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Sample records for adjuvant cancer stem

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of cancer stem cell vaccines in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangyang; Lu, Lin; Xia, Yang; Chen, Xin; Chang, Alfred E.; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Hurt, Elaine; Owen, John; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Dai, Fu; Bao, Yangyi; Wang, Yi; Whitfield, Joel; Xia, Jian-chuan; Huang, Shiang; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies aimed at targeting cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be most efficacious if deployed in the adjuvant setting. In this study, we offer preclinical evidence this is the case for a CSC-DC vaccine as tested in murine models of SCC7 squamous cell cancer and D5 melanoma. Vaccination of mice with an ALDHhigh SCC7 CSC-DC vaccine after surgical excision of established SCC7 tumors reduced local tumor relapse and prolonged host survival. This effect was augmented significantly by simultaneous administration of anti-PD-L1, an immune checkpoint inhibitor. In the minimal disease setting of D5 melanoma, treatment of mice with ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccination inhibited primary tumor growth, reduced spontaneous lung metastases and increased host survival. In this setting, CCR10 and its ligands were downregulated on ALDHhigh D5 CSCs and in lung tissues respectively after vaccination with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC. RNAi-mediated attenuation of CCR10 blocked tumor cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. T cells harvested from mice vaccinated with ALDHhigh D5 CSC-DC selectively killed ALDHhigh D5 CSCs, with additional evidence of humoral immunological engagement and a reduction in ALDHhigh cells in residual tumors. Overall, our results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ALDHhigh CSC-DC vaccines in the adjuvant setting to more effectively limit local tumor recurrence and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, as compared with traditional DC vaccines, with increased host survival further accentuated by simultaneous PD-L1 blockade. PMID:27325649

  2. HER2 drives luminal breast cancer stem cells in the absence of HER2 amplification: Implications for efficacy of adjuvant trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Ithimakin, Suthinee; Day, Kathleen C.; Malik, Fayaz; Zen, Qin; Dawsey, Scott J.; Bersano-Begey, Tom F.; Quraishi, Ahmed A.; Ignatoski, Kathleen Woods; Daignault, Stephanie; Davis, April; Hall, Christopher L.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Heath, Amber N.; Tawakkol, Nader; Luther, Tahra K.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Chadwick, Whitney A.; Day, Mark L.; Kleer, Celina G.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Korkaya, Hasan; Wicha, Max S.

    2013-01-01

    Although current breast cancer treatment guidelines limit the use of HER2 blocking agents to tumors with HER2 gene amplification, recent retrospective analyses suggest that a wider group of patients may benefit from this therapy. Utilizing breast cancer cell lines, mouse xenograft models and matched human primary and metastatic tissues, we demonstrate that HER2 is selectively expressed in and regulates self-renewal of the cancer stem cell population in ER+, HER2− luminal breast cancers. Although trastuzumab had no effects on the growth of established luminal breast cancer mouse xenografts, administration after tumor inoculation blocked subsequent tumor growth. HER2 expression is increased in luminal tumors grown in mouse bone xenografts, as well as in bone metastases from breast cancer patients compared to matched primary tumors. Furthermore this increase in HER2 protein expression was not due to gene amplification but rather was mediated by RANK-ligand in the bone microenvironment. These studies suggest that the clinical efficacy of adjuvant trastuzumab may relate to the ability of this agent to target the cancer stem cell population in a process that does not require HER2 gene amplification. Furthermore these studies support a cancer stem cell model in which maximal clinical benefit is achieved when cancer stem cell targeting agents are administered in the adjuvant setting. PMID:23442322

  3. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owain Peris; Melling, James Daniel; Ghaneh, Paula

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer related death worldwide with an overall five-year survival of less than 5%. Potentially curative surgery, which alone can improve 5-year survival to 10%, is an option for only 10%-20% of patients at presentation owing to local invasion of the tumour or metastatic disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve 5-year survival to 20%-25% but conflicting evidence remains with regards to chemoradiation. In this article we review the current evidence available from published randomised trials and discuss ongoing phase III trials in relation to adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  5. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  6. Adjuvant analgesics in cancer pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Raj; Jones, Stephanie

    2012-02-01

    Adjuvant analgesics (co-analgesics) are medications whose primary indication is the management of a medical condition with secondary effects of analgesia. Cancer pain is multifactorial and often involves inflammatory, nociceptive, and neuropathic pain subtypes. Adjuvant analgesics used in conjunction with opioids have been found to be beneficial in the management of many cancer pain syndromes; however, they are currently underutilized. Antidepressants, anticonvulsants, local anesthetics, topical agents, steroids, bisphosphonates, and calcitonin are all adjuvants which have been shown to be effective in the management of cancer pain syndromes. When utilizing analgesic adjuvants in the treatment of cancer pain, providers must take into account the particular side effect profile of the medication. Ideally, adjuvant analgesics will be initiated at lower dosages and escalated as tolerated until efficacy or adverse effects are encountered.

  7. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  8. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  9. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-04-14

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard" adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  11. [Adjuvant therapy of breast cancer with trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Beneder, Christine; Marth, Christian

    2008-01-01

    With the approval of trastuzumab (Herceptin) in 1998, a new era of breast cancer treatment has been heralded. This antibody is directed at the intracellular domain of a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, the so-called HER2 receptor. About 25-30% of all breast cancers overexpress this factor, which is associated with a more unfavorable prognosis. Trastuzumab is indicated for patients whose tumor overexpresses HER2. All previous studies on the adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab show very consistent results and provide evidence that the risk of recurrence can be reduced by half by the antibody. Nevertheless, there are still numerous open and controversially discussed questions concerning the use of trastuzumab in adjuvant therapy.

  12. Adjuvant treatment strategies for early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Waterston, Ashita M; Cassidy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Colon cancer remains a major cause of death; however, in the last 3 years a number of trials have been published that have led to changes in the treatment of patients with this disease. Initially, the adjuvant treatment of patients following curative resection was based on their Dukes staging; this is now being refined by consideration of other pathological factors, as well as the investigation of newer prognostic markers such as p53, Ki67 and a number of genes on chromosome 18. Tumours generally develop from the progressive accumulation of genetic events, although some develop through mutation or inactivation of DNA mismatch repair proteins leading to microsatellite instability; this is particularly important in Lynch's syndrome. The loss of gene expression can occur by deletion or mutation of genes or by aberrant methylation of CpG islands. In patients with Dukes C colon cancer the standard of care for adjuvant chemotherapy was previously based on bolus fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil) and folinic acid (leucovorin) administered 5 days per month or weekly for 6 months. Recent studies with a combination of infusional fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin have been found to be superior. A further study replacing fluorouracil with oral capecitabine has also demonstrated equivalent disease-free survival. Although some debate remains regarding the benefit of adjuvant treatment for patients with Dukes B colon cancer, the emerging consensus is that, for those patients who are younger and have high-risk features, chemotherapy should be discussed. A number of large vaccine trials have also been conducted in the adjuvant setting and, overall, these have been disappointing. This is a rapidly advancing area of therapy and the results of new trials are awaited to determine whether additional benefits can be achieved with biological therapies such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-epithelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, which have already

  13. Overview of adjuvant systemic therapy in early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A; Singletary, S Eva

    2007-04-01

    The benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy in reducing risk of distant relapse from breast cancer have been recognized for several decades. The intent of adjuvant therapy is to eliminate the occult micrometastatic breast cancer burden before it progresses into clinically apparent disease. Successful delivery of effective adjuvant systemic therapy as a complement to surgical management of breast cancer has contributed to the steady declines in breast cancer mortality observed internationally over the past 2 decades. Ongoing clinical and translational research in breast cancer seeks to improve the efficacy of systemic agents for use in the conventional postoperative (adjuvant) setting.

  14. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  15. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  16. Herbal medicines as adjuvants for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Calway, Tyler; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, many patients, including cancer patients, concurrently take prescription drugs and herbal supplements. Co-administration of prescription medicines and herbal supplements may have negative outcomes via pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. However, multiple constituents in botanicals may also yield beneficial pharmacological activities. Botanicals could possess effective anticancer compounds that may be used as adjuvants to existing chemotherapy to improve efficacy and/or reduce drug-induced toxicity. Herbal medicines, such as ginseng, potentiated the effects of chemotherapeutic agents via synergistic activities, supported by cell cycle evaluations, apoptotic observations, and computer-based docking analysis. Since botanicals are nearly always administrated orally, the role of intestinal microbiota in metabolizing ginseng constituents is presented. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical utility of the botanicals in cancer chemoprevention.

  17. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  18. Adjuvant therapy for colon cancer in the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Rao, S; Cunningham, D

    2003-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with colon cancer who undergo curative surgical resection develop metastatic disease. Over the last 20 years large prospective randomised studies have demonstrated a clear survival benefit for patients with stage III colon cancer who are treated with adjuvant 5FU based chemotherapy. At the present time 6 months of 5FU and leucovorin is generally considered the standard adjuvant therapy. For stage II disease the routine use of adjuvant treatment remains controversial. Newer drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and the oral fluoropyrimidines have proven active in advanced colorectal cancer and are currently being evaluated in the adjuvant setting. Molecular markers for this disease are being identified and may help define those patients who would benefit from therapy. The integration of adjuvant immunotherapy with conventional chemotherapy offers the potential to improve the long-term outcome for surgically resected colon cancer.

  19. Biotherapy in the Adjuvant Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; Boutayeb, Saber; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    The use of adjuvant chemotherapy has improved survival in early-stage colon cancer. Ongoing adjuvant clinical trials are evaluating the addition of targeted therapies to standard chemotherapy regimen. Preliminary results with bevacizumab were disappointing. Also, cetuximab added to chemotherapy does not seem to be better than chemotherapy alone, even in selected wild-type KRAS populations. A better understanding of mechanisms of action of drugs, tumor biology, and predictive biomarkers are needed to design future adjuvant trials. PMID:27942334

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ejlertsen, Bent

    2016-05-01

    these CMF regimens has not been compared within the context of a randomised trial. Shifting from the 77B's classic CMF regimen to the 82B four-weekly IV regimen or the 89B three-weekly IV regimen was associated with a 30% increased risk of a DFS event in a multivariate analysis of a population-based cohort study. Furthermore, the four-weekly regimen used in 82B was associated with a 40% increase in mortality. The strengths of the design include identical selection criteria, uniform and prospective registration of treatment, tumour and patient characteristics. Caution is still required due to the non-experimental design of the comparison. Another finding was a substantial difference in the risk of amenorrhoea; and while 15% of patients aged 40 or younger in 77B had regular menses throughout chemotherapy, the corresponding percentage was 37 in 82B and 47 in 89B. The DBCG in collaboration with a Swedish and a Dutch centre participating in the DBCG trial 89B compared CMF with ovarian ablation in premenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumours. No significant differences were found in DFS or OS in the preplanned analysis, suggesting that the benefits of CMF may, at least in part, be explained by ovarian suppression in premenopausal patients with ER-positive tumours. However, these results are not clinically useful by themselves as other chemotherapy regimens have been more efficacious, and knowledge is still lacking regarding the benefits from adding ovarian suppression to chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. The results from the DBCG 77B and 82C are in accordance with other large adjuvant trials and the EBCTCG meta-analyses. The benefits obtained with any individual anticancer drug are largely determined by the cancer (somatic) genome; and by being a molecular target of anthracyclines, TOP2A aberrations could obviously be associated with cancer drug benefits. In the DBCG 89D, a significant heterogeneity was observed between a beneficial effect on DFS and OS

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagrial, A M; Chang, D K; Nguyen, N Q; Johns, A L; Chantrill, L A; Humphris, J L; Chin, V T; Samra, J S; Gill, A J; Pajic, M; Pinese, M; Colvin, E K; Scarlett, C J; Chou, A; Kench, J G; Sutherland, R L; Horvath, L G; Biankin, A V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Elderly patients are under-represented in Phase III clinical trials, and as a consequence the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer is not clear. We aimed to assess the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods: We assessed a community cohort of 439 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent operative resection in centres associated with the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. Results: The median age of the cohort was 67 years. Overall only 47% of all patients received adjuvant therapy. Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy were predominantly younger, had later stage disease, more lymph node involvement and more evidence of perineural invasion than the group that did not receive adjuvant treatment. Overall, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with prolonged survival (median 22.1 vs 15.8 months; P<0.0001). Older patients (aged ⩾70) were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (51.5% vs 29.8% P<0.0001). Older patients had a particularly poor outcome when adjuvant therapy was not delivered (median survival=13.1 months; HR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27–2.78, P=0.002). Conclusion: Patients aged ⩾70 are less likely to receive adjuvant therapy although it is associated with improved outcome. Increased use of adjuvant therapy in older individuals is encouraged as they constitute a large proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24263063

  2. High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Adjuvant Treatment in High-Risk Breast Cancer: Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Lanza, Francesco; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Öztürk, Mustafa; Blaise, Didier; Leno Núñez, Rubén; Schouten, Harry C; Bosi, Alberto; De Giorgi, Ugo; Generali, Daniele; Rosti, Giovanni; Necchi, Andrea; Ravelli, Andrea; Bengala, Carmelo; Badoglio, Manuela; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Bregni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) in 583 high-risk breast cancer (BC) patients (>3 positive nodes) who were transplanted between 1995 and 2005 in Europe. All patients received surgery before transplant, and 55 patients (9.5%) received neoadjuvant treatment before surgery. Median age was 47.1 years, 57.3% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 56.5% had endocrine-responsive tumors, 19.5% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumor, and 72.4% had ≥10 positive lymph nodes at surgery. Seventy-nine percent received a single HDC procedure. Overall transplant-related mortality was 1.9%, at .9% between 2001 and 2005, whereas secondary tumor-related mortality was .9%. With a median follow-up of 120 months, overall survival and disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years in the whole population were 75% and 64% and 58% and 44%, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that rates of overall survival were significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors, <10 positive lymph nodes, and smaller tumor size. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. Adjuvant HDC with AHSCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be considered in selected high-risk BC patients and further investigated in clinical trials.

  3. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  4. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  5. NCCN Task Force Report: Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Brown, Elizabeth; Burstein, Harold J; Gradishar, William J; Hudis, Clifford A; Loprinzi, Charles; Mamounas, Eleftherios Paul; Perez, Edith A; Pritchard, Kathleen; Ravdin, Peter; Recht, Abram; Somlo, George; Theriault, Richard L; Winer, Eric P; Wolff, Antonio C

    2006-03-01

    The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) first published the NCCN Breast Cancer Treatment Guidelines in 1996. The Guidelines address the treatment of all stages of breast cancer across the spectrum of patient care and have been updated yearly. Adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has undergone an especially rapid evolution over the past few years. Therefore, the NCCN Breast Cancer Guidelines Panel was supplemented by additional experts to form the Adjuvant Therapy Task Force to provide a forum for an extended discussion and expanded input to the adjuvant therapy recommendations for the Breast Cancer Treatment Guidelines. Issues discussed included methods of risk-stratification for recurrence; how biologic markers such as HER2 status, quantitative estrogen receptor, or genetic markers can be incorporated as prognostic or predictive factors; and how age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor levels impact benefits from chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Additionally, the task force discussed the strategies for use of aromatase inhibitors in postmenopausal women and the potential incorporation of trastuzumab into adjuvant therapy of women with HER2/neu positive breast cancer. This supplement summarizes the background data and ensuing discussion from the Adjuvant Task Force meeting.

  6. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  7. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  8. Management of adjuvant mitotane therapy following resection of adrenal cancer.

    PubMed

    Terzolo, M; Ardito, A; Zaggia, B; Laino, F; Germano, A; De Francia, S; Daffara, F; Berruti, A

    2012-12-01

    Whenever adrenal cancer (ACC) is completely removed we should face the dilemma to treat by means of adjuvant therapy or not. In our opinion, adjuvant mitotane is the preferable approach in most cases because the majority of patients following radical removal of an ACC have an elevated risk of recurrence. A better understanding of factors that influence prognosis and response to treatment will help in stratifying patients according to their probability of benefiting from adjuvant mitotane, with the aim of sparing unnecessary toxicity to patients who are likely unresponsive. However, until significant advancements take place, we have to deal with uncertainty using our best clinical judgement and personal experience in the clinical decision process. In the present paper, we present the current evidence on adjuvant mitotane treatment and describe the management strategies of patients with ACC after complete surgical resection. We acknowledge the limit that most recommendations are based on personal experience rather than solid evidence.

  9. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  10. Breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James; Swainey, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer may recur through 15 years and beyond after diagnosis; thus, breast cancer patients require long-term follow-up after adjuvant treatment to detect recurrent disease. History taking, physical examination, and regular mammography are still the foundation of appropriate breast cancer follow-up in the adjuvant setting. Clearly, breast MRI has a role in certain high-risk patients, but in moderate-risk patients, the decision to use MRI must be based on the complexity of the clinical scenario. Other routine imaging studies (CT, positron emission tomography, and bone scans) and laboratory testing--including tumor marker assessments--in asymptomatic patients have not demonstrated an improvement in survival, quality of life, toxicity, or cost-effectiveness. Survivorship issues are also an inherent part of breast cancer follow-up; physicians should make every effort to address supportive care issues unique to breast cancer survivors including hot flashes, bone health, neuropathy, and risk-reduction strategies.

  11. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  12. [Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer?].

    PubMed

    Hupe, M C; Kramer, M W; Kuczyk, M A; Merseburger, A S

    2015-05-01

    Advanced urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is associated with a high metastatic potential. Life expectancy for metastatic patients is poor and rarely exceeds more than one year without further therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can decrease the tumour burden while reducing the risk of death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been discussed controversially. Patients with lymph node-positive metastases seem to benefit the most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In selected patients, metastasectomy can prolong survival. In metastastic patients, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin has become the new standard regimen due to a lower toxicity in comparison to the combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC). For second-line treatment, vinflunine is the only approved therapeutic agent.

  13. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  14. Radiation plus chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-04-01

    The most common neo-adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer is chemotherapy and concurrent radiation therapy. In general, it is delivered pre-operatively for patients with clinical evidence of T(3-4) disease or post-operatively in patients who have undergone surgery and have T(3) and/or N(1-2) disease. This chapter reviews the rationale and results for neo-adjuvant therapy, the selection process for pre-operative versus post-operative treatment, and new approaches and controversies.

