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Sample records for adjuvant arthritis rats

  1. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  2. Effects and mechanisms of Geniposide on rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Miao-Miao; Wu, Hong; Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Chen, Jin-Yun; Hu, Shun-Li; Shen, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Geniposide (GE), an iridoid glycoside compound, is the major active ingredient of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit which has anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GE on adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats and its possible mechanisms. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with GE at 30, 60 and 120mg/kg from days 18 to 24 after immunization. Lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by MTT. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, IL-4 and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined by ELISA. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phospho-JNK (p-JNK) were detected by Western blot. GE (60, 120mg/kg) significantly relieved the secondary hind paw swelling and arthritis index, along with decreased Th17-cells cytokines and increased Treg-cell cytokines in mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes (MLNL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of AA rats. In addition, GE decreased the expression of p-JNK in MLNL and PBL of AA rats. In vivo study, it was also observed that GE attenuated histopathologic changes of MLN in AA rats. Collectively, GE might exert its anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects through inducing Th17 cell immune tolerance and enhancing Treg cell-mediated activities by down-regulating the expression of p-JNK. The mechanisms of GE on JNK signaling in MLNL and PBL may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24583144

  3. Thalidomide analogue CC1069 inhibits development of rat adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, S J; Freeman, S L; Corral, L G; Ocampo, C J; Kaplan, G

    1999-01-01

    The cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been implicated in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis in humans as well as of experimental arthritis in rodents. Thalidomide, and to a greater extent the new thalidomide analogue CC1069, inhibit monocyte TNF-α production both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study is to establish whether these drugs block production of TNF-α as well as IL-2 by rat leucocytes and whether this inhibition affects the development of rat adjuvant arthritis (AA). Cultured splenocytes were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or concanavalin A (Con A) in the presence of thalidomide, CC1069, or solvent, and the production of TNF-α and IL-2 were compared. Next, adjuvant was injected into the base of the tail of rats without or with daily intraperitoneal injections with 100–200 mg/kg per day thalidomide or 50–200 mg/kg per day CC1069. Disease activity, including ankle swelling, hind limb radiographic and histological changes, weight gain, and ankle joint cytokine mRNA levels, were monitored. CC1069, but not the parent drug thalidomide, inhibited in vitro production of TNF-α and IL-2 by stimulated splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, a dose-dependent suppression of AA disease activity occurred in the CC1069-treated animals. In contrast, thalidomide-treated rats experienced comparable arthritis severity to placebo-treated animals. There was also a reduction in TNF-α and IL-2 mRNA levels in the ankle joints of CC1069-treated rats compared with thalidomide- and placebo-treated arthritic rats. Early initiation of CC1069 treatment suppressed AA inflammation more efficiently than delayed treatment. We conclude that thalidomide, which did not suppress TNF-α or IL-2 production in vitro by Lewis rat cells, did not suppress development of rat AA. However, the development of rat AA can be blocked by the thalidomide analogue CC1069, which is an efficient inhibitor of TNF-α production and IL-2 in vitro

  4. Decreased hepatobiliary transport of methotrexate in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, M; Totsuka, R; Fujimura, H; Kume, T

    2002-12-01

    1. We investigated the difference in hepatobiliary transport of methotrexate in normal and adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats and substantiated the expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in the liver. 2. Biliary clearance of methotrexate in normal and AA rats was calculated from plasma concentrations and biliary excretion following intravenous infusion and hepatic uptake clearance was estimated from an integration plot using methotrexate concentrations in plasma and liver. 3. Biliary clearance of methotrexate in AA rats was 2.30 +/- 0.23 ml min(-1) kg(-1) (mean SD) and significantly lower than in normal rats (8.42 +/- 0.81 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). The uptake clearance of methotrexate in AA rats was also lower than in normal rats (0.138 versus 0.278 ml min(-1) g liver(-1)). 4. MRP2 in the liver was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled antibody and visualized using a confocal laser microscope system. The expression level of MRP2 in AA rats was very low compared with normal rats, indicating a down-regulation in AA rats. 5. In conclusion, biliary clearance of methotrexate was decreased due to the lower activities in both uptake and canalicular secretion, suggesting that several active transporters in the liver, including MRP2, are down-regulated in AA rats. PMID:12593762

  5. Effect of galantamine on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gowayed, Mennatallah A; Refaat, Rowaida; Ahmed, Walid M; El-Abhar, Hanan S

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses cytokine production and macrophage activation, via the interaction of its neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) with the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), present on neurons and inflammatory cells. The present study aimed to verify the potential anti-inflammatory effect of galantamine against experimental arthritis induced in rats. Fourteen days post adjuvant injection, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with three doses of galantamine (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg) or leflunomide (10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks and arthritis progression was assessed by hind paw swelling. Additionally, serum biomarkers, viz., anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (Anti-CCP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Radiological examination of the hind paws was also carried out to evaluate the degree of joint damage. Adjuvant arthritis led to a significant weight loss, marked swelling of the hind paw and alteration in the serum levels of anti-CCP, TNF-α, IL-10 and MCP-1. These alterations were associated with significant radiological changes of the joints. Galantamine, in a dose-dependent manner, reduced significantly all biomarkers of inflammation, with the highest dose showing the best beneficial anti-inflammatory effect that was superior in magnitude to the reference drug leflunomide in most of the studied parameters. In conclusion, these results suggest that galantamine may represent a novel, inexpensive and effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26189022

  6. Effect of iron complexes on adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, A J; Blake, D R; Morris, C J

    1992-01-01

    When a total dose infusion of iron dextran is given to anaemic rheumatoid patients an exacerbation of inflammatory synovitis in previously affected joints is observed. The adjuvant arthritis model of inflammation in rats has been used to investigate the mechanism of iron promoted synovitis. Either iron dextran (5 mg injected intravenously) with a dextran C control, or iron sorbitol (7.5 mg injected intramuscularly) with a sorbitol citrate complex control was given at the onset of clinical joint inflammation. Iron dextran significantly increased joint inflammation (assessed by joint scoring) at days 12, 13, 14, and 16 after injection. Similarly, iron sorbitol produced a significant increase in the joint score at days 17, 18, 19, and 21. In addition, extensive osteoporosis was observed in the rats treated with iron sorbitol. These pro-inflammatory effects of iron coincide with the presence of positive results for synovial iron (III) using Perl's test and neutrophil infiltration. The results of this study suggest that the iron induced increase in synovitis in adjuvant arthritis is a result of iron promoted oxidative damage and is not likely to be due to the dextran C or the sorbitol citric acid components. It is suggested that a similar mechanism may occur in rheumatoid patients given iron supplements. Images PMID:1586252

  7. Decreased activity of hepatic P-glycoprotein in the isolated perfused liver of the adjuvant arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Achira, M; Totsuka, R; Kume, T

    2002-11-01

    1. We investigated the hepatobiliary transport of doxorubicin in the isolated perfused liver prepared from the adjuvant arthritis rat, an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, to examine the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity in the adjuvant arthritis rat. 2. Liver was isolated from the normal and the adjuvant arthritis rat and perfused for 60 min with recirculating buffer and the perfusate and bile samples were collected at timed interval. 3. The elimination of doxorubicin in the adjuvant arthritis rat tended to be reduced, but it was not significantly different from the normal rat. Biliary clearance (CL(bile)) in the normal rat was 1.93 +/- 0.48 ml min(-1), whereas, CL(bile) in the adjuvant arthritis rat was significantly decreased to 0.40 +/- 0.13 ml min(-1). 4. CL(bile) was markedly decreased to about 0.15 ml min(-1) in the presence of 100 microM verapamil in both types of rat. Methotrexate treatment had no effect on CL(bile) in both the normal and adjuvant arthritis rat (2.18 +/- 0.22 and 0.47 +/- 0.22 ml min(-1), respectively). 5. The results suggest that the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity was markedly decreased in the adjuvant arthritis rat and the effect of methotrexate on the hepatic P-glycoprotein activity did not corresponded to its anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:12487726

  8. Suppression and augmentation of rat adjuvant arthritis with monoclonal anti-interferon-gamma antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Wiesenberg, I; Van der Meide, P H; Schellekens, H; Alkan, S

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a monoclonal antibody (MoAb DB-1), which neutralized rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), on the induction and progression of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats induced by intraplantar injection of Freund's complete adjuvant was studied. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with MoAb DB-1 (0.3-5 mg) for various times. Prophylactic treatment with MoAb DB-1, starting 2 days prior to arthritis induction, inhibited oedema in both the injected and non-injected hind paws and delayed joint destruction as shown by radiography. However, despite continued MoAb treatment, the disease progressed. High doses of MoAb DB-1 exacerbated the disease. A control MoAb of the same isotype did not have significant effects on adjuvant arthritis. Therapeutic treatment with the MoAb DB-1 starting 8 days after arthritis induction caused only slight and short-lived inhibitory effects. IFN-gamma appears to be a critical lymphokine for the development of adjuvant arthritis. PMID:12412757

  9. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism of the heart from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Amanda Caroline; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Amado, Ciomar Aparecida Bersani; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate, in a more extensive way, the oxidative state and parameters related to energy metabolism of the heart tissue of rats using the model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The latter is a model for the human arthritic disease. Measurements were done in the total tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria and cytosolic fraction. The adjuvant-induced arthritis caused several modifications in the oxidative state of the heart which, in general, indicate an increased oxidative stress (+80% reactive oxygen species), protein damage (+53% protein carbonyls) and lipid damage (+63% peroxidation) in the whole tissue. The distribution of these changes over the various cell compartments was frequently unequal. For example, protein carbonyls were increased in the whole tissue and in the cytosol, but not in the mitochondria. No changes in GSH content of the whole tissue were found, but it was increased in the mitochondria (+33%) and decreased in the cytosol (-19%). The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was 77% stimulated by arthritis; the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were diminished by 31, 25 and 35.3%, respectively. In spite of these alterations, no changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity and in the efficiency of energy transduction were found. It can be concluded that the adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats causes oxidative damage to the heart with an unequal intracellular distribution. Compared to the liver and brain the modifications caused by arthritis in the heart are less pronounced on variables such as GSH levels and protein integrity. Possibly this occurs because the antioxidant system of the heart is less impaired by arthritis than that reported for the former tissues. Even so, the modifications caused by arthritis represent an imbalanced situation that probably contributes to the cardiac symptoms of the arthritis disease. PMID:27032477

  10. Protective effects of L-carnitine and alpha-lipoic acid in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tastekin, Nurettin; Aydogdu, Nurettin; Dokmeci, Dikmen; Usta, Ufuk; Birtane, Murat; Erbas, Hakan; Ture, Mevlut

    2007-10-01

    Free radicals play an important role in the pathophysiology of adjuvant arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of L-carnitine (LC) and alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA) which are known to have antioxidant effects, in the treatment of adjuvant arthritis. Arthritis model was created by the administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in 32 of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were divided into five groups. Rats in Group I served as controls and received 0.1 ml kg(-1) saline. Group II received only 0.1 ml of CFA and served as the CFA-control for the other groups. Groups III-V, after being injected with CFA, were treated with LC, alpha-LA or diclofenac, respectively. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) were measured in plasma samples. Enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured. The paws of rats were evaluated histopathologically to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects. TNF-alpha levels were measured for the evaluation of inflammation. In Group II plasma MDA increased, levels of glutathione decreased, enzyme activities of SOD and GPx decreased. Histopathological damage increased in the paws of the rats in this group. MDA levels decreased in Groups III-V when compared with Group II. GSH levels significantly increased in Group III and IV than Group V. SOD activity of Group IV was higher than Group III and V. TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in Group IV and V. LC and alpha-LA seemed to have protective effects against oxidative damage in adjuvant arthritis model. PMID:17826175

  11. Role of Sinomenine on Complete Freund's Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhou; Wei, Meng; Chen, Lvyi; Xie, Guangjing; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiuqiao

    2016-06-01

    The investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of sinomenine (Sin) on experimental adjuvant arthritis rats stimulated by Freund's complete adjuvant and explore the corresponding potential molecular mechanism. The content of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 were detected. Besides, canonical nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway was also assessed to evaluate the antiarthritic potential of sinomenine. Pathological sections of rat paws showed sinomenine and diclofenac sodium significantly alleviated articular cartilage lesion, cellular infiltration, epithelial cell degeneration, synovial tissue vasodilation and congestion. The phosphorylations of inhibitor of kappaB alpha and NF-κB subunit p65 were downregulated with the treatment of sinomenine in dose dependent manners, as well as proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, it was assumed that sinomenine might be a new therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):429-435, 2016. PMID:27079983

  12. The influence of simvastatin in rats mandible and femur bone mass under Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Seferos, Nikos; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Kotsiou, Antonia; Rallis, Georgios; Tesseromatis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats has been used widely as a model of rodent arthropathy and polyarthritis followed by osteoporosis, decreased bone formation and increased bone formation. Osteoporosis is characterized by rapid reduce of bone mass affecting more than 100 million people worldwide. Periodontitis a chronic inflammatory, of multifactorian origin disease has been associated with general osteoporosis. Protective bone-specific anabolic and antiresorptive effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have also been evaluated in normal and osteoporotic bone. AIM. The aim of the study was to investigate mandible and femur bone density in Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis rats under the influence of simvastatin. METHODS. Three groups (A, B, C) of 7 Wistar male rats each aged 3 months, (292±48.38 g) were used. A control. Group B and C subjected experimental arthritis via complete Freund's adjuvant injected in right paw. Group C was treated with simvastatin 0.5 mg/kg/daily po 14 days. Femur, mandible were isolated and sizes parameters, biochemical serum findings and BMD were estimated. RESULTS. CFA established by paw diameter, adrenals and spleen weight increase and thymus weight decrease, while biochemical serum findings were also affected. Reduced femur, mandible weight and general bone mass parameters BMD evaluated via DEXA occurred and restored under simvastatin treatment. CONCLUSIONS. CFA induced mandible and femur injuries are repaired by ssimvatatin treatment that could be therapeutically useful. PMID:23037783

  13. Free radical scavenging activity of Cleome gynandra L. leaves on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Subramanian, S; Kandaswamy, M

    2005-08-01

    The generation of free radicals has been implicated in the causation of several diseases of known and unknown etiologies such as, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, cancer, etc., and compounds that can scavenge free radicals have great potential in ameliorating these disease processes. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Cleome gynandra leaf extract at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. Oral administration of C. gynandra leaf extract significantly increased the levels of lipid peroxides and activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological observations made on the limb tissue. The presence of biologically active ingredients and vital trace elements in the leaves readily account for free radical scavenging property of C. gynandra. PMID:16132687

  14. Antiarthritic activity of a polyherbal formulation against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Petchi, R. Ramesh; Parasuraman, S.; Vijaya, C.; Gopala Krishna, S. V.; Kumar, M. Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To formulate a polyherbal formulation and evaluate its antiarthritic activity against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Glycosmis pentaphylla, Tridax procumbens, and Mangifera indica are well-known plants available throughout India and they are commonly used for the treatment of various diseases including arthritis. The polyherbal formulation was formulated using the ethanol extracts of the stem bark of G. pentaphylla, whole plant of T. procumbens, and leaves of M. indica. The polyherbal formulation contains the ethanol extracts of G. pentaphylla, T. procumbens, and M. indica in the ratio of 2:2:1. The quality of the finished product was evaluated as per the World Health Organization's guidelines for the quality control of herbal materials. Arthritis was induced in female Wistar rats using Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), and the antiarthritic effect of polyherbal formulation was studied at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg. The effects were compared with those of indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At the end of the study, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological analysis. The radiological examination was carried out before terminating the study. Results: Polyherbal formulation showed significant antiarthritic activity at 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, and this effect was comparable with that of indomethacin. The antiarthritic activity of polyherbal formulation is supported by biochemical and hematological analysis. Conclusion: The polyherbal formulation showed signinicant antiarthritic activity against FCA-induced arthritis in female Wistar rats. PMID:26229343

  15. Tissue-specific regulation of expression and activity of P-glycoprotein in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, Meguru; Totsuka, Ryuichi; Fujimura, Hisako; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2002-07-01

    Cyclosporine A and steroids are effective against rheumatoid arthritis and also known as substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). We investigated the effect of arthritis on the hepatic and intestinal P-gp activity in rats, and substantiated the expression level of the hepatic P-gp. Doxorubicin was used as a P-gp substrate. Cumulative biliary excretion and intestinal exsorption of doxorubicin following intravenous administration were compared between adjuvant arthritis (AA) and normal rats. Intestinal P-gp activity was also investigated by intestinal everted sac method, and hepatic P-gp was detected by FITC-labeled antibody and visualized using a confocal laser microscope system. Biliary clearance of doxorubicin in AA rats was significantly decreased from that in normal rats. The expression level of the hepatic P-gp in AA rats was very low compared to normal rats, indicating down-regulation. Intestinal exsorption clearance was not different between AA and normal rats. Permeability of doxorubicin across intestinal everted sac was comparable between AA and normal rats, corresponding to in vivo study. In AA rats, hepatic P-gp activity was decreased due to the reduction of expression level, but intestinal P-gp activity was not changed. Different regulation systems may be involved in liver and intestine. PMID:12113888

  16. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  17. Lymphoid abnormalities in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. I. Mitogen responsiveness and lymphokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, S C; Daniels, J F; Wilson, R E; Carlson, R P; Lewis, A J

    1984-01-01

    Lewis rats injected in the hind paw with Mycobacterium butyricum develop a severe polyarthritis which shares certain features in common with rheumatoid arthritis in man. Spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rats with this form of arthritic disease proliferate poorly in vitro in response to concanavalin A (con A), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The splenic hyporesponsiveness appears within four days of M. butyricum injection (three to five days prior to the development of detectable arthritis), reaches a peak 16-22 days following injection, and persists for at least 40 days. Buffalo strain rats injected with M. butyricum do not develop arthritis, and their spleen cells respond normally to con A, PHA, and PWM. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) the synthesis of interleukin 1 (IL-1) by spleen or peritoneal macrophages from arthritic Lewis rats equalled or exceeded that of macrophages from normal rats. In contrast splenic T cells from arthritic rats produced reduced amounts of interleukin 2 (IL-2; T cell growth factor) in response to stimulation with PHA or con A. Moreover, con-A-activated spleen cells from arthritic rats failed to bind IL-2 and to respond to this growth factor with increased 3H-TdR uptake as did normal spleen cells. In-vitro treatment of 'arthritic' cells with 10(-5) M indomethacin did not restore to normal their reduced mitogen responsiveness, and spleen cells from normal and arthritic rats were equally sensitive to the inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on con-A-induced proliferative responses. These results indicate that peripheral lymphoid function is compromised in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and that this functional deficit is mediated by aberrant synthesis of and response to IL-2 by T cells of arthritic animals. PMID:6335388

  18. Adjuvant oils induce arthritis in the DA rat. I. Characterization of the disease and evidence for an immunological involvement.

    PubMed

    Kleinau, S; Erlandsson, H; Holmdahl, R; Klareskog, L

    1991-12-01

    An intradermal injection of Freund's incomplete adjuvant oil (FIA) without further additives was shown to induce erosive polyarthritis in dark Agouti (DA) rats, but not in Lewis rats. Histological examination revealed joint inflammation, first with polymorphonuclear cells and synovial hyperplasia, and subsequently, with multinucleated giant cells. Both constituents of FIA, mineral oil and Arlacel A, as well as Pristane oil were arthritogenic, whereas vegetable oil were not. Re-administration of adjuvant oil after recovery failed to induce arthritis, thus making possible a role of specific immunity in this new form of arthritis in rats. PMID:1812893

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects and pharmacokinetics study of geniposide on rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Yun; Wu, Hong; Li, Hui; Hu, Shun-Li; Dai, Miao-miao; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of Geniposide (GE), an iridoid glycoside compound extracted from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats and its pharmacokinetic (PK) basis. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with GE (30, 60 and 120mg/kg) from day 17 to 24 after immunization. Fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) proliferation was assessed by MTT. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 were determined using double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPKs) related proteins in FLS was detected by Western blotting. PK profiles were simultaneously detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in AA rat plasma after oral administration of GE on day 17 after immunization. As a result, GE promoted the recovery of arthritis and inhibited the colonic inflammation damage in AA rats by decreasing the expression level of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, increasing the production of IL-10 and inhibiting the expression of phospho-p38 (p-p38) related proteins in FLS. PK parameters (AUC, Cmax and t1/2) tended to be associated with dosage-related decreasing of efficacy index. PMID:25434608

  20. Establishment of a Rat Adjuvant Arthritis-Interstitial Lung Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liu-nan; Kong, Xiao-dan; Wang, Hong-jiang; Zhan, Li-bin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Development of an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) and improved knowledge of the pathogenesis of RA-ILD may facilitate earlier diagnosis and the development of more effective targeted therapies. Methods. Adult male Wistar rats were studied in an adjuvant arthritis (AA) model induced by the injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Rats were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after FCA injection. Lung tissue was obtained for histopathological examination and evaluation of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) protein expression levels. Results. Pulmonary inflammation was evident in lung tissue from day 21 after FCA injection. Inflammation and mild fibrosis were observed in lung tissue on day 28 after FCA injection. Cav-1 protein expression was significantly decreased from day 7 through day 28 and TGF-β1 protein expression was significantly increased on day 28 after FCA injection compared to control (P < 0.05). Conclusion. We established an AA rat model that exhibited the extra-articular complication of RA-ILD. We identified Cav-1 and TGF-β1 as protein biomarkers of RA-ILD in this model and propose their signaling pathway as a possible target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26881215

  1. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  2. Autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in adjuvant-arthritis rats treatment with resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Song, Xianbin; Cao, Wei; Lu, Jinseng; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Zhicheng; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol derivatives which exhibits a pro-apoptotic effect in a variety of human cancers by triggering mitochondria apoptosis pathway and autophagy. However, there are scarcely reports on its apoptosis-promoting effect in abnormal proliferation fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism and apoptosis-inducing effects of resveratrol on the abnormal proliferation of FLSs in adjuvant-arthritis (AA) rats. Since using resveratrol for 12 days resulted in a significant decreasing the swelling degree of the paw, reducing malondialdehyde (MDA) content and enhancing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, antioxidant capacity, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase ratio in AA rats. Moreover, we found that 5 μMH2O2 could increase cells viability, Beclin1, LC3A/B, MnSOD, SIRT3 protein expression in FLSs. But, resveratrol could reverse these effects by changing mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) to promote mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation in 5 μMH2O2-treatment FLSs. These results suggest that oxidative stress existed in AA rats. Resveratrol could suppress oxidative stress in AA rats and increase mtROS production by reducing autophagy protein Beclin1, LC3A/B and oxidative stress protein MnSOD to promoted the apoptosis of FLSs. Thus, targeting of mtROS may be a crucial mechanism of resveratrol confers patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27611176

  3. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Xin; Fan, Arthur Yin; Zhou, An-Nan; Moudgil, Kamal D.; Ma, Zhong-Ze; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Fong, Harry HS; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) and its modifications have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for about one hundred years to alleviate pain and inflammation. Aim To investigate the effects of HLXL on complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced multiple-joint arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods Male Lewis rats, 190–210g, were immunized subcutaneously at the base of the tail with 200 µl of heat-killed M. tuberculosis in mineral oil (5 mg/ml). HLXL (2.30g/kg and 4.60g/kg) or vehicle control (n=8 per group) was administered orally (i.g.) once a day between days 16–25 post-CFA injection. The rats were observed for signs of arthritis with arthritic changes (erythema, edema, induration) being scored on a scale of 0 to 4 of increasing severity using a standard scoring system. The maximum arthritis score per rat was 16. A plethysmometer was used to measure edema volume in each paw. Adverse effects of HLXL were monitored by closely observing the animals for unusual behavioral changes. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in local tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on day 25 post-CFA. Results HLXL significantly decreased arthritis scores between days 23–25 in the 2.30g/kg group and 21–25 in the 4.60g/kg group (p<0.05). It reduced paw edema on days 22 and 24 in the 2.30g/kg group and on days 20, 22 and 24 in the 4.60g/kg group compared to control (p<0.05). Local tissue TNF-α and IL-1β levels on day 25 post-CFA injection were significantly (p<0.05) lower in rats treated with HLXL than in control rats. No observable adverse effects were found. Conclusion The data suggest that HLXL produces significant anti-arthritic effects that may be mediated by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, and it appears to be safe. PMID:19100323

  4. Identification and distribution of four metabolites of geniposide in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Hong; Dai, Miao-Miao; Li, Hui; Chen, Jin-Yun; Hu, Shun-Li

    2014-09-01

    Geniposide (GE), also called Jasminoidin, is the major active ingredient of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit, which has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Growing evidences suggested that GE has a great potentiality for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, GE is rapidly metabolized, and we know little about its availability or metabolites in tissues. To elucidate the distribution of GE and its metabolites in tissues, three groups of adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats were given GE (33, 66 and 120 mg/kg) from days 18 to 24, and the biotransformation of GE in plasma, liver, spleen, synovium, urine and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) of rats was investigated by a novel approach named Information-Dependent Acquisition (IDA)-Mediated LC-MS/MS method. As a result, GE and its four major metabolites were detected as follows: GE, G1, G2 in plasma; GE, G2 in MLNs; only GE in liver and synovium; GE, G2, G3 and G4 in spleen; and GE, G1, G2 and G4 in urine. In total four metabolites (G1-G4) involved in the in vivo metabolism processes were identified. The results of this work have demonstrated the IDA-Mediated LC-MS/MS could screen rapidly and reliably the characterization of metabolites from iridoid compounds. PMID:24910002

  5. Specific accumulation of cholesterol-rich liposomes in the inflammatory tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Love, W G; Amos, N; Kellaway, I W; Williams, B D

    1990-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography has shown that after intravenous injection cholesterol-poor liposomes (100 nm) are unstable and their phospholipid is redistributed. Under identical conditions cholesterol-rich liposomes remain structurally intact within the circulation. When injected intravenously cholesterol-rich liposomes accumulate within the inflamed paws of rats with adjuvant induced arthritis to the same extent as cholesterol-poor liposomes. Uptake in inflamed tissue of three cholesterol-rich liposome preparations was always significantly greater than the uptake noted in normal tissue. The degree of accumulation in inflamed tissue was found to depend on the size of the liposome, with the greatest uptake, 7% of the injected dose, achieved by the smallest vesicle (100 nm). These results indicate that intact liposomes accumulate at inflamed joint tissue sites. Therefore the passive targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs encapsulated within these liposomes could be contemplated. PMID:2396866

  6. Increase in sensory neuropeptides surrounding the Achilles tendon in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Heidgren, Marie-Louise; Kreicbergs, Andris; Ackermann, Paul W

    2005-03-01

    The Achilles tendon in rats with adjuvant arthritis was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for the occurrence of two sensory neuropeptides, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and a sensory modulating peptide, galanin (GAL). The tissue concentration of SP and CGRP in the Achilles tendon and its envelope, i.e. the paratenon and bony insertion, as assessed by RIA was increased by 22% and 71%, respectively, compared to normal controls, whereas the level of GAL was unchanged. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry applied to different regions of the tendon in arthritic rats disclosed an increased occurrence of SP and CGRP positive nerve fibers in the paratenon and bone tendinous junction, whereas GAL fibers were only increased at the bone tendinous junction. Notably, neither neuropeptides nor inflammatory cells were seen in the tendon proper. The increased occurrence of SP and CGRP in the tendon envelope presumably reflects inflammatory actions, whereas that of GAL implies an endogenous anti-inflammatory response. The observed SP and CGRP upregulation in the paratenon and bony insertion suggests a pathophysiological role in paratenonitis and enthesitis often seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Presumably Achillodynia originates in the tendon envelope rather than the tendon proper. The observations could be used to define new pharmacological targets for mitigating symptoms from tendons in rheumatoid arthritis and possibly also in other disorders. Whether a neuronal pathogenic mechanism underlies tendon overuse disorders in non-arthritic tendinopathies and the development of degeneration, i.e. tendinosis, remains to be studied. PMID:15734239

  7. Intraarticular gene transfer of SPRY2 suppresses adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jingying; Du, Zhiyan; Yu, Jiyun; Xu, Yuanji; Wang, Fang

    2015-08-01

    AKT and ERK pathways have been implicated as therapeutic targets for human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) inhibition, and thus RA treatment. Sprouty2 (SPRY2) has been known as a tumor suppressor by blocking both ERK and AKT signaling cascades. Whether SPRY2 can function as a suppressor of tumor-like inflammatory FLS and RA through negatively regulating AKT and ERK activation has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SPRY2 might have antiarthritic effects in experimental animal model of RA. We first determined that expression of SPRY2 mRNA was decreased in FLS from patients with RA compared with patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Further studies demonstrated that intraarticular gene transfer with AdSPRY2, the recombinant adenovirus containing SPRY2 complementary DNA, resulted in a significant suppression of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared with the control AdGFP, the adenoviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein, as reflected in both clinical and histological observations. AdSPRY2 suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation of ERK and AKT signals in AIA ankle joints. These results suggest that using SPRY2 to block the AKT and ERK pathways effectively reduces the inflammatory responses and arthritic progression in AIA. Thus, the development of an immunoregulatory strategy based on SPRY2 may therefore have therapeutic potential in the treatment of RA. PMID:25935347

  8. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. NO-naproxen modulates inflammation, nociception and downregulates T cell response in rat Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cicala, C; Ianaro, A; Fiorucci, S; Calignano, A; Bucci, M; Gerli, R; Santucci, L; Wallace, J L; Cirino, G

    2000-07-01

    1. Anti-inflammatory non steroidal drugs releasing NO (NO-NSAIDs) are a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs to which has been added an NO-releasing moiety. These compounds have been shown to retain the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity of the parent compound but to be devoid of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. 2. Freund's adjuvant (FA) arthritis was induced in rats by a single intraplantar injection into the right hindpaw of 100 microl of mycobacterium butirricum (6 mg ml(-1)). The effect of equimolar doses of naproxen (1, 3 and 10 mg kg(-1)) and NO-naproxen (1.5, 4.5 and 16 mg kg(-1)) was evaluated using two dosage regimen protocols: (i) preventive, starting oral administration of the drugs at the time of induction of arthritis and for the following 21 days (day 1 - 21); (ii) therapeutic, starting oral administration of the drugs 7 days after adjuvant injection and for the following 14 days (day 7 - 21). 3. Hindpaw swelling (days 3, 7, 11, 14, 17, 21) and nociception (days 15 and 21) were measured. On day 22 rats were sacrificed, draining lymph nodes were removed and T cells isolated. In vitro proliferation of T cells following stimulation with concanavalin A (0.5 - 5 microg ml(-1)) was measured using a tritiated thymidine incorporation assay. IL-2 receptor expression on T cells was measured by FACS analysis. 4. Naproxen and NO-naproxen showed similar activity in reducing oedema formation in the non-injected (controlateral) hindpaw. Both drugs showed anti-nociceptive effect. NO-naproxen was anti-nociceptive at a dose of 4.5 mg kg(-1) while naproxen showed the same extent of inhibition only at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1). 5. T cells were isolated and characterized by FACS analysis. Stimulation of isolated T cells with concanavallin A in vitro caused a significant increase in thymidine uptake. NO-naproxen at a dose of 4.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited T cell proliferation to the same extent as 10 mg kg(-1) of naproxen. 6. Inhibition of T cell proliferation was

  10. NO-naproxen modulates inflammation, nociception and downregulates T cell response in rat Freund's adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cicala, Carla; Ianaro, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano; Calignano, Antonio; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Gerli, Roberto; Santucci, Luca; Wallace, John L; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory non steroidal drugs releasing NO (NO-NSAIDs) are a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs to which has been added an NO-releasing moiety. These compounds have been shown to retain the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity of the parent compound but to be devoid of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity.Freund's adjuvant (FA) arthritis was induced in rats by a single intraplantar injection into the right hindpaw of 100 μl of mycobacterium butirricum (6 mg ml−1). The effect of equimolar doses of naproxen (1, 3 and 10 mg kg−1) and NO-naproxen (1.5, 4.5 and 16 mg kg−1) was evaluated using two dosage regimen protocols: (i) preventive, starting oral administration of the drugs at the time of induction of arthritis and for the following 21 days (day 1–21); (ii) therapeutic, starting oral administration of the drugs 7 days after adjuvant injection and for the following 14 days (day 7–21).Hindpaw swelling (days 3, 7, 11, 14, 17, 21) and nociception (days 15 and 21) were measured. On day 22 rats were sacrificed, draining lymph nodes were removed and T cells isolated. In vitro proliferation of T cells following stimulation with concanavalin A (0.5–5 μg ml−1) was measured using a tritiated thymidine incorporation assay. IL-2 receptor expression on T cells was measured by FACS analysis.Naproxen and NO-naproxen showed similar activity in reducing oedema formation in the non-injected (controlateral) hindpaw. Both drugs showed anti-nociceptive effect. NO-naproxen was anti-nociceptive at a dose of 4.5 mg kg−1 while naproxen showed the same extent of inhibition only at a dose of 10 mg kg−1.T cells were isolated and characterized by FACS analysis. Stimulation of isolated T cells with concanavallin A in vitro caused a significant increase in thymidine uptake. NO-naproxen at a dose of 4.5 mg kg−1 inhibited T cell proliferation to the same extent as 10 mg kg−1 of naproxen.Inhibition of T cell proliferation

  11. Protective role of theophylline and their interaction with nitric oxide (NO) in adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rishi; Chaudhary, Manju J; Tiwari, Prafulla C; Babu, Suresh; Pant, K K

    2015-12-01

    Theophylline (non-specific PDE inhibitor) and their interactions with nitric oxide modulators were evaluated in adjuvant-induced arthritic model of rats. Wistar rats (200-300g), 8 animals per group were used in the study. The animals were injected with 0.1mL of squalene and 0.2mL of complete Freund's adjuvant on day (0) in sub-planter region of right hind paw controls received only saline. The treatment with theophylline and nitric oxide modulators were done from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis indexes, ankle diameter, paw volume, and body weight were determined to assess RA progression from day (0) to day 28. On day 28 animals were sacrificed and their blood collected for IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine levels and hind paw for pathological analysis. Synovial fluid from joint spaces of CFA inoculated rats was collected to estimate TNF-α level in synovial fluid. The data obtained was analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by the Newman-Keuls post-hoc test. Theophylline (10 and 20mg/kg) significantly decreased adjuvant induced increased arthritis-index, paw volume and ankle diameter (p<0.05 in all parameters) compared to only adjuvant control group. It also reversed adjuvant induced slight decrease in body weight to normalcy. l-Arginine 100mg/kg+theophylline 20mg/kg suppressed TNF-α and elevates IL-10 level as well as reversed adjuvant-induced elevated arthritic parameters as compared to only adjuvant and prednisone group (p<0.001). Synovial TNF-α level of adjuvant only group was several fold higher than its serum level. Treatment with theophylline 20mg/kg significantly reduces synovial TNF-α level as compared to adjuvant only group. Theophylline 20mg/kg+L-NAME 10mg/kg significantly reversed these adjuvant-induced changes in immunological, histopathological and arthritis parameters (p<0.05). PMID:26349791

  12. Comparative antigen-induced gene expression profiles unveil novel aspects of susceptibility/resistance to adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming T; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-12-01

    Lewis (LEW) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype (RT.1(l)) display differential susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). LEW are susceptible while WKY are resistant to AIA. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis of these disparate outcomes, we compared the gene expression profiles of the draining lymph node cells (LNC) of these two rat strains early (day 7) following a potentially arthritogenic challenge. LNC were tested both ex vivo and after restimulation with the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65. Biotin-labeled fragment cRNA was generated from RNA of LNC and then hybridized with an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray chip. The differentially expressed genes (DEG) were compared by limiting the false discovery rate to <5% and fold change ≥2.0, and their association with quantitative trait loci (QTL) was analyzed. This analysis revealed overall a more active immune response in WKY than LEW rats. Important differences were observed in the association of DEG with QTL in LEW vs. WKY rats. Both the number of upregulated DEG associated with rat arthritis-QTL and their level of expression were relatively higher in LEW when compared to WKY rat; however, the number of downregulated DEG-associated with rat arthritis-QTL as well as AIA-QTL were found to be higher in WKY than in LEW rats. In conclusion, distinct gene expression profiles define arthritis-susceptible versus resistant phenotype of MHC-compatible inbred rats. These results would advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and might also offer potential novel targets for therapeutic purposes. PMID:23911410

  13. Effect of solid nanoparticle of indomethacin on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We designed new oral formulations containing indomethacin (IMC) solid nanoparticles, and investigate their usefulness by evaluating bioavailability and gastrointestinal lesions. The IMC solid nanoparticles were prepared using methylcellulose (MC), 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), and the bead mill method, and high quality dispersions containing 1.0% IMC nanoparticles were prepared (IMC(nano), particle size: 76 ± 58 nm, means ± S.D.). The fate of serum IMC and the induction of paw edema in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats receiving low-doses IMC(nano) (0.4 mg/kg) were similar to those following the administration of a therapeutic dose of conventional IMC prepared with MC and HPβCD (conventional IMC, 2 mg/kg), and the bioavailability in 0.4 mg/kg IMC(nano) was 5.3-fold higher in comparison with that in 2 mg/kg conventional IMC. IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions in AA rats administered IMC(nano) (8 mg/kg), in consideration of bioavailability, were significantly less than for conventional IMC (40 mg/kg). On the other hand, the toxicity caused by conventional IMC and IMC(nano) was similar in Caco-2 cells. It is possible that the oral administration of IMC solid nanoparticles will show increased effectiveness in treating RA without causing IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions, since the bioavailability is higher than that of conventional IMC. An oral drug delivery system using drug nanoparticles may expand the usage of NSAIDs for therapy in the inflammatory field. PMID:24989003

  14. Antioxidant and Angiostatic Effect of Spirulina platensis Suspension in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eman A. I.; Barakat, Bassant M.; Hassan, Ranya

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many degenerative diseases, mainly rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and curative properties and is also competent of acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and recently anti-angiogenic agent. In the present study, the antioxidant and the immunomodulatory effect of Spirulina platensis as well as its anti-angiogenic effect against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat model were tested. Results We found that the development of arthritis was concealed; moreover it successfully inhibited the development of macroscopic as well as microscopic and histopathological lesions in AIA rats when compared to control. Spirulina treated group showed a higher survival rate and moreover, it reduced the clinical score of RA in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Spirulina decreased serum levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, TBARS, VEGF and increased serum levels of GSH compared to the RA non-treated group. Conclusions The present study concluded that Spirulina is able to restrain the changes produced through adjuvant-induced arthritis. The suppressing effect of Spirulina could be attributed, at least in part, to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:25853428

  15. Therapeutic Effect of Saponin Rich Fraction of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Pankaj S; Bulani, Vipin D; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M; Deshpande, Padmini S; Gawali, Nitin B; Juvekar, Archana R

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Achyranthes aspera Linn. (AA) is used in folklore for the treatment of various inflammatory ailments and arthritis like conditions. Anti-inflammatory activity of saponin rich (SR) fraction of AA has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess the antiarthritic effect of SR fraction of Achyranthes aspera in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Methods. Arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, paw volume, changes in tibiotarsal joint thickness, hyperalgesic parameters, and spleen and thymus index. Haematological, serum, biochemical, and inflammatory cytokine and in vivo antioxidant parameters were measured on the last day of the study. Results. SR fraction significantly suppressed paw swelling and arthritic score and improved the pain threshold in motility and stair climbing tests. There was a reversal in the levels of altered parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide. SR fraction significantly decreased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Moreover, histopathology revealed a significant reduction in synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and bone destruction in the joints. Conclusion. These observations explain the therapeutic benefit of SR fraction of AA in suppressing the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. PMID:26273477

  16. Therapeutic Effect of Saponin Rich Fraction of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kothavade, Pankaj S.; Bulani, Vipin D.; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M.; Deshpande, Padmini S.; Gawali, Nitin B.; Juvekar, Archana R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Achyranthes aspera Linn. (AA) is used in folklore for the treatment of various inflammatory ailments and arthritis like conditions. Anti-inflammatory activity of saponin rich (SR) fraction of AA has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess the antiarthritic effect of SR fraction of Achyranthes aspera in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Methods. Arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, paw volume, changes in tibiotarsal joint thickness, hyperalgesic parameters, and spleen and thymus index. Haematological, serum, biochemical, and inflammatory cytokine and in vivo antioxidant parameters were measured on the last day of the study. Results. SR fraction significantly suppressed paw swelling and arthritic score and improved the pain threshold in motility and stair climbing tests. There was a reversal in the levels of altered parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide. SR fraction significantly decreased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Moreover, histopathology revealed a significant reduction in synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and bone destruction in the joints. Conclusion. These observations explain the therapeutic benefit of SR fraction of AA in suppressing the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. PMID:26273477

  17. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  18. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual extracts were in the following order: water-IS ex. > methanol ex. > butanol ex. > ethyl acetate ex. The water/methanol extract from I. sinclairii remarkably inhibited UV-mediated upregulation of NF-κB activity in transfected HaCaT cells. GAG as a water-soluble alcohol precipitated fraction also produced a noticeable anti-edema effect. This GAG also inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in LAW 264.7 cells, cytokine TNF-α production in splenocytes, and atherogenesis cytokine levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in HUVEC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the histological analysis, the LV dorsal root ganglion, including the articular cartilage, and linked to the paw-treated IS GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Combined treatment with Indomethacin® (5 mg/kg) and IS GAG (10 mg/kg) also more effectively inhibited CFA-induced paw edema at 3 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr to levels comparable to the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Thus, the IS GAG described here holds great promise as an anti-inflammatory drug in the future. PMID:24386520

  19. Effect of total flavonoids of Chrysanthemum indicum on the apoptosis of synoviocytes in joint of adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yu; Li, Jun; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Jiang, Hui; Xie, Xue-Feng; Hu, Rong

    2008-01-01

    Chrysanthemum is a traditional Chinese medicine used in China to treat inflammatory diseases. The total flavonoids Chrysanthemum indicum (TFC) were extracted from the dried bud of Chrysanthemum indicum. Our previous study had demonstrated that TFC was a new class of effective anti-inflammation, analgesia and immunoloregulation agents. In this study, we established an adjuvant arthritis (AA) model by injection of Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA) to investigate the effect of TFC on the apoptosis of synoviocytes in AA Rats. Synoviocytes isolated from knee joint of rats were treated with different doses of TFC in vitro. Synoviocytes proliferation was measured by MTT assay, and DNA fragmentations were evaluated on agarose gel electrophoresis. The levels of caspase-3 cleaved fragments were analyzed by Western blot. The annexin V stain assay was used to explore the inhibition of caspase-3 on the amelioration of synoviocytes apoptosis. The results showed that TFC inhibited the proliferation of synoviocytes. Electrophoresis showed higher ladders of DNA bands in the TFC group. Cleaved fragments of caspase-3 were increased significantly. Furthermore, the apoptotic synoviocytes were markedly decreased by the caspase-3 specific inhibitor. These results suggest that TFC could induce synoviocytes apoptosis and suppress proliferation of synoviocytes in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats. PMID:18711767

  20. The effect of curcumin and its nanoformulation on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoling; Sun, YanHua; Liu, Ziliang; Zhang, Mingqin; Li, Chunqing; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induced by the prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses, is one of the most prevalent of all chronic inflammatory joint diseases. Curcumin (CM), a yellow hydrophobic polyphenol derived from the herb turmeric, has various pharmacological activities against many chronic diseases and acts by inhibiting cell proliferation and metastasis and downregulating various factors, including nuclear factor kappa B, interleukin-1β and TNF-α. Given the pathogenesis of RA, we hypothesized that the drug also has antiarthritic effects. The aims of the present study included the following: 1) examining the therapeutic effect of CM administered via intravenous (iv) injection on RA and 2) formulating the drug into oil–water nanoemulsions (Ns) to overcome the low oral bioavailability of CM and achieve oral delivery of the drug. Methods The effect of CM administered through iv injection on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was studied in terms of paw swelling, weight indices of the thymus and spleen, and pathological changes in nuclear factor kappa B expression and inflammatory cytokines. Methotrexate was used as a positive control. The CM-Ns were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizing method and characterized with respect to the particle size and morphology. The stability of the CM-Ns in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids and in vitro release were also investigated. A pharmacokinetic study of the CM-Ns and suspensions in which the plasma levels were determined using an high performance liquid chromatography method and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a statistical moment theory was also performed in rats. Results CM administered via iv injection had a therapeutic effect on RA similar to methotrexate. CM-Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were successfully prepared, and the drug was well encapsulated into the Ns without degradation in simulated GI conditions. The area under the curve (AUC) and Cmax

  1. Urinary metabolite profiling provides potential differentiation to explore the mechanisms of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-Rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-Bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-Juan

    2016-09-01

    To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the perspective of metabolomics, gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) technology was used to observe changes in the metabolic profiles of urine output from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and an experimental group, with eight in each. Rats in the experimental group were induced by intracutaneous innoculation of 0.1 mL Freund's complete adjuvant to right paws. On day 20 after immunization, the metabolic profiles between rat control and experimental groups were compared by combining GC-TOF/MS technology with multivariate statistical approaches, including principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis. Nine potential biomarkers were identified, including 2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid, tartronic acid, dehydroshikimic acid, hippuric acid, adenine, phenaceturic acid, l-dopa, 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and melibiose. The findings indicate that the rats with AA are disturbed in metabolism of purine, amino acid, fat and energy. This study also demonstrates that the dysfunction in a range of biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, which leads to increased oxygen free radicals and inflammation, could cause underlying pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26856389

  2. In vivo and in vitro effects of dexamethasone on leukocyte migration in the rat adjuvant arthritis model

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, T.R.; Mirkovich, A.; Maloney, P.; Goodwin, D.A.

