (plasmatic levels of IL-1β, IL-17, MCP-1, CRP, and activation of NF-κB in liver). In combination with MTX, N-f-5HT markedly potentiated the therapeutic effect of MTX low dose, which resulted in significant improvement of all parameters measured. The findings showed that the combination therapy simultaneously decreased multiple markers of inflammation, a result crucial for future therapy of RA.

  6. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  7. Triphala exhibits anti-arthritic effect by ameliorating bone and cartilage degradation in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of triphala and its underlying mechanism on adjuvant-induced rat model. For comparison purpose, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was used. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Triphala (100 mg/kg body weight [bwt]) was administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after the arthritis induction. Arthritis induction increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory marker enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) in the paw tissues of rats. The levels of bone collagen were found to decrease with increased urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and total glycosaminoglycans) in arthritic rats. In addition, the immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased expression of NF-kBp65 and COX-2 in the paw tissues of arthritic rats. However, administration of triphala significantly inhibited the biochemical and molecular alterations in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats compared to indomethacin (3 mg/kg bwt) as evidenced by the radiological and histopathological analysis. In conclusion, our results suggest that triphala administration ameliorate bone and cartilage degradation during rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25942351

  8. Triphala exhibits anti-arthritic effect by ameliorating bone and cartilage degradation in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of triphala and its underlying mechanism on adjuvant-induced rat model. For comparison purpose, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was used. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Triphala (100 mg/kg body weight [bwt]) was administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after the arthritis induction. Arthritis induction increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory marker enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) in the paw tissues of rats. The levels of bone collagen were found to decrease with increased urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and total glycosaminoglycans) in arthritic rats. In addition, the immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased expression of NF-kBp65 and COX-2 in the paw tissues of arthritic rats. However, administration of triphala significantly inhibited the biochemical and molecular alterations in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats compared to indomethacin (3 mg/kg bwt) as evidenced by the radiological and histopathological analysis. In conclusion, our results suggest that triphala administration ameliorate bone and cartilage degradation during rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  10. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Arab, Hany H; El-Sawalhi, Maha M

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10mg/kg/day p.o. for 21days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α & IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE2 & LTB4) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids.

  11. Freund's adjuvants: relationship of arthritogenicity and adjuvanticity in rats to vehicle composition

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, M. W.; Orr, K. J.; Beck, Frances W. J.; Pearson, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Over a hundred compounds and natural materials were examined for their ability to induce arthritis in rats when mixed with heat-killed delipidated Mycobacteria tuberculosis. Many of these materials were also assessed for (CMI) adjuvant activity by their ability to induce allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats when mixed with guinea-pig spinal cord, both with and without added M. tuberculosis. Cyclization and/or the presence of oxygen atoms, or double bonds reduced (or abolished) the arthritogenic potential and adjuvanticity of alkanes>C10. Esters/triglycerides of fatty acids >C12, retinol acetate (not palmitate) and vitamins E and K showed co-arthritogenic and adjuvant activity. Other active lipids included squalene and cholesterol oleate, which are both present in human sebum. Sebaceous lipids may therefore perhaps function as natural adjuvants if resorbed during abrasion and infection. Squalane (perhydrosqualene), pristane and hexadecane were excellent substitutes for mineral oil in preparing arthritogenic adjuvants from various mycobacteria, C. rubrum and N. asteroides. These oily compounds were also very effective adjuvants per se, in the absence of bacterial material or emulsifier, for inducing EAE in Lewis rats. PMID:4214125

  12. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  13. The effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heesung; Son, Taeyoon; Lee, Aeju; Youn, Inchan; Seo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Han Sung; Jung, Byungjo

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) on the acute progression of arthritis. Previous studies showed controversial clinical results regarding the effects of low-level laser therapy on arthritis, with the outcomes depending upon stimulation parameters such as laser wavelength and dosage. Based on the positive effects of MILNS on osteoporotic mice, we hypothesized that MILNS could potentially suppress the progression of arthritis owing to its biostimulation effects. Eight C57BL/6 mice with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis were used as acute progression arthritis models and divided into the laser and control groups (n = 4 each). In the laser group, after minimally invasive laser stimulation, laser speckle contrast images (LSCIs) were obtained every 6 h for a total of 108 h. The LSCIs in the control group were obtained without laser stimulation. The effects of MILNS on the acute progression of arthritis were indirectly evaluated by calculating the paw area and the average laser speckle index (LSI) at the arthritis-induced area. Moreover, the macrophage population was estimated in the arthritis-induced area. Compared to the control group, the laser group showed (1) lower relative variations of the paw area, (2) lower average LSI in the arthritis-induced area, and (3) lower macrophage population in the arthritis-induced area. These results indicate that MILNS may suppress the acute progression of CFA-induced arthritis in mice and may thus be used as a potential treatment modality of arthritis in clinics.

  14. Formoterol decreases muscle wasting as well as inflammation in the rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Gomez-Moreira, Carolina; Nieto-Bona, María Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, Maria Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists are powerful anabolic agents that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy and have been proposed as a promising treatment for muscle wasting in human patients. The aim of this work was to determine whether formoterol, a selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, is able to ameliorate muscle wasting in arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant. Control and arthritic rats were injected daily with 50 μg/kg sc formoterol or saline for 12 days. Body weight change, food intake, and arthritis index were analyzed. After euthanasia, in the gastrocnemius mRNA was analyzed by PCR, and proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Arthritis decreased gastrocnemius weight, cross-sectional area, and myofiber size, whereas formoterol increased those variables in both arthritic and control rats. Formoterol decreased the external signs of arthritis as well as NF-κB(p65) activation, TNFα, and COX-2 levels in the gastrocnemius of arthritic and control rats. Those effects of formoterol were associated with a decreased expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, and MuRF1 and in LC3b lipidation. Arthritis increased the expression of MyoD, myogenin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 and -5 in the gastrocnemius. In control and in arthritic rats, treatment with formoterol increased Akt phosphorylation and myogenin levels, whereas it decreased IGFBP-3 expression in the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that formoterol has an anti-inflammatory effect and decreases muscle wasting in arthritic rats through increasing Akt activity and myogenin and decreasing myostatin, the p-NF-κB(p65)/TNF pathway, and IGFBP-3. PMID:27245339

  15. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  16. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  17. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  18. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  19. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species. PMID:19591012

  20. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species.

  1. Topically Applied Phospho-Sulindac Hydrogel is Efficacious and Safe in the Treatment of Experimental Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mattheolabakis, George; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.; Huang, Liqun; Ouyang, Nengtai; Cheng, Ka Wing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Formulate phospho-sulindac (P-S, OXT-328) in a Pluronic hydrogel to be used as a topical anti-inflammatory agent and study its efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics in an arthritis model. Methods LEW/crlBR rats with Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis were treated with P-S formulated in Pluronic hydrogel (PSH). We determined the clinical manifestations of arthritis including the locomotor activity of the rats; evaluated joints for inflammation, bone resorption, cartilage damage, COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation; assayed plasma IL-6 and IL-10 levels; and studied the pharmacokinetics of P-S in rats after topical or oral administration. Results PSH applied at the onset of arthritis or when arthritis was fully developed, suppressed it by 56–82%, improved the locomotor activity of the rats 2.1–4.4 fold, suppressed synovial inflammation, bone resorption, cartilage damage, NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression but not plasma IL-6 and IL-10 levels. There were no side effects. PSH produced rapidly high local levels of P-S with < 14% of P-S reaching the circulation, while orally administered PS was rapidly metabolized generating much lower joint levels of P-S. Conclusions Topical application of PSH is efficacious and safe in the treatment of Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis; has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile; and likely acts by suppressing key pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. PMID:23483440

  2. Protective potential of MMR vaccine against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahman, Rehab S; Suddek, Ghada M; Gameil, Nariman M; El-Kashef, Hassan A

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MMR vaccine on inflammation which was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into the control, CFA, MMR and CFA + MMR groups. Inflammatory symptoms such as paw oedema was measured in CFA-injected rats' paw. Body weight changes and alterations in some haematological parameters and oxidative stress markers following CFA injection were checked. In CFA-inflammed rats, there was a significant increase in rat paw thickness and decrease in body weight increment. MMR exhibited a significant anti-inflammatory effect as manifested by reduction in paw thickness and normal gain in body weight when administered 1 week prior to induction of inflammation. The altered haematological parameters (TLC) and oxidative stress markers (MDA, GSH, SOD) in the inflammed rats were significantly brought back to near normal by MMR treatment. In conclusion, MMR vaccine showed a reduction in rat paw thickness and it could significantly normalize the haematological and biochemical abnormalities in CFA-induced inflammatory pain model in rats. Our data suggested that MMR could be a potential protective agent against certain types of inflammatory pain. Further histopathological and radiological studies are required to confirm the possibility of developing novel therapeutic vaccines against some forms of arthritis.

  3. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  4. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. PMID:27433576

  5. Inhibition by Artocarpus tonkinensis of the development of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, D D T; Catrina, A I; Lundberg, K; Harris, H E; Ha, N T; Anh, P T; Larsson, P

    2005-03-01

    Extracts of the leaves and roots from the tree Artocarpus tonkinensis A Cheval (family Moraceae) are used in traditional Vietnamese medicine in order to treat backache as well as rheumatic joint diseases. We prepared an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract from this plant and tested its anti-inflammatory properties in an experimental arthritis model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in Dark Agouti rats by means of immunization with collagen type II (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Starting at the day of immunization, the rats were treated daily with intraperitoneal injections of Artocarpus extract. Arthritis progression was measured by means of clinical scoring of paws and anti-CII antibody titres were measured by means of ELISA. In vitro, lymph node (LN) cell cultures were treated with Artocarpus extract and the apoptosis-inducing effect was determined with FACS staining by using annexin V and propidium iodide as well as the TUNEL method. Treatment of the rats with Artocarpus extract decreased arthritis incidence and severity and delayed disease onset. When treatment was started after the onset of arthritis, a tendency towards arthritis amelioration was observed. In vitro, Artocarpus extract acted as a T-cell modulator, inhibiting mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated LN-derived lymphocytes. Thus, we have demonstrated that an EtOAc extract of Artocarpus, a plant traditionally used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating arthritic conditions, has beneficial effects in an experimental arthritis model. This effect is likely to be T cell-dependent and mediated through apoptosis induction in activated cells.

  6. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Enzymosomes with surface-exposed superoxide dismutase: in vivo behaviour and therapeutic activity in a model of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria Manuela; Boerman, Otto C; Laverman, Peter; Corvo, Maria Luísa; Storm, Gert; Cruz, Maria Eugénia Meirinhos

    2007-02-12

    Acylated Superoxide Dismutase (Ac-SOD) enzymosomes, liposomal enzymatic systems expressing catalytic activity in the intact form, were previously characterized. The main scope of the present work was to investigate the biological behaviour of Ac-SOD inserted in the lipid bilayer of liposomes, in comparison with SOD located in the aqueous compartment of liposomes. Two types of liposomes were used: conventional liposomes presenting an unmodified external surface and long circulating liposomes coated with poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG). Liposomal formulations of Ac-SOD and SOD were prepared and labelled with indium-111 and their in vivo fate compared. Data obtained led us to the conclusion that, for liposomes coated with PEG the in vivo fate was not influenced by the insertion of Ac-SOD in the lipid bilayers. The potential therapeutic effect of Ac-SOD enzymosomes was compared with SOD liposomes in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. A faster anti-inflammatory effect was observed for Ac-SOD enzymosomes by monitoring the volume of the inflamed paws. The present results allowed us to conclude that Ac-SOD enzymosomes are nano-carriers combining the advantages of expressing enzymatic activity in intact form and thus being able to exert therapeutic effect even before liposomes disruption, as well as acting as a sustained release of the enzyme. PMID:17169460

  8. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression. PMID:21531199

  9. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression.

  10. Suppression of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and tumor necrosis factor-α by Pongamia pinnata seed extract in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Mandal, Suvra; Kar, Manoj; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata is a plant known for its therapeutic usage in Indian traditional medicine. Despite the controversy regarding toxic flavonoid and erucic acid content, the seed of this plant is consumed in tribal medicine and its oil is used in Ayurveda to treat psoriasis and arthritis. This study explored the potential anti-arthritic effects of a P. pinnata seed (hexane) extract (PSE) at non-lethal doses in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model; possible mechanisms of any observed effects were also explored. After establishing the lethal doses arising from oral exposure to the extract, the material was administered per os daily at two doses (0.3 g/kg/day; 0.5 g/kg/day) to arthritic rats. Other rats received indomethacin or vehicle (control). Treatments were performed for a total of 14 days. One day after the final exposure, the rats were euthanized to permit harvest of various cells, blood, and tissues for analyses. Paw diameter and tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the paws were evaluated as indices for edema and neutrophil infiltration into the tissue. The severity of arthritis in the experimental rats was assessed via measures of urinary hydroxyproline (HP) and glucosamine, and of serum pro-inflammatory TNFα and anti-inflammatory IL-10. The extent of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in peritoneal macrophages harvested from naïve rats and then treated in vitro was also assessed. The results indicated that exposure to PSE significantly decreased paw diameter, tissue myeloperoxidase level, and levels of urinary HP and glucosamine, as well as of serum TNFα and IL-10 in adjuvant-injected (arthritic) rats. In vitro PSE treatment also resulted in a marked inhibition of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in primary cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Thus, PSE appears to be able to prevent experimental arthritis, in part, by helping to maintain the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:23971718

  11. Xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata exert significant therapeutic efficacy on adjuvant-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian; Xia, Yan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jian-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The study was designed to investigate effects of the xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) mice in vivo. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score, body weight loss, paw circumference, histological changes and hyperplasia of lymphatic tissues. Plasma samples were collected for estimation of interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) and sialic acid (SA) in liver were assessed by colorimetric method. Xanthones significantly ameliorated the severity of AA indicated by the physical parameters changes, and reverted the abnormal changes of MDA, GSH, NAG and SA in liver. Levels of IL-1, TNF-α, MCP-1 and VEGF reduced dramatically meanwhile. The effects of xanthones on AA were the outcome of the multitargets activities, and probably associated with NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24419745

  12. A Soft Coral-Derived Compound, 11-epi-Sinulariolide Acetate Suppresses Inflammatory Response and Bone Destruction in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:23675440

  13. A soft coral-derived compound, 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate suppresses inflammatory response and bone destruction in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-You; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  14. UP1304, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba, Mitigates Pain and Inflammation in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though, the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share pain as the prime complaints. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side effects. Hence, the need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is an overdue. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP1304, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the botanical composition were demonstrated in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats with oral dose ranges of 50–200 mg/kg. Ibuprofen at a dose of 100 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. Ex vivo sulfated glycosaminoglycan inhibition assays were performed. Results: Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance, suppression of paw edema and ankle thickness were observed in animals treated with UP1304 compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats. These results were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment. Inhibitions of proteoglycan degradation were observed in a range of 37.5–61.7% for concentration of UP1304 at 50–200 μg/mL when compared to interleukin-1α-exposed untreated explants. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1304, for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, could potentially be considered agent of botanical origin for the improvement of arthritis associated symptoms. SUMMARY Pain is one of the cardinal signs of arthritis.Long term applications of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief are associated with cardiovascular

  15. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  16. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity.

  17. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-01-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  18. Chrysin alleviates testicular dysfunction in adjuvant arthritic rats via suppression of inflammation and apoptosis: Comparison with celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Arab, Hany H.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.

    2014-09-01

    Long standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with testicular dysfunction and subfertility. Few studies have addressed the pathogenesis of testicular injury in RA and its modulation by effective agents. Thus, the current study aimed at evaluating the effects of two testosterone boosting agents; chrysin, a natural flavone and celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in testicular impairment in rats with adjuvant arthritis, an experimental model of RA. Chrysin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and celecoxib (5 mg/kg) were orally administered to Wistar rats once daily for 21 days starting 1 h before arthritis induction. Chrysin suppressed paw edema with comparable efficacy to celecoxib. More important, chrysin, dose-dependently and celecoxib attenuated the testicular injury via reversing lowered gonadosomatic index and histopathologic alterations with preservation of spermatogenesis. Both agents upregulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression and serum testosterone with concomitant restoration of LH and FSH. Furthermore, they suppressed inflammation via abrogation of myeloperoxidase, TNF-α and protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS besides elevation of IL-10. Alleviation of the testicular impairment was accompanied with suppression of oxidative stress via lowering testicular lipid peroxides and nitric oxide. With respect to apoptosis, both agents downregulated FasL mRNA expression and caspase-3 activity in favor of cell survival. For the first time, these findings highlight the protective effects of chrysin and celecoxib against testicular dysfunction in experimental RA which were mediated via boosting testosterone in addition to attenuation of testicular inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Generally, the 50 mg/kg dose of chrysin exerted comparable protective actions to celecoxib. - Highlights: • Chrysin and celecoxib alleviated testicular suppression in adjuvant arthritis. • They attenuated histopathological damage and preserved spermatogenesis

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Sida rhombifolia stems and roots in adjuvant induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Limmy, T P

    2012-04-01

    Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer anti-oxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Herbal medicine provides a foundation for various traditional medicine systems worldwide. The Sida species is one of the most important families of medicinal plants in India. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Sida rhombifolia extracts for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. The altered levels of hematological parameters were reverted to near normal levels, especially the elevated rate of erythrocyte sedimentation was significantly reduced by S. rhombifolia extracts in experimental rats. Oral administration of root and stem of S. rhombifolia extracts significantly increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological and transmission electron microscopy observations made on the hind limb tissue.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract in an antigen-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-06-13

    The red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. This study sought to investigate the cartilage-protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using (1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and (2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents), and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis.

  1. Nociceptive sensitivity and opioid antinociception and antihyperalgesia in Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles D; Nickerson, Michael D

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to examine sex differences in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and sex differences in opioid antinociception and anti-hyperalgesia. Female rats developed inflammation and hyperalgesia faster and exhibited greater peak hyperalgesia than male rats. In arthritic (CFA-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during estrus and proestrus, and in nonarthritic (vehicle-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during proestrus. Morphine and oxycodone were more potent in male than female arthritic rats, and butorphanol was more potent and effective in male than female arthritic rats. The potency of morphine was increased in arthritic rats, although to a greater magnitude in males. The potency of oxycodone was increased in male but not female arthritic rats. The potency of butorphanol was increased in arthritic male rats and the maximal antinociceptive effect of butorphanol was increased in arthritic female rats, but it did not result in greater than 20% antinociception. Morphine, oxycodone, and butorphanol all produced antihyperalgesic effects (returning thresholds of arthritic rats to the thresholds of nonarthritic rats) with greater potency in males than females. The peripherally acting opioid agonist loperamide produced intermediate levels of antinociception in male and female arthritic rats and no antinociception in nonarthritic rats. Loperamide was more potent in male than female arthritic rats at producing antihyperalgesia. These data demonstrate sex differences in arthritis-induced hyperalgesia and responsiveness to opioid analgesics. In arthritic rats, the antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are most probably mediated by both central and peripheral opioid receptors, whereas their antihyperalgesic effects are mediated primarily by actions at peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15608071

  2. Fish Oil and Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis: Inhibitory Effect on Leukocyte Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Kummer, Raquel; Tronco, Rafael Prizon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of n-3 fatty acids, has been studied for its beneficial effects in many diseases. Recent studies have shown the robust anti-inflammatory activity of fish oil (FO), when administered orally to rats, in models of acute inflammation. Herein, we investigated if treatment with fish oil preparation (FOP) could interfere with the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. We also evaluated the effect of treatment on rolling behavior and leukocyte adhesion in vivo and on leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro. Treatment with FOP (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) initiated on the day of induction of arthritis (day 0) and maintained for 21 days reduced the total number of leukocytes recruited into the joint cavity, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in arthritic rats, and leukocyte migration in response to stimulation with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Together, our data provide evidence that FOP plays an important inhibitory role in the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. PMID:26378008

  3. Optimization of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for management of arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatachalam Senthil; Kumar, Dilly Ashok; Kalaivani, Kalyanasundaram; Gangadharan, Akkalayi Chandrapuram; Raju, K V S Narayana; Thejomoorthy, Pammi; Manohar, Bhakthavatchalam Murali; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2005-09-01

    Studies were undertaken to find out the effects of low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) in rats, a widely used model for screening potential therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AIA was induced by an intradermal injection of a suspension of heat killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (500 mug/0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of male Wistar rats. This resulted in swelling, loss of body weight, increase in paw volume as well as the activity of lysosomal enzymes viz., acid phosphatase, cathepsin D, and beta-glucuronidase and significant radiological and histological changes. PEMF therapy for arthritis involved optimization of three significant factors, viz., frequency, intensity, and duration; and the waveform used is sinusoidal. The use of factorial design in lieu of conventional method resulted in the development of an ideal combination of these factors. PEMF was applied using a Fransleau-Braunbeck coil system. A magnetic field of 5 Hz x 4 muT x 90 min was found to be optimal in lowering the paw edema volume and decreasing the activity of lysosomal enzymes. Soft tissue swelling was shown to be reduced as evidenced by radiology. Histological studies confirmed reduction in inflammatory cells infiltration, hyperplasia, and hypertrophy of cells lining synovial membrane. PEMF was also shown to have a membrane stabilizing action by significantly inhibiting the rate of release of beta-glucuronidase from lysosomal rich and sub-cellular fractions. The results indicated that PEMF could be developed as a potential therapy in the treatment of arthritis in humans.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  5. Histological assessment of intra-articular versus intra-peritoneal betamethasone L.A on tempromandibular joint arthritis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Ghalayani, Parichehr; Razavi, Seid Mohammad; Babadi, Fatemeh; Sardari, Farimah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pain and dysfunction of the tempromandibular joint (TMJ) are major clinical problems, especially, in arthritis. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intra-articular (IA) versus intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of betamethasone long acting on TMJ arthritis in rat. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, an inflammation in the left TMJ of 29 rats was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. After 1 week, rats were divided into 5 groups: Group A: Rats of this group were not treated (n = 5); groups B, C: Rats were injected with a single dose of ½ mg/kg betamethasone L.A IA (n = 6); groups D, E: Rats received a single dose of ½ mg/kg betamethasone L.A IP (n = 6). Rats in groups B and D after 1 week, and in groups C, E and A, at 4 weeks after drug injection were sacrificed. Severity of inflammation was scored from 1 to 11 according to synovial hyperplasia, vascularity, fibrin deposits, and synovial adhesion. Results were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (P < 0/05 was considered significant). Results: Significant differences were existed between groups B, D (P = 0/004) and groups C, E (P = 0/002). The least severity of Inflammation and also evidence of resorbtion in condylar head was seen in group C. Conclusion: The best therapeutic response was seen with IA injection of betamethasone L.A in comparison with IP injection. PMID:24130589

  6. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  7. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of the multidrug herbomineral formulation in male Wistar rats against rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Snehal S.; Shah, Praboth V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunological and inflammatory mechanisms, which may play a role in a number of disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ancient ayurvedic physicians had developed certain dietary and therapeutic measures to arrest or prevent these disorders. Objective: Rheuma off gold (RG) is a herbomineral formulation recommended by ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of RA. This study was carried out to lend scientific evidence to the efficacy claim for RG in the management of RA in folklore medicine. Materials and Methods: Arthritis was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Treatment with formulation 100 mg/kg and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given to rats intragastrically once a day from day 1 to day 21 and after which estimation of physical, biochemical, and hematological parameters were carried out. Results: Treatment of formulation to adjuvant induced arthritic animal showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) improvement in physical parameters like arthritic index, paw edema, paw thickness as well as reduction of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein, serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The treatment also produced statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in hemoglobin percent and improvement in splenomegaly and thymus index. In the histopathological examination, ameliorative effect of formulation was observed in hyperplasia of synovium, pannus formation, and destruction of the joint space. Conclusion: The results obtained in experiments indicated that the formulation significantly inhibited the adjuvant-induced arthritis which was comparable to dexamethasone and had preferable anti-inflammatory effect without significant side effect. Thus, the formulation may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. PMID:23930040

  8. Combination of coenzyme Q10 with methotrexate suppresses Freund's complete adjuvant-induced synovial inflammation with reduced hepatotoxicity in rats: Effect on oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mona K

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a cornerstone disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, possessing both anti-arthritic and hepatoprotective potential. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of CoQ10 (10mg/kg) alone and in combination with MTX (2mg/kg) on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, and to elucidate the potential properties of CoQ10 in ameliorating MTX-induced liver damage in rats. Rats were assigned to; normal, arthritic, MTX treated, CoQ10 treated or a combination of MTX and CoQ10. CoQ10 administration potentiated the antiarthritic effect of MTX. Moreover, the combination therapy was effective in attenuating the severity of MTX-induced liver damage displayed by the improvement in hepatospecific serum markers and confirmed by the histo-pathological evaluation. Additionally, it attenuated the hepatic oxidative stress and the intensity of inflammatory mediators associated with MTX administration as evident by the regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and the inhibitory effects on TNF-α and IL-6 levels. These results revealed that CoQ10 can serve as a useful adjuvant and promote the safe use of MTX in the management of arthritis, not only by potentiating the antiarthritic effect of MTX, but also by alleviating MTX-induced hepatocellular injury.

  9. Anti-bone resorption activity of deer antler aqua-acupunture, the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong) in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Kap-Sung; Choi, Byeong-Joon; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Seung-Duk; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-01-15

    Effect of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, a traditional immunosuppressive acupuncture, was evaluated to assess the reductions in bone mass, strength, and turnover in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. For measuring the above parameters, a 20-day dosing experiment was performed using 6-week-old female Lewis rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting the adjuvant into the hind paw of the Lewis rats. The age-dependent increases in the body weight, lumbar bone mineral content and density (BMC and BMD) and compressive strength were disturbed in the arthritic rats. At 10 days, the histomorphometric parameters of bone formation (BFR/BS and BFR/BV) and the serum osteocalcin levels were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls of Lewis rats. However, the BMC values corrected for body weight did not differ significantly between the arthritic and normal rats, and the bone minerals were not reduced when they were compared with the baseline controls. At 20 days, the parameters of bone minerals and strength of the lumbar body in the arthritic rats, both with and without correction for body weight, were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls. The trabecular mineralizing surface remained significantly reduced and the osteoclast numbers were increased. DAA at the doses of 10, 20, 50 and 100 microg/kg, administered by Shinsu (B23) acupuncture daily from the start of the experiment, significantly prevented the development of the chronic paw edema at 20 days. The reductions in the parameters such as bone minerals, strength, and trabecular bone formation, and the increase in osteoclast number were alleviated by this DAA. Age-dependent increases in the lumbar height, disturbed by the adjuvant injection, were also maintained. These results indicated that a 20-day-period is necessary to obtain sufficient reductions in the bone mass and strength of the lumbar body

  10. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  11. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    PubMed Central

    Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described. PMID:23554193

  12. Distinct alterations in ATP-binding cassette transporter expression in liver, kidney, small intestine, and brain in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Norikane, Sari; Okada, Ayaka; Adachi, Mamiko; Kato, Yukio; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathophysiological changes of infection or inflammation are associated with alterations in the production of numerous absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion-related proteins. However, little information is available on the effects of inflammation on the expression levels and activities of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We examined the effect of acute (on day 7) and chronic (on day 21) inflammation on the expression of ABC transporters in some major tissues in rat. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats was used as an animal model for inflammation. The mRNA levels of mdr1a and mdr1b encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decreased significantly in livers of AA rats on day 21. Hepatic protein levels of P-gp, Mrp2, and Bcrp decreased significantly in membranes but not homogenates of AA rats after 7 days and after 21 days of treatment with adjuvant. Contrary to liver, protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2, but not Bcrp in kidney, increased significantly in membranes. The biliary excretion of rhodamine 123 was decreased in rats with chronic inflammation owing to decreases in efflux activities of P-gp. Our results showed that the expression of transporters in response to inflammation was organ dependent. In particular, hepatic and renal P-gp and Mrp2 exhibited opposite changes in membrane protein levels.