  15. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  16. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  17. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Ampulla of Vater Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for ampulla of Vater cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1991 and December 2002, 118 patients with ampulla of Vater cancer underwent en bloc resection. Forty-one patients received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy [RT(+) group], and 77 did not [RT(-) group]. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered to the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes, for a total dose of up to 40 Gy delivered in 2-Gy fractions, with a planned 2-week rest period halfway through the treatment period. Intravenous 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was given on Days 1 to 3 of each split course. The median follow-up was 65 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival rate in the RT(-) and RT(+) groups was 66.9% and 52.8%, respectively (p = 0.2225). The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival rate in the RT(-) and RT(+) groups was 79.9% and 80.2%, respectively (p = 0.9582). When age, type of operation, T stage, N stage, histologic differentiation, and the use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy were incorporated into the Cox proportional hazard model, there was an improvement in the locoregional relapse-free survival rate (p = 0.0050) and a trend toward a longer overall survival (p = 0.0762) associated with the use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Improved overall survival (p = 0.0235) and locoregional relapse-free survival (p = 0.0095) were also evident in patients with nodal metastasis. In contrast, enhanced locoregional control (p = 0.0319) did not result in longer survival in patients with locally advanced disease (p = 0.4544). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy may enhance locoregional control and overall survival in patients with ampulla of Vater cancer after curative resection, especially in those with nodal involvement.

  18. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  19. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  20. Adjuvant Everolimus for Resected Kidney Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with renal cell cancer who have undergone partial or complete nephrectomy will be randomly assigned to take everolimus tablets or matching placebo tablets daily for 54 weeks.

  1. Mitomycin C as an adjuvant in resected gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Alcobendas, F; Milla, A; Estape, J; Curto, J; Pera, C

    1983-01-01

    As a result of their previous experience with mitomycin C at high discontinuous doses in advanced gastric cancer, the authors studied its role as an adjuvant for locally advanced cases after surgical complete resection. Results from 70 evaluable patients are presented. Patients were allocated randomly to receive mitomycin C, 20 mg/m2 I.V. direct once every 6 weeks, four courses, or a placebo. After a follow-up period of 250 weeks, seven patients of treatment arm and 23 controls have already relapsed (p less than 0.001). Toxicity was moderate and controllable by symptomatic measures. The authors consider this investigation a positive contribution in the field of adjuvant therapy of gastric cancer. PMID:6407408

  2. Hepatic toxicity caused by adjuvant CMF/CNF in breast cancer patients and reversal by tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Hirvikoski, P P; Kumpulainen, E J; Johansson, R T

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy on liver enzymes in breast cancer patients. Furthermore, the effect of tamoxifen on liver enzymes was analyzed. Liver function tests from 194 breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with or without tamoxifen (TAM) were reviewed. Statistically very significant increases were seen in alkaline phosphatase, aspartate acetyl transferase, and gamma glutamyl transferase levels in these patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. No statistical changes were noticed in bilirubin levels. If tamoxifen was given together with adjuvant chemotherapy, no changes in liver function tests were detected. Hepatic toxicity was induced in breast cancer patients by adjuvant CMF/CNF therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, mitoxantrone). These changes were mostly mild. Adjuvant tamoxifen reduced the increase in liver enzymes caused by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  5. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  6. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  7. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  8. Selective glucocorticoid receptor-activating adjuvant therapy in cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sundahl, Nora; Clarisse, Dorien; Bracke, Marc; Offner, Fritz; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Beck, Ilse M.

    2016-01-01

    Although adverse effects and glucocorticoid resistance cripple their chronic use, glucocorticoids form the mainstay therapy for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, and play an important role in treatment protocols of both lymphoid malignancies and as adjuvant to stimulate therapy tolerability in various solid tumors. Glucocorticoid binding to their designate glucocorticoid receptor (GR), sets off a plethora of cell-specific events including therapeutically desirable effects, such as cell death, as well as undesirable effects, including chemotherapy resistance, systemic side effects and glucocorticoid resistance. In this context, selective GR agonists and modulators (SEGRAMs) with a more restricted GR activity profile have been developed, holding promise for further clinical development in anti-inflammatory and potentially in cancer therapies. Thus far, the research into the prospective benefits of selective GR modulators in cancer therapy limped behind. Our review discusses how selective GR agonists and modulators could improve the therapy regimens for lymphoid malignancies, prostate or breast cancer. We summarize our current knowledge and look forward to where the field should move to in the future. Altogether, our review clarifies novel therapeutic perspectives in cancer modulation via selective GR targeting. PMID:27713909

  9. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D; Anderson, Roger T; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival.A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model.About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all-cause mortality.Our findings

  10. The role of targeted agents in adjuvant therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen

    2005-07-01

    The recent survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-small cell lung cancer provides optimism for the future success of targeted therapy in this setting. It is important that we begin to explore molecularly targeted agents in the adjuvant arena, but how best to accomplish this in the face of these new findings presents a challenge. Criteria for selecting promising targeted therapies and optimal trial designs to evaluate them expeditiously in the adjuvant setting are clearly needed.

  11. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  12. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  13. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy approaches for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Derek; Burgess, Earle; Gaston, Kris E; Haake, Michael R; Riggs, Steven B

    2012-10-01

    Deeply invasive bladder cancer, representing approximately 20% of incident cases, is cured by radical cystectomy or radiotherapy in less than 50% of cases. In an effort to improve cure rates, based on objective response rates in metastatic disease of 40%-70% from combination chemotherapy regimens, systemic chemotherapy has been incorporated into programs of definitive treatment for this disease. Several randomized trials and a meta-analysis have confirmed a survival benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by definitive local treatment, reflecting both median survival figures and cure rates. Despite several promising phase II trials, no randomized trial of classical adjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer has demonstrated an overall survival benefit, despite increments in disease-free survival. Molecular prognostication has been studied in an effort to improve the utility of systemic therapy for invasive non-metastatic bladder cancer, but randomized trials have not shown associated survival benefit. Despite level 1 evidence of a survival benefit from neoadjuvant MVAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin [Adriamycin], cisplatin) or cisplatin, methotrexate, and vinblastine (CMV) chemotherapy, more than 50% of incident cases do not receive such treatment.

  14. [A case of early gastric cancer completely responding to adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nakano, Mae; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Nakano, Masato; Ishikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Koyama, Yu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with ascending colon cancer (cT3N1M0, Stage IIIa), which was found during examinations following a positive fecal occult blood test. The patient was also diagnosed with early gastric cancer (cT1a, N0, M0, Stage IA)during a preoperative gastroscopy examination. A laparoscopically assisted right colectomy and D3 lymphadenectomy was performed for the ascending colon cancer. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was Stage IIIb (pT3N2), he was administered in combination with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CapeOX) as adjuvant chemotherapy before the treatment for the colon cancer. After 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, we were unable to detect any gastric lesions at the same location using gastroscopy, and so diagnosed a clinical complete response. A follow-up gastroscopy 6 months later showed the same findings. The patient has had no recurrence of gastric cancer for 18 months after the initial operation. He will continue to be followed up closely using gastroscopy. In this case, CapeOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer was also effective for early gastric cancer.

  15. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  16. Cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen as adjuvant therapies in the management of breast cancer. CRC Adjuvant Breast Trial Working Party.

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    In 1980 the Cancer Research Campaign launched a multi-centre breast cancer trial; aimed at repeating the Scandinavian Chemotherapy Study Group's cyclophosphamide trial, and the NATO tamoxifen study; thereby further evaluating the role of these two adjuvant regimens in patients with early breast cancer. Two thousand two hundred and thirty women were randomized into this trial between 1980 and 1985 and preliminary analyses demonstrate a significant improvement in event-free survival for both regimens. Results from this study closely parallel the two trials it set out to repeat. PMID:2900646

  17. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  18. Menopausal status and adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer patients: a practical guideline.

    PubMed

    De Vos, F Y F L; van Laarhoven, H W M; Laven, J S E; Themmen, A P N; Beex, L V A M; Sweep, C G J; Seynaeve, C; Jager, A

    2012-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy amongst women in the developed world. For patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer eligible for adjuvant hormonal therapy, it is important to know if the ovaries are (still) functional or not. Indeed, the choice for a specific adjuvant hormonal treatment depends on the menopausal status of an individual woman. The currently available measures to determine the menopausal status are conflicting. Until better measures become available, we propose a practical guideline enabling an optimal choice of adjuvant hormonal therapy for women with a hormone receptor positive breast cancer taking into account uncertainties about their menopausal status.

  19. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-05-15

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients.

  20. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been established as a standard for patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Adjuvant chemotherapy increased the 5-year survival rates by 4% to 15% within randomized trials and, based on a meta-analysis of five cisplatin-based trials, by 5.4%. Adjuvant chemotherapy consists of a cisplatin-based doublet, preferentially cisplatin plus vinorelbine. Future improvements in outcome of adjuvant therapy are expected by customized chemotherapy and the integration of targeted therapies or immunotherapy. PMID:25806316

  2. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  3. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stimulated by antiestrogens. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor involve changes of both proliferation and...self-renewal capabilities of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER- positive breast cancer stem/progenitor...potent tumor-seeding efficiency. . Fig 3. The effects of antiestrogens on the differentiation of ER-positive breast cancer stem cells expressing

  5. The use of adjuvant bisphophonates in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam M

    2014-11-01

    Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer has resulted in significant improvement in breast cancer-related outcomes. In addition to chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, the bone-protective agents known as bisphosphonates have been extensively investigated for their putative antitumor effect. Backed by strong preclinical data from in vitro and in vivo models, several randomized clinical trials have evaluated the role of bisphosphonates in an adjuvant setting. The recent NSABP B-34 (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-34) and AZURE (Adjuvant Zoledronic Acid to Reduce Recurrence) studies found no disease-free survival benefit with clodronate and zoledronate, respectively, whereas the ABCSG-12 (Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group trial 12) study found improvement in disease-free survival with zoledronate. Data from these trials suggested a beneficial effect of bisphosphonates in older, postmenopausal women and in premenopausal women treated with ovarian suppression. Given the acceptable toxicity profile of bisphosphonates, these agents could be a useful adjunct to adjuvant chemotherapy or endocrine treatment for early-stage breast cancer in a carefully selected subset of patients. This review aims to critically synthesize the results of clinical trials of adjuvant bisphosphonates in early-stage breast cancer, and to provide guidelines for the use of these agents in early-stage breast cancer.

  6. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ismaili, Nabil; Mellas, Nawfel; Masbah, Ouafae; Elmajjaoui, Sanaa; Arifi, Samia; Bekkouch, Imane; Ahid, Samir; Bazid, Zakaria; Tazi, Mohammed Adnane; Erraki, Abdelouahed; El Mesbahi, Omar; Benjaafar, Noureddine; El Gueddari, Brahim El Khalil; Ismaili, Mohammed; Afqir, Said; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Background The optimal sequencing of chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast surgery was largely studied but remains controversial. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a valuable method for adjuvant treatment of breast cancer which is under ongoing research program in our hospital. We are evaluating the feasibility of the concomitant use of chemotherapy retrospectively. Methods Two hundred forty four women having breast cancer were investigated in a retrospective study. All patients were either treated by radical surgery or breast conservative surgery. The study compares two adjuvant treatments associating concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In the first group (group A) the patients were treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy in concomitant way using anthracycline (n = 110). In the second group (group B) the patients were treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy in concomitant way using CMF treatment (n = 134). Chemotherapy was administered in six cycles, one each 3 weeks. Radiotherapy delivered a radiation dose of 50 Gy on the whole breast (or on the external wall) and/or on the lymphatic region. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the rates of disease free survival, loco-regional recurrence-free survival and overall survival. The Pearson Khi2 test was used to analyse the homogeneity between the two groups. The log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between the two groups A and B. Results After 76.4 months median follow-up (65.3 months mean follow up), only one patient relapsed to loco-regional breast cancer when the treatment was based on anthracycline. However, 8 patients relapsed to loco-regional breast cancer when the treatment was based on CMF. In the anthracycline group, the disease free survival after 5 years, was 80.4% compared to 76.4% in the CMF group (Log-rank test: p = 0.136). The overall survival after 5 years was 82.5% and 81.1% in the anthracycline and CMF groups respectively (Log-rank test: p = 0.428). The loco

  7. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  8. Generation of "virtual" control groups for single arm prostate cancer adjuvant trials.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenyu; Lilly, Michael B; Koziol, James A; Chen, Xin; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Yipeng; Skarecky, Douglas; Sutton, Manuel; Sawyers, Anne; Ruckle, Herbert; Carpenter, Philip M; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Mingsen; Pan, Cong; Zhu, Jian-Guo; McLaren, Christine E; Gurley, Michael J; Lee, Chung; McClelland, Michael; Ahlering, Thomas; Kattan, Michael W; Mercola, Dan

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to construct a control group for trials of adjuvant therapy (Rx) of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RP) due to ethical issues and patient acceptance. We utilized 8 curve-fitting models to estimate the time to 60%, 65%, … 95% chance of progression free survival (PFS) based on the data derived from Kattan post-RP nomogram. The 8 models were systematically applied to a training set of 153 post-RP cases without adjuvant Rx to develop 8 subsets of cases (reference case sets) whose observed PFS times were most accurately predicted by each model. To prepare a virtual control group for a single-arm adjuvant Rx trial, we first select the optimal model for the trial cases based on the minimum weighted Euclidean distance between the trial case set and the reference case set in terms of clinical features, and then compare the virtual PFS times calculated by the optimum model with the observed PFSs of the trial cases by the logrank test. The method was validated using an independent dataset of 155 post-RP patients without adjuvant Rx. We then applied the method to patients on a Phase II trial of adjuvant chemo-hormonal Rx post RP, which indicated that the adjuvant Rx is highly effective in prolonging PFS after RP in patients at high risk for prostate cancer recurrence. The method can accurately generate control groups for single-arm, post-RP adjuvant Rx trials for prostate cancer, facilitating development of new therapeutic strategies.

  9. Could Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Surgery Benefit Elderly Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin Woon; Kwon, In Gyu; Son, Young-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate tolerance to adjuvant chemotherapy, and to compare survival between treatments using only surgery and using surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy, in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer who were ≥75 years of age. Materials and Methods Patients ≥75 years of age who were diagnosed with pathological stage II or III gastric cancer were identified retrospectively and categorized into the surgery only and surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups. Clinicopathological and survival data were compared between these two groups. Results Among the 130 patients studied, 67 patients underwent curative surgery only, and 63 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy after curative surgery. In the latter group, adverse events were reported in 24 patients (38.1%). The treatments were discontinued in 19 patients (30.2%) owing to any reason. The overall 5-year survival rates of the surgery only and the surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups did not differ significantly (44.1% vs. 30.7%, respectively; P=0.804). Among 90 death events, deaths from recurrences of gastric cancer occurred in 42 patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and the depths of tumor invasions were related to survival, and the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery did not influence survival. Conclusions The decision for the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients should be taken after considering the condition of individual patients and their life expectancies. PMID:28053813

  10. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  11. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  12. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Millikan, Randall E; Stadler, Walter; De Mulder, Pieter; Sherif, Amir; von der Maase, Hans; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Soloway, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of the disease were made with reference to a 4-point scale. Results of the authors' deliberations are presented as a consensus document. Meta-analysis of randomized trials on cisplatin-containing combination neoadjuvant chemotherapy revealed a 5% difference in favor of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No randomized trials have yet compared survival with transurethral resection of bladder tumor alone versus cystectomy for the management of patients with muscle-invasive disease. Collaborative international adjuvant chemotherapy trials are needed to assist researchers in assessing the true value of adjuvant chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients

  13. [Neoadjuvant, inductive or adjuvant chemotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, C-H; De Santis, M

    2013-11-01

    Perioperative chemotherapy is a standard treatment for patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma undergoing radical cystectomy; however, direct comparisons of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy are lacking. Evidence-based data and implementation into daily clinical practice favor neoadjuvant chemotherapy; nevertheless, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is still underused in daily practice compared to adjuvant chemotherapy. If neoadjuvant chemotherapy has not been used and patients are fit enough to receive cisplatin, adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in patients with pT3-pT4 and/or lymph node metastases.

  14. Sleep Aid Use During and Following Breast Cancer Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tiffany A.; Berger, Ann M.; Dizona, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of sleep aid use is limited despite the high prevalence of insomnia among women before, during, and following breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy treatments (CTX). This study's purpose was to 1) determine the frequency and characteristics of participants taking sleep aid(s); 2) identify the frequency and percent of sleep aid use by category (prescription sedative/hypnotics, prescription anti-depressants, prescription analgesics, prescription anti-emetics, over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, OTC cold/flu/sinus, OTC sleep, alcohol, and herbal supplements); and 3) compare sleep aid use by category in the experimental and control groups within a randomized-controlled clinical trial RCT). Methods Longitudinal, descriptive, secondary RCT data analysis of women (n=219) receiving out-patient CTX, and at 30, 60, and 90 days following the last CTX and 1 year following CTX1. Participants recorded daily sleep aid use on a Sleep Diary. Analyses included descriptives, chi-square, and RM-ANOVA. Results Approximately 20% of participants took at least one sleep aid before CTX1; usage decreased over time (12-18%); a 2nd sleep aid was used infrequently. Prescription sedative/hypnotics (46%) and OTC analgesics (24%) were used most frequently. OTC sleep aids were most commonly used as a 2nd aid. Prescription sedative/hypnotics [F(7,211)=4.26, p=0.00] and OTC analgesics [F(7,211)=2.38, p=0.023] use decreased significantly over time. Conclusions Results reflect the natural course of CTX, recovery, and healing. Comprehensive screening for sleep-wake disturbances and sleep aid use may lead to a better understanding of the risks and benefits of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, and ultimately lead to selection of the safest and most effective treatment. PMID:20878849

  15. Role of toll-like receptors and their adaptors in adjuvant immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Akazawa, Takashi; Uehori, Junji; Matsumoto, Misako; Azuma, Ichiro; Toyoshima, Kumao

    2003-01-01

    The potentiation of immune responses to tumor-associated antigen (Ag) is a pivotal issue in immunotherapy for cancer and thus requires the use of adjuvants, which are involved in efficient antibody (Ab) production and killer cell induction. The efficacy for tumor regression of a number of adjuvants that have been applied to immunotherapy in humans and tumor-bearing animal models has been tested without understanding of the function of adjuvants. Recent findings on the function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptors facilitated the elucidation of the molecular basis of adjuvant activity. TLR signaling was found to induce interferons (IFNs), chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines and mature dendritic cells (DCs) for enhanced efficiency in antigen presentation. The mediators then play a crucial role in the organization of acquired immunity and, together with matured DCs, activate cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and NK cells. These TLR outputs vary among adjuvants, which may depend on adjuvant-specific selection of appropriate sets of TLRs and their adaptors. Here we review how a variety of host immune responses are induced by an individual adjuvant to confer an adjuvant-specific anti-tumor immunity. We elaborate specifically on two adjuvants, BCG-cell wall skeleton and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The former activates TLR2/4 on DCs and induces tumor-specific CTL allowing general application to patients with surgically dissected cancer and improving prognosis, while the latter activates TLR3 on DCs to release type 1 IFN that induces tumor cell apoptosis and NK-mediated tumor cytotoxicity.