    1982-12-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and mononuclear cells were isolated from the blood of dexamethasone-treated normal rats, in vitro mononuclear cell migration was inhibited and PMN migration was stimulated in comparison to controls. Inflammogen-induced PMNs showed inhibited cell migration due to dexamethasone treatment. Gamma camera imaging was then used to detect cells in vivo after labeling with /sup 111/In. When the dexamethasone-treated blood cells were injected into adjuvant arthritis diseased rats, mononuclear cells showed depressed migration into the inflamed paws, while PMNs showed stimulated migration into the inflamed paws in comparison to controls. When the recipient adjuvant arthritic animals were treated with dexamethasone, both normal mononuclear cell and normal PMN migration to the inflamed paws were inhibited.

  3. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  4. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  5. Penetration and effect of topically applied dimethylsulfoxide or indomethacin on adjuvant arthritis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.D.; Horn, P.A.; McCreary, L.D.

    1983-07-01

    The present study, using /sup 14/C-DMSO, established the systemic and local load and distribution of topically applied DMSO in adjuvant arthritic rats. Under equivalent conditions, the antiinflammatory effects (systemic and local) of topical DMSO treatments were compared with a topical treatment of a control vehicle or of indomethacin, a known effective antiinflammatory agent. No significant systemic or local antiinflammatory effect of topical DMSO was seen in the adjuvant arthritic rats. Indomethacin, applied topically, had a significant systemic antiinflammatory effect; however, no significant local antiinflammatory effect of indomethacin was observed.

  6. Application of a radiometric ear assay for studies of adjuvant arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gans, K.R.; Heyner, S.; Orzechowski, R.F.

    1980-06-01

    A radioisotopic method, originally developed for measuring the cellular response in delayed hypersensitivity lesions in mice, has been evaluated in adjuvant arthritic rats. Focal accumulation of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-/sup 125/I (/sup 125/IUdR) at a site of antigen challenge (left pinna) was measured and expressed as increased radioactivity in the challenged (left) over the unchallenged (right) ear (L/R ear ratio). A significant negative correlation was observed between the /sup 125/IUdR ear ratios and subjective arthritic scores in established adjuvant disease. The results of this study support the utility of the /sup 125/IUdR ear assay to quantify cellular accumulation at a site of antigen challenge in adjuvant arthritic rats and possibly other antigenic systems in this species.

  7. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  8. Glucocorticoids in nano-liposomes administered intravenously and subcutaneously to adjuvant arthritis rats are superior to the free drugs in suppressing arthritis and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ulmansky, Rina; Turjeman, Keren; Baru, Moshe; Katzavian, Galia; Harel, Michal; Sigal, Alex; Naparstek, Yaakov; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2012-06-10

    We have previously shown that intravenous (i.v.) treatment with sterically stabilized nano-liposomes (NSSL) actively remote-loaded with the glucocorticoid (GC) methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (NSSL-MPS) or betamethasone hemisuccinate (NSSL-BMS) significantly decreased severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats (a model of human rheumatoid arthritis) throughout all disease stages. Here, we compared i.v. or subcutaneous (s.c.) weekly treatment with each of the two NSSL-GC to weekly or daily treatment with the free drugs or with the TNF-α antagonists Infliximab and Etanercept. Therapeutic efficacy and effects on the profile of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, and INF-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines in rat sera and splenocyte tissue culture supernatants were compared to those of the liposomal and free drugs. Both s.c. and i.v. NSSL-GC suppressed arthritis significantly, compared to higher doses of the free drugs or to TNF-α antagonists. NSSL-GC also suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but did not change the levels of TGF- β. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these nano-drugs makes them candidates for treatment of human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22226777

  9. Activation of NALP1 inflammasomes in rats with adjuvant arthritis; a novel therapeutic target of carboxyamidotriazole in a model of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Guo, Lei; Yu, Xiaoli; Wu, Danwei; Luo, Lifeng; Zhu, Lingzhi; Chen, Wei; Chen, Chen; Ye, Caiying; Zhang, Dechang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their production is mainly regulated by NF-κB and inflammasomes. Carboxyamidotriazole (CAI) exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activities by decreasing cytokines. Here, we have investigated NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NALP) inflammasomes in a rat model of RA and explored the therapeutic effects of CAI in this model and the involvement of NF-κB and inflammasomes in the actions of CAI. Experimental Approach The anti-arthritic effects of CAI were assessed in the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model in rats, using radiological and histological techniques. NALP1 and NALP3 inflammasomes, NF-κB pathway and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels were measured with Western blots, immunohistochemistry and elisa. Key Results CAI decreased the arthritis index, improved radiological and histological changes, and reduced synovial IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TNF-α levels in rats with AA. Compared with normal rats, the 70 kDa NALP1 isoform was up-regulated, NALP3 was down-regulated, and levels of the 165 kDa NALP1 isoform and the adaptor protein ASC were unchanged in synovial tissue from AA rats. CAI reduced the 70 kDa NALP1 isoform and restored NALP3 levels in AA rats; CAI inhibited caspase-1 activation in AA synovial tissue, but not its enzymic activity in vitro. In addition, CAI reduced expression of p65 NF-κB subunit and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation in AA rats. Conclusion and Implications NALP1 inflammasomes were activated in synovial tissues from AA rats and appeared to be a novel therapeutic target for RA. CAI could have therapeutic value in RA by inhibiting activation of NF-κB and NALP1 inflammasomes and by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25799914

  10. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  12. Effect of pumpkin-seed oil on the level of free radical scavengers induced during adjuvant-arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Fahim, A T; Abd-el Fattah, A A; Agha, A M; Gad, M Z

    1995-01-01

    Pumpkin-seed oil (PSO), a natural supplement rich with antioxidant ingredients, was given to rats in which arthritis was induced using Freund's complete adjuvant. Its effect was compared with that of indomethacin, as a classical anti-inflammatory agent. Two experimental patterns were studied, an acute phase that was applied only with PSO and a chronic phase applied for both PSO and indomethacin. Compared to normal untreated rats, it was shown that the induction of arthritis caused a decrease in serum sulphhydryl groups, with an increase in serum ceruloplasmin in both phases. Blood glutathione was first elevated in the acute phase, then its level was reduced in the chronic phase. Serum N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity was elevated only at the acute phase, while plasma total proteins and albumin were reduced at the chronic phase. Liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was markedly increased, while no changes were observed in the levels of liver lipid peroxides and glutathione. These changes in the studied parameters were attributed to the superoxides and free radicals during arthritic inflammation. Administration of PSO succeeded in modulating most of the altered parameters affected during arthritis, especially at the chronic phase. Also, a remarkable inhibition of paw oedema was observed. A similar pattern was obtained upon treatment with indomethacin except that indomethacin markedly elevated liver lipid peroxides levels. Concurrent administration of PSO with indomethacin caused no changes in the parameters studied compared to that induced by treatment with indomethacin alone. PMID:7784309

  13. Differences in pharmacokinetics and hepatobiliary transport of a novel anti-inflammatory agent between normal and adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, M; Totsuka, R; Kume, T

    2002-12-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics, particularly the hepatobiliary transport of T-5557 ((3-methyl-2-oxo-piperadin-3-yl)-acetic acid N'-(3-thieophen-2-yl-8-methoxy-quinazolin-1-yl)-hydrazide), a novel anti-inflammatory agent, has been examined in normal and adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. 2. Following oral administration of T-5557, the absolute bioavailability in AA rats was increased by sixfold compared with normal rats. The extent of binding T-5557 to plasma proteins obtained from AA rats was markedly greater than in normal rats (97.0 versus 88.2%). The biliary clearance in AA rats was significantly lower than that in normal rats (1.186 versus 5.621 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), and lower intrinsic biliary clearance was also observed in AA rats (40.33 versus 69.83 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). 3. Concomitant administration of T-5557 with quinidine, a potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor, to normal rats caused a significant decrease in the biliary clearance of T-5557 by 37.9%. Moreover, the transport of T-5557 for the apical-to-basal compartment in a Caco-2 cells' monolayer was fourfold lower than that for the opposite direction, and was increased in the presence of quinidine and verapamil. 4. These results suggest that P-glycoprotein is involved in the biliary excretion of T-5557 and the decrease in the transport activity as well as the increase in plasma protein binding caused the elevated plasma concentration and bioavailability of T-5557 in AA rats. PMID:12593761

  14. Cytochemical demonstration of constitutive H2O2 production by macrophages in synovial tissue from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffstein, S. T.; Gennaro, D. E.; Meunier, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    Generation of toxic oxygen metabolites by inflammatory cells is considered to be one of the mechanisms by which inflammation produces tissue injury. This concept is based on in vitro studies of purified leukocyte populations because it has not been possible to assess production of these metabolites in tissues. In order to determine whether or not inflammatory cells in tissue generate H2O2, the authors modified an earlier cytochemical method for the localization of H2O2. The incubation medium consists of 0.5 mM CeCl3 in a Hepes-buffered balanced salt solution with Cl- as the only anion. Synovial tissue from the knees of normal and 16-day adjuvant arthritic rats was incubated in this medium for 30 minutes and then fixed and processed for electron microscopy. No H2O2 reaction product was visible in normal synovium. In contrast, patchy deposits of H2O2 reaction product were seen adjacent to a subpopulation of synovial lining macrophages in synovium from inflamed knee joints. These data show that rat synovial macrophages are capable of generating H2O2 when appropriately stimulated and that such a stimulus is present in adjuvant arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3257356

  15. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  16. Inhibition of oxidative stress in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis by carnosine, trolox and novel trolox-carnosine.

    PubMed

    Poništ, S; Slovák, L; Kuncírová, V; Fedorova, T; Logvinenko, A; Muzychuk, O; Mihalová, D; Bauerová, K

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine (CARN) is an anti-glycating agent able to quench superoxide, and to neutralize 4-hydroxynonenal. Trolox-carnosine (CARN-T) was synthesized because of its resistance against degradation and to improve CARN antioxidant capacity. We evaluated the impact of trolox (TRO), CARN and its derivative CARN-T on oxidative stress (OS) in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis (AA). The experiments were done on healthy, control arthritic and arthritic animals with administration of CARN 150 mg/kg b.w., TRO 41 mg/kg b.w. and CARN-T 75 mg/kg b.w. in a daily dose during 28 days. Antioxidants did not affect the body weight on day 14, but on day 28 TRO enhanced the weight reduction. On day 14 and 28 CARN-T and TRO reduced arthritic score. IL-1beta, MCP-1 and MMP-9 were measured in plasma on day 14. MCP-1 was decreased by CARN-T and TRO. All antioxidants reduced IL-1beta and MMP-9 levels. Malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and protein carbonyls were increased in brain. CARN, CARN-T and TRO prevented higher lipid and protein oxidation in brain. CARN and CARN-T caused no weight reduction like TRO that has an advantage in inflammatory arthritis. Moreover the antioxidants administered had a similar therapeutic effects on arthritic score, markers of inflammation in plasma and OS in brain. PMID:26681078

  17. Differences in osteoclast formation between proximal and distal tibial osteoporosis in rats with adjuvant arthritis: inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Shu, Goukei; Yamamoto, Kaname; Nagashima, Masakazu

    2006-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis commonly suffer both systemic and periarticular osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are inhibitors of bone resorption, and several derivatives have been developed for treatment of enhanced bone resorption. We aimed to characterize osteoclast formation in two different sites, the proximal tibial and distal tibial areas, in rats with adjuvant arthritis, and to investigate the impact of amino or non-amino types of bisphosphonate. Adjuvant arthritis was initiated in rats while administering daily injections of either etidronate, a non-amino BP, or alendronate, an amino BP, for 3 weeks. On the day following the last injection, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the proximal tibia to assess systemic osteoporosis and in the distal tibia for periarticular osteoporosis using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subsequently, bone marrow cells from either end of the tibia were collected and incubated for 7 days before staining and counting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. In the rats with adjuvant arthritis, BMD of either end of the tibia was lower than in normal rats. Although etidronate prevented bone mineral loss at both ends, distal loss was significantly less than proximal. In contrast, alendronate significantly inhibited mineral loss primarily in the proximal area. Large osteoclasts, defined as having five or more nuclei, formed preferentially in the proximal tibia, while small osteoclasts with fewer than four nuclei were found mainly distally. The suppressive effect of alendronate was greater on the large osteoclasts, while etidronate had a greater effect on the small osteoclasts. These results show that the size and multinuclearity of osteoclasts and the number of osteoclasts formed are different in the distal and proximal areas of the tibia, and that alendronate and etidronate may suppress different types of osteoclasts as discriminated by the number of nuclei. PMID:17164994

  18. Protective effect of apigenin on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats via inhibiting P2X7/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiayun; He, He; Zhu, Lingpeng; Gao, Jin; Wei, Tingting; Ma, Zhanqian; Yan, Tianhua

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of apigenin (AP) on arthritis in rats stimulated by Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) was the main purpose of the investigation. Arthritis model was established by the administration of 0.1 ml FCA in the palmar surface. AP and diclofenac sodium (DS) were administered to explore and evidence the protective effects against adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were detected to assess the anti-inflammatory effect of AP. Besides, pathological conditions were examined in rat paws. Related-proteins of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway activated by P2X7 were investigated to determine the molecular mechanism of AP and their expressions were measured by western blot. The data showed that AP significantly suppressed the expressions of P2X7/NF-κB signal-related proteins and alleviated inflammatory reactions. Therefore, it was assumed that AP might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis. PMID:25935278

  19. An Important Role for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant Rat Model of Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bonezzi, F T; Sasso, O; Pontis, S; Realini, N; Romeo, E; Ponzano, S; Nuzzi, A; Fiasella, A; Bertozzi, F; Piomelli, D

    2016-03-01

    The endogenous lipid amides, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), exert marked antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models by engaging nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α. PEA and OEA are produced by macrophages and other host-defense cells and are deactivated by the cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), which is highly expressed in macrophages and B-lymphocytes. In the present study, we examined whether a) NAAA might be involved in the inflammatory reaction triggered by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the rat paw and b) administration of 4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]-carbamate (ARN726), a novel systemically active NAAA inhibitor, attenuates such reaction. Injection of CFA into the paw produced local edema and heat hyperalgesia, which were accompanied by decreased PEA and OEA content (assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) and increased NAAA levels (assessed by Western blot and ex vivo enzyme activity measurements) in paw tissue. Administration of undec-10-ynyl-N-[(3S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl] carbamate (ARN14686), a NAAA-preferring activity-based probe, revealed that NAAA was catalytically active in CFA-treated paws. Administration of ARN726 reduced NAAA activity and restored PEA and OEA levels in inflamed tissues, and significantly decreased CFA-induced inflammatory symptoms, including pus production and myeloperoxidase activity. The results confirm the usefulness of ARN726 as a probe to investigate the functions of NAAA in health and disease and suggest that this enzyme may provide a new molecular target for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26769918

  20. Anti-arthritic activity of luteolin in Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats by suppressing P2X4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fengchao; Zhou, Dun; Ji, Zhongqiu; Xu, Zhaofeng; Yang, Huilin

    2015-01-25

    To investigate anti-arthritic activity of luteolin (Lut) in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis (AA) in rats. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male rats were randomly divided into five groups with 10 mice in each group: (1) control group (saline), (2) AA group, (3) AA+Diclofenac Sodium (AA+DS, 5 mg/kg), (4) AA+Lut (20 mg/kg), (5) AA+Lut (40 mg/kg). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with Lut at 10 and 20 mg/kg from days 18 to 24 after immunization. Arthritic scores, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-17 (IL-17), paw histopathology and the proteins of P2X4 pathway were assessed at the end of the experiment. Lut reduced the severity of arthritic scores during the experimental period as compared with positive control (RA). Lut significantly suppressed TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17 as compared with RA group. Histopathological examination indicated that Lut alleviated infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia as well as protected joint destruction. Lut significantly suppressed P2X4, NLRP1, ASC, and Caspase-1p10. Lut may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of inflammation and arthritis. PMID:25450234

  1. Norisoboldine, an alkaloid compound isolated from Radix Linderae, inhibits synovial angiogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats by moderating Notch1 pathway-related endothelial tip cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Lu, Shuai; Gao, Xinghua; Luo, Yubin; Tong, Bei; Wei, Zhifeng; Lu, Tao; Xia, Yufeng; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao; Dai, Yue

    2012-08-01

    Synovial angiogenesis is well recognized as participating in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and has been regarded as a potential target for RA therapy. Previously, we have shown that norisoboldine (NOR) can protect joints from destruction in mice with collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Here, we investigate the effect of NOR on synovial angiogenesis in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats, and clarify the mechanisms in vitro. NOR, administered orally, significantly reduced the number of blood vessels and expression of growth factors in the synovium of AA rats. In vitro, it markedly prevented the migration and sprouting of endothelial cells. Notably, the endothelial tip cell phenotype, which is essential for the migration of endothelial cells and subsequent angiogenesis, was significantly inhibited by NOR. This inhibitory effect was attenuated by pretreatment with N-{N-[2-(3,5-difluorophenyl) acetyl]-(S)-alanyl}-(S)-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester, a Notch1 inhibitor, suggesting that the action of NOR was related to the Notch1 pathway. A molecular docking study further confirmed that NOR was able to promote Notch1 activation by binding the Notch1 transcription complex. In conclusion, NOR was able to prevent synovial angiogenesis in AA rats, which is a putatively new mechanism responsible for its anti-rheumatoid effect. The anti-angiogenesis action of NOR was likely achieved by moderating the Notch1 pathway-related endothelial tip cell phenotype with a potential action target of the Notch1 transcription complex. PMID:22875342

  2. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  3. Hydrodynamic Delivery of Chitosan-Folate-DNA Nanoparticles in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qin; Wang, Huijie; Tran, Covi; Qiu, Xingping; Winnik, Françoise M.; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dai, Kerong; Benderdour, Mohamed; Fernandes, Julio C.

    2011-01-01

    50 kDa chitosan was conjugated with folate, a specific tissue-targeting ligand. Nanoparticles such as chitosan-DNA and folate-chitosan-DNA were prepared by coacervation process. The hydrodynamic intravenous injection of nanoparticles was performed in the right posterior paw in normal and arthritic rats. Our results demonstrated that the fluorescence intensity of DsRed detected was 5 to 12 times more in the right soleus muscle and in the right gastro muscle than other tissue sections. β-galactosidase gene expression with X-gal substrate and folate-chitosan-plasmid nanoparticles showed best coloration in the soleus muscle. Treated arthritic animals also showed a significant decrease in paw swelling and IL-1β and PGE2 concentration in serum compared to untreated rats. This study demonstrated that a nonviral gene therapeutic approach using hydrodynamic delivery could help transfect more efficiently folate-chitosan-DNA nanoparticles in vitro/in vivo and could decrease inflammation in arthritic rats. PMID:21274258

  4. Developments in the rat adjuvant arthritis model and its use in therapeutic evaluation of novel non-invasive treatment by SOD in Transfersomes.

    PubMed

    Simões, S I; Delgado, T C; Lopes, R M; Jesus, S; Ferreira, A A; Morais, J A; Cruz, M E M; Corvo, M L; Martins, M B F

    2005-03-21

    The aim of this study was firstly to refine a rat model of arthritis, the adjuvant arthritis (AA) model, by studying the time course of the disease, introducing new evaluation methods such as haematological and biochemical parameters in order to identify the main stages of the disease. An optimisation of treatment schedule and evaluation criteria was developed. This refinement provided novel non-invasive anti-inflammatory treatment of the AA with SOD by using mixed lipid vesicles specially developed for transdermal delivery, Transfersomes (Tfs), this being the second major aim. The time course of AA includes a first stage: 1 day after the disease induction, the induced paw volume more than doubled and the paw circumference increased by approx. 50%. Two weeks later, another stage occurred where the disease shifted from the local arthritis form towards polyarthritis: an additional increase of volume and circumference of the induced and non-induced paws, occurred. The animals also started to loose weight around day 14 after the disease induction. Radiographic observable lesions increased correspondingly. Treatment of animals, started at day 1 after induction, by epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs showed that 1 mg SOD/kg body weight is more efficient than 0.66 mg SOD /kg body weight. As a positive control, SOD liposomes intravenously injected were used for comparison and confirmed the biological efficiency of epicutaneously applied SOD in Tfs. SOD solution and empty Tfs epicutaneously applied exerted no effect. In addition, epicutaneous application of SOD-Tfs used prophylactically was able to suppress the induced rat paw oedema. Radiographic images showed less joint lesions in SOD-Tfs treated animals in comparison with control and placebo treated rats. It was shown for the first time that SOD incorporated into Tfs and applied onto a skin area not necessarily close to the inflamed tissue is able to promote non-invasive treatment of induced arthritis. PMID:15763624

  5. The A3 adenosine receptor agonist CF502 inhibits the PI3K, PKB/Akt and NF-kappaB signaling pathway in synoviocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients and in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Ochaion, A; Bar-Yehuda, S; Cohen, S; Amital, H; Jacobson, K A; Joshi, B V; Gao, Z G; Barer, F; Patoka, R; Del Valle, L; Perez-Liz, G; Fishman, P

    2008-08-15

    The A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells and was defined as a target to combat inflammation. Synthetic agonists to this receptor, such as IB-MECA and Cl-IB-MECA, exert an anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant- and collagen-induced arthritis. In this study we present a novel A(3)AR agonist, CF502, with high affinity and selectivity at the human A(3)AR. CF502 induced a dose dependent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) via de-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. Furthermore, CF502 markedly suppressed the clinical and pathological manifestations of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in a rat experimental model when given orally at a low dose (100 microg/kg). As is typical of other G-protein coupled receptors, the A(3)AR expression level was down-regulated shortly after treatment with agonist CF502 in paw and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from treated AIA animals. Subsequently, a decrease in the expression levels of protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt), IkappaB kinase (IKK), I kappa B (IkappaB), NF-kappaB and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) took place. In addition, the expression levels of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3beta), beta-catenin, and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP), known to control the level and activity of NF-kappaB, were down-regulated upon treatment with CF502. Taken together, CF502 inhibits FLS growth and the inflammatory manifestations of arthritis, supporting the development of A(3)AR agonists for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18602896

  6. The A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonist CF502 Inhibits the PI3K, PKB/Akt and NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Synoviocytes from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and in Adjuvant Induced Arthritis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ochaion, A.; Bar-Yehuda, S.; Cohen, S.; Amital, H.; Jacobson, K.A.; Joshi, B.V.; Gao, Z.G.; Barer, F.; Patoka, R.; Del Valle, L.; Perez-Liz, G.; Fishman, P.

    2009-01-01

    The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells and was defined as a target to combat inflammation. Synthetic agonists to this receptor, such as IB-MECA and Cl-IB-MECA, exert an anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant and collagen induced arthritis. In this study we present a novel A3AR agonist, CF502, with high affinity and selectivity at the human A3AR. CF502 induced a dose dependent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) via de-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Furthermore, CF502 markedly suppressed the clinical and pathological manifestations of Adjuvant Induced Arthritis (AIA) in a rat experimental model when given orally at a low dose (100 μg/kg). As is typical of other G-protein coupled receptors, the A3AR expression level was down-regulated shortly after treatment with agonist CF502 in paw and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from treated AIA animals. Subsequently, a decrease in the expression levels of Protein Kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt), IκB kinase (IKK), (I kappa B) IκB, NF-κB and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) took place. In addition, the expression levels of Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β), β-catenin, and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), known to control the level and activity of NF-κB, were down-regulated upon treatment with CF502. Taken together, CF502 inhibits FLS growth and the inflammatory manifestations of arthritis, supporting the development of A3AR agonists for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18602896

  7. Anti-arthritic Activity of Dashanga Ghana (An Ayurvedic Compound Formulation) Against Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Charles Foster Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ruknuddin, Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arthritis is the most common cause of disability, limiting the activities of adults throughout the world. Apart from the conventional treatment strategies using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and glucocorticoids, newer and safer drugs are continuously being searched, as long-term usage of these drugs have resulted in adverse effects. Besides this, currently a number of medicinal plants are under scientific evaluation to develop a promising remedy in these cases. There is a need to investigate the complete therapeutic potential of these herbals for providing newer and safer treatment options with minimum side effects. Considering this, a polyherbal Ayurvedic compound formulation (Dashanga Ghana) has been studied in experimental animals to evaluate anti-arthritic activity. Materials and Methods: Dashanga Ghana has been prepared in the laboratory by following standard guidelines. Charles Foster albino rats were used to evaluate the activity through Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model. Results and Conclusions: Dashanga Ghana is found to possess significant anti-arthritic activity. Further studies are required to identify and characterize exact active phyto-constituents and to elucidate the exact mechanism of action, which is responsible for the observed pharmacological profile. PMID:26862275

  8. Regulation of osteoclastogenesis by Simon extracts composed of caffeic acid and related compounds: successful suppression of bone destruction accompanied with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Quan Yong; Kukita, Toshio; Ushijima, Yuki; Kukita, Akiko; Nagata, Kengo; Sandra, Ferry; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Toh, Kazuko; Okuma, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Sadamichi; Rasubala, Linda; Teramachi, Junpei; Miyamoto, Ichiko; Wu, Zhou; Iijima, Tadahiko

    2006-03-01

    Simon extracts are vitamin K(1)-rich food materials extracted from the leaves of the Simon sweet potato. Although vitamin K is known to stimulate bone formation, we postulated that Simon extracts also contain unknown biological compounds having the ability to regulate bone resorption. Here we prepared the vitamin K-free fraction from the Simon extracts and investigated the ability of this fraction on the differentiation of osteoclasts. A remarkable inhibitory effect of osteoclastogenesis was observed when osteoclast precursors were treated with this fraction in rat bone marrow culture systems as well as in a pure differentiation system using murine osteoclast precursor cell line. The vitamin K-free Simon extracts markedly suppressed severe bone destruction mediated by abundant osteoclasts associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the vitamin K-free Simon extracts contained three types of low molecular weight inhibitors for osteoclastogenesis; caffeic acid, chlorogenic acids and isochlorogenic acids. Among these substances, caffeic acid showed the most powerful inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Caffeic acid significantly suppressed expression of NFATc1, a key transcription factor for the induction of osteoclastogenesis. Our current study enlightened a high utility of the Simon extracts and their chemical components as effective regulators for bone resorption accompanied with inflammation and metabolic bone diseases. PMID:16205940

  9. Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206-211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241582

  10. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. PMID:26763139

  11. Targeting TNF-α and NF-κB Activation by Bee Venom: Role in Suppressing Adjuvant Induced Arthritis and Methotrexate Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Samar F.; El-Bakly, Wesam M.; Arafa, Hossam M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2013-01-01

    Low dose methotrexate is the cornerstone for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine such as bee venom. The combination of natural products with modern medicine poses the possibility of potential interaction between the two groups and needs investigation. The present study was aimed to investigate the modulatory effect of bee venom acupuncture on efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of methotrexate. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritic rats were treated for 3 weeks with methotrexate and/or bee venom. Arthritic score, ankle diameter, paw volume and tissue expression of NF-κB and TNF-α were determined to assess anti-arthritic effects, while anti-nociceptive effects were assessed by gait score and thermal hyperalgesia. Methotrexate toxicity was assessed by measuring serum TNF-α, liver enzymes and expression of NF-κB in liver. Combination therapy of bee venom with methotrexate significantly improved arthritic parameters and analgesic effect as compared to methotrexate alone. Bee venom ameliorated serum TNF-α and liver enzymes elevations as well as over expression of NF-κB in liver induced by methotrexate. Histological examination supported the results. And for the first time bee venom acupuncture was approved to increase methotrexate bioavailability with a significant decrease in its elimination. Conclusion: bee venom potentiates the anti-arthritic effects of methotrexate, possibly by increasing its bioavailability. Also, it provides a potent anti-nociceptive effect. Furthermore, bee venom protects against methotrexate induced hepatotoxicity mostly due to its inhibitory effect on TNF-α and NF-κB. PMID:24278124

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of glycosaminoglycan derived from Gryllus bimaculatus (a type of cricket, insect) on adjuvant-treated chronic arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Han, Jea Woong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Lee, Byung Mu

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus, Gb) were investigated in a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritic rat model. This GAG produced a significant anti-edema effect as evidenced by inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor, and interfered with atherogenesis by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels of (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), (2) interleukin-6, (3) prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells, and (4) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in normal splenocytes, in a dose-dependent manner. This GAG was also found to induce nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVEC cells and elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity levels. Histological findings demonstrated the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) dorsal root ganglion, which was linked to the paw treated with Gb GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Further, combined indomethacin (5 mg/kg)-Gb GAG (10 mg/kg) inhibited more effectively CFA-induced paw edema at 3 h and 2 or 3 d after treatment to levels comparable to only the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Ultraviolet (UV)-irritated skin inflammation also downregulated nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in transfected HaCaT cells. Data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of GAG obtained from cricket (Gb) may be useful for treatment of inflammatory diseases including chronic arthritis. PMID:25343284

  13. Common commercial cosmetic products induce arthritis in the DA rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sverdrup, B; Klareskog, L; Kleinau, S

    1998-01-01

    Many different agents, including mineral oil and silicone, have the capacity to act as immunological adjuvants, i.e., they can contribute to the activation of the immune system. Some adjuvants, including mineral oil, are known to induce arthritis in certain strains of rats after intradermal injection or percutaneous application. The aim of this study was to determine if common commercial cosmetic products containing mineral oil could induce arthritis in the highly susceptible DA (Dark Agouti) rat. Intradermal injection of five out of eight assayed cosmetic products without further additives resulted in arthritis with synovitis. One of the products induced a very aggressive arthritis, which had declined after 5-9 weeks. When this product was also assayed for arthritogenicity upon percutaneous administration, it induced a mild and transient arthritis in 5 out of 10 DA rats, whereas control animals showed no clinical signs of joint involvement. No arthritic reaction was seen in rats after peroral feeding with the most arthritogenic product or by intravaginal application of Freund's adjuvants. Silicone gel implants in DA rats did not cause arthritis. We conclude that mineral oils included in common commercially available products retain their adjuvant properties and are arthritogenic in the presently investigated arthritis-prone rat strain. There is yet no evidence that mineral oils present in cosmetics may contribute to arthritis in humans, but we suggest that this question should be subject to further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9417771

  14. Effects of one minute and ten minutes of walking activity in rats with arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant on pain and edema symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Raquel Pinheiro; Bressan, Elisângela; Silva, Tatiane Morgana da; Gevaerd, Monique da Silva; Tonussi, Carlos Rogério; Domenech, Susana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two protocols of exercise on nociception, edema and cell migration in rats with CFA-induced arthritis. Female Wistar rats (200 - 250 g, n = 50) was monoarthritis-induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; Mycobacterium butyricum, 0.5 mg/mL; 50 μL) into the right knee joint (TF; n = 24) or right ankle joint (TT; n = 26). Incapacitation was measured by the paw elevation time (TEP; s) in 1-min periods of observation. The edema of the knee or ankle joints was evaluated by the variation of the articular diameter (DA, cm) and by the paw volume variation (EP, mL), respectively. Both were measured during 10 consecutive days. Two protocols of exercise were performed: (a) in the constant exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 6) performing 1 minute of daily exercise on the cylinder; (b) variable exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 7), the exercise increased by 1 minute per day. The control groups (TF, n = 12; TT, n = 13) didn't perform the exercise. After 10 days, the animals were euthanized for total (CT; cells/mm3) and differential leukocyte counts (mononuclear - MON, and polymorphonuclear - PMN, cells/mm3) of the articular inflammatory exudate. The variable exercise protocol inhibited incapacitation and edema for both joints. However, cell migration decreased only in the TF.The constant exercise reduced edema in both joints, and cell migration was decreased in the TT. However, the incapacitation was not reduced. Variable exercise seemed to be more effective in reducing the inflammatory parameters than constant exercise. PMID:24878853

  15. Comparative evaluation of low-level laser and systemic steroid therapy in adjuvant-enhanced arthritis of rat temporomandibular joint: A histological study

    PubMed Central

    Khozeimeh, Faezeh; Moghareabed, Ahmad; Allameh, Maryam; Baradaran, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has shown a promising effect in ameliorating symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this investigation was to compare the early and late anti-inflammatory effects of LLLT and betamethasone in RA. Materials and Methods: In this animal experimental study, after inducing a model of RA in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of 37 Wistar rats using adjuvant injection, they were randomly distributed into three experimental groups of 12 animals each: (1) LLLT group; (2) steroid group which received a single dose of betamethasone systemically; and (3) positive control group, which did not receive any treatment. One rat served as the negative control. Half of the animals in all the experimental groups were sacrificed on the 21st day after RA induction (early phase), and the other half were sacrificed 2 weeks later (late phase). Then, the severity of TMJ inflammation was assessed histologically in each group on a semi-quantitative scale. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare differences (α = 0.05). Results: The LLLT and steroid groups showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower inflammation mean scores in both early (5.66 [±1.86] and 1.66 [±1.21], respectively) and late phases of evaluation (1.16 [±1.47] and 6.50 [±1.04], respectively) compared to positive control group in early and late stages of assessment (11.66 [±3.50] and 8.66 [±1.36], respectively). However, the best results (P < 0.005) were achieved in early phase of the steroid group as well as late phase of the LLLT group. Conclusion: Within limitations of this study, it may be concluded that LLLT method has a long-term promising effect on reducing inflammation severity of TMJ similar to betamethasone in earlier stages. PMID:26005460

  16. Efficacy of Combined Ultrasound-and-Microbubbles-Mediated Diclofenac Gel Delivery to Enhance Transdermal Permeation in Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Chung, Huan-Yu; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2016-08-01

    A previous study that investigated the effect of ultrasound (US) on the transdermal permeation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac found that therapeutic US can increase circulation in an inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Transdermal drug delivery has recently been demonstrated by US combined with microbubbles (MB) contrast agent (henceforth referred to as "US-MB"). The present study evaluated the efficacy of US-MB-mediated diclofenac delivery for treating adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats. RA was induced by injecting 100 μL of complete Freund's adjuvant into the ankle joint of male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) that were randomly divided into five treatment groups: (i) carbopol gel alone (the control [group C]), (ii) diclofenac-carbopol gel (group D), (iii) US plus carbopol gel (group U), (iv) US plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DU) and (v) US-MB plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DUB). The ankle width was measured over 10 d using high-frequency (40-MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler-mode imaging, covering the period before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of the induced RA showed synovitis and neovascularity. Only a small amount of neovascularity was observed after treatment. The recovery rate on day 10 was significantly higher in group DUB (97.7% ± 2.7%, mean ± standard deviation [SD]) than in groups C (1.0% ± 2.7%), D (37.5% ± 4.6%), U (75.5% ± 4.2%) and DU (87.3% ± 5.2%) (p < 0.05). The results obtained indicate that combining US and MB can increase the skin permeability and thereby enhance the delivery of diclofenac sodium gel and thereby inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounding the arthritic ankle. Color Doppler-mode imaging revealed that US-MB treatment induced a rapid reduction in synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area. PMID:27181685

  17. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:25637446

  18. Determination of geniposide in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method and its application to oral bioavailability and plasma protein binding ability studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Hong; Xu, Guo-Bing; Dai, Miao-Miao; Hu, Shun-Li; Sun, Liang-Liang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Rong; Li, Shu-Pin; Li, Guo-Qiang

    2015-04-10

    A specific, sensitive and high throughput ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was established and validated to assay geniposide (GE), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma: application to pharmacokinetic and oral bioavailability studies and plasma protein binding ability. Plasma samples were processed by de-proteinised with ice-cold methanol and separated on an ACQUITY UPLC™ HSS C18 column (100 mm × 2.1mm i.d., 1.8 μm particle size) at a gradient flow rate of 0.2 mL/min using acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water as mobile phase, and the total run time was 9 min. Mass detection was performed in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with negative electro-spray ionization includes the addition of paeoniflorin (Pae) as an internal standard (IS). The mass transition ion-pair was followed as m/z 387.4 → 122.4 for GE and m/z 479.4 → 449.0 for IS. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 2-50,000 ng/mL with lower limit of quantification of 2 ng/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD, %) of the assay were less than 8.4%, and the accuracy was within ± 6.4% in terms of relative error (RE). Extraction recovery, matrix effect and stability were satisfactory in adjuvant arthritis rat plasma. The UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of GE after oral administration of depurated GE at 33, 66, 132 mg/kg and intravenous injection at 33, 66, 132 mg/kg in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In addition, it was found that GE has rapid absorption and elimination, low absolute bioavailability, high plasma protein binding ability in AA rats after oral administration within the tested dosage range. It suggested that GE showed slow distribution into the intra- and extracellular space, and the binding rate was not proportionally dependent on plasma concentration of GE when the concentration of GE was

  19. Paradoxical effects of tumour necrosis factor-α in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard O

    2008-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α therapy is highly effective in rheumatoid arthritis and it is surprising, therefore, that a recent study showed that intraperitoneal administration of recombinant TNFα reduced the severity of adjuvant-induced arthritis and decreased IFNγ expression in cultured draining lymph node cells. Furthermore, in untreated arthritic rats, maximal TNFα expression in draining lymph node cells coincided with spontaneous disease remission, suggesting a role for endogenous TNFα in recovery from arthritis. If confirmed in further studies, these findings suggest that, in addition to its well-established pro-inflammatory properties, TNFα may also play a disease-limiting role in this model of rheumatoid arthritis by suppressing effector T cell responses. PMID:18564403

  20. Antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Pistia stratiotes in adjuvant-induced arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George A; Boampong, Johnson N

    2012-01-01

    Background Pistia stratiotes has been used effectively to treat a number of inflammatory conditions. This study aims to determine the antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes. Methods Arthritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats, paw swelling was measured, and arthritis indices were estimated in rats treated with aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes (AQ PSE and ET PSE, respectively), methotrexate, diclofenac, dexamethasone, and normal saline-treated rats. Radiologic imaging, hematological assessment of red and white blood cells, C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, as well as histopathological studies were also done. The data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 5. Results The 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses of AQ PSE and the 30 and 100 mg/kg doses of ET PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) reduction in ipsilateral paw swelling, similar to the effects of methotrexate, dexamethasone, and diclofenac. Only the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.01) reduction in contralateral paw swelling. Arthritic indices reduced significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) at all drug doses, except for the 100 and 300 mg/kg doses of ET PSE. White blood cell levels decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) in arthritic rats treated with the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE and those treated with methotrexate. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.01–0.001) lower in all the treatment groups except for the rats treated with AQ PSE 300 mg/kg and ET PSE 100 and 300 mg/kg doses. The arthritic animals treated with 30 mg/kg of the aqueous extract showed no inflammatory changes in the ipsilateral paw, while the contralateral paw showed only foci of mild chronic inflammatory changes, as seen with the reference drug treatment in histopathological studies. Conclusion This study establishes that aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. stratiotes have antiarthritic

  1. Effect of methotrexate on inflammatory cells redistribution in experimental adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Lucia; Jančová, Petra; Moravcová, Petra; Janegová, Andrea; Bauerová, Katarína; Poništ, Silvester; Mihalová, Danica; Janega, Pavol; Babál, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes in the spleen, the thymus and the knee joints of rats with experimental adjuvant arthritis induced by Mycobacterium butyricum in the incomplete Freund's adjuvant and the effect of treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Particular attention was aimed on the redistribution of granulocytes in the tissues during the inflammatory process. Clinical parameters, e.g., joint edema, body weight and of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity as an inflammatory marker, have also been determined. Induction of adjuvant arthritis caused a significant decrease in granulocyte number in the spleen and vice versa a significant increase in the knee joints, but without significant changes in the thymus. Treatment with methotrexate reversed this phenomenon by increasing the granulocyte number in the spleen and decreasing it in knee joints. MTX decreased the joint edema as well as the activity of GGT in the spleen, modified the size of the white pulp of the spleen and increased the cortex/medulla ratio in the thymus. The observed changes support the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of MTX supporting its use as the first-line medication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22083611

  2. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    van Bruggen, M.C.; van den Broek, M.F.; van den Berg, W.B. )

    1991-09-01

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation.