  13. Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, D.C.; Zhang, L.P.; Ma, F.; Abshire, S.M.; McIlwrath, S.L.; Stinchcomb, A.L.; Westlund, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current arthritis treatments often have side-effects attributable to active compounds as well as route of administration. Cannabidiol (CBD) attenuates inflammation and pain without side-effects, but CBD is hydrophobic and has poor oral bioavailability. Topical drug application avoids gastrointestinal administration, first pass metabolism, providing more constant plasma levels. Methods This study examined efficacy of transdermal CBD for reduction in inflammation and pain, assessing any adverse effects in a rat complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced monoarthritic knee joint model. CBD gels (0.6, 3.1, 6.2 or 62.3 mg/day) were applied for 4 consecutive days after arthritis induction. Joint circumference and immune cell invasion in histological sections were measured to indicate level of inflammation. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in response to noxious heat stimulation determined nociceptive sensitization, and exploratory behaviour ascertained animal’s activity level. Results Measurement of plasma CBD concentration provided by transdermal absorption revealed linearity with 0.6–6.2 mg/day doses. Transdermal CBD gel significantly reduced joint swelling, limb posture scores as a rating of spontaneous pain, immune cell infiltration and thickening of the synovial membrane in a dose-dependent manner. PWL recovered to near baseline level. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord (CGRP, OX42) and dorsal root ganglia (TNFα) revealed dose-dependent reductions of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Results showed 6.2 and 62 mg/day were effective doses. Exploratory behaviour was not altered by CBD indicating limited effect on higher brain function. Conclusions These data indicate that topical CBD application has therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects. PMID:26517407

  14. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been considered as an approach to addressing the consequences of different inflammatory disorders. The spore-forming probiotic strain Bacillus coagulans has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects in both animals and humans. The prebiotic inulin also potentially affects the immune system as a result of the change in the composition or fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Objective In the present study, an in vivo model was conducted to investigate the possible influences of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin, both in combination and/or separately, on the downregulation of immune responses and the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using arthritis-induced rat model. Design Forty-eight healthy male Wistar rats were randomly categorized into six experimental groups as follows: 1) control: normal healthy rats fed with standard diet, 2) disease control (RA): arthritis-induced rats fed with standard diet, 3) prebiotic (PRE): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin, 4) probiotic (PRO): RA+ 109 spores/day B. coagulans by orogastric gavage, 5) synbiotic (SYN): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin and 109 spores/day B. coagulans, and 6) treatment control: (INDO): RA+ 3 mg/kg/day indomethacin by orogastric gavage. Feeding with the listed diets started on day 0 and continued to the end of study. On day 14, rats were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis activity was evaluated by the biochemical parameters and paw thickness. Biochemical assay for fibrinogen (Fn), serum amyloid A (SAA), and TNF-α and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (α1AGp) was performed on day 21, 28, and 35 (7, 14 and 21 days post RA induction), respectively. Results Pretreatment with PRE, PRO, and SYN diets significantly inhibits SAA and Fn production in arthritic rats (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, was seen in the PRE, PRO, and SYN groups (P

  15. KCa1.1 inhibition attenuates fibroblast-like synoviocyte invasiveness and ameliorates rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Mark R.; Hu, Xueyou; Huq, Redwan; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Sun, Liang; Khan, Fatima S.; Laragione, Teresina; Horrigan, Frank T.; Gulko, Pércio S.; Beeton, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) participate in joint inflammation and damage during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its animal models. The purpose of this study was to define the importance of KCa1.1 (BK, Maxi-K, Slo1, KCNMA1) channel expression and function in FLS and to establish these channels as potential new targets for RA therapy. Methods We compared KCa1.1 expression levels in FLS from rats with the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model of RA and in FLS from healthy rats. We then used ex vivo functional assays combined with siRNA-induced knock-down, over-expression, and functional modulation of KCa1.1 in PIA-FLS. Finally, we determined the effectiveness of modulating KCa1.1 in two rat models of RA, moderate PIA and severe complete Freund’s adjuvant collagen-induced arthritis (CFA-CIA). Results We found that PIA-FLS express the KCa1.1 channel as their major potassium channel, as do FLS from patients with RA. In contrast, FLS from healthy rats expressed fewer of these channels. Inhibiting the function or expression of KCa1.1 ex vivo reduced the proliferation, production of proteases, and invasive properties of PIA-FLS whereas opening native KCa1.1 or over-expressing the channel enhanced the invasiveness of both PIA-FLS and FLS isolated from healthy rats. Treatment with a KCa1.1 channel blocker starting at onset of clinical signs stopped disease progression in both PIA and CFA-CIA, reduced joint and bone damage, and inhibited FLS invasiveness and proliferation. Conclusion Our results demonstrate a critical role for KCa1.1 channels in the regulation of FLS invasiveness and suggest they represent a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25252152

  16. Effect of ethanol extract of an ayurvedic preparation (Pathyadya Churna) on arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Madhavi G.; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the anti-arthritic activity of Pathyadya Churna ethanol extract (PCE) in rats. Materials and Methods: Formaldehyde (2% v/v) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA 0.l mL) was injected in the left hind paw of male Wistar rats to develop arthritis. These rats were treated with three doses (135, 270, and 540 mg/kg) of PCE and one dose (10 mg/kg) of indomethacin. Anti-arthritic activity of the extract was assessed by noting paw volumes, rheumatoid factor (RF), blood parameters, and histological changes. Results: PCE treatment reduced paw swelling in arthritis caused by both formaldehyde and CFA. In CFA-treated rats, a significant decrease (P < 0.001) was seen in hemoglobin (13.92 g/dL to 9.97 g/dL), red blood cell count (7.32 million/mm3 to 6.58 million/mm3), and packed cell volume (44.04% to 30.56%). There were also significant (P < 0.001) elevations in white blood cell count (8220/–11,420/mm3), platelets (2.46–4.15 lakhs/mL), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (3.76–8.03/60 min), RF (7.17–26.77 IU/mL), triglycerides (71.69–96.60 mg/dL), total cholesterol (96.85–145.05 mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein (53.11–109.60 mg/dL), and very low-density lipoprotein (14.34–19.32 mg/dL). In CFA-induced arthritic rats, high-density lipoprotein decreased significantly (29.40 mg/dL to 16.13 mg/dL). Marked changes were noted in the histology of ankles. Treatment with PCE significantly reversed all these hematological and histological changes in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: PCE has a significant anti-arthritic activity in rats and is free from toxic effects. PMID:27127317

  17. Ramipril and haloperidol as promising approaches in managing rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Fahmy Wahba, Mariam Gamal; Shehata Messiha, Basim Anwar; Abo-Saif, Ali Ahmed

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a challenging autoimmune disorder, whose treatments usually cause severe gastrointestinal, renal and other complications. We aimed to evaluate the beneficial anti-arthritic effects of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril and a dopamine receptor blocker, haloperidol, on Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced RA in adult female albino rats. Rats were allocated into a normal control group, an arthritis control group, two reference treatment groups receiving dexamethasone (1.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/day), and two treatment groups receiving ramipril (0.9 mg/kg/day) and haloperidol (1 mg/kg/day). Serum rheumatoid factor, matrix metalloprotinease-3 (MMP-3) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein as specific rheumatoid biomarkers, serum immunoglobulin G and antinuclear antibody as immunological biomarkers, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) as immunomodulatory cytokines, serum myeloperoxidase and C-reactive protein as inflammatory biomarkers, as well as malondialdehyde and glutathione reduced (GSH) as oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed. A histopathological study on joints and spleens was performed to support the results of biochemical estimations. Ramipril administration significantly corrected all the measured biomarkers, being restored back to normal levels except for MMP-3, TNF-α and IL-10. Haloperidol administration restored all the measured biomarkers back to normal levels except for TNF-α, IL-10 and GSH. In conclusion, ACE inhibitors represented by ramipril and dopamine receptor blockers represented by haloperidol may represent new promising protective strategies against RA, at least owing to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potentials.

  18. Topical mannitol reduces inflammatory edema in a rat model of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cavone, L; Calosi, L; Cinci, L; Moroni, F; Chiarugi, A

    2012-01-01

    The hexahydric alcohol mannitol is widely used to shift fluids from the intracellular to the extracellular compartments, to increase diuresis and improve mucus clearance in the airways. In principle, because of its physicochemical properties, topical mannitol might also draw fluids out of epidermis or mucosa. Here, we report that topical mannitol applications on the hind paws of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis reduced paw thickness and tissue edema without affecting the inflammatory infiltrates. Of note, the anti-edema effects of acute (4 h) mannitol application occurred earlier than those prompted by a similar treatment with classic anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac or ketoprofen. Yet, the extent of edema reduction was higher with diclofenac or ketoprofen than with mannitol when the drugs were applied in a chronic (16 h) paradigm. Together, data demonstrate that topical application of mannitol exerts potent and fast anti-edema effects in a rat model of joint inflammation, suggesting a possible utilization in patients affected by osseo-arthritic disorders.

  19. Lupeol, a triterpenoid isolated from Calotropis gigantea latex ameliorates the primary and secondary complications of FCA induced adjuvant disease in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Saratha, Venkatesan; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2012-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that affects 1% of the adult population worldwide. Calotropis gigantea is a xerophytic, latex producing medicinal plant widely distributed in nature. Different parts of the plant have been traditionally used for the treatment of various ailments including arthritis. In the present study, we have isolated and characterized lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpene from the dialyzable fraction of the latex and evaluated the anti-arthritic properties of lupeol in Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis in rats. Lupeol (50 mg/kg b.w/day) was administered orally to AA rats for 4 weeks. The alterations in body weight gain, paw volume, RBC, WBC, Hb, EPO, ESR, platelets and PCV were recorded. The activities of serum AST, ALT and ALP were also assayed. The levels of lipid profile were estimated. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 were also analyzed. The results of present study indicate the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of lupeol present in the C. gigantea latex.

  20. Role of T lymphocytes in collagen II-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L.; Holmdahl, R.; Larsson, E.; Wigzell, H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of T lymphocytes in collagen II induced arthritis in rats has been investigated. Functional T cells were needed for the development of arthritis since none out of 14 nude rats injected with collagen type II developed arthritis, whereas 11 out of 14 of their normal counterparts did. With the help of antibodies specific for Ia antigens and different T cell subsets in the rats, an immunohistochemical method was used to demonstrate that T cells, predominantly of `helper' type and anti-Ia reactive non-T cells were abundant in the arthritic synovial tissue. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:6219836

  1. Analgesic activity of diflunisal [MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] in rats with hyperalgesia induced by Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Winter, C A; Kling, P J; Tocco, D J; Tanabe, K

    1979-12-01

    A method is described for testing analgesia for narcotic or nonnarcotic drugs in rats injected with Freund's adjuvant in the tail, by manipulation of the tail the day after injection, or of the feet after the development of adjuvant arthritis. The method is responsive to a behavioral depressant or an anti-inflammatory steroid. Diflunisal (MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] exhibited activity in this assay after oral administration with potency about 25 times greater than that of aspirin, about 3 times that of glafenine and twice that of zomepirac. The onset of activity was within a 1/2 hour for narcotic analgesics but required about an hour for non-narcotic compounds. With the latter, the peak of activity was not attained until 2 to 4 hr, depending on the compound. The peak for diflunisal was delayed until the 3rd or 4th hour, but the onset of action was more prompt and the duration greater as the dose was increased. [14C]Diflunisal was concentrated to some extent in the inflamed tissue after adjuvant injection. Peak levels both in plasma and tissue appeared about 2 hr before peak analgesic effect. Repeated administration of large doses produced neither tolerance nor sensitization to the analgesic action of diflunisal. Naloxone and naltrexone did not antagonize the action of the compound, but when morphine and diflunisal were given together, the overall effect was enhanced.

  2. Septic arthritis secondary to rat bite fever: a challenging diagnostic course.

    PubMed

    Budair, Basil; Goswami, Karan; Dhukaram, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    We describe a challenging diagnostic course of a case of septic arthritis secondary to rat bite fever (Streptobacillus moniliformis) in a 29-year-old man who presented with generalised malaise, polyarthralgia and bilateral palmoplantar rash.

  3. Efficacy of ultrasound mediated microbubbles in diclofenac gel to enhance transdermal permeation in rheumatoid arthritis induced rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, A H; Chuang, H C; Chung, H Y

    2015-08-01

    In previous study in the literature, the effect of ultrasound on the transdermal permeation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac has been investigated. Therapeutic ultrasound can increase circulation in the inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Recently, transdermal drug delivery has been demonstrated by ultrasound (US) combining with microbubbles (MBs) contrast agent. In this study, the efficiency of US-MBs mediated diclofenac delivery for adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats was evaluated. RA was induced by injection of 100 μl Freund's complete adjuvant into the ankle joint in SD male rats (250-300g) and were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group (C); (2) penetrating diclofenac alone (D); (3) US alone (U); (4) US combined with penetrating diclofenac (DU); (5) US combined with MBs and penetrating diclofenac (DUB). The evaluations of ankle width were performed for 10 days by high frequency (40MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler mode imaging before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of arthritis induced show synovitis and neovascularity. After treatment, only a little neovascularity has been observed. The recovery rate at 10th day in the group DUB (97.7±2.7 %) was significantly higher than in the group C (1.0±2.7 %), group D (37.5±4.6 %), group U (75.5±4.2 %) and group DU (87.3±5.2 %) (p <; 0.05). Our results investigated that the treatments of US and MBs can increase skin permeability to enhance diclofenac sodium delivery and inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounded the arthritic ankle. In color Doppler imaging, after the combination treatment, the synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area was reduced quickly.

  4. Cia27 is a novel non-MHC arthritis severity locus on rat chromosome 10 syntenic to the rheumatoid arthritis 17q22-q25 locus.

    PubMed

    Brenner, M; Laragione, T; Yarlett, N C; Li, W; Mello, A; Gulko, P S

    2006-07-01

    Cia27 on rat chromosome 10 is a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) severity quantitative trait locus originally identified in a study of (DA x ACI) F2. As an initial step towards the positional cloning of the Cia27 gene, a 17 cM (21 Mb) interval from the DA strain (arthritis-susceptible) containing the two-logarithm of odds support interval comprising Cia27 was introgressed into the ACI (arthritis-resistant) background through genotype-guided congenic breeding. ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics developed a significantly more severe form of arthritis (CIA), with a 5.9-fold increase in median arthritis severity index, a parameter known to correlate with synovial inflammation, and cartilage and bone erosions, compared with ACI (P< or =0.001). The arthritis severity enhancing effect could be detected from day 21 onwards. Rats heterozygous at the congenic interval developed a disease similar to ACI rats, suggesting that DA alleles operate in a recessive manner. Levels of autoantibodies anti-rat type II collagen did not correlate with arthritis severity. Synovial tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) were significantly increased in ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics compared with ACI. These results demonstrate that Cia27 harbors a novel arthritis severity regulatory gene. The identification of this gene should facilitate the identification of the rheumatoid arthritis gene mapped to the human syntenic region on chromosome 17q22-q25. PMID:16691185

  5. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis.

  6. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  7. Quantitative gait analysis as a method to assess mechanical hyperalgesia modulated by disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rat

    PubMed Central

    Simjee, Shabana Usman; Jawed, Huma; Quadri, Javeria; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, azothioprine, chloroquine, D-penicillamine, methotrexate and sodium aurothiomalate (gold salt) were evaluated for possible disease-modifying effects in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Gait analysis was used to examine the role of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the development of pain. Body weights were also measured to monitor the progression of disease and the systemic antiarthritic effects of the test compounds used in this study, as well as their systemic toxicity. Our results showed that azothioprine (5 mg/kg/day), chloroquine (12.5 mg/kg/day), sodium aurothiomalate (2.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/week) not only inhibited the macroscopic changes such as erythema and swelling of limbs, but also exhibited significant reversal of gait deficits seen in the untreated or saline-treated arthritic rats. No reduction in the body weights were observed in the arthritic rats treated with azothioprine, chloroquine, sodium aurothiomalate and methotrexate. D-Penicillamine (12.5 mg/kg/day), however, showed a significant reduction (P < 0.03) in the body weights of the arthritic rats over a period of 22 days; furthermore, it was unable to show any reduction in arthritic score (P < 0.1). In earlier experiments, chloroquine and methotrexate failed to suppress carageenan-induced edema, suggesting that the mode of antiarthritic action may be different from those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Since these disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are reported to have an immunomodulatory role, especially the gold salt, which influences the monocyte–macrophage system, it is suggested that the observed antiarthritic effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs may be partly attributed to their immunomodulatory activity. PMID:17848187

  8. Arthritis-inducing ability of a synthetic adjuvant, N-acetylmuramyl peptides, and bacterial disaccharide peptides related to different oil vehicles and their composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, O; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S; Shiba, T; Kusumoto, S; Yokogawa, K; Kawata, S; Ozawa, A

    1980-01-01

    A synthetic adjuvant, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP), failed to produce polyarthritis with a wide dose range in a water-in-oil emulsion of mineral oil such as liquid paraffin, Drakeol, or heavy mineral oil. MDP, however, produced moderate to severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence in a water-in-oil emulsion made up of Difco incomplete adjuvant, which consists of Bavol F as an oil vehicle and Arlacel A as an emulsifier. N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-L-isoglutamine did not produce arthritis, whereas 4,6-diacetyl-MDP produced the disease. Bacterial peptidoglycans, such as disaccharide peptides which were N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanine and N-acetylglucosaminyl-6,o-acetyl-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanine, also produced polyarthritis with low incidence in Difco oil but not in the other mineral oils described above. MDP and bacterial disaccharide peptides were able to produce the disease even in the latter mineral oil only when the concentration of Arlacel A was increased from 15% to 20 to 30% in the oil. We concluded that one of the minimal essential structures responsible for development of this disease is MDP, although the role of the oil vehicle remained uncertain, and there is no direct correlation between granulona formation and arthritogenicity of MDP. PMID:7399708

  9. Lipopolysaccharide induces recurrence of arthritis in rat joints previously injured by peptidoglycan-polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Rat ankle joints injected intraarticularly with 5 micrograms of group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-APS) developed an acute course of arthritis. Recurrence of arthritis was induced in 100% of these joints by intravenous injection of as little as 10 micrograms of Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 3 wk after intraarticular injection. This reaction was similar in athymic and euthymic rats. Buffalo rats were less susceptible than Lewis or Sprague- Dawley rats. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Escherichia coli LPS, and S. typhimurium Re mutant LPS, were also active. Re mutant LPS activity was greatly reduced by mixing with polymyxin B. E. coli lipid A was weakly active. An acute synovitis of much less incidence, severity, and duration was seen in contralateral joints injected initially with saline, and in ankle joints of naive, previously uninjected rats after intravenous LPS injection. The intravenous injection of the muramidase mutanolysin on day 0 or 7 after intraarticular PG-APS injection prevented LPS-induced recurrence of arthritis. These studies suggest that the phlogistic activities of lipid A and peptidoglycan might interact in an inflammatory disease process, and that LPS may play a role in recurrent episodes of rheumatoid arthritis or reactive arthritis. PMID:3295108

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of co-administered MF59-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic and plain 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccines in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologicals.

    PubMed

    Milanetti, F; Germano, V; Nisini, R; Donatelli, I; Di Martino, A; Facchini, M; Ferlito, C; Cappella, A; Crialesi, D; Caporuscio, S; Biselli, R; Rossi, F; Salemi, S; D'Amelio, R

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients under immunosuppressive therapy are particularly susceptible to infections, mainly of the respiratory tract, thus vaccination may represent a strategy to reduce their incidence in this vulnerable population. In the 2009-10 influenza season, the safety and immunogenicity of co-administered non-adjuvanted seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines were evaluated in this study in 30 RA patients under therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or Abatacept and in 13 healthy controls (HC). Patients and HC underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation before (T0), 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2) after vaccinations. No severe adverse reactions, but a significant increase in total mild side effects in patients versus HC were observed. Both influenza vaccines fulfilled the three criteria of the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Seroconversion rate for any viral strain in patients and HC was, respectively, 68 versus 45 for H1-A/Brisbane/59/07, 72 versus 81 for H3-A/Brisbane/10/07, 68 versus 54 for B/Brisbane/60/08 and 81 versus 54 for A/California/7/2009. A slight increase in activated interferon (IFN)-γ-, TNF-α- or interleukin (IL)-17A-secreting T cells at T1 compared to T0, followed by a reduction at T2 in both patients and HC, was registered. In conclusion, simultaneous administration of adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines is safe and highly immunogenic. The largely overlapping results between patients and HC, in terms of antibody response and cytokine-producing T cells, may represent further evidence for vaccine safety and immunogenicity in RA patients on biologicals.

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of co-administered MF59-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic and plain 2009-10 seasonal influenza vaccines in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologicals.

    PubMed

    Milanetti, F; Germano, V; Nisini, R; Donatelli, I; Di Martino, A; Facchini, M; Ferlito, C; Cappella, A; Crialesi, D; Caporuscio, S; Biselli, R; Rossi, F; Salemi, S; D'Amelio, R

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients under immunosuppressive therapy are particularly susceptible to infections, mainly of the respiratory tract, thus vaccination may represent a strategy to reduce their incidence in this vulnerable population. In the 2009-10 influenza season, the safety and immunogenicity of co-administered non-adjuvanted seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines were evaluated in this study in 30 RA patients under therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or Abatacept and in 13 healthy controls (HC). Patients and HC underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation before (T0), 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2) after vaccinations. No severe adverse reactions, but a significant increase in total mild side effects in patients versus HC were observed. Both influenza vaccines fulfilled the three criteria of the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Seroconversion rate for any viral strain in patients and HC was, respectively, 68 versus 45 for H1-A/Brisbane/59/07, 72 versus 81 for H3-A/Brisbane/10/07, 68 versus 54 for B/Brisbane/60/08 and 81 versus 54 for A/California/7/2009. A slight increase in activated interferon (IFN)-γ-, TNF-α- or interleukin (IL)-17A-secreting T cells at T1 compared to T0, followed by a reduction at T2 in both patients and HC, was registered. In conclusion, simultaneous administration of adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines is safe and highly immunogenic. The largely overlapping results between patients and HC, in terms of antibody response and cytokine-producing T cells, may represent further evidence for vaccine safety and immunogenicity in RA patients on biologicals. PMID:24666311

  12. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  13. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  14. Conditional pharmacology/toxicology V: ambivalent effects of thiocyanate upon the development and the inhibition of experimental arthritis in rats by aurothiomalate (Myocrysin®) and metallic silver.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Michael; Butters, Desley; Vernon-Roberts, Barrie

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the bizarre and contrary effects of thiocyanate, the major detoxication product of hydrogen cyanide inhaled from tobacco smoke or liberated from cyanogenic foods, e.g. cassava. Thiocyanate both (1) promotes inflammatory disease in rats and (2) facilitates the anti-inflammatory action of historic metal therapies based on gold (Au) or silver (Ag) in three models of chronic polyarthritis in rats. Low doses of nanoparticulate metallic silver (NMS) preparations, i.e. zerovalent silver (Ag°) administered orally, suppressed the mycobacterial ('adjuvant')-induced arthritis (MIA) in rats. Similar doses of cationic silver, Ag(I), administered orally as silver oxide or soluble silver salts were inactive. By contrast, NMS only inhibited the development of the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rats when thiocyanate was also co-administered in drinking water. These (a) arthritis-selective and (b) thiocyanate-inducible effects of Ag° were also observed in some previous, and now extended, studies with the classic anti-arthritic drug, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM, Myocrisin(®)) and its silver analogue (STM), administered subcutaneously to rats developing the same three forms of polyarthritis. In the absence of either Ag° or ATM, thiocyanate considerably increased the severity of the MIA, CIA and PIA, i.e. acting as a pro-pathogen. Hitherto, thiocyanate was considered relatively harmless. This may not be true in rats/people with immuno-inflammatory stress and concomitant leukocyte activation. Collectively, these findings show how the drug action of a xenobiotic might be determined by the nature (and severity) of the experimental inflammation, as an example of conditional pharmacology. They also suggest that an incipient toxicity, even of normobiotics such as thiocyanate, might likewise be modulated beneficially by well-chosen xenobiotics (drugs, nutritional supplements, etc.), i.e. conditional toxicology (Powanda 1995

  15. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (p<0.01). Subcutaneous saline and clonidine (0.12μmol) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. The mixture of an ineffective-dose clonidine (0.12μmol) and a drug (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:26828301

  16. Role of endotoxin in 6-sulfanilamidoindazole(6SAI)-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohmachi, Yasushi; Dekura, Eriha; Miyazaki, Toshiko; Kume, Eisuke; Kitamura, Kazuyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2002-02-01

    6-Sulfanilamidoindazole (6SAI) induces selflimiting arthritis in rats. Since close relationships exist between arthritis and endotoxin, four experiments were conducted to clarify the relationship between endotoxin and 6SAI-induced arthritis. Endotoxin levels in the plasma from the abdominal aorta and portal vein from rats that had 6SAI (500 mg/kg) administered orally for up to 7 days remained within the control values at day 1 and day 3, and were significantly elevated at day 7. Endotoxin levels in the synovial fluid from the same rats showed no significant change. Ankle swelling and redness in rats treated 11 consecutive days with 6SAI did not ameliorate when coadministered with an anti-endotoxin agent, polymyxin B sulfate. Histopathological examination on the ankles of rats treated orally with non-arthiritogenic sulfonamides including sulfonamide, sulfamethoxazole and sulfadimethoxin (250 and 500 mg/kg/day, each compound) for 2 weeks demonstrated no inflammatory changes, while hyperplasia/hypertrophy of thyroid epithelial cells were frequently observed. When histopathological changes in the ankles from rats coadministered with 6SAI and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherihia coli O55:B5, 50 microg/kg, i.v.) were compared with those in rats treated with 6SAI or LPS alone, the ankles from the 6SAI+LPS treated animals had marked edematous inflammation in the synovium and surrounding connective tissues, whereas the LPS-group had only mild focal infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the synovium and the 6SAI-group showed no apparent changes. These results suggest that endotoxin is not a direct cause but a possible acceralating factor of 6SAI-induced arthritis, and that the effects of 6SAI on gut bacteria is not related with the pathogenesis of this model. PMID:11926286

  17. Adjuvant Potential of Selegiline in Attenuating Organ Dysfunction in Septic Rats with Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Jhang, Jhih-Gang; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Ka, Shuk-Man; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Liaw, Wen-Jinn

    2014-01-01

    Selegiline, an anti-Parkinson drug, has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. To explore the effect of selegiline on sepsis, we used a clinically relevant animal model of polymicrobial sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation was performed in male rats under anesthesia. Three hours after surgery, animals were randomized to receive intravenously selegiline (3 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. The administration of CLP rats with selegiline (i) increased arterial blood pressure and vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine, (ii) reduced plasma liver and kidney dysfunction, (iii) attenuated metabolic acidosis, (iv) decreased neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung, and (v) improved survival rate (from 44% to 65%), compared to those in the CLP alone rats. The CLP-induced increases of plasma interleukin-6, organ superoxide levels, and liver inducible nitric oxide synthase and caspase-3 expressions were ameliorated by selegiline treatment. In addition, the histological changes in liver and lung were significantly attenuated in the selegiline -treated CLP group compared to those in the CLP group. The improvement of organ dysfunction and survival through reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in peritonitis-induced sepsis by selegiline has potential as an adjuvant agent for critical ill. PMID:25268350

  18. Pulmonary gallium uptake in rats with granulomatosis induced by complete Freund adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislas-Leguern, G.; Masse, R.; Jaubert, F.; Chretien, J.; Huchon, G.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of gallium-67 uptake in lung granulomatosis, we studied 13 rats in which lung granulomatosis was induced by injection of complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) and 14 controls. Gallium uptake was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lavaged lung. The cells responsible for gallium uptake were identified by latent image activation autoradiography. Gallium activity in both lavaged lungs and bronchoalveolar cells (BAC) was higher in CFA-treated animals than in controls (172,205 +/- 134,783 DPM versus 44,456 +/- 14,486 DPM +/- SD (p less than 0.05) and 40,083 +/- 16,350 DPM versus 9100 +/- 4114 DPM (p less than 0.05), respectively). In control rats, about two-thirds of total lung gallium was located in the interstitium, whereas in CFA-treated rats it was found in the mononuclear cells of lung granulomas. Gallium tracks were more numerous in the alveolar macrophages (AM) of CFA-treated rats than in control AM (28.4 +/- 10.0/field versus 8.4 +/- 3.8/field, p less than 0.001) but the number of tracks was proportional to the number of AM (52.4 +/- 18.7 versus 12.2 +/- 4.3, respectively; p less than 0.001). It is concluded that in rats with CFA-induced lung granulomatosis 1) pulmonary gallium uptake increases, 2) mononuclear cells are responsible for this uptake in both granulomas and AM, and 3) the increased uptake is due to the increased number of mononuclear cells.

  19. The Role of C Fibers in Spinal Microglia Induction and Possible Relation with TRPV3 Expression During Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gazerani, Sasan; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, Homa; Golabi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stimulation of peptidergic fibers activates microglia in the dorsal horn. Microglia activation causes fractalkine (FKN) release, a neuron-glia signal, which enhances pain. The transient vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) mediates the release of neuropeptides, which can subsequently activate glia. TRPV1 and TRPV2 are generally expressed on C and Aδ fibers, respectively. Expression of both proteins is upregulated during inflammation, but expression of TRPV3 after induction of inflammation is unclear. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were used in all experiments. Arthritis was induced in them by single subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in their right hindpaws. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) was used to eliminate peptidergic fibers. We examined the relation between FKN and TRPV3 expression by administration of anti-FKN antibody. Results: Our study findings indicated that 1) spinal TRPV3 was mostly expressed on nonpeptidergic fibers, 2) expression of spinal TRPV3 increased following inflammation, 3) elimination of peptidergic fibers decreased spinal TRPV3 expression, 4) alteration of hyperalgesia was compatible with TRPV3 changes in RTX-treated rat, and 5) anti-FKN antibody reduced spinal TRPV3 expression. Discussion: It seems that the hyperalgesia variation during different phases of CFA-induced arthritis correlates with spinal TRPV3 expression variation on peptidergic fibers. Moreover, spinal microglial activation during CFA inflammation is involved in TRPV3 expression changes via FKN signaling. PMID:27563416

  20. Efficacy of Mitochondrial Antioxidant Plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium Bromide (SkQ1) in the Rat Model of Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, Alexander A.; Kolosova, Nataliya G.; Stefanova, Natalia A.; Lovat, Maxim V.; Egorov, Maxim V.; Manskikh, Vasily N.; Zinovkin, Roman A.; Galkin, Ivan I.; Prikhodko, Anastasia S.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Lukashev, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. Many antioxidants have been tested in arthritis, but their efficacy was, at best, marginal. In this study, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium bromide (SkQ1), was tested in vivo to prevent and cure experimental autoimmune arthritis. In conventional Wistar rats, SkQ1 completely prevented the development of clinical signs of arthritis if administered with food before induction. Further, SkQ1 significantly reduced the fraction of animals that developed clinical signs of arthritis and severity of pathological lesions if administration began immediately after induction of arthritis or at the onset of first symptoms (day 14 after induction). In specific pathogen-free Wistar rats, SkQ1 administered via gavage after induction of arthritis did not reduce the fraction of animals with arthritis but decreased the severity of lesions upon pathology examination in a dose-dependent manner. Efficacious doses of SkQ1 were in the range of 0.25–1.25 nmol/kg/day (0.13–0.7 μg/kg/day), which is much lower than doses commonly used for conventional antioxidants. SkQ1 promoted apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying its pharmacological activity. Considering its low toxicity and the wide therapeutic window, SkQ1 may be a valuable additional therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27293517

  1. Videoradiographic analysis of the range of motion in unilateral experimental knee joint arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The translational and predictive value of animal models highly depends on the validity of respective readout parameters. In arthritis research, there has been a shift from sole threshold testing for pain-related behavior, as well as from swelling and histology assessment for inflammation, toward an analysis of joint function as indicated, for instance, by an increasing number of studies on gait abnormalities. Clinically, the range of motion (ROM) of the affected joint plays a major role in diagnosis and the assessment of treatment benefits. This parameter, however, is only insufficiently detected by currently used analytic systems in animals. Methods Here we used high-resolution videoradiographic analysis to assess ROM in experimental knee joint arthritis in rats. This parameter is described during the 21-day course of antigen-induced arthritis in rats. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of antinociceptive (morphine) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone) treatment on ROM are documented. To obtain additional information on the implications of ROM in animal models, correlations were performed to measure pain-related behavior and inflammation. Results The study animals showed a significant reduction in ROM of the inflamed knee joint in the acute phase of arthritis. This was accompanied by an increase in knee joint movement on the contralateral side, indicating a compensational mechanism. Both morphine and dexamethasone treatment increased and thus normalized ROM. Changes in ROM were further stage-dependently correlated with weight bearing and joint swelling, that is, with both pain-related behavior and signs of inflammation. Conclusions The dynamic ROM observed in freely moving rats in our model of knee joint arthritis might serve as a parameter for global disease activity and might thus represent a promising readout parameter for preclinical assessment regarding the overall efficacy not only of antiarthritic but also of antinociceptive compounds. PMID

  2. Effect of adjuvants on the action of local anesthetics in isolated rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S.; Hough, Karen A.; Gebhart, G.F.; Williams, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing clinical use of adjuvant drugs to prolong the duration of local anesthetic-induced block of peripheral nerves. However, the mechanistic understanding regarding drug interactions between these compounds in the periphery is quite limited. Accordingly, we undertook this study to determine whether selected adjuvants are efficacious in blocking action potential propagation in peripheral nerves at concentrations used clinically, and whether these drugs influence peripheral nerve block produced by local anesthetics. Methods Isolated rat sciatic nerves were used to assess (1) the efficacy of buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, or midazolam, alone and in combination, on action potential propagation; and (2) their influence on the blocking actions of local anesthetics ropivacaine and lidocaine. Compound action potentials (CAPs) from A- and C-fibers were studied before and after drug application. Results At estimated clinical concentrations, neither buprenorphine nor dexamethasone affected either A- or C-waves of the CAP. Clonidine produced a small, but significant attenuation of the C-wave amplitude. Midazolam attenuated both A- and C-wave amplitudes, but with greater potency on the C-wave. The combination of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone had no influence on the potency or duration of local anesthetic- or midazolam-induced block of A-and C-waves of the CAP. Conclusions These results suggest that the reported clinical efficacy of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone influence the actions of local anesthetics via indirect mechanisms. Further identification of these indirect mechanisms may enable the development of novel approaches to achieve longer duration, modality-specific peripheral nerve block. PMID:22430023

  3. Berberis aristata Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis by Inhibition of NF-κB and Activating Nuclear Factor-E2-related Factor 2/hem Oxygenase (HO)-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Arunraja, S

    2016-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) in formaldehyde-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Arthritis was induced by administration of either formaldehyde (2% v/v) or CFA into the subplantar surface of the hind paw of the animal. In formaldehyde-induced arthritis and AIA, treatment of BAHE at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg orally significantly decreased joint inflammation as evidenced by decrease in joint diameter and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in histopathological examination. BAHE treatment demonstrated dose-dependent improvement in the redox status of synovium (decrease in GSH, MDA, and NO levels and increase in SOD and CAT activities). The beneficial effect of BAHE was substantiated with decreased expression of inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and VEGF by immunohistochemistry analysis in AIA model. BAHE increased HO-1/Nrf-2 and suppressed NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in adjuvant immunized joint. Additionally, BAHE abrogated degrading enzymes, as there was decreased protein expression of MMP-3 and -9 in AIA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract via the mechanism of inhibition of NF-κB and activation of Nrf-2/HO-1.