  16. Sequential hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer after adjuvant tamoxifen or anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Henderson, I Craig

    2003-01-01

    The use of adjuvant endocrine therapy in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive, early breast cancer has become important in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Tamoxifen has been the principal adjuvant hormonal therapy in pre- and postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer for nearly 20 years. Recent data in premenopausal women suggest benefit from ovarian ablation with or without tamoxifen. Early results from the 'Arimidex', Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) trial have demonstrated that the third-generation, selective aromatase inhibitor (AI) anastrozole ('Arimidex') is a suitable alternative adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive disease. After recurrence or relapse on adjuvant endocrine therapy, responses to the sequential use of additional endocrine agents are common. The increase in the number of options now available for adjuvant therapy will have important implications for the selection of the optimal sequence of endocrine agents in the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Menopausal status is an important factor in determining the endocrine therapy that a patient receives. For premenopausal women, tamoxifen and/or a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist such as goserelin ('Zoladex') are both options for adjuvant endocrine treatment. After progression on adjuvant and first-line tamoxifen, ovarian ablation is an appropriate second-line therapy. For premenopausal women who have undergone ovarian ablation, the use of third-line therapy with an AI becomes possible. For postmenopausal women, a wide choice of endocrine treatment options is available and an optimal sequence has yet to be determined. Options for first-line therapy of metastatic disease include an AI for women who have received adjuvant tamoxifen or tamoxifen for patients who have received adjuvant anastrozole. In addition, data suggest that fulvestrant ('Faslodex'), a novel estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist that

  17. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer after D2 Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-sheng; Ren, Chao; Bai, Long; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background A phase III clinical trial has already shown the survival benefits of postoperative chemotherapy in gastric cancer. However, there are limited published data concerning the elderly. This study aims to investigate the use of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer after D2 gastrectomy among the elderly and identify its impact on survival. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 360 patients who had undergone D2 gastrectomy, aged 65 years or older, with non-metastatic gastric cancer in a single institution. We analyzed the predictors and survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy use in the elderly. Further, we analyzed the survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy by dividing the patients into groups according to disease stages and chemotherapeutic regimens. Results Among the 360 patients, only 34.7% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Age, tumor location, lymph node involvement and tumor invasion were associated with the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy improved the overall survival for non-metastatic elderly patients (HR 0.60, 95%CI 0.42–0.83, P = 0.003). Significant survival benefits were found with adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III patients (HR 0.67, 95%CI 0.47–0.97, P = 0.033), but not in stage I patients or in stage II patients (HR 0.52, 95%CI 0.21–1.30 P = 0.161). Compared to adjuvant chemotherapy without platinum, no significant survival benefits were observed with platinum-containing chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95%CI 0.49–1.45, P = 0.530). Besides adjuvant chemotherapy, other independent prognostic factors of survival included tumor location, tumor size, histologic grade, depth of tumor invasion, and lymph node status. Conclusions This study demonstrated the survival benefits of adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy among the elderly patients with non-metastatic gastric cancer after D2 gastrectomy. However, due to the limitations of this study, further well-designed prospective studies with

  18. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  20. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. PMID:26516408

  1. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  2. Suppression of cancer relapse and metastasis by inhibiting cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Li, Youzhi; Rogoff, Harry A; Keates, Sarah; Gao, Yuan; Murikipudi, Sylaja; Mikule, Keith; Leggett, David; Li, Wei; Pardee, Arthur B; Li, Chiang J

    2015-02-10

    Partial or even complete cancer regression can be achieved in some patients with current cancer treatments. However, such initial responses are almost always followed by relapse, with the recurrent cancer being resistant to further treatments. The discovery of therapeutic approaches that counteract relapse is, therefore, essential for advancing cancer medicine. Cancer cells are extremely heterogeneous, even in each individual patient, in terms of their malignant potential, drug sensitivity, and their potential to metastasize and cause relapse. Indeed, hypermalignant cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells or stemness-high cancer cells, that are highly tumorigenic and metastatic have been isolated from cancer patients with a variety of tumor types. Moreover, such stemness-high cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. Here we show that BBI608, a small molecule identified by its ability to inhibit gene transcription driven by Stat3 and cancer stemness properties, can inhibit stemness gene expression and block spherogenesis of or kill stemness-high cancer cells isolated from a variety of cancer types. Moreover, cancer relapse and metastasis were effectively blocked by BBI608 in mice. These data demonstrate targeting cancer stemness as a novel approach to develop the next generation of cancer therapeutics to suppress cancer relapse and metastasis.

  3. Suppression of cancer relapse and metastasis by inhibiting cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Rogoff, Harry A.; Keates, Sarah; Gao, Yuan; Murikipudi, Sylaja; Mikule, Keith; Leggett, David; Li, Wei; Pardee, Arthur B.; Li, Chiang J.

    2015-01-01

    Partial or even complete cancer regression can be achieved in some patients with current cancer treatments. However, such initial responses are almost always followed by relapse, with the recurrent cancer being resistant to further treatments. The discovery of therapeutic approaches that counteract relapse is, therefore, essential for advancing cancer medicine. Cancer cells are extremely heterogeneous, even in each individual patient, in terms of their malignant potential, drug sensitivity, and their potential to metastasize and cause relapse. Indeed, hypermalignant cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells or stemness-high cancer cells, that are highly tumorigenic and metastatic have been isolated from cancer patients with a variety of tumor types. Moreover, such stemness-high cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. Here we show that BBI608, a small molecule identified by its ability to inhibit gene transcription driven by Stat3 and cancer stemness properties, can inhibit stemness gene expression and block spherogenesis of or kill stemness-high cancer cells isolated from a variety of cancer types. Moreover, cancer relapse and metastasis were effectively blocked by BBI608 in mice. These data demonstrate targeting cancer stemness as a novel approach to develop the next generation of cancer therapeutics to suppress cancer relapse and metastasis. PMID:25605917

  4. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  5. Role of Oxidative Stress in Stem, Cancer, and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The term ‘‘oxidative stress” refers to a cell’s state characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is one of the most important regulatory mechanisms for stem, cancer, and cancer stem cells. The concept of cancer stem cells arose from observations of similarities between the self-renewal mechanism of stem cells and that of cancer stem cells, but compared to normal stem cells, they are believed to have no control over the cell number. ROS have been implicated in diverse processes in various cancers, and generally the increase of ROS in cancer cells is known to play an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. Additionally, ROS have been considered as the most significant mutagens in stem cells; when elevated, blocking self-renewal and at the same time, serving as a signal stimulating stem cell differentiation. Several signaling pathways enhanced by oxidative stress are suggested to have important roles in tumorigenesis of cancer or cancer stem cells and the self-renewal ability of stem or cancer stem cells. It is now well established that mitochondria play a prominent role in apoptosis and increasing evidence supports that apoptosis and autophagy are physiological phenomena closely linked with oxidative stress. This review elucidates the effect and the mechanism of the oxidative stress on the regulation of stem, cancer, and cancer stem cells and focuses on the cell signaling cascades stimulated by oxidative stress and their mechanism in cancer stem cell formation, as very little is known about the redox status in cancer stem cells. Moreover, we explain the link between ROS and both of apoptosis and autophagy and the impact on cancer development and treatment. Better understanding of this intricate link may shed light on mechanisms that lead to better modes of cancer treatment. PMID:24281098

  6. Adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer and risk of hormone receptor-specific subtypes of contralateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Christopher I; Daling, Janet R; Porter, Peggy L; Tang, Mei-Tzu C; Malone, Kathleen E

    2009-09-01

    Compared with the breast cancer risk women in the general population have, breast cancer survivors have a substantially higher risk of developing a second primary contralateral breast cancer. Adjuvant hormonal therapy reduces this risk, but preliminary data indicate that it may also increase risk of hormone receptor-negative contralateral tumors. We conducted a population-based nested case-control study including 367 women diagnosed with both first primary estrogen receptor (ER)-positive invasive breast cancer and second primary contralateral breast cancer and 728 matched control women diagnosed only with a first breast cancer. Data on adjuvant hormonal therapy, other treatments, and breast cancer risk factors were ascertained through telephone interviews and medical record abstractions. Two-sided statistical tests using conditional logistic regression were conducted to quantify associations between adjuvant hormonal therapy and risk of hormone receptor-specific subtypes of contralateral breast cancer (n = 303 ER+ and n = 52 ER- cases). Compared with women not treated with hormonal therapy, users of adjuvant tamoxifen for >or=5 years had a reduced risk of ER+ contralateral breast cancer [odds ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.3-0.7], but a 4.4-fold (95% CI, 1.03-19.0) increased risk of ER- contralateral breast cancer. Tamoxifen use for <5 years was not associated with ER- contralateral breast cancer risk. Although adjuvant hormonal therapy has clear benefits, risk of the relatively uncommon outcome of ER- contralateral breast cancer may now need to be tallied among its risks. This is of clinical concern given the poorer prognosis of ER- compared with ER+ tumors.

  7. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Alone for HPV Related Oropharyngeal Cancers with High Risk Features

    PubMed Central

    Su, William; Liu, Jerry; Miles, Brett A.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.; Posner, Marshall; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current standard of care for oropharyngeal cancers with positive surgical margins and/or extracapsular extension is adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. It is unknown whether HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer benefits from this treatment intensification. Objective To investigate the outcomes of HPV+ patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy alone when chemoradiotherapy was indicated based on high risk pathological features. They were compared with high risk HPV+ patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods All high risk HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer patients (9) who received radiotherapy alone were identified. We also identified 17 patients who received chemoradiotherapy as a comparison group. Median follow up time was 37.3 months. Results No local failures developed in adjuvant radiotherapy group. There was 1 distant recurrence in this cohort and 3 in CRT cohort. Regarding toxicity, 8 (47.1%) chemoradiotherapy patients had >10 lb. weight loss (p = 0.013), despite 75% of them having a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed. No individuals in radiotherapy group experienced a >10 lb. weight loss and none required a gastrostomy tube. Conclusions This series provides preliminary evidence suggesting that the omission of concurrent chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy may offer comparative local control rates with a lower toxicity profile in the setting of HPV+ patients with traditional high risk features. PMID:27930732

  8. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  9. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

  10. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Stefan Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m{sup 2}), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h). A dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m{sup 2} in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m{sup 2} administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy.

  11. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  12. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  13. Epigenetic Targeting of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer (OC). As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cell (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC towards a differentiated phenotype, by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH+ OC cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH+ cells, including their tumor initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced re-expression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by re-programming residual cancer stem-like cells. Further, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  14. [Current status of adjuvant chemotherapy for resected lung cancer at our institute--focus on clinical trial enrollment].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Komori, Eisaku; Suehiro, Hiroshi; Ogino, Atsuko; Nogami, Hiroyuki; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Shinkai, Tetsu

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy after complete resection in Stage I B-III A non-small cell lung cancer is recommended. Several clinical trials of adjuvant chemotherapy are now underway in Japan. Our institute also participates in adjuvant clinical trials, but slow patient recruitment is a problem. In this paper, we reported the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy and recruitment for clinical trials at our institute. Between August 2001 and December 2008, candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy were 315 patients. Among them 186 who received adjuvant chemotherapy were younger and had less co-morbidity than those who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-five of the 186 patients participated in the clinical trials. The major reason of refusal of a clinical trial was that patients preferred to choose their own treatment and disliked randomized trials.

  15. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  16. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  17. Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    1 Endocrine-Related Cancer Commentary Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis Jiyoung Park 1 and Philipp E. Scherer...REPORT DATE JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leptin And Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells To...interest. Recently several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin , an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this

  18. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed. PMID:28105077

  19. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed.

  20. Use of liposomal doxorubicin for adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer in clinical practice*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Ding, Xian-feng; Shen, Jian-yu; Zhang, Xi-ping; Ding, Xiao-wen; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality. It is helpful to reduce the rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis by treating breast cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy, so as to increase the cure rate or survival of patients. In recent years, liposomes have been regarded as a kind of new carrier for targeted drugs. Being effective for enhancing drug efficacy and reducing side effects, they have been widely used for developing anticancer drugs. As a kind of anthracycline with high anticancer activity, doxorubicin can treat or alleviate a variety of malignant tumors effectively when it is used on its own or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Although liposomal doxorubicin has been extensively used in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer, its exact therapeutic efficacy and side effects have not been definitely proven. Various clinical studies have adopted different combined regimes, dosages, and staging, so their findings differ to certain extent. This paper reviews the clinical application of liposomal doxorubicin in the adjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer and illustrates therapeutic effects and side effects of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and non-PLD (NPLD) in clinical research, in order to discuss the strategies for applying these drugs in such adjuvant chemotherapy, looking forward to providing references for related research and clinical treatment in terms of dosage, staging, combined regimes, and analysis methods and so on. PMID:28070993

  1. On the stem cell origin of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-06-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer-field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change-the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth.

  2. Weight gain after adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early breast cancer in Istanbul Turkey.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Gul; Turhal, Nazım Serdar; Cabuk, Devrim; Yurt, Nevin; Yurtseven, Gul; Gumus, Mahmut; Teomete, Mehmet; Dane, Faysal; Yumuk, Perran Fulden

    2011-06-01

    Weight gain is a well-known and unwanted complication of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. We observed that the female Turkish cancer patients frequently gain weight with adjuvant treatment of breast cancer and planned to examine the magnitude of this problem in early breast cancer patients treated at our hospital. A total of 176 early breast cancer patients who received their adjuvant systemic therapy in Marmara University Hospital between 2003 and 2007 are included in the study. We recorded their weight before and after chemotherapy and also a year after chemotherapy to find out whether the change with weight is transitory. We have also recorded demographic information, including the educational level, menopausal status, the type of chemotherapy or hormonal treatment administered stage of disease, marital status, occupation and the underlying diseases to analyze the relationship between change in weight and these parameters. Median age of patients was 53 and 72% of patients were postmenopausal. Educational level was equally distributed for primary education (27%), high school (40%), and university (33%). The majority of the patients (76%) was married, had two children (69%) and was housewife (60%). Family history of any cancer was high (32%). Most of the patients had stage II cancer (56%), received anthracyclines+/- taxane based chemotherapy (98%) and had no underlying disease (68%). The majority also did not smoke (73%) or drink alcohol (93%). A total of 67% and 72% patients gained weight upon completion and one year after completion of chemotherapy. Mean weight before the chemotherapy, upon completion of chemotherapy and one year after completion of chemotherapy were 68.9 kg, 70.6 kg (P = 0.000) and 71.9 kg (P = 0.000) respectively. Mean body mass index was 27.1 at baseline, 27.8 upon completion of chemotherapy (P = 0.000) and 28.3 one year after completion of chemotherapy (P = 0.000). Age, menopausal status, multiparity and presence of comorbid diseases

  3. Cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lathia, Justin D.; Mack, Stephen C.; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E.; Valentim, Claudia L.L.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues with defined cellular hierarchies in development and homeostasis give rise to tumors with cellular hierarchies, suggesting that tumors recapitulate specific tissues and mimic their origins. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and malignant primary brain tumor and contains self-renewing, tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) that contribute to tumor initiation and therapeutic resistance. As normal stem and progenitor cells participate in tissue development and repair, these developmental programs re-emerge in CSCs to support the development and progressive growth of tumors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern CSCs has informed the development of novel targeted therapeutics for GBM and other brain cancers. CSCs are not self-autonomous units; rather, they function within an ecological system, both actively remodeling the microenvironment and receiving critical maintenance cues from their niches. To fulfill the future goal of developing novel therapies to collapse CSC dynamics, drawing parallels to other normal and pathological states that are highly interactive with their microenvironments and that use developmental signaling pathways will be beneficial. PMID:26109046

  4. Continued value of adjuvant anthracyclines as treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Biganzoli, Laura; Di Leo, Angelo

    2015-07-01

    Anthracyclines are frequently used in the adjuvant treatment of early-stage breast cancer. However, with the increasing use of other active drugs--mainly taxanes and trastuzumab in HER2-positive disease--coupled with concerns about anthracycline-associated toxic effects, there is debate about whether anthracyclines are still needed. Three major factors should be taken into consideration with the investigation of the role of anthracyclines in management of early breast cancer; specifically, the proven efficacy of anthracyclines in breast cancer, the absence of superiority of non-anthracycline-based chemotherapy over anthracycline-taxane regimens, and the low risk of toxic effects associated with the cumulative doses of anthracyclines used in contemporary regimens. The risks remain substantially outweighed by the benefits of treatment with anthracyclines, and thus, they maintain an important role in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer, particularly in women with high-risk disease.

  5. Anti-Cancer Phytometabolites Targeting Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Heron F V; Goettert, Márcia I; Justo, Giselle Z; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a plentiful source of bioactive molecules with much structural diversity. In cancer treatment, molecules obtained from plants represent an attractive alternative to other treatments because several plant-derived compounds have exhibited lower toxicity and higher selectivity against cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the possible application of bioactive molecules obtained from plants against more primitive cell populations in cancers, cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are present in several kinds of tumors and are responsible for recurrences and metastases. Common anti-cancer drugs exhibit lower effectiveness against cancer stem cells because of their biological features. However, recently discovered natural phytometabolites exert cytotoxic effects on this rare population of cells in cancers. Therefore, this review presents the latest research on promising compounds from plants that can act as antitumor drugs and that mainly affect stem cell populations in cancers.

  6. Optimal adjuvant treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer in 2015.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Fouad, Tamer M; Piccart, Martine

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of trastuzumab as adjuvant treatment for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer changed the natural course of early-stage disease. Currently, one year of trastuzumab given concurrently with a taxane and following an anthracycline regimen is the preferred standard of care in Europe. The first attempt to escalate this approach, though the implementation of dual HER2 blockade with lapatinib added to trastuzumab, as assessed by the ALTTO trial, failed to improve further clinical outcomes; clinical assessment of the adjuvant trastuzumab/pertuzumab regimen is still ongoing in the APHINITY trial. Negative results were also reported for the addition of bevacizumab to adjuvant trastuzumab treatment within the context of the BETH study. Similarly, efforts to de-escalate through shortening the duration of adjuvant trastuzumab treatment failed (the PHARE trial), whereas others are still ongoing. Of note, evidence supports the use of lighter chemotherapy regimens with one year of adjuvant trastuzumab as backbone, for women with small HER2-positive breast tumors, where the omission of anthracyclines did not compromise the clinical outcome. Despite the successes achieved so far, a proportion of women with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer, will still experience disease recurrence. The identification of these women is urgently needed, as well as the identification of predictive biomarkers to dictate the optimal treatment strategy. So far, HER2 expression status has been the only validated predictive biomarker for this patient population. Despite the clear association of pCR achieved through neoadjuvant trastuzumab-based chemotherapy with clinical outcome, results from neoadjuvant trials have not been always consistent with what was seen in the adjuvant setting. Similarly, inconsistent results have been reported for the predictive ability of alterations affecting the PI3K signaling pathway or the quantification of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. In the era

  7. Early versus delayed initiation of adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Jong-Chan; Lee, Jongchan; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Jaihwan; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive tumor showing a tendency for early recurrence, even after curative resection. Although adjuvant treatment improves survival, it is unclear whether early adjuvant treatment initiation yields better outcomes in patients with PDAC. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 113 patients who underwent chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy after curative resection of PDAC: Fifty-six and 57 patients were in the early and delayed groups, respectively based on the median time of treatment initiation (35 days [range, 20–83 days]). Results Patient baseline characteristics were comparable in both groups, except for grade III or IV postoperative complications (5.4% in the early group vs. 22.8% in the delayed group). With a median 20.3-month follow-up, the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) times were 29.5 and 14.7 months, respectively. The early group had significantly prolonged OS (39.1 vs. 21.1 months, p = 0.018) and DFS (18.8 vs. 10.0 months, p = 0.034), compared to the delayed group. Among 71 patients who completed planned adjuvant treatment, patients in the early group tended to have longer, though not statistically significant, OS and DFS times than those in the delayed group. In 67 patients without postoperative complications, patients in the early group had longer OS (42.8 vs. 20.5 months, p = 0.002) and DFS (19.6 vs. 9.1 months, p = 0.005) than those in the delayed group. By multivariate analysis, incompletion of treatment (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.039, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.334–6.992), delayed treatment initiation (HR: 1.822, 95% CI: 1.081–3.070), and positive angiolymphatic invasion (HR: 2.116, 95% CI: 1.160–3.862) were significantly associated with shorter OS. Conclusions Adjuvant treatment should be delivered earlier and completed for better outcomes in resected PDAC patients, especially without postoperative complications. PMID:28301556

  8. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer.