  3. Therapeutic Vaccination against Adjuvant Arthritis Using Autoimmune T Cells Treated with Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Karin, Nathan; Shinitzky, Meir; Cohen, Irun R.

    1987-07-01

    An ideal treatment for autoimmune diseases would be a nontoxic means of specifically neutralizing the autoreactive lymphocytes responsible for the disease. This goal has been realized in experimental autoimmunity models by immunizing rats or mice against their own autoimmune cells such that the animals generate an immune response specifically repressive to the disease-producing lymphocytes. This maneuver, termed lymphocyte vaccination, was demonstrated to be effective using some, but not all, autoimmune helper T-lymphocyte lines. We now report that T lymphocytes, otherwise incapable of triggering an immune response, can be transformed into effective immunogens by treating the cells in vitro with hydrostatic pressure. Clone A2b, as effector clone that recognized cartilage proteoglycan and caused adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats, is such a cell. Untreated A2b could not trigger an immune response, but inoculating rats with pressure-treated A2b induced early remission of established adjuvant arthritis as well as resistance to subsequent disease. Specific resistance to arthritis was associated with anti-idiotypic T-cell reactivity to clone A2b and could be transferred from vaccinated rats to naive recipients using donor lymphoid cells. Aggregation of T-lymphocyte membrane components appeared to be important for an immune response because the effects of hydrostatic pressure could be reproduced by treatment of A2b with chemical cross-linkers or with agents disrupting the cytoskeleton. Populations of lymph node cells from antigen-primed rats, when treated with hydrostatic pressure, could also induce suppression of disease. Thus, effective vaccines can be developed without having to isolate the autoimmune T lymphocytes as lines or clones. These results demonstrate that effector T lymphocytes suitably treated may serve as agents for specifically controlling the immune system.

  4. Modulation of Adjuvant Arthritis by Cellular and Humoral Immunity to Hsp65

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene Y.; Durai, Malarvizhi; Mia, Younus; Kim, Hong R.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are highly conserved, and their expression is upregulated in cells by heat and other stressful stimuli. These proteins play a vital role in preserving the structural and functional integrity of cells under stress. Despite the ubiquitous expression of Hsps in an individual, the immune system is not fully tolerant to them. In fact, Hsps are highly immunogenic in nature, and immune response to these proteins is observed in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Studies on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as observations in patients with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have unraveled immunoregulatory attributes of self-Hsp65-directed immunity. Notable features of Hsp65 immunity in AA include protection rather than disease induction following immunization of Lewis rats with self (rat)-Hsp65; the diversification of T cell response to mycobacterial Hsp65 during the course of AA and its association with spontaneous induction of response to self-Hsp65; the cross-reactive T cells recognizing foreign and self homologs of Hsp65 and their role in disease suppression in rats; the suppressive effect of antibodies to Hsp65 in AA; and the use of Hsp65, its peptides, or altered peptide ligands in controlling autoimmune pathology. The results of studies in the AA model have relevance to RA and JIA. We believe that these insights into Hsp65 immunity would not only advance our understanding of the disease process in RA/JIA, but also lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27379088

  5. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  6. Mechanism of Xinfeng Capsule on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Analysis of Urinary Metabolomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-juan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the potential effects of Xinfeng capsule (XFC) on urine metabolic profiling in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS). GC-TOF/MS technology was combined with multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). These methods were used to distinguish the healthy group, untreated group, and XFC treated group and elucidate potential biomarkers. Nine potential biomarkers such as hippuric acid, adenine, and L-dopa were identified as potential biomarkers, indicating that purine metabolism, fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and energy metabolism were disturbed in AA rats. This study demonstrated that XFC is efficacious for RA and explained its potential metabolomics mechanism. PMID:26989506

  7. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  8. Pharmacological influence on processes of adjuvant arthritis: Effect of the combination of an antioxidant active substance with methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Drafi, Frantisek; Bauerova, Katarina; Kuncirova, Viera; Ponist, Silvester; Mihalova, Danica; Fedorova, Tatiana; Harmatha, Juraj; Nosal, Radomir

    2012-06-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. A certain correlation was observed between oxidative stress, arthritis and the immune system. Reactive oxygen species produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative burst, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an altered antioxidant defense capacity barrier. In the present study the effect of substances with antioxidative properties, i.e. pinosylvin and carnosine, was determined in monotherapy for the treatment of adjuvant arthritis (AA). Moreover carnosine was evaluated in combination therapy with methotrexate. Rats with AA were administered first pinosylvin (30 mg/kg body mass daily per os), second carnosine (150 mg/kg body mass daily per os) in monotherapy for a period of 28 days. Further, rats with AA were administered methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body mass 2-times weekly per os), and a combination of methotrexate+carnosine, with the carnosine dose being the same as in the previous experiment. Parameters, i.e. changes in hind paw volume and arthritic score were determined in rats as indicators of destructive arthritis-associated clinical changes. Plasmatic levels of TBARS and lag time of Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation (tau-FeLP) in plasma and brain were specified as markers of oxidation. Plasmatic level of CRP and activity of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in spleen and joint were used as inflammation markers. In comparison to pinosylvin, administration of carnosine monotherapy led to a significant decrease in the majority of the parameters studied. In the combination treatment with methotrexate+carnosine most parameters monitored were improved more remarkably than by methotrexate alone. Carnosine can increase the disease-modifying effect of

  9. Successful immunotherapy with matrix metalloproteinase-derived peptides in adjuvant arthritis depends on the timing of peptide administration

    PubMed Central

    van Bilsen, Jolanda HM; Wagenaar-Hilbers, Josée PA; van der Cammen, Maarten JF; van Dijk, Mariska EA; van Eden, Willem; Wauben, Marca HM

    2002-01-01

    We have recently found that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are targets for T-cell and B-cell reactivity in experimental arthritis. In the present article, we investigate whether modulation of MMP-specific T-cell responses could influence the course of adjuvant arthritis (AA). Lewis rats were treated nasally with MMP peptides prior to or after AA induction. Administration of the MMP-10 or the MMP-16 peptide prior to AA induction reduced the arthritic symptoms. In contrast, administration of the MMP-10 peptide after AA induction aggravated the arthritic symptoms. The present study shows the possible usefulness of MMP peptides for immunotherapy. However, a clear understanding of proper timing of peptide administration is crucial for the development of such therapies. PMID:12106501

  10. Synergistic activity of curcumin with methotrexate in ameliorating Freund's Complete Adjuvant induced arthritis with reduced hepatotoxicity in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Banji, David; Pinnapureddy, Jyothi; Banji, Otilia J F; Saidulu, A; Hayath, Md Sikinder

    2011-10-01

    Methotrexate is employed in low doses for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. One of the major drawbacks with methotrexate is hepatotoxicity resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Curcumin is an extensively used spice possessing both anti-arthritic and hepatoprotective potential. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of curcumin (30 and 100 mg/kg) in combination with subtherapeutic dose of methotrexate (1 mg/kg) is salvaging hepatotoxicity, oxidative stress and producing synergistic anti-arthritic action with methotrexate. Wistar albino rats were induced with arthritis by subplantar injection of Freund's Complete Adjuvant and pronounced arthritis was seen after 9 days of injection. Groups of animals were treated with subtherapeutic dose of methotrexate followed half an hour later with 30 and 100mg/kg of curcumin from day 9 up to days 45 by intraperitoneal route. Methotrexate treatment in Freund's Complete Adjuvant induced arthritic animals produced elevation in the levels of aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase, total and direct bilirubin. Enhanced oxidative stress in terms of measured lipid peroxides was observed in the methotrexate treated group. Curcumin significantly circumvented hepatotoxicity induced by methotrexate as evidenced by a change in biochemical markers possibly due to its strong anti-oxidant action. Hepatoprotective potential of curcumin was also confirmed from histological evaluation. Sub-therapeutic dose of methotrexate elicited substantial anti-arthritic action when used in combination with curcumin implying that the latter potentiated its action. Concomitant administration of curcumin with methotrexate was also found to minimize liver damage. PMID:21693118

  11. Formoterol decreases muscle wasting as well as inflammation in the rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-SanMiguel, Ana Belén; Gomez-Moreira, Carolina; Nieto-Bona, María Paz; Fernández-Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, Maria Ángeles; Martín, Ana Isabel; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists are powerful anabolic agents that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy and have been proposed as a promising treatment for muscle wasting in human patients. The aim of this work was to determine whether formoterol, a selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonist, is able to ameliorate muscle wasting in arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant. Control and arthritic rats were injected daily with 50 μg/kg sc formoterol or saline for 12 days. Body weight change, food intake, and arthritis index were analyzed. After euthanasia, in the gastrocnemius mRNA was analyzed by PCR, and proteins were analyzed by Western blotting. Arthritis decreased gastrocnemius weight, cross-sectional area, and myofiber size, whereas formoterol increased those variables in both arthritic and control rats. Formoterol decreased the external signs of arthritis as well as NF-κB(p65) activation, TNFα, and COX-2 levels in the gastrocnemius of arthritic and control rats. Those effects of formoterol were associated with a decreased expression of myostatin, atrogin-1, and MuRF1 and in LC3b lipidation. Arthritis increased the expression of MyoD, myogenin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 and -5 in the gastrocnemius. In control and in arthritic rats, treatment with formoterol increased Akt phosphorylation and myogenin levels, whereas it decreased IGFBP-3 expression in the gastrocnemius. These data suggest that formoterol has an anti-inflammatory effect and decreases muscle wasting in arthritic rats through increasing Akt activity and myogenin and decreasing myostatin, the p-NF-κB(p65)/TNF pathway, and IGFBP-3. PMID:27245339

  12. Arthritis associated with adjuvant mycobacterial treatment for carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A; Allard, S A; Maini, R N

    1989-01-01

    A patient who developed an inflammatory polyarthritis following intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) used in the treatment of bladder cancer is described. An inflammatory synovitis comprising predominantly T lymphocytes was demonstrated on synovial biopsy. The synovitis resolved spontaneously within 14 days in this 'human model' of adjuvant arthritis. Images PMID:2786389

  13. Freund's adjuvants: relationship of arthritogenicity and adjuvanticity in rats to vehicle composition

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, M. W.; Orr, K. J.; Beck, Frances W. J.; Pearson, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Over a hundred compounds and natural materials were examined for their ability to induce arthritis in rats when mixed with heat-killed delipidated Mycobacteria tuberculosis. Many of these materials were also assessed for (CMI) adjuvant activity by their ability to induce allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats when mixed with guinea-pig spinal cord, both with and without added M. tuberculosis. Cyclization and/or the presence of oxygen atoms, or double bonds reduced (or abolished) the arthritogenic potential and adjuvanticity of alkanes>C10. Esters/triglycerides of fatty acids >C12, retinol acetate (not palmitate) and vitamins E and K showed co-arthritogenic and adjuvant activity. Other active lipids included squalene and cholesterol oleate, which are both present in human sebum. Sebaceous lipids may therefore perhaps function as natural adjuvants if resorbed during abrasion and infection. Squalane (perhydrosqualene), pristane and hexadecane were excellent substitutes for mineral oil in preparing arthritogenic adjuvants from various mycobacteria, C. rubrum and N. asteroides. These oily compounds were also very effective adjuvants per se, in the absence of bacterial material or emulsifier, for inducing EAE in Lewis rats. PMID:4214125

  14. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  15. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  16. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  17. Effect of nabumetone treatment on vascular responses of the thoracic aorta in rat experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ulker, S; Onal, A; Hatip, F B; Sürücü, A; Alkanat, M; Koşay, S; Evinç, A

    2000-04-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drug which is known to cause less gastrointestinal damage than other NSAI drugs. This study was performed to evaluate whether nabumetone treatment might alter the vascular aberrations related to inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Nabumetone treatment (120 or 240 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), orally) was initiated on the 15th day of adjuvant inoculation and continued for 14 days. Arthritic lesions, vascular contractile and relaxant responses and gastroduodenal histopathological preparations were evaluated 29 days after adjuvant inoculation. The contractile responses of aortic rings to phenylephrine and KCl were increased in grade 2 arthritic rats. In grade 3 arthritis only the phenylephrine contractility was decreased. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were decreased in grades 2 and 3. In healthy rats, nabumetone did not change the vascular responses. After treatment of arthritic rats with nabumetone, both the contractile and relaxant response of the aortic rings returned to normal, and arthritic score and paw swelling were reduced. Gastroduodenal histopathology did not show erosions or ulcers in any of the groups. In conclusion, nabumetone improved the systemic signs and vascular alterations in experimental arthritis without showing any gastrointestinal side effects. PMID:10754450

  18. Quercetin: a potential natural drug for adjuvant treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian-Jun; Lin, Yuan; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Hou-Li; Diao, Yun-Peng; Li, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the rheumatism mainly manifested as disabling joint disease and mainly involves hands, wrists, feet and other small joints. Recurrent arthritis attacks, synovial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia and bone and cartilage damages eventually lead to joint dysfunction and other complications, and there is no cure. Quercetin (QU) is a kind of natural flavonoids, with lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and other pharmacological activities, and minor toxic side effects. Thus, we assume that QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. The possible mechanism is through regulation of NF-κB, to inhibit the transcription of joint synovitis factors, hinder the generation of inflammatory factors, and inhibit the inflammatory reaction; through inhibiting the activities of VEGF, bFGF, MMP-2 and other cytokines, to inhibit angiogenesis in multiple links and inhibit synovial pannus formation. QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. PMID:24146468

  19. Modulation of Th1 cytokines and inflammatory mediators by Euphorbia hirta in animal model of adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fayaz Ahmad, Sheikh; Sultan, Phalisteen; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Khan, Tajdar Husain; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2013-10-01

    Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae) (E. hirta) is a tree locally used as a traditional medicine in Africa and Australia to treat numerous diseases such as hypertension, respiratory ailments, tumors, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we investigated the anti-arthritic activity of fresh leaves of E. hirta ethanol extract that was found to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines of adjuvant arthritis in rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in rats (Wistar) by the subplantar injection of 0.05 ml freshly prepared suspension (5.0 mg/ml) of steam killed Mycobacterium tuberculli in liquid paraffin. Animals were treated with graded doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of E. hirta ethanol extract, p.o. E. hirta significantly inhibited the swelling of the adjuvant-induced arthritis. Moreover, E. hirta at higher dose (200 mg/kg) showed 40.54 ± 1.09 % of CD3+, 15.1 ± 0.76 % of CD4+, 12.2 ± 1.18 % of CD8+ T cell receptor and 17.6 ± 1.11 % gated of CD19+ B cell receptor revealing a down regulation of adjuvant-induced arthritis as compared to the corresponding valves of the arthritic control rats. According to the results shown in Tables 1, 2, the production of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ were increased in splenocytes of arthritic rats and this increased level was reduced by E. hirta. Also, E. hirta significantly down regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide production in peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that E. hirta exhibits an improvement in adjuvant-induced arthritis through down regulation of activated macrophages and T lymphocytes functions. Such unique effects of E. hirta shown on adjuvant arthritis rat model may be advantageous to the long-term treatment of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Table 1 Effect of E. hirta and prednisolone (Pred) on LPS-induced IL-1β and TNF-α productions from splenocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculli-induced inflammatory arthritic rats Treatment

  20. Adjuvant oestrogen therapy does not improve disease activity in postmenopausal patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, H R; van Everdingen, A A; van Wijk, M J; Jacobs, J W; Bijlsma, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether oestrogens can be used as treatment to diminish disease activity in women with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Forty postmenopausal female patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study on the possible beneficial effect of adjuvant treatment of oestradiol on disease activity. RESULTS--Thirty three patients completed 52 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oestradiol-valerate or placebo. No statistically significant difference was found in and between both treatment groups with regard to articular indices, pain score by visual analogue scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and health questionnaire on daily activities before, during and at the end of the study. CONCLUSION--This first randomised prospective placebo-controlled study shows no beneficial effect of oestrogens on disease activity in postmenopausal female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8311536

  1. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    SONG, HOU-PAN; LI, XIN; YU, RONG; ZENG, GUANG; YUAN, ZHEN-YI; WANG, WEI; HUANG, HUI-YONG; CAI, XIONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans. PMID:26622511

  2. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species. PMID:19591012

  3. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats. PMID:25276195

  4. Imaging of Carrageenan-Induced Local Inflammation and Adjuvant-Induced Systemic Arthritis with [11C]PBR28 PET

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xia; Wang, Xueding; English, Sean J; Desmond, Timothy; Sherman, Phillip S; Quesada, Carole A; Piert, Morand R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction [11C]PBR28 binding to translocator protein (TSPO) was evaluated for imaging of acute and chronic inflammation using two established rat models. Methods Acute inflammation was induced by local Carrageenan-injection into the paw of Fisher 344 rats (model A). T-cell mediated adjuvant arthritis was induced by heat-inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum injection in Lewis rats (model B). Micro-PET scan was performed after injection of approximately 35 MBq [11C]PBR28. In model A, volumes of interest (VOIs) were defined in the paw of Fisher 344 rats (n=6) with contralateral sham treatment as control. For model B, VOIs were defined in the tail, sacroiliac joints, hips, knees and thigh muscles of M. butyricum treated animals (n=8) and compared with sham-treated controls (n=4). The peak 11C-PBR28 SUV (SUVpeak) and area under the curve (AUCSUV) of 60-minute time-activity data were calculated. Immunohistochemistry for CD68, a macrophage stain, was performed from paw tissues. In addition, the [11C]PBR28 cell uptake was measured in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated and non-stimulated macrophage cultures. Results LPS-stimulated macrophages displayed dose-dependent increased [11C]PBR28 uptake, which was blocked by non-labeled PBR28. In both models, radiotracer uptake of treated lesions increased rapidly within minutes and displayed overall accumulative kinetics. The SUVpeak and AUCSUV of Carrageenan-treated paws was significantly increased compared to controls. Also, the [11C]PBR28 uptake ratio of Carrageenan-treated vs. sham-treated paw correlated significantly with CD68 staining ratios of the same animals. In adjuvant arthritis, significantly increased [11C]PBR28 SUVpeak and AUCSUV values were identified at the tail, knees, and sacroiliac joints, while no significant differences were identified in the lumbar spine and hips. Conclusions Based on our initial data, [11C]PBR28 PET appears to have potential for imaging of various inflammatory processes involving

  5. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. PMID:27433576

  6. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24664592

  7. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression. PMID:21531199

  8. Enzymosomes with surface-exposed superoxide dismutase: in vivo behaviour and therapeutic activity in a model of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria Manuela; Boerman, Otto C; Laverman, Peter; Corvo, Maria Luísa; Storm, Gert; Cruz, Maria Eugénia Meirinhos

    2007-02-12

    Acylated Superoxide Dismutase (Ac-SOD) enzymosomes, liposomal enzymatic systems expressing catalytic activity in the intact form, were previously characterized. The main scope of the present work was to investigate the biological behaviour of Ac-SOD inserted in the lipid bilayer of liposomes, in comparison with SOD located in the aqueous compartment of liposomes. Two types of liposomes were used: conventional liposomes presenting an unmodified external surface and long circulating liposomes coated with poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG). Liposomal formulations of Ac-SOD and SOD were prepared and labelled with indium-111 and their in vivo fate compared. Data obtained led us to the conclusion that, for liposomes coated with PEG the in vivo fate was not influenced by the insertion of Ac-SOD in the lipid bilayers. The potential therapeutic effect of Ac-SOD enzymosomes was compared with SOD liposomes in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. A faster anti-inflammatory effect was observed for Ac-SOD enzymosomes by monitoring the volume of the inflamed paws. The present results allowed us to conclude that Ac-SOD enzymosomes are nano-carriers combining the advantages of expressing enzymatic activity in intact form and thus being able to exert therapeutic effect even before liposomes disruption, as well as acting as a sustained release of the enzyme. PMID:17169460

  9. Xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata exert significant therapeutic efficacy on adjuvant-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian; Xia, Yan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jian-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The study was designed to investigate effects of the xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) mice in vivo. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score, body weight loss, paw circumference, histological changes and hyperplasia of lymphatic tissues. Plasma samples were collected for estimation of interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) and sialic acid (SA) in liver were assessed by colorimetric method. Xanthones significantly ameliorated the severity of AA indicated by the physical parameters changes, and reverted the abnormal changes of MDA, GSH, NAG and SA in liver. Levels of IL-1, TNF-α, MCP-1 and VEGF reduced dramatically meanwhile. The effects of xanthones on AA were the outcome of the multitargets activities, and probably associated with NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24419745

  10. A Soft Coral-Derived Compound, 11-epi-Sinulariolide Acetate Suppresses Inflammatory Response and Bone Destruction in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:23675440

  11. UP1304, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba, Mitigates Pain and Inflammation in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though, the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share pain as the prime complaints. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side effects. Hence, the need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is an overdue. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP1304, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the botanical composition were demonstrated in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats with oral dose ranges of 50–200 mg/kg. Ibuprofen at a dose of 100 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. Ex vivo sulfated glycosaminoglycan inhibition assays were performed. Results: Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance, suppression of paw edema and ankle thickness were observed in animals treated with UP1304 compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats. These results were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment. Inhibitions of proteoglycan degradation were observed in a range of 37.5–61.7% for concentration of UP1304 at 50–200 μg/mL when compared to interleukin-1α-exposed untreated explants. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1304, for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, could potentially be considered agent of botanical origin for the improvement of arthritis associated symptoms. SUMMARY Pain is one of the cardinal signs of arthritis.Long term applications of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief are associated with cardiovascular

  12. Transfer of spleen cells expanded by T cell growth factor suppresses arthritis induced in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, H; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-01-01

    The effects of transfer of T cell growth factor (TCGF)-expanded spleen cells after concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation into syngeneic Lewis rats were studied. The recipient rats were immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant for induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA) or chick type II collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant for induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) on day 0. Each of 5 X 10(7) cultured cells without mitogenic stimulation, 2 X 10(7) Con A-stimulated cells, or 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells cultured for 8 days (4 days X 2 culture cycles) after Con A stimulation was given on days 0 and 7. Both transfers of the cultured cells without stimulation and TCGF-expanded cells markedly diminished the severity of AA and CIA. On the contrary, transfer of Con A-stimulated cells led to no suppressive activity. In addition, transfer to TCGF-expanded cells significantly lowered the titre of anti-type II collagen antibody compared to that of control rats. The transfer of 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells was optimal for suppressing AA, in terms of cell number. This observation suggests that these cells were much more effective than were the unstimulated cultured cells, for which more than five times the number was required for the same suppressive activity. As far as the phenotypic proportion of helper (W3/13) and suppressor (OX-8) cells is concerned, we found no significant differences between the cultured cell groups and the freshly separated spleen cell group. The precise mechanism of these suppressive effects is the subject of further study. The transfer of TCGF-expanded cells appears to have a potent immunomodulatory effect. PMID:3497743

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract in an antigen-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-06-13

    The red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. This study sought to investigate the cartilage-protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using (1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and (2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents), and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  14. A role for mast cells in the development of adjuvant-induced vasculitis and arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, B.; Burns, A. R.; Kubes, P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the role of mast cells in the development of vasculitis and joint swelling in adjuvant-immunized rats. Leukocyte trafficking within mesenteric venules (rolling and adhesion) and mast cell activation (ruthenium red uptake) were examined in vivo. Elevated leukocyte trafficking was observed by 4 days after immunization, whereas joint swelling developed between days 10 and 12. Perivascular mast cells took up ruthenium red and appeared activated by electron microscopy at 4 but not 12 days after immunization. Treatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn on days 1 to 4 after immunization blocked ruthenium red uptake at day 4 and reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion by approximately 50%. This treatment also reduced rolling, adhesion, and joint swelling at day 12 by approximately 50%. Cromolyn treatment over days 9 to 12 reduced joint swelling but increased leukocyte emigration into the mesentery. Peritoneal mast cells isolated 4 days after immunization elicited significant neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, whereas day 12 mast cells did not. Mast cell activation and vasculitis were absent in adjuvant-resistant Fisher/344 rats. These data suggest that mast cells play an early role in the initiation of vasculitis and may function by day 12 to limit infiltration of leukocytes from the vasculature. In the joint, however, mast cells appear to contribute to inflammation at early as well as later time points. Images Figure 2 PMID:9466582

  15. Fish Oil and Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis: Inhibitory Effect on Leukocyte Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Kummer, Raquel; Tronco, Rafael Prizon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of n-3 fatty acids, has been studied for its beneficial effects in many diseases. Recent studies have shown the robust anti-inflammatory activity of fish oil (FO), when administered orally to rats, in models of acute inflammation. Herein, we investigated if treatment with fish oil preparation (FOP) could interfere with the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. We also evaluated the effect of treatment on rolling behavior and leukocyte adhesion in vivo and on leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro. Treatment with FOP (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) initiated on the day of induction of arthritis (day 0) and maintained for 21 days reduced the total number of leukocytes recruited into the joint cavity, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in arthritic rats, and leukocyte migration in response to stimulation with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Together, our data provide evidence that FOP plays an important inhibitory role in the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. PMID:26378008

  16. Chrysin alleviates testicular dysfunction in adjuvant arthritic rats via suppression of inflammation and apoptosis: Comparison with celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Arab, Hany H.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.

    2014-09-01

    Long standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with testicular dysfunction and subfertility. Few studies have addressed the pathogenesis of testicular injury in RA and its modulation by effective agents. Thus, the current study aimed at evaluating the effects of two testosterone boosting agents; chrysin, a natural flavone and celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in testicular impairment in rats with adjuvant arthritis, an experimental model of RA. Chrysin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and celecoxib (5 mg/kg) were orally administered to Wistar rats once daily for 21 days starting 1 h before arthritis induction. Chrysin suppressed paw edema with comparable efficacy to celecoxib. More important, chrysin, dose-dependently and celecoxib attenuated the testicular injury via reversing lowered gonadosomatic index and histopathologic alterations with preservation of spermatogenesis. Both agents upregulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression and serum testosterone with concomitant restoration of LH and FSH. Furthermore, they suppressed inflammation via abrogation of myeloperoxidase, TNF-α and protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS besides elevation of IL-10. Alleviation of the testicular impairment was accompanied with suppression of oxidative stress via lowering testicular lipid peroxides and nitric oxide. With respect to apoptosis, both agents downregulated FasL mRNA expression and caspase-3 activity in favor of cell survival. For the first time, these findings highlight the protective effects of chrysin and celecoxib against testicular dysfunction in experimental RA which were mediated via boosting testosterone in addition to attenuation of testicular inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Generally, the 50 mg/kg dose of chrysin exerted comparable protective actions to celecoxib. - Highlights: • Chrysin and celecoxib alleviated testicular suppression in adjuvant arthritis. • They attenuated histopathological damage and preserved spermatogenesis

  17. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  18. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-01-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  19. Liposomal encapsulation enhances and prolongs the anti-inflammatory effects of water-soluble dexamethasone phosphate in experimental adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (i.v.) injection of liposomally encapsulated dexamethasone phosphate (DxM-P) in comparison to free DxM-P in rats with established adjuvant arthritis (AA). This study focused on polyethylene glycol (PEG)-free liposomes, to minimize known allergic reactions caused by neutral PEG-modified (PEG-ylated) liposomes. Methods Efficacy was assessed clinically and histologically using standard scores. Non-specific and specific immune parameters were monitored. Activation of peritoneal macrophages was analyzed via cytokine profiling. Pharmacokinetics/biodistribution of DxM in plasma, synovial membrane, spleen and liver were assessed via mass spectrometry. Results Liposomal DxM-P (3 × 1 mg/kg body weight; administered intravenously (i.v.) on Days 14, 15 and 16 of AA) suppressed established AA, including histological signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, white blood cell count, circulating anti-mycobacterial IgG, and production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and IL-6 by peritoneal macrophages. The suppression was strong and long-lasting. The clinical effects of liposomal DxM-P were dose-dependent for dosages between 0.01 and 1.0 mg/kg. Single administration of 1 mg/kg liposomal DxM-P and 3 × 1 mg/kg of free DxM-P showed comparable effects consisting of a partial and transient suppression. Moreover, the effects of medium-dose liposomal DxM-P (3 × 0.1 mg/kg) were equal (in the short term) or superior (in the long term) to those of high-dose free DxM-P (3 × 1 mg/kg), suggesting a potential dose reduction by a factor between 3 and 10 by liposomal encapsulation. For at least 48 hours after the last injection, the liposomal drug achieved significantly higher levels in plasma, synovial membrane, spleen and liver than the free drug. Conclusions This new PEG-free formulation of macrophage-targeting liposomal DxM-P considerably reduces the dose and/or frequency required to treat AA, with a potential

  20. Nociceptive sensitivity and opioid antinociception and antihyperalgesia in Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles D; Nickerson, Michael D

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to examine sex differences in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and sex differences in opioid antinociception and anti-hyperalgesia. Female rats developed inflammation and hyperalgesia faster and exhibited greater peak hyperalgesia than male rats. In arthritic (CFA-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during estrus and proestrus, and in nonarthritic (vehicle-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during proestrus. Morphine and oxycodone were more potent in male than female arthritic rats, and butorphanol was more potent and effective in male than female arthritic rats. The potency of morphine was increased in arthritic rats, although to a greater magnitude in males. The potency of oxycodone was increased in male but not female arthritic rats. The potency of butorphanol was increased in arthritic male rats and the maximal antinociceptive effect of butorphanol was increased in arthritic female rats, but it did not result in greater than 20% antinociception. Morphine, oxycodone, and butorphanol all produced antihyperalgesic effects (returning thresholds of arthritic rats to the thresholds of nonarthritic rats) with greater potency in males than females. The peripherally acting opioid agonist loperamide produced intermediate levels of antinociception in male and female arthritic rats and no antinociception in nonarthritic rats. Loperamide was more potent in male than female arthritic rats at producing antihyperalgesia. These data demonstrate sex differences in arthritis-induced hyperalgesia and responsiveness to opioid analgesics. In arthritic rats, the antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are most probably mediated by both central and peripheral opioid receptors, whereas their antihyperalgesic effects are mediated primarily by actions at peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15608071

  1. Cytokine expression and synovial pathology in the initiation and spontaneous resolution phases of adjuvant arthritis: Interleukin-17 expression is upregulated in early disease

    PubMed Central

    Bush, K A; Walker, J S; Lee, C S; Kirkham, B W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the immune processes controlling the initiation and spontaneous resolution of adjuvant arthritis (AA). We investigated synovial T-cell recruitment and mRNA expression of IL-17 and other important disease related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, TNF and TGF-β in inguinal lymph node (ILN) and synovial membrane (SM). Arthritis severity was assessed by a numerical rating score and rats were sacrificed every 3–4 days postadjuvant induction. Further assessment involved quantitative radiology and histology of the ankle joints on each day, and the ILN and SM were removed for RNA extraction. Cytokine mRNA expression was measured using RT-PCR and densitometry. Paraffin sections of rat ankle joints were stained for T-cells (CD3) by immunohistochemistry. In the ILN, there was an increase in IL-17, TNF and IFN-γ expression in the early stages of disease, with a secondary sustained increase in IFN-γ expression. In the SM, there was expression of T-cell cytokines in early arthritis (day 13), and prolonged TNF and TGF-β expression, which reflected disease progression. IL-4 mRNA expression increased in the later stages of AA. Synovial T-cell numbers transiently increased at day 6, and remained high from days 13–28. Increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, including IL-17, in the ILN reflects the initiating events in the early stage of disease. IL-17 may therefore play an important role in the pathogenesis of AA. The increase in IL-4 (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the SM in the later stages of AA suggests that IL-4 is involved in the spontaneous resolution of AA. The initial increase in IFN-γ in the ILN may reflect a pro-inflammatory response, while the prolonged secondary increase may indicate activation of regulatory T-cells. PMID:11298138

  2. Effects of central administration of oxytocin-saporin cytotoxin on chronic inflammation and feeding/drinking behaviors in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Takanori; Kawasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Motojima, Yasuhito; Saito, Reiko; Ueno, Hiromichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Sabanai, Ken; Mori, Toshiharu; Ohnishi, Hideo; Sakai, Akinori; Ueta, Yoichi

    2016-05-16

    An increase in the arthritis index as a marker of chronic inflammation and suppression of food intake are observed in adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats. Our previous study demonstrated that central oxytocin (OXT)-ergic pathways were activated potently in AA rats. In the present study, OXT-saporin (SAP) cytotoxin, which chemically disrupts OXT signaling was administered centrally to determine whether central OXT may be involved in the developments of chronic inflammation and alteration of feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. The arthritis index was significantly enhanced in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). Suppression of food intake was significantly attenuated transiently in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered i.c.v. but not i.t. Suppression of drinking behavior was not affected by i.t. or i.c.v. administration of OXT-SAP in AA rats. In addition, intraperitoneal administration of an OXT receptor antagonist did not change the arthritis index or feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. These results suggest that central OXT-ergic pathways may be involved in anti-inflammation at the spinal level and suppression of feeding behavior at the forebrain-brainstem level in AA rats. PMID:27060190

  3. Optimization of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for management of arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatachalam Senthil; Kumar, Dilly Ashok; Kalaivani, Kalyanasundaram; Gangadharan, Akkalayi Chandrapuram; Raju, K V S Narayana; Thejomoorthy, Pammi; Manohar, Bhakthavatchalam Murali; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2005-09-01

    Studies were undertaken to find out the effects of low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) in rats, a widely used model for screening potential therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AIA was induced by an intradermal injection of a suspension of heat killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (500 mug/0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of male Wistar rats. This resulted in swelling, loss of body weight, increase in paw volume as well as the activity of lysosomal enzymes viz., acid phosphatase, cathepsin D, and beta-glucuronidase and significant radiological and histological changes. PEMF therapy for arthritis involved optimization of three significant factors, viz., frequency, intensity, and duration; and the waveform used is sinusoidal. The use of factorial design in lieu of conventional method resulted in the development of an ideal combination of these factors. PEMF was applied using a Fransleau-Braunbeck coil system. A magnetic field of 5 Hz x 4 muT x 90 min was found to be optimal in lowering the paw edema volume and decreasing the activity of lysosomal enzymes. Soft tissue swelling was shown to be reduced as evidenced by radiology. Histological studies confirmed reduction in inflammatory cells infiltration, hyperplasia, and hypertrophy of cells lining synovial membrane. PEMF was also shown to have a membrane stabilizing action by significantly inhibiting the rate of release of beta-glucuronidase from lysosomal rich and sub-cellular fractions. The results indicated that PEMF could be developed as a potential therapy in the treatment of arthritis in humans. PMID:15887257

  4. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  5. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  6. Potential of Vigna radiata (L.) sprouts in the management of inflammation and arthritis in rats: Possible biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwarlu, E; Reddy, K Purnima; Dilip, D

    2016-01-01

    Vigna radiata (Fabaceae) is an important pulse crop widespread throughout the tropics and warm temperature regions. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro anti-inflammatory and in vivo antiarthritic activity of Vigna radiata sprouts in rats. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity was determined by membrane stabilization and protein denaturation method. Whereas, the antiarthritic activity of the ethanolic extract of the sprouts was evaluated by complete Freund's adjuvant model with diclofenac sodium as the standard drug. Body weights, paw volume, biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation, total reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase and lysosomal enzymes like cathepsin-D, N-acetyl β-D-glucosamindase and β-D-glucuronidase were estimated. Treatment with ethanolic extract of V. radiata exhibited significant membrane stabilization activity and protein denaturation activity, and significantly attenuated the biochemical changes induced by administration of complete Freund's adjuvant. The findings of the present study suggest the possible role of Vigna radiata in the therapeutics of arthritis. PMID:26891551

  7. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  8. β2-adrenoceptor signaling reduction in dendritic cells is involved in the inflammatory response in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huaxun; Chen, Jingyu; Song, Shasha; Yuan, Pingfan; Liu, Lihua; Zhang, Yunfang; Zhou, Aiwu; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammation of the synovium, which leads to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone. Adrenoreceptor (AR) signaling may play an important role in modulating dendritic cell (DC), which may be involved in the pathogenesis of RA. We examined the effect of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline (ISO) on DC function, the impact of the β2-AR agonist salbutamol on adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) rats, and changes in β2-AR signaling in DCs during the course of AA. ISO inhibited the expression of the surface molecules CD86 and MHC-II, inhibited the stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation by DC and TNF-α secretion, and promoted DC antigen uptake and IL-10 secretion. The effects of ISO on MHC-II expression, DC stimulation of T lymphocyte proliferation, and DC antigen uptake were mediated by β2-AR. Treatment with salbutamol ameliorated the severity of AA and histopathology of the joints and inhibited proliferation of thymus lymphocytes and FLS in vivo. β2-AR signaling was weaker in AA rats compared to the control. Elevated GRK2 and decreased β2-AR expression in DC cytomembranes were observed in AA and may have decreased the anti-inflammatory effect of β2-AR signaling. Decreased β2-AR signaling may be relevant to the exacerbation of arthritis inflammation. PMID:27079168

  9. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    PubMed Central

    Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described. PMID:23554193

  10. Therapeutic effect of umbelliferon-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(2(I)→1(II))-α-D-glucopyranoside on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Anwar, Firoz; Verma, Amita; Mujeeb, Mohd

    2015-06-01

    The aim and objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the antiarthritic and antioxidant effect of umbelliferon-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(2I→1II)-α-D-glucopyranoside (UFD) in chemically induced arthritic rats. The different doses of the UFD were tested against the turpentine oil (TO), formaldehyde induced acute arthritis and complete fruend's adjuvant (CFA) induced chronic arthritis in Wistar rats. Arthritic assessment and body weight was measured at regular interval till 28 days. On day 28, all the groups animals were anaesthetized, blood were collected from the puncturing the ratro orbital and estimated the hematological parameters. The animals were sacrificed; synovial tissue was extracted and estimated the malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The different doses of the UFD showed the protective effect against turpentine oil, formaldehyde induced acute arthritis and CFA induced chronic arthritis at dose dependent manner. Acute model of arthritis such as TOand formaldehyde induced inflammation due to releasing of the inflammatory mediators; significantly inhibited by the UFD at dose dependent manner. CFA induced arthritic rats treated with the different doses of the UFD showed the inhibitory effect on the delayed increase in joint diameter as seen in arthritic control group rats. UFD significantly improved the arthritic index, body weight and confirmed the antiarthritic effect. UFD showed the effect on the hematological parameter such as improved the level of the RBC, Hb and decline the level of the EBC, ESR and confirmed the immune suppressive effect. UFD significantly improved the level of the endogenous antioxidant and confirmed the antioxidant effect. This present investigation suggests that the UFD has prominent antiarthritic impact which can be endorsed to its antiarthritic and antioxidant effects. PMID:26028721

  11. Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, D.C.; Zhang, L.P.; Ma, F.; Abshire, S.M.; McIlwrath, S.L.; Stinchcomb, A.L.; Westlund, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current arthritis treatments often have side-effects attributable to active compounds as well as route of administration. Cannabidiol (CBD) attenuates inflammation and pain without side-effects, but CBD is hydrophobic and has poor oral bioavailability. Topical drug application avoids gastrointestinal administration, first pass metabolism, providing more constant plasma levels. Methods This study examined efficacy of transdermal CBD for reduction in inflammation and pain, assessing any adverse effects in a rat complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced monoarthritic knee joint model. CBD gels (0.6, 3.1, 6.2 or 62.3 mg/day) were applied for 4 consecutive days after arthritis induction. Joint circumference and immune cell invasion in histological sections were measured to indicate level of inflammation. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in response to noxious heat stimulation determined nociceptive sensitization, and exploratory behaviour ascertained animal’s activity level. Results Measurement of plasma CBD concentration provided by transdermal absorption revealed linearity with 0.6–6.2 mg/day doses. Transdermal CBD gel significantly reduced joint swelling, limb posture scores as a rating of spontaneous pain, immune cell infiltration and thickening of the synovial membrane in a dose-dependent manner. PWL recovered to near baseline level. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord (CGRP, OX42) and dorsal root ganglia (TNFα) revealed dose-dependent reductions of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Results showed 6.2 and 62 mg/day were effective doses. Exploratory behaviour was not altered by CBD indicating limited effect on higher brain function. Conclusions These data indicate that topical CBD application has therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects. PMID:26517407

  12. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been considered as an approach to addressing the consequences of different inflammatory disorders. The spore-forming probiotic strain Bacillus coagulans has demonstrated anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects in both animals and humans. The prebiotic inulin also potentially affects the immune system as a result of the change in the composition or fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Objective In the present study, an in vivo model was conducted to investigate the possible influences of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin, both in combination and/or separately, on the downregulation of immune responses and the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using arthritis-induced rat model. Design Forty-eight healthy male Wistar rats were randomly categorized into six experimental groups as follows: 1) control: normal healthy rats fed with standard diet, 2) disease control (RA): arthritis-induced rats fed with standard diet, 3) prebiotic (PRE): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin, 4) probiotic (PRO): RA+ 109 spores/day B. coagulans by orogastric gavage, 5) synbiotic (SYN): RA+ 5% w/w long-chain inulin and 109 spores/day B. coagulans, and 6) treatment control: (INDO): RA+ 3 mg/kg/day indomethacin by orogastric gavage. Feeding with the listed diets started on day 0 and continued to the end of study. On day 14, rats were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis activity was evaluated by the biochemical parameters and paw thickness. Biochemical assay for fibrinogen (Fn), serum amyloid A (SAA), and TNF-α and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (α1AGp) was performed on day 21, 28, and 35 (7, 14 and 21 days post RA induction), respectively. Results Pretreatment with PRE, PRO, and SYN diets significantly inhibits SAA and Fn production in arthritic rats (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, was seen in the PRE, PRO, and SYN groups (P

  13. Effect of polaprezinc on impaired healing of chronic gastric ulcers in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats--role of insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-1.