  4. Imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclastogenesis and joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Hashimoto, Jun; Nampei, Akihide; Tsuboi, Hideki; Tateishi, Kosuke; Ono, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a key factor for osteoclastogenesis at the bone-pannus interface in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as a receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Imatinib mesylate inhibits the phosphorylation of c-fms, a receptor for M-CSF. The present study investigates the effect of imatinib mesylate on joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Imatinib mesylate (50 or 150 mg/kg), dexamethasone, or vehicle was administered daily to CIA rats for 4 weeks from the onset of arthritis. Hind-paw swelling and body weight were measured weekly. At weeks 2 and 4, the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints and the ankle and subtalar joints were radiographically and histologically assessed. The effect of imatinib mesylate on osteoclast formation from rat bone marrow cells with M-CSF and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in vitro was also examined. Radiographic assessment showed that 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate suppressed the destruction of the MTP and the ankle and subtalar joints at week 2, and MTP joint destruction at week 4 in CIA rats, although hind-paw swelling was not suppressed. The number of TRAP-positive cells at the bone-pannus interface was significantly reduced in the group administered with 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate compared with that given vehicle at week 4. Imatinib mesylate dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cells in vitro as well as osteoclast formation induced by M-CSF and sRANKL. These findings suggest that imatinib mesylate could prevent joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Passive transfer with serum and evidence that IgG anticollagen antibodies can cause arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that serum from rats with type II collagen-induced arthritis, when fractionated with 50% ammonium sulfate and concentrated, would transfer arthritis to nonimmunized recipients. The arthritis in recipients developed within 18-72 h and displayed all of the major histopathologic characteristics of the early lesion in immunized animals but was transient and less severe. Although consideration was given to the possibility that a circulating immune complex was involved, no evidence of such a complex was detected. Further fractionation of the serum yielded an IgG anticollagen antibody that was fully active in transferring disease. The antibody's reaction was inhibited by the native bovine type II collagen used for immunization of donors and the antibody strongly cross-reacted with homologous type II collage but not with denatured collagen. These studies demonstrate that arthritis in rats can be induced with anti- type II collagen antibodies and suggest that an autoimmune process is involved. Because antibodies to collagen have also been detected in human rheumatic diseases, further investigation of the characteristics of collagen antibodies capable of inducing arthritis seems warranted. PMID:7054355

  6. Oral buprenorphine is anti-inflammatory and modulates the pathogenesis of streptococcal cell wall polymer-induced arthritis in the Lew/SSN rat.

    PubMed

    Volker, D; Bate, M; Gentle, R; Garg, M

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out to determine an effective regimen for pain management in streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in female Lew/SSN rats. Forty weanling rats lin 2 groups) were trained to accept disks of jelly as part of their dietary regimen. At 8 weeks of age weighing 150 g, SCW arthritis was induced and sublingual buprenorphine tablets were incorporated into the jelly disks to alleviate the pain of acute arthritis, which developed 24 h post-induction. Group A rats received buprenorphine at a rate of 1 mg/kg 12 hourly. Group B rats received buprenorphine at a rate of 2 mg/kg 12 hourly. Both groups of rats were monitored for symptoms of distress using an adaptation of the Morton and Griffin scale of adverse reactions. Group A rats with severe arthritis required additional subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of buprenorphine to alleviate the adverse effects of arthritis. Group B rats, with twice the dose of buprenorphine did not require additional s.c. injections of buprenorphine. Histological sections of rat hocks indicated that the inflammation was suppressed in Group B rats. We concluded that oral administration of buprenorphine is an effective method of pain management in the pathogenesis of SCW-induced arthritis in Lew/SSN rats. In this model of arthritis, oral buprenorphine has a significant anti-inflammatory effect and appears to modulate the destructive arthritic phase in joints in this animal model of arthritis.

  7. Clinical and histological assessment of collagen-induced arthritis progression in the diabetes-resistant BB/Wor rat.

    PubMed

    Knoerzer, D B; Donovan, M G; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1997-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis in the diabetes-resistant BB (DR BB)/Wor rat is a severe, aggressive disease initiated by immunization with heterologous native Type II collagen. Onset of clinical symptoms reproducibly occurs in 100% of animals between days 10 and 12 following collagen immunization. Hypertrophy of the synovial lining is the first histological manifestation of the early inflammatory arthritis. A mild inflammatory infiltrate in the synovium rapidly becomes a fibrovascular pannus eroding articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Beginning at the joint margins, an active synovitis is present. Light microscopy and immunohistochemical staining show the infiltrate to be comprised of mononuclear (lymphocytes, macrophages) and polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells. In addition, there is histological evidence for chronic inflammatory nodules and necrotizing vasculitis in connective tissue from diseased joints, both morphologic features associated with rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Subchondral bone erosion appears to be mediated largely by the resorptive action of activated osteoclasts. These histological parameters of disease progression in the DR BB/Wor rat are similar to human rheumatoid arthritis. The extensive degree of similarity in the pathology of DR BB/Wor rat collagen-induced arthritis and human rheumatoid arthritis supports the role of this model as an in vivo disease model for human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:9061845

  8. Triphala herbal extract suppresses inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and adjuvant-induced arthritic rats via inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, Mahaboob Khan

    2016-07-01

    This study sought to explore the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of triphala in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, triphala (100-300 μg/ml) significantly suppressed production of inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VEGF, NO, PGE2), intracellular free radicals and release of lysosomal enzymes (e.g. acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D) in a dose-related manner. With triphala, mRNA levels of genes for pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1, inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 enzymes and NF-κBp65 were down-regulated in the stimulated cells; in contrast, there was up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Western blot analyses revealed that triphala suppressed the protein expression of NF-κB p65 and p-NF-κB p65 in the stimulated cells, which subsequently reduced over-expression of TNFα, IL-17, iNOS and COX-2 in a manner similar to that observed with BAY 11-7082, an IκB kinase inhibitor. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed inhibition of p-NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and COX-2 protein expression caused by triphala. Consistent with these findings, the animal studies presented confirmed that triphala exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model by reducing of inflammatory mediator (e.g. IL-17, COX-2 and RANKL) expression via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Taken together, the results here demonstrated that triphala has potential anti-inflammatory applications that could be used for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27438966

  9. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  10. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A.; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  11. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity.

  12. Evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A as an immune adjuvant for photodynamic therapy in a rat sarcoma model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment option for several forms of human cancer, and like traditional chemotherapy and ionizing radiation therapy, PDT alone is not curative for some cases. Recent efforts have aimed at developing strategies for adjuvant therapy for PDT. Given the nature of PDT-mediated cell damage, immunotherapy is a promising adjuvant for long-term control of solid tumors. A candidate immune stimulant for use with PDT is monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA), a non-toxic fraction of the endotoxin molecule. The hypothesis is that adjuvant MLA immunotherapy with PDT will improve local tumor control and prevent growth of subsequently implanted tumor cells when compared to PDT alone. To date, no significant differences in circulating leukocyte populations or tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations have been identified in 9L tumor-bearing F344 rats after systemic administrations of MLA. Likewise, no significant difference has been identified in local tumor control following PDT of 9L tumors with or without adjuvant MLA. Further results are pending.

  13. Therapeutic effects of estradiol benzoate on development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in the Lewis rat are mediated via suppression of the humoral response against denatured collagen type II (CII)

    PubMed Central

    WAKSMAN, Y.; HOD, I.; FRIEDMAN, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the development of anti-CII antibodies and their pathogenic potential were studied during the progress of established CIA in the rat. CIA was induced in mature female Lewis rats by two subcutaneous inoculations containing bovine native CII (BCIIn), emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Clinical arthritis fully developed by day 18 and then EB (1 mg/kg body wt per day, diluted in corn oil (CO)) was administered intramuscularly every second day thereafter. Antibodies binding four different CIIs (bovine or rat, either native or heat-denatured) were detected in sera and joint tissue extracts by means of solid-phase ELISA. Pharmacological doses of EB (>0·2 mg/kg body wt per day) caused significant remission of established CIA 5-7 days after treatment, and selectively suppressed the production of antibodies specific for denatured CII. To evaluate the arthritogenic potential of circulating anti-CIId IgG, transfer experiments were performed. IgG anti-CIIn, purified from EB-treated CIA rats, was not arthritogenic, whereas IgG anti-denatured (CIId), purified from CO-treated CIA rats, caused severe passive arthritis. Furthermore, pretreatment with rat CIId protected against subsequent induction of CIA, and this protection was associated with suppressed antibody production against CIId. Collectively, our results indicate that antibodies specific for CIId are involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, and that oestrogen-related remission of clinical arthritis may be caused by a selective suppression of antibodies produced against degraded/denatured CII. PMID:8608634

  14. Oh rats! Fever, rash and arthritis in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carina M; Tsai, Gary; Sanchez-Flores, Xavi

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with worsening right-sided hip and low back pain for 2 days. She had also experienced intermittent fevers and a recurring maculopapular rash over the past 2 weeks. Social history revealed the presence of three domestic rats living in the girl's home. Blood cultures returned positive for Streptobacillus moniliformis, the causative agent of rat-bite fever. Rat-bite fever often goes undiagnosed, as the clinical presentation is non-specific. Untreated, the infection can result in death due to sepsis or endocarditis. The bacterium is generally susceptible to penicillin antibiotics with full clinical recovery when treated in a timely and appropriate manner. After 4 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, our patient fully recovered without long-term sequelae. PMID:26701936

  15. Promising potential of new generation translocator protein tracers providing enhanced contrast of arthritis imaging by positron emission tomography in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of and subsequent monitoring of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could benefit from detection of (sub)clinical synovitis. Imaging of (sub)clinical arthritis by targeting the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated macrophages is feasible using (R)-[11C] PK11195-based positron emission tomography (PET), but clinical applications are limited by background uptake in peri-articular bone/bone marrow. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two other TSPO ligands with potentially lower background uptake in neurological studies, [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714, in a rat model of arthritis. Methods TSPO binding of DPA-713, DPA-714 and PK11195 were assessed by in vitro competition studies with [3H]DPA-713 using human macrophage THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In vivo studies were performed in rats with methylated bovine serum albumin-induced knee arthritis. Immunohistochemistry with anti-TSPO antibody was performed on paraffin-embedded sections. Rats were imaged with [11C]DPA-713 or [18F]DPA-714 PET, followed by ex vivo tissue distribution studies. Results were compared with those obtained with the tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195, the established ligand for TSPO. Results In THP-1 cells, relative TSPO binding of DPA-713 and DPA-714 were 7-fold and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in PK11195. Comparable results were observed in CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In the arthritis rat model, immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of TSPO-positive inflammatory cells in the arthritic knee. PET images showed that uptake of [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 in arthritic knees was significantly increased compared with contralateral knees and knees of normal rats. Uptake in arthritic knees could be largely blocked by an excess of PK11195. [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 provided improved contrast compared with (R)-[11C]PK11195, as was shown by significantly higher arthritic knee-to-bone ratios of [11C]DPA-713 (1.60

  16. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  17. Low-level light therapy for zymosan-induced arthritis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Dai, Tianhong; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Cohen, Richard; Apruzzese, William A.; Smotrich, Michael H.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) can ameliorate the pain, swelling and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. Light is absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and/or cyclic AMP production and consequent gene transcription via activation of transcription factors. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT in medicine, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed animal models designed to objectively quantify response to LLLT and compare different light delivery regimens. In the arthritis model we inject zymosan into rat knee joints to induce inflammatory arthritis. We have compared illumination regimens consisting of a high and low fluence (3 J/cm2 and 30 J/cm2), delivered at a high and low irradiance (5 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2) using 810-nm laser light daily for 5 days, with the effect of conventional corticosteroid (dexamethasone) therapy. Results indicated that illumination with 810-nm laser is highly effective (almost as good as dexamethasone) at reducing swelling and that longer illumination time was more important in determining effectiveness than either total fluence delivered or irradiance. Experiments carried out using 810-nm LLLT on excisional wound healing in mice also confirmed the importance of longer illumination times. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT.

  18. The eicosapentaenoic to docosahexaenoic acid ratio of diets affects the pathogenesis of arthritis in Lew/SSN rats.

    PubMed

    Volker, D H; FitzGerald, P E; Garg, M L

    2000-03-01

    Dietary-induced changes in tissue levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids modify inflammatory reactions through changes in the synthesis of lipid and peptide mediators of inflammation. Four semipurified 20% fat diets, based on beef tallow (BT), safflower oil (SFO), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) were provided. The DHA and EPA ratios of the (n-3) fatty acid-based diets were 1.1 and 3.4, respectively. The effect of prefeeding diets differing in EPA to DHA ratios prior to the induction of streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis in female Lew/SSN rats was examined. Weanling rats were fed diets for 5 wk before arthritis induction and 5 wk post-arthritis induction. Footpad thickness, hock circumference, plasma and macrophage fatty acids and histological assessment were compared. There were no differences in food intake and final body weights among the groups. Footpad inflammation, reported as percentage change (adjusted for growth) was greatest for rats fed the BT-based diet, intermediate in those fed the SFO-based diet and least for the rats fed the EPA- and DHA-based diets (P < 0.05). Macrophage phospholipids revealed cellular incorporation of EPA and DHA from the fish-oil based diets which modified lipid and peptide mediators of inflammation. Histological sections of rat hocks ranked by severity of arthritis-related changes suggested that the SFO- and EPA-based diets were more successful in ameliorating the destructive arthritic phase in hock joints than the BT- and DHA-based diets (P = 0.09) in this model of arthritis. The course of SCW-induced arthritis can be altered by diet-induced changes in macrophage fatty acid composition. The EPA-based diet is more effective in suppression of inflammation than the DHA-based diet.

  19. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  20. [Influence of melatonin and diclofenac on circadian rhythm of locomotor activity in rats with local inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Popov, A V; Naumov, S S; Arushanian, É B

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is accompanied by disorganization of the circadian rhythm of locomotion in rats. Control saline injections increased the rhythm disturbances. Chronic administration of melatonin (5 mg/kg) attenuated these chronopathological shifts. Diclofenac demonstrated much lower positive chronopharmacological activity than did melatonin.

  1. MicroRNA-26a negatively regulates toll-like receptor 3 expression of rat macrophages and ameliorates pristane induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal toll-like receptor (TLR)3 signaling plays an indispensable role in pathogenesis of both experimental and human rheumatoid arthritis, and microRNAs (miRNAs) might orchestrate this signaling pathway. This study was performed to determine the relationship between miR-26a and TLR3 in rat macrophages and to observe effects of miR-26a mimic on pristane induced arthritis (PIA) in rats. Methods Dual luciferase reporter assay was used to validate the direct interaction between miR-26a (a candidate miRNA to target tlr3 mRNA) and tlr3 3′UTR. MiR-26a regulation on TLR3 gene expression was determined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting after miR-26a mimics and inhibitors were transfected into rat macrophage line NR8383 cells. Poly I:C (TLR3 ligand) was used to trigger TLR3 activation, and mRNA expression of its downstream cytokines interferon (ifn)-β and tumor necrosis factor (tnf)-α was accordingly detected to determine the regulation of TLR3 signaling. Expressions of TLR3 and miR-26a were detected during rat bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) induction, in pristane stimulated NR8383 cells and spleens from methotrexate (MTX) treated PIA rats. A miR-26a mimic was administrated intraperitoneally to PIA rats, and arthritis severity was evaluated by macroscopic or microscopic observations. Results Direct target relationship between miR-26a and tlr3 mRNA in rats was confirmed. Modifications of miR-26a function by transfection of miR-26a mimics and inhibitors exhibited corresponding repression and augmentation of TLR3 and its signaling downstream cytokine expressions in NR8383 cells. The alteration of miR-26a expression was negatively related with TLR3 expression during BMDM induction, in pristane-primed NR8383 cells and PIA rat spleens. Moreover, both abnormal expressions were rescued in MTX treated arthritis rat spleens. The miR-26a mimic treatment displayed the depression of TLR3 expression and ameliorated the disease severity in the rats with pristane

  2. Age-dependent changes in 24-hour rhythms of catecholamine content and turnover in hypothalamus, corpus striatum and pituitary gland of rats injected with Freund's adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Pilar; Cardinali, Daniel P; Chacon, Fernando; Castrillón, Patricia O; Reyes Toso, Carlos A; Esquifino, Ana I

    2001-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the circadian sequela of an immune challenge in the brain of aged rats. To assess them, we studied 24-hour rhythms in hypothalamic and striatal norepinephrine (NE) content, hypothalamic and striatal dopamine (DA) turnover and hypophysial NE and DA content, in young (2 months) and aged (18–20 months) rats killed at 6 different time intervals, on day 18th after Freund's adjuvant or adjuvant's vehicle administration. Results Aging decreased anterior and medial hypothalamic NE content, medial and posterior hypothalamic DA turnover, and striatal NE concentration and DA turnover. Aging also decreased NE and DA content in pituitary neurointermediate lobe and augmented DA content in the anterior pituitary lobe. Immunization by Freund's adjuvant injection caused: (i) reduction of DA turnover in anterior hypothalamus and corpus striatum; (ii) acrophase delay of medial hypothalamic DA turnover in old rats, and of striatal NE content in young rats; (iii) abolition of 24-h rhythm in NE and DA content of neurointermediate pituitary lobe, and in DA content of anterior lobe, of old rats. Conclusions The decline in catecholamine neurotransmission with aging could contribute to the decrease of gonadotropin and increase of prolactin release reported in similar groups of rats. Some circadian responses to immunization, e.g. suppression of 24-h rhythms of neurointermediate lobe NE and DA and of anterior lobe DA were seen only in aged rats. PMID:11741510

  3. Dual effect of nitric oxide in articular inflammatory pain in zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    da S Rocha, José C; Peixoto, Magno E B; Jancar, Sônia; de Q Cunha, Fernando; de A Ribeiro, Ronaldo; da Rocha, Francisco A C

    2002-06-01

    The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to articular pain in arthritis induced by zymosan (1 mg, intra articular) in rats was assessed by measuring articular incapacitation (AI). Systemic treatment with the non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or with the selective iNOS inhibitors aminoguanidine (AG; 10 - 100 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or 1400W (0.5 - 1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) inhibited the AI induced by injection of zymosan 30 min later. Local (intra articular) treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME or AG, 0.1 - 1 micromol; 1400W, 0.01 (micromol) 30 min before zymosan also inhibited the AI. Systemic or local treatment with the NOS inhibitors (L-NAME; AG, 100 mg kg(-1) i.p. or 0.1 micromol joint(-1); 1400W, 1 mg kg(-1) s.c. or 0.01 micromol joint(-1)), 2 h after zymosan did not affect the subsequent AI. Local treatment with the NO donors SNP or SIN-1, 2 h after zymosan did inhibit AI. L-NAME and AG, given i.p. inhibited nitrite but not prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in the joints. L-NAME (100 mg kg(-1)) but not AG (100 mg kg(-1)) increased mean arterial blood pressure. Neither L-NAME, AG nor the NO donor SIN-1 altered articular oedema induced by zymosan. In conclusion, inhibitors of iNOS decrease pain in zymosan arthritis only when given before the zymosan. This was not due to inhibition of articular PGE(2) release or oedema. NO donors also promoted antinociception in zymosan arthritis without affecting oedema.

  4. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats. PMID:26508519

  5. Cytokine production in arthritis susceptible and resistant rats: a study with arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic Lactobacillus cell walls.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2001-02-01

    The basis of the different susceptibility to bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis between Lewis and Fischer rats is unclear. Likewise, it is not known why cell walls of some species of Lactobacillus are arthritogenic and those of others are not. With these two questions in mind, we investigated the role of anti-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4) and proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1 beta) cytokines in Lewis and Fischer rats injected intraperitoneally with cell walls from arthritogenic or nonarthritogenic species of Lactobacillus. Cytokine levels in the serum and in vitro production by peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were studied. The results obtained indicate that the differences in the production of IL-10, IL-4, TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta do not explain the difference in the arthritis susceptibility between Lewis and Fischer rats. Likewise, the arthritogenicity of different Lactobacillus cell walls appears not to be dependent on their capacity to stimulate cytokine production. PMID:11169216

  6. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naive, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of

  7. Enhanced activity of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) in mesenteric but not epididymal fat correlates with higher production of epinephrine in mesenteric adipocytes in rat model of cachectic rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stofkova, Andrea; Krskova, Katarina; Vaculin, Simon; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Cachectic rheumatoid arthritis, the less frequent form of the disease, is associated with loss of fat mass and often more severe course of the disease. Its experimental model represents rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) characterized by edema, lack of appetite, sharp body weight and fat loss. As individual fat depots display functional differences, here we studied lipolytic activity and sensitivity to lipolytic stimuli of nodeless epididymal fat (eWAT) and perinodal mesenteric fat (mWAT) depots at the peak of AA. We also examined changes in catecholamine and cytokine levels involved in lipolysis in plasma and/or isolated adipocytes from both WATs to identify the contribution of local, adipocyte-based processes and/or systemic events to adiposity loss in cachectic rheumatoid arthritis. AA was induced to male Lewis rats by complete Freund's adjuvant. Groups of ad libitum-fed and pair-fed controls were used to distinguish the effects of food restriction from inflammation-induced cachexia. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and its phosphorylated form (pHSL) were analyzed by western blot. CRP and catecholamine levels in plasma or adipocyte lysates were determined using ELISA kits. Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1/CXCL1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and leptin in adipocyte lysate were analyzed by quantitative protein microarray. Plasma glycerol and FFA were measured spectrophotometrically. AA rats developed severe cachexia, with lower adiposity in mWAT compared to normal and pair-fed controls, whereas in eWAT the adiposity was similarly reduced in AA and pair-fed groups. ATGL levels in both WATs were not affected by AA or pair feeding. AA upregulated levels of HSL, pHSL and pHSL/HSL ratio in mWAT, whereas none of these parameters has changed in eWAT of AA rats or in either WATs of pair-fed rats. In AA rats plasma glycerol was elevated, whereas FFA concentration was reduced. Plasma

  8. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound, suppresses pro-inflammatory mediators and RANKL expression via modulating NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are inhabitant mesenchymal cells of synovial joints and have been recognized to play an imperative role in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking these pathological roles of FLS provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment for RA. A recent study had confirmed that majoon ushba (MU), a polyherbal unani compound, possesses anti-arthritic effects in in vivo. Toward this direction, an effort has been made to understand the effect of MU on FLS derived from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Here, we observed that MU administration (100-300 µg/ml) significantly inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 protein similar to that of the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in NFкB signaling pathway and suppressed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in MAPKs signaling pathway in AIA-FLS. In addition, the protein expression of TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and iNOS was also found reduced. MU treatment significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-17, iNOS, and COX-2), transcription factors (NFкB-p65 and AP-1), and RANKL and attenuated the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 (ELISA) in AIA-FLS. Furthermore, MU treatment significantly inhibited the level of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes release, and glycoproteins and increased antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase and catalase) in AIA-FLS. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that MU possesses anti-inflammatory effect against AIA-FLS through the decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators expression by suppressing NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:27067226

  9. Hormones and autoimmunity: animal models of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilder, R L

    1996-05-01

    Hormones, particularly those involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes (HPG and HPA), play important roles in various animal models of autoimmunity such as systemic lupus erythematosus in mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and rats, and the streptococcal cell wall, adjuvant and avridine arthritis models in rats. Intimately linked to the subject of hormones and autoimmunity are gender, sex chromosomes and age. The importance of these factors in the various animal models is emphasized in this chapter. Several major themes are apparent. First, oestrogens promote B-cell dependent immune-complex mediated disease (e.g. lupus nephritis) but suppress T-cell dependent pathology (CIA in mice and rats), and vice versa. Second, testosterone's effects are complicated and depend on species and disease model. In rats, testosterone suppresses both T-cell and B-cell immunity. In mice, the effects are complex and difficult to interpret, e.g. they tend to enhance CIA arthritis and suppress lupus. Sex chromosome/sex hormone interactions are clearly involved in generating these complicated effects. Third, studies in Lewis and Fischer F344 rats exemplify the importance of corticosteroids, corticotrophin releasing hormone and the HPA axis in the regulation of inflammation and the predisposition to autoimmune diseases. Fourth, the HPA axis is intimately linked to the HPG axis and is sexually dimorphic. Oestrogens stimulate higher corticosteroid responses in females. The animal model data have major implications for understanding autoimmunity in humans. In particular, adrenal and gonadal hormone deficiency is likely to facilitate T-cell dependent diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, while high oestrogen levels or effects, relative to testosterone, are likely to promote B-cell dependent immune-complex-mediated diseases such as lupus nephritis.

  10. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  11. Murine autoimmune arthritis is exaggerated by infection with the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; Wang, Arthur; Villemaire, Michelle; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A; McDougall, Jason J; McKay, Derek M

    2013-06-01

    Infection with helminth parasites triggers strong and stereotypic immune responses in humans and mice, which can protect against specific experimentally-induced autoimmune diseases. We have shown that infection with the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, confers a protective effect on FCA-induced joint inflammation. Here, we investigated the effect of a prophylactic infection with H. diminuta on the K/BxN-serum model of polyarthritis in BALB/c mice. Mice were infected with 10 cysticercoids of H. diminuta by oral gavage and 8 days later arthritis was induced by i.p. injection of K/BxN arthritogenic serum. Joint swelling and pain measurements were recorded throughout a 13 day time course. At necropsy, joints and blood serum were collected. K/BxN-treated mice developed joint inflammation in the front paws, hind paws and knees as shown by increased swelling, mechanical allodynia and myeloperoxidase activity. Mice infected with H. diminuta had more severe disease, with increased eosinophil peroxidase activity in their paws and greater inflammatory infiltrate and synovitis in the knee joints. Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice displayed significant increases in serum levels of C5a and mast cell protease-1 compared with K/BxN-serum only treatment, the latter being indicative of mast cell activation. In contrast to the protective effect of infection with H. diminuta in FCA-induced monoarthritis, infection with this helminth exacerbated K/BxN serum-induced polyarthritis in BALB/c mice. This correlated with increases in C5a and mast cell activation: factors critical in the development of K/BxN-induced arthritis. Thus, while data accumulate from animal models showing that infection with helminth parasites may be beneficial for a variety of auto-inflammatory diseases, our findings demonstrate the potential for helminths to exacerbate disease. Hence care is needed when helminth therapy is translated into a clinical setting.

  12. Effect of Currently Approved Carriers and Adjuvants on the Pre-Clinical Efficacy of a Conjugate Vaccine against Oxycodone in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, Marco; Vervacke, Jeffrey S.; Distefano, Mark D.; Tucker, Ashli M.; Laudenbach, Megan; Pentel, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against the highly abused prescription opioid oxycodone has shown pre-clinical efficacy for blocking oxycodone effects. The current study further evaluated a candidate vaccine composed of oxycodone derivatized at the C6 position (6OXY) conjugated to the native keyhole limpet hemocyanin (nKLH) carrier protein. To provide an oxycodone vaccine formulation suitable for human studies, we studied the effect of alternative carriers and adjuvants on the generation of oxycodone-specific serum antibody and B cell responses, and the effect of immunization on oxycodone distribution and oxycodone-induced antinociception in mice and rats. 6OXY conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or a GMP grade KLH dimer (dKLH) was as effective as 6OXY conjugated to the nKLH decamer in mice and rats, while the 6OXY hapten conjugated to a TT-derived peptide was not effective in preventing oxycodone-induced antinociception in mice. Immunization with 6OXY-TT s.c. absorbed on alum adjuvant provided similar protection to 6OXY-TT administered i.p. with Freund’s adjuvant in rats. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, alone or in combination with alum, offered no advantage over alum alone for generating oxycodone-specific serum antibodies or 6OXY-specific antibody secreting B cells in mice vaccinated with 6OXY-nKLH or 6OXY-TT. The immunogenicity of oxycodone vaccines may be modulated by TLR4 signaling since responses to 6OXY-nKLH in alum were decreased in TLR4-deficient mice. These data suggest that TT, nKLH and dKLH carriers provide consistent 6OXY conjugate vaccine immunogenicity across species, strains and via different routes of administration, while adjuvant formulations may need to be tailored to individual immunogens or patient populations. PMID:24797666

  13. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arthritis - psoriatic; Psoriasis - psoriatic arthritis; Spondylitis - psoriatic arthritis ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. Nail psoriasis is linked ...