  9. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated “CpG motifs” trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  10. [Is there alternative to FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer patients?].

    PubMed

    Esch, Anouk; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Being the second cancer for men and the third cancer for women in France, colorectal cancer represents a serious public health issue. Its incidence has increased these last years and despite new therapeutics being developed, it still has a bad prognostic. Thanks in part to Hemoccult national mass screening program, its diagnosis is made possible at an earlier stage, which makes a surgical curative resection and the carrying out of adjuvant chemotherapy possible. For stage III colic cancer that has been surgically removed, adjuvant chemotherapy by FOLFOX 4 has to be offered. Nevertheless, because of its toxicities, the patient's high age, important comorbidities or post-surgical complications, this chemotherapy occasionally cannot be done. What are the colorectal cancer prognostic factors which would guide the chemotherapy? TNM classification, number of examined lymph nodes, MSI status, and presence or not of a perforation or a perinervous, lymphatic or venous invasion is recognized prognostic factors. Also, what are the alternatives of FOLFOX 4 regimen as colorectal cancer adjuvant treatment?

  11. Dose-dense and sequential strategies in adjuvant breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Untch, M; Von Koch, F; Crohns, C; Sobotta, K; Kahlert, S; Konecny, G; Hepp, H

    2001-05-01

    Several attempts have been made to improve the survival rates of breast cancer patients. The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy was clearly shown, but the absolute difference of 2% to 11% in overall survival, depending on the patient group, is disappointingly small. In particular, high-risk patients, such as those with > or = 10 involved lymph nodes, extracapsular spread, or vascular invasion, still have an excessive risk of recurrence even after standard adjuvant chemotherapy. To increase the survival rates after adjuvant therapy, new chemotherapeutic agents and new strategies of application are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar), methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) seems to be safe and effective in patients with breast cancer. In addition, in metastatic patients, dose-intensified chemotherapy is being investigated. The introduction of epirubicin (Ellence), an agent less cardiotoxic and equally active compared to doxorubicin, enabled the escalation of anthracyclines in adjuvant therapy without serious cardiotoxic effects. The combination of dose-intensified chemotherapy and sequential application in the treatment of breast cancer is reviewed.

  12. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  13. [Criteria of efficacy of adjuvant immunotherapy of surface cancer of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Medvedev, V L; Budnik, N V

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of prognostic significance of interleukine-8 (L-8) urine levels was made in 12 patients with verified surface cancer of the urinary bladder (SCUB) on adjuvant intravesical immunotherapy. Quantitative enzyme immunoassay identified IL-8 in the urine before intravesical injection of BCG vaccine and 6 hours later. A total of 192 urine samples were studied ("Multiskan-Jems", 405 nm). Adjuvant immunotherapy raises an L-8 level in the urine of the patients. After 8-week immunotherapy IL-8 elevated from 169.4 pg/ml to 326 pg/ml. Four patients with minimal difference in IL-8 urine levels (120 pg/ml, on the average) before and 6 hours after intravesical injection of BCG vaccine developed recurrence. Thus, quantitative assessment of IL-8 in urine of SCUB patients given intravesical BCG therapy can serve as one of prognostic criteria of adjuvant immunotherapy efficacy.

  14. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  15. Adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Bartholomew, L Kay; Carpentier, Melissa Y; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Vernon, Sally W

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant hormonal therapy significantly improves long-term survival of breast cancer patients with hormone receptor-positive disease. Despite the proven clinical efficacy of tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors, many breast cancer survivors either fail to take the correct dosage at the prescribed frequency (adherence) or discontinue therapy (persistence). This systematic review aims to: (1) determine the prevalence of adherence and persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors in clinical practice, and (2) identify correlates of adherence and persistence. We searched Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL for studies that measured rates and/or correlates of adherence and/or persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy. Studies were reviewed in a multi-step process: (1) the lead author screened titles and abstracts of all potentially eligible studies; (2) each coauthor reviewed a random 5 % sample of abstracts; and (3) two sets of coauthors each reviewed half of all "maybe" abstracts. Any disagreements were discussed until consensus was reached. Twenty-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Prevalence of adherence ranged from 41 to 72 % and discontinuation (i.e., nonpersistence) ranged from 31 to 73 %, measured at the end of 5 years of treatment. Extremes of age (older or younger), increasing out-of-pocket costs, follow-up care with a general practitioner (vs. oncologist), higher CYP2D6 activity, switching from one form of therapy to another, and treatment side effects were negatively associated with adherence and/or persistence. Taking more medications at baseline, referral to an oncologist, and earlier year at diagnosis were positively associated with adherence and/or persistence. Adherence and persistence to adjuvant hormonal therapy among breast cancer survivors is suboptimal. Many of the correlates of adherence and persistence studied to date are not modifiable. Our review reveals a critical need for further research on modifiable factors

  16. miR-21 Expression in Cancer Cells may Not Predict Resistance to Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Primary Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup; Nielsen, Dorte; Møller, Trine; Mortensen, Christiane Ehlers; Holmstrøm, Kim; Høgdall, Estrid

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab is established as standard care for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. However, 50% of the patients do not respond to the trastuzumab therapy, and therefore new predictive biomarkers are highly warranted. MicroRNAs (miRs) constitute a new group of biomarkers and their cellular expression can be determined in tumor samples by in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis. miR-21 is highly prevalent and up-regulated in breast cancer and has been linked to drug resistance in clinical and in vitro settings. To determine expression patterns of miR-21 in high-grade breast cancers, we examined miR-21 expression in 22 HER2-positive tumors and 15 HER2-negative high-grade tumors by ISH. The histological examination indicated that patient samples could be divided into three major expression patterns: miR-21 predominantly in tumor stroma, predominantly in cancer cells, or in both stromal and cancer cells. There was no obvious difference between the HER2-positive and HER2-negative tumors in terms of the miR-21 expression patterns and intensities. To explore the possibility that miR-21 expression levels and/or cellular localization could predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, we analyzed additional 16 HER2-positive tumors from patients who were treated with trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting. Eight of the 16 patients showed clinical recurrence and were considered resistant. Examination of the miR-21 expression patterns and intensities revealed no association between the miR-21 scores in the cancer cell population (p = 0.69) or the stromal cells population (p = 0.13) and recurrent disease after adjuvant trastuzumab. Thus, our findings show that elevated miR-21 expression does not predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab.

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathological high-risk muscle invasive bladder cancer: time to reconsider?

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Brian C.; Eapen, Libni J.; Bahl, Amit; Murthy, Vedang; Roubaud, Guilhem; Orré, Mathieu; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Shariat, Shahrokh; Larré, Stephane; Richaud, Pierre; Christodouleas, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Radical cystectomy with extended pelvic lymph-node dissection, associated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, remains the standard of care for advanced, non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Loco-regional control is a key factor in the outcome of patients since it is related to overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and cause-specific survival. The risk of loco-regional recurrence (LRR) is correlated to pathological factors as well as the extent of the lymphadenectomy. In addition, neither pre- nor post-operative chemotherapy have shown a clear impact on LRR-free survival. Several recent publications have led to the development of a nomogram predicting the risk of LRR, in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy. Given the high risk of LRR for selected patients and improvements in radiation techniques that can reduce toxicity, there is a growing interest in adjuvant radiotherapy; international cooperative groups have come together to provide the rationale in favor of adjuvant radiotherapy. Clinical trials in order to reduce the risk of pelvic relapse are opened based on this optimizing patient selection. The aim of this critical literature review is to provide an overview of the rationale supporting the studies of adjuvant radiation for patients with pathologic high-risk MIBC. PMID:27785427

  18. Enhancing Immunogenicity of Cancer Vaccines: QS-21 as an Immune Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Gin, David Y.; Slovin, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    Saponins comprise a class of plant natural products that incorporate a lipophilic terpenoid core, to which is appended one or more carbohydrate residues. They are amphiphilic molecules and often exhibit toxic biological profiles, likely as a result of their roles as vital components in protective coatings to defend against phytopathogen infection and insect predation. The most notable of adjuvant-active saponins investigated for vaccine development come from the Chilean Soapbark Tree, Quillaja saponaria (i.e., QS). More than 30 years ago, semi-purified extracts (i.e., Quil A) from the cortex of Quillaja saponaria were found to be highly effective as adjuvants in veterinary vaccines. However, due to significant and variable toxicity effects, Quil A was not deemed appropriate for human vaccines. More refined purification methods have led to multiple fractions which are derived from the original plant extract. As such, QS-21 to date appears to be one of the more scientifically interesting and robust adjuvants in use in vaccinology. The role of QS-21 as an adjuvant for use in a variety of cancer vaccine trials and its comparison to other adjuvants is discussed in this review. PMID:25473385

  19. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  20. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  1. Personalizing colon cancer adjuvant therapy: selecting optimal treatments for individual patients.

    PubMed

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Salazar, Ramon; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-06-01

    For more than three decades, postoperative chemotherapy-initially fluoropyrimidines and more recently combinations with oxaliplatin-has reduced the risk of tumor recurrence and improved survival for patients with resected colon cancer. Although universally recommended for patients with stage III disease, there is no consensus about the survival benefit of postoperative chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer. The most recent adjuvant clinical trials have not shown any value for adding targeted agents, namely bevacizumab and cetuximab, to standard chemotherapies in stage III disease, despite improved outcomes in the metastatic setting. However, biomarker analyses of multiple studies strongly support the feasibility of refining risk stratification in colon cancer by factoring in molecular characteristics with pathologic tumor staging. In stage II disease, for example, microsatellite instability supports observation after surgery. Furthermore, the value of BRAF or KRAS mutations as additional risk factors in stage III disease is greater when microsatellite status and tumor location are taken into account. Validated predictive markers of adjuvant chemotherapy benefit for stage II or III colon cancer are lacking, but intensive research is ongoing. Recent advances in understanding the biologic hallmarks and drivers of early-stage disease as well as the micrometastatic environment are expected to translate into therapeutic strategies tailored to select patients. This review focuses on the pathologic, molecular, and gene expression characterizations of early-stage colon cancer; new insights into prognostication; and emerging predictive biomarkers that could ultimately help define the optimal adjuvant treatments for patients in routine clinical practice.

  2. Adjuvant Cancer Biotherapy by Viscum Album Extract Isorel: Overview of Evidence Based Medicine Findings.

    PubMed

    Sunjic, Suzana Borovic; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Vukovic, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Weiss, Elisabeth Sussman; Soldo, Ivo; Djakovic, Nikola; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-09-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidence based findings describing effects of the Viscum album extract Isorel in cancer therapy with respect to the type of therapy, stage and type of illness. This study presents cumulated data for 74 patients with different types and stages of cancer treated by Viscum album extract as adjuvant treatment to different conventional therapies, mostly combined surgery and radiotherapy. The biotherapy effectiveness was evaluated according to the outcome as (1) no major therapeutic improvement (15% of patients), (2) prevention of tumor recurrence (47% of patients) and (3) regression of cancer (38% of patients). Notably, there was no obvious health worsening during the follow up period at all. Thus, the results obtained for conventional anticancer therapies combined with adjuvant biotherapy based on Viscum album extract seem to be beneficial for the majority of cancer patients (85%) without serious side effects.

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan: global and Japanese perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Junichi; Morita, Satoshi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Rahman, Mahbubur; Nakao, Akimasa

    2004-09-01

    Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer after surgical resection has been under clinical investigation for decades. However, up until now, consistent and concrete evidence has not been generated either in Japan or other countries in favor of adjuvant therapy in terms of survival compared to surgery alone. Meta-analyses reported from Western countries have shown either no or borderline benefit for chemotherapy after surgical resection of gastric cancer. A recent trial showed significant benefit for chemoradiotherapy. However, Japanese specialists believe that their perspectives are different from those in the West due to the following: (1) gastric cancer incidence is several times higher in Japan; (2) more stringent screening programs are emphasized in Japan, thus baseline conditions of cancer patients are different; (3) specific operative techniques are used; and (4) Japanese surgeons have probably acquired additional experience in gastric cancer resection techniques. From the 1960s to the 1980s first mitomycin (MMC) and, later, a combination of oral fluorinated pyrimidines (o-FP) and MMC showed improved survival benefit in Japan compared to surgery alone. However, in the late 1980s, an expert group re-examined the results of previous trials, questioned them, and suggested fresh trials. Since then, the Japanese Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) has conducted relevant trials to re-examine the effect of MMC and/or o-FP as adjuvant chemotherapy. The results of trials JCOG 8801 and JCOG 9206 have already been reported, and the accrual of patients for another trial (NSAS-GC trial) has just been completed. A pooled analysis of the two preceding trials showed a borderline survival benefit for o-FP compared to surgery alone. If o-FP treatment shows a 5% difference in survival benefit in the NSAS-GC trial, a meta-analysis of the three trials would probably reveal overall significant results. In conclusion, this therapy could become the standard adjuvant treatment regimen for

  4. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Fatima; Omenetti, Alessia; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2011-01-01

    Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh), that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors. PMID:21188169

  5. [HER-2/neu positive breast cancer: how to prescribe adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin)?].

    PubMed

    Belkacémi, Yazid; Gligorov, Joseph; Mauriac, Louis; Azria, David

    2006-10-01

    One of the most recent advances in the management of Her-2/neu positive breast cancer is the validation of a targeted therapy from bench to the clinic, particularly towards the adjuvant setting. The recommended dose of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the HER-2 antigen, has been determined in phase I studies. In the metastatic patients two randomised trials have demonstrated its efficacy when associated to taxanes. In less than 10 years, trastuzumab became the standard of care in the adjuvant treatment of HER-2/neu positive breast cancer. In this setting, two combinations regimen with chemotherapy (concomitant or sequential) have been recently published. The concomitant schedule has been used in three studies (North American Group, BCIRG, FinHer), whereas in the Hera trial trastuzumab was started after the end of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. In this article, the advantages and uncertainties on efficacy and toxicities of the trastuzumab administration modalities, associated or not to chemotherapy and radiation therapy, are discussed.

  6. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  7. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert; Robertson, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  8. Cell membrane modulation as adjuvant in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zalba, Sara; Ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving numerous biological processes, which can exist in parallel, can be complementary, or are engaged when needed and as such can replace each other. This redundancy in possibilities cancer cells have, are fundamental to failure of therapy. However, intrinsic features of tumor cells and tumors as a whole provide also opportunities for therapy. Here we discuss the unique and specific makeup and arrangement of cell membranes of tumor cells and how these may help treatment. Interestingly, knowledge on cell membranes and associated structures is present already for decades, while application of membrane modification and manipulation as part of cancer therapy is lagging. Recent developments of scientific tools concerning lipids and lipid metabolism, opened new and previously unknown aspects of tumor cells and indicate possible differences in lipid composition and membrane function of tumor cells compared to healthy cells. This field, coined Lipidomics, demonstrates the importance of lipid components in cell membrane in several illnesses. Important alterations in cancer, and specially in resistant cancer cells compared to normal cells, opened the door to new therapeutic strategies. Moreover, the ability to modulate membrane components and/or properties has become a reality. Here, developments in cancer-related Lipidomics and strategies to interfere specifically with cancer cell membranes and how these affect cancer treatment are discussed. We hypothesize that combination of lipid or membrane targeted strategies with available care to improve chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy will bring the much needed change in treatment in the years to come.

  9. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  10. Capecitabine with radiation is an effective adjuvant therapy in gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Chee Kian; Choo, Su Pin; Poon, Donald Yew Hee; Toh, Han Chong; Ong, Simon Yew Kuang; Tan, Sze Huey; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Foo, Kian Fong

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcome of patients who received concurrent capecitabine (Xeloda) and radiation (XRT) compared to the established concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with radiation (5FU-RT) and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy alone as adjuvant treatment in gastric cancers. METHODS: All patients with gastric cancers who received adjuvant treatment at the National Cancer Centre Singapore between 1996 and 2006 were reviewed. Treatment outcomes of patients who received XRT were compared with those who had 5FU-RT or chemotherapy alone as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancers. RESULTS: A total of 108 patients were reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 60. The majority of the patients (64.8%) had advanced stage III and IV disease (with no distant metastasis). All except 4 patients had D2 gastrectomy. Twenty one patients (19.4%) had positive surgical resection margins. Thirty three patients received XRT compared with 52 who had 5FU-RT and 23 who received chemotherapy alone. For the patients in the chemotherapy-only group, all had fluoropyrimidine-based therapy, with added cisplatin in 7 patients and epirubicin in 2 patients. Median recurrence-free survival was longer for the XRT group (52 mo) compared to the 5FU-RT (35 mo) and chemotherapy-only groups (25 mo) (P = 0.48). The patients in the XRT group achieved similar median overall survival (53 mo) as the 5FU-RT (54 mo) and the chemotherapy-only groups (44 mo) (P = 0.5). CONCLUSION: Capecitabine with concurrent radiation was as effective as concurrent 5FU with radiation or fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy alone when used as adjuvant treatment in patients with gastric cancers. PMID:20677345

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of information processing in breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Schagen, Sanne B; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Boogerd, Willem; Hamburger, Hans L; van Dam, Frits S A M

    2005-11-01

    Cognitive deficits are found in a number of breast-cancer patients who have undergone adjuvant (Cyclophosphamide, Methotrexate, and 5-Fluorouracil (CMF)) chemotherapy, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The objective of this study is to investigate information processing in these patients with concurrent registration of brain activity. Twenty-six breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant CMF chemotherapy and a control group of 23 stage I breast-cancer patients not treated with chemotherapy were examined. Mean time since treatment for the CMF patients was 5.1 years after the last CMF course, and for the control patients 3.6 years after termination of radiotherapy. An information processing task was administered with concurrent EEG registration. Reaction times and the amplitudes and latencies of an Event Related Potential component (P3) in different task conditions related to input, central, and output processing of information were studied. Significant differences in latency and amplitude of the P3 component were found between the treatment groups with an earlier and reduced P3 in the chemotherapy group. Patients treated with chemotherapy had longer reaction times (although not significantly different) than the control group on all task conditions. Our data provide further evidence for long-term neurocognitive problems in breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant (CMF) chemotherapy and offer new information regarding abnormalities in brain functioning in these patients.