    PubMed

    Kato, S; Tanaka, A; Ogawa, Y; Kanatsu, K; Seto, K; Yoneda, T; Takeuchi, K

    2001-01-01

    Polaprezinc, N-(3-aminopropionyl)-L-histidinatozinc, has been shown to stimulate the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in mesenchymal cells, the polypeptide playing a role in the gastric epithelial wound repair. The present study was performed to examine the effect of polaprezinc on the impaired healing of chronic gastric ulcers in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, in relation to IGF-1. Arthritis was induced in male Dark Agouti (DA) rats by a single injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), and the gastric ulcers were induced by thermal cauterization (70 degrees C for 30 sec) 7 days after FCA injection. Omeprazole (30 mg/kg) was administered p.o. once daily, while recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1) (30 micrograms/kg, s.c.) or polaprezinc (3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered twice daily, starting from 3 days after ulceration for 14 days. The healing of gastric ulcers was significantly delayed in arthritic rats as compared to normal rats on day 10 and 17 following ulceration. The expression of IGF-1 mRNA was markedly increased in the ulcerated mucosa, but this response was apparently attenuated in arthritic rats. Repeated administration of polaprezinc accelerated the healing of gastric ulcers in both normal and arthritic rats, in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was more pronounced in arthritic rats. Likewise, treatment with omeprazole also significantly promoted the healing of gastric ulcers in both normal and arthritic rats. On the other hand, rhIGF-1 significantly promoted the gastric ulcer healing in arthritic rats without any effect on that in normal rats. These results suggest that the impaired healing of chronic gastric ulcers in arthritic rats is, at least partly, accounted for by less expression of IGF-1, and the polaprezinc improves the delayed healing of gastric ulcers in arthritic rats, probably through an increase in IGF-1 production. PMID:11208487

  14. KCa1.1 inhibition attenuates fibroblast-like synoviocyte invasiveness and ameliorates rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Mark R.; Hu, Xueyou; Huq, Redwan; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Sun, Liang; Khan, Fatima S.; Laragione, Teresina; Horrigan, Frank T.; Gulko, Pércio S.; Beeton, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) participate in joint inflammation and damage during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its animal models. The purpose of this study was to define the importance of KCa1.1 (BK, Maxi-K, Slo1, KCNMA1) channel expression and function in FLS and to establish these channels as potential new targets for RA therapy. Methods We compared KCa1.1 expression levels in FLS from rats with the pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model of RA and in FLS from healthy rats. We then used ex vivo functional assays combined with siRNA-induced knock-down, over-expression, and functional modulation of KCa1.1 in PIA-FLS. Finally, we determined the effectiveness of modulating KCa1.1 in two rat models of RA, moderate PIA and severe complete Freund’s adjuvant collagen-induced arthritis (CFA-CIA). Results We found that PIA-FLS express the KCa1.1 channel as their major potassium channel, as do FLS from patients with RA. In contrast, FLS from healthy rats expressed fewer of these channels. Inhibiting the function or expression of KCa1.1 ex vivo reduced the proliferation, production of proteases, and invasive properties of PIA-FLS whereas opening native KCa1.1 or over-expressing the channel enhanced the invasiveness of both PIA-FLS and FLS isolated from healthy rats. Treatment with a KCa1.1 channel blocker starting at onset of clinical signs stopped disease progression in both PIA and CFA-CIA, reduced joint and bone damage, and inhibited FLS invasiveness and proliferation. Conclusion Our results demonstrate a critical role for KCa1.1 channels in the regulation of FLS invasiveness and suggest they represent a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25252152

  15. Effect of ethanol extract of an ayurvedic preparation (Pathyadya Churna) on arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Madhavi G.; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the anti-arthritic activity of Pathyadya Churna ethanol extract (PCE) in rats. Materials and Methods: Formaldehyde (2% v/v) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA 0.l mL) was injected in the left hind paw of male Wistar rats to develop arthritis. These rats were treated with three doses (135, 270, and 540 mg/kg) of PCE and one dose (10 mg/kg) of indomethacin. Anti-arthritic activity of the extract was assessed by noting paw volumes, rheumatoid factor (RF), blood parameters, and histological changes. Results: PCE treatment reduced paw swelling in arthritis caused by both formaldehyde and CFA. In CFA-treated rats, a significant decrease (P < 0.001) was seen in hemoglobin (13.92 g/dL to 9.97 g/dL), red blood cell count (7.32 million/mm3 to 6.58 million/mm3), and packed cell volume (44.04% to 30.56%). There were also significant (P < 0.001) elevations in white blood cell count (8220/–11,420/mm3), platelets (2.46–4.15 lakhs/mL), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (3.76–8.03/60 min), RF (7.17–26.77 IU/mL), triglycerides (71.69–96.60 mg/dL), total cholesterol (96.85–145.05 mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein (53.11–109.60 mg/dL), and very low-density lipoprotein (14.34–19.32 mg/dL). In CFA-induced arthritic rats, high-density lipoprotein decreased significantly (29.40 mg/dL to 16.13 mg/dL). Marked changes were noted in the histology of ankles. Treatment with PCE significantly reversed all these hematological and histological changes in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: PCE has a significant anti-arthritic activity in rats and is free from toxic effects. PMID:27127317

  16. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  17. Therapeutic Effect of Ficus lacor Aerial Roots of Various Fractions on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, Rakesh K.; Arora, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate antiarthritic potential and phytochemical screening of various extracts of Ficus lacor aerial roots. The antiarthritic activity was evaluated by adjuvant-induced arthritis at the dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight and the standard drug used was indomethacin. The extracts administered in higher doses reduced the lesions to a greater extent showing a dose-dependent decrease in lesions comparable with standard drug indomethacin. The extracts of FLPE and FLET showed significant increase in body weight as compared to arthritic control group as well as an increase in liver weight, a decrease in liver weight, and an increase in spleen weight in arthritis control. The extracts of FLPE and FLET showed significant decrease in WBC count, increase in hemoglobin contents, and RBC count as compared to control group. FLEA and FLCF were not able to produce a significant effect. There was significant reduction in production of IL-1 and TNF-α level between model group and control group in serum. In conclusion, we demonstrate that, at 100 mg/kg body weight, doses of FLPE and PLET extracts were highly effective in preventing and suppressing the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis. PMID:24167737

  18. Paederia foetida Linn. inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis by suppression of PGE(2) and COX-2 expression via nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Al-Abbasi, F A; Ahmed, Danish; Verma, Amita; Mujeeb, Mohd; Anwar, Firoz

    2015-05-01

    The current investigation was undertaken to determine the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Paederia foetida Linn. (PF) along with its mechanism of action when implemented in tissue protection. HPTLC was used in the identification of the compound quercetin, while in vitro analysis confirmed the significance of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action of PF. We initially demonstrated the in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of PF, evaluating it against a variety of phlogistic agents as well as turpentine oil, prostaglandin and arachidonic acid. Groups of rats, fasted overnight, were treated as follows: Group I: normal control (vehicle), Group II: PF (100 mg kg(-1)), Group III: arthritic control (CFA only, 0.05 ml), Group IV, V, VI: CFA (0.05 ml) + PF (25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) and Group VII: CFA (0.05 ml) + indomethacin (10 mg per kg b.w.). PF significantly protected against paw edema, arthritic index and body weight alteration induced by Complete Fruend's Adjuvant (CFA). Other observations, like histological and macroscopic changes, were observed in CFA induced inflammation in knee joints. Subcutaneous administration of CFA was accompanied by proinflammatory cytokine status, as appraised by the amplification of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α); oxidative stress status was estimated by the enhancement of the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the depletion of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione (GSH). Pre-treatment with PF significantly (P < 0.001) protected against CFA induced oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. More prominently, CFA administration augmented tissue and plasma superoxide (O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, while the PF pre-treatment significantly (P < 0.001) reversed all CFA induced intracellular interruption. Following CFA induced arthritis, PF was tested for its free radical scavenging activity against the DPPH and ABTS radicals

  19. Enhancement of anti arthritic effect of quercetin using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots as nanocarrier in adjuvant induced arthritic Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jeyadevi, R; Sivasudha, T; Rameshkumar, A; Ananth, D Arul; Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Kumaresan, K; Kumar, L Dinesh; Jagadeeswari, S; Renganathan, R

    2013-12-01

    In this present study, we investigated thio glycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs) as nano carrier to study the antiarthritic activity of quercetin on adjuvant induced arthritic Wistar rats. The free radical scavenging activity of QDs-QE complex was evaluated by 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion scavenging assays. Fifteen days after adjuvant induction, arthritic rats received QDs-QE complex orally at the dose of 0.2 and 0.4mg/kg daily for 3 weeks. Diclofenac sodium (DF) was used as a reference drug. Administration of QDs-QE complex showed a significant reduction in inflammation and improvement in cartilage regeneration. Treatment with QDs-QE complex significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions lipid peroxidation and showed significant (P<0.05) increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) catalase (CAT) levels in paw tissue. C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of experimental animals were also estimated. Histology of hind limb tissue in experimental groups confirmed the complete cartilage regeneration in arthritis induced rats treated with QDs-QE complex. Based on our findings, we suggest that the QDs act as nano carrier for the drugs used in the treatment of various degenerative diseases. PMID:23994749

  20. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Difficulty moving a joint (called "limited range of motion") Some types of arthritis may cause joint deformity. ... exercise). Walking is a good example. Range of motion exercises for flexibility. Strength training for muscle tone. ...

  1. Low-level laser therapy stimulates tissue repair and reduces the extracellular matrix degradation in rats with induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; de Souza Pires, Ivan Luiz; de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphological and biochemistry action of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups with 12 animals each: (AG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and (LG) group with arthritis induced in the left TMJ and treated with LLLT (830 nm, 30 mW, 3 J/cm(2)). Right TMJs in the AG group were used as noninjected control group (CG). Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 50 μl Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) and LLLT began 1 week after arthritis induction. Histopathological analysis was performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Toluidine Blue, and picrosirius. Biochemical analysis was determined by the total concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and evaluation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Statistical analysis was performed using paired and unpaired t tests, with p < 0.05. Compared to AG, LG had minor histopathological changes in the TMJ, smaller thickness of the articular disc in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001), high birefringence of collagen fibers in the anterior (p < 0.0001), middle (p < 0.0001) and posterior regions (p < 0.0001) on the articular disc, and statistically lower activity of MMP-2 latent (p < 0.0001), MMP-2 active (P = 0.02), MMP-9 latent (p < 0.0001), and MMP-9 active (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that LLLT can increase the remodeling and enhancing tissue repair in TMJ with induced arthritis. PMID:27147076

  2. Combination of coenzyme Q10 with methotrexate suppresses Freund's complete adjuvant-induced synovial inflammation with reduced hepatotoxicity in rats: Effect on oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mona K

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a cornerstone disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, possessing both anti-arthritic and hepatoprotective potential. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of CoQ10 (10mg/kg) alone and in combination with MTX (2mg/kg) on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, and to elucidate the potential properties of CoQ10 in ameliorating MTX-induced liver damage in rats. Rats were assigned to; normal, arthritic, MTX treated, CoQ10 treated or a combination of MTX and CoQ10. CoQ10 administration potentiated the antiarthritic effect of MTX. Moreover, the combination therapy was effective in attenuating the severity of MTX-induced liver damage displayed by the improvement in hepatospecific serum markers and confirmed by the histo-pathological evaluation. Additionally, it attenuated the hepatic oxidative stress and the intensity of inflammatory mediators associated with MTX administration as evident by the regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and the inhibitory effects on TNF-α and IL-6 levels. These results revealed that CoQ10 can serve as a useful adjuvant and promote the safe use of MTX in the management of arthritis, not only by potentiating the antiarthritic effect of MTX, but also by alleviating MTX-induced hepatocellular injury. PMID:25488045

  3. Cardiovascular effects of herbicides and formulated adjuvants on isolated rat aorta and heart.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yin-Ching; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Wang, Shun-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2007-06-01

    Various formulations of agricultural chemicals, including solutions, wettable powders, and emulsifiable concentrates, contain adjuvants of solvents and surfactants in addition to active ingredients. Among these formulations, herbicides are among the most commonly used pesticides globally. Some pesticides have been demonstrated to cause severe circulatory failure in poisoned humans. To clarify the potential risk of herbicides and their adjuvants influence on the cardiovascular system, four technical grade (TG) herbicides and their end products (EP), including paraquat, glyphosate, glufosinate, and atrazine, as well as their formulated adjuvants isopropylamine (IPA), polyoxyethylene alkylether sulfate (AES), ethyl acetate (EA), xylene, petrolium-170 (P-170), and solvesso-100 (S-100), were assessed to determine their effects on isolated rat aorta and heart. The results revealed that the vasorelaxation effects of the herbicide EPs exceeded those of TGs, and atrazine produced more significant vasorelaxation in rat aortas than the other herbicides tested. The formulated adjuvants of IPA did not affect the aorta; however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused significant vasorelaxation. Herbicide EPs-induced vasorelaxation was generally endothelium-dependent. Furthermore, the TG and EP of paraquat, and the TG of glufosinate and glyphosate were found to have no effect on the isolated heart. However, the normal twitch tensions of the isolated heart were significantly inhibited by EPs of glyphosate and glufosinate, and by TG and EP of atrazine. Although, the adjuvants of IPA appeared unaffected, however, AES, EA, xylene, P-170 and S-100 caused complete inhibition and contraction on the isolated hearts. These results indicated that the adjuvants of herbicides might enhance hypotension and contributed to cardiovascular disorders during intoxication. PMID:17267167

  4. Establishment of a rat model of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhu, Jialiang; Song, Keran; Hou, Shuxun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunli; Tang, Jiaguang

    2014-12-01

    To study the establishment of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint in a rat model. Complete Freund's adjuvant (experimental group) and saline (control group) were randomly injected into the right and left side of rat, respectively. The rats were killed, and degeneration of lumbar facet joint was evaluated at macroscopic level and scored based on OARSI scores system. Moreover, Interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the synovium were measured. The macroscopic scores and OARSI scores of experimental group were higher than the control group (P < 0.05). The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was significantly increased only on 3- and 7-day post-surgery when compared with controls, and interleukin-1β was increased on days 3,7 and 14 post-surgery (P < 0.05). The rat model of adjuvant can induce degeneration of the lumbar facet joint. It can be useful for studies on mechanisms and treatment of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis. PMID:24973958

  5. Ascorbic acid iontophoresis for chondral gain in rats with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Mauricio Ferraz; Cassettari, Lucas Langoni; Neves, Lais Mara Siqueira das; Oliveira, Olga Maria Mascarenhas de Faria; Marcolino, Alexandre Márcio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the cellularity and thickness of the articular cartilage of the femur in rats with arthritis after treatment with iontophoresis. METHODS: To evaluate these objectives, a histological analysis was performed on hematoxylin and eosin, where cellularity and cartilage thickness were observed and evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by manual counting by 700.09µm² area. RESULTS: The group treated with IAA had normal cellularity (40.1 cells/μm2) and maintenance of non-calcified cartilage (75.5μm), suggesting normal thickness. The non-treated group C+, on the other hand, had a lower mean number of chondrocytes (13.0μm2) (P <0.05) and, when the cartilage thickness was compared, it showed higher average thickness of calcified cartilage (104.8 mm) and lower mean of non-calcified cartilage (53.3μm) CONCLUSION: The use of iontophoresis with L-ascorbic acid by continuous electric current contributed to a quantitative gain of chondrocytes and improved the thickness distribution of calcified and non-calcified cartilage. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:25246850

  6. Inhibition of GSK-3β Alleviates Collagen II-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiyan; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Jiashun; Hu, Bailong; Fang, Xiuyi; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor is a serine/threonine kinase with an inhibitory role in glycogen synthesis, which is essential in inflammatory and immunological diseases. The purpose of our study was to determine if TDZD-8 can alleviate collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Material/Methods Twenty collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis rats were treated with selective GSK-3β inhibitor. The effects of GSK-3β inhibition on collagen II-induced rheumatoid arthritis in the rats were evaluated by paw edema, histological examination of arthritic synovium, radiographic examination of knee joint, and the level of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine. The level of cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-10, and TNF-α, was examined by Elisa. Results GSK-3β inhibitor significantly reduced the development of rheumatoid arthritis in rats. The levels of inflammation mediators such as prostaglandin E2, 5-hydroxytryptamin, and histamine were decreased in the TDZD-8 group. Serum levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α were significantly reduced in the TDZD-8 group compared with the RA group. Conclusions Treatment with GSK-3β inhibitor suppressed inflammatory response in RA rats. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSK-3β can be an effective treatment for RA. PMID:27029564

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of co-administered MF59-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic and plain 2009–10 seasonal influenza vaccines in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologicals

    PubMed Central

    Milanetti, F; Germano, V; Nisini, R; Donatelli, I; Di Martino, A; Facchini, M; Ferlito, C; Cappella, A; Crialesi, D; Caporuscio, S; Biselli, R; Rossi, F; Salemi, S; D'Amelio, R

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients under immunosuppressive therapy are particularly susceptible to infections, mainly of the respiratory tract, thus vaccination may represent a strategy to reduce their incidence in this vulnerable population. In the 2009–10 influenza season, the safety and immunogenicity of co-administered non-adjuvanted seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines were evaluated in this study in 30 RA patients under therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or Abatacept and in 13 healthy controls (HC). Patients and HC underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation before (T0), 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2) after vaccinations. No severe adverse reactions, but a significant increase in total mild side effects in patients versus HC were observed. Both influenza vaccines fulfilled the three criteria of the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Seroconversion rate for any viral strain in patients and HC was, respectively, 68 versus 45 for H1-A/Brisbane/59/07, 72 versus 81 for H3-A/Brisbane/10/07, 68 versus 54 for B/Brisbane/60/08 and 81 versus 54 for A/California/7/2009. A slight increase in activated interferon (IFN)-γ-, TNF-α- or interleukin (IL)-17A-secreting T cells at T1 compared to T0, followed by a reduction at T2 in both patients and HC, was registered. In conclusion, simultaneous administration of adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines is safe and highly immunogenic. The largely overlapping results between patients and HC, in terms of antibody response and cytokine-producing T cells, may represent further evidence for vaccine safety and immunogenicity in RA patients on biologicals. PMID:24666311

  8. The effects of opioids, local anesthetics and adjuvants on isolated pregnant rat uterine muscles.

    PubMed

    Nacitarhan, C; Sadan, G; Kayacan, N; Ertugrul, F; Arici, G; Karsli, B; Erman, M

    2007-05-01

    Local anaesthetics, opioids and adjuvants are often used for managing labor pain. Some others of these agents are reported to cause alterations on uterine contractility during labor. However, there are controversies and the effects of some others are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of opioids such as alfentanyl, meperidine, remifentanyl; local anesthetics such as mepivacaine, ropivacaine, bupivacaine; and adjuvants such as clonidine and midazolam on isolated pregnant rat uterine muscle. Strips of longitudinal uterine smooth muscle obtained from rats pregnant for 18-21 days were suspended in 20 ml organ baths. Isometric tension was continuously measured with an isometric force transducer connected to a computer-based data acquisition system. The effects of cumulative concentrations of alfentanyl, meperidine, remifentanyl, mepivacaine, ropivacaine, bupivacaine, clonidine and midazolam (10(-8) - 10(-4) M, for all) on contractions induced by oxytocin (1 mU/ml) were studied. Alfentanyl (10(-5) M), meperidine (10(-5) M), remifentanyl (10(-4) M), bupivacaine (10(-4) M), ropivacaine (10(-4) M) and midazolam (3 x 10(-5) M) caused significant decreases in contractile responses of uterine strips to oxytocin. Contrastingly, mepivacaine increased (33.1% +/- 7.2%) oxytocin-induced contractions of uterine strips while clonidine exerted no significant effect. The sensitivity of myometrial preparations to tested local anesthetics or opioids did not differ significantly. The findings of the present study demonstrated that some local anesthetics, opioids and adjuvants caused significant and agent-specific alterations on contractility of the pregnant rat myometrium. Therefore, they seemed to have a potential to influence uterine contractility during clinical management of pain during labor. However, further research is needed to extrapolate these finding to clinical practice. PMID:17609740

  9. Conditional pharmacology/toxicology V: ambivalent effects of thiocyanate upon the development and the inhibition of experimental arthritis in rats by aurothiomalate (Myocrysin®) and metallic silver.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Michael; Butters, Desley; Vernon-Roberts, Barrie

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the bizarre and contrary effects of thiocyanate, the major detoxication product of hydrogen cyanide inhaled from tobacco smoke or liberated from cyanogenic foods, e.g. cassava. Thiocyanate both (1) promotes inflammatory disease in rats and (2) facilitates the anti-inflammatory action of historic metal therapies based on gold (Au) or silver (Ag) in three models of chronic polyarthritis in rats. Low doses of nanoparticulate metallic silver (NMS) preparations, i.e. zerovalent silver (Ag°) administered orally, suppressed the mycobacterial ('adjuvant')-induced arthritis (MIA) in rats. Similar doses of cationic silver, Ag(I), administered orally as silver oxide or soluble silver salts were inactive. By contrast, NMS only inhibited the development of the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rats when thiocyanate was also co-administered in drinking water. These (a) arthritis-selective and (b) thiocyanate-inducible effects of Ag° were also observed in some previous, and now extended, studies with the classic anti-arthritic drug, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM, Myocrisin(®)) and its silver analogue (STM), administered subcutaneously to rats developing the same three forms of polyarthritis. In the absence of either Ag° or ATM, thiocyanate considerably increased the severity of the MIA, CIA and PIA, i.e. acting as a pro-pathogen. Hitherto, thiocyanate was considered relatively harmless. This may not be true in rats/people with immuno-inflammatory stress and concomitant leukocyte activation. Collectively, these findings show how the drug action of a xenobiotic might be determined by the nature (and severity) of the experimental inflammation, as an example of conditional pharmacology. They also suggest that an incipient toxicity, even of normobiotics such as thiocyanate, might likewise be modulated beneficially by well-chosen xenobiotics (drugs, nutritional supplements, etc.), i.e. conditional toxicology (Powanda 1995

  10. Metabolomics analysis of collagen-induced arthritis in rats and interventional effects of oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghong; Hu, Jinbo; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Yan; Shui, Bingjie; Ding, Zhishan; Yao, Li; Fan, Yongsheng

    2014-08-01

    A serum metabolomics method based on rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (RRLC-Q-TOF-MS) was performed for a holistic evaluation of the metabolic changes of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to assess the interventional effects of type II collagen (CII) in this model. Partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was employed to study the metabolic profiling of CIA rats and control rats. Ten metabolites, namely, 12(S)-HHTrE, 12(S)-HEPE, PGE2, TXB2, 12(S)-HETE, LysoPE(16:0), PE(O-18:0/0:0), Lyso-PE(18:2), Lyso-PE(20:4), and Lyso-PC(22:5) were identified as differential metabolites associated with the pathogenesis of CIA. These results suggested that dysregulation of the arachidonic acid (AA) and phospholipid metabolic networks is involved in the pathomechanism of CIA. Differential metabolomics and histopathological analyses demonstrated that CII inhibits the progress of arthritis. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of CII on CIA may involve regulation of the disordered AA and phospholipid metabolic networks. This metabolomics study provides new insights into the pathogenesis of arthritis and, furthermore, indicates the potential mechanism underlying the significantly increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined as a clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in arthritis patients. PMID:24814225

  11. Sustained macrophage infiltration upon multiple intra-articular injections: an improved rat model of rheumatoid arthritis for PET guided therapy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chandrupatla, Durga M S H; Weijers, Karin; Gent, Yoony Y J; de Greeuw, Inge; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Jansen, Gerrit; van der Laken, Conny J; Molthoff, Carla F M

    2015-01-01

    To widen the therapeutic window for PET guided evaluation of novel anti-RA agents, modifications were made in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Arthritis was induced in the right knee of Wistar rats with repeated boosting to prolong articular inflammation. The contralateral knee served as control. After immunization with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) in complete Freund's adjuvant and custom Bordetella pertussis antigen, one or more intra-articular (i.a.) mBSA injections were given over time in the right knee. Serum anti-mBSA antibodies, DTH response, knee thickness, motion, and synovial macrophages were analyzed and [18F]FDG(-general inflammation) and (R)-[11C]PK11195 (macrophages-)PET was performed followed by ex vivo tissue distribution. Significant anti-mBSA levels, DTH, swelling of arthritic knee, and sustained and prolonged macrophage infiltration in synovial tissue were found, especially using multiple i.a. injections. Increased [18F]FDG and (R)-[11C]PK11195 accumulation was demonstrated in arthritic knees as compared to contralateral knees, which was confirmed in ex vivo tissue distribution studies. Boosting proved advantageous for achieving a chronic model without remission. The model will offer excellent opportunities for repeated PET studies to monitor progression of disease and efficacy of novel therapeutic agents for RA in the same animal. PMID:25695087

  12. The Role of C Fibers in Spinal Microglia Induction and Possible Relation with TRPV3 Expression During Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gazerani, Sasan; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, Homa; Golabi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stimulation of peptidergic fibers activates microglia in the dorsal horn. Microglia activation causes fractalkine (FKN) release, a neuron-glia signal, which enhances pain. The transient vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) mediates the release of neuropeptides, which can subsequently activate glia. TRPV1 and TRPV2 are generally expressed on C and Aδ fibers, respectively. Expression of both proteins is upregulated during inflammation, but expression of TRPV3 after induction of inflammation is unclear. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were used in all experiments. Arthritis was induced in them by single subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in their right hindpaws. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) was used to eliminate peptidergic fibers. We examined the relation between FKN and TRPV3 expression by administration of anti-FKN antibody. Results: Our study findings indicated that 1) spinal TRPV3 was mostly expressed on nonpeptidergic fibers, 2) expression of spinal TRPV3 increased following inflammation, 3) elimination of peptidergic fibers decreased spinal TRPV3 expression, 4) alteration of hyperalgesia was compatible with TRPV3 changes in RTX-treated rat, and 5) anti-FKN antibody reduced spinal TRPV3 expression. Discussion: It seems that the hyperalgesia variation during different phases of CFA-induced arthritis correlates with spinal TRPV3 expression variation on peptidergic fibers. Moreover, spinal microglial activation during CFA inflammation is involved in TRPV3 expression changes via FKN signaling. PMID:27563416

  13. Efficacy of Mitochondrial Antioxidant Plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium Bromide (SkQ1) in the Rat Model of Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, Alexander A.; Kolosova, Nataliya G.; Stefanova, Natalia A.; Lovat, Maxim V.; Egorov, Maxim V.; Manskikh, Vasily N.; Zinovkin, Roman A.; Galkin, Ivan I.; Prikhodko, Anastasia S.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Lukashev, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common autoimmune diseases. Many antioxidants have been tested in arthritis, but their efficacy was, at best, marginal. In this study, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, plastoquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium bromide (SkQ1), was tested in vivo to prevent and cure experimental autoimmune arthritis. In conventional Wistar rats, SkQ1 completely prevented the development of clinical signs of arthritis if administered with food before induction. Further, SkQ1 significantly reduced the fraction of animals that developed clinical signs of arthritis and severity of pathological lesions if administration began immediately after induction of arthritis or at the onset of first symptoms (day 14 after induction). In specific pathogen-free Wistar rats, SkQ1 administered via gavage after induction of arthritis did not reduce the fraction of animals with arthritis but decreased the severity of lesions upon pathology examination in a dose-dependent manner. Efficacious doses of SkQ1 were in the range of 0.25–1.25 nmol/kg/day (0.13–0.7 μg/kg/day), which is much lower than doses commonly used for conventional antioxidants. SkQ1 promoted apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying its pharmacological activity. Considering its low toxicity and the wide therapeutic window, SkQ1 may be a valuable additional therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27293517

  14. Inhibition of Hippocampal Regeneration by Adjuvant Dexamethasone in Experimental Infant Rat Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bally, Lia; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes neurological sequelae in up to half of surviving patients. Neuronal damage associated with poor outcome is largely mediated by the inflammatory host response. Dexamethasone (DXM) is used as an adjuvant therapy in adult PM, but its efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in children is controversially discussed. While DXM has previously been shown to enhance hippocampal apoptosis in experimental PM, its impact on hippocampal cell proliferation is not known. This study investigated the impact of DXM on hippocampal proliferation in infant rat PM. Eleven-day-old nursing Wistar rats (n = 90) were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce experimental meningitis. Treatment with DXM or vehicle was started 18 h after infection, concomitantly with antibiotics (ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg of body weight twice a day [b.i.d.]). Clinical parameters were monitored, and the amount of cells with proliferating activity was assessed using in vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and an in vitro neurosphere culture system at 3 and 4 d postinfection. DXM significantly worsened weight loss and survival. Density of BrdU-positive cells, as an index of cells with proliferating activity, was significantly lower in DXM-treated animals compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.0001). In parallel, DXM reduced neurosphere formation as an index for stem/progenitor cell density compared to vehicle treatment (P = 0.01). Our findings provide clear evidence that DXM exerts an antiproliferative effect on the hippocampus in infant rat PM. We conclude that an impairment of regenerative hippocampal capacity should be taken into account when considering adjuvant DXM in the therapeutic regimen for PM in children. PMID:26824948

  15. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  16. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (p<0.01). Subcutaneous saline and clonidine (0.12μmol) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. The mixture of an ineffective-dose clonidine (0.12μmol) and a drug (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:26828301

  17. Adjuvant Potential of Selegiline in Attenuating Organ Dysfunction in Septic Rats with Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Jhang, Jhih-Gang; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Ka, Shuk-Man; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Liaw, Wen-Jinn

    2014-01-01

    Selegiline, an anti-Parkinson drug, has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. To explore the effect of selegiline on sepsis, we used a clinically relevant animal model of polymicrobial sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation was performed in male rats under anesthesia. Three hours after surgery, animals were randomized to receive intravenously selegiline (3 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. The administration of CLP rats with selegiline (i) increased arterial blood pressure and vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine, (ii) reduced plasma liver and kidney dysfunction, (iii) attenuated metabolic acidosis, (iv) decreased neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung, and (v) improved survival rate (from 44% to 65%), compared to those in the CLP alone rats. The CLP-induced increases of plasma interleukin-6, organ superoxide levels, and liver inducible nitric oxide synthase and caspase-3 expressions were ameliorated by selegiline treatment. In addition, the histological changes in liver and lung were significantly attenuated in the selegiline -treated CLP group compared to those in the CLP group. The improvement of organ dysfunction and survival through reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in peritonitis-induced sepsis by selegiline has potential as an adjuvant agent for critical ill. PMID:25268350

  18. Adjuvant potential of selegiline in attenuating organ dysfunction in septic rats with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Jhang, Jhih-Gang; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Ka, Shuk-Man; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Liaw, Wen-Jinn; Huang, Hsieh-Chou; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Selegiline, an anti-Parkinson drug, has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects. To explore the effect of selegiline on sepsis, we used a clinically relevant animal model of polymicrobial sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation was performed in male rats under anesthesia. Three hours after surgery, animals were randomized to receive intravenously selegiline (3 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. The administration of CLP rats with selegiline (i) increased arterial blood pressure and vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine, (ii) reduced plasma liver and kidney dysfunction, (iii) attenuated metabolic acidosis, (iv) decreased neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung, and (v) improved survival rate (from 44% to 65%), compared to those in the CLP alone rats. The CLP-induced increases of plasma interleukin-6, organ superoxide levels, and liver inducible nitric oxide synthase and caspase-3 expressions were ameliorated by selegiline treatment. In addition, the histological changes in liver and lung were significantly attenuated in the selegiline -treated CLP group compared to those in the CLP group. The improvement of organ dysfunction and survival through reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in peritonitis-induced sepsis by selegiline has potential as an adjuvant agent for critical ill. PMID:25268350

  19. Ultrastructure of pulmonary granulomatosis induced in rats by intravenous complete Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Soler, P; Bernaudin, J F; Basset, F

    1975-10-01

    Following the intravenous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, changes in the rat lung were studied with the electron microscope. Interstitial granulomas were produced and whereas on light microscopy these appeared to consist mainly of epitheloid cells, electron microscopy showed that the granulomas were largely made up of macrophages. Epithelioid cells were in fact few in number, atypical in appearance and limited to the periphery of some granulomas. Fenestrated capillaries were also found at the edge of the granulomas. The alveolar macrophages were increased in number and size but marked cytoplasmic vacuolation and a paucity of lysosomes are consistent with our previous suggestion that the phagocytic and migratory properties of these cells are weakened or inhibited. Alterations were found in both types of alveolar epithelial cell with the appearance of intermediate cell forms. PMID:171827

  20. Pulmonary gallium uptake in rats with granulomatosis induced by complete Freund adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislas-Leguern, G.; Masse, R.; Jaubert, F.; Chretien, J.; Huchon, G.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of gallium-67 uptake in lung granulomatosis, we studied 13 rats in which lung granulomatosis was induced by injection of complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) and 14 controls. Gallium uptake was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lavaged lung. The cells responsible for gallium uptake were identified by latent image activation autoradiography. Gallium activity in both lavaged lungs and bronchoalveolar cells (BAC) was higher in CFA-treated animals than in controls (172,205 +/- 134,783 DPM versus 44,456 +/- 14,486 DPM +/- SD (p less than 0.05) and 40,083 +/- 16,350 DPM versus 9100 +/- 4114 DPM (p less than 0.05), respectively). In control rats, about two-thirds of total lung gallium was located in the interstitium, whereas in CFA-treated rats it was found in the mononuclear cells of lung granulomas. Gallium tracks were more numerous in the alveolar macrophages (AM) of CFA-treated rats than in control AM (28.4 +/- 10.0/field versus 8.4 +/- 3.8/field, p less than 0.001) but the number of tracks was proportional to the number of AM (52.4 +/- 18.7 versus 12.2 +/- 4.3, respectively; p less than 0.001). It is concluded that in rats with CFA-induced lung granulomatosis 1) pulmonary gallium uptake increases, 2) mononuclear cells are responsible for this uptake in both granulomas and AM, and 3) the increased uptake is due to the increased number of mononuclear cells.

  1. [Sonic hedgehog (SHH) promotes the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts of rats with collagen-induced arthritis].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Qin, Suping; Sun, Dexu; Pan, Wei; Li, Xiangyang; Kong, Fanyun; Zhen, Kuiyang; Tang, Renxian

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of sonic hedgehog (SHH) on the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts (SFs). Methods The serum samples were collected from 30 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 30 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 30 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and 30 healthy subjects. The concentrations of serum SHH were detected by ELISA. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) were developed by type 2 collagen in Sprague-Dawley rats. The SFs were isolated from knee synovial tissues of CIA rats, and then identified by the detection of vimentin by immunofluorescence technique. Before and 72 hours after blocking SHH-glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli-1) signaling pathway with GANT61, the expression level of SHH in SFs was detected by Western blotting, and the proliferation of SFs was examined with CCK-8 assay. Results The level of serum SHH in the RA patients was remarkably higher than that in the SLE, AS patients and the healthy controls. In the CIA rats, the expression of SHH in SFs in vitro was higher than that in the healthy control rats. After 72-hour treatment of GANT61 to block SHH-Gli-1 signaling pathway, the expression level of SHH protein in SFs from CIA rats was reduced, and meanwhile the proliferation of the SFs was inhibited. Conclusion SHH plays an important role in the proliferation of SFs and could be used as a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:27126942

  2. Berberis aristata Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis by Inhibition of NF-κB and Activating Nuclear Factor-E2-related Factor 2/hem Oxygenase (HO)-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Arunraja, S

    2016-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) in formaldehyde-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Arthritis was induced by administration of either formaldehyde (2% v/v) or CFA into the subplantar surface of the hind paw of the animal. In formaldehyde-induced arthritis and AIA, treatment of BAHE at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg orally significantly decreased joint inflammation as evidenced by decrease in joint diameter and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in histopathological examination. BAHE treatment demonstrated dose-dependent improvement in the redox status of synovium (decrease in GSH, MDA, and NO levels and increase in SOD and CAT activities). The beneficial effect of BAHE was substantiated with decreased expression of inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and VEGF by immunohistochemistry analysis in AIA model. BAHE increased HO-1/Nrf-2 and suppressed NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in adjuvant immunized joint. Additionally, BAHE abrogated degrading enzymes, as there was decreased protein expression of MMP-3 and -9 in AIA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract via the mechanism of inhibition of NF-κB and activation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:27294302

  3. Effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, G W; McCall, S; Cole, B C; Radov, L A; Ward, J R; Griffiths, M M

    1993-03-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were evaluated in DA rats. Prophylactic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide suppressed the arthritis incidence, clinical inflammation, destructive bone changes, and development of anti-collagen antibody in DA rats subsequently injected with porcine type-II collagen. Therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide had a definite suppression on established CIA when started 21 days after the initial collagen injection, but the suppression was less marked than that of prophylactic treatment. Gold had no impact on CIA in DA rats when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:8213350

  4. Swertiamarin attenuates inflammation mediators via modulating NF-κB/I κB and JAK2/STAT3 transcription factors in adjuvant induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, S; Islam, V I Hairul; Babu, N Prakash; Pandikumar, P; Thirugnanasambantham, K; Chellappandian, M; Raj, C Simon Durai; Paulraj, M Gabriel; Ignacimuthu, S

    2014-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease that leads to pannus formation followed by severe joint destruction, characterized by synovial hyperplasia, inflammation and angiogenesis. Swertiamarin is a secoiridoid glycoside that is used as an anti-inflammatory compound, mainly found in Enicostema axillare (Lam) A. Raynal, a medicinal plant used in Indian system of traditional medicine. In the present study, the effect of swertiamarin was evlauated in experimental adjuvant arthritis animal model by the estimation of biochemical (paw thickness, lysosomal enzymes, and urinary degradative products) parameters, proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes along with histopathological and radiographic observations. The proteins of phosphorylated NF-κB/IκB and JAK2/STAT3 transcription factors were also quantified from experimental animals as well as LPS induced RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. In in silico analysis, swertiamarin was docked with proinflammatory enzymes to confirm its potential. The administration of swertiamarin (2, 5, 10mg/kg bw) significantly (P⩽0.05) inhibited the levels of paw thickness, lysosomal enzymes and increased the body weight of experimental animals in a dose dependent manner. In molecular analysis, the treatment decreased the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL1, TNF, IL-6) and proangiogenic enzymes (MMPs, iNOS, PGE2, PPARγ and COX-2); and also significantly (P⩽0.05) increased the levels of antiinflammatory proteins (IL-10, IL-4) when compared to the disease groups. The swertiamarin treatment significantly (P⩽0.05) inhibited the release of NF-κB p65, p-IκBα, p-JAK2 and p-STAT3 signaling proteins levels on both experimental animals and LPS induced cells. Histopathological and radiological analysis evidenced the curative effect of swertiamarin on bone destruction. The docking studies of swertiamarin on proinflammatory enzymes supported the results from the in vivo experiments. Thus the swertiamarin inhibited

  5. Effect of Bizhongxiao decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF levels in collagen-induced arthritis in rat synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic autoimmune disease, affects sufferers in many different ways. Treatment of this chronic condition is particularly challenging. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) provides alternatives. Bizhongxiao decoction (BZX) is a TCM complex, which has been used clinically for many years to treat RA. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae on IL-1 and TNF-1 levels in rats with RA, and to elucidate its mechanism of action. Methods Ninety healthy normal female SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal (control), model, BZX decoction, and the three dismantled formulae (I: heat-clearing and detoxication, II: dissipating dampness, and III: blood circulation promotion). Apart from the normal (control) group, the rats in each group were injected subcutaneously with bovine type II collagen and complete Freund adjuvant to establish a collagen-induced arthritis model, so that inhibition of foot swelling in the rats by BZX decoction and its dismantled formulae could be observed. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF in synovial joints at various time points. Results Twenty-one days after the model was established, the levels of TNF and IL-1 were significantly higher in the model group, BZX decoction group and dismantled formula groups I, II and III than in the normal controls (P < 0.05). The levels of these cytokines were significantly higher in the model group than the BZX decoction or the three dismantled formula groups (P <0.01). At longer times, the TNF and IL-1 levels in model group rose gradually; those in the BZX decoction and dismantled formula groups were gradually reduced. The cytokine levels in the BZX decoction group were lower than in the three dismantled formula groups and continued to decline. Conclusions BZX decoction and the three dismantled formulae examined down-regulated the inflammatory

  6. Increased translocation of Escherichia coli and development of arthritis in vitamin A-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, U; Hanson, L A; Bremell, T; Kahu, H; Dahlgren, U I

    1995-01-01

    We studied the immune response and the colonization pattern in vitamin A-deficient rats that were colonized with the Escherichia coli O6 K13 pOmp 21 strain, which is genetically manipulated to produce ovalbumin and to be resistant to ampicillin. In the vitamin A-deficient rats, the number of bacteria per gram of feces was about five times higher than in the paired fed control rats 4 weeks after colonization. In the control rats, the colon and the lower part of the ileum were colonized, while in the vitamin A-deficient rats all parts of the small intestine, as well as the colon, were heavily inhabited by bacteria. Furthermore, in 75% of the vitamin A-deficient rats, the E. coli bacteria were found in the mesenteric lymph nodes, and in 50% of the rats E. coli were found in the kidneys. These animals also developed severe arthritis. The levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, IgE, and biliary IgA antibodies against the bacterial antigens were significantly higher in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the control rats. The number of IgA-producing cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine was significantly lower in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the control rats; however, there was an increase in the number of CD8+ cells and transforming growth factor beta-producing cells in the lamina propria of the vitamin A-deficient rats. Disturbances in T-cell function were demonstrated, since spleen cells from the vitamin A-deficient rats produced more gamma interferon and interleukin-2 in vitro than control spleen cells. In summary, vitamin A deficiency led to a decrease in the ability to control the localization of intestinal bacteria and an increase in translocation, which was followed by development of arthritis regardless of substantial levels of antibacterial antibodies. The bacterial invasion made the animals hyperresponsive to the bacterial antigens, despite the fact that vitamin A deficiency is normally associated with suppressed antibody production