  14. Comparison of two PBR ligands with classical antiinflammatory drugs in LPS-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Elisângela; Farges, Roseli C; Ferrara, Pascual; Tonussi, Carlos R

    2003-04-25

    The antinociceptive and anti-edematogenic effects of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands, Ro5-4864 (7-chloro-5- (4-chlorophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2) and PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide), were studied in an experimental model of carrageenan/LPS -induced arthritis in rats. These effects were compared with those of indomethacin and dexamethasone. Both pre and post-treatments with PK11195 were found to be anti-edematogenic and antinociceptive. The lower dose (0.01 mg/kg) exhibited the higher anti-edematogenic effect. On the other hand, the higher dose (0.5 mg/kg) produced antinociception, but with a decreased anti-edematogenic effect. Ro5-4864 produced a negligible antinociception and anti-edematogenic effect as pretreatment, but a pro-edematogenic effect when given as post-treatment. Dexamethasone and indomethacin presented parallel and dose-dependent antinociceptive and anti-edematogenic effects. In conclusion, PK11195 can effectively diminish arthritic nociception and edema elicited by LPS, but probably by mechanisms different from those of dexamethasone or indomethacin. RO5-4864 seemed to have opposite effect on this model.

  15. Cure of established, intracerebral rat gliomas induced by therapeutic immunizations with tumor cells and purified APC or adjuvant IFN-gamma treatment.

    PubMed

    Siesjö, P; Visse, E; Sjögren, H O

    1996-09-01

    We have previously reported that immunizations with mutagen-induced immunogenic variants of a weakly immunogenic rat glioma could protect against isografts of the original tumor cells. In this study we show that prolonged survival and cures of rats with established gliomas in their brains can be achieved by therapeutic immunizations with tumor cell mutants, combined with in vitro and in vivo interferon (IFN)-gamma (adjuvant) treatment, or tumor cells admixed with semipurified syngeneic dendritic cells. Cure of rats with established intracerebral gliomas was possible when immunizations were initiated up to 5 days after intracerebral isografting of original tumor cells. Unexpectedly, immunizations combined with in vitro and in vivo IFN-gamma treatment or with admixed semipurified dendritic cells equalized the immunogenic potential of the original tumor cells and that of mutagen-induced immunogenic cell variants (tum-). This demonstrates that effective immunizations against a weakly immunogenic brain tumor can be achieved by different adjuvant concepts. The therapeutic effect of immunizations with tumor cells admixed with semipurified dendritic cells was highly significant in female rats, whereas only occasional cures and prolonged survival were recorded in male rats. The overall results show that therapeutic immunizations can indeed be effective against an established and growing intracerebral tumor.

  16. Exogenous tumour necrosis factor α induces suppression of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Our previous studies showed that arthritic Lewis (LEW) rats produced the highest levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α in the recovery phase of adjuvant arthritis (AA), suggesting a correlation between high TNFα levels and reduced severity of arthritis. To further explore this correlation, we compared the TNFα secretion profile of the AA-resistant Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats with that of LEW rats, determined the effect of exogenous TNFα on the course of AA in LEW rats, and examined various mechanisms involved in TNFα-induced disease modulation. Methods A cohort each of LEW and WKY rats was immunised subcutaneously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb). At different time points thereafter, subgroups of rats were killed and their draining lymph node cells were tested for cytokine production. Another group of LEW rats was injected with TNFα intraperitoneally daily for a total of 10 injections, 3 before and 6 after Mtb challenge, and then observed for signs of AA. In parallel, TNFα-treated rats were examined for changes in other cytokines, in CD4+CD25+ T cell frequency, and in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA expression levels. Results LEW rats displayed a TNFα secretion profile that was opposite to that of the WKY rats. Furthermore, TNFα treatment significantly downmodulated the severity of AA in LEW rats, and decreased the interferon (IFN)-γ secretion in response to the pathogenic determinant of the disease-related antigen. No significant alterations were observed in other parameters tested. Conclusion The role of endogenous TNFα in the induction and propagation of arthritis is well established. However, exogenous TNFα can downmodulate the course of AA, displaying an immunoregulatory functional attribute of this cytokine. PMID:18380898

  17. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-06-10

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention.

  18. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S.; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  19. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  20. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  1. Effects of Libby amphibole exposure on two models of arthritis in the Lewis rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggest that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing venniculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The collagen induced arthriti...

  2. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  3. Effect of green tea extract and vitamin C on oxidant or antioxidant status of rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Meki, Abdel-Raheim M A; Hamed, Enas Ahmed; Ezam, Khaled A

    2009-07-01

    Elevated free radical generation in inflamed joints and impaired antioxidant system has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Green tea extracts (GTE) have been shown to reduce inflammation in inflammatory arthritis murine model. This study investigates possible mechanisms by which vitamin C and GTE protect joints in RA rat model. This study included forty adult male rats that were divided into four groups (10 rats each); control group, collagen II induced RA group (CII), CII treated with vitamin C (CII + Vit C) and CII treated with GTE (CII + GTE) in physiology laboratory, Assiut University, Egypt. After 45 days of treatment, plasma levels of lipid peroxides (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), ceruloplasmin (CP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), uric acid (UA) and glutathione (GSH) were detected using colorimetric methods, PGE(2) using ELISA and copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) using spectrometer. In CII group, levels of LPO, NO, PGE(2), UA, CP, Cu were higher while SOD, GSH, Zn were lower than controls. In groups treated with vitamin C and GTE, levels of SOD, GSH were increased while levels of LPO, NO, PGE(2), Cu, CP were decreased compared with CII group. Levels of UA were decreased and Zn increased in GTE treated group compared with CII group. GTE treated group showed higher Zn and low Cu levels compared with vitamin C treated group. This study suggests proper GTE and vitamin C intake may effectively normalize the impaired oxidant/antioxidant system and delaying complication of RA.

  4. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters gene expression in the rat brain: Experimental design and bioinformatic analysis of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Alexandre A; Stepien, Katarzyna A; Weinberg, Joanne; Kobor, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We previously identified gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats prenatally exposed to alcohol under both steady-state and challenge conditions (Lussier et al., 2015, Alcohol.: Clin. Exp. Res., 39, 251-261). In this study, adult female rats from three prenatal treatment groups (ad libitum-fed control, pair-fed, and ethanol-fed) were injected with physiological saline solution or complete Freund׳s adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis (adjuvant-induced arthritis, AA). The prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were collected 16 days (peak of arthritis) or 39 days (during recovery) following injection, and whole genome gene expression was assayed using Illumina׳s RatRef-12 expression microarray. Here, we provide additional metadata, detailed explanations of data pre-processing steps and quality control, as well as a basic framework for the bioinformatic analyses performed. The datasets from this study are publicly available on the GEO repository (accession number GSE63561). PMID:26217797

  5. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters gene expression in the rat brain: Experimental design and bioinformatic analysis of microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, Alexandre A.; Stepien, Katarzyna A.; Weinberg, Joanne; Kobor, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats prenatally exposed to alcohol under both steady-state and challenge conditions (Lussier et al., 2015, Alcohol.: Clin. Exp. Res., 39, 251–261). In this study, adult female rats from three prenatal treatment groups (ad libitum-fed control, pair-fed, and ethanol-fed) were injected with physiological saline solution or complete Freund׳s adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis (adjuvant-induced arthritis, AA). The prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were collected 16 days (peak of arthritis) or 39 days (during recovery) following injection, and whole genome gene expression was assayed using Illumina׳s RatRef-12 expression microarray. Here, we provide additional metadata, detailed explanations of data pre-processing steps and quality control, as well as a basic framework for the bioinformatic analyses performed. The datasets from this study are publicly available on the GEO repository (accession number GSE63561). PMID:26217797

  6. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans. PMID:18421172

  7. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans.

  8. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA.

  9. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA. PMID:27698704

  10. Histopathologic effects of a low molecular weight heparin on bone healing in rats: a promising adjuvant in dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Mehmet Numan; Oken, Ozdamar Fuad; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Ucaner, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of short-term prophylactic dose of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) drug on the bone healing process in an animal model simulating the osteotomy obtained in dacryocystorhinostomy. METHODS Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into 2 groups. Subcutaneous injections of enoxaparin 1 mg/kg (enoxaparin-treated group) and saline solution (control group) were performed once daily for 4d, beginning on the first preoperative day. The osteotomy was created at the femoral diaphysis in all animals by using a Kirschner wire. Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups depending on the timing of the second operation, 14 or 21d following initial osteotomy. Patent osteotomy area on the second and the third weeks in each group were calculated by using a computer software on digital micrographs. RESULTS The patent osteotomy areas at the second and the third weeks were significantly larger in the enoxaparin-treated group than those of the control group (P<0.001 for each time-period). In the control group, the patent osteotomy area at the third week of healing was significantly smaller than that of the second week (P=0.003), whereas there was no significant difference between these two measurements in the enoxaparin-treated group (P=0.185). CONCLUSION Short-term administration of enoxaparin resultes in a significant alteration in bone healing at 14 and 21d after injury. LMWHs can be regarded as promising alternative adjuvants in dacryocystorhinostomy after being evaluated with further clinical and animal studies. PMID:27366684

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  12. Effects of RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Y.-Y.; Li, Y.-F.; Xu, M.; Li, W.-Y.; Yang, M.; Li, R.-L.

    2015-01-01

    RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses antigout, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperuricemic properties based on the traditional conceptions. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PRP15 in rat gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the present study, we found that treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg) in rats with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals significantly attenuated the knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and the elevated expressions of nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in synovial tissues were significantly inhibited, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) result showed that MSU-induced high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in synovial fluid were reduced by treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg). We conclude that RPP15 may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and its activity of antigout may be partially related to inhibiting TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and NF-κB p65 expression in the synovial tissues. PMID:26221174

  13. EGFP gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    JING, XIANG-XIANG; LIU, JIE; YANG, BING-ANG; FU, SHAO-QING; WU, TANG-NA; WANG, DONG-LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of enhancing green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. An optimal SonoVue dose was determined using 40 normal rats categorized into five groups according to the various doses of microbubbles used. At 1 week after ultrasound irradiation, the rats were sacrificed. Damage to the joint synovial tissues was observed with hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining under a microscope. A further 44 normal rats were used to establish a rat model of RA, and were then categorized into four groups: EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP, microbubbles + EGFP and ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP. The last group was irradiated with ultrasound for 10 min following the injection of 300 μl SonoVue and 10 μg EGFP into the joint cavity. Rats were sacrificed after 3 days and synovial tissue was collected from the knee joints for observation of EGFP with fluorescence microscopy and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGFP expression was observed in the synovial tissues of all groups. However, high EGFP expression levels were observed in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in the EGFP expression levels between the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups. However, EGFP expression levels in the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups significantly differed (P<0.05) from that in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. Therefore, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction improved EGFP transfection efficiency into the joint synovial tissues of rats with RA. PMID:24940446

  14. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Mycotic arthritis; Infectious arthritis - fungal ... Marquez J, Espinoza LR. Infectious arthritis II: mycobacterial, brucellar, fungal, and parasitic arthritis. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, eds. Rheumatology . ...

  15. Disposition of human recombinant lubricin in naive rats and in a rat model of post-traumatic arthritis after intra-articular or intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Wang, Qin; Xu, Xin; Harrold, John; Daugusta, Daren; Li, Jian; Zollner, Richard; Flannery, Carl R; Rivera-Bermúdez, Moisés A

    2012-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that intra-articular (IA) administration of human recombinant lubricin, LUB:1, significantly inhibited cartilage degeneration and pain in the rat meniscal tear model of post-traumatic arthritis. In this report, we show that after a single IA injection to naïve rats and rats that underwent unilateral meniscal tear, [(125)I]LUB:1 had a tri-phasic disposition profile, with the alpha, beta, and gamma half-life estimates of 4.5 h, 1.5 days, and 2.1 weeks, respectively. We hypothesize that the terminal phase kinetics was related to [(125)I]LUB:1 binding to its ligands. [(125)I]LUB:1 was detected on articular cartilage surfaces as long as 28 days after single IA injection. Micro-autoradiography analysis suggested that [(125)I]LUB:1 tended to localize to damaged joint surfaces in rats with meniscal tear. After a single intravenous (IV) dose to rats, [(125)I]LUB:1 was eliminated rapidly from the systemic circulation, with a mean total body clearance of 154 mL/h/kg and a mean elimination half-life (t (1/2)) of 6.7 h. Overall, LUB:1 has met a desired disposition profile of a potential therapeutic intended for an IA administration: target tissue (knee) retention and fast elimination from the systemic circulation after a single IA or IV dose.

  16. The specificity of peptides bound to human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 influences the prevalence of arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M; Sayad, A; Simmons, W A; Jones, R C; Maika, S D; Satumtira, N; Dorris, M L; Gaskell, S J; Bordoli, R S; Sartor, R B; Slaughter, C A; Richardson, J A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1998-09-01

    Human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen B27 is highly associated with the rheumatic diseases termed spondyloarthropathies, but the mechanism is not known. B27 transgenic rats develop a spontaneous disease resembling the human spondyloarthropathies that includes arthritis and colitis. To investigate whether this disease requires the binding of specific peptides to B27, we made a minigene construct in which a peptide from influenza nucleoprotein, NP383-391 (SRYWAIRTR), which binds B27 with high affinity, is targeted directly to the ER by the signal peptide of the adenovirus E3/gp19 protein. Rats transgenic for this minigene, NP1, were made and bred with B27 rats. The production of the NP383-391 peptide in B27(+)NP1(+) rats was confirmed immunologically and by mass spectrometry. The NP1 product displaced approximately 90% of the 3H-Arg-labeled endogenous peptide fraction in B27(+)NP1(+) spleen cells. Male B27(+)NP1(+) rats had a significantly reduced prevalence of arthritis, compared with B27(+)NP- males or B27(+) males with a control construct, NP2, whereas colitis was not significantly affected by the NP1 transgene. These findings support the hypothesis that B27-related arthritis requires binding of a specific peptide or set of peptides to B27, and they demonstrate a method for efficient transgenic targeting of peptides to the ER. PMID:9730889

  17. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  18. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  19. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26690894

  20. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  1. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII.

  2. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund’s complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins’ expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA. PMID:27508035

  3. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins' expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA. PMID:27508035

  4. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins' expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA.

  5. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao-Xin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Kou, Jian-Qun; Xu, Yin-Li; Wang, Shu-Zhi; Zhu, Qi; Yang, Lu; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis. PMID:25767552

  6. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cao-Xin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Kou, Jian-Qun; Xu, Yin-Li; Wang, Shu-Zhi; Zhu, Qi; Yang, Lu; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis. PMID:25767552

  7. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  8. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  9. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  10. Glorisa superba Hydroalcoholic Extract from Tubers Attenuates Experimental Arthritis by Downregulating Inflammatory Mediators, and Phosphorylation of ERK/JNK/p-38.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Patil, Amol

    2016-10-01

    Glorisa superba (GS) is a medicinal plant that has been traditionally used in the treatment of joint pain and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was carried out to investigate the antiarthritic activity of Glorisa superba hydroalcoholic extract (GSHE) in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Arthritis was induced by sub-plantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and GSHE (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg/day) was administered orally for 21 consecutive days. Joint diameter was measured on Days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21. GSHE dose dependently attenuates the increased joint diameter and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level following induction of arthritis by adjuvant. This attenuation was well substantiated with reduced mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and NF-κB. Additionally, GSHE inhibited phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway as there was decreased protein expression of MAPK (p-p38/p38 and p-ERK/ERK p-JNK/JNK ratio). Moreover, GSHE in a dose-dependent fashion normalized the redox status of ankle joint (GSH, malonaldialdehyde [MDA], and NO levels and superoxide dismutase [SOD] and catalase [CAT] activities) and displayed decreased inflammatory cell infiltration in histopathological findings. Taken together, these findings indicate that GSHE protects against AIA by modulating MAPK. PMID:27603689

  11. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-01-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues. PMID:9144371

  12. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-05-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of protocatechuic acid in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Lende, Amol B; Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Deshpande, Avinash D; Muley, Milind M; Patil, Rajesh Ramesh; Bafna, Pallavi A; Naik, Suresh R

    2011-10-01

    Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of protocatechuic acid (PCA), a natural product, was evaluated in different rat models (viz., carrageenan-induced paw oedema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma and Freund's adjuvant arthritis) of inflammation and chemical and heat induced mouse models of pain. Treatment with PCA inhibited significantly different biological parameters like hind paw oedema, granuloma exudates formation and arthritis index in carrageenan oedema, cotton pellet granuloma and Freund's adjuvant arthritis, respectively. The biochemical changes viz., glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, lipid peroxidation and NO in oedematous or in liver tissues and serum alanine aminotransferase and lactic dehydrogenase occurred during different types of inflammation were either significantly restored or inhibited with PCA pretreatment. Present experimental findings demonstrate promising anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of PCA which is comparable with that of standard drugs used.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  15. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  16. Ferulic acid ethyl ester diminished Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced incapacitation through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Valmor Macedo; Gomes, Bruno de Sousa; Neto, Benedito de Sousa; Ferreira, Alana Rodrigues; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Carvalho e Martins, Maria do Carmo; Oliveira, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid ethyl ester (FAEE) is a derivate from ferulic acid which reportedly has antioxidant effect; however, its role on inflammation was unknown. In this study, we investigated the orally administered FAEE anti-inflammatory activity on experimental inflammation models and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. CFA-induced arthritis has been evaluated by incapacitation model and radiographic knee joint records at different observation time. FAEE (po) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.001) within the 1st to 5th hours at 50 and 100 mg/kg doses. FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg, po inhibited leukocyte migration into air pouch model (p < 0.001), and myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities (p < 0.001) increased total thiol concentration and decreased the TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations, NO, and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. In the CFA-induced arthritis, FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the edema and the elevation paw time, a joint disability parameter, since second hour after arthritis induction (p < 0.001). FAEE presented rat joint protective activity in radiographic records (p < 0.001). The data suggest that the FAEE exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte migration, oxidative stress reduction, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  18. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  19. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  20. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene Y.; Chi, Howard H.; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1l) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-γ in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1l) rats secreted high levels of IFN-γ much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-β was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-γ, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:18276192

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  2. Role of NMDA receptors in the trigeminal pathway, and the modulatory effect of magnesium in a model of rat temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, André L C; Siqueira, Rafaelly M P; Araujo, Joana C B; Gondim, Delane V; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Quetz, Josiane S; Havt, Alexandre; Lima, Aldo A M; Vale, Mariana L

    2013-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is a common cause of orofacial pain. In the present study, the modulatory effects of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) and magnesium were investigated in TMJ arthritis hypernociception. Male Wistar rats received an intra-articular injection of carrageenan (Cg) in the TMJ, and mechanical hypernociception was measured. The NMDA-R antagonist, MK-801, and magnesium chloride (MgCl₂ ) were administered before arthritis induction. Magnesium deficiency was promoted by feeding rats a synthetic magnesium-free diet for 9 d before injection of Cg. The Cg induced mechanical hypernociception that lasted for 120 h. MK-801 inhibited this hypernociceptive state. MgCl₂ pretreatment prevented Cg-induced hypernociception and altered the nociceptive threshold in the absence of Cg. Magnesium deficiency increased hypernociception and induced spontaneous hypernociceptive behavior. TMJ arthritis increased the expression of mRNA for all NMDA-R subunits and immunostaining of phosphorylated NR1 (phospho-NR1). MgCl₂ inhibited expression of NR2B mRNA and phospho-NR1 immunostaining and increased expression of NR3 mRNA. Magnesium deficiency increased expression of both NR1 and NR3 mRNAs and phospho-NR1 immunostaining in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis. We found that magnesium modulates nociceptive behavior and induces NMDA-R subunit rearrangement in the subnucleus caudalis. The present results may lead to a better understanding of central processing in the nociceptive trigeminal pathway and the development of new approaches to treat orofacial pain with a TMJ origin.

  3. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  4. Efficacy of GM6001 as an adjuvant to ceftriaxone in a neonatal rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Han, Qizheng

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis; therefore, MMP inhibitors may be a neuroprotective treatment for brain injury caused by meningitis because of their antiinflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 in a rat model of S. pneumoniae meningitis. For these experiments, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an uninfected group, meningitis group, antibiotic group and GM6001+antibiotic group. Uninfected animals were sham infected with sterile saline. Rats in the other three groups were inoculated with S. pneumoniae and left untreated, treated with ceftriaxone, or treated with ceftriaxone combined with GM6001. Rats in the meningitis group were severely ill, and MMP-9 was significantly up-regulated. The change in brain water content was consistent with the MMP-9 level. A significant loss of neurons and impaired learning function were observed in the meningitis group. Treatment with the antibiotic and GM6001 significantly down-regulated the level of MMP-9, decreased the brain water content, attenuated neuronal injury and improved learning. Conclusions: GM6001 protected the brain from damage caused by S. pneumoniae, and this effect may occur via downregulating MMP-9 and decreasing brain water content. PMID:25576979

  5. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  6. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  7. The up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats with inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ting; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral inflammation induces central sensitization that displays the features by the development of pain hypersensitivity to the stimuli. It has been shown that activation of glia contributes to the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after peripheral inflammation. It has been suggested that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) primarily expressed on microglia affects central pain response. The present study was designed to examine the expressions of TLR4 and microglia in the spinal cord in different time points of inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The results show that CFA induces significant pain hypersensitivity and paw edema as well as spinal dorsal horn (SDH) microglia activation with the increased expressions of OX-42 and TLR4 during the inflammatory pain, respectively. The quantification of TLR4 with Western Blot analysis also suggests the same patter with the morphological results during the progress of inflammatory pain. In addition, chronic minocycline hydrochloride intrathecal injection reverses pain hypersensitivity and suppresses activation of microglia and TLR4 induced by CFA, but has hardly any effects on paw edema. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of TLR4 and microglia in rats in CFA inflammatory pain states, and suggest that blockade of microglia should likely be considered as a therapeutic opportunity.

  8. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local dorsal cutaneous noxious pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epinephrine as additive for propranolol as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we tested the effect of co-administration of epinephrine with propranolol on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Bupivacaine, a long-lasting local anesthetic, was used as control. Subcutaneous propranolol and bupivacaine elicited a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [2.05 (1.95-2.21) μmol/kg]>propranolol [9.21 (9.08-9.42) μmol/kg] (P<0.01 for each comparison). Subcutaneous epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. Mixtures of epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) with drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, intensified and prolonged drug action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of combined drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) exhibited no cutaneous analgesia. We concluded that propranolol was less potent but produced a similar duration of action when compared to bupivacaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine enhanced the potency and extended the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:24973696

  9. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute septic arthritis are caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria . Chronic septic arthritis (which is less common) ... cases are caused by the bacteria group B streptococcus. Another common cause is Haemophilus influenza , especially if ...

  10. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  11. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  12. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  13. Wax D of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in Buffalo rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Semba, I; Hirayama, Y; Koga, T; Nagao, S; Takada, H

    1998-12-01

    A suspension of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in liquid paraffin has been reported to induce foot swelling accompanied by new bone formation in Buffalo (BUF) rats, which are low responders to the induction of adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we found that wax D, a mycobacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragment-arabinogalactan-mycolic acid complex, was an effective component of this bacterium for the induction of osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in BUF rats. Chronic inflammation was produced in BUF rats by a single subcutaneous injection of wax D suspended in liquid paraffin. Other Mycobacterium species and Gordona bronchialis were also capable of inducing this reaction. Other bacterial cells including the acid-fast bacteria Nocardia and Rhodococcus, purified cell walls and peptidoglycans from Lactobacillus plantarum, wax C, cord factor, arabinogalactan and mycolic acid prepared from M. tuberculosis were inactive in this respect. In addition, when wax D was administered as a water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's type adjuvant), bone formation scarcely occurred in BUF rats. In Fisher (F344) and Wistar rats, both of which are responder strains to adjuvant arthritis, wax D in liquid paraffin did not induce bone formation.

  14. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G; Perales-Canales, Sonia I; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3-dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor-null (Prlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA.

  15. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats. PMID:26989428

  17. Standardization of an experimental model suitable for studies on the effect of exercise on arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Raquel Pinheiro; Bressan, Elisangela; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Gevaerd, Monique da Silva; Tonussi, Carlos Rogério; Domenech, Susana Cristina

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To standardize an experimental model of chronic monoarthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant appropriate for the analysis of the effect of walking on nociception and on joint edema. Methods: The following factors were evaluated as to monoarthritis induction: route and site of administration, number and interval of inoculations, Mycobacterium species, and animal gender. Wistar male and female rats (200 to 250g) received two injections of complete Freund's adjuvant containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (1.0mg/mL; 50μL) or Mycobacterium butyricum (0.5mg/mL; 50μL) intra-articularly in the tibiotarsal or tibiofemoral joints, or an injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (Mycobacterium butyricum or tuberculosis) intradermally at the base of the tail and another intra-articularly (tibiotarsal or tibiofemoral). The animals were submitted to evaluations of articular disability and edema. Articular disability was assessed by paw elevation time (in seconds) during the one-minute walk test. Edema of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by variation of joint diameter (cm). Tibiotarsal joint edema was measured by the volume of the paw (mL). Results: Administration of complete Freund's adjuvant containing Mycobacterium butyricum increased paw elevation time and edema in both joints. Conclusion: These data allow standardization of an animal model of chronic monoarthritis adequate for analysis of the effects of exercise on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23579748

  18. [Adjuvants--essential components of new generation vaccines].

    PubMed

    Dzierzbicka, Krystyna; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksander M

    2006-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of vaccines that augment an immunological reaction of organism. New vaccines based on recombinant proteins and DNA, are more save than traditional vaccines but they are less immunogenic. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of new, improved vaccine adjuvants. There are two classes of adjuvants: vaccine delivery systems (e.g. emulsions, microparticles, immune-stimulating complexes ISCOMs, liposomes) and immunostimulatory adjuvants (e.g. lipopolysaccharide, monophosphoryl lipid A, CpG DNA, or muramylpeptides). The discovery of more potent and safer adjuvants may allow to development better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against chronic infectious (e.g., HSV, HIV, HCV, HBV, HPV, or Helicobacter pylori) and noninfectious diseases as multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, allergy and tumors (e.g., melanoma, breast, or colon cancer). PMID:17078510

  19. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  20. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  1. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm fruit pulp fixed ethyl acetate extract on zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Francisco Fábio Bezerra; de Araújo, Joana Cláudia Bezerra; Pereira, Anamaria Falcão; Brito, Gerly Anne Castro; Gondim, Delane Viana; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Vale, Mariana Lima

    2015-11-01

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fruit pulp of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm (Caryocaraceae), popularly known as pequi, has wide applications in popular medicine. Preclinical tests have demonstrated the therapeutic properties of the oil. We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Pequi C. coriaceum Wittm ethyl acetate extract (PCCO) on zymosan-induced arthritis in rat knee joint. The animals were pretreated with PCCO for 7 consecutive days or with a single dose. Paw elevation time (PET), leukocyte infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) and cytokine levels were assessed 4h after zymosan injection. Synovial tissue was harvested for immunohistochemical analysis, edema and vascular permeability. We observed a significant decrease in PET with PCCO pretreatment. PCCO showed a significant reduction of leukocyte migration and a decrease in MPO. Decreases were observed in cytokine release in the synovial fluid and TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-1 immunostaining in synovial tissue. Edema was inhibited by treatment with all doses of PCCO. The data suggest that PCCO exerts antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects on arthritis in rats.

  2. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm fruit pulp fixed ethyl acetate extract on zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Francisco Fábio Bezerra; de Araújo, Joana Cláudia Bezerra; Pereira, Anamaria Falcão; Brito, Gerly Anne Castro; Gondim, Delane Viana; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Vale, Mariana Lima

    2015-11-01

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fruit pulp of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm (Caryocaraceae), popularly known as pequi, has wide applications in popular medicine. Preclinical tests have demonstrated the therapeutic properties of the oil. We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Pequi C. coriaceum Wittm ethyl acetate extract (PCCO) on zymosan-induced arthritis in rat knee joint. The animals were pretreated with PCCO for 7 consecutive days or with a single dose. Paw elevation time (PET), leukocyte infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) and cytokine levels were assessed 4h after zymosan injection. Synovial tissue was harvested for immunohistochemical analysis, edema and vascular permeability. We observed a significant decrease in PET with PCCO pretreatment. PCCO showed a significant reduction of leukocyte migration and a decrease in MPO. Decreases were observed in cytokine release in the synovial fluid and TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-1 immunostaining in synovial tissue. Edema was inhibited by treatment with all doses of PCCO. The data suggest that PCCO exerts antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects on arthritis in rats. PMID:26341615

  3. CB1 and CB2 contribute to antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of electroacupuncture on experimental arthritis of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Delane Viana; Araújo, Joana Cláudia Bezerra; Cavalcante, André Luiz Cunha; Havt, Alexandre; Quetz, Josiane da Siva; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque; Lima Vale, Mariana

    2012-11-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) and cannabinoids have been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects in animal models of arthritis. Male Wistar rats were injected with saline or zymosan (2 mg) into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). EA (10 Hz, 30 min) was performed 2 h after or 1 h before zymosan administration. AM251 or AM630 (3 mg/kg, i.p.)were administered before EA treatment. Mechanical hypernociception was accessed after zymosan administration. Rats were sacrificed 6 h after zymosan administration and the joint was removed for histopathological analysis. The gene expression of CB₁ and CB₂ receptors was assessed after sacrifice of the TMJ arthritic animals. EA inhibited zymosan-induced hypernociception (p < 0.05). AM251 reversed significantly the antinociceptive effect of EA, suggesting that the CB₁ receptor is involved in this effect. AM630 reversed the anti-inflammatory effect of EA. CB₁ and CB₂ receptor gene expression was upregulated 6 h after zymosan-induced arthritis in the EA-treated group. We observed downregulation of CB₂ receptor gene expression in the EA group at the 24th hour compared with the 6th hour. Higher CB₁ receptor gene expression was also found compared with the 6th hour. EA produced antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, and these effects appeared to be mediated through CB₁ and CB₂ receptor activation.