  12. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design. PMID:28191547

  13. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  15. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  16. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  17. Adjuvant Therapy: Treatment to Keep Cancer from Returning

    MedlinePlus

    ... or neoadjuvant therapy doesn't come without a price — the side effects can be more than minor ... chemotherapy. Radiation therapy. Radiation therapy uses high-powered energy beams, such as X-rays, to kill cancer ...

  18. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  19. Scalp cooling has no place in the prevention of alopecia in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tollenaar, R A; Liefers, G J; Repelaer van Driel, O J; van de Velde, C J

    1994-01-01

    35 patients were studied to determine the effectiveness of scalp hypothermia in the prevention of alopecia caused by adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Scalp hypothermia was induced by the newly developed Theracool cooling machine. The chemotherapeutic regimen consisted of one perioperative course of doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (EORTC protocol 10854). Only 4 (11%) patients showed acceptable hair preservation (no or minor alopecia). 12 patients (34%) had moderate alopecia, all requiring a wig. 19 patients (54%) had complete alopecia. No scalp metastases were observed after scalp cooling. These results and a review of the literature suggest that scalp hypothermia to prevent alopecia may only be effective in a cytotoxic regimen containing an anthracycline as the sole alopecia-inducing agent. With current adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, in which a combination of cyclophosphamide and an anthracycline is often used, there is no place for scalp hypothermia.

  20. Emerging Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer: Propolis and its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a bee-metabolized resinous substance (bee glue) from plant sap and gums. It has been in usage as a healing agent since antiquity, yet has not garnered global popularity as a health promoter. Its biological effects, which range from antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, dermatoprotective, anti-allergic, laxative and immunomodulatory to anticancer, have been validated. Propolis has shown efficacy against brain, head and neck, skin, breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, bladder, prostate, colon and blood cancers. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, anti-angiogenesis, prevention of metastasis, cell-cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and moderation of the chemotherapy-induced deleterious side effects have been deduced as the key mechanisms of cancer manipulation. The components conferring antitumor potentials have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester, chrysin, artepillin C, nemorosone, galangin, cardanol, etc. These compounds target various genetic and biochemical pathways of cancer progression. Depending on the botanical sources and the geographical origin, biological activities of propolis vary. Despite phenomenal development in cancer research, conventional therapy falls short in complete malignancy management. The findings obtained so far build hope that propolis as a complementary medicine may address the lacunae. This review documents the recent advances and scope of amendement in cancer remediation with adequate emphasis on the mechanistic aspect of propolis.

  1. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  2. Clinical and immunological assessment in breast cancer patients receiving anticancer therapy and bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract as an adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Lara, Humberto H; Turrent, Liliana Ixtepan; Garza-Treviño, Elsa N; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Dialyzable leukocyte extract (DLE) is one of the immunological agents used as an adjuvant in cancer therapy; it has been associated with improved quality of life during cancer chemotherapy. Based on these previous findings and on the observed clinical benefits attributed to DLE in other types of cancer, we investigated its clinical and immunological effects as a therapy adjuvant on breast cancer patients who received only chemotherapy, as compared to patients administered bovine DLE (bDLE) as an adjuvant. This study included 43 breast cancer patients who were about to begin chemotherapy. This group was divided as follows: 25 received chemotherapy and bDLE as an adjuvant therapy, and 18 received only chemotherapy without the adjuvant. All patient clinical and immunological responses were monitored. Among patients in the group that received bDLE as adjuvant, 60% showed a complete response, 32% showed a partial response and 8% did not respond. By contrast, in the group without the adjuvant, 39% showed a complete response, 50% displayed a partial response and 11% were non-responders. In addition, bDLE treatment in combination with chemotherapy resulted in the enhancement of the Karnofsky performance scale during chemotherapy. Even though patients underwent several cycles of chemotherapy without bDLE, the lymphocyte population dropped to below the reference value. On the other hand, in patients with bDLE as adjuvant, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and the B lymphocytes were maintained within the median range of the reference value. The number of natural killer cells also increased after chemotherapy treatment with bDLE as an adjuvant. In conclusion, bDLE treatment contributes to significant immunological recovery in patients that have undergone heavy chemotherapy, increasing the clinical response and quality of life during chemotherapy.

  3. Regulation of breast cancer stem cell features.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Patrycja; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are rare, tumour-initiating cells that exhibit stem cell properties: capacity of self-renewal, pluripotency, highly tumorigenic potential, and resistance to therapy. Cancer stem cells have been characterised and isolated from many cancers, including breast cancer. Developmental pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin, Notch/γ-secretase/Jagged, Shh (sonic hedgehog), and BMP signalling pathways, which direct proliferation and differentiation of normal stem cells, have emerged as major signalling pathways that contribute to the self-renewal of stem and/or progenitor cells in a variety of organs and cancers. Deregulation of these signalling pathways is frequently linked to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and breast CSCs often possess properties of cells that have undergone the EMT process. Signalling networks mediated by microRNAs and EMT-inducing transcription factors tie the EMT process to regulatory networks that maintain "stemness". Recent studies have elucidated epigenetic mechanisms that control pluripotency and stemness, which allows an assessment on how embryonic and normal tissue stem cells are deregulated during cancerogenesis to give rise to CSCs. Epigenetic-based mechanisms are reversible, and the possibility of "resetting" the abnormal cancer epigenome by applying pharmacological compounds targeting epigenetic enzymes is a promising new therapeutic strategy. Chemoresistance of CSCs is frequently driven by various mechanisms, including aberrant expression/activity of ABC transporters, aldehyde dehydrogenase and anti-oncogenic proteins (i.e. BCL2, B-cell lymphoma-2), enhanced DNA damage response, activation of pro-survival signalling pathways, and epigenetic deregulations. Despite controversy surrounding the CSC hypothesis, there is substantial evidence for their role in cancer, and a number of drugs intended to specifically target CSCs have entered clinical trials.

  4. Contribution of Early Detection and Adjuvant Treatments to Breast Cancer Mortality Reduction in Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vilaprinyo, Ester; Puig, Teresa; Rue, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Background Reductions in breast cancer (BC) mortality in Western countries have been attributed to the use of screening mammography and adjuvant treatments. The goal of this work was to analyze the contributions of both interventions to the decrease in BC mortality between 1975 and 2008 in Catalonia. Methodology/Principal Findings A stochastic model was used to quantify the contribution of each intervention. Age standardized BC mortality rates for calendar years 1975–2008 were estimated in four hypothetical scenarios: 1) Only screening, 2) Only adjuvant treatment, 3) Both interventions, and 4) No intervention. For the 30–69 age group, observed Catalan BC mortality rates per 100,000 women-year rose from 29.4 in 1975 to 38.3 in 1993, and afterwards continuously decreased to 23.2 in 2008. If neither of the two interventions had been used, in 2008 the estimated BC mortality would have been 43.5, which, compared to the observed BC mortality rate, indicates a 46.7% reduction. In 2008 the reduction attributable to screening was 20.4%, to adjuvant treatments was 15.8% and to both interventions 34.1%. Conclusions/Significance Screening and adjuvant treatments similarly contributed to reducing BC mortality in Catalonia. Mathematical models have been useful to assess the impact of interventions addressed to reduce BC mortality that occurred over nearly the same periods. PMID:22272292

  5. Exosome removal as a therapeutic adjuvant in cancer.

    PubMed

    Marleau, Annette M; Chen, Chien-Shing; Joyce, James A; Tullis, Richard H

    2012-06-27

    Exosome secretion is a notable feature of malignancy owing to the roles of these nanoparticles in cancer growth, immune suppression, tumor angiogenesis and therapeutic resistance. Exosomes are 30-100 nm membrane vesicles released by many cells types during normal physiological processes. Tumors aberrantly secrete large quantities of exosomes that transport oncoproteins and immune suppressive molecules to support tumor growth and metastasis. The role of exosomes in intercellular signaling is exemplified by human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) over-expressing breast cancer, where exosomes with the HER2 oncoprotein stimulate tumor growth and interfere with the activity of the therapeutic antibody Herceptin®. Since numerous observations from experimental model systems point toward an important clinical impact of exosomes in cancer, several pharmacological strategies have been proposed for targeting their malignant activities. We also propose a novel device strategy involving extracorporeal hemofiltration of exosomes from the entire circulatory system using an affinity plasmapheresis platform known as the Aethlon ADAPT™ (adaptive dialysis-like affinity platform technology) system, which would overcome the risks of toxicity and drug interactions posed by pharmacological approaches. This technology allows affinity agents, including exosome-binding lectins and antibodies, to be immobilized in the outer-capillary space of plasma filtration membranes that integrate into existing kidney dialysis systems. Device therapies that evolve from this platform allow rapid extracorporeal capture and selective retention of target particles < 200 nm from the entire circulatory system. This strategy is supported by clinical experience in hepatitis C virus-infected patients using an ADAPT™ device, the Hemopurifier®, to reduce the systemic load of virions having similar sizes and glycosylated surfaces as cancer exosomes. This review discusses the possible

  6. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  7. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shijie; Li, Chunbao; Cheng, Ninghui; Cui, Xiaojiang; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs). We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment. PMID:26273424

  8. Generation of Novel Thyroid Cancer Stem-Like Cell Clones: Effects of Resveratrol and Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Heather; Yu, Xiao-Min; Harrison, April D; Larrain, Carolina; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Jidong; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an aggressive and highly lethal cancer for which conventional therapies have proved ineffective. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) represent a small fraction of cells in the cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are responsible for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis. We characterized CSCs in thyroid carcinomas and generated clones of CSC lines. Our study showed that anaplastic thyroid cancers had significantly more CSCs than well-differentiated thyroid cancers. We also showed that Aldefluor-positive cells revealed significantly higher expression of stem cell markers, self-renewal properties, thyrosphere formation, and enhanced tumorigenicity. In vivo passaging of Aldefluor-positive cells resulted in the growth of larger, more aggressive tumors. We isolated and generated two clonal spheroid CSC lines derived from anaplastic thyroid cancer that were even more enriched with stem cell markers and more tumorigenic than the freshly isolated Aldefluor-positive cells. Resveratrol and valproic acid treatment of one of the CSC lines resulted in a significant decrease in stem cell markers, Aldefluor expression, proliferation, and invasiveness, with an increase in apoptosis and thyroid differentiation markers, suggesting that these cell lines may be useful for discovering new adjuvant therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers. For the first time, we have two thyroid CSC lines that will be useful tools for the study of thyroid CSC targeted therapies.

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  10. Colon cancer stem cells: controversies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Tesori, Valentina; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-05-28

    Tumors have long been viewed as a population in which all cells have the equal propensity to form new tumors, the so called conventional stochastic model. The cutting-edge theory on tumor origin and progression, tends to consider cancer as a stem cell disease. Stem cells are actively involved in the onset and maintenance of colon cancer. This review is intended to examine the state of the art on colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), with regard to the recent achievements of basic research and to the corresponding translational consequences. Specific prominence is given to the hypothesized origin of CSCs and to the methods for their identification. The growing understanding of CSC biology is driving the optimization of novel anti-cancer targeted drugs.

  11. Adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen compared to aromatase inhibitors for 257 male breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eggemann, Holm; Ignatov, Atanas; Smith, Bobbie J; Altmann, Udo; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Röhl, Freidrich W; Jahn, Mark; Costa, Serban-Dan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AI) on the survival of men with breast cancer. We analyzed 257 male patients with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer from numerous German population-based cancer registries treated with tamoxifen (N = 207) or aromatase inhibitors (N = 50). The median follow-up was 42.2 (range 2-115) months. Median age at diagnosis was 68 (range 36-91) years. Thirty-seven (17.9 %) patients treated with tamoxifen and 16 (32.0 %) patients treated with AI died (log rank p = 0.007). After the adjustment for the patient's age, tumor size, node status, and tumor grading, the AI treatment was linked to a 1.5-fold increase in risk of mortality compared to tamoxifen (HR 1.55; 95 % CI: 1.13-2.13; p = 0.007). The overall survival in male breast cancer was significantly better after adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen compared to an aromatase inhibitor. Tamoxifen should be considered as the treatment of choice for hormone-receptor-positive male breast cancer.

  12. Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Breast Cancer Palliative Care and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a life-threatening disease among women worldwide with annual rates of reported incidence and death increasing alarmingly. Chemotherapy is a recommended and effective treatment option for breast cancer; however, the narrow therapeutic indices and varied side effects of currently approved drugs present major hurdles in increasing its effectiveness. An increasing number of literature evidence indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in treatment-related symptom control and alleviation of side effects plays an important role in increasing survival rate and quality of life in breast cancer patients. This review focuses on the use of herbal medicines and acupuncture in palliative care and as adjuvants in the treatment of breast cancer. Herbal medicinal treatments, the correlation of clinical use with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action, and the use of certain acupoints in acupuncture are summarized. The aim of this review is to facilitate an understanding of the current practice and usefulness of herbal medicine and acupuncture as adjuvants in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23840256

  13. DETERMINANTS OF ADJUVANT OXALIPLATIN RECEIPT AMONG OLDER STAGE II AND III COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Jennifer L; Stürmer, Til; Sanoff, Hanna K; Brookhart, Alan; Sandler, Robert S; Warren, Joan L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding adjuvant oxaliplatin treatment among older stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. We sought to identify patient/tumor, physician, hospital, and geographic factors associated with oxaliplatin use among older patients. Methods Individuals diagnosed at age>65 with stage II/III CRC from 2004–2007 undergoing surgical resection and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were identified using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program (SEER)-Medicare, a database including patient/tumor and hospital characteristics. Physician information was obtained from the American Medical Association. We used Poisson regression to identify independent predictors of oxaliplatin receipt. The discriminatory ability of each category of characteristics to predict oxaliplatin receipt was assessed by comparing the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) from logistic regression models. Results We identified 4,388 individuals who underwent surgical resection at 773 hospitals and received chemotherapy from 1,517 physicians. Adjuvant oxaliplatin use was higher among stage III (colon=56%, rectum=51%) compared to stage II patients (colon=37%, rectum=35%). Overall, patients who were older, diagnosed before 2006, separated, divorced or widowed, living in a higher poverty census tract or in the East or Midwest, or with higher levels of comorbidity were less likely to receive oxaliplatin. Patient factors and calendar year accounted for most of the variation in oxaliplatin receipt (AUC=75.8%). Conclusion Adjuvant oxaliplatin use increased rapidly from 2004–2007 despite uncertainties regarding its effectiveness in older patients. Physician and hospital characteristics had little influence on adjuvant oxaliplatin receipt among older patients. PMID:23512326

  14. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  15. [Adjuvant radiotherapy for bladder cancer in patients with risk of locoregional recurrence: Who, what and how?

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Larré, S; Chapet, O; Latorzeff, I; Fléchon, A; Roubaud, G; Orré, M; Belhomme, S; Richaud, P

    2017-02-01

    Radical cystectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection remains the standard of care for non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Locoregional control is a key factor in the outcome of patients since it is related to overall survival, metastasis-free survival and specific survival. Locoregional recurrence rate is directly correlated to pathological results and the quality of lymphadenectomy. In addition, while pre- or postoperative chemotherapy improved overall survival, it showed no impact on locoregional recurrence-free survival. Several recent publications have led to the development of a nomogram that predicts the risk of locoregional recurrence, in order to identify patients for which adjuvant radiotherapy could be beneficial. International cooperative groups have then come together to provide the rational for adjuvant radiotherapy, reinforced by recent technical developments limiting toxicity, and to develop prospective studies to reduce the risk of relapse. The aim of this critical literature review is to provide an overview of the elements in favor of adjuvant radiation for patients treated for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  16. Metformin as an adjuvant treatment for cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, C.; Cafferty, F. H.; Vale, C.; Langley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metformin use has been associated with a reduced risk of developing cancer and an improvement in overall cancer survival rates in meta-analyses, but, to date, evidence to support the use of metformin as an adjuvant therapy in individual cancer types has not been presented. Patients and methods We systematically searched research databases, conference abstracts and trial registries for any studies reporting cancer outcomes for individual tumour types in metformin users compared with non-users, and extracted data on patients with early-stage cancer. Studies were assessed for design and quality, and a meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the adjuvant effect of metformin on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), to inform future trial design. Results Of 7670 articles screened, 27 eligible studies were identified comprising 24 178 participants, all enrolled in observational studies. In those with early-stage colorectal cancer, metformin use was associated with a significant benefit in all outcomes [RFS hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–0.85; OS HR 0.69, CI 0.58–0.83; CSS HR 0.58, CI 0.39–0.86]. For men with early-stage prostate cancer, metformin was associated with significant, or borderline significant, benefits in all outcomes (RFS HR 0.83, CI 0.69–1.00; OS HR 0.82, CI 0.73–0.93; CSS HR 0.58, CI 0.37–0.93); however, there was significant heterogeneity between studies. The data suggest that prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy may benefit more from metformin (RFS HR 0.45, CI 0.29–0.70). In breast and urothelial cancer, no significant benefits were identified. Sufficient data were not available to conduct analyses on the impact of metformin dose and duration. Conclusions Our findings suggest that metformin could be a useful adjuvant agent, with the greatest benefits seen in colorectal and prostate cancer, particularly in those receiving radical

  17. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  18. Evaluation of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.H.; O'Neill, M. Jr.; DeMuth, W.E. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    One hundred eighteen patients with lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed to determine whether postoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves survival. Patterns of treatment failure and three year NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates were assessed according to extent of tumor spread, histology, and treatment method. Patients with hilar or mediastinal node metastases were at higher risk of local failure compared to those with negative nodes. Postoperative RT reduced local recurrence and improved 3 year survival among patients with positive nodes. However, postoperative RT did not improve survival among those with negative nodes. Our data indicated that patients with positive hilar or mediastinal nodes may require postoperative RT to improve survival.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected colorectal cancer metastases: Literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Giovanni; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Nannini, Margherita; Curti, Stefania; Ottone, Marta; Dall’Olio, Filippo Gustavo; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Biasco, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only option of cure for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the risk of recurrence within 18 mo after metastasectomy is around 75% and the liver is the most frequent site of relapse. The current international guidelines recommend an adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of CRC metastases despite the lower level of evidence (based on the quality of studies in this setting). However, there is still no standard treatment and the effective role of an adjuvant therapy remains controversial. The aim of this review is to report the state-of-art of systemic chemotherapy and regional chemotherapy with hepatic arterial infusion in the management of patients after resection of metastases from CRC, with a literature review and meta-analysis of the relevant randomized controlled trials. PMID:26811604

  20. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  1. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  2. Surface engineering tumor cells with adjuvant-loaded particles for use as cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kawther K; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-02-28

    Cell surface engineering is an expanding field and whilst extensive research has been performed decorating cell surfaces with biomolecules, the engineering of cell surfaces with particles has been a largely unexploited area. This study reports on the assembly of cell-particle hybrids where irradiated tumor cells were surface engineered with adjuvant-loaded, biodegradable, biocompatible, polymeric particles, with the aim of generating a construct capable of functioning as a therapeutic cancer vaccine. Successfully assembled cell-particle hybrids presented here comprised either melanoma cells or prostate cancer cells stably adorned with Toll-like receptor-9 ligand-loaded particles using streptavidin-biotin cross-linking. Both cell-particle assemblies were tested in vivo for their potential as therapeutic cancer vaccines yielding promising therapeutic results for the prostate cancer model. The ramifications of results obtained for both tumor models are openly discussed.