  7. Photodynamic therapy using talaporfin sodium for synovial membrane from rheumatoid arthritis patients and collagen-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Eiji; Kageyama, Yasunori; Kohno, Eiji; Hirano, Toru; Koide, Yukio; Terakawa, Susumu; Nagano, Akira

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium as a new method of synovectomy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We first used RA synovial membrane (RASM) for in vitro and in vivo study. The RASM was obtained from patients with RA during total knee replacement. In the in vitro study, RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RASCs) obtained from the RASM were examined by fluorescent microscopy to measure the intracellular localization of talaporfin sodium. The cells were then subjected to PDT, and their viability was examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium inner salt assay. In the in vivo assay, RASM was obtained as described above, grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and subjected to PDT. The damaged area of RASM was evaluated histologically at 1 day after PDT. Next, we performed a separate experiment using rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). After intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium, the concentration of talaporfin sodium accumulated in the CIA synovial membrane (CIASM) was compared with that in cartilage, periarticular muscle, and skin. We then performed PDT with intra-articular injection of talaporfin sodium and intra-articular irradiation. The damaged area of the CIASM was measured at 1 day after the PDT, and the articular histological and radiological changes of the ankle were observed at 56 days after the PDT. In RASM, talaporfin sodium accumulated in lysosomes in vitro, and the phototoxicity to RASCs in vitro and to RASM grafted onto SCID mice in vivo depended on the concentration of talaporfin sodium and the laser energy. In CIA rats, there was a greater accumulation of talaporfin sodium in the CIASM than in normal tissue. The CIASM was selectively damaged at 1 day after the PDT, and the bone and cartilage destruction were ameliorated at 56 days after the PDT. In conclusion, PDT using talaporfin sodium might be a new method for

  8. Immunosuppressive activity of BCG: effects of adjuvant disease, lymphocyte subpopulations, and homing of thoracic duct cells in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, R I; Spadaro-Antonelli, M A; Lawrence, V J; Quagliata, F

    1979-01-01

    Administration of BCG by various dosage schedules suppressed adjuvant disease in rats. BCG administration produced an initial increase, followed by a depression, of the phytohemagglutinin response of purified blood lymphocytes. An increase in absolute and relative numbers of bursa-equivalent (B)-cells followed BCG administration, concurrent with a decrease in the phytohemagglutinin responsiveness. With adjuvant alone, there was a diminution in phytohemagglutinin response and an increase in number of B-cells; the latter occurred immediately after adjuvant injection and also when the generalized disease appeared. When both BCG and adjvant were present, parallel increases of phytohemagglutinin responsiveness and B-cell numbers resulted. The pattern of tissue localization of radioactively labeled thoracic duct cells from normal or BCG-treated donors given to normal, BCG-treated, adjuvant-injected, and BCG-treated + adjuvant-injected syngeneic recipients indicated significantly greater homing to the thymus and decreased localization to the bone marrow when BCG had been given to either donors or recipients. When labeled thymus cells were used, only the decreased bone marrow localization was noted. These observations suggest that the suppressive effect of BCG may be mediated through modification of the lymphocyte recirculation pattern, possibly resulting from alterations in lymphocyte recognition sites. PMID:383618

  9. Oh rats! Fever, rash and arthritis in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carina M; Tsai, Gary; Sanchez-Flores, Xavi

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with worsening right-sided hip and low back pain for 2 days. She had also experienced intermittent fevers and a recurring maculopapular rash over the past 2 weeks. Social history revealed the presence of three domestic rats living in the girl's home. Blood cultures returned positive for Streptobacillus moniliformis, the causative agent of rat-bite fever. Rat-bite fever often goes undiagnosed, as the clinical presentation is non-specific. Untreated, the infection can result in death due to sepsis or endocarditis. The bacterium is generally susceptible to penicillin antibiotics with full clinical recovery when treated in a timely and appropriate manner. After 4 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, our patient fully recovered without long-term sequelae. PMID:26701936

  10. Therapeutic effects of estradiol benzoate on development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in the Lewis rat are mediated via suppression of the humoral response against denatured collagen type II (CII)

    PubMed Central

    WAKSMAN, Y.; HOD, I.; FRIEDMAN, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the development of anti-CII antibodies and their pathogenic potential were studied during the progress of established CIA in the rat. CIA was induced in mature female Lewis rats by two subcutaneous inoculations containing bovine native CII (BCIIn), emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Clinical arthritis fully developed by day 18 and then EB (1 mg/kg body wt per day, diluted in corn oil (CO)) was administered intramuscularly every second day thereafter. Antibodies binding four different CIIs (bovine or rat, either native or heat-denatured) were detected in sera and joint tissue extracts by means of solid-phase ELISA. Pharmacological doses of EB (>0·2 mg/kg body wt per day) caused significant remission of established CIA 5-7 days after treatment, and selectively suppressed the production of antibodies specific for denatured CII. To evaluate the arthritogenic potential of circulating anti-CIId IgG, transfer experiments were performed. IgG anti-CIIn, purified from EB-treated CIA rats, was not arthritogenic, whereas IgG anti-denatured (CIId), purified from CO-treated CIA rats, caused severe passive arthritis. Furthermore, pretreatment with rat CIId protected against subsequent induction of CIA, and this protection was associated with suppressed antibody production against CIId. Collectively, our results indicate that antibodies specific for CIId are involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, and that oestrogen-related remission of clinical arthritis may be caused by a selective suppression of antibodies produced against degraded/denatured CII. PMID:8608634

  11. Effect of adjuvants on the action of local anesthetics in isolated rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S.; Hough, Karen A.; Gebhart, G.F.; Williams, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing clinical use of adjuvant drugs to prolong the duration of local anesthetic-induced block of peripheral nerves. However, the mechanistic understanding regarding drug interactions between these compounds in the periphery is quite limited. Accordingly, we undertook this study to determine whether selected adjuvants are efficacious in blocking action potential propagation in peripheral nerves at concentrations used clinically, and whether these drugs influence peripheral nerve block produced by local anesthetics. Methods Isolated rat sciatic nerves were used to assess (1) the efficacy of buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, or midazolam, alone and in combination, on action potential propagation; and (2) their influence on the blocking actions of local anesthetics ropivacaine and lidocaine. Compound action potentials (CAPs) from A- and C-fibers were studied before and after drug application. Results At estimated clinical concentrations, neither buprenorphine nor dexamethasone affected either A- or C-waves of the CAP. Clonidine produced a small, but significant attenuation of the C-wave amplitude. Midazolam attenuated both A- and C-wave amplitudes, but with greater potency on the C-wave. The combination of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone had no influence on the potency or duration of local anesthetic- or midazolam-induced block of A-and C-waves of the CAP. Conclusions These results suggest that the reported clinical efficacy of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone influence the actions of local anesthetics via indirect mechanisms. Further identification of these indirect mechanisms may enable the development of novel approaches to achieve longer duration, modality-specific peripheral nerve block. PMID:22430023

  12. Differential Anti-inflammatory Activity of HDAC Inhibitors in Human Macrophages and Rat Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, Thomas J; Cotterell, Adam; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Vesey, David A; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2016-02-01

    Vorinostat and other inhibitors of different histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes are currently being sought to modulate a variety of human conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Some HDAC inhibitors are anti-inflammatory in rodent models of arthritis and colitis, usually at cytotoxic doses that may cause side effects. Here, we investigate the dose-dependent pro- and anti-inflammatory efficacy of two known inhibitors of multiple HDACs, vorinostat and BML281, in human macrophages and in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis by monitoring effects on disease progression, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Both HDAC inhibitors differentially modulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine release from human macrophages, suppressing release of some inflammatory mediators (IL12p40, IL6) at low concentrations (<3 µM) but amplifying production of others (TNF, IL1β) at higher concentration (>3 μΜ). This trend translated in vivo to rat arthritis, with anti-inflammatory activity inversely correlating with dose. Both compounds were efficacious only at a low dose (1 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.), whereas a higher dose (5 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.) showed no positive effects on reducing pathology, even showing signs of exacerbating disease. These striking effects suggest a smaller therapeutic window than previously reported for HDAC inhibition in experimental arthritis. The findings support new investigations into repurposing HDAC inhibitors for anti-inflammatory therapeutic applications. However, HDAC inhibitors should be reinvestigated at lower, rather than higher, doses for enhanced efficacy in chronic diseases that require long-term treatment, with careful management of efficacy and long-term safety. PMID:26660228

  13. Promising potential of new generation translocator protein tracers providing enhanced contrast of arthritis imaging by positron emission tomography in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of and subsequent monitoring of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could benefit from detection of (sub)clinical synovitis. Imaging of (sub)clinical arthritis by targeting the translocator protein (TSPO) on activated macrophages is feasible using (R)-[11C] PK11195-based positron emission tomography (PET), but clinical applications are limited by background uptake in peri-articular bone/bone marrow. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two other TSPO ligands with potentially lower background uptake in neurological studies, [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714, in a rat model of arthritis. Methods TSPO binding of DPA-713, DPA-714 and PK11195 were assessed by in vitro competition studies with [3H]DPA-713 using human macrophage THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In vivo studies were performed in rats with methylated bovine serum albumin-induced knee arthritis. Immunohistochemistry with anti-TSPO antibody was performed on paraffin-embedded sections. Rats were imaged with [11C]DPA-713 or [18F]DPA-714 PET, followed by ex vivo tissue distribution studies. Results were compared with those obtained with the tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195, the established ligand for TSPO. Results In THP-1 cells, relative TSPO binding of DPA-713 and DPA-714 were 7-fold and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in PK11195. Comparable results were observed in CD14+ monocytes from healthy volunteers. In the arthritis rat model, immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of TSPO-positive inflammatory cells in the arthritic knee. PET images showed that uptake of [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 in arthritic knees was significantly increased compared with contralateral knees and knees of normal rats. Uptake in arthritic knees could be largely blocked by an excess of PK11195. [11C]DPA-713 and [18F]DPA-714 provided improved contrast compared with (R)-[11C]PK11195, as was shown by significantly higher arthritic knee-to-bone ratios of [11C]DPA-713 (1.60

  14. Reactivation of arthritis induced by small bowel bacterial overgrowth in rats: role of cytokines, bacteria, and bacterial polymers.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, S N; Wang, J; Sartor, R B; Zhang, C; Bender, D; Dalldorf, F G; Schwab, J H

    1995-06-01

    Arthritis is often associated with intestinal diseases, but the etiology is not known. We developed a rat model whereby arthritis was reactivated by experimental small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO). Self-limited monoarticular arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of 2 micrograms of rhamnose peptidoglycan-polysaccharide derived from group A streptococci into the ankle joints in female Lewis rats. Eleven days after intra-articular injection, when swelling was resolving, experimental SBBO induced by surgical creation of jejunal self-filling blind loops reactivated arthritis, but SBBO induced by creation of self-emptying blind loops, which minimally increases luminal bacteria, and sham operation did not (P < 0.001). Increased joint diameters in rats with self-filling blind loops persisted for at least 56 days after surgery. Reactivation of arthritis due to SBBO was prevented by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antiserum and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (P < 0.001), indicating that these cytokines mediate joint swelling secondary to intestinal injury. Recombinant bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, an agent which neutralizes endotoxin, and metronidazole, which is active against anaerobic bacteria, prevented arthritis (P < 0.001), but polymyxin B (which also neutralizes endotoxin) and gentamicin had no effect. Mutanolysin, an enzyme which degrades peptidoglycan-polysaccharide from group A streptococci, exacerbated arthritis for the first 6 days but then diminished joint swelling from 12 to 21 days after surgery (P < 0.001). These studies introduce a reproducible animal model of reactivation of arthritis secondary to intestinal injury and demonstrate a role for bacterial products from endogenous enteric organisms. PMID:7768612

  15. Triphala herbal extract suppresses inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and adjuvant-induced arthritic rats via inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, Mahaboob Khan

    2016-07-01

    This study sought to explore the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of triphala in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, triphala (100-300 μg/ml) significantly suppressed production of inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VEGF, NO, PGE2), intracellular free radicals and release of lysosomal enzymes (e.g. acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D) in a dose-related manner. With triphala, mRNA levels of genes for pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1, inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 enzymes and NF-κBp65 were down-regulated in the stimulated cells; in contrast, there was up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Western blot analyses revealed that triphala suppressed the protein expression of NF-κB p65 and p-NF-κB p65 in the stimulated cells, which subsequently reduced over-expression of TNFα, IL-17, iNOS and COX-2 in a manner similar to that observed with BAY 11-7082, an IκB kinase inhibitor. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed inhibition of p-NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and COX-2 protein expression caused by triphala. Consistent with these findings, the animal studies presented confirmed that triphala exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model by reducing of inflammatory mediator (e.g. IL-17, COX-2 and RANKL) expression via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Taken together, the results here demonstrated that triphala has potential anti-inflammatory applications that could be used for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27438966

  16. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A.; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  17. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  18. Low-level light therapy for zymosan-induced arthritis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Dai, Tianhong; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Cohen, Richard; Apruzzese, William A.; Smotrich, Michael H.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) can ameliorate the pain, swelling and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. Light is absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and/or cyclic AMP production and consequent gene transcription via activation of transcription factors. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT in medicine, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed animal models designed to objectively quantify response to LLLT and compare different light delivery regimens. In the arthritis model we inject zymosan into rat knee joints to induce inflammatory arthritis. We have compared illumination regimens consisting of a high and low fluence (3 J/cm2 and 30 J/cm2), delivered at a high and low irradiance (5 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2) using 810-nm laser light daily for 5 days, with the effect of conventional corticosteroid (dexamethasone) therapy. Results indicated that illumination with 810-nm laser is highly effective (almost as good as dexamethasone) at reducing swelling and that longer illumination time was more important in determining effectiveness than either total fluence delivered or irradiance. Experiments carried out using 810-nm LLLT on excisional wound healing in mice also confirmed the importance of longer illumination times. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT.

  19. Evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A as an immune adjuvant for photodynamic therapy in a rat sarcoma model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment option for several forms of human cancer, and like traditional chemotherapy and ionizing radiation therapy, PDT alone is not curative for some cases. Recent efforts have aimed at developing strategies for adjuvant therapy for PDT. Given the nature of PDT-mediated cell damage, immunotherapy is a promising adjuvant for long-term control of solid tumors. A candidate immune stimulant for use with PDT is monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA), a non-toxic fraction of the endotoxin molecule. The hypothesis is that adjuvant MLA immunotherapy with PDT will improve local tumor control and prevent growth of subsequently implanted tumor cells when compared to PDT alone. To date, no significant differences in circulating leukocyte populations or tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations have been identified in 9L tumor-bearing F344 rats after systemic administrations of MLA. Likewise, no significant difference has been identified in local tumor control following PDT of 9L tumors with or without adjuvant MLA. Further results are pending.

  20. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  1. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  2. MicroRNA-26a negatively regulates toll-like receptor 3 expression of rat macrophages and ameliorates pristane induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal toll-like receptor (TLR)3 signaling plays an indispensable role in pathogenesis of both experimental and human rheumatoid arthritis, and microRNAs (miRNAs) might orchestrate this signaling pathway. This study was performed to determine the relationship between miR-26a and TLR3 in rat macrophages and to observe effects of miR-26a mimic on pristane induced arthritis (PIA) in rats. Methods Dual luciferase reporter assay was used to validate the direct interaction between miR-26a (a candidate miRNA to target tlr3 mRNA) and tlr3 3′UTR. MiR-26a regulation on TLR3 gene expression was determined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting after miR-26a mimics and inhibitors were transfected into rat macrophage line NR8383 cells. Poly I:C (TLR3 ligand) was used to trigger TLR3 activation, and mRNA expression of its downstream cytokines interferon (ifn)-β and tumor necrosis factor (tnf)-α was accordingly detected to determine the regulation of TLR3 signaling. Expressions of TLR3 and miR-26a were detected during rat bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDM) induction, in pristane stimulated NR8383 cells and spleens from methotrexate (MTX) treated PIA rats. A miR-26a mimic was administrated intraperitoneally to PIA rats, and arthritis severity was evaluated by macroscopic or microscopic observations. Results Direct target relationship between miR-26a and tlr3 mRNA in rats was confirmed. Modifications of miR-26a function by transfection of miR-26a mimics and inhibitors exhibited corresponding repression and augmentation of TLR3 and its signaling downstream cytokine expressions in NR8383 cells. The alteration of miR-26a expression was negatively related with TLR3 expression during BMDM induction, in pristane-primed NR8383 cells and PIA rat spleens. Moreover, both abnormal expressions were rescued in MTX treated arthritis rat spleens. The miR-26a mimic treatment displayed the depression of TLR3 expression and ameliorated the disease severity in the rats with pristane

  3. Involvement of DDAH/ADMA pathway in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Meng; Xia, Jing; Zhou, Ting; Yuan, Qiong; Zhang, Wei-Fang; Hu, Chang-Ping; Li, Yuan-Jian; Jiang, Jun-Lin

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the early stage of atherosclerosis, which is typically associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, is not only an independent predictor for endothelial dysfunction but also a proinflammatory mediator. It has been shown that the level of ADMA was elevated in patients with RA. In the present study, we investigated the potential effect of ADMA on inflammation process in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model and primary cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) exposed to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In CIA rats, the plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 were markedly increased, while the plasma levels of ADMA did not increase. The expression of dimethylarginine dimethylohydrolase2 (DDAH2), the key enzyme for ADMA degradation, was markedly reduced in inflamed joint synovium of CIA rats. Moreover, the expression of anti-inflammatory factor cortistatin (CST) was markedly decreased in joint synovium of CIA rats. Treatment of cultured FLS with TNF-α significantly increased the levels of ADMA, and decreased the expression of DDAH2 mRNA and protein accompany with an increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 and a reduction in the expression of CST mRNA and protein, and the effects of TNF-α were abolished by DDAH2 overexpression. Treatment of FLS with ADMA also significantly increased the levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and reduced the expression of CST. These findings suggest that DDAH/ADMA participates in the pathogenesis of RA, and that the effect of DDAH/ADMA may be mediated by CST. PMID:23619555

  4. Cytokine production in arthritis susceptible and resistant rats: a study with arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic Lactobacillus cell walls.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2001-02-01

    The basis of the different susceptibility to bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis between Lewis and Fischer rats is unclear. Likewise, it is not known why cell walls of some species of Lactobacillus are arthritogenic and those of others are not. With these two questions in mind, we investigated the role of anti-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4) and proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1 beta) cytokines in Lewis and Fischer rats injected intraperitoneally with cell walls from arthritogenic or nonarthritogenic species of Lactobacillus. Cytokine levels in the serum and in vitro production by peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were studied. The results obtained indicate that the differences in the production of IL-10, IL-4, TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta do not explain the difference in the arthritis susceptibility between Lewis and Fischer rats. Likewise, the arthritogenicity of different Lactobacillus cell walls appears not to be dependent on their capacity to stimulate cytokine production. PMID:11169216

  5. Applying refinement to the use of mice and rats in rheumatoid arthritis research.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Penny; Armstrong, Rachel; Boden, Tania; Garside, Paul; Knight, Katherine; Lilley, Elliot; Seed, Michael; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Richard O

    2015-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a painful, chronic disorder and there is currently an unmet need for effective therapies that will benefit a wide range of patients. The research and development process for therapies and treatments currently involves in vivo studies, which have the potential to cause discomfort, pain or distress. This Working Group report focuses on identifying causes of suffering within commonly used mouse and rat 'models' of RA, describing practical refinements to help reduce suffering and improve welfare without compromising the scientific objectives. The report also discusses other, relevant topics including identifying and minimising sources of variation within in vivo RA studies, the potential to provide pain relief including analgesia, welfare assessment, humane endpoints, reporting standards and the potential to replace animals in RA research. PMID:26168847

  6. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naive, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of

  7. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naïve, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire® profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan® analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our

  8. Effects and mechanisms of vitamin A and vitamin E on the levels of serum leptin and other related cytokines in rats with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XIONG, RI-BO; LI, QING; WAN, WEI-REN; GUO, JIN-QIANG; LUO, BING-DE; GAN, LU

    2014-01-01

    Leptin has been identified as an important cytokine in the inflammatory networks of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Higher serum leptin levels may accelerate the development of RA. This study aimed to examine the effects of vitamin A (VitA) and vitamin E (VitE) on the levels of leptin and other related experimental and clinical indices, and to explore the mechanisms of these effects through the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction pathway in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA model rats were established by the intradermal injection of bovine type II collagen emulsified in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, followed by a booster intradermal injection. Four weeks later, the CIA model rats were treated with 42.86 μg retinol equivalents/kg body weight (b.w.) VitA or 200 mg/kg b.w. VitE for four weeks. The levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-4, C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatic factor were measured by ELISA using commercial kits, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was determined. In addition, the expression levels of phosphorylated (p)-STAT1, p-STAT3 and leptin in the synovium were evaluated by western blot analysis. The results indicated that VitA and VitE significantly reduced the levels of leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 and CRP and the ESR and significantly increased the levels of IL-10 compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, significantly reduced p-STAT3 protein expression levels were observed in the VitA and VitE groups. In conclusion, VitA and VitE reduced the levels of serum leptin protein and other cytokines. Furthermore, VitA and VitE also reduced the p-STAT3 protein levels. The present study may provide a novel approach for the treatment of RA. PMID:25009608

  9. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tian-shen; Du, Zhong-heng; Li, Zhi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Huang, Ka-te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  10. Enhanced activity of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) in mesenteric but not epididymal fat correlates with higher production of epinephrine in mesenteric adipocytes in rat model of cachectic rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stofkova, Andrea; Krskova, Katarina; Vaculin, Simon; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Cachectic rheumatoid arthritis, the less frequent form of the disease, is associated with loss of fat mass and often more severe course of the disease. Its experimental model represents rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) characterized by edema, lack of appetite, sharp body weight and fat loss. As individual fat depots display functional differences, here we studied lipolytic activity and sensitivity to lipolytic stimuli of nodeless epididymal fat (eWAT) and perinodal mesenteric fat (mWAT) depots at the peak of AA. We also examined changes in catecholamine and cytokine levels involved in lipolysis in plasma and/or isolated adipocytes from both WATs to identify the contribution of local, adipocyte-based processes and/or systemic events to adiposity loss in cachectic rheumatoid arthritis. AA was induced to male Lewis rats by complete Freund's adjuvant. Groups of ad libitum-fed and pair-fed controls were used to distinguish the effects of food restriction from inflammation-induced cachexia. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and its phosphorylated form (pHSL) were analyzed by western blot. CRP and catecholamine levels in plasma or adipocyte lysates were determined using ELISA kits. Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1/CXCL1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and leptin in adipocyte lysate were analyzed by quantitative protein microarray. Plasma glycerol and FFA were measured spectrophotometrically. AA rats developed severe cachexia, with lower adiposity in mWAT compared to normal and pair-fed controls, whereas in eWAT the adiposity was similarly reduced in AA and pair-fed groups. ATGL levels in both WATs were not affected by AA or pair feeding. AA upregulated levels of HSL, pHSL and pHSL/HSL ratio in mWAT, whereas none of these parameters has changed in eWAT of AA rats or in either WATs of pair-fed rats. In AA rats plasma glycerol was elevated, whereas FFA concentration was reduced. Plasma

  11. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  12. The adjuvant effect of stearyl tyrosine on a recombinant subunit hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Nixon-George, A; Moran, T; Dionne, G; Penney, C L; Lafleur, D; Bona, C A

    1990-06-15

    We describe the enhancement of the antibody response against hepatitis B surface Ag by octadecyl L-tyrosine, a synthetic adjuvant designed to exert its adjuvant effect in a manner similar to that of alum because it binds soluble Ag and releases it slowly from the site of injection. Our data demonstrate that octadecyl L-tyrosine showed a significant enhancement of the antihepatitis B surface Ag response compared to that of alum in the secondary response. The most striking difference between octadecyl L-tyrosine and alum in the antihepatitis B surface Ag antibody response was the absence of IgE-specific antibodies subsequent to immunization of the Ag in octadecyl L-tyrosine. Both the optical isomers of the octadecyl esters of tyrosine were adjuvant active, however, the racemic mixture showed a significantly lowe adjuvant activity. This adjuvant has great potential to be used in humans because it is devoid of side effects as assessed by the lack of acute and chronic toxicity in mice and rats, pyrogenicity in rabbits, formation of granuloma in cats, and adjuvant arthritis in rats. PMID:2351829

  13. Finemapping of the arthritis QTL Pia7 reveals co-localization with Oia2 and the APLEC locus.

    PubMed

    Rintisch, C; Kelkka, T; Norin, U; Lorentzen, J C; Olofsson, P; Holmdahl, R

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the effect of the quantitative trait locus Pia7 on arthritis severity. The regulatory locus derived from the arthritis-resistant E3 rat strain was introgressed into the arthritis-susceptibility DA strain through continuous backcrossing. Congenic rats were studied for their susceptibility to experimental arthritis using pristane and adjuvant oil. In addition, cell number and function of various leukocyte populations were analyzed either under naive or stimulated conditions. We found that the minimal congenic fragment of DA.E3-Pia7 rats overlapped with the minimal fragment in DA.PVG-Oia2 congenic rats, which has been positionally cloned to the antigen-presenting lectin-like receptor complex (APLEC) genes. DA.E3-Pia7 congenic rats were protected from both PIA and OIA, but the protection was more pronounced in OIA. In adoptive transfer experiments we observed that the Pia7 locus controlled the priming of arthritogenic T cells and not the effector phase. In addition, Pia7 congenic rats had a significant higher frequency of B cells and granulocytes as well as TNFalpha production after stimulation, indicating a higher activation state of cells of the innate immune system. In conclusion, this study shows that the APLEC locus is a major locus regulating the severity of experimentally induced arthritis in rats. PMID:20200546

  14. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071). PMID:26175002

  15. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound, suppresses pro-inflammatory mediators and RANKL expression via modulating NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are inhabitant mesenchymal cells of synovial joints and have been recognized to play an imperative role in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking these pathological roles of FLS provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment for RA. A recent study had confirmed that majoon ushba (MU), a polyherbal unani compound, possesses anti-arthritic effects in in vivo. Toward this direction, an effort has been made to understand the effect of MU on FLS derived from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Here, we observed that MU administration (100-300 µg/ml) significantly inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 protein similar to that of the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in NFкB signaling pathway and suppressed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in MAPKs signaling pathway in AIA-FLS. In addition, the protein expression of TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and iNOS was also found reduced. MU treatment significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-17, iNOS, and COX-2), transcription factors (NFкB-p65 and AP-1), and RANKL and attenuated the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 (ELISA) in AIA-FLS. Furthermore, MU treatment significantly inhibited the level of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes release, and glycoproteins and increased antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase and catalase) in AIA-FLS. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that MU possesses anti-inflammatory effect against AIA-FLS through the decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators expression by suppressing NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:27067226

  16. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  17. Correlation of some in vitro and in vivo investigations in rats sensitized with complete Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Kalafut, F; Novotná, L

    1977-01-01

    The survival of peripheral blood lymphocytes following 24 hours of incubation with PPD, migration of peritoneal exudate cells from capillary tubes in the presence or absence of specific antigen in culture medium were investigated at different time intervals after sensitization with complete Freund's adjuvant. Relative regional lymph node weights and enlargement indices were evaluated in all animals. Furthermore, total leucocyte counts and differential counts of different cell types were determined. A correlation between the parameters studied was found, especially between the migration of peritoneal exudate cells and the survival of blood lymphocytes. The kinetic changes in the regional lymph node weights in sensitized animals in relation to those of IFA injected animals can be considered specifically affected. Increasing numbers of peripheral blood leucocytes after sensitization with complete Freud's adjuvant and the finding of increased numbers of monocytes and eosinophils in the initial stages of the observations have been reported in the literature. The results are discussed in relation to problems of tuberculin skin hypersensitivity in ratswhich has long been contradictory in the literature. PMID:885281

  18. Effects of Libby amphibole exposure on two models of arthritis in the Lewis rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggest that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing venniculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The collagen induced arthriti...

  19. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  20. Collagen-induced arthritis in the BB rat. Prevention of disease by treatment with CTLA-4-Ig.

    PubMed Central

    Knoerzer, D B; Karr, R W; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1995-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cell activation requires two independent signalling events, one mediated through T cell receptor engagement by the antigen-presenting cell-expressed peptide/class II major histocompatibility complex, and the second through the cognate interactions of costimulatory molecules expressed on the T cell and antigen-presenting cell. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental systems suggesting that the CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway is crucial for induction of maximal T cell proliferation and T helper-B cell collaboration for IgG production. This pathway can be blocked by CTLA-4-Ig, a soluble form of CTLA-4 which binds with high avidity to the CD28 ligands, B7-1 and B7-2. Here, we show that CTLA-4-Ig treatment prevents clinical and histological manifestations of disease in a collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis in the diabetes resistant BB/Wor rat, when therapy is initiated before immunization with bovine type II collagen (BIIC). Anti-BIIC antibody titers are reduced in CTLA-4-Ig-treated rats compared to diseased control animals. Histologically, joints from CTLA-4-Ig-treated animals show no histological abnormalities, in contrast to control antibody-treated animals, which show complete erosion of the articular cartilage and bone. Despite the efficacy of CTLA-4-Ig in preventing clinical and histological signs of arthritis and reducing antibody responses to BIIC, delayed type hypersensitivity responses to collagen 18 d or more after CTLA-4-Ig treatment ends are similar in CTLA-4-Ig-treated and untreated rats, suggesting that the prolonged disease suppression observed does not result from induction of T cell anergy. Images PMID:7543497

  1. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  2. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S.; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  3. Chronic arthritis induced in rats by cell wall fragments of Eubacterium species from the human intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Severijnen, A J; van Kleef, R; Hazenberg, M P; van de Merwe, J P

    1990-01-01

    To investigate arthritis-inducing properties of Eubacterium species, which are major residents of the human intestinal flora, cell wall fragments (CWF) of several Eubacterium strains were prepared and tested in an animal model. After a single intraperitoneal injection in the rat, CWF of E. aerofaciens, E. contortum, and E. lentum induced a chronic polyarthritis. E. limosum and E. tortuosum CWF induced an acute self-limiting joint inflammation, whereas E. rectale CWF failed to do so. The rhamnose contents of the isolated CWF were not related to their arthritis-inducing properties. Paradoxically, the sensitivity of CWF to lysozyme digestion, which is regarded as a parameter for the clearance of CWF in tissues, appeared to be positively correlated with the ability of Eubacterium CWF to induce chronic joint inflammation. Our findings show the diversity in arthritis-inducing properties among different species of the anaerobic genus Eubacterium and underline the importance of the anaerobic intestinal flora in the induction of joint inflammation. Images PMID:2298490

  4. Influence of decontamination on induction of arthritis in Lewis rats by cell wall fragments of Eubacterium aerofaciens. Arthropathic properties of indigenous anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kool, J; Severijnen, A J; Klasen, I S; Gerrits-Boeye, M Y; Hazenberg, M P

    1992-01-01

    Although the cause (or causes) of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, many workers have suggested that microorganisms play a part. The intestinal flora in particular has been related to the development of joint inflammation. It has been shown previously that cell wall fragments of several anaerobic Gram positive intestinal bacteria of human origin are arthritogenic after a single intraperitoneal injection in Lewis rats. The part played by indigenous microflora in this model has now been studied by decontaminating Lewis rats before the injection of Eubacterium aerofaciens cell wall fragments. The pattern and severity of arthritis appeared to be comparable in decontaminated and control rats. The second goal of this work was to isolate arthritogenic bacteria from the autochthonous intestinal flora of rats. Only a limited number of bacteria showing a resemblance to arthritogenic strains from human intestinal flora (i.e. E aerofaciens and Bifidobacterium adolescentis) could be isolated. These strains did not induce chronic arthritis after intraperitoneal injection. This may explain why spontaneous arthritis did not develop in Lewis rats. Images PMID:1586251

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  6. Effects of RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Y.-Y.; Li, Y.-F.; Xu, M.; Li, W.-Y.; Yang, M.; Li, R.-L.

    2015-01-01

    RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses antigout, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperuricemic properties based on the traditional conceptions. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PRP15 in rat gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the present study, we found that treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg) in rats with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals significantly attenuated the knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and the elevated expressions of nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in synovial tissues were significantly inhibited, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) result showed that MSU-induced high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in synovial fluid were reduced by treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg). We conclude that RPP15 may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and its activity of antigout may be partially related to inhibiting TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and NF-κB p65 expression in the synovial tissues. PMID:26221174

  7. Interstitial nephritis in rats produced by E. coli in adjuvant: immunological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, J E

    1977-01-01

    An increased incidence and severity of interstitial nephritis was produced in F344/fmai rats immunized with E. coli 022 in pertussis vaccine for 12-15 months. Migration of peritoneal exudate cells from immunized animals was inhibited by syngeneic kidney antigens. One out of twenty-eight immunized animals developed anti-TBM antibodies. In this model, interstitial nephritis develops in association with cell-mediated immunity to kidney tissue. PMID:342152

  8. A pure polysaccharide from Ephedra sinica treating on arthritis and inhibiting cytokines expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuhong; Shu, Zunpeng; Xing, Na; Xu, Bingqing; Wang, Changfu; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, we found that the acidic polysaccharides of Ephedra sinica had immunosuppressive effect to treat rheumatoid arthritis and the pure polysaccharide ESP-B4 was the main composition of the acidic polysaccharides. At present, the exact molecular mechanism of ESP-B4 on treating arthritis is unclear. We are thus evaluating the properties of ESP-B4 on LPS-induced THP-1 pro-monocytic cells and adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats via TLR4. In vitro, ESP-B4 decreased the production of cytokines induced by LPS. In addition, ESP-B4 reduced the LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB. Pretreatment with ESP-B4 significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of MAPKs induced by LPS. Furthermore, in vivo, after 12 days of disease induced by adjuvant, rats were treated with ESP-B4 for 16 days. ESP-B4 significantly improved all parameters of inflammation. ESP-B4 reduced the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines by inhibiting the TLR4 signaling pathway to treat rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26835987

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  10. Effect and mechanism of AR-6 in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-xue; Li, Yun-man; Fang, Wei-rong; Cheng, Peng; Liu, Lifang; Li, Fengwen

    2010-06-01

    The root of Clematis chinensis Osbeck has been used widely in rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine and AR-6 is a triterpene saponin isolated from it. In this present study, we investigated in vivo effects of oral AR-6 in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) and in vitro effect in macrophage and synoviocytes cells. Arthritic scores and serum inflammatory mediators were evaluated 19 days after AA induction by endermic injection of Freund's complete adjuvant in Sprague-Dawley(S-D) rats. Oral administration of AR-6 to arthritic rats resulted in a clear decrease of clinical signs compared to untreated controls. The synoviocyte and macrophage response ex vivo were then analyzed. Anti-arthritic effects of AR-6 correlated with significant decrease of NO and TNF-alpha produced by peritoneal macrophages, ex vivo and in vitro. AR-6 also significant decreased the proliferation of synoviocyte. These data indicate that AR-6 is a potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic and preventive agent. PMID:19842015

  11. EGFP gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    JING, XIANG-XIANG; LIU, JIE; YANG, BING-ANG; FU, SHAO-QING; WU, TANG-NA; WANG, DONG-LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of enhancing green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. An optimal SonoVue dose was determined using 40 normal rats categorized into five groups according to the various doses of microbubbles used. At 1 week after ultrasound irradiation, the rats were sacrificed. Damage to the joint synovial tissues was observed with hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining under a microscope. A further 44 normal rats were used to establish a rat model of RA, and were then categorized into four groups: EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP, microbubbles + EGFP and ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP. The last group was irradiated with ultrasound for 10 min following the injection of 300 μl SonoVue and 10 μg EGFP into the joint cavity. Rats were sacrificed after 3 days and synovial tissue was collected from the knee joints for observation of EGFP with fluorescence microscopy and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGFP expression was observed in the synovial tissues of all groups. However, high EGFP expression levels were observed in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in the EGFP expression levels between the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups. However, EGFP expression levels in the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups significantly differed (P<0.05) from that in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. Therefore, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction improved EGFP transfection efficiency into the joint synovial tissues of rats with RA. PMID:24940446

  12. Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

  13. Pathogenesis of Lactobacillus casei-induced polyarthritis in Lewis rats: 2. Time related changes in organ weights and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; O'Byrne, E M; Blancuzzi, V; Schlosser, M; Borman, C H; DiPasquale, G

    1993-01-01

    Hepatic enzymes and organ weights were measured in LEW/N female rats during the acute and the chronic phases of L. casei-induced arthritis on day 3 and days 30 and 59, respectively. In the acute phase, day 3, adrenal and spleen weights were increased and thymus weights were decreased in L. casei arthritic rats as compared to normal control rats. Adrenal, liver, kidney, spleen and thymus weights of arthritic rats were in the normal range on days 30 and 59. Liver cytochrome P450, aminopyrine N-demethylase and analine hydroxylase were reduced in livers of L. casei-treated rats on day 3 as compared to normal controls. On days 30 and 59 hepatic enzymes in L. casei-arthritic rats were in the normal range. Unlike adjuvant arthritis in which changes in liver enzymes alter drug metabolism; after the acute onset of L. casei-induced arthritis, hepatic enzymes return to the normal range. PMID:8273567

  14. Histopathologic effects of a low molecular weight heparin on bone healing in rats: a promising adjuvant in dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Mehmet Numan; Oken, Ozdamar Fuad; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Ucaner, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of short-term prophylactic dose of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) drug on the bone healing process in an animal model simulating the osteotomy obtained in dacryocystorhinostomy. METHODS Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into 2 groups. Subcutaneous injections of enoxaparin 1 mg/kg (enoxaparin-treated group) and saline solution (control group) were performed once daily for 4d, beginning on the first preoperative day. The osteotomy was created at the femoral diaphysis in all animals by using a Kirschner wire. Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups depending on the timing of the second operation, 14 or 21d following initial osteotomy. Patent osteotomy area on the second and the third weeks in each group were calculated by using a computer software on digital micrographs. RESULTS The patent osteotomy areas at the second and the third weeks were significantly larger in the enoxaparin-treated group than those of the control group (P<0.001 for each time-period). In the control group, the patent osteotomy area at the third week of healing was significantly smaller than that of the second week (P=0.003), whereas there was no significant difference between these two measurements in the enoxaparin-treated group (P=0.185). CONCLUSION Short-term administration of enoxaparin resultes in a significant alteration in bone healing at 14 and 21d after injury. LMWHs can be regarded as promising alternative adjuvants in dacryocystorhinostomy after being evaluated with further clinical and animal studies. PMID:27366684

  15. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  16. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  17. Reactive nitrogen species scavenging, rather than nitric oxide inhibition, protects from articular cartilage damage in rat zymosan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Brain, Susan D; Greenacre, Stan; Jerônimo, Selma Maria Bezerra; de Melo, Liana Batista; Keeble, Julie; da Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (PN) to inflammation in a zymosan-induced (1 mg, intra-articular, i.art.) rat model of arthritis was assessed by histopathology and by measuring the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the articular cartilage. Progression of the chronic synovitis in zymosan-induced arthritis (ZYA) was associated with increased nitrite and nitrotyrosine (3-NT) levels in the joint exudates that paralleled a progressive loss of the GAG content. An increase in 3-NT was also observed after i.art. PN. The nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (25–75 mg kg−1day−1) or the selective inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (50–100 mg kg−1day−1) given 1 h before (prophylactic) or 3 days after (therapeutic) injection of the zymosan ameliorated the synovitis, but worsened the GAG loss, as measured at the end of the experiment (day 7). The PN scavenger uric acid (100–250 mg kg−1 i.p. four times daily) given prophylactically until the end of the experiment (day 14), in a dose compatible with its PN scavenging activity, significantly decreased both the synovitis and the GAG loss. In conclusion, PN formation is associated with cartilage damage in addition to proinflammatory activity in ZYA. NOS inhibitors and a PN scavenger were able to reduce the cellular infiltration, while displaying opposite effects on cartilage homeostasis either by enhancing or ameliorating the damage, respectively. PMID:14662723

  18. Characterisation of the rat oesophagus epithelium antigens defined by the so-called 'antikeratin antibodies', specific for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Girbal, E; Sebbag, M; Gomès-Daudrix, V; Simon, M; Vincent, C; Serre, G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--An attempt was made to characterise the antigens recognised by serum IgG antibodies directed to the stratum corneum of rat oesophagus epithelium, the so-called 'antikeratin antibodies', which were shown to be highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and thus to have an actual diagnostic value. METHODS--Immunoblotting was performed with RA serum samples on different extracts of rat oesophagus epithelium separated by various monodimensional and two dimensional electrophoreses. RESULTS--Three low-salt-soluble antigens sensitive to proteinase K and, therefore, of protein nature were identified. Two proteins, with apparent molecular masses of 210 and 120-90 kilodaltons, shared isoelectric points ranging from 5.8 to 8.5; the third protein exhibited isoelectric points from 4.5 to 7.2 while its molecular mass ranged from 130 to 60 kilodaltons. Immunoadsorption of RA serum samples onto cytokeratins extracted from the stratum corneum of rat oesophagus epithelium did not change their immunoreactivity towards the three antigenic proteins. Widely used deglycosylation and dephosphorylation methods failed to modify either the electrophoretic migration of the proteins or their immunoreactivity with RA serum samples. CONCLUSION--The so-called 'antikeratin antibodies' do not react with cytokeratins. They specifically recognise three late epithelial differentiation proteins which had not been previously described. These proteins may be related to (pro)filaggrin. Images PMID:7504913

  19. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26690894

  20. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII. PMID:16759146

  1. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  2. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  3. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cao-Xin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Kou, Jian-Qun; Xu, Yin-Li; Wang, Shu-Zhi; Zhu, Qi; Yang, Lu; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis. PMID:25767552

  4. Suppression of Inflammation and Arthritis by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao-Xin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Kou, Jian-Qun; Xu, Yin-Li; Wang, Shu-Zhi; Zhu, Qi; Yang, Lu; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxin (CTX) from Naja naja atra venom (NNAV) reportedly had analgesic effect in animal models but its role in inflammation and arthritis was unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic actions of orally administered CTX-IV isolated from NNAV on rodent models of inflammation and adjuvant arthritis. CTX had significant anti-inflammatory effects in models of egg white induced nonspecific inflammation, filter paper induced rat granuloma formation, and capillary osmosis tests. CTX significantly reduced the swelling of paw induced by egg white, the inflammatory exudation, and the formation of granulomas. CTX reduced the swelling of paw, the AA clinical scores, and pathological alterations of joint. CTX significantly decreased the number of the CD4 T cells and inhibited the expression of relevant proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-6. CTX significantly inhibited the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and reduced the level of p-STAT3 in FLS. These results suggest that CTX inhibits inflammation and inflammatory pain and adjuvant-induced arthritis. CTX may be a novel therapeutic drug for treatment of arthritis. PMID:25767552

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  6. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  7. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund’s complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins’ expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA. PMID:27508035

  8. Relationship between PI3K pathway and angiogenesis in CIA rat synovium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lin; Zhang, Guichun; Liu, Lifeng; Chen, Chen; Cao, Xuecheng; Cai, Jinfang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the synovium of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) joint, and whether the PI3K pathway regulates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis or not. A randomized controlled according to the principle of the rats were divided into normal control group (10 rats) and the experimental group (40 rats). The experimental group rats were established as type II collagen plus adjuvant Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis model. HIF-1α and VEGF proteins' expression in serum of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by ELISA. Microvessel density (MVD) in synovial tissue of CIA rats group and normal control group were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. The protein expression of PTEN, PI3K, and AKT in synovial tissue were detected by Western Blot. Compared with normal control group, toes and ankle swelling and arthritis index (AI) of CIA rat increased, and the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α proteins in peripheral serum increased, IHC showed that MVD was significantly higher than that of the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Western Blot results showed that PI3K and AKT proteins expression in CIA synovial tissue of rats increased, while the expression of PTEN protein decreased. Correlation analysis showed that VEGF and HIF-1 levels in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with arthritis index (AI); the contents of HIF-1α and VEGF in the peripheral serum of CIA rats were positively correlated with MVD in synovium tissue. The CIA rat model regulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in peripheral serum by PI3K signaling pathway, and then regulated neovascularization in RA. PMID:27508035

  9. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  10. Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics of etanercept, rheumatoid arthritis biologics, after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Yo; Kwon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Min-Soo; Baek, In-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    Etanercept was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010 as a biologic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of etanercept after intravenous and subcutaneous injection in rats. The plasma concentration of etanercept was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intravenous and subcutaneous administration of 2 mg/kg of etanercept to rats showed that etanercept was slowly absorbed (time to reach the peak drug concentration [T max] = 1.60 days, bioavailability [F] = 47.18 %) and slowly eliminated (half-life [t 1/2], 2.33 days after intravenous administration and 3.31 days after subcutaneous administration). The area under the curve values on day 13 (AUC13day) were 121.25 ± 14.37 and 48.56 ± 6.78 μg day/mL after intravenous and subcutaneous administration, respectively. A two-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics (V max = 94.28 µg/day; K m = 10.88 µg/mL) was used to describe the pharmacokinetic profile of etanercept. Our results describe the pharmacokinetic profile of etanercept, and these results could be used for the development of etanercept biosimilars. PMID:25725773

  11. Long-Term Effects of (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) on Pristane-Induced Arthritis (PIA) in Female Dark Agouti Rats.