  4. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  5. Adjuvant effect of caffeine on acetylsalicylic acid anti-nociception: prostaglandin E2 synthesis determination in carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation in rat.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sánchez, Sílvia; Planas, Eulàlia; Poveda, Raquel

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we report a synergistic interaction between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAF) on the inhibition of nociception in a model of peripheral inflammation in rat; on the contrary no interaction have been found on anti-inflammatory effects and peripheral prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) synthesis inhibition. Acute inflammation was induced by the subplantar injection of carrageenan into the right hind paw, and the effects of the drugs were evaluated from 0 to 5h. Nociception was assessed using the Randall & Selitto test, and the inflammatory response by plethismometry. Oral administration of ASA (10-400mg/kg) induced dose-related anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. On the other hand, oral CAF administration (5-50mg/kg) did not show a dose-related inhibitory effect, neither on the inhibition of nociception nor on the inflammatory response. To analyze a possible interaction between both drugs a dose-response curve to ASA plus a fixed dose of CAF (5mg/kg) was obtained 3h after the injection of carrageenan, when the inflammatory pain peaked. A fixed dose of CAF was able to improve the anti-nociceptive, but not the anti-inflammatory, effects of ASA. We also assessed, by enzyme immunoassay, the effects of the combination on peripheral PGE-2 levels: CAF did not alter the inhibitory effect of ASA on PGE-2 synthesis. Our results corroborate the well-known clinical effects of combining ASA and CAF; on the other hand, we rule out that prostaglandin synthesis inhibition at peripheral sites would be the mechanism responsible of the adjuvant anti-nociceptive effect of CAF.

  6. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  7. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  8. Exposure of brown Norway rats to diesel exhaust particles prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization elicits IgE adjuvant activity but attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Antonini, James M; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) during the sensitization process has been shown to increase antigen-specific IgE production and aggravate allergic airway inflammation in human and animal models. In this study, we evaluated the effect of short-term DEP exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-mediated responses using a post-sensitization model. Brown Norway rats were first exposed to filtered air or DEP (20.6 +/- 2.7 mg/m3) for 4 h/day for five consecutive days. One day after the final air or DEP exposure (day 1), rats were sensitized with aerosolized OVA (40.5 +/- 6.3 mg/m3), and then again on days 8 and 15, challenged with OVA on day 29, and sacrificed on days 9 or 30, 24 h after the second OVA exposure or the final OVA challenge, respectively. Control animals received aerosolized saline instead of OVA. DEP were shown to elicit an adjuvant effect on the production of antigen-specific IgE and IgG on day 30. At both time points, no significant airway inflammatory responses and lung injury were found for DEP exposure alone. However, the OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and numbers of T cells and their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in lung-draining lymph nodes were markedly reduced by DEP on day 30 compared with the air-plus-OVA exposure group. The OVA-induced nitric oxide (NO) in the BAL fluid and production of NO, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-12 by alveolar macrophages (AM) were also significantly lowered by DEP on day 30 as well as day 9. DEP or OVA alone decreased intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes on days 9 and 30. The combined DEP and OVA exposure resulted in further depletion of GSH in both cell types. These results show that short-term DEP exposure prior to sensitization had a delayed effect on enhancement of the sensitization in terms of allergen-specific IgE and IgG production, but caused an attenuation of the allergen-induced airway

  9. Treatment of experimental arthritis with poly(D, L-lactic/glycolic acid) nanoparticles encapsulating betamethasone sodium phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, M; Ishihara, T; Izumo, N; Takatsu, M; Mizushima, Y

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic activity of hydrophilic glucocorticoid encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles, which have shown slow release and are targeted to inflamed joints after intravenous administration, in experimental arthritis models. Methods: Betamethasone sodium phosphate (BSP) encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles with a size of 100–200 nm (PLGA-nanosteroid) was prepared using a modified oil in water emulsion solvent diffusion method with Zn ions and coated with lecithin. Rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA rats) and mice with anti-type II collagen antibody induced arthritis (AbIA mice) were treated intravenously with PLGA-nanosteroid after the initial sign of arthritis. Results: In AA rats, a 30% decrease in paw inflammation was obtained in 1 day and maintained for 1 week with a single injection of 100 µg of PLGA-nanosteroid. Soft x ray examination 7 days after this treatment showed decreased soft tissue swelling. Moreover, the PLGA-nanosteroid was also highly effective in AbIA mice. A single injection of 30 µg of the PLGA-nanosteroid resulted in almost complete remission of the inflammatory response after 1 week. In contrast, the same dose of free BSP after three administrations only moderately reduced the severity of inflammation. In addition, a histological examination 7 days after the treatment showed a significant decrease of the inflammatory cells in the joints. Conclusion: The observed strong therapeutic benefit obtained with PLGA-nanosteroid may be due to the targeting of the inflamed joint and its prolonged release in situ. Targeted drug delivery using a sustained release PLGA-nanosteroid is a successful intervention in experimental arthritis. PMID:15695536

  10. Arthritis Induces Early Bone High Turnover, Structural Degradation and Mechanical Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Vale, Ana Catarina; Cavaleiro, Inês; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Brito, José Américo Almeida; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months) inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone. Methods Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers. Results AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively) and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046). Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002) and bone volume (p = 0.0003) and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009) in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively) in the arthritic group. Conclusions We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness. PMID:25617902

  11. Protective and anti-arthritic effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA), inhibiting dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, on phosphate ions-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis and rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanp-Sung; Choi, Yoo-Haeng; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kang, Seung-Goo; Park, Young-Guk

    2004-07-01

    The effect of water extract of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA; Cervi Pantotrichum Cornu) prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong in Korean), a traditional immunosuppressive and immunoactivating Korean herbal acupuncture [Int. Immunopharm. 3 7 (2003) 1001] on rat chondrocyte apoptosis was studied. Terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes were isolated from rat costochondrial cartilage and cell death was measured in the presence of 3-5 mM phosphate ions (Pi). The effect of 10 microg/ml DAA was compared to that of phosphonoformic acid (PFA), a competitive inhibitor of the Na-Pi co-transport on Pi-induced apoptosis in chondrocytes. A total of 1 mM PFA blocked anion-induced cell death and prevented an increase in the cell Pi content. In a parallel study, we determined that the DAA also protected chondrocytes from death. On the other hand, the effect of DAA was also evaluated as an inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DHase) and tested in the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Female 7-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the evaluation of DAA in the CIA model. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis score, body weight loss, bone destruction score. DAA was administered by bilateral Shinsu (B23) acupuncture five times per week (10, 20, 30, and 100 microg/kg/day). DAA inhibited rat liver DHO-DHase in vitro with Ki = 843 +/- 43 microg/ml. The anti-proliferative effect of DAA was caused by cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Treatment with 300 mg/kg/day of DAA completely prevented the development of CIA based on the reduction of the arthritis score. The 50% effective dose (ED50) of DAA on arthritis score was 64 mg/kg. DAA ameliorated body weight loss associated with disease onset. DAA suppressed the development of arthritis, even when it was administered after a booster immunization of collagen. DAA is a novel immunosuppressant which inhibits DHO-DHase and its effects in CIA suggest that

  12. A novel therapeutic approach targeting rheumatoid arthritis by combined administration of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin with reference to pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory enzymes, RANKL and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Farhath; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-03-25

    The present study was designed to assess the combined efficacy of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Morin (30 mg/kg b.wt), indomethacin (3 mg/kg b.wt) and combination of morin and indomethacin were administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after adjuvant injection. We have found that the activities/levels of lysosomal acid hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosaminidase and cathepsin-D), glycoproteins (hexose and hexosamine), urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans), reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, VEGF and PGE2) and paw edema were significantly increased in arthritic rats compared to controls. Whereas, the anti-oxidant status (SOD, CAT, GPx, glutathione, and ceruloplasmin), body weight and bone collagen was found to be decreased. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), RANKL, and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) was found upregulated in the ankle joints of arthritic rats in qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, the increased protein expression of NF-kB p65 and COX-2 was also detected by immunohistochemical analysis. On the other hand, the above said imbalances were regulated back effectively to near normal as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis on combined treatment with morin and indomethacin. Our study indicates that the combination therapy was more effective than either single drug alone in suppressing the pathogenesis of RA.

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  14. Automated segmentation of knee and ankle regions of rats from CT images to quantify bone mineral density for monitoring treatments of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Francisco; Sevilla, Raquel; Zhu, Joe; Vanko, Amy; Lee, Jung Hoon; Dogdas, Belma; Zhang, Weisheng

    2014-03-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) obtained from a CT image is an imaging biomarker used pre-clinically for characterizing the Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) phenotype. We use this biomarker in animal studies for evaluating disease progression and for testing various compounds. In the current setting, BMD measurements are obtained manually by selecting the regions of interest from three-dimensional (3-D) CT images of rat legs, which results in a laborious and low-throughput process. Combining image processing techniques, such as intensity thresholding and skeletonization, with mathematical techniques in curve fitting and curvature calculations, we developed an algorithm for quick, consistent, and automatic detection of joints in large CT data sets. The implemented algorithm has reduced analysis time for a study with 200 CT images from 10 days to 3 days and has improved the robust detection of the obtained regions of interest compared with manual segmentation. This algorithm has been used successfully in over 40 studies.

  15. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  16. Suppression of Ongoing Experimental Arthritis by a Chinese Herbal Formula (Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan) Involves Changes in Antigen-Induced Immunological and Biochemical Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Lee, David Y.-W; Ma, Zhongze; Yu, Hua; Fong, Harry H. S.; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL), which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg) was fed to Lewis (RT.11) rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients. PMID:20981317

  17. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... It typically begins during the early-adult years. Juvenile arthritisarthritis that is diagnosed before age 16. The most common form of juvenile arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affects between 30,000 and ...

  18. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  19. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser ...

  20. In the rat, citrullinated autologous fibrinogen is immunogenic but the induced autoimmune response is not arthritogenic

    PubMed Central

    Duplan, V; Foulquier, C; Clavel, C; Al Badine, R; Serre, G; Saoudi, A; Sebbag, M

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of arginyl to citrullyl residues (citrullination) is essential for the formation of the epitopes recognized by rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA). ACPA are secreted by plasma cells of the rheumatoid synovial tissue where their major target, citrullinated fibrin, is abundant. Although numerous arguments suggest that ACPA play an important role in RA, their pathological relevance remains to be established. In the present study, we assessed the immunogenicity and arthritogenicity of complete Freund's adjuvant-emulsified autologous citrullinated (C-rFBG) or non-citrullinated (NC-rFBG) fibrinogen in Lewis (LEW) and Brown–Norway rats, which exhibit drastic differences in their susceptibility to induced autoimmune diseases. NC-rFBG induced no antibody response. In contrast, a single injection of C-rFBG induced an IgG response directed mainly to citrullinated determinants of rFBG. However, all rat strains remained devoid of clinical and histological signs of arthritis up to 3 months after C-rFBG inoculation. Next, in LEW rats, we tested whether autoimmunity to C-rFBG could aggravate acute ankle arthritis triggered by intra-articular injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). However, such arthritis evolved identically in the presence or absence of anti-C-rFBG autoantibodies. However, IFA-injected joints were devoid of citrullinated fibrin deposits. Therefore, citrullination allows breakdown of immunological tolerance but the autoimmune response developed is not spontaneously arthritogenic. Whether or not it can aggravate arthritis with citrullinated fibrin deposits remains to be evaluated. PMID:16907920

  1. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  2. Long-Term Effects of (–)-Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) on Pristane-Induced Arthritis (PIA) in Female Dark Agouti Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leichsenring, Anna; Bäcker, Ingo; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian; Lange, Franziska; Flemmig, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)—a widespread chronic inflammatory disease in industrialized countries—is characterized by a persistent and progressive joint destruction. The chronic pro-inflammatory state results from a mutual activation of the innate and the adaptive immune system, while the exact pathogenesis mechanism is still under discussion. New data suggest a role of the innate immune system and especially polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils) not only during onset and the destructive phase of RA but also at the chronification of the disease. Thereby the enzymatic activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a peroxidase strongly abundant in neutrophils, may be important: While its peroxidase activity is known to contribute to cartilage destruction at later stages of RA the almost MPO-specific oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is also discussed for certain anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we used pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in Dark Agouti rats as a model for the chronic course of RA in man. We were able to shown that a specific detection of the HOCl-producing MPO activity provides a sensitive new marker to evaluate the actual systemic inflammatory status which is only partially detectable by the evaluation of clinical symptoms (joint swelling and redness measurements). Moreover, we evaluated the long-term pharmacological effect of the well-known anti-inflammatory flavonoid epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Thereby only upon early and continuous oral application of this polyphenol the arthritic symptoms were considerably diminished both in the acute and in the chronic phase of the disease. The obtained results were comparable to the treatment control (application of methotrexate, MTX). As revealed by stopped-flow kinetic measurements, EGCG may regenerate the HOCl-production of MPO which is known to be impaired at chronic inflammatory diseases like RA. It can be speculated that this MPO activity-promoting effect of EGCG may contribute to the

  3. Rioprostil prevents gastric bleeding induced by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in dogs and arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Katz, L B; Capetola, R J; Argentieri, D C; Moore, L E; Genna, T; Porter, M C; Jasty, V; Hartnagel, R E; Abrutyn, D; Shriver, D A

    1986-10-01

    Gastrointestinal irritation is the most significant side effect in patients chronically taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) for treatment of arthritic conditions. Rioprostil, a primary alcohol prostaglandin E1 analog, prevents gastric bleeding induced by several NSAID in a rat model of arthritis that is similar in many aspects to human rheumatoid arthritis. Daily oral dosing of rioprostil (50 micrograms/kg BID for 15 days) did not influence the course of the adjuvant disease in rats or alter the antiinflammatory or analgesic effect of the NSAID. In a 13 week efficacy study in dogs, rioprostil (40-60 micrograms/kg, PO) completely prevented gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by daily administration of aspirin. PMID:3102726

  4. Temporal cytokine expression and the target organ attributes unravel novel aspects of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Astry, Brian; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmunity is determined by multiple factors. Defining the contribution of the quantitative versus qualitative aspects of antigen-directed immune responses as well as the factors influencing target organ susceptibility is vital to advancing the understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In a series of studies, we have addressed these issues using the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lewis rats are susceptible to AA following immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra, whereas Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same MHC (major histocompatibility complex) haplotype are resistant. Comparative studies on these and other susceptible/resistant rodent strains have offered interesting insights into differential cytokine responses in the face of comparable T cell proliferative response to the disease relevant antigens. Study of the cytokine kinetics have also permitted validation of the disease-protective versus disease-aggravating effects of specific cytokines by treatment of rats/mice with those cytokines at different phases of the disease. In regard to the target organ attributes, the migration of arthritogenic leukocytes into the joints; the expression of mediators of inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue damage; the role of vascular permeability; and the characteristics of vascular endothelial cells have been examined. Further, various inhibitors of angiogenesis are effective in suppressing arthritis. Taken together, the differential cytokine responses and unique attributes of the target organ have revealed novel aspects of disease susceptibility and joint damage in AA. The translation of this basic research in animal models to RA patients would not only advance our understanding of the disease process, but also offer novel avenues for immunomodulation of this disease. PMID:24434324

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  6. Antigen sparing with adjuvanted inactivated polio vaccine based on Sabin strains

    PubMed Central

    Westdijk, Janny; Koedam, Patrick; Barro, Mario; Steil, Benjamin P.; Collin, Nicolas; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; van der Ley, Peter; Kersten, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Six different adjuvants, each in combination with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) produced with attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), were evaluated for their ability to enhance virus neutralizing antibody titers (VNTs) in the rat potency model. The increase of VNTs was on average 3-, 15-, 24-fold with adjuvants after one immunization (serotype 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Also after a boost immunization the VNTs of adjuvanted sIPV were on average another 7- 20- 27 times higher than after two inoculations of sIPV without adjuvant. The results indicate that it is feasible to increase the potency of inactivated polio vaccines by using adjuvants. PMID:23313617

  7. Haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Yogarajah, S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Sturrock, R D

    1986-02-01

    A detailed clinical and radiological examination of the joints and laboratory studies were carried out on 139 haemophiliacs attending a single centre. The group included more patients with mild and moderate haemophilia (factor levels 6 to 60 per cent) than in previous studies. Haemarthrosis, the most common bleeding manifestation, had affected more than two-thirds of patients including many with mild or moderate disease. Restriction and contracture of the knees and elbows were the most common clinical features and, with the ankles, these joints were most frequently affected both clinically and radiologically. Using a combination of clinical and radiological features, 42 per cent of the patients could be classed as having 'definite' and a further 14 per cent 'possible' haemophilic arthritis. Although haemarthroses were equally prevalent in patients with classical haemophilia and Christmas disease, arthritis was more frequently present in the former. Haemarthrosis and joint disease were exceptional in von Willebrand's disease. The prevalence of arthritis generally related to disease severity as measured by factor level but, in contrast to earlier studies, definite arthritis was seen in some patients with factor levels up to 20 per cent of normal although the number of affected joints was less in these patients with milder disease. Laboratory test abnormalities including circulating immune complexes and hypocomplementaemia were noted in some patients but the abnormalities correlated poorly with clinical features. The present results suggest a recent slight reduction in the prevalence or severity of haemophilic arthritis, possibly attributable to recent improvements in factor replacement treatment. Longer-term studies are required to show whether arthritis is indeed lessening or whether the onset is merely being delayed.

  8. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)‐flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX‐1 (IC50 = 8.97 nM) and COX‐2 (IC50 = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20–28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  9. Effect of melatonin on 24-hour rhythms of ornithine decarboxylase activity and norepinephrine and acetylcholine synthesis in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen of young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, D P; Brusco, L I; García Bonacho, M; Esquifìno, A I

    1998-05-01

    Young (50 days old) and old (18 months old) Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with mycobacterial Freund's adjuvant to produce an inflammatory disease of the joints and were studied the day before, and on days 6, 12 and 18 after injection. At every postinjection interval examined, old rats had significantly lower circadian amplitudes of pineal melatonin content. On day 18 of arthritis development, decreased levels of pineal melatonin were also seen in young rats. A second study, carried out 18 days after the injection of Freund's complete adjuvant and after 17 daily injections of 10 or 100 microg of melatonin in the evening, indicated that melatonin treatment restored the inflammatory response in old rats (assessed plethysmographically in hind paws) to the level found in young animals. In young rats, an inflammation-promoting effect of 100 microg melatonin could be demonstrated. As a consequence of the immune reaction, submaxillary lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase activity (an index of lymph cell proliferation) augmented significantly, with acrophases of 24-hour rhythms in the afternoon for lymph nodes or in the morning for spleen. Mesor and amplitude of ornithine decarboxylase rhythm were lowest in old rats, while melatonin injection generally augmented its amplitude. Lymph node and splenic tyrosine hydroxylase activity (a presynaptic adrenergic marker) reached maximal values during early night hours while maximal values of [3H]acetylcholine synthesis (a presynaptic cholinergic marker) occurred during the afternoon in lymph nodes. Amplitude and mesor of these rhythms were lowest in old rats, an effect generally counteracted by melatonin treatment. The results suggest that inflammation is accompanied by an age-dependent, significant depression of pineal melatonin synthesis during adjuvant-induced arthritis and a decreased amplitude of the circadian rhythm of immune cell proliferation and autonomic activity in lymph nodes and spleen. These effects are

  10. ASIA or Shoenfeld's syndrome--an autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, M; Chicoş, B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, reports have suggested grouping different autoimmune conditions that are triggered by external stimuli as a single syndrome called autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). This syndrome is characterized by the appearance of myalgia, myositis, muscle weakness, arthralgia, arthritis, chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment and memory loss, and the possible emergence of a demyelinating autoimmune disease caused by systemic exposure after vaccines and adjuvants. As there are no markers for ASIA, the authors intend to present ASIA, or Shoenfeld's syndrome, as an autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants. PMID:24620624

  11. Folate Receptor-Targeted Dendrimer-Methotrexate Conjugate for Inflammatory Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rong; Majoros, Istvan; Misra, Asish C; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phil; Marotte, Hubert; Bergin, Ingrid L; Cao, Zhengyi; Goonewardena, Sascha; Morry, Jingga; Zhang, Shuai; Beer, Michael; Makidon, Paul; Kotlyar, Alina; Thomas, Thommey P; Baker, James R

    2015-08-01

    Generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamide) (PAMAM) dendrimers are synthetic polymers that have been broadly applied as drug delivery carriers. Methotrexate (MTX), an anti-folate metabolite, has been successfully used as an anti-inflammatory drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the clinic. In this study, we examine the therapeutic efficacy of G5 PAMAM dendrimer methotrexate conjugates (G5-MTX) that also have folic acid (FA) conjugated to the G5-MTX (G5-FA-MTX) to target inflammation-activated folate receptors overexpressing macrophages. These cells are thought to play an important role in the development of RA. With G5 serving as a control, the in vitro binding affinities of G5-FA-MTX and G5-MTX to activated macrophages were assessed in RAW264.7, NR8383 and primary rat peritoneal macrophages. The results indicated that the binding of either conjugate to macrophages was concentration- and temperature-dependent and could be blocked by the presence of 6.25 mM free FA (p < 0.005). The preventive effects of G5-MTX and G5-FA-MTX conjugates on the development of arthritis were explored on an adjuvant-induced inflammatory arthritis model and had similar preventive effects in inflammatory arthritis at a MTX equivalent dose of 4.95 μmol/kg. These studies indicated that when multiples of MTX are conjugated on dendritic polymers, they specifically bind to folate receptor overexpressing macrophages and have comparable anti-inflammatory effects to folate targeted MTX conjugated polymers.

  12. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  13. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  14. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  15. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes.

  16. Protective effects of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil in animal models of acute inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Sepodes, B; Rocha, J; Direito, R; Fernandes, A; Brites, D; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Bronze, M R; Figueira, M E

    2015-04-01

    Virgin olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, and its beneficial health effects have been related with oleic acid and phenolic compounds content. Hydroxytyrosol, a typical virgin olive oil phenolic compound, has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties as previously reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oil at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg in a rodent model of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced by intradermic administration, in male Wistar rats, of Freund's adjuvant with collagen type II on days 1 and 21. Hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils were administrated by gavage from day 23 until day 35. The treatment at 5-mg/kg dose significantly decreased paw edema (P<.01), histological damage, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and markedly reduced the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, improving articular function in treated animals. Acute inflammation, induced by carrageenan, was also evaluated for hydroxytyrosol-supplemented refined olive oils at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg. Both doses significantly reduced paw edema (P<.001). Our results suggest that the supplementation of refined olive oil with hydroxytyrosol may be advantageous in rheumatoid arthritis with significant impact not only on chronic inflammation but also on acute inflammatory processes. PMID:25620693

  17. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  18. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  19. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  20. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of lupeol and lupeol linoleate in rats.

    PubMed

    Geetha, T; Varalakshmi, P

    2001-06-01

    Two pentacyclic triterpenes, namely lupeol and lupeol linoleate, were investigated for their anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, anti-pyretic and ulcerogenic properties in comparison with the commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin in rats. Lupeol, lupeol linoleate and indomethacin showed a reduction in paw swelling by 39, 58 and 35%, respectively, in adjuvant arthritis. Triterpenes were devoid of any antinociceptive, anti-pyretic and ulcerogenic actions. However, indomethacin exhibited a positive response to these properties. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of triterpenes is different from the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:11378285

  2. Antiarthritic activity of Majoon Suranjan (a polyherbal Unani formulation) in rat

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Y.K.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Majoon Suranjan (MS) is a polyherbal formulation used in Unani system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study evaluates the antiarthritic efficacy of this formulation in three different experimental models. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of MS (in doses of 450, 900 and 1800 mg/kg body wt) was evaluated using the turpentine oil induced paw oedema model and the antiarthritic efficacy was evaluated using the formaldehyde and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis models. Aspirin (100 mg/kg body wt) was used as the standard drug in all the models. In order to assess the safety of the test drug, oral acute and 28 day toxicity studies were also carried out. Results: MS produced a dose dependent protective effect in all the experimental models. Its antiarthritic efficacy was comparable to aspirin in formaldehyde induced arthritis and was superior to aspirin in turpentine oil induced paw oedema and CFA induced arthritis. MS also inhibited the delayed increase in joint diameter as seen in control and aspirin treated animals in CFA induced arthritis. Oral LD50 of MS was found to be >5000 mg/kg in rats. Chronic administration did not produce any significant physiological changes in the tested animals. Interpretation & conclusions: Results of the present study suggest that the antiarthritic activity of MS was due to the interplay between its anti-inflammatory and disease modifying activities, thus supporting its use in traditional medicine for the treatment of RA. PMID:21985823

  3. Corticosteroid-binding globulin is a biomarker of inflammation onset and severity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lesley A; Bodnar, Tamara S; Weinberg, Joanne; Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2016-08-01

    Plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) plays a critical role in regulating glucocorticoid bioavailability and is an acute phase 'negative' protein during inflammation. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model, plasma CBG levels decrease in rats that develop severe inflammation, and we have now determined when and how these reductions in CBG occur. After administering complete Freund's adjuvant or saline intra-dermally at the tail base, blood samples were taken periodically for 16days. In adjuvant-treated rats, decreases in plasma CBG levels matched the severity of inflammation, and decreases were observed 4days before any clinical signs of inflammation. Decreases in CBG levels coincided with an ~5kDa reduction in its apparent size, consistent with proteolytic cleavage, and cleaved CBG lacked steroid-binding activity. At the termination of the experimental period, hepatic Cbg mRNA levels were decreased in rats with severe inflammation. While plasma TNF-α increased in all adjuvant-treated rats, increases in Il-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ were only observed in rats with cleaved CBG. Rats with cleaved CBG also exhibited increased spleen weights, and strong negative correlations were observed among CBG, IL-6 and spleen weights, respectively. However, there were no differences in hepatic Cbg mRNA levels in relation to the apparent proteolysis of CBG, suggesting that CBG cleavage occurs before changes in hepatic Cbg expression. Our results indicate that the levels and integrity of plasma CBG are biomarkers of the onset and severity of inflammation. Dynamic changes in the levels and function of CBG likely modulate the tissue availability of corticosterone during inflammation.

  4. Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation—Session 9: Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Dalençon, François

    2013-01-01

    The Session 9 of the Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation meeting pointed out the permanent need for vaccine improvement and for adjuvant development. Indeed, the increasing use of recombinant subunit vaccines for both parenteral and mucosal vaccination necessitates the development of improved adjuvants. This session dealt with strategies for the development of new vaccine adjuvants with respect to the availability of new molecules targeting specifically the receptors of the systemic or mucosal immune system. PMID:23938771

  5. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  6. Subclass distribution of IgG antibodies to the rat oesophagus stratum corneum (so-called anti-keratin antibodies) in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C; Serre, G; Basile, J P; Lestra, H C; Girbal, E; Sebbag, M; Soleilhavoup, J P

    1990-07-01

    Serum IgG, labelling the stratum corneum of the rat oesophagus epithelium, so-called anti-keratin antibodies (AKA) constitute the most specific marker for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated 31 IgG AKA-positive rheumatoid sera and 21 control sera from patients with non-rheumatoid inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The serum level of IgG1,2,3 and 4 was determined by radial immunodiffusion and the subclass distribution of IgG AKA by a three-step semi-quantitative immunofluorescence assay using standard monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the four human IgG subclasses. In the rheumatoid sera, the serum level of IgG1 was found to be significantly increased and the level of IgG2 significantly decreased with regard to the control sera, while the levels of IgG3 and 4 as well as total IgG were in the normal range. IgG1,2,3, and 4 AKA were detected in 27 (87%), 6 (19%), 4 (13%) and 11 (35%) of the 31 rheumatoid sera, respectively, and were found to be independent of the clinical and biological indices of the disease. In spite of inter-individual heterogeneity, two predominant profiles were distinguished: IgG1 (alone) and IgG(1 + 4), which together represented 18 sera (58%). The large predominance of IgG1 AKA and the quasi-absence of IgG2 AKA suggest that the recognized antigen may be partly comprised of protein. Moreover, the high frequency of occurrence of IgG4 AKA might result from chronic exposure to the eliciting antigen, which could be a genuine autoantigen since we demonstrated that it is also present in the stratum corneum of human epidermis.