  3. Cancer stem cells: A contentious hypothesis now moving forward.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael L; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Macdonald, Joanna; Li, Yong; Wang, Tao; Pu, Chunwen; Wang, Zhidong; Qiao, Liang; Duan, Wei

    2014-03-28

    Cancer stem cells are a progressive concept to account for the cell biological nature of cancer. Despite the controversies regarding the cancer stem cell model, it has the potential to provide a foundation for new innovative treatment targeting the roots of cancer. The last two years have witnessed exceptional progress in cancer stem cell research, in particular on solid tumours, which holds promise for improved treatment outcomes. Here, we review recent advances in cancer stem cell research, discuss challenges in the field and explore future strategies and opportunities in cancer stem cell studies to overcome resistance to chemotherapy.

  4. Advances in management of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: Consequences for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jeanne; Douard, Richard; Durdux, Catherine; Landi, Bruno; Berger, Anne; Taieb, Julien

    2016-11-01

    More than half the patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal disease at diagnosis with a high risk of recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and standardized radical surgery with total mesorectal excision have been established as the 'gold standard' for treating these patients. Pathological staging using the ypTNM classification system to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is widely used in clinical practice, but the delivery of ACT is still controversial, as many discrepancies persist in the conclusions of different trials, due to heterogeneity of the inclusion criteria between studies, lack of statistical power, and variations in preoperative and adjuvant regimens. In 2014, a meta-analysis of four randomized phase-III trials (EORTC 22921, I-CNR-RT, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, CHRONICLE) failed to demonstrate any statistical efficacy of fluorouracil (5FU)-based ACT. Three recent randomized trials aimed to compare 5FU with 5FU plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Two of them (ADORE, CAO/ARO/AIO-04) appeared to find a disease-free survival benefit for patients treated with the combination therapy. Thus, while awaiting new data, it can be said that, as of 2015, patients with yp stage I tumors or histological complete response derived no benefit from adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen should be proposed for yp stage III patients, and may be considered for yp stage II tumors in fit patients with high-risk factors. Nevertheless, well-designed and sufficiently powered clinical trials dedicated to adjuvant treatments for rectal cancer remain justified in future to achieve a high level of proof in keeping with evidence-based medical standards.

  5. Randomized Trial of Neuroprotective Effects of Erythropoietin in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropsychological Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Effects of Erythropoietin in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer : Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropsychological Study...Neuroprotective Effects of Erythropoietin in Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer : Positron Emission Tomography...11 Introduction In the United States approximately 60-80% of patients diagnosed with breast cancer will receive

  6. Does adjuvant radiation therapy benefit women with small mammography-detected breast cancers?

    PubMed Central

    Jerzak, K.; Dudalski, N.; Pritchard, K.; Sun, P.; Narod, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with small nonpalpable breast tumours have an excellent prognosis. The benefit of radiotherapy in this group of low-risk women is unknown. Methods A cohort of 1595 women with stages i–iii invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery were followed for local recurrence. Using t-tests, baseline demographic data and tumour characteristics were compared for the women who had palpable (n = 1023) and mammography-detected (n = 572) breast cancers. The 15-year actuarial risk of local recurrence was estimated using a Kaplan–Meier method, stratified for adjuvant radiation therapy (yes or no), tumour palpability (palpable or not), and tumour size (≤1 cm or >1 cm). Hazard ratios (hrs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% cis) were calculated using a multivariate Cox regression model. Results were considered statistically significant if 2-tailed p values were less than 0.05. Results Among women with a nonpalpable tumour, the 15-year actuarial rates of local recurrence were, respectively, 13.9% and 18.3% for those treated and not treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (hr: 0.65; 95%ci: 0.40 to 1.06; p = 0.08). Among women with small nonpalpable breast cancers (≤1.0 cm), the rates were 14.6% and 13.4% respectively (p = 0.67). The absolute reduction in 15-year local recurrence was 11.0% for women with palpable tumours. Conclusions Our results suggest that women with small (<1 cm) screen-detected nonpalpable breast cancers likely derive little benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy; however, an adequately powered randomized trial would be required to make definitive conclusions. PMID:28270722

  7. Tamoxifen as the First Targeted Long Term Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an unlikely pioneering medicine in medical oncology. Nevertheless, the medicine has continued to surprise us, perform and save lives for the past 40 years. Unlike any other medicine in oncology, it is used to treat all stages of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, male breast cancer, pioneered the use of chemoprevention by reducing the incidence of breast cancer in women at high risk and induces ovulation in subfertile women! The impact of tamoxifen is ubiquitous. However, the power to save lives from this unlikely success story came from the first laboratory studies which defined that “longer was going to be better” when tamoxifen was being considered as an adjuvant therapy (Jordan 1978 Use of the DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinoma system for the evaluation of tamoxifen as a potential adjuvant therapy Reviews in Endocrine Related Cancer. October Supplement: 49–55.). This is that success story, with a focus on the interdependent components of: excellence in drug discovery, investment in self-selecting young investigators, a conversation with Nature, a conversation between the laboratory and the clinic, and the creation of the Oxford Overview Analysis. Each of these factors was essential to propel the progress of tamoxifen to evolve as an essential part of the fabric of society. “Science is adventure, discovery, new horizons, insight into our world, a means of predicting the future and enormous power to help others”(Hoagland 1990).- Mahlon Hoagland, MD. Director, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology (1970–85) PMID:24659478

  8. Positive effect of tamoxifen as part of adjuvant chemo-endocrine therapy for breast cancer. Hokkaido Adjuvant Chemo-Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, J.; Samejima, N.; Tanabe, T.; Hayasaka, H.; Mito, M.; Hata, Y.; Asaishi, K.

    1994-01-01

    A prospective randomised multicentre clinical study was undertaken for 2 years and 3 months from November 1982, with the aim of examining the significance of using a combination of ftorafur (FT) and tamoxifen (TAM) for post-operative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Patients had either stage II or stage IIIa disease, were age 75 or below and had undergone radical mastectomy. Patients were divided into two groups and received one of the following treatment protocols: treatment A, intravenous administration of doxorubicin (DOX), 20 mg on the day of surgery and 10 mg the next day, followed by oral FT 50 mg day-1 for 2 years from the 14th day; treatment B, the same pattern of DOX administration for the first 2 days, followed by a combined therapy of FT and TAM 20 mg day-1 for 2 years. The number of patients was 546 (treatment A 274 and treatment B 272), of whom 34 (6%) were ineligible. The remaining 512 patients (treatment A 254 and treatment B 258) were followed up for 5 years for analysis. Significantly higher 5 year disease-free rate and 5 year survival rates were observed with treatment B compared with treatment A. When seen in terms of background factors, node-positive patients appeared to derive more benefit from tamoxifen than node-negative patients, but the oestrogen receptor-negative and premenopausal subgroups appeared to derive about the same benefit as those who were oestrogen receptor positive and post-menopausal. Indeed, survival in the premenopausal group was significantly better with tamoxifen (P = 0.04). No increase in side-effects was seen by combining TAM with FT. The study results demonstrate that concomitant administration of FT and TAM is better than FT alone for post-operative adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. PMID:8142265

  9. Cancer stem cells: mirage or reality?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Piyush B; Chaffer, Christine L; Weinberg, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    The similarities and differences between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been the source of much contention, with some recent studies calling into question the very existence of CSCs. An examination of the literature indicates, however, that the CSC model rests on firm experimental foundations and that differences in the observed frequencies of CSCs within tumors reflect the various cancer types and hosts used to assay these cells. Studies of stem cells and the differentiation program termed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) point to the possible existence of plasticity between stem cells and their more differentiated derivatives. If present, such plasticity would have major implications for the CSC model and for future therapeutic approaches.

  10. Management of stage II colon cancer - the use of molecular biomarkers for adjuvant therapy decision

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is uncertainty on the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colorectal cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the combined role of clinical, pathological and molecular parameters to identify those stage II patients who better benefit from adjuvant therapy. Methods We examined 120 stage II colon cancer patients. Of these, 60 patients received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy after surgery and the other 60 did not receive therapy. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed to evaluate the expressions of Thymidylate synthetase (TYMS), TP53 (p53), β-catenin (CTNNB1) and CD8. For TYMS, its mRNA expression levels were also investigated by real time qRT-PCR. The entire case study was characterized by the presence of a defect in the MMR (mismatch repair) system, the presence of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP or CIMP-High) and for the V600E mutation in the BRAF gene. At the histo-pathological level, the depth of tumour invasion, lymphovascular invasion, invasion of large veins, host lymphocytic response and tumour border configuration were recorded. Results The presence of the V600E mutation in the BRAF gene was a poor prognostic factor for disease free and overall survival (DFS; hazard ratio [HR], 2.57; 95% CI: 1.03 -6.37; p = 0.04 and OS; HR, 3.68; 95% CI: 1.43-9.47; p < 0.01 respectively), independently of 5-FU treatment. Adjuvant therapy significantly improved survival in patients with high TYMS levels (p = 0.04), while patients with low TYMS had a better outcome if treated by surgery alone (DFS; HR, 6.07; 95% CI, 0.82 to 44.89; p = 0.04). In patients with a defect in the MMR system (dMMR), 5-FU therapy was associated to reduced survival (DFS; HR, 37.98; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1381.31; p = 0.04), while it was beneficial for CIMP-High associated tumours (DFS; HR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.02 to 1.13; p = 0.05). Conclusions Patients’ characterization according to MMR status, CIMP phenotype and TYMS m

  11. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  12. Cancer stem cells: controversies in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah K; Matsui, William

    2009-11-01

    Increasing data suggest that the initiation, relapse, and progression of human cancers are driven by specific cell populations within an individual tumor. However, inconsistencies have emerged in precisely defining phenotypic markers that can reliably identify these "cancer stem cells" in nearly every human malignancy studied to date. Multiple myeloma, one of the first tumors postulated to be driven by a rare population of cancer stem cells, is no exception. Similar to other diseases, controversy surrounds the exact phenotype and biology of multiple myeloma cells with the capacity for clonogenic growth. Here, we review the studies that have led to these controversies and discuss potential reasons for these disparate findings. Moreover, we speculate how these inconsistencies may be resolved through studies by integrating advancements in both myeloma and stem cell biology.

  13. [Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer after the adjuvant chemotherapy trial of S-1 for gastric cancer in Hiroshima prefecture: results from a questionnaire survey and future challenges].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kakuhiro; Hirabayashi, Naoki; Ninomiya, Motoki; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Hatanaka, Nobutaka; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tanabe, Kazuaki

    2013-12-01

    A questionnaire survey on postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer was conducted for 76 hospitals affiliated with the Hiroshima Oncology Group of Gastric Cancer in Hiroshima prefecture in January 2011. Responses were obtained from 29 hospitals, including 12 core cancer treatment hospitals, and the following results were obtained. The percentage of patients completing 1 year of oral S-1 was >70%, affecting approximately 75% of the entire hospital cohort. Dose reduction was conducted in approximately 30% of patients because of age, poor PS, and renal insufficiency. The standard S-1 regimen (4 weeks of S-1 treatment followed by 2 weeks of rest)was adopted in almost half of the patients, whereas the rest of the patients received another treatment schedule such as 2 weeks of treatment followed by 1 week of rest. Dose reduction and withdrawal of S-1 due to adverse events were conducted more frequently in hospitals with low completion rates of 1-year S- 1 treatment than those with a high completion rate. S-1 was most commonly discontinued because of subjective adverse events and patient request, although the discontinuation rate according to objective adverse events such as bone marrow depression was not very high. The fact that some hospitals had high completion rates suggested the importance of supplementary tools for patient IC.

  14. Subjective cognitive complaints one year after ceasing adjuvant endocrine treatment for early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribi, K; Aldridge, J; Phillips, K-A; Thompson, A; Harvey, V; Thürlimann, B; Cardoso, F; Pagani, O; Coates, A S; Goldhirsch, A; Price, K N; Gelber, R D; Bernhard, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the BIG 1-98 trial objective cognitive function improved in postmenopausal women 1 year after cessation of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer. This report evaluates changes in subjective cognitive function (SCF). Methods: One hundred postmenopausal women, randomised to receive 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, letrozole, or a sequence of the two, completed self-reported measures on SCF, psychological distress, fatigue, and quality of life during the fifth year of trial treatment (year 5) and 1 year after treatment completion (year 6). Changes between years 5 and 6 were evaluated using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Subjective cognitive function and its correlates were explored. Results: Subjective cognitive function and the other patient-reported outcomes did not change significantly after cessation of endocrine therapy with the exception of improvement for hot flushes (P=0.0005). No difference in changes was found between women taking tamoxifen or letrozole. Subjective cognitive function was the only psychosocial outcome with a substantial correlation between year 5 and 6 (Spearman's R=0.80). Correlations between SCF and the other patient-reported outcomes were generally low. Conclusion: Improved objective cognitive function but not SCF occur following cessation of adjuvant endocrine therapy in the BIG 1-98 trial. The substantial correlation of SCF scores over time may represent a stable attribute. PMID:22531635

  15. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  16. Tailoring Adjuvant Radiation Therapy by Intraoperative Imaging to Detect Residual Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Melodi J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    For many solid cancers, radiation therapy is offered as an adjuvant to surgical resection in order to lower rates of local recurrence and improve survival. However, a subset of patients treated with surgery alone will not have a local recurrence. Currently, there is no way to accurately determine which patients have microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed after surgery and therefore are most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. To address this problem, a number of technologies have been developed to try to improve margin assessment of resected tissue and to detect residual cancer in the tumor bed. Moreover, some of these approaches have been translated from the preclinical arena into clinical trials. Here, we review different types of intraoperative molecular imaging systems for cancer. Optical imaging techniques like epi-illumination, fluorescence molecular tomography and optoacoustic imaging can be coupled with exogenous fluorescent imaging probes that accumulate in tumors passively via the enhanced permeability and retention effect or are targeted to tumor tissues based on affinity or enzyme activity. In these approaches, detection of fluorescence in the tumor bed may indicate residual disease. Protease activated probes have generated great interest because of their potential for leading to high tumor to normal contrast. Recently, the first Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and activation of a protease activated probe was conducted. Spectroscopic methods like radiofrequency spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are based on energy absorption and scattering respectively, have also been tested in humans and are able to distinguish between normal and tumors tissues intraoperatively. Most recently, multi-modal contrast agents have been developed that target tumors and contain both fluorescent dyes and MRI contrast agents, allowing for preoperative planning and intraoperative margin assessment with a single contrast agent. Further

  17. Relationship Between Topoisomerase 2A RNA Expression and Recurrence after Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Childs, Barrett H.; Shak, Steven; Brassard, Diana; Badve, Sunil; Baehner, Frederick L.; Bugarini, Roberto; Rowley, Steve; Perez, Edith; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E.; Sledge, George W.; Gray, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To perform an exploratory analysis of the relationship between gene expression and recurrence in operable hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-normal breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy. Experimental Design RNA was extracted from archived tumor samples derived from 378 patients with stage I–III HR-positive, HER2-normal breast cancer and analyzed by RT-PCR for a panel of 374 genes, including the 21 gene Recurrence Score (RS). Patients were randomized to receive adjuvant doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide or docetaxel in trial E2197, with no difference in recurrence seen in the treatment arms. All available recurrent cases were selected plus a non-recurrent cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify relationships between gene expression and recurrence. Results TOP2A expression exhibited the strongest association with increased recurrence risk (p=0.01), and was significantly associated with recurrence (p=0.008) in a multivariate analysis adjusted for clinicopathological features. Elevated TOP2A expression above the median was associated with a 2.6-fold increase (95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.3, 5.2 p=0.008) in risk of recurrence if the RS was less than 18, and a 2.0-fold increase (95% CI, 1.2, 3.2, p=0.003) if there was an intermediate RS of 18–30. Conclusions In patients with HR-positive, HER2-normal breast cancer, a population known to have a low incidence of TOP2A gene alterations thought to be predictive of anthracycline benefit, there is a range of TOP2A RNA expression that is strongly associated with recurrence after adjuvant anthracyclines which provides information complementary to RS, indicating that it merits further evaluation as a prognostic and predictive marker. PMID:19996222

  18. Induction of cancer cell stemness by chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingwang; Ghisolfi, Laura; Keates, Andrew C; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lee, Dong-ki; Li, Chiang J

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies indicate that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in most hematological and solid tumors. CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into the multitude of cells that comprise the tumor mass. Moreover, these cells have been shown to be intrinsically resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Despite their fundamental role in cancer pathogenesis, the cellular origin of CSCs remains highly controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether heterogeneous cancer cells can acquire stem cell-like properties in response to chemotherapy. We demonstrate that carboplatin can induce the self-renewal (spherogenesis) and pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct3/4 expression) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells grown under stem cell culture conditions. Moreover, we show that non-CSC cells, obtained by side population flow cytometric sorting using Hoechst 33342, can acquire stem-like properties after exposure to carboplatin. Finally, we show that knockdown of Sox2 and Oct3/4 gene expression in HCC cells can reduce carboplatin-mediated increases in sphere formation and increase cellular sensitivity to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data indicate that bulk cancer cells may be an important source of CSCs during tumor development, and that targeting Sox2 and/or Oct3/4 may be a promising approach for targeting CSCs in clinical cancer treatment.

  19. Use of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil and Radiation Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection Among the Elderly and Impact on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Joshua; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; McBride, Russell; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In randomized trials patients with resected nonmetastatic gastric cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoRT) had better survival than those who did not. We investigated the effectiveness of adjuvant chemoRT after gastric cancer resection in an elderly general population and its effects by stage. Methods and Materials: We identified individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database aged 65 years or older with Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) gastric cancer, from 1991 to 2002, who underwent gastric resection, using multivariate modeling to analyze predictors of chemoRT use and survival. Results: Among 1,993 patients who received combined chemoRT or no adjuvant therapy after resection, having a later year of diagnosis, having a more advanced stage, being younger, being white, being married, and having fewer comorbidities were associated with combined treatment. Among 1,476 patients aged less than 85 years who survived more than 4 months, the 313 who received combined treatment had a lower mortality rate (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.98) than the 1,163 who received surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy significantly reduced the mortality rate for Stages III and IV (M0), trended toward improved survival for Stage II, and showed no benefit for Stage IB. We observed trends toward improved survival in all age categories except 80 to 85 years. Conclusions: The association of combined adjuvant chemoRT with improved survival in an overall analysis of Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) resected gastric cancer is consistent with clinical trial results and suggests that, in an elderly population, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is effective. However, our observational data suggest that adjuvant treatment may not be effective for Stage IB cancer, is possibly appropriate for Stage II, and shows significant survival benefits for Stages III and IV (M0) for those aged less than 80 years.