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, Anna; Bäcker, Ingo; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian; Lange, Franziska; Flemmig, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-a widespread chronic inflammatory disease in industrialized countries-is characterized by a persistent and progressive joint destruction. The chronic pro-inflammatory state results from a mutual activation of the innate and the adaptive immune system, while the exact pathogenesis mechanism is still under discussion. New data suggest a role of the innate immune system and especially polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils) not only during onset and the destructive phase of RA but also at the chronification of the disease. Thereby the enzymatic activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a peroxidase strongly abundant in neutrophils, may be important: While its peroxidase activity is known to contribute to cartilage destruction at later stages of RA the almost MPO-specific oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is also discussed for certain anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we used pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in Dark Agouti rats as a model for the chronic course of RA in man. We were able to shown that a specific detection of the HOCl-producing MPO activity provides a sensitive new marker to evaluate the actual systemic inflammatory status which is only partially detectable by the evaluation of clinical symptoms (joint swelling and redness measurements). Moreover, we evaluated the long-term pharmacological effect of the well-known anti-inflammatory flavonoid epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Thereby only upon early and continuous oral application of this polyphenol the arthritic symptoms were considerably diminished both in the acute and in the chronic phase of the disease. The obtained results were comparable to the treatment control (application of methotrexate, MTX). As revealed by stopped-flow kinetic measurements, EGCG may regenerate the HOCl-production of MPO which is known to be impaired at chronic inflammatory diseases like RA. It can be speculated that this MPO activity-promoting effect of EGCG may contribute to the

  12. Anti-arthritic effects of magnolol in human interleukin 1β-stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes and in a rat arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyh-Horng; Shih, Kao-Shang; Liou, Jing-Ping; Wu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Anita Shin-Yuan; Wang, Kang-Li; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) play an important role in the pathologic processes of destructive arthritis by producing a number of catabolic cytokines and metalloproteinases (MMPs). The expression of these mediators is controlled at the transcriptional level. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of magnolol (5,5'-Diallyl-biphenyl-2,2'-diol), the major bioactive component of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, by examining its inhibitory effects on inflammatory mediator secretion and the NF-κB and AP-1 activation pathways and to investigate its therapeutic effects on the development of arthritis in a rat model. The in vitro anti-arthritic activity of magnolol was tested on interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated FLS by measuring levels of IL-6, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by ELISA and RT-PCR. Further studies on how magnolol inhibits IL-1β-stimulated cytokine expression were performed using Western blots, reporter gene assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and confocal microscope analysis. The in vivo anti-arthritic effects of magnolol were evaluated in a Mycobacterium butyricum-induced arthritis model in rats. Magnolol markedly inhibited IL-1β (10 ng/mL)-induced cytokine expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5-25 µg/mL). In clarifying the mechanisms involved, magnolol was found to inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of the IKK/IκB/NF-κB and MAPKs pathways by suppressing the nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of both transcription factors. In the animal model, magnolol (100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced serum cytokine levels. Our results demonstrate that magnolol inhibits the development of arthritis, suggesting that it might provide a new therapeutic approach to inflammatory arthritis diseases. PMID:22359588

  13. Combined treatment with low dose prednisone and escin improves the anti-arthritic effect in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuan; Song, Yanqin; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Menglin; Fu, Fenghua

    2016-02-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating whether low dose oral prednisone combined with escin could inhibit the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in SD rats began day 1 for 28 days. Prednisone at doses of 2, 10 mg/kg/day alone or escin at doses of 5, 10 mg/kg/day alone, or prednisone at dose of 2 mg/kg/day with escin at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg/day were given to different groups of rats intragastrically from day 13 to 28 respectively. Paw swelling, arthritic index, histological and radiographic changes were assessed to evaluate the anti-arthritic effect. Weight growth, spleen and thymus indexes were also calculated. Serum samples were collected for estimation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Rats developed erosive arthritis of the hind paw when immunized with adjuvant. Prednisone 2 mg/kg combined with escin 5 or 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited the paw swelling. Histopathological and radiographic analysis showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration, synovial hyperplasia and bone erosion by combination therapy, which also markedly suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). No significant changes were found in monotherapy group except prednisone 10 mg/kg group. Furthermore, combined treatment rescued some of GCs' adverse effects evidenced by increase in body weight and decrease in index of spleen compared with untreated AIA rats. In conclusion, the combination therapy possessed synergistic anti-arthritic efficacy and reduced adverse effect, which may play a role in the management of human RA. PMID:26773773

  14. Hesperidin inhibits collagen-induced arthritis possibly through suppression of free radical load and reduction in neutrophil activation and infiltration.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Kumar, Anubhav; Sajad, Mir; Zargan, Jamil; Ansari, Meraj; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Khan, Haider A

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone in a chronic phase. Pathology of rheumatoid arthritis suggests autoimmunity linked to inflammation. In our study, rheumatoid arthritis was induced in Wistar rats by intradermal injections of 100 μl of emulsion containing bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail. Disease developed about 13 ± 1 days after immunization and treatment with hesperidin (HES) at a dose of 160 mg kg(-1) body weight was given after onset of disease daily until 20th day. The effect of treatment in the rats was monitored by clinical scoring, biochemical parameters and histological evaluations in joints. A steady increase in the articular elastase, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation was observed in joints of arthritic rats as compared to control, whereas a significant decrease in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase was observed in collagen-induced arthritis rats as compared to control group. The results from the present work indicate that the treatment with hesperidin was effective in bringing about significant changes on all the parameters studied in collagen-induced arthritis rats. These data confirm that erosive destruction of the joint cartilage in collagen-induced arthritis is due free radicals released by activated neutrophils and produced by other biochemical pathways. In the present study, an attempt has been made to amelioration of the disease process by a natural product. These results suggest that oral administration of HES could be effective for treating human RA patients. PMID:22527139

  15. Efficacy of an immunotoxin to folate receptor beta in the intra-articular treatment of antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We previously demonstrated that synovial sublining macrophages express folate receptor beta (FRβ). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular administration of a recombinant immunotoxin to FRβ for treating rat antigen-induced arthritis. Methods A monoclonal antibody (mAb) to rat FRβ was produced by immunizing mice with B300-19 cells (murine pre-B cells) transfected with the rat FRβ gene. Recombinant immunotoxin was prepared by conjugating the Fv portion of the anti-rat FRβ mAb heavy chain with a truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin A and the Fv portion of the anti-rat FRβ mAb light chain. Antigen-induced arthritis was induced through intra-articular injection of methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) after two subcutaneous injections of mBSA and complete Freund's adjuvant. Immunotoxin was intra-articularly injected into the arthritis joint every other day for seven days after arthritis onset. Joint swelling was measured and histological scores of inflammation, synovial thickness, cartilage, and bone destruction were determined. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect osteoclast and osteoclast precursor FRβ-expressing macrophages and cathepsin K-positive cells on day 21. Results Intra-articular administration of the immunotoxin attenuated joint swelling (61% suppression; P < 0.01 compared to the control on day 21) and improved histological findings, particularly cartilage and bone destruction (scores of rats treated with control versus the immunotoxin: 2.2 versus 0.5; P < 0.01), by reducing the number of FRβ-expressing macrophages and cathepsin K-positive cells. Conclusions Intra-articular administration of an immunotoxin to FRβ is effective for improving rat antigen-induced arthritis. PMID:22551402

  16. Evaluation of the novel folate receptor ligand [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate for macrophage targeting in a rat model of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Detection of (subclinical) synovitis is relevant for both early diagnosis and monitoring of therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previously, the potential of imaging (sub)clinical arthritis was demonstrated by targeting the translocator protein in activated macrophages using (R)-[11C]PK11195 and positron emission tomography (PET). Images, however, also showed significant peri-articular background activity. The folate receptor (FR)-β is a potential alternative target for imaging activated macrophages. Therefore, the PET tracer [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate was synthesized and evaluated in both in vitro and ex vivo studies using a methylated BSA induced arthritis model. Methods [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate was synthesized in a two-step procedure. Relative binding affinities of non-radioactive fluoro-PEG-folate, folic acid and naturally circulating 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-Me-THF) to FR were determined using KB cells with high expression of FR. Both in vivo [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate PET and ex vivo tissue distribution studies were performed in arthritic and normal rats and results were compared with those of the established macrophage tracer (R)-[11C]PK11195. Results [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate was synthesized with a purity >97%, a yield of 300 to 1,700 MBq and a specific activity between 40 and 70 GBq/µmol. Relative in vitro binding affinity for FR of F-PEG-folate was 1.8-fold lower than that of folic acid, but 3-fold higher than that of 5-Me-THF. In the rat model, [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate uptake in arthritic knees was increased compared with both contralateral knees and knees of normal rats. Uptake in arthritic knees could be blocked by an excess of glucosamine-folate, consistent with [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate being specifically bound to FR. Arthritic knee-to-bone and arthritic knee-to-blood ratios of [18F]fluoro-PEG-folate were increased compared with those of (R)-[11C]PK11195. Reduction of 5-Me-THF levels in rat plasma to those mimicking human levels increased absolute

  17. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  18. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  19. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene Y.; Chi, Howard H.; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1l) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-γ in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1l) rats secreted high levels of IFN-γ much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-β was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-γ, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:18276192

  20. 5-HT2CR blockade in the amygdala conveys analgesic efficacy to SSRIs in a rat model of arthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain, including arthritic pain, has a negative affective component and is often associated with anxiety and depression. However, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) show limited effectiveness in pain. The amygdala plays a key role in the emotional-affective component of pain, pain modulation and affective disorders. Neuroplasticity in the basolateral and central amygdala (BLA and CeA, respectively) correlate positively with pain behaviors. Evidence suggests that serotonin receptor subtype 5-HT2CR in the amygdala contributes critically to anxiogenic behavior and anxiety disorders. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HT2CR in the amygdala accounts for the limited effectiveness of SSRIs in reducing pain behaviors and that 5-HT2CR blockade in the amygdala renders SSRIs effective. Results Nocifensive reflexes, vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior were measured in adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Behavioral experiments were done in sham controls and in rats with arthritis induced by kaolin/carrageenan injections into one knee joint. Rats received a systemic (i.p.) administration of an SSRI (fluvoxamine, 30 mg/kg) or vehicle (sterile saline) and stereotaxic application of a selective 5-HT2CR antagonist (SB242084, 10 μM) or vehicle (ACSF) into BLA or CeA by microdialysis. Compared to shams, arthritic rats showed decreased hindlimb withdrawal thresholds (increased reflexes), increased duration of audible and ultrasonic vocalizations, and decreased open-arm choices in the elevated plus maze test suggesting anxiety-like behavior. Fluvoxamine (i.p.) or SB242084 (intra-BLA) alone had no significant effect, but their combination inhibited the pain-related increase of vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior without affecting spinal reflexes. SB242084 applied into the CeA in combination with systemic fluvoxamine had no effect on vocalizations and spinal reflexes. Conclusions The data suggest that 5-HT2CR in the amygdala

  1. Anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity of a cytotoxic protein NN-32 from Indian spectacle cobra (Naja naja) venom in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Antony; Datta, Poulami; Das, Tanaya; Biswas, Ajoy Kumar; Gomes, Aparna

    2014-11-01

    The anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity of NN-32, a cytotoxic protein from Indian spectacle cobra snake (Naja naja) venom has been studied in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis and carrageenan induced anti inflammatory model. NN-32 treatment showed significant decrease in physical and urinary parameters, serum enzymes, serum cytokines levels as compared to arthritic control group of rats. NN-32 treatment recovered carrageenan induced inflammation as compared to control group of rats. The findings showed that the cytotoxic protein NN-32 shares anti arthritic and anti inflammatory activity and thus NN-32 may target complex pathophysiological processes like cancer- arthritis-inflammation. PMID:25026566

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  3. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 μg, 100 μg and 150 μg) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 μg) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to

  4. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  5. Oxidative changes in the blood and serum albumin differentiate rats with monoarthritis and polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Adelar; Silveira, Sandra Silva; Castro-Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Oliveira, Márcia Rosângela Neves; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis in rats, as rheumatoid arthritis in humans, may be of greater or lesser severity, namely polyarthritis and monoarthritis, respectively. The present study was planned to evaluate the oxidative changes in the blood and specifically in the serum albumin of rats with adjuvant-induced mono- and poly-arthritis. Total antioxidant capacity, thiols, carbonyl groups, albumin, uric acid and ascorbic acid were measured in the total serum. The specific oxidative status of albumin was also measured after separation by affinity chromatography. All serum oxidative parameters were close to normal in monoarthritic rats with the exception of the ascorbic acid concentration, which was 23 % lower, and albumin carbonyl groups, which were 64 % higher. Many modifications were found in polyarthritic rats, specially the ascorbic acid concentration (35 % lower) and albumin carbonyl groups (102 % higher). The results revealed that the levels of ascorbic acid in the serum and carbonyl groups in the albumin molecule can be regarded as indicators of the severity of arthritis since they were modified by both monoarthritis and polyarthritis, but to different degrees. PMID:26835218

  6. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  7. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Mingqing; Zhang, Yuqin; Li, Huang; Zheng, Haiyin; Yu, Lishuang; Chu, Kedan; Lin, Yu; Chen, Lidian

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑8, tumor necrosis factor‑α and nuclear factor‑κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE‑treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  8. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  10. Arthritis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour massage will be donated to the Arthritis Foundation! Jingle Bell Run Join us for the nation's ... a cure! Answers When You Need Them Arthritis Foundation licensed social workers provide 24/7 assistance on ...

  11. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  12. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan- or Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Edema and Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C.; Vasko, Michael R.; Duarte, Djane B.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of inflammation are used to assess the production of inflammatory mediators at sites of inflammation, the anti-inflammatory properties of agents such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the efficacy of putative analgesic compounds to reverse cutaneous hypersensitivity. This protocol details methods to elicit and measure carrageenan- and complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Due to possible differences between the dorsal root sensory system and the trigeminal sensory system, injections of either the footpad or vibrissal pad are described. In this manner, cutaneous inflammation can be assessed in tissue innervated by the lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons (footpad) and by the trigeminal ganglion neurons (vibrissal pad). PMID:22382999

  13. Models of Inflammation: Carrageenan- or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-Induced Edema and Hypersensitivity in the Rat.

    PubMed

    McCarson, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of inflammation are used to assess the production of inflammatory mediators at sites of inflammation, the processing of pain sensation at CNS sites, the anti-inflammatory properties of agents such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the efficacy of putative analgesic compounds in reversing cutaneous hypersensitivity. Detailed in this unit are methods to elicit and measure carrageenan- and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced cutaneous inflammation. Due to possible differences between the dorsal root sensory system and the trigeminal sensory system, injections into either the footpad or vibrissal pad are described. In this manner, cutaneous inflammation can be assessed in tissue innervated by the lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons (footpad) or by the trigeminal ganglion neurons (vibrissal pad). PMID:26331888

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats. PMID:26989428

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats. PMID:26989428

  16. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  17. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  18. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  19. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm fruit pulp fixed ethyl acetate extract on zymosan-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Francisco Fábio Bezerra; de Araújo, Joana Cláudia Bezerra; Pereira, Anamaria Falcão; Brito, Gerly Anne Castro; Gondim, Delane Viana; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Vale, Mariana Lima

    2015-11-01

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fruit pulp of Caryocar coriaceum Wittm (Caryocaraceae), popularly known as pequi, has wide applications in popular medicine. Preclinical tests have demonstrated the therapeutic properties of the oil. We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Pequi C. coriaceum Wittm ethyl acetate extract (PCCO) on zymosan-induced arthritis in rat knee joint. The animals were pretreated with PCCO for 7 consecutive days or with a single dose. Paw elevation time (PET), leukocyte infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) and cytokine levels were assessed 4h after zymosan injection. Synovial tissue was harvested for immunohistochemical analysis, edema and vascular permeability. We observed a significant decrease in PET with PCCO pretreatment. PCCO showed a significant reduction of leukocyte migration and a decrease in MPO. Decreases were observed in cytokine release in the synovial fluid and TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-1 immunostaining in synovial tissue. Edema was inhibited by treatment with all doses of PCCO. The data suggest that PCCO exerts antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects on arthritis in rats. PMID:26341615

  20. Efficacy of GM6001 as an adjuvant to ceftriaxone in a neonatal rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Han, Qizheng

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis; therefore, MMP inhibitors may be a neuroprotective treatment for brain injury caused by meningitis because of their antiinflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 in a rat model of S. pneumoniae meningitis. For these experiments, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an uninfected group, meningitis group, antibiotic group and GM6001+antibiotic group. Uninfected animals were sham infected with sterile saline. Rats in the other three groups were inoculated with S. pneumoniae and left untreated, treated with ceftriaxone, or treated with ceftriaxone combined with GM6001. Rats in the meningitis group were severely ill, and MMP-9 was significantly up-regulated. The change in brain water content was consistent with the MMP-9 level. A significant loss of neurons and impaired learning function were observed in the meningitis group. Treatment with the antibiotic and GM6001 significantly down-regulated the level of MMP-9, decreased the brain water content, attenuated neuronal injury and improved learning. Conclusions: GM6001 protected the brain from damage caused by S. pneumoniae, and this effect may occur via downregulating MMP-9 and decreasing brain water content. PMID:25576979

  1. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  2. Wax D of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in Buffalo rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Semba, I; Hirayama, Y; Koga, T; Nagao, S; Takada, H

    1998-12-01

    A suspension of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in liquid paraffin has been reported to induce foot swelling accompanied by new bone formation in Buffalo (BUF) rats, which are low responders to the induction of adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we found that wax D, a mycobacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragment-arabinogalactan-mycolic acid complex, was an effective component of this bacterium for the induction of osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in BUF rats. Chronic inflammation was produced in BUF rats by a single subcutaneous injection of wax D suspended in liquid paraffin. Other Mycobacterium species and Gordona bronchialis were also capable of inducing this reaction. Other bacterial cells including the acid-fast bacteria Nocardia and Rhodococcus, purified cell walls and peptidoglycans from Lactobacillus plantarum, wax C, cord factor, arabinogalactan and mycolic acid prepared from M. tuberculosis were inactive in this respect. In addition, when wax D was administered as a water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's type adjuvant), bone formation scarcely occurred in BUF rats. In Fisher (F344) and Wistar rats, both of which are responder strains to adjuvant arthritis, wax D in liquid paraffin did not induce bone formation. PMID:9879920

  3. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol produces a marked peripheral action in intensifying and prolonging analgesia in response to local dorsal cutaneous noxious pinprick in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Pan, He-Jia; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epinephrine as additive for propranolol as an infiltrative anesthetic. Using a rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR), we tested the effect of co-administration of epinephrine with propranolol on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Bupivacaine, a long-lasting local anesthetic, was used as control. Subcutaneous propranolol and bupivacaine elicited a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [2.05 (1.95-2.21) μmol/kg]>propranolol [9.21 (9.08-9.42) μmol/kg] (P<0.01 for each comparison). Subcutaneous epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. Mixtures of epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) with drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95, respectively, intensified and prolonged drug action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of combined drugs (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED95 with epinephrine (0.012 μmol/kg) exhibited no cutaneous analgesia. We concluded that propranolol was less potent but produced a similar duration of action when compared to bupivacaine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Epinephrine as adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine enhanced the potency and extended the duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. PMID:24973696

  4. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  5. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kou-Zhu; Liu, Yan-Li; Gu, Jin-Hua; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV) in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg), the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg), and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg) were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg) significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23634171

  6. Integration of efficacy, pharmacokinetic and safety assessment of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in a preclinical model of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zuurmond, Anne-Marie; Koudijs, Angela; van El, Benno; Doornbos, Robert P; van Manen-Vernooij, Babs C T; Bastiaans, Jacqueline H M W; Penninks, André H; van Bilsen, Jolanda H M; Cnubben, Nicole H P; Degroot, Jeroen

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of a drug are likely influenced by the disease state of a patient. In this study, we investigated the influence of arthritic processes on pharmacokinetics and immunotoxicity of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Anakinra) in the rat adjuvant arthritis model. Anakinra dose-dependently suppressed joint inflammation and degradation as demonstrated by reduced clinical arthritis score, paw thickness, synovial infiltration and bone degradation. In addition, plasma levels of chemokines MCP-1 and GRO/KC were reduced. Pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by disease state of the rats as judged from a decrease in C(max) and an increase of the MRT as the disease progressed at a dose of 24 and 72 mg Anakinra/kg body weight. The pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose-dependently, but non-proportionally with increasing dose. Low level anti-Anakinra antibody formation was observed at prolonged exposure to the biologic. Safety parameters, including haematology, splenic lymphocyte subset analysis, ex vivo stimulation of spleen cells and histopathology of immune system organs were affected by the disease itself to such extent that no additional effects of Anakinra could be observed. In conclusion, we demonstrated that pharmacokinetic behaviour of Anakinra was influenced by the arthritis background of the rats resulting in decreased internal exposure. PMID:21300126

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  8. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another form of reactive arthritis starts with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  9. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  10. [Adjuvants--essential components of new generation vaccines].

    PubMed

    Dzierzbicka, Krystyna; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksander M

    2006-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of vaccines that augment an immunological reaction of organism. New vaccines based on recombinant proteins and DNA, are more save than traditional vaccines but they are less immunogenic. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of new, improved vaccine adjuvants. There are two classes of adjuvants: vaccine delivery systems (e.g. emulsions, microparticles, immune-stimulating complexes ISCOMs, liposomes) and immunostimulatory adjuvants (e.g. lipopolysaccharide, monophosphoryl lipid A, CpG DNA, or muramylpeptides). The discovery of more potent and safer adjuvants may allow to development better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against chronic infectious (e.g., HSV, HIV, HCV, HBV, HPV, or Helicobacter pylori) and noninfectious diseases as multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, allergy and tumors (e.g., melanoma, breast, or colon cancer). PMID:17078510

  11. Arthritis Induces Early Bone High Turnover, Structural Degradation and Mechanical Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Vale, Ana Catarina; Cavaleiro, Inês; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Brito, José Américo Almeida; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months) inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone. Methods Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers. Results AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively) and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046). Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002) and bone volume (p = 0.0003) and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009) in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively) in the arthritic group. Conclusions We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness. PMID:25617902

  12. Ozone oxidative postconditioning ameliorates joint damage and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Jaqueline Dranguet; Fraga, Angela; Díaz, María Teresa; Mallok, A; Viebahn-Hänsler, Renate; Fahmy, Ziad; Barberá, Ariana; Delgado, Liván; Menéndez, Silvia; Fernández, Olga Sonia León

    2013-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic condition present in ~1% of the adult population. Many pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in RA, including Reactive Oxygen Species such as nitric oxide NO, pro-inflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and other molecules. Ozone oxidative postconditioning has regulatory effects on some pathological targets associated with RA. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ozone therapy in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats in point of joints inflammation and morphology. Moreover, cytokines, nitric oxide and oxidative stress levels in spleen homogenates were evaluated. Ozone treatment ameliorated joint damage, reduced TNF-α concentrations as well as TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels. Besides, cellular redox balance, nitric oxide and fructolysine levels were reestablished after ozone oxidative postconditioning. It was concluded that pleiotropic ozone's effects clarify its therapeutic efficacy in RA. Decreasing inflammation and joint injury, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts and re-establishment of cellular redox balance after ozone treatment were demonstrated. PMID:23911887

  13. Automated segmentation of knee and ankle regions of rats from CT images to quantify bone mineral density for monitoring treatments of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Francisco; Sevilla, Raquel; Zhu, Joe; Vanko, Amy; Lee, Jung Hoon; Dogdas, Belma; Zhang, Weisheng

    2014-03-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) obtained from a CT image is an imaging biomarker used pre-clinically for characterizing the Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) phenotype. We use this biomarker in animal studies for evaluating disease progression and for testing various compounds. In the current setting, BMD measurements are obtained manually by selecting the regions of interest from three-dimensional (3-D) CT images of rat legs, which results in a laborious and low-throughput process. Combining image processing techniques, such as intensity thresholding and skeletonization, with mathematical techniques in curve fitting and curvature calculations, we developed an algorithm for quick, consistent, and automatic detection of joints in large CT data sets. The implemented algorithm has reduced analysis time for a study with 200 CT images from 10 days to 3 days and has improved the robust detection of the obtained regions of interest compared with manual segmentation. This algorithm has been used successfully in over 40 studies.

  14. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  15. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity. PMID:22173958

  16. MRI evaluation of BBB disruption after adjuvant AcSDKP treatment of stroke with tPA in rat.

    PubMed

    Ding, G; Zhang, Z; Chopp, M; Li, L; Zhang, L; Li, Q; Wei, M; Jiang, Q

    2014-06-20

    The primary limitation of thrombolytic treatment of ischemic stroke with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the hemorrhagic risk. We tested AcSDKP (N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline), as an auxiliary therapeutic agent, to reduce blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a combination tPA thrombolytic treatment of stroke. Wistar rats subjected to embolic stroke were randomly assigned to either the tPA monotherapy group (n=9) or combination of tPA and AcSDKP treatment group (n=9) initiated at 4 h after ischemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements were performed before and after the treatments. Immunohistochemical staining and measurements were performed to confirm MRI findings. Longitudinal MRI permeability measurements with gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) demonstrated that combination treatment of acute embolic stroke with AcSDKP and tPA significantly reduced BBB leakage, compared to tPA monotherapy, at 3 and 6 days (18.3±9.8 mm3 vs. 65.0±21.0 mm3, p<0.001) after the onset of stroke, although BBB leakage was comparable between the two groups prior to the treatments (6.8±4.4 mm3 vs. 4.3±3.3 mm3, p>0.18). The substantial reduction of BBB leakage observed in the combination treatment group was closely associated with reduced ischemic lesions measured by T2 maps (113.6±24.9 mm3 vs. 188.1±60.8 mm3, p<0.04 at 6 days). Histopathological analysis of the same population of rats showed that the combination treatment significantly reduced parenchymal fibrin deposition (0.063±0.059 mm2 vs. 0.172±0.103 mm2, p<0.03) and infarct volume (146.7±35.9 mm3 vs. 199.3±60.4 mm3, p<0.05) compared to the tPA monotherapy at 6days after stroke. MRI provides biological insight into the therapeutic benefit of combination treatment of stroke with tPA and AcSDKP 4h after onset, and demonstrates significantly improved cerebrovascular integrity with neuroprotective effects compared with tPA monotherapy. PMID:24769225

  17. Exposure of brown Norway rats to diesel exhaust particles prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization elicits IgE adjuvant activity but attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Antonini, James M; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) during the sensitization process has been shown to increase antigen-specific IgE production and aggravate allergic airway inflammation in human and animal models. In this study, we evaluated the effect of short-term DEP exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-mediated responses using a post-sensitization model. Brown Norway rats were first exposed to filtered air or DEP (20.6 +/- 2.7 mg/m3) for 4 h/day for five consecutive days. One day after the final air or DEP exposure (day 1), rats were sensitized with aerosolized OVA (40.5 +/- 6.3 mg/m3), and then again on days 8 and 15, challenged with OVA on day 29, and sacrificed on days 9 or 30, 24 h after the second OVA exposure or the final OVA challenge, respectively. Control animals received aerosolized saline instead of OVA. DEP were shown to elicit an adjuvant effect on the production of antigen-specific IgE and IgG on day 30. At both time points, no significant airway inflammatory responses and lung injury were found for DEP exposure alone. However, the OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and numbers of T cells and their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in lung-draining lymph nodes were markedly reduced by DEP on day 30 compared with the air-plus-OVA exposure group. The OVA-induced nitric oxide (NO) in the BAL fluid and production of NO, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-12 by alveolar macrophages (AM) were also significantly lowered by DEP on day 30 as well as day 9. DEP or OVA alone decreased intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes on days 9 and 30. The combined DEP and OVA exposure resulted in further depletion of GSH in both cell types. These results show that short-term DEP exposure prior to sensitization had a delayed effect on enhancement of the sensitization in terms of allergen-specific IgE and IgG production, but caused an attenuation of the allergen-induced airway

  18. Comparison of drug and cell-based delivery: engineered adult mesenchymal stem cells expressing soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II prevent arthritis in mouse and rat animal models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda N; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe; Mosca, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNFα and blocks TNFα-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNFα-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNFα-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNFα generated from either implanted TNFα-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNFα, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1α, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNFα complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNFα and IL1α, but not interferon γ, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation

  19. Suppression of Ongoing Experimental Arthritis by a Chinese Herbal Formula (Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan) Involves Changes in Antigen-Induced Immunological and Biochemical Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Lee, David Y.-W; Ma, Zhongze; Yu, Hua; Fong, Harry H. S.; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major autoimmune diseases of global prevalence. The use of the anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of RA is associated with severe adverse reactions and toxicity. This limitation has necessitated the search for novel therapeutic products. We report here a traditional Chinese medicine-based herbal formula, Huo luo xiao ling dan (HLXL), which has potent antiarthritic activity as validated in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model. HLXL (2.3 g/Kg) was fed to Lewis (RT.11) rats daily by gavage beginning at the onset of arthritis and then continued through the observation period. HLXL inhibited the severity of ongoing AA. This suppression of arthritis was associated with significant alterations in the T cell proliferative and cytokine responses as well as the antibody response against the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65). There was a reduction in the level of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17 and IL-1β but enhancement of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, there was inhibition of both the anti-Bhsp65 antibody response and the serum level of nitric oxide. Thus, HLXL is a promising CAM modality for further testing in RA patients. PMID:20981317

  20. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  1. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  3. A novel therapeutic approach targeting rheumatoid arthritis by combined administration of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin with reference to pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory enzymes, RANKL and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Farhath; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-03-25

    The present study was designed to assess the combined efficacy of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Morin (30 mg/kg b.wt), indomethacin (3 mg/kg b.wt) and combination of morin and indomethacin were administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after adjuvant injection. We have found that the activities/levels of lysosomal acid hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosaminidase and cathepsin-D), glycoproteins (hexose and hexosamine), urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans), reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, VEGF and PGE2) and paw edema were significantly increased in arthritic rats compared to controls. Whereas, the anti-oxidant status (SOD, CAT, GPx, glutathione, and ceruloplasmin), body weight and bone collagen was found to be decreased. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), RANKL, and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) was found upregulated in the ankle joints of arthritic rats in qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, the increased protein expression of NF-kB p65 and COX-2 was also detected by immunohistochemical analysis. On the other hand, the above said imbalances were regulated back effectively to near normal as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis on combined treatment with morin and indomethacin. Our study indicates that the combination therapy was more effective than either single drug alone in suppressing the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:25698669

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  5. Enteropathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  6. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013:chap 109. Krogstad P. Septic arthritis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  7. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  9. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  10. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . Causes Psoriasis is a common skin problem that causes red ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In ...

  11. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  12. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    1991-08-01

    In this review of the 1990 septic arthritis literature, we revisit synovial fluid leukocytosis, examine the utility of synovial fluid glucose and protein measurements, and look at the levels of two cytokines, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1, in infected joint fluids. We see the many faces of gonococcal arthritis and the ravages of septic arthritis when the host has rheumatoid arthritis. Should we recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for the rheumatoid patient with a prosthetic joint who is undergoing a procedure that leads to transient bacteremia? What are some of the salient features of septic arthritis when it involves the sternoclavicular or sacroiliac joints? We also look at some unusual microorganisms, eg, group C Streptococcus, Streptococcus viridans, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas maltophilia, and Neisseria sicca. In patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, we encounter reports of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and spinal epidural abscess caused by opportunistic microorganisms. Two unusual sites of infection include the C1-2 lateral facet joint and subacromial bursa without involvement of the glenohumeral joint. Finally, we examine how to drain a septic knee: the orthopedic point of view. PMID:1911055

  13. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  14. Targeted delivery of low-dose dexamethasone using PCL-PEG micelles for effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Jiang, Jiayu; Chen, Wenfei; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2016-05-28

    Glucocorticoid (GC) is the cornerstone therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, but high doses are associated with serious adverse effects. In an effort to improve the efficacy of low-dose GC therapy, we developed a micelle system for targeted delivery to inflamed joints and validated the approach in a rat model of arthritis. Micelles loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) self-assembled from the amphipathic poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG) polymer via film dispersion, and they were injected intravenously at a dose of only 0.8mg/kg into rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. The micelles persisted for a relatively long time in the circulation, and they accumulated preferentially in inflamed joints. Micelle-delivered Dex potently reduced joint swelling, bone erosion, and inflammatory cytokine expression in both joint tissue and serum. PCL-PEG micelles caused only moderate adverse effects on body weight, lymphocyte count and blood glucose concentration, and they weakly activated the host complement system. These results suggest that encapsulating Dex in PCL-PEG micelles may allow for safe and effective low-dose GC therapy targeting inflammatory disorders. PMID:27057749

  15. Long-Term Effects of (–)-Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) on Pristane-Induced Arthritis (PIA) in Female Dark Agouti Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leichsenring, Anna; Bäcker, Ingo; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian; Lange, Franziska; Flemmig, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)—a widespread chronic inflammatory disease in industrialized countries—is characterized by a persistent and progressive joint destruction. The chronic pro-inflammatory state results from a mutual activation of the innate and the adaptive immune system, while the exact pathogenesis mechanism is still under discussion. New data suggest a role of the innate immune system and especially polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils) not only during onset and the destructive phase of RA but also at the chronification of the disease. Thereby the enzymatic activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a peroxidase strongly abundant in neutrophils, may be important: While its peroxidase activity is known to contribute to cartilage destruction at later stages of RA the almost MPO-specific oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is also discussed for certain anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we used pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in Dark Agouti rats as a model for the chronic course of RA in man. We were able to shown that a specific detection of the HOCl-producing MPO activity provides a sensitive new marker to evaluate the actual systemic inflammatory status which is only partially detectable by the evaluation of clinical symptoms (joint swelling and redness measurements). Moreover, we evaluated the long-term pharmacological effect of the well-known anti-inflammatory flavonoid epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Thereby only upon early and continuous oral application of this polyphenol the arthritic symptoms were considerably diminished both in the acute and in the chronic phase of the disease. The obtained results were comparable to the treatment control (application of methotrexate, MTX). As revealed by stopped-flow kinetic measurements, EGCG may regenerate the HOCl-production of MPO which is known to be impaired at chronic inflammatory diseases like RA. It can be speculated that this MPO activity-promoting effect of EGCG may contribute to the

  16. In the rat, citrullinated autologous fibrinogen is immunogenic but the induced autoimmune response is not arthritogenic

    PubMed Central

    Duplan, V; Foulquier, C; Clavel, C; Al Badine, R; Serre, G; Saoudi, A; Sebbag, M

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of arginyl to citrullyl residues (citrullination) is essential for the formation of the epitopes recognized by rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA). ACPA are secreted by plasma cells of the rheumatoid synovial tissue where their major target, citrullinated fibrin, is abundant. Although numerous arguments suggest that ACPA play an important role in RA, their pathological relevance remains to be established. In the present study, we assessed the immunogenicity and arthritogenicity of complete Freund's adjuvant-emulsified autologous citrullinated (C-rFBG) or non-citrullinated (NC-rFBG) fibrinogen in Lewis (LEW) and Brown–Norway rats, which exhibit drastic differences in their susceptibility to induced autoimmune diseases. NC-rFBG induced no antibody response. In contrast, a single injection of C-rFBG induced an IgG response directed mainly to citrullinated determinants of rFBG. However, all rat strains remained devoid of clinical and histological signs of arthritis up to 3 months after C-rFBG inoculation. Next, in LEW rats, we tested whether autoimmunity to C-rFBG could aggravate acute ankle arthritis triggered by intra-articular injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). However, such arthritis evolved identically in the presence or absence of anti-C-rFBG autoantibodies. However, IFA-injected joints were devoid of citrullinated fibrin deposits. Therefore, citrullination allows breakdown of immunological tolerance but the autoimmune response developed is not spontaneously arthritogenic. Whether or not it can aggravate arthritis with citrullinated fibrin deposits remains to be evaluated. PMID:16907920

  17. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  18. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis. PMID:16030067

  19. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)‐flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX‐1 (IC50 = 8.97 nM) and COX‐2 (IC50 = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20–28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  20. Trends in vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Lavelle, Ed C

    2011-04-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a century and have been particularly effective at promoting protective humoral immunity. However, alum is not optimally effective for diseases where cell-mediated immunity is required for protection. Furthermore, adjuvants including oil-in-water emulsions have shown improved efficacy for avian influenza protection suggesting that even for diseases where humoral immunity can confer protection, there is scope for developing improved adjuvants. There have been major developments in antigen discovery over the past decade, which has accelerated the vaccine development process for new indications and this demands a new generation of adjuvants that can drive and specifically direct the desired immune responses. A number of systems are under investigation that combine different types of adjuvants into specific formulations with greater activity. Additionally, targeting of vaccines to specific immune cells shows great promise. In the case of cancer and chronic infectious diseases, it may be difficult to develop effective vaccines without blocking immune regulatory pathways, which impede cell-mediated responses. However, increased understanding of immunology and particularly the innate immune system is informing vaccine adjuvant research and consequently driving the development of novel and specifically directed vaccine adjuvant strategies. In this article we address the importance of adjuvants in vaccine development, the known mode of action of specific adjuvants and recent developments in this important field. PMID:21506650

  1. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  2. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  3. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  4. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  5. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  6. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine. PMID:22129866

  7. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  8. Pristimerin, a naturally occurring triterpenoid, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating the cellular and soluble immune mediators of inflammation and tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li; Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H; Astry, Brian; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting the synovial joints. The currently available drugs for RA are effective only in a proportion of patients and their prolonged use is associated with severe adverse effects. Thus, new anti-arthritic agents are being sought. We tested Pristimerin, a naturally occurring triterpenoid, for its therapeutic activity against rat adjuvant arthritis. Pristimerin effectively inhibited both arthritic inflammation and cartilage and bone damage in the joints. Pristimerin-treated rats exhibited a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-23) and the IL-6/IL-17-associated transcription factors (pSTAT3 and ROR-γt), coupled with an increase in the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. Also increased was IFN-γ, which can inhibit IL-17 response. In addition, the Th17/Treg ratio was altered in favor of immune suppression and the RANKL/OPG ratio was skewed towards anti-osteoclastogenesis. This is the first report on testing Pristimerin in arthritis. We suggest further evaluation of Pristimerin in RA patients. PMID:25308129

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of Clematis chinensis Osbeck extract(AR-6) may be associated with NF-κB, TNF-α, and COX-2 in collagen-induced arthritis in rat.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Li, Yun-Man; Fang, Wei-Rong; Liu, Li-Fang; Li, Feng-Wen