  7. Experimental immunization with anti-rheumatic bacterial extract OM-89 induces T cell responses to heat shock protein (hsp)60 and hsp70; modulation of peripheral immunological tolerance as its possible mode of action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BLOEMENDAL, A; VAN DER ZEE, R; RUTTEN, V P M G; VAN KOOTEN, P J S; FARINE, J C; VAN EDEN, W

    1997-01-01

    OM-89 is a bacterial (Escherichia coli) extract used for oral administration in the treatment of RA. Given the evidence that immunity to bacterial heat shock antigens plays a critical role in the immunomodulation of arthritis and possibly inflammation in general, the purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the presence and immunogenicity of hsp in OM-89. Furthermore, we studied the effects of OM-89 in an experimental arthritis, where hsp are known to have a critical significance in disease development. In rats immunization with OM-89 was found to lead to proliferative T cell responses to hsp60 and hsp70 of both E. coli and mycobacterial origin. Conversely, immunization with hsp antigens was also found to induce T cell reactivity specific for OM-89. Based on this and the antigen specificity analysis of specific T cell lines, hsp70 (DnaK) turned out to be one of the major immunogenic constituents of OM-89. Parenteral immunization with OM-89 was found to reduce resistance to adjuvant arthritis (AA), whereas oral administration was found to protect against AA. Given the arthritis-inhibitory effect of oral OM-89 in AA, it is possible that peripheral tolerance is induced at the level of regulatory T cells with specificity for hsp. This may also constitute a mode of action for OM-89 as an arthritis-suppressive oral drug. PMID:9353151

  8. Tinospora cordifolia inhibits autoimmune arthritis by regulating key immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Sannegowda, K M; Venkatesha, S H; Moudgil, K D

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints leading to tissue damage. Despite the availability of potent drugs including the biologics, many patients fail to respond to them, whereas others suffer adverse effects following long-term use of these drugs. Accordingly, the use of natural herbal products by RA patients has been increasing over the years. However, limited information about the mechanism of action of these natural products is a major shortcoming that prevents the widespread acceptance of herbal therapy by professionals and patients alike. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE) using the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human RA and elaborated the immune mechanisms underlying this effect. TCE treatment suppressed arthritic inflammation and bone and cartilage damage. The anti-inflammatory effect of TCE was mediated via reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as: IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17; the frequency of IL-17-producing T cells; and the production of chemokines such as RANTES. Furthermore, TCE treatment limited bone damage by shifting the balance of mediators of bone remodeling (e.g., receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand [RANKL] and MMP-9) in favor of anti-osteoclastic activity. Our results suggest that TCE and its bioactive components should be evaluated for their utility as therapeutic adjuncts to conventional drugs against RA. PMID:26467057

  9. Ameliorative Effects of a Polyphenolic Fraction of Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. Bark in Animal Models of Inflammation and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Badal; Bodhankar, Subhash; Mohan, V; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Syn C. verum, family: Lauraceae) is one of the oldest traditional medicines for inflammatory- and pain-related disorders. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the polyphenol fraction from Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark (CPP) in animal models of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Dose-response studies of CPP (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) used in a separate set of in vivo experiments were conducted in acute (carrageenan-induced rat paw edema), subacute (cotton pellet-induced granuloma), and sub-chronic (AIA, adjuvant-induced established polyarthrtis) models of inflammation in rats and the acetic acid-induced writhing model of pain in mice. Effects of CPP on cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from Concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated lymphocytes were also evaluated in vitro. CPP showed a strong and dose-dependent reduction in paw volume, weight loss reversal effects against carrageenan-induced paw edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models in rats. CPP (200 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days) showed a significant reduction in elevated serum TNF-α concentration without causing gastric ulcerogenicity in the AIA model in rats. CPP also demonstrated mild analgesic effects during acute treatment as evidenced by the reduction in the writhing and paw withdrawal threshold of the inflamed rat paw during the acetic acid-induced writhing model and Randall-Selitto test. CPP was found to inhibit cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from ConA-stimulated lymphocytes in vitro. In conclusion, CPP demonstrated prominent action in animal models of inflammation and arthritis and therefore can be considered as a potential anti-rheumatic agent with disease-modifying action.

  10. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  11. A novel approach to arthritis treatment based on resveratrol and curcumin co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules: In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Coradini, Karine; Friedrich, Rossana B; Fonseca, Francisco N; Vencato, Marina S; Andrade, Diego F; Oliveira, Cláudia M; Battistel, Ana Paula; Guterres, Silvia S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Beck, Ruy C R

    2015-10-12

    Resveratrol and curcumin are two natural polyphenols extensively used due to their remarkable anti-inflammatory activity. The present work presents an inedited study of the in vivo antioedematogenic activity of these polyphenols co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules on Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. Lipid-core nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed polymer. Animals received a single subplantar injection of CFA in the right paw. Fourteen days after arthritis induction, they were treated with resveratrol, curcumin, or both in solution or loaded in lipid-core nanocapsules (1.75 mg/kg/twice daily, i.p.), for 8 days. At the doses used, the polyphenols in solution were not able to decrease paw oedema. However, nanoencapsulation improved the antioedematogenic activity of polyphenols at the same doses. In addition, the treatment with co-encapsulated polyphenols showed the most pronounced effects, where an inhibition of 37-55% was observed between day 16 and 22 after arthritis induction. This treatment minimized most of the histological changes observed, like fibrosis in synovial tissue, cartilage and bone loss. In addition, unlike conventionally arthritis treatment, resveratrol and curcumin co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules did not alter important hepatic biochemical markers (ALP, AST, and ALT). In conclusion, the strategy of co-encapsulating resveratrol and curcumin in lipid-core nanocapsules improves their efficacy as oedematogenic agents, with no evidence of hepatotoxic effects. This is a promising strategy for the development of new schemes for treatment of chronic inflammation diseases, like arthritis. PMID:26206297

  12. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  13. Combination therapy of dexamethasone with epigallocatechin enhances tibiotarsal bone articulation and modulates oxidative status correlates with cartilage cytokines expression in the early phase of experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Sannigrahi, Santanu; Ghosh, Balaram; Pusp, Priyanka; Roy, Tathagata

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of antioxidant for the treatment of arthritis, especially under the therapy with immunosuppressant, is motivated because antioxidant plays an essential role in disease progression and moreover, immunosuppressive treatment suffers redox homeostasis balance of the organism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the enhancement of anti-arthritic effect of dexamethasone in combination with epigallocatechin on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Adjuvant arthritic rats were treated with dexamethasone (0.2mg/kg), epigallocatechin (100mg/kg) and combination of dexamethasone (0.1mg/kg) with epigallocatechin (100mg/kg) daily for a period of 28 days. Paw swelling changes, estimation of serum albumin level, alteration of bone mineral density, histopathological, and radiographical analysis were assessed to evaluate the anti-arthritic effect. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities in joint tissue homogenate were performed along with the expression of different pro-inflammatory cartilage cytokines like TNF-α and IL-6. Dexamethasone and epigallocatechin combination potentiated both the antiarthritic (decrease of hind paw volume) and the antioxidant effect (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase). In combination with dexamethasone, epigallocatechin markedly potentiated the beneficial effect of dexamethasone which resulted in more significant increment of serum albumin and bone mineral density. Improvement of anti-arthritic effect of combination therapy was supported by histopathological, radiographical alterations, and attenuation of over-expression of cartilage cytokines. Epigallocatechin act as potent antioxidant and combined administration of dexamethasone with epigallocatechin increased the anti-arthritic efficacy of basal dexamethasone therapy and suppressed the development phase of arthritic progression in rats.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of grape melanin. Inhibitory effects on paw edema and adjuvant induced disease.

    PubMed

    Avramidis, N; Kourounakis, A; Hadjipetrou, L; Senchuk, V

    1998-07-01

    Natural or synthetic melanin (CAS 8049-97-6) is a high molecular weight heteropolymer, product of the enzyme tyrosinase, found to possess radical scavenging and antioxidant functions. It was of interest, therefore, to study in detail the possible anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties of a melanin isolated from grapes. The inhibitory effect of melanin on carrageenin-induced edema, as well as on edemas produced by other phlogistics, was remarkable suggesting that melanin interferes with the prostaglandin as well as the leukotriene and/or complement system mediated inflammation. Grape melanin showed potent inhibitory effect on adjuvant induced disease (AID) in rat, suppressing significantly the primary inflammation and almost totally the secondary lesions of arthritis. Melanin under the present experimental conditions not only strongly inhibited the in vitro lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomal membranes, but furthermore protected the in vivo hepatic peroxidation occurring in AID rats, demonstrating its antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The serum proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-a and the serum globulin fraction were elevated in AID rats, parameters which were more or less normalised by melanin treatment in contrast to the reduced serum levels of IL-2 which were not affected. Similarly to other lipoxygenase inhibitors and hydroxyl radical scavenger NSAIDs, melanin treatment did not affect IL-1 neither increased the splenic mitogenic responses, unlike the classical cyclooxygenase inhibitory NSAIDs. The subpopulation Th1 (T4+ or T8+) of lymphocytes is mainly responsible for cellular immune responses and thus their possible inhibition by melanin could lead to suppression of the development of AID, a model for cell-mediated immunity. The effect of melanin on T-cells is exhibited by the reduced spleen mitogenic responses to a T-cell mitogen and the reduced serum levels of IL-2 of treated rats. In conclusion, grape melanin is an

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you ... Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P. ...

  16. Adjuvants for allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently performed via either the subcutaneous or sublingual routes as a treatment for type I (IgE dependent) allergies. Aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate are broadly used as adjuvants for subcutaneous allergy vaccines, whereas commercial sublingual vaccines rely upon high doses of aqueous allergen extracts in the absence of any immunopotentiator. Adjuvants to be included in the future in products for allergen specific immunotherapy should ideally enhance Th1 and CD4+ regulatory T cell responses. Imunomodulators impacting dendritic or T cell functions to induce IL10, IL12 and IFNγ production are being investigated in preclinical allergy models. Such candidate adjuvants encompass synthetic or biological immunopotentiators such as glucocorticoids, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, selected probiotic strains (e.g., Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species) as well as TLR2 (Pam3CSK4), TLR4 (monophosphoryl lipid A, synthetic lipid A analogs) or TLR9 (CpGs) ligands. Furthermore, the use of vector systems such as mucoadhesive particules, virus-like particles or liposomes are being considered to enhance allergen uptake by tolerogenic antigen presenting cells present in mucosal tissues.

  17. Vaccine Potentiation by Combination Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Levast, Benoît; Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne; Mutwiri, George; Gerdts, Volker; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial components of vaccines. They significantly improve vaccine efficacy by modulating, enhancing, or extending the immune response and at the same time reducing the amount of antigen needed. In contrast to previously licensed adjuvants, current successful adjuvant formulations often consist of several molecules, that when combined, act synergistically by activating a variety of immune mechanisms. These “combination adjuvants” are already registered with several vaccines, both in humans and animals, and novel combination adjuvants are in the pipeline. With improved knowledge of the type of immune responses needed to successfully induce disease protection by vaccination, combination adjuvants are particularly suited to not only enhance, but also direct the immune responses desired to be either Th1-, Th2- or Th17-biased. Indeed, in view of the variety of disease and population targets for vaccine development, a panel of adjuvants will be needed to address different disease targets and populations. Here, we will review well-known and new combination adjuvants already licensed or currently in development—including ISCOMs, liposomes, Adjuvant Systems Montanides, and triple adjuvant combinations—and summarize their performance in preclinical and clinical trials. Several of these combination adjuvants are promising having promoted improved and balanced immune responses. PMID:26344621

  18. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin-6′-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA. PMID:27184722

  19. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-17

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA.

  20. Effect of pine pollen extract on experimental chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Eun-Mi

    2009-05-01

    The effects of pine pollen extract (PE) on Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated. The oral administration of PE (100 and 200 mg/kg per day) for 21 days after subcutaneous immunization with FCA, significantly reduced hindpaw swelling and the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6) compared with the FCA-induced arthritis group. Treatment with the PE (100 mg/kg) also decreased the serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and increased HDL-cholesterol contents compared with those of the arthritis group. Since CIA is a model of some types of human autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the study examined whether PE is efficacious against CIA in mice and investigated the possible antioxidant potential of PE on CIA. Arthritis in DBA/1J mice was induced by subcutaneous immunization with bovine type II collagen. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once daily for 49 days after initial immunization with type II collagen. The arthritis score and paw edema were markedly suppressed in the groups treated with PE. Moreover, administration of PE (100 mg/kg) for 49 days reduced the serum levels of rheumatoid factor, anti-type II collagen antibody, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, protein carbonyl, advanced glycation endproducts, malondialdehyde and LDL-cholesterol compared with that of CIA mice. These results suggest that the pine pollen might be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  1. Adjuvant-induced antired blood cell activity in CBA mice

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Ann; McBride, W. H.; Weir, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Various micro-organisms are known to act as immunological adjuvants and included amongst these are Corynebacteriaceae. Numerous studies on Corynebacterium parvum have shown, in particular, its ability to cause proliferation and enhanced activity of the reticulo-endothelial system. This organism also leads in mice to anaemia and this report describes the simultaneous appearance of a red cell autoantibody in mice injected with C. parvum or another diphtheroid (SF 16) isolated from rheumatoid joint fluid. The significance of this latter observation is considered in relation to the unexplained anaemia of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:4933319

  2. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  3. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  4. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  5. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  8. Antisense-mediated knockdown of Na(V)1.8, but not Na(V)1.9, generates inhibitory effects on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Feng; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in sensory neurons were known as key pain modulators. Comparing with the widely reported Na(V)1.8, roles of Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain are poorly studied by antisense-induced specific gene knockdown. Here, we used molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods to examine the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain. Following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammation treatment, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions and increased sodium current densities. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated that Na(V)1.8 mainly localized in medium and small-sized DRG neurons, whereas Na(V)1.9 only expressed in small-sized DRG neurons. Intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of AS ODN was used to down-regulate Na(V)1.8 or Na(V)1.9 expressions confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Unexpectedly, behavioral tests showed that only Na(V)1.8 AS ODN, but not Na(V)1.9 AS ODN could reverse CFA-induced heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that TTX-R sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in primary sensory neurons played distinct roles in CFA-induced inflammatory pain and suggested that antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated blocking of key pain modulator might point toward a potential treatment strategy against certain types of inflammatory pain. PMID:21572961

  9. Macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species protects against autoimmune priming with a defined polymeric adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvants and the immune priming events in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, is a key challenge to identify their aetiology. Adjuvants are, however, complex structures with inflammatory and immune priming properties. Synthetic polymers provide a possibility to separate these functions and allow studies of the priming mechanisms in vivo. A well-balanced polymer, poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNiPAAm) mixed with collagen type II (CII) induced relatively stronger autoimmunity and arthritis compared with more hydrophilic (polyacrylamide) or hydrophobic (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide and poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide) polymers. Clearly, all the synthesized polymers except the more hydrophobic poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide induced arthritis, especially in Ncf1-deficient mice, which are deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We identified macrophages as the major infiltrating cells present at PNiPAAm-CII injection sites and demonstrate that ROS produced by the macrophages attenuated the immune response and the development of arthritis. Our results reveal that thermo-responsive polymers with high immune priming capacity could trigger an autoimmune response to CII and the subsequent arthritis development, in particular in the absence of NOX2 derived ROS. Importantly, ROS from macrophages protected against the autoimmune priming, demonstrating a critical regulatory role of macrophages in immune priming events. PMID:26455429

  10. Adjuvant disease induced by mycobacteria, determinants of arthritogenicity.

    PubMed

    Audibert, F; Chedid, L

    1976-02-01

    Genetic, endocrine and immunological factors are probably involved in adjuvant polyarthritis. The nature of the vehicle and of the mycobacterial components administered also has a major influence. It was originally assumed that arthritogenicity and adjuvanticity of mycobacterial fractions such as wax D were intimately related. Our previous findings showed that the water soluble adjuvant (WSA) of M.smegmatis which could substitute for mycobacterial cells in Freund's complete adjuvant and induce delayed hypersensitivity was not arthritogenic in the Wistar rat. We have since observed that auto-immune diseases could be elicited by WSA. Therefore experiments were repeated using the very susceptible Lewis strain. The activity of cord factor and of various mycobacterial preparations suspended in mineral or in peanut oil was also evaluated in mice and in normal or hypophysectomized rats. Our present findings confirm the absence of arthritogenicity of WSA in the Lewis strain. They also indicate that cord factor with WSA does not suffice to induce a generalized adjuvant disease, but that a mycobacterial component which could be susceptible to lysozyme treatment is required also. However, the local inflammation of the injected limb was produced by a preparation of cord factor administered in mineral or even in peanut oil. This was observed in normal or hypophysectomized rats and in Swiss mice which were not susceptible to the generalized disease.

  11. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  12. Adjuvant therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, S S; Kirkwood, J M

    1998-06-01

    Patients with AJCC Stage IIB and III melanoma have a poor 5-year survival rate which has been the driving force behind attempts to find an effective adjuvant therapy for this stage of disease that would effectively reduce relapse and improve survival. Immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), Corynebacterium parvum, and levamisole have not been successful in achieving this goal, nor have trials with chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation. The recent Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 1684 study showed significant improvement in relapse-free and overall survival with high doses of alpha interferon (IFNalpha) given for 1 year. Lower dosages of IFNalpha have to date been unsuccessful in impacting upon long-term survival. Recent data with vaccines have been encouraging, and the GM2-KLH vaccine is the focus of ongoing intergroup study comparing this treatment with IFNalpha in resected Stage IIB and III melanoma. The various regimens are reviewed in this article. PMID:9588723

  13. Enhanced Topical Delivery of Tetrandrine by Ethosomes for Treatment of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pKa = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin. PMID:24062995

  14. Enhanced topical delivery of tetrandrine by ethosomes for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pK(a) = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin.

  15. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  16. Enhanced topical delivery of tetrandrine by ethosomes for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pK(a) = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin. PMID:24062995

  17. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  18. Nanomedicines for Inflammatory Arthritis: Head-To-Head Comparison of Glucocorticoid-Containing Polymers, Micelles and Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Crielaard, Bart J.; Dusad, Anand; Lele, Subodh M.; Rijcken, Cristianne J. F.; Metselaar, Josbert M; Kostková, Hana; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Kiessling, Fabian; Mikuls, Ted R.; Hennink, Wim E.; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging research direction, nanomedicine has been increasingly utilized to treat inflammatory diseases. In this head-to-head comparison study, four established nanomedicine formulations of dexamethasone, including liposomes (L-Dex), core-crosslinked micelles (M-Dex), slow releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-slow) and fast releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-fast), were evaluated in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model with an equivalent dose treatment design. It was found that after a single i.v. injection, the formulations with the slower drug release kinetics (i.e. M-Dex and P-Dex-slow) maintained longer duration of therapeutic activity than those with relatively faster drug release kinetics, resulting in better joint protection. This finding will be instructional in the future development and optimization of nanomedicines for the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis. The outcome of this study also illustrates the value of such head-to-head comparison studies in translational nanomedicine research. PMID:24341611

  19. Effects of simvastatin, atorvastatin, ezetimibe, and ezetimibe + simvastatin combination on the inflammatory process and on the liver metabolic changes of arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Lívia; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Bracht, Adelar; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2012-12-01

    In this study, simvastatin, atorvastatin, ezetimibe, and ezetimibe + simvastatin combination were administered to arthritic rats, first to determine their effects on the inflammatory response, employing a low-dose adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. Arthritis was induced by the subcutaneous injection of a suspension of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (100 μg) in mineral oil [complete Freund's adjuvant used (CFA)] into the plantar surface of the hind paws. Simvastatin(40 mg/kg), atorvastatin(10 mg/kg), ezetimibe(10 mg/kg), ezetimibe(10 mg/kg) + simvastatin(20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg) were given intragastrically and the treatment began on the day of CFA injection and continued daily up to the 28th day after arthritis induction. The ezetimibe + simvastatin combination was more effective in reducing the inflammatory response in arthritic rats than in atorvastatin, simvastatin, or ezetimibe monotherapy. The observed effect seems to be cholesterol-independent as there were no changes in plasma cholesterol levels. In spite of the benefits on joint lesions, treatment with ezetimibe + simvastatin combination caused a marked increment in liver, kidneys, spleen size, and plasma transaminases activities. Therefore, animals treated with the ezetimibe(10 mg/kg) + simvastatin(40 mg/kg) combination were also submitted to liver perfusion experiments. In this regard, ezetimibe + simvastatin did not improve the liver metabolic alterations seen in control arthritic rats, on the contrary, a worsening was observed in liver production of glucose from alanine, as well as in oxygen uptake. All of these metabolic changes appear to be induced by treatment with ezetimibe + simvastatin combination, as the same metabolic effects were observed in normal and treated arthritic animals.

  20. Molecular signatures of vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn; Lindqvist, Madelene; Harandi, Ali M

    2015-09-29

    Mass vaccination has saved millions of human lives and improved the quality of life in both developing and developed countries. The emergence of new pathogens and inadequate protection conferred by some of the existing vaccines such as vaccines for tuberculosis, influenza and pertussis especially in certain age groups have resulted in a move from empirically developed vaccines toward more pathogen tailored and rationally engineered vaccines. A deeper understanding of the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity at molecular level enables the development of vaccines that selectively target certain type of immune responses without excessive reactogenicity. Adjuvants constitute an imperative element of modern vaccines. Although a variety of candidate adjuvants have been evaluated in the past few decades, only a limited number of vaccine adjuvants are currently available for human use. A better understanding of the mode of action of adjuvants is pivotal to harness the potential of existing and new adjuvants in shaping a desired immune response. Recent advancement in systems biology powered by the emerging cutting edge omics technology has led to the identification of molecular signatures rapidly induced after vaccination in the blood that correlate and predict a later protective immune response or vaccine safety. This can pave ways to prospectively determine the potency and safety of vaccines and adjuvants. This review is intended to highlight the importance of big data analysis in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of adjuvants to inform rational development of future human vaccines. PMID:25989447

  1. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  3. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  4. Enthesitis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Misra, Durga Prasanna

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis of childhood. Currently, it is characterized by seven categories. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) category usually affects boys older than 6 years and presents with lower limb asymmetrical arthritis associated with enthesitis. Later, these children can develop inflammatory lumbosacral pain (IBP). These children are at risk of developing acute anterior uveitis. A recently devised disease activity index, Juvenile Spondyloarthropathy Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), has been validated in retrospective cohorts. The corner stone of treatment is NSAIDs, local corticosteroid injections, and exercise. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine can be used for peripheral arthritis while anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are sometimes used to treat refractory enthesitis and sacroiliitis. Almost two third of patients with ERA have persistent disease and often have impairments in their quality of life. The presence of hip or ankle arthritis and a family history of spondyloarthropathy or polyarticular joint involvement at onset are associated with poorer prognosis.

  5. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  6. Effect of Boschniakia rossica on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras)proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and its anti-inflammatory activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zong-Zhu; Jin, Hai-Ling; Yin, Xue-Zhe; Li, Tian-Zhu; Quan, Ji-Shu; Jin, Zeng-Nan

    2000-12-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of Boschniakia rossica (BR) extract on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras) proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and its anti-inflammatory activities.METHODS:The expression of tumor marker-placental form glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), p53 and p21(ras) proteins were investigated by immunohisto-chemical techniques and ABC method. Anti-inflammatory activities of BR were studied by xylene and croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced rat pow edema, adjuvant-induced rat arthritis and cotton pellet induced mouse granuloma formation methods.RESULTS:The 500mg/kg of BR-H2O extract frac-tionated from BR-Methanol extract had inhibitory effect on the formation of DEN-induced GST-P-positive foci in rat liver (GST-P staining was 78% positive in DEN+AAF group vs 20% positive in DEN+AAF+BR group, P<0.05) and the expression of mutant p53 and p21(ras) protein was lower than that of hepatic preneoplastic lesions (33% and 22% positive respectively in DEN+AAF group vs negative in DEN+AAF+BR group). Both CH(2)Cl(2) and H(2)O extracts from BR had anti-inflamatory effect in xylene and crotonoil induced mouse ear edema (inhibitory rates were 26%-29% and 35%-59%, respectively). BR H(2)O extract exhibited inhibitory effect in carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced hind paw edema and adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in mice.CONCLUSION:BR extract exhibited inhibitory effect on formation of preneoplastic hepatic foci in early stage of rat chemical hepato-carcinogenesis.Both CH(2)Cl(2) and H(2)O extracts from BR exerted anti-inflammatory effect in rats and mice.

  7. Inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and NO production in mouse macrophage and inflammatory response in rat animal models by a novel Ayurvedic formulation, BV-9238.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debendranath; Chaskar, Sunetra; Athavale, Nitin; Chitre, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic crippling disease, where protein-based tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors show significant relief, but with potentially fatal side effects. A need for a safe, oral, cost-effective small molecule or phyto-pharmaceutical is warranted. BV-9238 is an Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation containing specialized standardized extracts of Withania somnifera, Boswellia serrata, Zingiber officinale and Curcuma longa. The anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 were evaluated for inhibition of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) production, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated, RAW 264.7, mouse macrophage cell line. BV-9238 reduced TNF-α and NO production, without any cytotoxic effects. Subsequently, the formulation was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) and carrageenan-induced paw edema (CPE) rat animal models. AIA was induced in rats by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally in the paw, and BV-9238 and controls were administered orally for 21 days. Arthritic scores in AIA study and inflamed paw volume in CPE study were significantly reduced upon treatment with BV-9238. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 are due to its inhibition of TNF-α, and NO, and this formulation shows promise as an alternate therapy for inflammatory disorders where TNF-α and NO play important roles. PMID:24706581

  8. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  9. Preclinical Potency and Biodistribution Studies of an AAV 5 Vector Expressing Human Interferon-β (ART-I02) for Local Treatment of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aalbers, Caroline J.; Bevaart, Lisette; Loiler, Scott; de Cortie, Karin; Wright, J. Fraser; Mingozzi, Federico; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proof of concept for local gene therapy for the treatment of arthritis with immunomodulatory cytokine interferon beta (IFN-β) has shown promising results in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For the treatment of RA patients, we engineered a recombinant adeno-associated serotype 5 vector (rAAV5) encoding human (h)IFN-β under control of a nuclear factor κB promoter (ART-I02). Methods The potency of ART-I02 in vitro as well as biodistribution in vivo in arthritic animals was evaluated to characterize the vector prior to clinical application. ART-I02 expression and bioactivity after transduction was evaluated in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from different species. Biodistribution of the vector after local injection was assessed in a rat adjuvant arthritis model through qPCR analysis of vector DNA. In vivo imaging was used to investigate transgene expression and kinetics in a mouse collagen induced arthritis model. Results Transduction of RA FLS in vitro with ART-I02 resulted in high expression levels of bioactive hIFN-β. Transduction of FLS from rhesus monkeys, rodents and rabbits with ART-I02 showed high transgene expression, and hIFN-β proved bioactive in FLS from rhesus monkeys. Transgene expression and bioactivity in RA FLS were unaltered in the presence of methotrexate. In vivo, vector biodistribution analysis in rats after intra-articular injection of ART-I02 demonstrated that the majority of vector DNA remained in the joint (>93%). In vivo imaging in mice confirmed local expression of rAAV5 in the knee joint region and demonstrated rapid detectable and sustained expression up until 7 weeks. Conclusions These data show that hIFN-β produced by RA FLS transduced with ART-I02 is bioactive and that intra-articular delivery of rAAV5 drives expression of a therapeutic transgene in the joint, with only limited biodistribution of vector DNA to other tissues, supporting progress towards a phase 1 clinical trial for the local treatment of

  10. The melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreases inflammation and muscle wasting in arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gómez‐SanMiguel, Ana Belen; Martín, Ana Isabel; Nieto‐Bona, María Paz; Fernández‐Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, María Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory diseases induce cachexia that increases mortality and morbidity of the illness. Adjuvant‐induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. Alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone has an anti‐inflammatory effect in arthritic rats and decreases muscle wasting. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether the anti‐cachectic action of alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone is mediated by the melanocortin receptor type 3 pathway. Methods Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant, and 6 days afterwards, arthritic rats were injected with the selective melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐gammaMSH ( d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH) 500 µg/kg subcutaneously. or saline twice a day, for 10 days. Results d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased the external signs of inflammation and body weight loss, but it was not able to modify the anorexigenic effect of arthritis or the increase in hypothalamic cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) expression. In contrast, d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH prevented arthritis‐induced increase in hypothalamic IL‐1β and serum corticosterone levels and the decrease in serum IGF‐I levels. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH treatment also prevented arthritis‐induced NF‐kB(p65) phosphorylation and tumour necrosis factor‐α mRNA increase in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH administration to arthritic rats increased gastrocnemius mass, its cross‐sectional area, and mean fast fibre area. Those effects of d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH were associated with a decreased expression of atrogin‐1 and muscle ring‐finger protein‐1 in the gastrocnemius. In rats treated with saline, arthritis increased the expression of autophagy marker genes LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap1 as well as the conversion of LC3b I to LC3b II by lipidation in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased gastrocnemius LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap

  11. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27429986

  12. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway.

  13. Immune Modulation of B. terrestris Worker (a Type of Bumblebee), Extract on CFA-induced Paw Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ja; Han, Jea Woong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    To develop a composition for enhancing immunity, based on alcohol extracts of the bumblebee as an active ingredient, bumblebee ethanol extracts were evaluated for their protective effect in chronic models of inflammation, adjuvant induced rat arthritis. B. terrestris worker extract (SDIEX) and, B. hypocrita sapporoensis lava an pupa extract (SPDYBEX), significantly decreased paw edema in arthritic rats, at a dose 100 mg/kg, respectively. The cytokine levels related inflammation of COX-2, sPLA2, VEGF, and TNF-α, were decreased, compared to positive control, indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Histopathological data demonstrated decreases inflammatory activity, hind paw edema, and repaired hyaline articular cartilage in DRG over a 2 wk administration. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of SDIEX and SPDYBEX revealed the presence of cantharidin. PMID:25584147

  14. The involvement of heat-shock proteins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Nung; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on the role of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in animal models ans patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The published literature in Medline (PubMed), including our published work on the cell-mediated as well as humoral immune response to various HSPs was reviewed. Studies in both the pre-clinical animal models of arthritis as well as RA were examined critically and the data presented. Results In experimental arthritis, disease induction by different arthritogenic stimuli, including an adjuvant, led to immune response to mycobacterial HSP65 (BHSP65). However, attempts to induce arthritis by a purified HSP have not met with success. There are several reports of a significant immune response to HSP65 in RA patients. But, the issue of cause and effect is difficult to address. Nevertheless, several studies in animal models and a couple of clinical trials in RA patients have shown the beneficial effect of HSPs against autoimmune arthritis. Conclusions There is a clear association between immune response to HSPs, particularly HSP65, and the initiation and propagation of autoimmune arthritis in experimental models. The correlation is relatively less convincing in RA patients. In both cases, the ability of HSPs to modulate arthritis offers support, albeit an indirect one, for the involvement of these antigens in the disease process. PMID:19969325

  15. Mucosal adjuvants: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingbin

    2016-09-01

    Most pathogens access the body via mucosal surfaces. Mucosal vaccination is a highly effective and recommended method to prevent mucosally transmitted infections. Compared with immunization via intramuscular injection, mucosal immunization offers remarkable advantages, including non-invasiveness, low costs and reduced risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases, which make it more acceptable to human beings, especially to young children. However, only few mucosal vaccines are licensed for human, which is mainly due to the deficiency of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. Adjuvants, as important components of most vaccines, are essential to enhance immunity and induce immune memory. The development of mucosal adjuvants, unfortunately, has been severely hampered by research strategies based on empiric trials and non-comprehensive methods for safety evaluation. Therefore, changing the research and development strategies of mucosal adjuvant field from empiricism based discovery to rational design based invention is highly demanded. The change of strategies mainly depends upon clarification of mechanism of mucosal adjuvant activity though a combination of life science, information science and materials science. PMID:27159278

  16. Evaluation of Caesalpinia bonducella flower extract for anti-inflammatory action in rats and its high performance thin layer chromatography chemical fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Arunadevi, Rathinam; Murugammal, Shanmugam; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study is aimed to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity of Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming (Caesalpiniaceae) flower extract (CBFE) and to study its effect on radiographic outcome in adjuvant induced arthritis and authentication by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) chemical fingerprinting. Materials and Methods: CBFE was administered orally (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced inflammation, cotton pellet induced chronic granulomatous inflammation and autacoids-induced inflammation. Effect on radiographic outcome was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis. CBFE was HPTLC fingerprinted in suitable solvent system. Result: In carrageenan-induced inflammation, CBFE produced significant inhibition in edema volume at all the doses (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and percentage of inhibition was 28.68, 31.00, and 22.48, respectively as compared to control at 5 h of its administration. In cotton pellet granuloma assay, CBFE significantly decreased the granuloma weight at 300 mg/kg dose level by 22.53%. CBFE (300 mg/kg) caused significant inhibition by 37.5, 44.44, and 35.29% edema volume, at ½, 1 and 3 h after 5-hydroxytryptamine injection, respectively. Radiographic score of animals treated with 300 mg/kg CBFE was significantly decreased when compared to arthritic control animals. Conclusion: The extract was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity. CBFE treatment improved the bony architecture in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The developed HPTLC fingerprint would be helpful in the authentication of C. bonducella flower extract. PMID:26729956

  17. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  18. Oily adjuvants and autoimmunity: now time for reconsideration?