  20. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  1. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  2. Controversies of adjuvant endocrine treatment for breast cancer and recommendations of the 2007 St Gallen conference.

    PubMed

    Rabaglio, Manuela; Aebi, Stefan; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica

    2007-10-01

    Endocrine treatment for breast cancer was introduced more than a century ago. The discovery of hormone receptors has allowed targeting of endocrine treatment to patients whose primary tumours express these receptors. In the adjuvant setting, different approaches are used in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. In premenopausal patients, suppression of ovarian function and the use of tamoxifen are the most important therapeutic options, even though questions on timing, duration, and combination of these compounds remain unanswered. The use of aromatase inhibitors in combination with ovarian-function suppression is currently under investigation in the premenopausal setting. In postmenopausal patients, aromatase inhibitors given after 2-3 years or 5 years of tamoxifen have shown a significant benefit over tamoxifen alone. However, questions on this treatment also remain unanswered. For example, whether all patients should receive an aromatase inhibitor or whether some subgroups of patients might be optimally treated by tamoxifen alone is yet to be established. In this paper we review the published work on adjuvant endocrine treatment in breast cancer and provide recommendations from the 2007 St Gallen International Conference on Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer.

  3. Start strong or switch? Adjuvant endocrine strategies for postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tusquets Trías de Bes, Ignasi; Tormo, Sònia Servitja; Mestres, Joan Albanell

    2009-01-01

    Women are at considerable risk of recurrence in the first few years following initial treatment for early breast cancer. To reduce the risk of recurrence, including distant metastases, those with hormone-sensitive breast cancer receive adjuvant endocrine treatment. Lymph node metastases are a predictor of high risk of early recurrence and distant metastases; however, a significant number of women with node-negative disease will also develop distant metastases. This is of concern, because the development of distant metastases is associated with a high risk of breast cancer death. Studies in postmenopausal women showed that an aromatase inhibitor (AI) as initial, upfront treatment reduces early recurrence, including distant metastases, compared with tamoxifen. The three available AIs (letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane) are approved for adjuvant use. Upfront letrozole or anastrozole improved time to distant metastasis in patients included in the Breast International Group 1-98 and Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination trials, respectively. Of note, the beneficial effects of letrozole on distant disease were already observed in the first report at 2 years of follow-up and confirmed in the updated results with 50 months of follow-up. Here, we discuss the available data for all AIs and strategies to be taken into account for patient management, with a special focus on the effects of available options on early recurrences and metastasis risk.

  4. Cancer stem cells: the lessons from pre-cancerous stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract How a cancer is initiated and established remains elusive despite all the advances in decades of cancer research. Recently the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been revived, challenging the long-standing model of ‘clonal evolution’ for cancer development and implicating the dawning of a potential cure for cancer [1]. The recent identification of pre-cancerous stem cells (pCSCs) in cancer, an early stage of CSC development, however, implicates that the clonal evolution is not contradictory to the CSC hypothesis but is rather an aspect of the process of CSC development [2]. The discovery of pCSC has revealed and will continue to reveal the volatile properties of CSC with respect to their phenotype, differentiation and tumourigenic capacity during initiation and progression. Both pCSC and CSC might also serve as precursors of tumour stromal components such as tumour vasculogenic stem/progenitor cells (TVPCs). Thus, the CSC hypothesis covers the developing process of tumour-initiating cells (TIC) → pCSC → CSC → cancer, a cellular process that should parallel the histological process of hyperplasia/metaplasia (TIC) → pre-cancerous lesions (pCSC) → malignant lesions (CSC → cancer). The embryonic stem (ES) cell and germ line stem (GS) cell genes are subverted in pCSCs. Especially the GS cell protein piwil2 may play an important role during the development of TIC → pCSC → CSC, and this protein may be used as a common biomarker for early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer. As cancer stem cell research is yet in its infancy, definitive conclusions regarding the role of pCSC cannot be made at this time. However, this review will discuss what we have learned from pCSC and how this has led to innovative ideas that may eventually have major impacts on the understanding and treatment of cancer. PMID:18053092

  5. Tuberculosis axillary lymph node coexistent breast cancer in adjuvant treatment: case report

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of breast cancer and tuberculosis is rare. In most cases, involvement by tuberculosis occurs in axillary lymph nodes. We report a case of a 43-years-old patient who had undergone adenomastectomy and left sentinel lymph node biopsy due to a triple negative ductal carcinoma. At the end of adjuvant treatment, the patient had an atypical lymph node in the left axilla. Lymph node was excised, and after laboratory analysis, the diagnosis was ganglion tuberculosis. The patient underwent treatment for primary tuberculosis. The development of these two pathologies can lead to problems in diagnosis and treatment. An accurate diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:26018148

  6. Chemotherapy in recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer after adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, M.; Nicholas, G.; Goss, G.D.; Wheatley-Price, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite adjuvant systemic therapy in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc), many will subsequently relapse. We investigated treatment choices at relapse and assessed the effect of palliative platinum doublet systemic therapy in this population. Methods With research ethics board approval, we performed a retrospective chart review of all patients with resected nsclc who received adjuvant systemic therapy from January 2002 until December 2008 at our institution. The primary outcome was the response rate to first-line palliative systemic therapy among patients who relapsed. Results We identified 176 patients who received adjuvant platinum doublet systemic therapy (82% received cisplatin–vinorelbine). In the 85 patients who relapsed (48%), median time to relapse was 18.5 months (95% confidence interval: 15 months to 21.3 months). Palliative systemic therapy was given in 43 patients. Of those 43 patients, 25 (58%) were re-challenged with platinum doublet systemic therapy, with a response rate of 29% compared with 18% in 18 patients who received other systemic therapy (p = 0.48). We observed a trend toward an increased clinical benefit rate (complete response + partial response + stable disease) in patients who were treated with a platinum doublet (67% vs. 41%, p = 0.12). Median overall survival (os) from relapse was 15.3 months in patients receiving palliative systemic therapy and 7.8 months in those receiving best supportive care alone. Compared with patients treated with non-platinum regimens, the platinum-treated group experienced longer survival after relapse (18.4 months vs. 9.7 months, p = 0.041). Conclusions In patients previously treated with adjuvant systemic therapy, re-treatment with platinum doublet chemotherapy upon relapse is feasible. Moreover, compared with patients receiving other first-line systemic therapy, patients receiving platinum doublets experienced higher response rates and significantly longer

  7. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable gastric cancer? A practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Craig C.; Maroun, Jean; Zuraw, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Objective To make recommendations on the use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy in addition to surgery in patients with resectable gastric cancer (T1–4, N1–2, M0). Options Neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments compared with “curative” surgery alone. Outcomes Overall survival, disease-free survival, and adverse effects. Evidence The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify randomized trials. Values Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative (CCOPGI) Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and methodologists. A systematic review of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice, to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. This report has been reviewed and approved by the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group, comprising medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, a pathologist and 2 community representatives. Benefits, harms and costs When compared with surgery alone, at 3 years adjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been shown to increase overall survival by 9% (50% v. 41%, p = 0.005) and to improve relapse-free survival from 31% to 48% (p = 0.001). At 5 years, it has been shown to increase overall survival by 11.6% (40% v. 28.4%) and to improve relapse-free survival from 25% to 38% (p < 0.001). Treatment has been associated with toxic deaths in 1% of patients. The most frequent adverse effects (> grade 3 [Southwest Oncology Group toxicity scale] are hematologic (54%), gastrointestinal (33%), influenza-like (9%), infectious (6%) and neurologic (4%). The radiation fields used can possibly damage the left kidney, resulting in hypertension and other renal problems. Furthermore, this therapy could increase the demand on radiation resources. Physicians and patients should understand the tradeoffs between survival benefit

  8. Oncometabolic Nuclear Reprogramming of Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; García, María G.; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Fernández, Agustín F.; Joven, Jorge; Fraga, Mario F.; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Summary By impairing histone demethylation and locking cells into a reprogramming-prone state, oncometabolites can partially mimic the process of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. Using a systems biology approach, combining mathematical modeling, computation, and proof-of-concept studies with live cells, we found that an oncometabolite-driven pathological version of nuclear reprogramming increases the speed and efficiency of dedifferentiating committed epithelial cells into stem-like states with only a minimal core of stemness transcription factors. Our biomathematical model, which introduces nucleosome modification and epigenetic regulation of cell differentiation genes to account for the direct effects of oncometabolites on nuclear reprogramming, demonstrates that oncometabolites markedly lower the “energy barriers” separating non-stem and stem cell attractors, diminishes the average time of nuclear reprogramming, and increases the size of the basin of attraction of the macrostate occupied by stem cells. These findings establish the concept of oncometabolic nuclear reprogramming of stemness as a bona fide metabolo-epigenetic mechanism for generation of cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26876667

  9. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways are inherent signaling pathways in normal embryogenesis, development, and hemostasis. However, dysfunctions of these pathways are evident in multiple tumor types and malignancies. Specifically, aberrant activation of these pathways is implicated in modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of cancer cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into heterogeneous tumor cells. The CSCs are accountable for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. In this review, we focus on roles of Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways in CSCs' stemness and functions and summarize therapeutic studies targeting these pathways to eliminate CSCs and improve overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:28356914

  10. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  11. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant treatment of young women with breast cancer: the estrogen rich is a poor candidate!

    PubMed

    Azim, Hamdy A; Kamal, Nermine S; Malak, Rafaat A

    2013-06-01

    During the last 2 decades the role of bisphosphonates (BPs) to reduce skeletal-related events from bone metastases in breast cancer has been well defined. Several preclinical studies have strongly suggested that BPs may also provide an anti-cancer effect in early breast cancer. Indeed, the use of adjuvant BPs represents a unique approach that attempts at eradicating occult tumor micro-metastases residing in the bone marrow via targeting the bone microenvironment to render it less favorable for cancer cell growth. Although, this concept has been tested clinically for more than 15 years, no final consensus has been reached as for the routine use of BPs in the adjuvant phase of breast cancer, owing to conflicting results of randomized studies. Nevertheless, accumulating evidence from recent trials has indicated a therapeutic benefit of adjuvant BPs-particularly zoledronic acid-in women with established menopause, with no or perhaps detrimental effects in premenopausal women. Indeed, this hypothesis has opened a new chapter on the role of estrogen-poor microenvironment as a potential pre-requisite for the anti-tumor effects of BPs in the adjuvant phase of breast cancer. In this review, we will emphasize the biological rational of using BPs to target bone microenvironment in patients with early breast cancer and we will explore mechanistic differences; related to bisphosphonates effects in premenopausal versus postmenopausal women and how the endocrine environment would influence the anticancer potential of these compounds.

  12. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Schoenfeld, Joshua D.; Buatti, John M.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. PMID:25460731

  13. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  14. Prognosis of invasive breast cancer after adjuvant therapy evaluated with VEGF microvessel density and microvascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ultrasonographic microvascular imaging in the evaluation of prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. A total of 121 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent ultrasonographic contrast-enhanced imaging, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining, and microvessel density (MVD) counts. The parameters of microvascular imaging and the expression of VEGF and MVD in primary breast cancer were calculated. The correlation between these factors and the overall and progression-free survival rate were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among 121 cases, the positive VEGF cases were 75 and negative ones were 46. The cut point of 52.3 was calculated by the regressive curve for MVD counts. The data showed the mean intensity (MI) was positively associated with both the MVD counts (r = .51, p < .001) and VEGF expression (r = .35, p < .001). For the prognosis of patients, high VEGF expression and MVD counts were associated with reduced progressive and survival times (PFS, p = .032 and p = .034; OS, p = .041 and p = .038, respectively). The correlation between parameters of microvascular imaging, VEGF expressive status, and the MVD counts were established. The cut point of mean intensity (MI = 40) was used to investigate as an independent predictor for PFS (p = .021) and OS (p = .025), respectively, due to a strong correlation between MVD counts and VEGF expression in patients with invasive breast cancer. The microvascular imaging could be a visual and helpful tool to predict the prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies.

  15. Treatment outcomes after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Kyung-Ja; Park, Kyung-Ran; Ha, Boram; Kim, Yi-Jun; Jung, Wonguen; Lee, Rena; Kim, Seung Cheol; Moon, Hye Sung; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jihae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. Results The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery. PMID:27703126

  16. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Right- and Left-Sided Colon Cancer: Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Schumacher, Jessica; Allen, Glenn O.; Neuman, Heather; Lange, Erin O’Connor; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy is established for stage III colon cancer; however, uncertainty exists for stage II patients. Tumor heterogeneity, specifically microsatellite instability (MSI) which is more common in right-sided cancers, may be the reason for this observation. We examined the relationship between adjuvant chemotherapy and overall 5-year mortality for stage II colon cancer by location (right- versus left-side) as a surrogate for MSI. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified Medicare beneficiaries from 1992 to 2005 with AJCC stage II (n=23,578) and III (n=17,148) primary adenocarcinoma of the colon who underwent surgery for curative intent. Overall 5-year mortality was examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score weighting. Results Eighteen percent (n=2,941) of stage II patients with right-sided cancer and 22% (n=1,693) with left-sided cancer received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjustment, overall 5-year survival benefit from chemotherapy was observed only for stage III patients (right-sided: HR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.59–0.68, p<0.001 and left-sided: HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.56–0.68, p<0.001). No survival benefit was observed for stage II patients with either right-sided (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.87–1.09, p=0.64) or left-sided cancer (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84–1.12, p=0.68). Conclusions Among Medicare patients with stage II colon cancer, a substantial number receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve overall 5-year survival for either right- or left-sided colon cancers. Our results reinforce existing guidelines and should be considered in treatment algorithms for older adults with stage II colon cancer. PMID:24643898

  17. MicroRNA reins in embryonic and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Bibekanand; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas; Ghosh, Zhumur

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs represents a new layer of gene regulation in stem cells by controlling the molecular mechanisms involved in modulating stem cell fate and behavior. Such a role of microRNA is seen in embryonic stem cell as well, maintaining a delicate balance between survival, proliferation, and self-renewal signals. Further, dysregulation of stem cell self-renewal is a likely requirement for the initiation and formation of cancer stem cells that probably pose resistance to current cancer treatments. In fact, the precise mechanism that regulates embryonic as well as cancer stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency remains largely unknown. Understanding the miRNA related stem cell biology and pathways offers great promise for improving stem cell mediated regenerative therapy as well as cancer therapies. Here we summarize some of the emerging evidences demonstrating the role of these molecular switches in embryonic and cancer stem cells.

  18. Epithelial stem cells and intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawna; Barker, Nick

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian intestine is comprised of an epithelial layer that serves multiple functions in order to maintain digestive activity as well as intestinal homeostasis. This epithelial layer contains highly proliferative stem cells which facilitate its characteristic rapid regeneration. How these stem cells contribute to tissue repair and normal homeostasis are actively studied, and while we have a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cellular locations that underlie stem cell regulation in this tissue, much still remains undiscovered. This review describes epithelial stem cells in both intestinal and non-intestinal tissues, as well as the strategies that have been used to further characterize the cells. Through a discussion of the current understanding of intestinal self-renewal and tissue regeneration in response to injury, we focus on how dysregulation of critical signaling pathways results in potentially oncogenic aberrations, and highlight issues that should be addressed in order for effective intestinal cancer therapies to be devised.

  19. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  20. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) as an adjuvant in cancer treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M M; Haniadka, R; Chacko, P P; Palatty, P L; Baliga, M S

    2011-01-01

    Despite acquiring a strong understanding of the molecular basis and advances in treatment, cancer is the second major cause of death in the world. In clinics, the stagedependent treatment strategies may include surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments like hormonotherapy and chemotherapy, which are associated with side effects. The use of traditional herbal medicine in cancer patients is on a rise, as it is believed that these medications are non toxic and alleviate the symptoms of cancer, boost the immune system, or may tackle the cancer itself. Since antiquity the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe commonly known as ginger (family Zingiberaceae) have widely been used as a spice and condiment in different societies. Additionally, ginger also has a long history of medicinal use in various cultures for treating common colds, fever, to aid digestion, treat stomach upset, diarrhoea, nausea, rheumatic disorders, gastrointestinal complications and dizziness. Preclinical studies have also shown that ginger possesses chemopreventive and antineoplastic properties. It is also reported to be effective in ameliorating the side effects of γ-radiation and of doxorubicin and cisplatin; to inhibit the efflux of anticancer drugs by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to possess chemosensitizing effects in certain neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this review is to address observations on the role of ginger as adjuvant to treatment modalities of cancer. Emphasis is also placed on the drawbacks and on future directions for research that will have a consequential effect on cancer treatment and cure.

  1. Pilot study of bone mineral density in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headley, J. A.; Theriault, R. L.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.; Hortobagyi, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in breast cancer patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Chemotherapy drugs and dosages along with a history of risk factors for reduced bone density including activity level, tobacco and/or alcohol use, metabolic bone disease, family history, and hormone exposure were identified. Results showed that women who became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy had BMD 14% lower than women who maintained menses after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-treated women who maintained ovarian function had normal BMD. This study suggests that women who have premature menopause as a result of chemotherapy for breast cancer are at increased risk of bone loss and may be at risk for early development of osteoporosis. Women who maintain menses do not appear to be at risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss.

  2. Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy in Women with Early-stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Santeufemia, Davide A; Fadda, Giovanni M; Tozzoli, Renato; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2016-01-01

    For decades, adjuvant hormonal therapy has become the standard treatment of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Currently, the drugs available are GnRH agonists, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and aromatase inhibitors. The use of GnRH agonists represents a potentially reversible treatment that can restore ovarian function after chemotherapy. In premenopausal women, systemic therapy based on selective estrogen receptor modulators administration (e.g., tamoxifen) usually represents the standard adjuvant treatment. There are not sufficient data to recommend the routine addition of GnRH agonists to other endocrine therapies. In postmenopausal women, the disease-free survival was significantly prolonged in patients treated with aromatase inhibitor compared with those treated with tamoxifen, but the survival benefit was modest. Better results were obtained when the two drugs were administered sequentially. According to the ASCO guidelines, after 5 years of tamoxifen treatment, either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors therapy should be suggested for an additional 5 years. Unfortunately, most adverse events are consistent with estrogen deprivation and are common to all therapies, and the cumulative toxicity causes discontinuation and nonadherence to therapy in up to 50% of patients. Switching tamoxifen to an aromatase inhibitor may reduce adverse event incidence. Molecular-targeted therapy is useful in patients with advanced, relapsed or hormonal therapy-resistant tumors, usually as second- or third-line treatment. These drugs are usually added to aromatase inhibitors; however, currently, they have not yet been used in patients with early breast cancer.