    2012-10-01

    The root of Clematis chinensis Osbeck has been used widely in rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine, and AR-6 is a triterpene saponin isolated from it. In this present study, we investigated the in vivo effects of oral AR-6 in chronic rat with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and possible molecular mechanism. CIA was induced by immunizing 56 female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with chicken typeIIcollagen (CII). Following eighteen days, the immunization rats with CIA were treated with AR-6 (32, 16, 8 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (7 mg/kg), and TGP (Total Glucosides of Paeonia) (180 mg/kg) for 7 days, and rats without CIA were given the same volume of purified water. TNF-α and IL-1β levels in peripheral blood will be measured by ELISA, and Western blot analysis will be used to detect the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2, in synovial membrane. We found that therapeutic treatment with AR-6 markedly improves the paw swelling and histopathological changes. Moreover, the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were markedly lowered, and the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2, in the synovial membrane of CIA rats was significantly inhibited in the AR-6-treated groups. These results enable to prove that AR-6 has a potential anti-inflammatory effect in CIA rats, and its mechanism may relate to the inhibition of the expression of NF-κB p65 subunits, TNF-α and COX-2. PMID:21932136

  10. Midfoot arthritis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar; Rao, Smita; Nawoczenski, Deborah; Flemister, Adolf S; DiGiovanni, Benedict; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2010-07-01

    Midfoot arthritis is a common cause of significant pain and disability. Although the medial tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints provide < 7 degrees of sagittal plane motion, the more mobile lateral fourth and fifth TMT joints provide balance and accommodation on uneven ground. These small constrained TMT joints also provide stability and translate the forward propulsion motion of the hindfoot and ankle joint to the forefoot metatarsophalangeal joints from heel rise to toe-off. Posttraumatic degeneration is the primary cause of midfoot arthritis, although primary degeneration and inflammatory conditions can also affect this area. The result is a painful midfoot that can no longer effectively transmit load from the hindfoot to the forefoot. Shoe modifications and orthotic inserts are the mainstay of nonsurgical management. Successful management of midfoot arthritis with orthoses is predicated on achieving adequate joint stabilization while still allowing function. Surgical intervention typically involves arthrodesis of the medial midfoot, although the best treatment of the more mobile lateral column is a subject of debate. PMID:20595134

  11. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  12. β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I in synovial tissue of collagen-induced rat model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hairong; Xu, Dawei; Tao, Ran; Ni, Xiaohui; Shen, Aiguo; Wang, Youhua

    2011-09-01

    β1,4-galactosyltransferase-I (β1,4-GalT-I), which is one of the best-studied glycosyltransferases, plays a key role in the synthesis of selectin ligands such as sialyl Lewis (sLe(x)) and sulfated sLe(x). Previous studies showed that inflammatory responses of β1,4-GalT-I-deficient mice were impaired because of the defect in selectin-ligand biosynthesis. However, the expression of β1,4-GalT-I and its biological function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain to be elucidated. The mRNA and protein expression of β1,4-GalT-I increased in synovial tissue of the RA group compared with the Normal group at 10d and 15d after collagen-induced. Double staining indicated β1,4-GalT-I overlapped with macrophage-like synoviocytes (MLSs), fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Moreover, β1,4-GalT-I mRNA in FLSs in vitro was affected in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to TNF-α stimulation. ELISA revealed that expression of TNF-α was attenuated in FLSs in vitro treated with β1,4-GalT-I-Ab. We therefore suggest that β1,4-GalT-I may play an important role in the inflammation process of RA synovial tissue, which would provide the foundation for further researching into the concrete mechanism of β1,4-GalT-I in RA. PMID:21161318

  13. Polyclonal Th1 cells transfer oil-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Svelander, L; Müssener, A; Erlandsson-Harris, H; Kleinau, S

    1997-01-01

    T-cells play a critical role in oil-induced arthritis (OIA) in DA rats. The present study focuses on the involvement of CD4/CD8 T cells in OIA by using adoptive transfer. Mitogen-activated T cells from DA rats previously injected with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) were depleted of CD4+ T cells or CD8+ T cells before transfer to irradiated naive receipients. The results indicate that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of passively induced OIA. However, in vitro blocking experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the CD4 molecule of the T cells before transfer did not affect the passive OIA. Neither was passive OIA inhibited by treating the CD4+ T cells with mAb to intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in order to block cell-cell interactions or migration. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were sensitive, however, to in vitro treatment with mAb to the interleukin-2 receptor, which inhibited the disease or delayed the onset of passive OIA in recipients. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were also analysed for expression of specific T-cell receptor (TCR) variable (V) beta chains, critical for recognition of autoantigen, by utilizing V beta gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results show a heterogeneous expression of V beta segments of the TCR, indicating a polyclonal origin of the pathogenic cells. Moreover, an investigation of the T helper (Th)1/Th2 status of the CD4+ T cells, defined by cytokine expression, was made at the mRNA level by using in situ hybridization. High numbers of interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA expressing cells and also interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-expressing cells could be identified. We conclude from this study that non-immunogenic IFA triggers polyclonal, IL-2-dependent Th1 cells which induce arthritis. The contribution of the CD4 or ICAM-1 molecules for arthritis induction seem to be of minor importance. PMID:9227326

  14. Antiarthritic activity of Majoon Suranjan (a polyherbal Unani formulation) in rat

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surender; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Y.K.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Majoon Suranjan (MS) is a polyherbal formulation used in Unani system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study evaluates the antiarthritic efficacy of this formulation in three different experimental models. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of MS (in doses of 450, 900 and 1800 mg/kg body wt) was evaluated using the turpentine oil induced paw oedema model and the antiarthritic efficacy was evaluated using the formaldehyde and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis models. Aspirin (100 mg/kg body wt) was used as the standard drug in all the models. In order to assess the safety of the test drug, oral acute and 28 day toxicity studies were also carried out. Results: MS produced a dose dependent protective effect in all the experimental models. Its antiarthritic efficacy was comparable to aspirin in formaldehyde induced arthritis and was superior to aspirin in turpentine oil induced paw oedema and CFA induced arthritis. MS also inhibited the delayed increase in joint diameter as seen in control and aspirin treated animals in CFA induced arthritis. Oral LD50 of MS was found to be >5000 mg/kg in rats. Chronic administration did not produce any significant physiological changes in the tested animals. Interpretation & conclusions: Results of the present study suggest that the antiarthritic activity of MS was due to the interplay between its anti-inflammatory and disease modifying activities, thus supporting its use in traditional medicine for the treatment of RA. PMID:21985823

  15. Corticosteroid-binding globulin is a biomarker of inflammation onset and severity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lesley A; Bodnar, Tamara S; Weinberg, Joanne; Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2016-08-01

    Plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) plays a critical role in regulating glucocorticoid bioavailability and is an acute phase 'negative' protein during inflammation. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model, plasma CBG levels decrease in rats that develop severe inflammation, and we have now determined when and how these reductions in CBG occur. After administering complete Freund's adjuvant or saline intra-dermally at the tail base, blood samples were taken periodically for 16days. In adjuvant-treated rats, decreases in plasma CBG levels matched the severity of inflammation, and decreases were observed 4days before any clinical signs of inflammation. Decreases in CBG levels coincided with an ~5kDa reduction in its apparent size, consistent with proteolytic cleavage, and cleaved CBG lacked steroid-binding activity. At the termination of the experimental period, hepatic Cbg mRNA levels were decreased in rats with severe inflammation. While plasma TNF-α increased in all adjuvant-treated rats, increases in Il-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ were only observed in rats with cleaved CBG. Rats with cleaved CBG also exhibited increased spleen weights, and strong negative correlations were observed among CBG, IL-6 and spleen weights, respectively. However, there were no differences in hepatic Cbg mRNA levels in relation to the apparent proteolysis of CBG, suggesting that CBG cleavage occurs before changes in hepatic Cbg expression. Our results indicate that the levels and integrity of plasma CBG are biomarkers of the onset and severity of inflammation. Dynamic changes in the levels and function of CBG likely modulate the tissue availability of corticosterone during inflammation. PMID:27418032

  16. Experimental immunization with anti-rheumatic bacterial extract OM-89 induces T cell responses to heat shock protein (hsp)60 and hsp70; modulation of peripheral immunological tolerance as its possible mode of action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BLOEMENDAL, A; VAN DER ZEE, R; RUTTEN, V P M G; VAN KOOTEN, P J S; FARINE, J C; VAN EDEN, W

    1997-01-01

    OM-89 is a bacterial (Escherichia coli) extract used for oral administration in the treatment of RA. Given the evidence that immunity to bacterial heat shock antigens plays a critical role in the immunomodulation of arthritis and possibly inflammation in general, the purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the presence and immunogenicity of hsp in OM-89. Furthermore, we studied the effects of OM-89 in an experimental arthritis, where hsp are known to have a critical significance in disease development. In rats immunization with OM-89 was found to lead to proliferative T cell responses to hsp60 and hsp70 of both E. coli and mycobacterial origin. Conversely, immunization with hsp antigens was also found to induce T cell reactivity specific for OM-89. Based on this and the antigen specificity analysis of specific T cell lines, hsp70 (DnaK) turned out to be one of the major immunogenic constituents of OM-89. Parenteral immunization with OM-89 was found to reduce resistance to adjuvant arthritis (AA), whereas oral administration was found to protect against AA. Given the arthritis-inhibitory effect of oral OM-89 in AA, it is possible that peripheral tolerance is induced at the level of regulatory T cells with specificity for hsp. This may also constitute a mode of action for OM-89 as an arthritis-suppressive oral drug. PMID:9353151

  17. Tinospora cordifolia inhibits autoimmune arthritis by regulating key immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Sannegowda, K M; Venkatesha, S H; Moudgil, K D

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the joints leading to tissue damage. Despite the availability of potent drugs including the biologics, many patients fail to respond to them, whereas others suffer adverse effects following long-term use of these drugs. Accordingly, the use of natural herbal products by RA patients has been increasing over the years. However, limited information about the mechanism of action of these natural products is a major shortcoming that prevents the widespread acceptance of herbal therapy by professionals and patients alike. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE) using the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human RA and elaborated the immune mechanisms underlying this effect. TCE treatment suppressed arthritic inflammation and bone and cartilage damage. The anti-inflammatory effect of TCE was mediated via reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as: IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17; the frequency of IL-17-producing T cells; and the production of chemokines such as RANTES. Furthermore, TCE treatment limited bone damage by shifting the balance of mediators of bone remodeling (e.g., receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand [RANKL] and MMP-9) in favor of anti-osteoclastic activity. Our results suggest that TCE and its bioactive components should be evaluated for their utility as therapeutic adjuncts to conventional drugs against RA. PMID:26467057

  18. Ameliorative Effects of a Polyphenolic Fraction of Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. Bark in Animal Models of Inflammation and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Badal; Bodhankar, Subhash; Mohan, V.; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Syn C. verum, family: Lauraceae) is one of the oldest traditional medicines for inflammatory- and pain-related disorders. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the polyphenol fraction from Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark (CPP) in animal models of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Dose-response studies of CPP (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) used in a separate set of in vivo experiments were conducted in acute (carrageenan-induced rat paw edema), subacute (cotton pellet-induced granuloma), and sub-chronic (AIA, adjuvant-induced established polyarthrtis) models of inflammation in rats and the acetic acid-induced writhing model of pain in mice. Effects of CPP on cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from Concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated lymphocytes were also evaluated in vitro. CPP showed a strong and dose-dependent reduction in paw volume, weight loss reversal effects against carrageenan-induced paw edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models in rats. CPP (200 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days) showed a significant reduction in elevated serum TNF-α concentration without causing gastric ulcerogenicity in the AIA model in rats. CPP also demonstrated mild analgesic effects during acute treatment as evidenced by the reduction in the writhing and paw withdrawal threshold of the inflamed rat paw during the acetic acid-induced writhing model and Randall-Selitto test. CPP was found to inhibit cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from ConA-stimulated lymphocytes in vitro. In conclusion, CPP demonstrated prominent action in animal models of inflammation and arthritis and therefore can be considered as a potential anti-rheumatic agent with disease-modifying action. PMID:23833722

  19. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  20. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  1. A novel approach to arthritis treatment based on resveratrol and curcumin co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules: In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Coradini, Karine; Friedrich, Rossana B; Fonseca, Francisco N; Vencato, Marina S; Andrade, Diego F; Oliveira, Cláudia M; Battistel, Ana Paula; Guterres, Silvia S; da Rocha, Maria Izabel U M; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Beck, Ruy C R

    2015-10-12

    Resveratrol and curcumin are two natural polyphenols extensively used due to their remarkable anti-inflammatory activity. The present work presents an inedited study of the in vivo antioedematogenic activity of these polyphenols co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules on Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. Lipid-core nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of preformed polymer. Animals received a single subplantar injection of CFA in the right paw. Fourteen days after arthritis induction, they were treated with resveratrol, curcumin, or both in solution or loaded in lipid-core nanocapsules (1.75 mg/kg/twice daily, i.p.), for 8 days. At the doses used, the polyphenols in solution were not able to decrease paw oedema. However, nanoencapsulation improved the antioedematogenic activity of polyphenols at the same doses. In addition, the treatment with co-encapsulated polyphenols showed the most pronounced effects, where an inhibition of 37-55% was observed between day 16 and 22 after arthritis induction. This treatment minimized most of the histological changes observed, like fibrosis in synovial tissue, cartilage and bone loss. In addition, unlike conventionally arthritis treatment, resveratrol and curcumin co-encapsulated in lipid-core nanocapsules did not alter important hepatic biochemical markers (ALP, AST, and ALT). In conclusion, the strategy of co-encapsulating resveratrol and curcumin in lipid-core nanocapsules improves their efficacy as oedematogenic agents, with no evidence of hepatotoxic effects. This is a promising strategy for the development of new schemes for treatment of chronic inflammation diseases, like arthritis. PMID:26206297

  2. Celastrus and its bioactive celastrol protect against bone damage in autoimmune arthritis by modulating osteoimmune cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H; Yu, Hua; Tong, Li; Stains, Joseph P; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2012-06-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by bone erosion and cartilage destruction in the joints. Many of the conventional antiarthritic drugs are effective in suppressing inflammation, but they do not offer protection against bone damage. Furthermore, the prolonged use of these drugs is associated with severe adverse reactions. Thus, new therapeutic agents that can control both inflammation and bone damage but with minimal side effects are sought. Celastrus is a Chinese herb that has been used for centuries in folk medicine for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. However, its utility for protection against inflammation-induced bone damage in arthritis and the mechanisms involved therein have not been examined. We tested celastrus and its bioactive component celastrol for this attribute in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of RA. The treatment of arthritic rats with celastrus/celastrol suppressed inflammatory arthritis and reduced bone and cartilage damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone histomorphometry. The protective effects against bone damage are mediated primarily via the inhibition of defined mediators of osteoclastic bone remodeling (e.g. receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)), the deviation of RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio in favor of antiosteoclastic activity, and the reduction in osteoclast numbers. Furthermore, both the upstream inducers (proinflammatory cytokines) and the downstream effectors (MMP-9) of the osteoclastogenic mediators were altered. Thus, celastrus and celastrol controlled inflammation-induced bone damage by modulating the osteoimmune cross-talk. These natural products deserve further consideration and evaluation as adjuncts to conventional therapy for RA. PMID:22549786

  3. Novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D

    2001-11-01

    Vaccination remains the single most valuable tool in the prevention of infectious disease. Nevertheless, there exists a need to improve the performance of existing vaccines such that fewer boosts are needed or to develop novel vaccines. For the development of effective vaccines for humans, a great need exists for safe and effective adjuvants. A number of novel adjuvants have been reported in recent years including: i) bacterial toxins such as cholera toxin, CT, and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT; ii) less toxic derivatives of CT and LT; iii) endogenous human immunomodulators, such as IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF; iv) hormones; v) lipopeptides; vi) saponins, such as QS-21; vii) synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN); viii) lipid 'A derivatives, such as monophosphoryl lipid A, MPL, and ix) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivatives. Herein, we will review recent findings using these novel adjuvant systems. PMID:12455400

  4. Gait changes precede overt arthritis and strongly correlate with symptoms and histopathological events in pristane-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in the rat has been described as an animal model of inflammatory arthritis which exhibits features similar to rheumatoid arthritis in humans, such as a chronic, destructive, and symmetrical involvement of peripheral joints. However, so far little is known about the earliest inflammatory events and their influence on locomotor behaviour during the course of PIA. To investigate this issue a detailed analysis of the pathologic changes occurring during the prodromal and early stages of PIA was performed. Methods Arthritis was induced in DA.rats by injection of 150 μl 2,6,10,4-tetramethyl-pentadecane (pristane) at the base of the tail and changes in locomotor behaviour of the affected paws were monitored using the CatWalk quantitative gait analysis system. The pathologic events occurring in the joints of pristane-injected animals were studied before onset, at onset, and during acute phase of arthritis by histological methods. Results Gait analysis revealed that changes in locomotion such as reduced paw print areas and stance phase time are already apparent before the onset of clinically discernible arthritis symptoms (erythema, paw swelling) and correlate with PIA scores. In agreement with these findings, inflammatory tenosynovitis could be observed by histology already before the onset of erythema and swelling of the respective paws. In the most heavily affected rats also irregularities in step sequence patterns occurred A kinetic analysis of clinical and histological findings demonstrated that gait changes precede the pathological changes occurring during the acute phase of pristane-induced arthritis. Conclusions Gait analysis allows for pinpointing the initial inflammatory changes in experimental arthritis models such as pristane-induced arthritis. Analysis of early clinically relevant symptoms in arthritis models may facilitate the search for novel therapeutics to interfere with pain, inflammation and joint destruction

  5. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA. PMID:27184722

  6. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin-6′-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA. PMID:27184722

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  8. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  9. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  10. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  11. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  13. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  14. Decrease of CD68 Synovial Macrophages in Celastrol Treated Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, Rita; Vidal, Bruno; Lopes, Inês P.; Paisana, Eunice; Rino, José; Moita, Luis F.; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease characterized by cellular infiltration into the joints, hyperproliferation of synovial cells and bone damage. Available treatments for RA only induce remission in around 30% of the patients, have important adverse effects and its use is limited by their high cost. Therefore, compounds that can control arthritis, with an acceptable safety profile and low production costs are still an unmet need. We have shown, in vitro, that celastrol inhibits both IL-1β and TNF, which play an important role in RA, and, in vivo, that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Our main goal in this work was to test the effect of celastrol in the number of sublining CD68 macrophages (a biomarker of therapeutic response for novel RA treatments) and on the overall synovial tissue cellularity and joint structure in the adjuvant-induced rat model of arthritis (AIA). Methods Celastrol was administered to AIA rats both in the early (4 days after disease induction) and late (11 days after disease induction) phases of arthritis development. The inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight were evaluated during treatment period. Rats were sacrificed after 22 days of disease progression and blood, internal organs and paw samples were collected for toxicological blood parameters and serum proinflammatory cytokine quantification, as well as histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation, respectively. Results Here we report that celastrol significantly decreases the number of sublining CD68 macrophages and the overall synovial inflammatory cellularity, and halted joint destruction without side effects. Conclusions Our results validate celastrol as a promising compound for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26658436

  15. Effects of the cFMS kinase inhibitor 5-(3-methoxy-4-((4-methoxybenzyl)oxy)benzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine (GW2580) in normal and arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Conway, James G; Pink, Heather; Bergquist, Mandy L; Han, Bajin; Depee, Scott; Tadepalli, Sarva; Lin, Peiyuan; Crumrine, R Christian; Binz, Jane; Clark, Richard L; Selph, Jeffrey L; Stimpson, Stephen A; Hutchins, Jeff T; Chamberlain, Stanley D; Brodie, Thomas A

    2008-07-01

    The cFMS (cellular homolog of the V-FMS oncogene product of the Susan McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus) (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 83:3331-3335, 1986) kinase inhibitor 5-(3-methoxy-4-((4-methoxybenzyl)oxy)benzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine (GW2580) inhibits colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1-induced monocyte growth and bone degradation in vitro and inhibits CSF-1 signaling through cFMS kinase in 4-day models in mice (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:16078, 2005). In the present study, the kinase selectivity of GW2580 was further characterized, and the effects of chronic treatment were evaluated in normal and arthritic rats. GW2580 selectively inhibited cFMS kinase compared with 186 other kinases in vitro and completely inhibited CSF-1-induced growth of rat monocytes, with an IC(50) value of 0.2 microM. GW2580 dosed orally at 25 and 75 mg/kg 1 and 5 h before the injection of lipopolysaccharide inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by 60 to 85%, indicating a duration of action of at least 5 h. In a 21-day adjuvant arthritis model, GW2580 dosed twice a day (b.i.d.) from days 0 to 21, 7 to 21, or 14 to 21 inhibited joint connective tissue and bone destruction as assessed by radiology, histology and bone mineral content measurements. In contrast, GW2580 did not affect ankle swelling in the adjuvant model nor did it affect ankle swelling in a model where local arthritis is reactivated by peptidoglycan polysaccharide polymers. GW2580 administered to normal rats for 21 days showed no effects on tissue histology and only modest changes in serum clinical chemistry and blood hematology. In conclusion, GW2580 was effective in preserving joint integrity in the adjuvant arthritis model while showing minimal effects in normal rats. PMID:18434589

  16. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  17. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with arthritis Preventing anemia in children with chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis Whether daily calcium supplements ... density in children with arthritis The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on ... role of an inflammatory chemical called interleukin-15 (IL-15). For More ...

  18. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  19. Methotrexate (MTX)-cIBR conjugate for targeting MTX to leukocytes: conjugate stability and in vivo efficacy in suppressing rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Anderson, Meagan E; Xu, Christine R; Yakovleva, Tatyana V; Gu, Leo C; Malefyt, Thomas R; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2012-09-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis at low doses and leukemia at high doses; however, this drug can produce severe side effects. Our hypothesis is that MTX side effects can be attenuated by directing the drug to the target cells (i.e., leukocytes) using (cyclo(1,12)PenPRGGSVLVTGC) peptide (cIBR). To test this hypothesis, MTX was conjugated to the N-terminus of cIBR peptide to give MTX-cIBR conjugate. MTX-cIBR (5.0 mg/kg) suppressed joint arthritis in adjuvant arthritis rats and prevented periarticular inflammation and bone resorption of the limb joints. In vitro, the toxicity of MTX-cIBR peptide against Molt-3 T cells was inhibited by anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) antibody and cIBR peptide in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that the uptake of MTX-cIBR was partially mediated by LFA-1. Chemical stability studies indicated that MTX-cIBR was most stable at pH 6.0. The MTX portion of MTX-cIBR was unstable under acidic conditions, whereas the cIBR portion was unstable under basic conditions. In biological media, MTX-cIBR had short half lives in rat plasma (44 min) and homogenized rat heart tissue (38 min). This low plasma stability may contribute to the low in vivo efficacy of MTX-cIBR; therefore, there is a need to design a more stable conjugate to improve the in vivo efficacy. PMID:22539217

  20. Enhanced topical delivery of tetrandrine by ethosomes for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pK(a) = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin. PMID:24062995

  1. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  2. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  3. Enhanced Topical Delivery of Tetrandrine by Ethosomes for Treatment of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chao; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Shujin; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yan; Li, Guiling

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the feasibility of ethosomes for improving the antiarthritic efficacy of tetrandrine by topical application. It was found that tetrandrine was a weak base (pKa = 7.06) with pH-dependent partition coefficient. The spherical-shaped ethosomes were prepared by pH gradient loading method. Ex vivo permeation and deposition behavior demonstrated that the drug flux across rat skin and deposition of the drug in rat skin for ethosomes was 2.1- and 1.7-fold higher than that of liposomes, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that ethosomes could enhance the topical delivery of the drug in terms of depth and quantity compared with liposomes. The ethosomes were shown to generate substantial enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of tetrandrine on Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis with regard to liposomes. These results indicated that ethosomes would be a promising carrier for topical delivery of tetrandrine into and across the skin. PMID:24062995

  4. Nanomedicines for Inflammatory Arthritis: Head-To-Head Comparison of Glucocorticoid-Containing Polymers, Micelles and Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Crielaard, Bart J.; Dusad, Anand; Lele, Subodh M.; Rijcken, Cristianne J. F.; Metselaar, Josbert M; Kostková, Hana; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Kiessling, Fabian; Mikuls, Ted R.; Hennink, Wim E.; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging research direction, nanomedicine has been increasingly utilized to treat inflammatory diseases. In this head-to-head comparison study, four established nanomedicine formulations of dexamethasone, including liposomes (L-Dex), core-crosslinked micelles (M-Dex), slow releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-slow) and fast releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-fast), were evaluated in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model with an equivalent dose treatment design. It was found that after a single i.v. injection, the formulations with the slower drug release kinetics (i.e. M-Dex and P-Dex-slow) maintained longer duration of therapeutic activity than those with relatively faster drug release kinetics, resulting in better joint protection. This finding will be instructional in the future development and optimization of nanomedicines for the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis. The outcome of this study also illustrates the value of such head-to-head comparison studies in translational nanomedicine research. PMID:24341611

  5. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo evaluation of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Samira; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Rameshrad, Maryam; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-04-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of triamcinolone acetonide-loaded hydroxyapatite (TA-loaded HAp) nanocomposites in the arthritic rat model. The HAp nanocomposites were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method and the drug was subsequently incorporated into the nanocomposites using an impregnation method. The physicochemical properties as well as cytotoxicity of the prepared nanoformulation were examined as well. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the prepared nanoformulation, the various parameters such as paw volume, haematological parameters and histological studies were assessed in the arthritic rats. The nanocomposites with the particle size of 70.45nm, pore size of 2.71nm and drug loading of 41.94% were obtained in this study. The specific surface area (aBET) as well as the volume of nitrogen adsorbed on one gram of HAp to complete the monolayer adsorption (Vm) were decreased after the drug loading process. The prepared nanoformulation revealed the slower drug release profile compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, the obtained data from MTT assay showed that the TA-loaded nanocomposites had a lower cytotoxic effect on NIH-3T3 and CAOV-4 cell lines as compared to the pure drug. Furthermore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites demonstrated favorable effects on the paw volume as well as the haematological and histopathological abnormalities in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Therefore, TA-loaded HAp nanocomposites are potentially suggested for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis after further required evaluations. PMID:26764105

  6. Macrophage-derived reactive oxygen species protects against autoimmune priming with a defined polymeric adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Holmdahl, Rikard; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvants and the immune priming events in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, is a key challenge to identify their aetiology. Adjuvants are, however, complex structures with inflammatory and immune priming properties. Synthetic polymers provide a possibility to separate these functions and allow studies of the priming mechanisms in vivo. A well-balanced polymer, poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNiPAAm) mixed with collagen type II (CII) induced relatively stronger autoimmunity and arthritis compared with more hydrophilic (polyacrylamide) or hydrophobic (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide and poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide) polymers. Clearly, all the synthesized polymers except the more hydrophobic poly-N-tertbutylacrylamide induced arthritis, especially in Ncf1-deficient mice, which are deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We identified macrophages as the major infiltrating cells present at PNiPAAm-CII injection sites and demonstrate that ROS produced by the macrophages attenuated the immune response and the development of arthritis. Our results reveal that thermo-responsive polymers with high immune priming capacity could trigger an autoimmune response to CII and the subsequent arthritis development, in particular in the absence of NOX2 derived ROS. Importantly, ROS from macrophages protected against the autoimmune priming, demonstrating a critical regulatory role of macrophages in immune priming events. PMID:26455429

  7. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  8. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  9. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  10. The adjuvancy of silicones: dependency on compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Klykken, P C; White, K L

    1996-01-01

    Studies have been conducted in mice (B6C3F1) and rats (Sprague Dawley, Fischer 344) to investigate the adjuvancy potential of silicone mammary gel and the low molecular weight silicone fluid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Dependent on the experimental conditions employed, a divergent data profile emerges. If the antigen (bovine serum albumin, BSA) is emulsified with either the gel or the D4 prior to intramuscular immunization, an amplified anti-BSA IgG antibody response, as measured by multipoint ELISA methodology, is noted over the 8 week measurement period. In parallel studies, a variety of non-silicone personal care ingredients (lanolin, white mineral oil, isopropyl palmitate) were also capable of amplifying this humoral response relative to the non-adjuvant phosphate buffered saline control. These observations are consistent with the empirical knowledge that hydrophobic substances tend to augment immune responses. However, under conditions in which the antigen is not blended with the silicone prior to immunization, normal immune responses are noted. In short (10 day) and long (180 day) term gel implant studies, the optimal IgM and IgG antibody responses, as determined in the antibody forming cell assay, were equivalent between the gel implanted and control animals. Moreover, under similar exposure conditions, no adjuvancy was noted in the three Host Resistance models (B16F10 Melanoma, Listeria monocytogenes, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) tested. Antibody forming cell studies conducted after 28 days of oral or inhalation exposure to D4 have also yielded responses similar to the non-silicone exposed vehicle controls. Collectively, these data suggest that in the absence of premixing the antigen with the silicone test material, there does not appear to be any silicone induced adjuvant response. PMID:8565549

  11. Hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, S B; Schon, L C

    1998-04-01

    Arthritis of the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint is a common disorder that affects shoewear, ambulation, and other activities of daily living. Etiologies include degenerative arthritis (hallux rigidus), crystal induced arthropathy (gout, pseudogout), rheumatoid arthritis, the seronegative spondyloathropathies, posttraumatic degeneration, and advanced hallux valgus. Accurate diagnosis and selection of the appropriate intervention depends on recognition of pertinent clinical and radiographic features. This study presents a synopsis of the senior author's (LCS) experience with 439 surgically treated patients with hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis, focusing on origin and treatment. PMID:9584362

  12. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  13. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  14. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  15. Celastrus treatment modulates antigen-induced gene expression in lymphoid cells of arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Venkatesha, S H; Nanjundaiah, S; Tong, L; Moudgil, K D

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence and the disease process primarily targets the synovial joints. Despite improvements in the treatment of RA over the past decade, there still is a need for new therapeutic agents that are efficacious, less expensive, and free of severe adverse reactions. Celastrus has been used in China for centuries for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, we previously reported that ethanol extract of Celastrus aculeatus Merr. (Celastrus) attenuates adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-arthritic activity of Celastrus have not yet been fully defined. We reasoned that microarray analysis might offer useful insights into the pathways and molecules targeted by Celastrus. We compared the gene expression profiles of the draining lymph node cells (LNC) of Celastrus-treated (Tc) versus water-treated (Tw) rats, and each group with untreated arthritic rats (T(0)). LNC were restimulated with mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 (Bhsp65). We identified 104 differentially expressed genes (DEG) (8 upregulated, 96 downregulated) when comparing Tc with T(0) rats, in contrast to 28 (12 upregulated, 16 downregulated) when comparing Tw and T(0) rats. Further, 20 genes (6 upregulated, 14 downregulated) were shared by both Tw and Tc groups. Thus, Celastrus treatment (Tc) significantly downregulated a large proportion of genes compared to controls (Tw). The DEG were mainly associated with the processes of immune response, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and cell signaling. These results provide novel insights into the mechanism of Celastrus anti-arthritic activity, and unravel potential therapeutic targets for arthritis. PMID:22697077

  16. Adjuvant Therapy: Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad; Kirkwood, John M.

    2011-01-01

    With an incidence that is increasing at 2–5% per year, cutaneous melanoma is an international scourge that disproportionately targets young individuals. Despite much research, the treatment of advanced disease is still quite challenging. Immunotherapy with high-dose interferon-α2b or interleukin-2 benefits a select group of patients in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, respectively, with significant attendant toxicity. Advances in the biology of malignant melanoma and the role of immunomodulatory therapy have produced advances that have stunned the field. In this paper, we review the data for the use of interferon-α2b in various dosing ranges, vaccine therapy, and the role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma. Recent trials in the metastatic setting using anticytoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti-CTLA-4) monoclonal antibody therapy and BRAF inhibitor therapy have demonstrated clear benefit with prolongation of survival. Trials investigating combinations of these novel agents with existing immunomodulators are at present underway. PMID:22220281

  17. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27429986

  18. The adjuvanted influenza vaccines with novel adjuvants: experience with the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine.

    PubMed

    Podda, A

    2001-03-21

    Elderly people and subjects with underlying chronic diseases are at increased risk for influenza and related complications. Conventional influenza vaccines provide only limited protection in the elderly population. In order to enhance the immune response to influenza vaccines, several adjuvants have been evaluated. Among these, an oil in water adjuvant emulsion containing squalene, MF59, has been combined with subunit influenza antigens and tested in clinical trials in comparison with non-adjuvanted conventional vaccines. Data from a clinical database of over 10000 elderly subjects immunised with this adjuvanted vaccine (Fluad, Chiron Vaccines, Siena, Italy) demonstrate that, although common postimmunisation reactions are more frequent in recipients of the adjuvanted vaccine, this vaccine is well tolerated, also after re-immunisation in subsequent influenza seasons. Immunogenicity analyses demonstrate a consistently higher immune response with statistically significant increases of postimmunisation geometric mean titres, and of seroconversion and seroprotection rates compared to non-adjuvanted subunit and split influenza vaccines, particularly for the A/H3N2 and the B strains. The higher immunogenicity profile of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine is maintained also after subsequent immunisations. An even higher adjuvant effect was shown in subjects with low pre-immunisation titre and in those affected by chronic underlying diseases. In conclusion, the addition of MF59 to subunit influenza vaccines enhances significantly the immune response in elderly subjects without causing clinically important changes in the safety profile of the influenza vaccine. PMID:11257408

  19. Varicella arthritis in a child.

    PubMed Central

    Shuper, A; Mimouni, M; Mukamel, M; Varsano, I

    1980-01-01

    A 2 1/2-year-old girl developed arthritis in a metatarsophalangeal joint concomitantly with varicella. As she recovered within 2 days without antimicrobial treatment, it was considered that the arthritis was directly due to the viral infection. The importance of differentiating viral arthritis from septic arthritis, a well-known complication of varicella, is stressed. PMID:7436508

  20. Effect of Boschniakia rossica on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras)proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and its anti-inflammatory activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zong-Zhu; Jin, Hai-Ling; Yin, Xue-Zhe; Li, Tian-Zhu; Quan, Ji-Shu; Jin, Zeng-Nan

    2000-12-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of Boschniakia rossica (BR) extract on expression of GST-P, p53 and p21(ras) proteins in early stage of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and its anti-inflammatory activities.METHODS:The expression of tumor marker-placental form glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), p53 and p21(ras) proteins were investigated by immunohisto-chemical techniques and ABC method. Anti-inflammatory activities of BR were studied by xylene and croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced rat pow edema, adjuvant-induced rat arthritis and cotton pellet induced mouse granuloma formation methods.RESULTS:The 500mg/kg of BR-H2O extract frac-tionated from BR-Methanol extract had inhibitory effect on the formation of DEN-induced GST-P-positive foci in rat liver (GST-P staining was 78% positive in DEN+AAF group vs 20% positive in DEN+AAF+BR group, P<0.05) and the expression of mutant p53 and p21(ras) protein was lower than that of hepatic preneoplastic lesions (33% and 22% positive respectively in DEN+AAF group vs negative in DEN+AAF+BR group). Both CH(2)Cl(2) and H(2)O extracts from BR had anti-inflamatory effect in xylene and crotonoil induced mouse ear edema (inhibitory rates were 26%-29% and 35%-59%, respectively). BR H(2)O extract exhibited inhibitory effect in carrageenin, histamine and hot scald-induced hind paw edema and adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats and cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in mice.CONCLUSION:BR extract exhibited inhibitory effect on formation of preneoplastic hepatic foci in early stage of rat chemical hepato-carcinogenesis.Both CH(2)Cl(2) and H(2)O extracts from BR exerted anti-inflammatory effect in rats and mice. PMID:11819701

  1. The involvement of heat-shock proteins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Nung; Yu, Hua; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on the role of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis in animal models ans patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The published literature in Medline (PubMed), including our published work on the cell-mediated as well as humoral immune response to various HSPs was reviewed. Studies in both the pre-clinical animal models of arthritis as well as RA were examined critically and the data presented. Results In experimental arthritis, disease induction by different arthritogenic stimuli, including an adjuvant, led to immune response to mycobacterial HSP65 (BHSP65). However, attempts to induce arthritis by a purified HSP have not met with success. There are several reports of a significant immune response to HSP65 in RA patients. But, the issue of cause and effect is difficult to address. Nevertheless, several studies in animal models and a couple of clinical trials in RA patients have shown the beneficial effect of HSPs against autoimmune arthritis. Conclusions There is a clear association between immune response to HSPs, particularly HSP65, and the initiation and propagation of autoimmune arthritis in experimental models. The correlation is relatively less convincing in RA patients. In both cases, the ability of HSPs to modulate arthritis offers support, albeit an indirect one, for the involvement of these antigens in the disease process. PMID:19969325

  2. The melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreases inflammation and muscle wasting in arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gómez‐SanMiguel, Ana Belen; Martín, Ana Isabel; Nieto‐Bona, María Paz; Fernández‐Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, María Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory diseases induce cachexia that increases mortality and morbidity of the illness. Adjuvant‐induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. Alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone has an anti‐inflammatory effect in arthritic rats and decreases muscle wasting. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether the anti‐cachectic action of alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone is mediated by the melanocortin receptor type 3 pathway. Methods Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant, and 6 days afterwards, arthritic rats were injected with the selective melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐gammaMSH ( d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH) 500 µg/kg subcutaneously. or saline twice a day, for 10 days. Results d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased the external signs of inflammation and body weight loss, but it was not able to modify the anorexigenic effect of arthritis or the increase in hypothalamic cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) expression. In contrast, d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH prevented arthritis‐induced increase in hypothalamic IL‐1β and serum corticosterone levels and the decrease in serum IGF‐I levels. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH treatment also prevented arthritis‐induced NF‐kB(p65) phosphorylation and tumour necrosis factor‐α mRNA increase in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH administration to arthritic rats increased gastrocnemius mass, its cross‐sectional area, and mean fast fibre area. Those effects of d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH were associated with a decreased expression of atrogin‐1 and muscle ring‐finger protein‐1 in the gastrocnemius. In rats treated with saline, arthritis increased the expression of autophagy marker genes LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap1 as well as the conversion of LC3b I to LC3b II by lipidation in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased gastrocnemius LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap

  3. Immune Modulation of B. terrestris Worker (a Type of Bumblebee), Extract on CFA-induced Paw Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ja; Han, Jea Woong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    To develop a composition for enhancing immunity, based on alcohol extracts of the bumblebee as an active ingredient, bumblebee ethanol extracts were evaluated for their protective effect in chronic models of inflammation, adjuvant induced rat arthritis. B. terrestris worker extract (SDIEX) and, B. hypocrita sapporoensis lava an pupa extract (SPDYBEX), significantly decreased paw edema in arthritic rats, at a dose 100 mg/kg, respectively. The cytokine levels related inflammation of COX-2, sPLA2, VEGF, and TNF-α, were decreased, compared to positive control, indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Histopathological data demonstrated decreases inflammatory activity, hind paw edema, and repaired hyaline articular cartilage in DRG over a 2 wk administration. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of SDIEX and SPDYBEX revealed the presence of cantharidin. PMID:25584147

  4. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver.

    PubMed

    Pašková, Ľudmila; Kuncírová, Viera; Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Čavojský, Tomáš; Bilka, František; Šišková, Katarína; Paulíková, Ingrid; Bezáková, Lýdia; Bauerová, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  5. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Poništ, Silvester; Mihálová, Danica; Nosáľ, Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Hrádková, Iveta; Šišková, Katarína; Bezáková, Lýdia

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT), with methotrexate (MTX), the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO), arthritic animals (AA), AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT), and AA given MTX (AA-MTX). N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX. PMID:27556049

  6. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  7. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  8. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  9. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  10. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  11. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  12. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  13. Evaluation of Caesalpinia bonducella flower extract for anti-inflammatory action in rats and its high performance thin layer chromatography chemical fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Arunadevi, Rathinam; Murugammal, Shanmugam; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study is aimed to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity of Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming (Caesalpiniaceae) flower extract (CBFE) and to study its effect on radiographic outcome in adjuvant induced arthritis and authentication by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) chemical fingerprinting. Materials and Methods: CBFE was administered orally (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced inflammation, cotton pellet induced chronic granulomatous inflammation and autacoids-induced inflammation. Effect on radiographic outcome was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis. CBFE was HPTLC fingerprinted in suitable solvent system. Result: In carrageenan-induced inflammation, CBFE produced significant inhibition in edema volume at all the doses (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg b.wt.) and percentage of inhibition was 28.68, 31.00, and 22.48, respectively as compared to control at 5 h of its administration. In cotton pellet granuloma assay, CBFE significantly decreased the granuloma weight at 300 mg/kg dose level by 22.53%. CBFE (300 mg/kg) caused significant inhibition by 37.5, 44.44, and 35.29% edema volume, at ½, 1 and 3 h after 5-hydroxytryptamine injection, respectively. Radiographic score of animals treated with 300 mg/kg CBFE was significantly decreased when compared to arthritic control animals. Conclusion: The extract was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity. CBFE treatment improved the bony architecture in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The developed HPTLC fingerprint would be helpful in the authentication of C. bonducella flower extract. PMID:26729956

  14. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  15. A Novel Selective Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis Inhibitor Relieves Pyrexia and Chronic Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kuwabara, Harumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Kubota, Kazufumi; Imamura, Yuichiro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Tengeiji, Atsushi; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a terminal prostaglandin in the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Inhibition of PGE2 production may relieve inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. We report here the profile of a novel selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound A [N-[(1S,3S)-3-carbamoylcyclohexyl]-1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidine-4-carboxamide], in animal models of pyrexia and inflammation. The compound selectively suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line A549 cells and rat macrophages. In the lipopolysaccharide-induced pyrexia model, this compound selectively reduced PGE2 production in cerebrospinal fluid and showed an anti-pyretic effect. In the adjuvant-induced arthritis model, compound A therapeutically decreased foot swelling in the established arthritis. Our data demonstrates that selective suppression of PGE2 synthesis shows anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting that selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitors can be applied as an alternative treatment to nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selective inhibitors. PMID:26923147

  16. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  18. Classification of Laser Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    An immunologic adjuvant, which enhances the magnitude and quality of immune responses to vaccine antigens, has become an essential part of modern vaccine practice. Chemicals and biologicals have been typically used for this purpose, but there are an increasing number of studies that are being conducted on the vaccine adjuvant effect of laser light on the skin. Currently, four different types or classes of laser devices have been shown to systemically enhance immune responses to intradermal vaccination: ultra-short pulsed lasers, non-pulsed lasers, non-ablative fractional lasers and ablative fractional lasers. Aside from involving the application of laser light to the skin in a manner that minimizes discomfort and damage, each type of laser vaccine adjuvant involves emission parameters, modes of action and immunologic adjuvant effects that are quite distinct from each other. This review provides a summary of the four major classes of “laser vaccine adjuvant” and clarifies and resolves their characteristics as immunologic adjuvants. These aspects of each adjuvant’s properties will ultimately help define which laser would be most efficacious in delivering a specific clinical benefit with a specific vaccine. PMID:27104047

  19. Arthritis in mice induced by a single immunisation with collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, F; Nomura, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice can be satisfactorily induced by a single immunisation and whether this model has some advantages compared with conventional CIA, which is induced by two immunisations. METHODS: The incidence of arthritis was observed under different immunisation conditions (variation of species of Mycobacterium included in complete Freund's adjuvant and the method of emulsification) and immunological, histopathological, and pharmacological features were examined. RESULTS: Under optimum immunisation conditions, joint inflammation developed two to three weeks after the primary immunisation with an incidence of 100% at four to five weeks. The progression of the arthritis was mild and was associated with moderate increases in concentrations of serum IgG against type II collagen. This CIA model was similar to the conventional model in histopathological and pharmacological features. CONCLUSIONS: Murine CIA could be successfully induced by a single immunisation. An important feature of this model was a mild progression of joint inflammation. This feature seems to be of benefit for monitoring the development of arthritis from an early stage in the disease and for the development of novel antirheumatic drugs for such early stage patients. Images PMID:8774181

  20. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  1. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  2. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bobanga, Iuliana D.; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y.