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M

    2012-02-01

    Immunologists have relied heavily on oil-based adjuvants to generate antibodies or induce auto-allergic responses in experimental animals. These are rarely used today for human vaccination because of their persistent irritancies and propensity to cause ulcers at sites of injection. However oily materials with adjuvant properties abound in our modern environment, both personal and extraneous. Their inadvertent impact as cryptotoxins may contribute to the rising incidence of auto-allergic diseases in recent times. Experimentally, the potential adjuvanticity of various oils, fats and other lipids can be evaluated by their ability (or otherwise) to induce auto-allergic disease(s) in rats and mice with, or even without, the addition of a mycobacterial immunostimulant. Genetic factors have been recognized that determine an animal's susceptibility or resistance to these oil-induced immunopathies. So it may be profitable to further characterize these factors, first in animals and then perhaps in human populations, to help find ways to enhance natural resistance to those adjuvant-active oils that may be widely distributed in the personal environment, notably mineral oil(s). (The six tables in this article summarize some relevant facts and a few conjectures.) A caveat: This review is restricted to the adjuvant properties of some oils in the personal environment. It does not cover the mechanisms of adjuvanticity.

  19. The ultrastructure of tomatine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Wun; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Morrow, W J W

    2002-12-01

    The tomatine adjuvant, consisting of tomatine, n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and ovalbumin, has recently been shown to potentiate the immunogenicity of protein antigen and elicit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in immunized animals. The physicochemical properties of tomatine adjuvant have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the microstructure of this complex formulation, as directly related to its physicochemical properties. To elucidate the micromorphology of this system, the tomatine adjuvant was separated by isopycnic ultracentrifugation, followed by freeze fracturing and examination by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The adjuvant mixture was shown to be composed of several micro- and nano-structures. The major fraction obtained from isopycnic separation was shown to consist of flaky needle-like microcrystals, approximately 80-160 nm in width and 2-4 microm in length. The tomatine crystals alone in 0.9% NaCl, on the other hand, were shown to be elongated hollow tubular crystals of hundreds of nanometers up to a few microns in length, along which n-octyl-beta-glucopyranoside was speculated to serve as a seeding microtemplate for gel crystallization of protein complexes. Indented marks within the gel phase were observed in the freeze fractured replicas of the adjuvant, suggesting that protein complexes may have been crystallized or precipitated within the gels. Several other forms of micro- and nano-structures were also observed, showing multiple-dispersion features with gel characteristics. The presence of gel crystalline and multiple-dispersed phases is postulated to contribute to the sustained immunopotentiation effect of tomatine adjuvant.

  20. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  1. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver.

    PubMed

    Pašková, Ľudmila; Kuncírová, Viera; Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Čavojský, Tomáš; Bilka, František; Šišková, Katarína; Paulíková, Ingrid; Bezáková, Lýdia; Bauerová, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  2. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  3. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  4. Adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Molife, R; Hancock, B W

    2002-10-01

    High risk surgically resected melanoma is associated with a less than 50% 5-year survival. Adjuvant therapy is an appropriate treatment modality in this setting, and is more likely to be effective as the tumour burden here is small. Clinical observations of spontaneous tumour regressions and a highly variable rate of disease progression suggest a role of the immune system in the natural history of melanoma. Biological agents have therefore been the subjects of numerous adjuvant studies. Early, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), levamisole, Corynebacterium parvum, chemotherapy, isolated limb perfusion (ILP), radiotherapy, transfer factor (TF), megestrol acetate and vitamin A yielded largely negative results. Current trials focus on vaccines and the interferons. To date the latter is the only therapy to have shown a significant benefit in the prospective randomised controlled phase III setting. This report represents a systematic review of studies in adjuvant therapy in melanoma. Data from ongoing studies is awaited before a role for adjuvant agents in high risk melanoma is confirmed. PMID:12399001

  5. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  6. Drug-disease interactions: reduced β-adrenergic and potassium channel antagonist activities of sotalol in the presence of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kulmatycki, Kenneth M; Abouchehade, Kassem; Sattari, Saeed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2001-01-01

    Inflammation may influence response to pharmacotherapy. We investigated the effect of inflammation on response to sotalol, a β-adrenergic receptor and potassium channel antagonist. Racemic sotalol (40 mg kg−1) was administered to healthy, acutely (interferonα 2a-induced) and chronically (Mycobacterium butyricum-induced adjuvant arthritis) inflamed male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4 – 6/group). Another group of interferon-treated rats received 3 mg kg−1 of anti-TNF antibody infliximab. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma sotalol concentration monitored for 6 h. The study was repeated in acutely inflamed rats following administration of stereochemically pure individual sotalol enantiomers [40 mg kg−1 S (potassium channel blocker) or 20 mg kg−1 R (β-adrenergic/potassium channel blocker)]. Chronic arthritis was readily evident. Acute arthritis was associated with elevated segmented neutrophils and increased plasma nitrite and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations. Sotalol affected ECG in all rats. In both inflamed groups, however, response to sotalol in prolongation of QT interval (potassium channel sensitivity) was reduced. The effect of PR interval (β-adrenergic activity) was also reduced following administration of the racemate and R-enantiomer. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between control and inflamed rats. Infliximab reduced nitrite and TNF concentrations and reversed the effect of acute inflammation on both PR and QT intervals. The reduced electrocardiographic responses to sotalol is likely due to the influence of inflammation on the action of the drug on both β-adrenergic and potassium channel receptors secondary to over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or nitric oxide. Our observation may have therapeutic consequences in all conditions where inflammatory mediators are increased. PMID:11350865

  7. [Adjuvants in modern medicine and veterinary].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, V G; Ozherelkov, S V; Sanin, A V; Kozhevnikova, T N

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to immunologic adjuvants--various natural and synthetics substances that are added to vaccines for stimulation of specific immune response, but they do not induce specific response themselves. Critically important is the selection of the correct adjuvants, for which mechanisms of effect on immune system are studied the most. The majority of these mechanisms as well as physical-chemical and biological features of modern adjuvants are analyzed in the review. The problem of safety of adjuvants, types of immune response induced by adjuvants of various nature, excipients that are being verified or already in use in modern medicine and veterinary are also examined.

  8. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  9. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  10. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  11. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  12. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gowdie, Peter J; Tse, Shirley M L

    2012-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a complex group of disorders with arthritis as a common feature. This article provides the pediatrician with a review of the epidemiology, classification, clinical manifestations, and complications of JIA. It also provides an update on the current understanding of the cause of JIA and recent developments in management and a recent review of the long-term outcome in JIA.

  14. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  15. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  16. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    PubMed

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system.

  17. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  18. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  19. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  20. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  1. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick J; Mueller, William P

    2011-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a serious, life and limb threatening infection. If suspected, empiric treatment must begin immediately and account for the most likely pathogens. Eight days following left knee arthroscopic surgery, a 51-year-old active duty male spent approximately 1 hour driving a personal watercraft on Okaloosa Bay near the Gulf of Mexico. Eight days later, he presented to the emergency room with septic arthritis of that knee. Fluid aspirated from the joint yielded Aeromonas hydrophila. The infection resolved with surgical drainage and 21 days of levofloxacin. A. hydrophila is a rare cause of septic arthritis, and reported cases have involved exposure to water after trauma to the affected joint. Many U.S. military bases are located in coastal areas and military members frequently participate in activities which compromise skin integrity and place them at increased risk for contracting waterborne infections. We present the ninth case of A. hydrophila septic arthritis described in the English language literature, highlight the importance of considering this pathogen in at-risk populations, and review the diagnosis and management of septic arthritis.

  3. Standardized ethyl acetate fraction from the roots of Brassica rapa attenuates the experimental arthritis by down regulating inflammatory responses and inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Yun, Chang Hyeon; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Bang, Myun-Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Cho, Young-Wuk; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2014-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the anti-arthritic potential of a standardized ethyl acetate fraction from the roots of Brassica rapa (EABR) and to explore the molecular mechanisms in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats and macrophages. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, EABR significantly reduced paw swelling, an arthritic index, serum rheumatoid factor, and tissue expression ratio of RANKL/OPG versus vehicle-administered group. This was found to be well correlated with significant suppressions in productions of PGE2, NO, and pro-inflammatory cytokines and in activations of NF-κB in AIA-induced paw tissues and LPS-induced macrophages. EABR attenuated NF-κB activation by reducing the nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of the p65 NF-κB, which were accompanied by parallel reductions in the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα after blocking the phosphorylation mediated IKK activation. The findings suggest EABR exerts its anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory properties via NF-κB inactivation in vitro and in vivo, and that EABR is a potential therapeutic for the treatment of arthritis and inflammation-associated disorders.

  4. Expression of cytokine mRNA and protein in joints and lymphoid organs during the course of rat antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pohlers, Dirk; Siegling, Angela; Buchner, Eberhard; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Palombo-Kinne, Ernesta; Emmrich, Frank; Bräuer, Rolf; Kinne, Raimund W

    2005-01-01

    Cytokine expression was assessed during antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in synovial membrane (SM), inguinal lymph node (LN), and spleen using competitive RT-PCR and sandwich ELISA. In the SM, early elevations of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA (by 6 hours; 450- and 200-fold, respectively) correlated with the joint swelling; a 6-fold increase in tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was not significant. Not only IL-2 and IFN-γ (which increased 10,000-fold and 200-fold, respectively), but also IL-5 and IL-10, increased acutely (6 hours – day 1; 3-fold and 35-fold, respectively) in the SM. In general, the protein levels in the SM for IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 (increase from 4-fold to 15-fold) matched the course of mRNA expression. In the inguinal LN, there were early mRNA elevations of IL-6 (a 2.5-fold increase by 6 hours, which correlated positively with the joint swelling) and IL-2 (4-fold by 6 hours), as well as later rises of IL-4 and IL-5 (2.5- and 4-fold, respectively, by day 3). No significant elevations of the corresponding proteins in this tissue were observed, except for IL-1β (by day 6) and IL-10 (by day 1). In the spleen, there were significant mRNA elevations at 6 hours of IL-1β (1.5-fold), IL-6 (4-fold; positively correlated with the joint swelling), IFN-γ (3-fold), and IL-2 (7- to 10-fold). IL-5 and IL-10 (2- and 3-fold, respectively) peaked from 6 hours to day 3 in the spleen. Increases of the corresponding proteins were significant in comparison with day 0 only in the case of IL-2 (day 6). By day 6 (transition to the chronic phase), the mRNA for cytokines declined to or below prearthritis levels in all the tissues studied except for IL-1β in the SM and IL-6 in the spleen. AIA is thus characterized by four phenomena: early synovial activation of macrophages, T helper (Th)1-like, and Th2-like cells; late, well-segregated Th2-like responses in the inguinal LN; late, overlapping Th1-like/Th2-like peaks in the spleen; and chronic elevation of

  5. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  7. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  9. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  10. Effect of prostanoid EP4 receptor antagonist, CJ-042,794, in rat models of pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Murase, Akio; Okumura, Takako; Sakakibara, Ayano; Tonai-Kachi, Hiroko; Nakao, Kazunari; Takada, Junji

    2008-02-01

    Recent study suggests that the proinflammatory and nociceptive effects of prostaglandin E(2) are mediated by prostanoid receptor subtype EP(4) and prostanoid EP(4) receptor may be a potential target for the treatment of inflammatory pain. Here we describe pharmacological characterization of a novel prostanoid EP(4) receptor antagonist, CJ-042,794 (4-{(1S)-1-[({5-chloro-2-[(4-fluorophenyl) oxy] phenyl} carbonyl) amino] ethyl} benzoic acid) in comparison with piroxicam (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) or rofecoxib (cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor). CJ-042,794 competitively antagonized cAMP accumulation with a pA(2) value of 8.7 in HEK293 cells overexpressing rat prostanoid EP(4) receptors. Orally administered CJ-042,794 dose-dependently inhibited carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia with an ED(50) value of 4.7 mg/kg (11 micromol/kg) and its maximal activity was somewhat less effective than that of 10 mg/kg piroxicam (30 micromol/kg p.o.). When CJ-042,794 and rofecoxib were administered to adjuvant-induced arthritis rats on Days 12-22 twice daily, both compounds reversed paw swelling to normal levels. These results suggest that a pharmacological blockade of the prostanoid EP(4) receptor may represent a new therapeutic strategy in signs and symptomatic relief of osteoarthritis and/or rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. The Effects of Supplemental Intra-Articular Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid on the Progression of Post-Traumatic Arthritis in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Rat Knee

    PubMed Central

    Teeple, Erin; Elsaid, Khaled A.; Jay, Gregory D.; Zhang, Ling; Badger, Gary J.; Akelman, Matthew; Bliss, Thomas F.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate articular cartilage and prevent wear. Because lubricin loss occurs following ACL injury, intra-articular lubricin injections may reduce cartilage damage in the ACL deficient knee. Purpose To determine if lubricin and/or hyaluronic acid supplementation will reduce cartilage damage in the ACL deficient knee. Study Design Controlled laboratory study Methods 36 male rats, 3 months old, underwent unilateral ACL transection. They were randomized to four treatments: 1) saline (PBS), 2) hyaluronic acid (HA), 3) purified human lubricin (LUB), and 4) LUB and HA (LUB+HA). Intra-articular injections were given twice weekly for four weeks starting one week after surgery. Knees were harvested one week following final injection. Radiographs of each limb and synovial fluid lavages were obtained at harvest. Histology was performed to assess cartilage damage using Safranin O/Fast green staining. Radiographs were scored for the severity of joint degeneration using the modified Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Synovial fluid levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan, collagen II breakdown, IL-1β, TNF-α and lubricin were measured using ELISA. Results Treatment with LUB or LUB+HA significantly decreased radiographic and histologic scores of cartilage damage (p=0.039, p=0.015, respectively) when compared to the PBS and HA conditions. There was no evidence of an effect of HA nor was the LUB effect HA dependent suggesting that the addition of HA did not further reduce damage. The synovial fluid of knees treated with LUB had significantly more lubricin in the synovial fluid at euthanasia, though there were no differences in the other cartilage metabolism biomarkers. Conclusions Supplemental intra-articular LUB reduced cartilage damage in the ACL transected rat knee 6 weeks after injury, while treatment with HA did not. Clinical Relevance Although longer-term studies are needed, intra-articular supplementation (tribosupplementation) with lubricin

  12. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory.

  13. Streptococcus canis arthritis in a cat breeding colony.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, F; Kunstýr, I; Mörstedt, R; Farouq, H; Wullenweber, M; Damsch, S

    1991-01-01

    This is the first description of a pathologic condition--arthritis in cats affecting mainly one joint, i.e. monarthritis--caused by Streptococcus canis (S. canis), of the Lancefield serologic group G. Six cases were recorded in a closed cat breeding colony during a 6 month period in 1988, and one additional case in 1990. Therapy with penicillin and streptomycin led to full recovery in four of six cases. The bacterium had been detected from different purulent processes sporadically--including one case of purulent arthritis in 1982--as a nosocomial infection since 1980, the year the breeding colony was established. A possible genetic predisposition (high inbreeding) may have contributed to the accumulation of the six cases in 1988. Although S. canis was isolated in mouse, rat, rabbit and dog, cat and man seem to be more frequently affected. There are some similarities between S. canis-arthritis in cat and man.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effect of egg white-chalcanthite and purple bamboo salts mixture on arthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Song, Hyun-kyung; Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Dong-Yoon; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of anti-osteoarthritis effects on egg white-chalcanthite (EC), purple bamboo salts (PBS), and a mixture of EC and PBS (EC+PBS). EC is a mixture of egg white and pulverized chalcanthite. PBS has been widely used as one of functional foods in Korea and shows unique features compared with common salt. Osteoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 4mg/kg bw) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Test substances were administered once daily for 6 weeks at doses of 10 mg EC, EC+100 mg PBS, EC+200 mg PBS before and after MIA injection. Each substance was assessed by blood chemistry parameters, and by serum cytokines including IL-1β and IL-6, and nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). Structural changes of articular cartilage were also evaluated by histopathological examination. As a result, body weight and blood chemistry parameter were not different in all experimental groups. EC+PBS mixture reduced the production of PGE2, NO, IL-1β, and IL-6. In histological grade of osteoarthritis, EC+PBS mixture had a tendency to ameliorate damage of articular cartilage induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, EC+PBS mixture was demonstrated to have a potential for anti-inflammatory effect against osteoarthritis induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27382377

  15. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations. PMID:27274998

  16. Vaccine adjuvants: putting innate immunity to work.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Robert L; Sher, Alan; Seder, Robert A

    2010-10-29

    Adjuvants enhance immunity to vaccines and experimental antigens by a variety of mechanisms. In the past decade, many receptors and signaling pathways in the innate immune system have been defined and these innate responses strongly influence the adaptive immune response. The focus of this review is to delineate the innate mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects. We highlight how adjuvants can be used to influence the magnitude and alter the quality of the adaptive response in order to provide maximum protection against specific pathogens. Despite the impressive success of currently approved adjuvants for generating immunity to viral and bacterial infections, there remains a need for improved adjuvants that enhance protective antibody responses, especially in populations that respond poorly to current vaccines. However, the larger challenge is to develop vaccines that generate strong T cell immunity with purified or recombinant vaccine antigens.

  17. Methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules are highly effective in the control of inflammation in synovial cells and a chronic arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Antônio Luiz; de Oliveira, Catiúscia Padilha; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease in the word, affecting 1% of the population. Long-term prognosis in RA was greatly improved following the introduction of highly effective medications such as methotrexate (MTX). Despite the importance of this drug in RA, 8%–16% of patients must discontinue the treatment because of adverse effects. Last decade, we developed a promising new nanocarrier as a drug-delivery system, lipid-core nanocapsules. Objective The aim of the investigation reported here was to evaluate if methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (MTX-LNC) reduce proinflammatory and T-cell-derived cytokines in activated mononuclear cells derived from RA patients and even in functional MTX-resistant conditions. We also aimed to find out if MTX-LNC would reduce inflammation in experimentally inflammatory arthritis at lower doses than MTX solution. Methods Formulations were prepared by self-assembling methodology. The adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats (AIA) and the effect on edema formation, TNF-α levels, and interleukin-1 beta levels after treatment was evaluated. Mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of RA patients during articular infiltration procedures were treated with MTX solution and MTX-LNC. For in vitro experiments, the same dose of MTX was used in comparing MTX and MTX-LNC, while the dose of MTX in the MTX-LNC was 75% lower than the drug in solution in in vivo experiments. Results Formulations presented nanometric and unimodal size distribution profiles, with D[4.3] of 175±17 nm and span of 1.6±0.2. Experimental results showed that MTX-LNC had the same effect as MTX on arthritis inhibition on day 28 of the experiment (P<0.0001); however, this effect was achieved earlier, on day 21 (P<0.0001), by MTX-LNC, and this formulation had reduced both TNF-α (P=0.001) and IL-1α (P=0.0002) serum levels by the last day of the experiment. Further, the MTX-LNC were more effective at reducing the

  18. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  19. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  20. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T; Sauld, John F; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T; Pollack, Henry J; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  1. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  2. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  3. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  4. Adjuvants are Key Factors for the Development of Future Vaccines: Lessons from the Finlay Adjuvant Platform

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Oliver; Romeu, Belkis; Cabrera, Osmir; González, Elizabeth; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Labrada, Alexis; Pérez, Rocmira; Reyes, Laura M.; Ramírez, Wendy; Sifontes, Sergio; Fernández, Nelson; Lastre, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against neglected diseases, especially those associated with poverty and social deprivation, is urgently needed. Modern vaccine technologies and a better understanding of the immune response have provided scientists with the tools for rational and safer design of subunit vaccines. Often, however, subunit vaccines do not elicit strong immune responses, highlighting the need to incorporate better adjuvants; this step therefore becomes a key factor for vaccine development. In this review we outline some key features of modern vaccinology that are linked with the development of better adjuvants. In line with the increased desire to obtain novel adjuvants for future vaccines, the Finlay Adjuvant Platform offers a novel approach for the development of new and effective adjuvants. The Finlay Adjuvants (AFs), AFPL (proteoliposome), and AFCo (cochleate), were initially designed for parenteral and mucosal applications, and constitute potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1 responses against several antigens. This review summarizes the status of the Finlay technology in producing promising adjuvants for unsolved-vaccine diseases including mucosal approaches and therapeutic vaccines. Ideas related to adjuvant classification, adjuvant selection, and their possible influence on innate recognition via multiple toll-like receptors are also discussed. PMID:24348475

  5. Arthritis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Aarli, J A; Milde, E J; Thunold, S

    1975-11-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis developed clinical signs of arthropathy. In two patients, the symptoms were due to a deforming rheumatoid arthritis and the myasthenic symptoms appeared as a transitory phase during the course of the disease. Muscle antibodies of IgG class were demonstrated with sera from both patients. Autoreactivity between muscle antibodies and rheumatoid factor was detected in one patient. Both patients died from sudden cardiac failure. Necropsy was performed in one and revealed a spotty myocardial necrosis. One patient had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Two patients had mild articular symptoms with indices of multivisceral disease and serological findings indicating a systemic lupus erythematous. One patient had classical ankylosing spondylitis, and one, unspecified arthropathy.

  6. Staphylococcal peptidoglycans induce arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zai-Qing; Deng, Guo-Min; Foster, Simon; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens in septic arthritis. To analyse the arthritogenic properties of staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN), highly purified PGN from S. aureus was intra-articularly injected into murine joints. The results demonstrate that PGN will trigger arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. A single injection of this compound leads to massive infiltration of predominantly macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with occasional signs of cartilage and/or bone destruction, lasting for at least 14 days. Further studies showed that this condition is mediated by the combined impact of acquired and innate immune systems. Our results indicate that PGN exerts a central role in joint inflammation triggered by S. aureus. PMID:11714392

  7. [Reactive arthritis. A review].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Espinoza, L R

    1990-07-01

    The arthritides that meet the definition or reactive arthritis include the so-called seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Patients are usually aged less than thirty-two. Preceding infection is generally intestinal or venereal, although the involved agent may remain unknown. Enteric forms occur in small epidemics, whereas venereal forms correlate with a recent new sexual partner. The clinical picture varies in severity, with manifestations overlapping between disorders, and often the first complaint is extra-articular. Highly suggestive of reactive arthritis is "sausage" deformity of fingers and toes, pain and stiffness about multiple joints accompanied by radiating lower back discomfort, and enthesitis, particularly at the Achilles tendon. One out of six or seven patients becomes disabled; therapy aimed at preventing disability is vital since medication has little effect on spinal involvement. Antibiotic therapy may be effective in cases in which specific etiologic agents are well defined.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  9. Safety evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL): an immunostimulatory adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Richardson, Derek; Elliott, Gary; Wheeler, Alan W

    2002-06-01

    Animal models have shown the potential use of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a detoxified bacterial lipopolysaccharide, as a vaccine adjuvant. Immunostimulatory activity with diverse effects on the cellular elements of the immune system has been demonstrated and a range of vaccines incorporating MPL, including allergy vaccines, are currently under clinical evaluation. A series of preclinical safety investigations was performed to support clinical use of MPL as used in allergy vaccines and comprised cardiovascular/respiratory assessment in dog (up to 100 microg/kg/day); repeat-dose toxicity in rat, rabbit, and dog (up to 2500 and 1200 microg/kg/day in the rat and dog, respectively); reproduction toxicity in rat and rabbit (up to 100 microg/kg/day); and genotoxicity studies. Overall, repeat-dose toxicity studies in the rat and dog showed expected immunostimulatory effects and/or signs of toxicity associated with overstimulation of the immune system (notably increased spleen weight and white blood cell values). Studies in the rabbit with weekly doses of MPL produced no effects. MPL was shown to have no adverse effects on cardiovascular/respiratory function, reproduction, and genotoxicity.

  10. Immunological adjuvants: a role for liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gregoriadis, G

    1990-03-01

    Recent technological advances have resulted in the production of safe subunit and synthetic small peptide vaccines. These vaccines are weakly or non-immunogenic and cannot, therefore, be used effectively in the absence of immunological adjuvants (agents that can induce strong immunity to antigens). Owing to the toxicity of adjuvants, only one (aluminium salts) has hitherto been licensed for use in humans, and it is far from ideal. In this article, Gregory Gregoriadis discusses the use of liposomes as an alternative safe, versatile, universal adjuvant that can induce humoral- and cell-mediated immunity to antigens when administered parenterally or enterally. PMID:2186746

  11. Chronic arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1994-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritides in children include a wide range of various diseases. One of the main concerns of physicians who treat these disorders is the risk of permanent physical disability resulting from joint damage. Actual classification relies mainly on clinical features, particularly the number of joints affected at onset, although the general feeling is that chronic childhood arthritis exists in many different entities gathered together under the common names juvenile chronic arthritis or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The past 2 years were rather fertile in debates for proposing a progression for more objectivity in nomenclature, which was the theme of the Pediatric Rheumatology Study Group session at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting held in Atlanta in 1992. The viewpoints from North America and Europe addressed at this meeting were published in a supplement of the Journal of Rheumatology in 1993. A debate on this topic was also organized at the International League Against Rheumatism Congress held in Barcelona in 1993. At present, the main criteria rely on clinical experience and natural history of the diseases and on biology and immunogenetics. Another important concern among pediatric rheumatologists is efficacy of treatment. Questions include, "Are we doing enough?" and "How safe are the therapeutic strategies?" In this review some of the recent studies that may be important for classification and nomenclature and therapy and management are discussed.

  12. Novel Adjuvants and Immunomodulators for Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Fang, Yongxiang; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial for efficacy of vaccines, especially subunit and recombinant vaccines. Rational vaccine design, including knowledge-based and molecularly defined adjuvants tailored for directing and potentiating specific types of host immune responses towards the antigens included in the vaccine is becoming a reality with our increased understanding of innate and adaptive immune activation. This will allow future vaccines to induce immune reactivity having adequate specificity as well as protective and recallable immune effector mechanisms in appropriate body compartments, including mucosal surfaces. Here we describe these new developments and, when possible, relate new immunological knowledge to the many years of experience with traditional, empirical adjuvants. Finally, some protocols are given for production of emulsion (oil-based) and liposome-based adjuvant/antigen formulations.

  13. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  14. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  15. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  16. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  17. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials’ physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25483497

  18. Adjuvant therapy after surgical stone management.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Michael N; Monga, Manoj; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the most widely researched adjuvant medical therapies for the surgical management of urolithiasis. Articles were identified and reviewed from PubMed and Medline databases with MeSH headings focusing on the various surgical treatments of urolithiasis and adjuvant therapy. Additional articles were retrieved from references and conference proceedings. Surgical treatments reviewed included shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Adjuvant therapy was considered medical or complementary therapy as an adjunct to these surgical interventions. Adjuvant therapy for the surgical management of urolithiasis has been documented to increase stone-free rates, reduce stone remission rates, prevent renal damage, and decrease postoperative morbidity. A variety of agents have been studied, ranging from antioxidants to alpha-blockers and to alkalinizing agents. Additionally, there is increasing interest in complementary adjuvant therapy (ie, acupuncture). Adjuvant therapy is a fertile area for research in the surgical management of urolithiasis. The optimal agents have yet to be determined and therefore further investigation is warranted and necessary.

  19. A Mucosal Adjuvant for the Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Jorquera, Patricia; Westdijk, Janny; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of poliovirus from the majority of the world has been achieved through the use of two vaccines: the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Both vaccines are effective at preventing paralytic poliomyelitis, however, they also have significant differences. Most importantly for this work is the risk of revertant virus from OPV, the greater cost of IPV, and the low mucosal immunity induced by IPV. We and others have previously described the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant that can induce a mucosal immune response to a co-administered antigen even when delivered at a non-mucosal site. In this report, we describe the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant (GVI3000) with IPV. The IPV-GVI3000 vaccine significantly increased systemic IgG, mucosal IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses to all three poliovirus serotypes in mice even when administered intramuscularly. Furthermore, GVI3000 significantly increased the potency of IPV in rat potency tests as measured by poliovirus neutralizing antibodies in serum. Thus, an IPV-GVI3000 vaccine would reduce the dose of IPV needed and provide significantly improved mucosal immunity. This vaccine could be an effective tool to use in the poliovirus eradication campaign without risking the re-introduction of revertant poliovirus derived from OPV. PMID:24333345

  20. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  1. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  2. Malvidin-3-O-β glucoside, major grape anthocyanin, inhibits human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and decreases clinical scores in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Decendit, Alain; Mamani-Matsuda, Maria; Aumont, Virginie; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Moynet, Daniel; Boniface, Katia; Richard, Emmanuel; Krisa, Stéphanie; Rambert, Jérôme; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Mossalayi, M D

    2013-11-15

    Polyphenolic anthocyanins are major colorful compounds in red fruits, known to prevent cardiovascular and other diseases. Grape polyphenols are a mixture of various molecules and their exact contribution to above bioactivities remains to be clarified. In the present study, we first analyzed the effect of purified grape-derived compounds on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival, proliferation, as well as for their ability to inhibit the activation of human normal macrophages. Data indicated that malvidin-3-O-β glucoside (Malβg), the major grape anthocyanin, is bioactive with no toxicity on human PBMC. Malβg decreased the transcription of genes encoding inflammatory mediators, confirmed by the inhibition of TNFα, IL1, IL-6 and iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) secretion from activated macrophages. As Malβg also inhibited inflammatory response of rat macrophages, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of Malβg in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Malβg significantly diminished inflammatory cachexia and arthritic paw scores in AIA rats at both therapeutic and preventive levels. In vivo effects of Malβg correlated with down-regulation of NO generation from AIA rats' peritoneal macrophages ex vivo. These data indicate that Malβg, major grape anthocyanin, is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in vitro and in vivo, without detectable toxic effect.

  3. Management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K; Gedalia, Abraham

    2004-09-01

    Septic arthritis in children remains a serious disease with the potential for significant systemic and musculoskeletal morbidity. Staphlococcus aureus is the most common cause of bone and joint infections in all age groups. Microbial invasion of the synovial space occurs typically results from hematogenous seeding. Diagnosis in neonates and young infants can be difficult since the clinical signs are much less specific in these age groups. Early diagnosis by needle aspiration of the affected joint and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with drainage of the affected joint is critical to avoid destruction of the articular cartilage and prevent disability. Septic arthritis in infants and children should always be managed by a pediatrician in close consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. Empiric antibiotic regimens should always include adequate anti-staphylococcal coverage. Antibiotic treatment should be started with appropriate doses of intravenous antibiotics. Switch to oral antibiotic therapy can be made when patient demonstrates clinical improvement. A minimum of 3-4 weeks of therapy is recommended. Close follow-up is warranted to monitor the growth of the affected limb until skeletal maturity.

  4. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  5. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  6. Intra-articular drug delivery from an optimized topical patch containing teriflunomide and lornoxicam for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: does the topical patch really enhance a local treatment?

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Guan, Yanli; Zhang, Yuxiu; Li, Yuanru; Fang, Liang

    2013-07-10

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often bear joint destruction and symptomatic pain. The aim of this work is to develop a compound transdermal patch containing teriflunomide (TEF) and lornoxicam (LOX) to transport these drugs across the skin with the isochronous permeation rates for RA therapy and investigate intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX following transdermal patches applied topically. The salts of TEF and LOX with organic amines diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA) and N-(2'-hydroxy-ethanol)-piperdine (NP) were prepared to improve the skin permeation of the parent drug. The optimized patch formulation is obtained from a 3-factor, 2-level central composite design. After topical application of the optimized compound patch to only one knee joint in rabbit, intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX on the application site was compared with that on the non-application site. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the optimized compound patch were evaluated using the adjuvant arthritis model and the pain model induced by acetic acid, respectively. The in vitro experiment results showed that the amine salts of TEF and LOX, especially TEF-TEtA and LOX-TEtA, enhanced the skin permeation of TEF and LOX from the transdermal patch system. The optimal formulation successfully displayed isochronous permeation rates for TEF and LOX across rabbit skin, and was defined with 5% of TEF-TEtA, 10% of LOX-TEtA and 15% of azone. The in vivo study showed that TEF and LOX from transdermal patches were transferred into skin, ligament and fat pad on the application site by direct diffusion and on the non-application site by the redistribution of systemic blood supply, while local absorption of TEF and LOX in synovial fluid originated from the systemic blood supply rather than direct diffusion. In the RA rat model, the results of swelling inhibition on primary arthritis of bilateral hind paws further confirmed the above

  7. Oil-based emulsion vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Strioga, Marius; Ascarateil, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are critical components in experimental and licensed vaccines used in human and veterinary medicine. When aiming to evoke an immune response to a purified antigen, the administration of antigen alone is often insufficient, unless the antigen contains microbial structures or has a natural particulate structure. In most cases, the rationale to use an adjuvant is obvious to the experimental immunologist or the professional vaccinologist, who is familiar with the nature of the antigen, and the aim of the vaccine to elicit a specific antibody response and/or a specific type of T cell response. In this unit, we describe protocols to formulate antigens with oil-based emulsions. Such emulsions represent a major prototype adjuvant category that is frequently used in experimental preclinical vaccines, as well as veterinary and human vaccines.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and ocular involvement.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chittaranjan; Banik, Sujoy; Islam, Md Nazarul; Biswas, Mukul Chandra; Biswas, Gautam; Biswas, Sobhan

    2003-09-01

    To study the occurrence and incidence of different ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis a random cross-sectional study was carried out among 54 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. The patients were examined thoroughly to detect any ocular disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Complete ocular examination with special emphasis on anterior segment evaluation and tearfilm study was done. Two-thirds of the patients examined had some kind of visual problem at presentation. Three patients (5.55%) had marked dry eye with another 20 (37.03%) having borderline tear deficiency. Two cases ( 3.70% ) of episcleritis were also seen. No cases of scleritis or retinopathy were found. The most common ocular association with rheumatoid arthritis was secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Other conditions include episcleritis and marginal keratitis.

  9. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  10. Therapy strategies in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Coates, Laura C

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous condition with a myriad of different clinical presentations. It commonly affects the skin and musculoskeletal system causing psoriasis, peripheral arthritis, axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis. Many patients also have related conditions, such as those within the metabolic syndrome and associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) conditions including inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis. Any therapeutic strategy must be tailored to the individual patient, taking into account her/his complete clinical presentation and comorbidities. New treatment recommendations from the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) provide evidence based recommendations on effective therapies for the management of each different manifestation of PsA, and how treatment may be affected by comorbidities (1). However, the limited evidence comparing different treatment strategies in PsA is recognised as a limitation in these recommendations and further information is detailed below.

  11. [Rheumatoid arthritis and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shunta; Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Sumida, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    The cytokines are an important substance involved in the immune reaction and maintenance of homeostasis. An imbalance in the cytokine network may lead to inflammation and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone and systemic manifestations. The pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-17 induce the inflammation of the joints and destruction of bone and cartilage via activation of macrophages, fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS), helper T (Th) cells and osteoclasts. Recently, the available therapeutic agents that target these cytokines have excellent clinical effects in RA patients.

  12. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  13. [Septic arthritis in adults].

    PubMed

    Loock, J; Haustedt, N; Wollenhaupt, J

    2014-09-01

    Septic arthritis is a true rheumatological emergency requiring immediate and thoughtful effort for rapid diagnosis establishment and treatment initiation. Children and elderly persons as well as immunocompromised individuals, patients with pre-existing joint damage and with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases are preferentially affected. Bacteremia, joint surgery and intra-articular injections pose risk situations for the development of joint infections. The most frequent causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus but other relevant pathogens include coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and mycobacteria. Synovial fluid analysis (e.g. appearance, cell count and microbiological examination) is the most important step to establish the diagnosis. The two main components of therapy consist of joint drainage and antibiotic treatment. The approach to periprosthetic joint infections depends on the duration of symptoms, causative organism and individual factors.

  14. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Maria; Gottlieb, Beth S

    2012-07-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthrithis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood.JIA is a chronic disease that is associated with periods of disease flares and periods of disease inactivity.Early, aggressive treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, or methotrexate, has significantly improved the outcome of most children who have JIA. Biologics have been shown to be both safe and effective for the treatment of more aggressive forms of arthritis and for uveitis. Long-term safety data of biologics is still uncertain. In the near future, it is hoped that genetic testing will allow earlier diagnosis of JIA as well as help predict the disease course of children who have JIA. Genetic analysis also may allow physicians to target therapies more effectively. It is hoped that development of more specific therapies will decrease overall immunosuppression and other associated toxicities.

  16. Adjuvants and vector systems for allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe; Lombardi, Vincent; Saint-Lu, Nathalie; Tourdot, Sophie; Bodo, Véronique; Mascarell, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a curative treatment of type I allergies. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is conducted with allergens adsorbed on aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate particles, whereas sublingual immunotherapy relies on high doses of soluble allergen without any immunopotentiator. There is a potential benefit of adjuvants enhancing regulatory and Th1 CD4+T cell responses during specific immunotherapy. Molecules affecting dendritic cells favor the induction of T regulatory cell and Th1 responses and represent valid candidate adjuvants for allergy vaccines. Furthermore, the interest in viruslike particles and mucoadhesive particulate vector systems, which may better address the allergen(s) to tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, is documented.

  17. [ADJUVANTED INFLUENZA VACCINES: DATA FROM DIRECT COMPARATIVE STUDIES].

    PubMed

    Chernikova, M I; Vasiliev, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the cornerstone of influenza control, however available vaccines are subject to certain limitations. Adjuvanted vaccines are a promising approach, however available adjuvants have a suboptimal effectiveness and safety profile. Data from direct comparative trials are necessary for selection of optimal adjuvants among currently available and search for novel safe and effective adjuvants for next generation influenza vaccines. Data from published direct comparative studies of adjuvants for influenza vaccines are summarized, a lack of such studies is noted, especially those using adequate methods and designs and comparing adjuvants of major groups (nature/source and mechanism of action). Several promising approaches of adjuvant research and development could be identified: chitosan-based adjuvants, oil-in-water emulsions and multi-component formulations (depot + immune modulating components).

  18. Outlining novel cellular adjuvant products for therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Tefit, Josianne Nitcheu; Serra, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    Despite the library of new adjuvants available for use in vaccines, we remain, at present, almost reliant on aluminum-based compounds for clinical use. The increasing use of recombinant subunit vaccines, however, makes the need for improved adjuvant of particular interest. Adjuvants are crucial components of all cancer vaccines whether they are composed of whole cells, proteins or peptides. For the purposes of this article, cellular adjuvant products are defined as adjuvants associated with cellular or T-cell immunity. Several pharmaceutical companies are developing new adjuvants or immune enhancers for the treatment of cancers such as melanoma and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Several products are being developed and have entered clinical trials either alone or in combination. In this article, we discuss recent adjuvant development and novel cellular adjuvant products for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  19. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  20. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  1. Protective Effect of High Molecular Weight Protein Sub-fraction of Calotropis procera Latex in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Ramos, Marcio V.; Vasconcelos, Mirele da Silveira; Kumar, Vijay L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteins present in the latex of Calotropis procera have been shown to produce anti-inflammatory effect and to afford protection in various disease models. Objectives: To determine the efficacy of high molecular weight protein sub-fraction (LPPI) of latex of C. procera in ameliorating joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a preclinical model of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and the effect of two doses of LPPI (5 and 25 mg/kg) and diclofenac (5 mg/kg) was evaluated on joint swelling, stair climbing ability, motility, and dorsal flexion pain on day 3. The rats were sacrificed on day 3 to measure tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Evaluation of joint histology was also made. Results: Intra-articular injection of FCA produced joint swelling and difficulty in stair climbing ability, motility, and pain on flexion of the joint as revealed by scores obtained for these functional parameters. LPPI produced a dose-dependent decrease in joint swelling and improved joint functions. Arthritic rats also revealed altered oxidative homeostasis where joint tissue GSH levels were decreased and TBARS levels were increased as compared to normal rats. The levels of these oxidative stress markers were near normal in arthritic rats treated with LPPI. Moreover, treatment with LPPI also maintained the structural integrity of the joint. The protective effect of LPPI was comparable to the standard anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that LPPI fraction comprising high molecular weight proteins could be used for the alleviation of arthritic symptoms. SUMMARY High molecular weight protein sub-fraction of latex of Calotropis procera (LPPI) reduced joint swelling and hyperalgesia in arthritic ratsLPPI produced a significant improvement in stair climbing ability and motility

  2. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  3. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  4. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  5. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  6. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  7. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  8. Gaps in knowledge and prospects for research of adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Seder, Robert; Reed, Steven G; O'Hagan, Derek; Malyala, Padma; D'Oro, Ugo; Laera, Donatello; Abrignani, Sergio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Steinman, Lawrence; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    A panel of researchers working in different areas of adjuvanted vaccines deliberated over the topic, "Gaps in knowledge and prospects for research of adjuvanted vaccines" at, "Enhancing Vaccine Immunity and Value" conference held in July 2014. Several vaccine challenges and applications for new adjuvant technologies were discussed.

  9. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  10. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  11. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  12. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  13. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  14. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  15. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven.

  16. Adjuvants for peptide-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khong, Hiep; Overwijk, Willem W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies based on T cells have shown impressive clinical benefit. In particular, immune checkpoint blockade therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 are causing dramatic tumor shrinkage and prolonged patient survival in a variety of cancers. However, many patients do not benefit, possibly due to insufficient spontaneous T cell reactivity against their tumors and/or lacking immune cell infiltration to tumor site. Such tumor-specific T cell responses could be induced through anti-cancer vaccination; but despite great success in animal models, only a few of many cancer vaccine trials have demonstrated robust clinical benefit. One reason for this difference may be the use of potent, effective vaccine adjuvants in animal models, vs. the use of safe, but very weak, vaccine adjuvants in clinical trials. As vaccine adjuvants dictate the type and magnitude of the T cell response after vaccination, it is critical to understand how they work to design safe, but also effective, cancer vaccines for clinical use. Here we discuss current insights into the mechanism of action and practical application of vaccine adjuvants, with a focus on peptide-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27660710

  17. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  18. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization and evaluation of triamcinolone, raloxifene, and their dual-loaded microspheres as prospective local treatment system in rheumatic rat joints.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Yigit; Kurum, Baris; Karahan, Siyami; Tezcaner, Aysen; Ozen, Seza; Keskin, Dilek

    2014-08-01

    In this study, injectable microspheres were developed for the local treatment of joint degeneration in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Microspheres loaded with triamcinolone (TA), a corticosteroid drug, and/or raloxifene (Ral), a cartilage regenerative drug, were prepared with a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polycaprolactone (PCL). Microspheres were optimized for particle size, structural properties, drug release, and loading properties. In vitro release of Ral was very slow because of the low solubility of the drug and hydrophobic nature of PCL. However, when coloaded with TA, both drugs were released at higher amounts compared with their single forms. Smallest particle sizes were obtained in dual drug-loaded microspheres. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed biocompatibility of microspheres. In vivo bioefficacy of these microspheres was also examined in adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. In vivo histological studies of control groups showed development of RA with high median lesion score (5.0). Compared with control and intra-articular free drug injections, microsphere treatment groups showed lower lesion scores and better healing outcomes in histological evaluations. Results suggest that a controlled delivery system of TA and RAL by a single injection in inflamed joints holds promise for healing and suppressing inflammation.

  20. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  1. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  2. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6 weeks duration in patients aged less than 16 years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  3. Vitamins as influenza vaccine adjuvant components.

    PubMed

    Quintilio, Wagner; de Freitas, Fábio Alessandro; Rodriguez, Dunia; Kubrusly, Flavia Saldanha; Yourtov, Dimitri; Miyaki, Cosue; de Cerqueira Leite, Luciana Cezar; Raw, Isaias

    2016-10-01

    A number of adjuvant formulations were assayed in mice immunized with 3.75 µg of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09 influenza vaccine with vitamins A, D and/or E in emulsions or B2 and/or B9 combined with Bordetella pertussis MPLA and/or alum as adjuvants. Squalene was used as positive control, as well as MPLA with alum. The immune response was evaluated by a panel of tests, including a hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test, ELISA for IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a and IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 quantification in splenocyte culture supernatant after stimulus with influenza antigen. Immunological memory was evaluated using a 1/10 dose booster 60 days after the first immunization followed by assessment of the response by HAI, IgG ELISA, and determination of the antibody affinity index. The highest increases in HAI, IgG1 and IgG2a titers were obtained with the adjuvant combinations containing vitamin E, or the hydrophilic combinations containing MPLA and alum or B2 and alum. The IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicates that the response to the combination of B2 with alum would have more Th2 character than the combination of MPLA with alum. In an assay to investigate the memory response, a significant increase in HAI titer was observed with a booster vaccine dose at 60 days after immunization with vaccines containing MPLA with alum or B2 with alum. Overall, of the 27 adjuvant combinations, MPLA with alum and B2 with alum were the most promising adjuvants to be evaluated in humans. PMID:27449155

  4. Vitamins as influenza vaccine adjuvant components.

    PubMed

    Quintilio, Wagner; de Freitas, Fábio Alessandro; Rodriguez, Dunia; Kubrusly, Flavia Saldanha; Yourtov, Dimitri; Miyaki, Cosue; de Cerqueira Leite, Luciana Cezar; Raw, Isaias

    2016-10-01

    A number of adjuvant formulations were assayed in mice immunized with 3.75 µg of A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09 influenza vaccine with vitamins A, D and/or E in emulsions or B2 and/or B9 combined with Bordetella pertussis MPLA and/or alum as adjuvants. Squalene was used as positive control, as well as MPLA with alum. The immune response was evaluated by a panel of tests, including a hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test, ELISA for IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a and IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 quantification in splenocyte culture supernatant after stimulus with influenza antigen. Immunological memory was evaluated using a 1/10 dose booster 60 days after the first immunization followed by assessment of the response by HAI, IgG ELISA, and determination of the antibody affinity index. The highest increases in HAI, IgG1 and IgG2a titers were obtained with the adjuvant combinations containing vitamin E, or the hydrophilic combinations containing MPLA and alum or B2 and alum. The IgG1/IgG2a ratio indicates that the response to the combination of B2 with alum would have more Th2 character than the combination of MPLA with alum. In an assay to investigate the memory response, a significant increase in HAI titer was observed with a booster vaccine dose at 60 days after immunization with vaccines containing MPLA with alum or B2 with alum. Overall, of the 27 adjuvant combinations, MPLA with alum and B2 with alum were the most promising adjuvants to be evaluated in humans.

  5. Prevention of arthritis markers in experimental animal and inflammation signalling in macrophage by Karanjin isolated from Pongamia pinnata seed extract.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mukherjee, Debarati; Mandal, Suvra; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Karanjin, the furanoflavonoid reported to possess gastroprotective and anti-diabetic properties, was investigated against experimental arthritis and its molecular signalling in inflammation was explored in macrophages. Karanjin was isolated from hexane extract of Pongamia pinnata seeds and was evaluated on arthritis markers in adjuvant induced arthritis model (AIA) in two doses (per oral; 10 mg/kg/day and 20 mg/kg/day). Karanjin dose dependently reduced collagen and cartilage breakdown markers viz. urinary hydroxyproline and glucosamine, respectively, serum lysosomal enzymes responsible for articular cartilage damage, and major proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, secreted by macrophages involved in articular inflammation and destruction. Karanjin also prevented joint damage as evidenced from arthritis score, radiographic and histopathological analysis. To delineate the molecular target of Karanjin, in vitro study on LPS induced macrophages were performed at calibrated non toxic doses (4 µg/mL and 6 µg/mL). Karanjin reduced TNFα production and also showed potent inhibitory effect on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production which is generally induced by TNFα from activated macrophages. NF-κB, the key regulator of TNFα signalling during inflammation was significantly suppressed by Karanjin. Our study for the first time highlights the anti-inflammatory role of Karanjin in experimental arthritis model as well as on macrophage signalling, thereby depicting its probable mechanism of action. PMID:24399783

  6. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  7. Review of L-tyrosine confirming its safe human use as an adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Richardson, Derek; Wheeler, Alan W

    2002-01-01

    Although there is a long history of exposure to allergy vaccines containing L-tyrosine, there has been no central publication reviewing its adjuvant properties in animal and human studies together with an assessment of its safe use. This paper summarizes a range of investigational data (unpublished) available to the authors as well as published literature reports. An array of in vitro and in vivo studies showed that L-tyrosine has ideal adjuvant properties, comprising a high adsorptive power for proteins, enhancement of IgG antibody induction with no stimulatory effect on IgE antibody level and action as a short-term depot adjuvant, delaying the bioavailability of allergenic materials rather than directly influencing immunocompetent cells. A series of preclinical safety investigations comprised single-dose parenteral studies in the mouse and rat, repeat-dose parenteral toxicity studies over 28 days in the rat and dog (up to 25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) plus genotoxicity and local tolerance studies. No signs of toxicity or genotoxicity were seen; repeat-dose toxicity studies showed expected white cell and spleen weight immunostimulatory effects; local-dose site reactions were also seen and were confirmed in local tolerance studies. Findings from a range of clinical studies using allergy vaccines containing L-tyrosine reflected the lack of toxicity seen in animal work and showed evidence of enhanced immunostimulatory activity. Local injection site reactions (a common response to any form of clinical vaccination) in these studies were likely to be due to the presence of L-tyrosine per se. The lack of findings of toxicological concern found during this review supports the hypothesis that L-tyrosine is a safe adjuvant for human use.

  8. Ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Chiara; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Gattamelata, Angelica; Vavala, Caterina; Valesini, Guido; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation that can lead to structural damage of cartilage, bone and tendons. Assessing the inflammatory activity and the severity is essential in RA to help rheumatologists in adopting proper therapeutic strategies and in evaluating disease outcome and response to treatment. In the last years musculoskeletal (MS) ultrasonography (US) underwent tremendous technological development of equipment with increased sensitivity in detecting a wide set of joint and soft tissues abnormalities. In RA MSUS with the use of Doppler modalities is a useful imaging tool to depict inflammatory abnormalities (i.e. synovitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis) and structural changes (i.e. bone erosions, cartilage damage and tendon lesions). In addition, MSUS has been demonstrated to be able to monitor the response to different therapies in RA to guide local diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as biopsy, fluid aspirations and injections. Future applications based on the development of new tools may improve the role of MSUS in RA.

  9. New generation adjuvants--from empiricism to rational design.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Derek T; Fox, Christopher B

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvants are an essential component of modern vaccine development. Despite many decades of development, only a few types of adjuvants are currently included in vaccines approved for human use. In order to better understand the reasons that development of some adjuvants succeeded while many others failed, we discuss some of the common attributes of successful first generation adjuvants. Next, we evaluate current trends in the development of second generation adjuvants, including the potential advantages of rationally designed synthetic immune potentiators appropriately formulated. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes of next generation adjuvants. Throughout, we emphasize that the importance of formulation and analytical characterization in all aspects of vaccine adjuvant development is often underappreciated. We highlight the formulation factors that must be evaluated in order to optimize interactions between vaccine antigens, immune potentiators, and particulate formulations, and the resulting effects on safety, biological activity, manufacturability, and stability.

  10. New generation adjuvants--from empiricism to rational design.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Derek T; Fox, Christopher B

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvants are an essential component of modern vaccine development. Despite many decades of development, only a few types of adjuvants are currently included in vaccines approved for human use. In order to better understand the reasons that development of some adjuvants succeeded while many others failed, we discuss some of the common attributes of successful first generation adjuvants. Next, we evaluate current trends in the development of second generation adjuvants, including the potential advantages of rationally designed synthetic immune potentiators appropriately formulated. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes of next generation adjuvants. Throughout, we emphasize that the importance of formulation and analytical characterization in all aspects of vaccine adjuvant development is often underappreciated. We highlight the formulation factors that must be evaluated in order to optimize interactions between vaccine antigens, immune potentiators, and particulate formulations, and the resulting effects on safety, biological activity, manufacturability, and stability. PMID:26022561

  11. [Differential diagnosis of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Eviltis, Egidijus

    2003-01-01

    Acute arthritis can first present as a symptom of dangerous and rapidly progressing disease. It is quite easy to differentiate between arthritis and periarthritis. More problematical is correct early differential diagnosis of the acute arthritis. Determining whether one, several or many joints are affected can narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Arthrocentesis and synovial fluid testing provide much information and should be done at initial evaluation if possible. The presence or absence of fever, rash, family history of joint disease and exposure to infective organisms can further direct diagnostic studies and treatment. In general, to avoid masking clues, drug therapy should be delayed for mild symptoms until diagnosis is complete. This article is designed mostly for primary care physicians, residents and includes author's original data and review of recommended reading. PMID:12794379

  12. Effect of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc root extracts on behavioral and radiology changes in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Madan L; Jalalpure, Sunil S

    2011-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of petroleum ether, chloroform, and methanol root extracts of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc (Family: Zingiberaceae) on behavioral and radiology aspects of Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA)-induced monoarthritis in left ankle joint of rats using open-field test. Traditionally, Curcuma zedoaria root has been used as anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic drug. Behavioral aspects include latency time to explore, ambulatory, rearing, grooming, urination, and defecation. Animals were divided into ten groups each of six rats, all the animals were subjected to open-field test before the induction of arthritis at 0 day and thereafter 3, 7, 14 21, 28, 35, and 42 days of postinoculation FCA injection. The rat was placed in an open field and observed all behavioral aspects for 5 minutes and radiography analysis was made on day 42. Selected doses were 10 mg/kg.i.p. Indomethacin 200 mg/kg.p.o. marketed herbal drug Rumalaya forte and 200 and 400 mg/kg.p.o. of each extracts, respectively. The results showed significant decrease in ambulation and rearing; however, increase in latency time to explore and grooming, urination, and defecation in control group, but in contrast, drug-treated groups showed significant recovery in all behavioral aspects except methanol groups. On the basis of radiography examination, control and methanol groups showed highest swelling compared with normal group; however, all drug-treated groups showed significant reduced swelling. Treatments with petroleum ether and chloroform extracts recovery were observed in behavioral and radiological aspects in arthritic rats. PMID:22171314

  13. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of sulfated polysaccharide fractions from Sargassum wightii and Halophila ovalis in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Neelakandan, Yuvaraj; Venkatesan, Arul

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this objective is to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of sulfated polysaccharide purified fractions isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum wightii and seagrass Halophila ovalis in male Wistar rats. Subjects and Methods: Crude sulfated polysaccharide from S. wightii and H. ovalis was subjected to anion exchange chromatography, and the chemical composition was investigated. The antinociceptive activity of purified fractions was investigated using formalin and hot plate test. Carrageenan-induced paw edema, peritonitis model, and Freund's Complete Adjuvant-induced arthritis model were employed to determine the anti-inflammatory activity. Results: In the formalin test, there was a significant reduction in licking time in both phases of the test at a dose of 10 mg/kg. In the hot plate test, the antinociceptive effect was observed only in animals treated with 5, 10 mg/kg suggesting that the analgesic effect occurs through a central action mechanism. Sw FrIV and Ho FrIV significantly inhibited paw edema induced by carrageenan, especially at 3 h after treatment and potentially decreased neutrophil migration at 10 mg/kg, respectively. In Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, a significant reduction in paw volume was observed in Sw FrIV and Ho FrIV-treated groups (10 mg/kg). Conclusion: Purified components from S. wightii and H. ovalis have strong antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect on animal model. However, to determine the molecular mechanism, it is necessary to investigate the effect of purified fractions on inhibition of nitric oxide synthase expression mediated by inhibiting the phosphorylation of various signal proteins in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PMID:27721544

  14. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  15. Septic arthritis involving Capnocytophaga ochracea.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, R E; Chase, W F; Lauderdale, P W; McCleskey, F K

    1984-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee developed in a 21-month-old child. The causative organism, isolated from two separate arthrocenteses, was identified as Capnocytophaga ochracea morphologically and by biochemical reactions. Previous human infections (bacteremias) have occurred in granulocytopenic hosts with concomitant oral pathology including periodontitis and gingivitis. No abnormalities of oral hygiene were present in this patient, and granulocyte numbers were normal or elevated. Eradication of the infection was accomplished with 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy combined with surgical drainage. Septic arthritis expands the spectrum of infections reported to be caused by Capnocytophaga spp. PMID:6715520

  16. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  17. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  18. Psychosocial and Physical Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Thomas Gregory; Elwood, J. Mark; Waxler-Morrison, Nancy; Ragaz, Joseph; Skippen, Diane Hazel; Turner, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    Breast cancer patients younger than 55 completed a questionnaire on psychosocial factors and physical side effects shortly after diagnosis and 9 to 15 months after diagnosis. Those who had used adjuvant chemotherapy were more likely than those who had not to report physical side effects; there was little difference in psychosocial factors. Recent users were more likely than ex-users to report physical side effects, difficulties with domestic chores, and improvement in psychosocial factors. PMID:21229020

  19. Inflammatory responses following intramuscular and subcutaneous immunization with aluminum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Maeda, Mika; Kawashima, Hisashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines are administered through an intramuscular injection (IM) in the US and EU, however, a subcutaneous injection (SC) has been recommended in Japan because of serious muscle contracture previously reported following multiple IMs of antibiotics. Newly introduced adjuvanted vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, have been recommended through IM. In the present study, currently available vaccines were evaluated through IM in mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induced inflammatory nodules at the injection site, which expanded into the intra-muscular space without any muscle degeneration or necrosis, whereas non-adjuvanted vaccines did not. These nodules consisted of polymorph nuclear neutrophils with some eosinophils within the initial 48h, then monocytes/macrophages 1 month later. Inflammatory nodules were observed 6 months after IM, had decreased in size, and were absorbed 12 months after IM, which was earlier than that after SC. Cytokine production was examined in the injected muscular tissues and AS04 adjuvanted HPV induced higher IL-1β, IL-6, KC, MIP-1, and G-CSF levels in muscle tissues than any other vaccine, but similar serum cytokine profiles were observed to those induced by the other vaccines. Currently available vaccines did not induce muscular degeneration or fibrotic scar as observed with muscle contracture caused by multiple IMs of antibiotics in the past.

  20. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  1. Utility of adjuvant systemic therapy in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, A. M. M.; Testori, A.; Marsden, J.; Hersey, P.; Quirt, I.; Petrella, T.; Gogas, H.; MacKie, R. M.; Hauschild, A.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of effective drugs in stage IV melanoma has impacted the effectiveness of adjuvant therapies in stage II/III disease. To date, chemotherapy, immunostimulants and vaccines have been used with minimal success. Interferon (IFN) has shown an effect on relapse-free survival (RFS) in several clinical trials; however, without a clinically significant effect on overall survival (OS). A recently conducted meta-analysis demonstrated prolongation of disease-free survival (DFS) in 7% and OS benefit in 3% of IFN-treated patients when compared with observation-only patients. There were no clear differences for the dose and duration of treatment observed. Observation is still an appropriate control arm in adjuvant clinical trials. Regional differences exist in Europe in the adjuvant use of IFN. In Northwest Europe, IFN is infrequently prescribed. In Central and Mediterranean Europe, dermatologists commonly prescribe low-dose IFN therapy for AJCC stage II and III disease. High-dose IFN regimens are not commonly used. The population of patients that may benefit from IFN needs to be further characterised, potentially by finding biomarkers that can predict response. Such studies are ongoing. PMID:19617295

  2. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  3. Recent Advances of Vaccine Adjuvants for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Trang

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the most effective and cost-efficient method for preventing diseases caused by infectious pathogens. Despite the great success of vaccines, development of safe and strong vaccines is still required for emerging new pathogens, re-emerging old pathogens, and in order to improve the inadequate protection conferred by existing vaccines. One of the most important