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24967094

  3. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics. PMID:8310085

  4. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  5. Spray drift mitigation with spray mix adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  6. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  7. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  8. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  9. Treatment with SiMiaoFang, an Anti-Arthritis Chinese Herbal Formula, Inhibits Cartilage Matrix Degradation in Osteoarthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Qian; Liu, Zhen-li; Lim, Li; Chen, Wei-heng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A Chinese herbal preparation, SiMiaoFang (SMF), has been used clinically for treating arthralgia by virtue of its anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving activities. However, no evidence base links SMF to anti-osteoarthritis (OA), particularly its link to inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation. In this study, we undertook a characterization of anti-OA activity of SMF using an in vivo rat model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx) together with in vitro studies with chondrocytes for further molecular characterization. ACLT+MMx rats were treated with SMF at doses of 0.63, 1.25, and 2.5 grams/kg per day for 6 weeks. SMF treatments significantly inhibited cartilage matrix degradation, as indicated by increasing proteoglycan and collagen content, particularly type II collagen expression in articular cartilage, decreasing CTX-II (collagen type II degradation marker), and increasing CPII (collagen type II synthesis marker) in circulation. Moreover, SMF suppressed synovial inflammation and inhibited release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α in serum. The levels of serum prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide productions were decreased via suppression of the production of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively. Importantly, SMF interfered with OA-augmented expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -3 and -13 and aggrecanases (ADAMTS) -4 and -5, which are considered to be key enzymes in cartilage matrix degradation, and simultaneously augmented OA-reduced tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -3 expression in the joints. The largest changes in these parameters were found at the highest dose. Meanwhile, SMF significantly decreased MMP-3 and -13 and increased TIMP-1 and -3 at mRNA and protein levels in IL-1β–induced chondrocytes. These findings provide the first evidence that SMF effectively treats OA by inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation

  10. Treatment with SiMiaoFang, an anti-arthritis chinese herbal formula, inhibits cartilage matrix degradation in osteoarthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Qian; Liu, Zhen-Li; Lim, Li; Chen, Wei-Heng; Lin, Na

    2013-10-01

    A Chinese herbal preparation, SiMiaoFang (SMF), has been used clinically for treating arthralgia by virtue of its anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving activities. However, no evidence base links SMF to anti-osteoarthritis (OA), particularly its link to inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation. In this study, we undertook a characterization of anti-OA activity of SMF using an in vivo rat model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx) together with in vitro studies with chondrocytes for further molecular characterization. ACLT+MMx rats were treated with SMF at doses of 0.63, 1.25, and 2.5 grams/kg per day for 6 weeks. SMF treatments significantly inhibited cartilage matrix degradation, as indicated by increasing proteoglycan and collagen content, particularly type II collagen expression in articular cartilage, decreasing CTX-II (collagen type II degradation marker), and increasing CPII (collagen type II synthesis marker) in circulation. Moreover, SMF suppressed synovial inflammation and inhibited release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α in serum. The levels of serum prostaglandin E₂ and nitric oxide productions were decreased via suppression of the production of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively. Importantly, SMF interfered with OA-augmented expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -3 and -13 and aggrecanases (ADAMTS) -4 and -5, which are considered to be key enzymes in cartilage matrix degradation, and simultaneously augmented OA-reduced tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -3 expression in the joints. The largest changes in these parameters were found at the highest dose. Meanwhile, SMF significantly decreased MMP-3 and -13 and increased TIMP-1 and -3 at mRNA and protein levels in IL-1β-induced chondrocytes. These findings provide the first evidence that SMF effectively treats OA by inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation. PMID

  11. Leflunomide in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Joachim Peter

    2007-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common unique form of inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its exact prevalence is unknown but 5-30% of the 2-3% of subjects of the general population affected with psoriasis are developing PsA. Typically PsA presents as an oligoarticular asymmetrical arthritis with predominant distal finger joint pattern, presence of spinal involvement enthesitis and dactylitis. There is evidence that T-cells play a key role in the immunopathology of PsA as well as Psoriasis. Leflunomide, a selective pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with the property to inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation has been shown to improve both joint and skin symptoms in patients with PsA. Significant response rates have been observed for Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), modified ACR20 and PASI 50 after 24 weeks of treatment with 20 mg/d Leflunomide orally in a randomised, placebo controlled multicenter trial (TOPAS Study). Leflunomide treatment also improved quality of life and showed a favourable safety profile. It is therefore concluded that Leflunomide offers an efficacious, well tolerated, safe, and relatively inexpensive therapeutic option for the treatment of actively inflamed joints and psoriatic skin lesions in patients with PsA. PMID:17854740

  12. [Arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Hanny, P; Chanudet, X; Celton, H; Doury, P; Larroque, P

    1987-01-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris may be associated with a number of articular diseases. Known to be present in Fiessinger-Leroy-Reiter syndrome and psoriasis arthropatica, this skin disease has been classified by Japanese authors as a new nosological entity: pustular osteo-arthritis. Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris seems to represent a meeting point for axial rheumatisms close to ankylozing spondylitis. PMID:3563169

  13. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  14. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  15. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of egg white-chalcanthite and purple bamboo salts mixture on arthritis induced by monosodium iodoacetate in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Song, Hyun-kyung; Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Dong-Yoon; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of anti-osteoarthritis effects on egg white-chalcanthite (EC), purple bamboo salts (PBS), and a mixture of EC and PBS (EC+PBS). EC is a mixture of egg white and pulverized chalcanthite. PBS has been widely used as one of functional foods in Korea and shows unique features compared with common salt. Osteoarthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 4mg/kg bw) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Test substances were administered once daily for 6 weeks at doses of 10 mg EC, EC+100 mg PBS, EC+200 mg PBS before and after MIA injection. Each substance was assessed by blood chemistry parameters, and by serum cytokines including IL-1β and IL-6, and nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2). Structural changes of articular cartilage were also evaluated by histopathological examination. As a result, body weight and blood chemistry parameter were not different in all experimental groups. EC+PBS mixture reduced the production of PGE2, NO, IL-1β, and IL-6. In histological grade of osteoarthritis, EC+PBS mixture had a tendency to ameliorate damage of articular cartilage induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, EC+PBS mixture was demonstrated to have a potential for anti-inflammatory effect against osteoarthritis induced by MIA in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27382377

  17. Sugarcane bagasse lignin, and silica gel and magneto-silica as drug vehicles for development of innocuous methotrexate drug against rheumatoid arthritis disease in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Sanaa M R; Darwish, Atef S; Shehata, Iman H; Abd Elhalem, Sahar S

    2015-03-01

    The present study clarifies co-therapy action of deliveries from their textural changes point of view. Methotrexate (MTX) was immobilized onto biodegradable lignin, silica gel and iron/silica nanocomposite. Loaded-MTX was i.p. injected into albino rats at doses of 0.25 and 0.5mg/kg/week for 2.5months, after which spleen, liver, testes and knee joint tissues were collected for tests. IFN-γ and IL-17A mRNA gene expressions in spleen in all biological samples were determined by RT-PCR. Physicochemical features of drug carriers were monitored by XRD, BET-PSD, SEM and TEM. Drug inflammatory-site targeting was found to be closely related to the physico-features of deliverers. The interlayered lignin of micro- and meso-pore channels directed MTX toward concealed infected cells in liver and testes tissues, while meso-structured silica flacks satisfied by gathering MTX around knee joints. The magneto-silica nanocomposite targeted MTX toward spleen tissue, which is considered as a lively factory for the production of electron rich compounds. PMID:25579963

  18. Experimental modulation of the reactivity of pleural milky spots (Kampmeier's foci) by Freund's adjuvants, betamethasone and mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A de D; Aguas, A P; Oliveira, M J; Cabral, J M; Grande, N R

    1994-01-01

    We studied the response of milky spots in the parietal pleura of the rat and mouse to intrapleural instillation of immunomodulatory agents such as complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvants and betamethasone, and also to infection by mycobacteria (M. avium). Both incomplete (mineral oil) and complete (mineral oil plus dead mycobacteria) adjuvants, as well as M. avium infection, induced a striking increase in the size and cellularity of the pleural milky spots whereas betamethasone caused a slight atrophy. The extensive inflammatory infiltrates observed after adjuvant injection differed between milky spots reactive to complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants. Fifteen days after adjuvant administration, the pleural milky spots of rats were still enlarged and hypercellular but differences were noted in the size of milky spots of the pleura between the 2 adjuvant treatments: animals submitted to injection of complete Freund's adjuvant showed an increase in the size of milky spots from d 3 to d 15, while the size of milky spots of the incomplete Freund's adjuvant treated group showed a decrease in size from d 3 to d 15. The milky spots at d 15 were well organised: reticulin fibres permeated the whole area of the milky spot and the different cell types were evenly distributed. Histiocytes, which were previously confined to the inner layer, were now the main cell type in all areas of milky spots. A moderate number of mast cells and a few eosinophils were also seen. Complete Freund's adjuvant caused the formation of granulomas in the milky spots, a change that was not detected in animals treated with incomplete adjuvant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7649783

  19. ROLE OF CARBON VERSUS DIESEL PARTICLES ON PULMONARY INFLAMMATION AND ALLERGIC ADJUVANT EFFECTS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated that residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or its constituent metals can behave as an adjuvant to promote allergic immune responses and asthma-like disease in Brown Norway rats We have further reported that these effects can be reproduced by adminstration of...

  20. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    PubMed

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  1. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  2. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  3. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  4. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  5. Polysaccharides: Candidates of promising vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingli; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium-based adjuvants remain the only adjuvants approved for human use in the USA for over 80 years because of alum's simplicity, tolerability, safety and cost-efficiency. Recent development of vaccines, especially the increasing applications of recombinant subunit and synthetic vaccines, makes aluminium adjuvants cannot stimulate enough immunity to the antigens, since aluminium adjuvants can only induce Th2 type immune responses. So, novel adjuvants are urgent to make up the disadvantages of aluminium adjuvants. However, some major hurdles need to be overcome, not only the scientific knowledge of adjuvants but also unacceptable side-effects and toxicity. A number of carbohydrate-based polysaccharides from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources can act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and recognize pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on immune cells, followed by triggering innate immunity and regulating adaptive immunity. What is more, polysaccharides are safe and biodegradable without tissue deposits as observed in aluminium adjuvants. Therefore, polysaccharide-based compounds and formulations are potential vaccine adjuvant candidates. Here, we mainly review polysaccharide-based adjuvants investigated in recent years. PMID:25994059

  6. [Psoriatic arthritis and etanercept].

    PubMed

    Pedraz, J; Daudén, E

    2010-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PA) is a chronic inflammatory condition whose symptoms generally appear after the skin symptoms. Making an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is of vital importance because of the potential development of mutilating and deforming arthritis. Classical treatments of PA include the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, or gold, and finally, leflunomide. Research on the pathophysiology of psoriasis and of the PA has led to the incorporation of biological treatments, specifically anti-TNF drugs. The three treatments used most in PA are etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. Of all these, we are going to make a systematic review of the principal studies available on etanercept for the treatment of PA. PMID:20492877

  7. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  8. [Juvenile psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xin-Ying; Liu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A case of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in a 12 year-old boy was reported. The patient had a history of one and half a year of bilateral heel pain, followed by pain in the right knee and ankle and right hip joint. He developed psoriatic lesions affecting his nails and skin. He had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) contents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 was detected but serum rheumatoid factor was not in the patient. A skin biopsy revealed psoriasis and ultrasonography demonstrated synovitis in right knee and ankle. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis was diagnosed based on his physical, laboratory and skin biopsy findings. A treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine produced no effect. Leflunomide in conjunction with anti-TNF biologic agents (Etanercept) was administered, followed by symptomatic improvement 2 weeks later. PMID:17706035

  9. Lack of Galanin 3 Receptor Aggravates Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Botz, Bálint; Kemény, Ágnes; Brunner, Susanne M; Locker, Felix; Csepregi, Janka; Mócsai, Attila; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic inflammation mediated by peptidergic sensory nerves has a crucial impact on the pathogenesis of various joint diseases. Galanin is a regulatory sensory neuropeptide, which has been shown to attenuate neurogenic inflammation, modulate neutrophil activation, and be involved in the development of adjuvant arthritis, but our current understanding about its targets and physiological importance is incomplete. Among the receptors of galanin (GAL1-3), GAL3 has been found to be the most abundantly expressed in the vasculature and on the surface of some immune cells. However, since there are minimal in vivo data on the role of GAL3 in joint diseases, we analyzed its involvement in different inflammatory mechanisms of the K/BxN serum transfer-model of autoimmune arthritis employing GAL 3 gene-deficient mice. After arthritis induction, GAL3 knockouts demonstrated increased clinical disease severity and earlier hindlimb edema than wild types. Vascular hyperpermeability determined by in vivo fluorescence imaging was also elevated compared to the wild-type controls. However, neutrophil accumulation detected by in vivo luminescence imaging or arthritic mechanical hyperalgesia was not altered by the lack of the GAL3 receptor. Our findings suggest that GAL3 has anti-inflammatory properties in joints by inhibiting vascular hyperpermeability and consequent edema formation. PMID:26941032

  10. Methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules are highly effective in the control of inflammation in synovial cells and a chronic arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Antônio Luiz; de Oliveira, Catiúscia Padilha; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease in the word, affecting 1% of the population. Long-term prognosis in RA was greatly improved following the introduction of highly effective medications such as methotrexate (MTX). Despite the importance of this drug in RA, 8%–16% of patients must discontinue the treatment because of adverse effects. Last decade, we developed a promising new nanocarrier as a drug-delivery system, lipid-core nanocapsules. Objective The aim of the investigation reported here was to evaluate if methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (MTX-LNC) reduce proinflammatory and T-cell-derived cytokines in activated mononuclear cells derived from RA patients and even in functional MTX-resistant conditions. We also aimed to find out if MTX-LNC would reduce inflammation in experimentally inflammatory arthritis at lower doses than MTX solution. Methods Formulations were prepared by self-assembling methodology. The adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats (AIA) and the effect on edema formation, TNF-α levels, and interleukin-1 beta levels after treatment was evaluated. Mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of RA patients during articular infiltration procedures were treated with MTX solution and MTX-LNC. For in vitro experiments, the same dose of MTX was used in comparing MTX and MTX-LNC, while the dose of MTX in the MTX-LNC was 75% lower than the drug in solution in in vivo experiments. Results Formulations presented nanometric and unimodal size distribution profiles, with D[4.3] of 175±17 nm and span of 1.6±0.2. Experimental results showed that MTX-LNC had the same effect as MTX on arthritis inhibition on day 28 of the experiment (P<0.0001); however, this effect was achieved earlier, on day 21 (P<0.0001), by MTX-LNC, and this formulation had reduced both TNF-α (P=0.001) and IL-1α (P=0.0002) serum levels by the last day of the experiment. Further, the MTX-LNC were more effective at reducing the

  11. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  12. Adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Chiarolanza, Ilaria; Boiardi, Luigi; Caruso, Andrea; Pazzola, Giulia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Di Lernia, Vito; Albertini, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Open prospective studies and randomized controlled trials (RCT) have shown the short-term efficacy of adalimumab (ADA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis. ADA effectively treated all varied musculoskeletal manifestations characteristic of PsA, including peripheral arthritis, spinal disease, enthesitis, and dactylitis. ADA significantly inhibited structural changes on radiographs, lessened disability, and improved quality of life in patients with active PsA. One study showed the efficacy of 24-week ADA therapy on bone marrow edema and erosions, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical and radiographic efficacy of ADA demonstrated during short-term treatment was sustained during longterm treatment. ADA was generally well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to that reported in studies of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis. Overall, ADA has a favorable risk-benefit profile in PsA. The combination of ADA and cyclosporine seems to be more effective than ADA monotherapy in patients with active PsA and inadequate response to methotrexate; however, this observation must be confirmed in RCT. PMID:22751600

  13. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance.

    PubMed

    Naik, S R; Wala, S M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund's adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc.) that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals) which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage) and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease. PMID:25121375

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  15. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. PMID:25962455

  16. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  17. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  18. Immune mechanisms in the transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis without adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Silberg, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be induced in Lewis rats without the use of adjuvant. Spleen cells of naive rats were sensitized to myelin basic protein (MBP) in vitro. Transfer of these cells did not result in the development of EAE. However, spleen cells from primary recipients, taken 10 days post transfer, and cultured with MBP (secondary culture, transferred EAE to secondary recipients. EAE can be induced in primary recipients by the transfer of secondary cultured cells or cultured cells or challenge with MBP in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 10 days after injection of naive cultured cells. The finding that MBP-CFA challenged 1' recipients developed EAE, suggests that the rats have been primed to MBP through the naive cultured cell transfer. The cells from naive culture that sensitize the primary recipient were radioresistant (1500 R), probably macrophages. This is in contrast to the cells transferring EAE to the secondary recipient, which were radiosensitive. Unlike the spleen cells which transfer EAE from MBP-CFA sensitized rats, the cells in the secondary transfer could not be activated to transfer EAE when cultured with concanavalin A. Clinical EAE in the secondary recipient was more severe when these rats were irradiated (200 R) prior to transfer. There is evidence that low dose irradiation eliminates naturally occurring suppressor cells. EAE also developed in lethally irradiated (850 R) recipients of secondary cultured cells, suggesting that the transferred cells can induce EAE alone or by recruiting radioresistant cells in the secondary host.

  19. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  20. Psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Kaloudi, Olga; Bertoni, Michele; Cassarà, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology occurring in patients with psoriasis. The Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis study group has recently developed a validated set of classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 98.7%. Three main clinical patterns have been identified: oligoarticular (≤ 4 involved joints) or polyarticular (≥ 5 involved joints) peripheral disease and axial disease with or without associated peripheral arthritis. In this context distal interphalangeal arthritis and arthritis mutilans may occur. According to other reports, also in our centre, asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most frequent pattern at onset. Axial disease has been estimated between 5% and 36% of patients. It is characterized by an irregular involvement of the axial skeleton with a predilection for the cervical spine. Recurrent episodes of enthesitis and dactylitis represent a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. In around 20% of cases distal extremity swelling with pitting edema of the hands or feet is observed. Unilateral acute iridocyclitis, usually recurrent in alternate fashion, is the most frequent extra-articular manifestation, and accelerated atherosclerosis is the prominent comorbidity. The clinical course of peripheral and axial psoriatic arthritis is usually less severe than rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. Local corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended in milder forms. Sulphasalazine and methotrexate are effective in peripheral psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have provided evidence on the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs to control symptoms and to slow or arrest radiological disease progression. PMID:21199465

  1. Increased limb involvement in murine collagen-induced arthritis following treatment with anti-interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Williams, D G; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the effect of administering H22, a hamster neutralizing MoAb to murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in collagen-induced arthritis. Mice were immunized with human type II collagen in adjuvant on day 1 and boosted with soluble collagen on day 21. H22 was administered (250 micrograms, intraperitoneally) either during the induction of arthritis (on days 0, 6, 13 and 20) or around the time of disease manifestation (on days 21, 28, 35 and 42). Control mice received either an isotype-matched non-neutralizing MoAb or saline. Both treatment regimes gave similar results. Treatment with H22 did not significantly affect the incidence of arthritis, time of onset, degree of oedema, histopathological severity, or level of anti-type II collagen IgG. However, a highly significant increase (P < 0.01) in the number of limbs affected by arthritis was observed in the H22-treated group, irrespective of whether the antibody was administered during the induction of arthritis, or during the time of clinical manifestation of disease. From these results it was concluded that anti-IFN-gamma treatment caused an increase in the number of arthritic lesions, but did not affect the severity of each individual lesion. PMID:8485917

  2. Gene expression profile and synovial microcirculation at early stages of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Philip; Ibrahim, Saleh; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Koczan, Dirk; Moeller, Steffen; Landes, Jürgen; Gradl, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of the initial mechanisms that lead to arthritic disease could facilitate development of improved therapeutic strategies. We characterized the synovial microcirculation of knee joints in susceptible mouse strains undergoing intradermal immunization with bovine collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant to induce arthritis (i.e. collagen-induced arthritis [CIA]). Susceptible DBA1/J and collagen II T-cell receptor transgenic mice were compared with CIA-resistant FVB/NJ mice. Before onset of clinical symptoms of arthritis, in vivo fluorescence microscopy of knee joints revealed marked leucocyte activation and interaction with the endothelial lining of synovial microvessels. This initial inflammatory cell response correlated with the gene expression profile at this disease stage. The majority of the 655 differentially expressed genes belonged to classes of genes that are involved in cell movement and structure, cell cycle and signal transduction, as well as transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism. However, 24 adhesion molecules and chemokine/cytokine genes were identified, some of which are known to contribute to arthritis (e.g. CD44 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1) and some of which are novel in this respect (e.g. CC chemokine ligand-27 and IL-13 receptor α1). Online in vivo data on synovial tissue microcirculation, together with gene expression profiling, emphasize the potential role played by early inflammatory events in the development of arthritis. PMID:15987489

  3. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  4. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  5. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations. PMID:27274998

  6. LASSBio-468: a new achiral thalidomide analogue which modulates TNF-alpha and NO production and inhibits endotoxic shock and arthritis in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Takiya, Christina M; de Arruda, Luciana B; Pascarelli, Bernardo; Gomes, Raquel N; Castro Faria Neto, Hugo C; Lima, Lídia M; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2005-03-01

    As part of a program researching the synthesis and immunopharmacological evaluation of novel synthetic compounds, we have described the immune modulatory profile of the new achiral thalidomide analogue LASSBio-468 in the present work. This compound was planned as an N-substituted phthalimide derivate, structurally designed as a hybrid of thalidomide and aryl sulfonamides, which were previously described as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and PDE4 inhibitors. LASSBio-468 was recently demonstrated to inhibit the TNF-alpha production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in vivo. Here, we investigated whether this compound would affect chronic inflammation processes associated with the production of this pro-inflammatory cytokine. Treatment with LASSBio-468 before a lethal dose injection of LPS in animals greatly inhibited endotoxic shock. This effect seems to be mediated by a specific down regulation of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide production, regulated mainly at the RNA level. In another model, histopathological analysis indicated that this compound also inhibited adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Taken together, our data demonstrated a potent anti-inflammatory effect of LASSBio-468, suggesting its use as a potential drug against chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:15683845

  7. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T; Sauld, John F; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T; Pollack, Henry J; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  8. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  9. MedlinePlus: Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Expert For You Women Patient Handouts Summary Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  10. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  11. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  12. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  13. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  14. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  16. Effects of indomethacin-loaded nanocapsules in experimental models of inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, A; Zilberstein, ACCV; Jäger, E; Campos, MM; Morrone, FB; Calixto, JB; Pohlmann, AR; Guterres, SS; Battastini, AMO

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The effects of systemic treatment with indomethacin-loaded nanocapsules (IndOH-NC) were compared with those of free indomethacin (IndOH) in rat models of acute and chronic oedema. Experimental approach: The following models of inflammation were employed: carrageenan-induced acute oedema (measured between 30 min and 4 h), sub-chronic oedema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) (determined between 2 h and 72 h), and CFA-induced arthritis (oedema measured between 14 and 21 days). Key results: IndOH or IndOH-NC produced equal inhibition of carrageenan-elicited oedema. However, IndOH-NC was more effective in both the sub-chronic (33 ± 4% inhibition) and the arthritis (35 ± 2% inhibition) model of oedema evoked by CFA, when compared with IndOH (21 ± 2% and 14 ± 3% inhibition respectively) (P < 0.01). In the CFA arthritis model, treatment with IndOH-NC markedly inhibited the serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor α and IL-6 (by 83 ± 8% and 84 ± 11% respectively), while the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly increased (196 ± 55%). The indices of gastrointestinal damage in IndOH-NC-treated animals were significantly less that those after IndOH treatment (58 ± 16%, 72 ± 6% and 69 ± 2%, for duodenum, jejunum and ileum respectively). Conclusions and implications: IndOH-NC produced an increased anti-inflammatory efficacy in long-term models of inflammation, allied to an improved gastrointestinal safety. This formulation might represent a promising alternative for treating chronic inflammatory diseases, with reduced undesirable effects. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19422380

  17. [Reactive arthritis: inflammation or true infection?].

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Reactive arthritis has been classically defined as an aseptic arthritis induced by a bacterial infection in another organ. If the classical form of reactive arthritis is in fact a spondyloarthritis triggered by a urogenital or intestinal bacterial infection, it is not necessarily sterile, and in some cases it may be worthwhile to treat a chronic infection with long-term antibiotherapy. In a broader definition, the concept of reactive arthritis is widened to other post-infectious rheumatism, such as post-streptococcal arthritis or post-viral arthritis. PMID:27089639

  18. Malvidin-3-O-β glucoside, major grape anthocyanin, inhibits human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and decreases clinical scores in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Decendit, Alain; Mamani-Matsuda, Maria; Aumont, Virginie; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Moynet, Daniel; Boniface, Katia; Richard, Emmanuel; Krisa, Stéphanie; Rambert, Jérôme; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Mossalayi, M D

    2013-11-15

    Polyphenolic anthocyanins are major colorful compounds in red fruits, known to prevent cardiovascular and other diseases. Grape polyphenols are a mixture of various molecules and their exact contribution to above bioactivities remains to be clarified. In the present study, we first analyzed the effect of purified grape-derived compounds on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival, proliferation, as well as for their ability to inhibit the activation of human normal macrophages. Data indicated that malvidin-3-O-β glucoside (Malβg), the major grape anthocyanin, is bioactive with no toxicity on human PBMC. Malβg decreased the transcription of genes encoding inflammatory mediators, confirmed by the inhibition of TNFα, IL1, IL-6 and iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) secretion from activated macrophages. As Malβg also inhibited inflammatory response of rat macrophages, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of Malβg in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Malβg significantly diminished inflammatory cachexia and arthritic paw scores in AIA rats at both therapeutic and preventive levels. In vivo effects of Malβg correlated with down-regulation of NO generation from AIA rats' peritoneal macrophages ex vivo. These data indicate that Malβg, major grape anthocyanin, is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in vitro and in vivo, without detectable toxic effect. PMID:23796750

  19. Intra-articular drug delivery from an optimized topical patch containing teriflunomide and lornoxicam for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: does the topical patch really enhance a local treatment?

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Guan, Yanli; Zhang, Yuxiu; Li, Yuanru; Fang, Liang

    2013-07-10

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often bear joint destruction and symptomatic pain. The aim of this work is to develop a compound transdermal patch containing teriflunomide (TEF) and lornoxicam (LOX) to transport these drugs across the skin with the isochronous permeation rates for RA therapy and investigate intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX following transdermal patches applied topically. The salts of TEF and LOX with organic amines diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA) and N-(2'-hydroxy-ethanol)-piperdine (NP) were prepared to improve the skin permeation of the parent drug. The optimized patch formulation is obtained from a 3-factor, 2-level central composite design. After topical application of the optimized compound patch to only one knee joint in rabbit, intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX on the application site was compared with that on the non-application site. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the optimized compound patch were evaluated using the adjuvant arthritis model and the pain model induced by acetic acid, respectively. The in vitro experiment results showed that the amine salts of TEF and LOX, especially TEF-TEtA and LOX-TEtA, enhanced the skin permeation of TEF and LOX from the transdermal patch system. The optimal formulation successfully displayed isochronous permeation rates for TEF and LOX across rabbit skin, and was defined with 5% of TEF-TEtA, 10% of LOX-TEtA and 15% of azone. The in vivo study showed that TEF and LOX from transdermal patches were transferred into skin, ligament and fat pad on the application site by direct diffusion and on the non-application site by the redistribution of systemic blood supply, while local absorption of TEF and LOX in synovial fluid originated from the systemic blood supply rather than direct diffusion. In the RA rat model, the results of swelling inhibition on primary arthritis of bilateral hind paws further confirmed the above

  20. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  1. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  2. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  3. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials’ physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25483497

  4. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  5. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  6. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  7. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  8. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  9. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  10. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  11. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  12. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  13. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  14. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  15. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  16. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  17. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  18. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  20. Methylprednisolone acetate-loaded hydroxyapatite nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: In vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Samira; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Rameshrad, Maryam; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-08-25

    The objective of this study was to improve the therapeutic efficacy of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by incorporating the drug into the hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized using a chemical precipitation technique and their size and morphology were evaluated by dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solid-state behavior of the nanoparticles was also characterized by operating X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda N2 adsorption/desorption analyses were also performed to determine the surface area, Vm (the volume of the N2 adsorbed on the one gram of the HAp when the monolayer is complete) and the pore size of the samples. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of the prepared nanoformulation on the adjuvant induced arthritic rats was assessed. HAp mesoporous nanoparticles with a particle size of 70.45nm, pore size of 2.71nm and drug loading of 44.53% were obtained. The specific surface area of HAp as well as the Vm values were decreased after the drug loading process. The nanoformulation revealed the slower drug release profile compared to the pure drug. The MTT assay indicated that the MPA-loaded nanoparticles had a lower cytotoxic effect on NIH-3T3 and CAOV-4 cell lines compared to the pure drug. Interestingly, the in vivo study confirmed that the drug-loaded nanoparticles could considerably decrease the paw volume and normalize the hematological abnormalities in the arthritic rats. PMID:27189528

  1. RANKL, OPG and CTR mRNA expression in the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-WEI; XU, ZHI-MIN; LI, ZHENG-QIANG; ZHANG, YAN; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) have been found to be involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts. The association between the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression ratio and the pathogenesis of bone-destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in several joints, but the available data for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of osteoclasts at sites of bone erosion by determining the CTR expression and the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the TMJ in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group, injected with saline solution for 6 weeks; and CIA group, injected with emulsion. The RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly increased in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats. The RANKL:OPG expression ratio on the trabecular bone surface was 9.0 and 6.4 in the CIA group at weeks 4 and 6, respectively, while the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the controls was 1.0:2. CTR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats; the level of CTR mRNA in the CTR-positive osteoclasts on the trabecular bone surface was 10.9- and 7.8-fold higher in the CIA rats than that in the control rats at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In conclusion, focal bone destruction in an experimental model of arthritis in the TMJ can be attributed to cells expressing CTR, a defining feature of osteoclasts. The expression of RANKL and OPG mRNA within the inflamed synovium provides an insight into the mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and function at the border of bone erosion in arthritis. PMID:26622411

  2. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  3. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system. PMID:24667331

  4. Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is more like oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis, than rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P S; Porter, G; Taylor, W J

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Since the original description of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) subgroups by Moll and Wright, there has been some discrepancy in the precise prevalence of the different subgroups and in particular the proportion of patients with polyarthritis. The higher prevalence of the polyarthritis subgroup may be due to the inclusion of patients with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with coincidental psoriasis. The classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) study database provided an opportunity to examine this question. Methods The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician‐diagnosed PsA and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of whom had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with PsA were divided into two groups: polyarthritis and non‐polyarthritis (which included the Moll and Wright subgroups of spinal disease, distal interphalangeal predominant and arthritis mutilans) and were compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparisons were made between all three groups and, if a significant difference occurred, between the two groups with PsA. Results The three groups differed significantly with regard to all clinical and laboratory variables except duration of disease. Significant differences were also found between the two groups of PsA in terms of age, sex, total number of involved joints, disability score and symmetry. However, no differences were found between the groups of patients with PsA in terms of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide, enthesitis, and spinal pain and stiffness. Further, dactylitis was commonly seen in patients with PsA (57% in the polyarticular group and 45% in non‐polyarticular group), and uncommonly found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (5%). With the exception of entheseal changes, syndesmophytes and osteolysis, typical radiological features of PsA could not be used to distinguish between the Ps

  5. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  6. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  7. Protective Effect of High Molecular Weight Protein Sub-fraction of Calotropis procera Latex in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Priyanka; Ramos, Marcio V.; Vasconcelos, Mirele da Silveira; Kumar, Vijay L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteins present in the latex of Calotropis procera have been shown to produce anti-inflammatory effect and to afford protection in various disease models. Objectives: To determine the efficacy of high molecular weight protein sub-fraction (LPPI) of latex of C. procera in ameliorating joint inflammation and hyperalgesia in a preclinical model of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Monoarthritis was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and the effect of two doses of LPPI (5 and 25 mg/kg) and diclofenac (5 mg/kg) was evaluated on joint swelling, stair climbing ability, motility, and dorsal flexion pain on day 3. The rats were sacrificed on day 3 to measure tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Evaluation of joint histology was also made. Results: Intra-articular injection of FCA produced joint swelling and difficulty in stair climbing ability, motility, and pain on flexion of the joint as revealed by scores obtained for these functional parameters. LPPI produced a dose-dependent decrease in joint swelling and improved joint functions. Arthritic rats also revealed altered oxidative homeostasis where joint tissue GSH levels were decreased and TBARS levels were increased as compared to normal rats. The levels of these oxidative stress markers were near normal in arthritic rats treated with LPPI. Moreover, treatment with LPPI also maintained the structural integrity of the joint. The protective effect of LPPI was comparable to the standard anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac. Conclusion: The findings of the present study show that LPPI fraction comprising high molecular weight proteins could be used for the alleviation of arthritic symptoms. SUMMARY High molecular weight protein sub-fraction of latex of Calotropis procera (LPPI) reduced joint swelling and hyperalgesia in arthritic ratsLPPI produced a significant improvement in stair climbing ability and motility

  8. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  9. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  10. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  11. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  12. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  13. Characterization and evaluation of triamcinolone, raloxifene, and their dual-loaded microspheres as prospective local treatment system in rheumatic rat joints.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Yigit; Kurum, Baris; Karahan, Siyami; Tezcaner, Aysen; Ozen, Seza; Keskin, Dilek

    2014-08-01

    In this study, injectable microspheres were developed for the local treatment of joint degeneration in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Microspheres loaded with triamcinolone (TA), a corticosteroid drug, and/or raloxifene (Ral), a cartilage regenerative drug, were prepared with a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polycaprolactone (PCL). Microspheres were optimized for particle size, structural properties, drug release, and loading properties. In vitro release of Ral was very slow because of the low solubility of the drug and hydrophobic nature of PCL. However, when coloaded with TA, both drugs were released at higher amounts compared with their single forms. Smallest particle sizes were obtained in dual drug-loaded microspheres. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed biocompatibility of microspheres. In vivo bioefficacy of these microspheres was also examined in adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. In vivo histological studies of control groups showed development of RA with high median lesion score (5.0). Compared with control and intra-articular free drug injections, microsphere treatment groups showed lower lesion scores and better healing outcomes in histological evaluations. Results suggest that a controlled delivery system of TA and RAL by a single injection in inflamed joints holds promise for healing and suppressing inflammation. PMID:24939720

  14. Adjuvant radiation for soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Colleen I; Haas, Rick; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades, limb-preservation surgery in combination with radiotherapy achieves local control rates exceeding 90% for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Local control is not as successful for retroperitoneal sarcoma (approximately 60%) despite aggressive surgical approaches including en bloc resection of uninvolved adjacent organs combined with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This review will discuss the indications for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for primary presentation of soft tissue sarcoma: "What," referring to the type and manner of planning and delivery of RT; "When," referring to the timing and scheduling of RT; and "Why," referring to the rationale for the use of RT will be addressed. From a practical stand point, this Educational Chapter on "adjuvant RT" will focus on pre- and postoperative RT in the context of gross total resection for extremity and retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma, the two most frequent paradigms for the use of adjuvant RT. PMID:25993234

  15. Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Portuondo, Deivys; Pérez, O; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine safety is a topic of concern for the treated individual, the family, the health care personnel, and the others involved in vaccination programs as recipients or providers. Adjuvants are necessary components to warrant the efficacy of vaccines, however the overstimulation of the immune system is also associated with adverse effects. Local reactions are the most frequent manifestation of toxicity induced by adjuvanted vaccines and, with the exception of the acute phase response (APR), much less is known about the systemic reactions that follow vaccination. Their low frequency or subclinical expression meant that this matter has been neglected. In this review, various systemic reactions associated with immune stimulation will be addressed, including: APR, hypersensitivity, induction or worsening of autoimmune diseases, modification of hepatic metabolism and vascular leak syndrome (VLS), with an emphasis on the mechanism involved. Finally, the authors analyze the current focus of discussion about vaccine safety and opportunities to improve the design of new adjuvanted vaccines in the future. PMID:24607449

  16. Synovial expression of Th17-related and cancer-associated genes is regulated by the arthritis severity locus Cia10.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, E; Brenner, M; Laragione, T; Gulko, P S

    2012-04-01

    We have previously identified Cia10 as an arthritis severity and articular damage quantitative trait locus. In this study, we used Illumina RatRef-12 microarrays to analyze the expression of 21,922 genes in synovial tissues from arthritis-susceptible DA and arthritis-protected DA.ACI(Cia10) congenics with pristane-induced arthritis. 310 genes had significantly different expression. The genes upregulated in DA, and reciprocally downregulated in DA.ACI(Cia10) included IL-11, Ccl12 and Cxcl10, as well as genes implicated in Th17 responses such as IL-17A, IL-6, Ccr6, Cxcr3 and Stat4. Suppressors of immune responses Tgfb and Vdr, and inhibitors of oxidative stress were upregulated in congenics. There was an over-representation of genes implicated in cancer and cancer-related phenotypes such as tumor growth and invasion among the differentially expressed genes. Cancer-favoring genes like Ctsd, Ikbke, and Kras were expressed in increased levels in DA, whereas inhibitors of cancer phenotypes such as Timp2, Reck and Tgfbr3 were increased in DA.ACI(Cia10). These results suggest that Cia10 may control arthritis severity, synovial hyperplasia and joint damage via the regulation of the expression of cancer-related genes, inflammatory mediators and Th17-related markers. These new findings have the potential to generate new targets for therapies aimed at reducing arthritis severity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22048456

  17. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  18. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  19. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of adults soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Bui-Nguyen, B; Italiano, A; Delva, F; Toulmond, M

    2010-06-01

    The main progress in the management of soft tissue sarcomas have been obtained in the field of local control. Although the main evolutive, vital, risk of these diseases is metastatic dissemination, efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial issue. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy cannot be considered as a standard for any situation. The last results of clinical trials, meta-analysis and population studies are presented and discussed in this article. New therapeutic strategies are to be developed to prevent metastases in soft tissue sarcomas. This needs a better understanding of the biology of those tumors, of metastases risk factors and of the determinants of systemic therapies efficacy in these tumors. PMID:20547481

  20. [ADJUVANTED INFLUENZA VACCINES: DATA FROM DIRECT COMPARATIVE STUDIES].

    PubMed

    Chernikova, M I; Vasiliev, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the cornerstone of influenza control, however available vaccines are subject to certain limitations. Adjuvanted vaccines are a promising approach, however available adjuvants have a suboptimal effectiveness and safety profile. Data from direct comparative trials are necessary for selection of optimal adjuvants among currently available and search for novel safe and effective adjuvants for next generation influenza vaccines. Data from published direct comparative studies of adjuvants for influenza vaccines are summarized, a lack of such studies is noted, especially those using adequate methods and designs and comparing adjuvants of major groups (nature/source and mechanism of action). Several promising approaches of adjuvant research and development could be identified: chitosan-based adjuvants, oil-in-water emulsions and multi-component formulations (depot + immune modulating components). PMID:26829860

  1. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  2. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

  3. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  4. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  5. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  6. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  7. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  8. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  9. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  10. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  11. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicant prior to application to...

  12. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  13. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  14. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  15. Effectiveness of spray adjuvants on reduction of spray drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  16. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  17. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  18. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  19. Evolution of collagen arthritis in mice is arrested by treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antibody or a recombinant soluble TNF receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, P F; Grau, G E; Vesin, C; Loetscher, H; Gentz, R; Lesslauer, W

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of DBA/1 mice with type II collagen within complete Freund's adjuvant leads to arthritis, lasting more than 3 months. Injection of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) IgG, 2 and 3 weeks after immunization prevented the development of arthritis in the following months. This treatment had no effect when started 2 months after induction of the disease. A soluble form of the human recombinant TNF receptor type-beta (rsTNFR-beta), continuously infused at a rate of 20 micrograms/day during the second and third week after immunization, also had a long-term protective effect. Anti-TNF antibody had no effect upon the production of anti-type II collagen antibodies. These results indicate that TNF is critically involved in an early phase of this arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1337334

  20. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.