  3. Differential clonal evolution in oesophageal cancers in response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John M.; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Makino, Seiko; Rayner, Emily; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Cross, William; Kovac, Michal; Ulahannan, Danny; Palles, Claire; Gillies, Richard S.; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Church, David; Maynard, Nicholas D.; Buffa, Francesca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Lai-Mun; Sharma, Ricky A.; Middleton, Mark; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    How chemotherapy affects carcinoma genomes is largely unknown. Here we report whole-exome and deep sequencing of 30 paired oesophageal adenocarcinomas sampled before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Most, but not all, good responders pass through genetic bottlenecks, a feature associated with higher mutation burden pre-treatment. Some poor responders pass through bottlenecks, but re-grow by the time of surgical resection, suggesting a missed therapeutic opportunity. Cancers often show major changes in driver mutation presence or frequency after treatment, owing to outgrowth persistence or loss of sub-clones, copy number changes, polyclonality and/or spatial genetic heterogeneity. Post-therapy mutation spectrum shifts are also common, particularly C>A and TT>CT changes in good responders or bottleneckers. Post-treatment samples may also acquire mutations in known cancer driver genes (for example, SF3B1, TAF1 and CCND2) that are absent from the paired pre-treatment sample. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can rapidly and profoundly affect the oesophageal adenocarcinoma genome. Monitoring molecular changes during treatment may be clinically useful. PMID:27045317

  4. Overview on cardiac, pulmonary and cutaneous toxicity in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Guenzi, Marina; Fozza, Alessandra; Vidali, Cristiana; Rovea, Paolo; Meacci, Fiammetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of breast cancer represents the standard treatment for early disease. Breast conserving surgery associated with radiotherapy for stage I-II has been proven to be as equally effective as mastectomy in term of local control, distant disease, and overall survival. The growing minimal invasive surgical approach on the axillary region, and the new breast reconstructive techniques, will probably lead to a significant decrease of the rate of side-effects related to mastectomy. Therefore, the adverse events caused by adjuvant radiation still remain a challenge. Cutaneous, pulmonary and cardiac toxicity represent the main toxicities of adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Safety profile of radiation is strongly dependent on the multidisciplinary management of the single case (systemic treatment, endocrine therapy, surgery), individual characteristics (i.e., co-morbidities, age, habits), and radiation-related aspects. Radiation techniques development, and facilities implementation concerning organs-at-risk sparing systems (i.e., image-guided radiotherapy, tracking systems, respiratory gating), represent brand new tools for the clinical oncologist, that would certainly minimize toxicity profile in the next future. However, data reported from published literature will greatly help physicians, to give to the patients appropriate counseling regarding the efficacy and potential adverse events of treatments, thus optimizing the informed decision-making process.

  5. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials. PMID:28149278

  6. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by tamoxifen during adjuvant breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jiyoung; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Jung-Mi; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Young Suk

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen and radiotherapy are used in breast cancer treatment worldwide. Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD), induced by tamoxifen, has been rarely reported. Herein, we report a RRD case induced by tamoxifen. A 47-year-old woman had a right quadrantectomy and an axillary lymph node dissection due to breast cancer. The tumor was staged pT2N0; it was hormone receptor positive, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen and radiotherapy. After 22 months of tamoxifen, the patient developed a localized heating sensation, tenderness, edema, and redness at the irradiated area of the right breast. The symptoms improved within 1 week without treatment. Three weeks later, however, the patient developed similar symptoms in the same area of the breast. She continued tamoxifen before and during dermatitis, and symptoms resolved within 1 week. PMID:25568855

  7. An overview of randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Meta-analysis of the published results from 54 randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer suggests that chemotherapy might increase absolute survival by 6.5% (95% confidence interval 3.1-9.9%). The odds ratio in favour of chemotherapy is 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.24-1.5). Single-agent chemotherapy given synchronously with radiotherapy increased survival by 12.1% (95% confidence interval 5-19%). The benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy was less: a rate difference of 3.7% (95% confidence interval 0.9-6.5%). The results suggest that the investigation of optimal agents and scheduling for synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy might still be important in clinical trials in head and neck cancer. PMID:7819055

  8. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    SciTech Connect

    Rouesse, Jacques . E-mail: j.rouesse@stcloud-huguenin.org; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.

  9. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  10. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-06-14

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome.

  11. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  12. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  13. Proteomics as a Guide for Personalized Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients with Early Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Chiara, Giordano B; Foltran, Luisa; Basso, Stefano M M

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics allows for better understanding of the function and regulation of cancer cells mediated by intra- and extracellular signaling networks. Integrating such information with clinicopathological characteristics of the tumor may lead to either detection of disease biomarkers useful to differentiate high-from low-risk patients, or to identification of new drug targets. Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently a personalized treatment strategy, especially for breast cancer (BC) patients, and the risk assessment of each patient influences its use because the benefit strictly correlates with the level of risk. Luminal A BCs are endocrine therapy (ET)-sensitive but exhibit low sensitivity to chemotherapy, while luminal B cancers, according to the Ki-67 proliferation rate may require for chemotherapy in addition to ET, and HER2-positive tumors derive benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy containing an anthracycline, a taxane and trastuzumab for one year. Triple-negative BCs have a high degree of genomic instability exhibiting a more aggressive clinical course with respect to other types of BC, and the anthracycline-taxane regimen constitutes the standard approach. Studies considering the use of targeted approaches (drugs), including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, or EFGR and HER2 blockers, are still under evaluation. In the genomic era, promising new targeted-therapies are worthy of further investigation, and mTOR inhibitors have been used for patients with high-risk ER-positive and HER2-negative tumors. In the near future, genetic and molecular profiling of BC will help to better-categorize patients, determine the choice of chemotherapy in low-risk, or intensify the treatment in high-risk cancer patients, eventually revealing new targeted agents.

  14. Understanding Breast Cancer Survivors' Beliefs and Concerns About Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy: Promoting Adherence.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Jensen, Roxanne E; Jennings, Yvonne; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2017-02-15

    Adjuvant hormonal therapy is recommended for women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer. Though critical, many patients are non-adherent to this therapy. Few scales have been developed to specifically address beliefs about adjuvant hormonal therapy. This study explores the clarity and relevance of the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire (BMQ) in the context of adherence behaviors to hormonal therapy in Black and White breast cancer survivors. We recruited women diagnosed with HR-positive cancer from the Washington, DC, area. An interviewer administered a standardized survey and conducted a cognitive interview. Participants rated the BMQ across three areas: relevance, difficulty, and clarity. We coded whether the comments identified item level issues: limited applicability, unclear reference, unclear perspective, or wording or tone. In-depth interviews were conducted with women who prematurely discontinued hormone therapy. The sample (n = 30) was equally split between Black and White survivors. On average, women were 57.9 years old (SD = 9.0). Overall 77% rated scale as relevant. Cognitive interviews revealed areas of perceived limited acceptability such as the notion of becoming too dependent or the notion of becoming worse if not taking the medication. Women who discontinued hormonal therapy (n = 2) felt ambivalent towards hormonal therapy as they reported having both positive and negative beliefs about the medication. Our study findings suggest new areas for further research and instrument development to accurately measure self-reported beliefs about hormonal therapy by HR-positive breast cancer survivors.

  15. Do Patients with Luminal A Breast Cancer Profit from Adjuvant Systemic Therapy? A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Blettner, Maria; Häusler, Sebastian; Janni, Wolfgang; Kreienberg, Rolf; Stein, Roland; Stüber, Tanja; Schwentner, Lukas; Bartmann, Catharina; Wöckel, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Luminal A breast cancers respond well to anti-hormonal therapy (HT), are associated with a generally favorable prognosis and constitute the majority of breast cancer subtypes. HT is the mainstay of treatment of these patients, accompanied by an acceptable profile of side effects, whereas the added benefit of chemotherapy (CHT), including anthracycline and taxane-based programs, is less clear-cut and has undergone a process of critical revision. Methods In the framework of the BRENDA collective, we analyzed the benefits of CHT compared to HT in 4570 luminal A patients (pts) with primary diagnosis between 2001 and 2008. The results were adjusted by nodal status, age, tumor size and grading. Results There has been a progressive reduction in the use of CHT in luminal A patients during the last decade. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses showed any statistically significant differences in relapse free survival (RFS) with the addition of CHT to adjuvant HT, independent of the nodal status, age, tumor size or grading. Even for patients with more than 3 affected lymph nodes, there was no significant difference (univariate: p = 0.865; HR 0.94; 95% CI: 0.46–1.93; multivariate: p = 0.812; HR 0.92; 95% CI: 0.45–1.88). Conclusions The addition of CHT to HT provides minimal or no clinical benefit at all to patients with luminal A breast cancer, independent of the RFS-risk. Consequently, risk estimation cannot be the initial step in the decisional process. These findings–that are in line with several publications–should encourage the critical evaluation of applying adjuvant CHT to patients with luminal A breast cancer. PMID:27992550

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil in a patient with colorectal cancer and Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Purim, Ofer; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2007-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy often requiring adjuvant chemotherapy. Familial Mediterranean Fever is a chronic hereditary disease which is relatively prevalent in the Middle East and is associated with recurrent episodes of serosal, synovial or cutaneous inflammations. The aim of this paper was to describe a patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever who received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. A 56-year-old man with Familial Mediterranean Fever and amyloidosis was referred for evaluation and treatment following surgery for colorectal cancer. In light of his relatively young age, good general state of health and apparently well-controlled Familial Mediterranean Fever, he was treated with chemotherapy consisting of four cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. The patient's clinical course during chemotherapy was unremarkable except for one minor attack of Familial Mediterranean Fever. The patient's follow-up was notable for periodic fluctuations in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, up to 4-fold of normal. The Familial Mediterranean Fever remained stable. Although our patient showed a good tolerability of treatment, the administration of chemotherapy to patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever raises several concerns. These include a potential deterioration in the Familial Mediterranean Fever status owing to chemotherapy-induced stress, the potential effect of Familial Mediterranean Fever or its treatment on the tolerability of chemotherapy and an overlapping toxicity of the drugs used to treat the two diseases. An increase in serum carcinoembryonic antigen in this setting may be related to the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism of Familial Mediterranean Fever but does not necessarily indicate disease recurrence. Clinicians should be aware of these issues considering the recent worldwide increase in colorectal cancer.

  17. Adjuvant gemcitabine versus NEOadjuvant gemcitabine/oxaliplatin plus adjuvant gemcitabine in resectable pancreatic cancer: a randomized multicenter phase III study (NEOPAC study)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite major improvements in the perioperative outcome of pancreas surgery, the prognosis of pancreatic cancer after curative resection remains poor. Adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival, but this treatment cannot be offered to a significant proportion of patients due to the surgical morbidity. In contrast, almost all patients can receive (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. This treatment is safe and effective, and has resulted in a median survival of 26.5 months in a recent phase II trial. Moreover, neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves the nutritional status of patients with pancreatic cancer. This multicenter phase III trial (NEOPAC) has been designed to explore the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods/Design This is a prospective randomized phase III trial. Patients with resectable cytologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head are eligible for this study. All patients must be at least 18 years old and must provide written informed consent. An infiltration of the superior mesenteric vein > 180° or major visceral arteries are considered exclusion criteria. Eligible patients will be randomized to surgery followed by adjuvant gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) for 6 months or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2, oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2) followed by surgery and the same adjuvant treatment. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is given four times every two weeks. The staging as well as the restaging protocol after neoadjuvant chemotherapy include computed tomography of chest and abdomen and diagnostic laparoscopy. The primary study endpoint is progression-free survival. According to the sample size calculation, 155 patients need to be randomized to each treatment arm. Disease recurrence will be documented by scheduled computed tomography scans 9, 12, 15, 21 and thereafter every 6 months until disease progression. For quality control, circumferential resection margins are marked intraoperatively, and

  18. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  19. Real-world experience with adjuvant fec-d chemotherapy in four Ontario regional cancer centres

    PubMed Central

    Madarnas, Y.; Dent, S.F.; Husain, S.F.; Robinson, A.; Alkhayyat, S.; Hopman, W.M.; Verreault, J.L.; Vandenberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy with fec-d (5-fluorouracil–epirubicin–cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel) is superior to that with fec-100 alone in women with early-stage breast cancer. As the use of fec-d increased in clinical practice, health care providers anecdotally noted higher-than-expected toxicity rates and frequent early treatment discontinuations because of toxicity. In the present study, we compared the rates of serious adverse events in patients who received adjuvant fec-d chemotherapy in routine clinical practice with the rates reported in the pacs-01 trial. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients prescribed adjuvant fec-d for early-stage breast cancer at 4 regional cancer centres in Ontario. Information was collected from electronic and paper charts by a physician investigator from each centre. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, independent samples t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and univariate regression. Results The 671 electronic and paper patient records reviewed showed a median patient age of 52.2 years, 229 patients (34.1%) with N0 disease, 508 patients (75.7%) with estrogen or progesterone receptor–positive disease (or both), and 113 patients (26%) with her2/neu–overexpressing breast cancer. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 152 patients (22.7%), most frequently at cycle 4, coincident with the initiation of docetaxel [78/152 (51.3%)]. Primary prophylaxis with hematopoietic growth factor support was used in 235 patients (35%), and the rate of febrile neutropenia was significantly lower in those who received prophylaxis than in those who did not [15/235 (6.4%) vs. 137/436 (31.4%); p < 0.001; risk ratio: 0.20]. Conclusions In routine clinical practice, treatment with fec-d is associated with a higher-than-expected rate of febrile neutropenia, in light of which, primary prophylaxis with growth factor should be considered, per international guidelines. Adoption based on clinical trial reports of

  20. Ewing's sarcoma cancer stem cell targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Roumiana

    2014-01-01

    Ewing`s sarcoma (ES) family of tumors (ESFTs) are round cell tumors of bone and soft tissues, afflicting children and young adults. This review summarizes the present findings about ES cancer stem cell (CSC) targeted therapy: prognostic factors, chromosomal translocations, initiation, epigenetic mechanisms, candidate cell of ES origin (Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs)). The ES CSC model, histopathogenesis, histogenesis, pathogenesis, ES mediated Hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) senescence are also discussed. ESFTs therapy is reviewed concerning CSCs, radiotherapy, risk of subsequent neoplasms, stem cell (SC) support, promising therapeutic targets for ES CSCs (CSC markers, immune targeting, RNAi phenotyping screens, proposed new drugs), candidate EWS-FLI1 target genes and further directions (including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)). Bone marrow-derived human MSCs are permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression with transition to ESFT-like cellular phenotype. ESFTs are genetically related to NCSC, permissive for EWS-FLI1 expression and susceptible to oncogene-induced immortalization. Primitive neuroectodermal features and MSC origin of ESFTs provide a basis of immune targeting. The microRNAs profile of ES CSCs is shared by ESCs and CSCs from divergent tumor types. Successful reprogramming of differentiated human somatic cells into a pluripotent state allows creation of patient- and disease-specific SCs. The functional role of endogenous EWS at stem cell level on both senescence and tumorigenesis is a link between cancer and aging. The regulatory mechanisms of oncogenic activity of EWS fusions could provide new prognostic biomarkers, therapeutic opportunities and tumor-specific anticancer agents against ESFTs.

  1. [Targeted molecular therapy based on advanced cancer stem cell model].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Improvement of cell purification and transplantation techniques have contributed to the identification of cell populations known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Although it was hypothesized that tumors are organized as hierarchies of tumor cells that are sustained by rare TICs, like normal tissue stem cells, there are several controversies towards such cancer stem cell model, e.g. reversible change of stem cell like population based on epigenetic changes, clonal genetic evolution and problems in xenotransplantation system. Despite complexity in cancer stem cell models, studies in cancer stem cell field have revealed that there are close relationship between cancer malignancy and stem cell properties, called "stemness". Understanding molecular mechanisms for controlling stemness would contribute to establishment of novel diagnostics or therapeutics for cancer.

  2. The stem cell adjuvant with Exendin-4 repairs the heart after myocardial infarction via STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Yan; Yin, Yujing; Du, Zhiyan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Junjie; Hu, Shunying; Wang, Changyong; Chen, Yundai

    2014-01-01

    The poor survival of cells in ischaemic myocardium is a major obstacle for stem cell therapy. Exendin-4 holds the potential of cardioprotective effect based on its pleiotropic activity. This study investigated whether Exendin-4 in conjunction with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) could improve the stem cell survival and contribute to myocardial repairs after infarction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by the left anterior descending artery ligation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. ADSCs carrying double-fusion reporter gene [firefly luciferase and monomeric red fluorescent protein (fluc-mRFP)] were quickly injected into border zone of MI in rats treated with or without Exendin-4. Exendin-4 enhanced the survival of transplanted ADSCs, as demonstrated by the longitudinal in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Moreover, ADSCs adjuvant with Exendin-4 decreased oxidative stress, apoptosis and fibrosis. They also improved myocardial viability and cardiac function and increased the differentiation rates of ADSCs into cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. Then, ADSCs were exposed to hydrogen peroxide/serum deprivation (H2O2/SD) to mimic the ischaemic environment in vitro. Results showed that Exendin-4 decreased the apoptosis and enhanced the paracrine effect of ADSCs. In addition, Exendin-4 activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) through the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Furthermore, Exendin-4 increased the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, but decreased the pro-apoptotic protein Bax of ADSCs. In conclusion, Exendin-4 could improve the survival and therapeutic efficacy of transplanted ADSCs through STAT3 activation via the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. This study suggests the potential application of Exendin-4 for stem cell–based heart regeneration. PMID:24779911

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells engineered for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Recent pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that stem cell-based therapies hold tremendous promise for the treatment of human disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are emerging as promising anti-cancer agents which have an enormous potential to be utilized to treat a number of different cancer types. MSC have inherent tumor-trophic migratory properties, which allows them to serve as vehicles for delivering effective, targeted therapy to isolated tumors and metastatic disease. MSC have been readily engineered to express anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic agents that specifically target different cancer types. Many of these strategies have been validated in a wide range of studies evaluating treatment feasibility or efficacy, as well as establishing methods for real-time monitoring of stem cell migration in vivo for optimal therapy surveillance and accelerated development. This review aims to provide an in depth status of current MSC-based cancer therapies, as well as the prospects for their clinical translation. PMID:21740940

  4. Targeted therapy against cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Rycaj, Kiera

    2015-07-01

    Research into cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and give rise to more mature (differentiated) cancer cells, and which may be the cells responsible for the overall organization of a tumor, has progressed rapidly and concomitantly with recent advances in studies of normal tissue stem cells. CSCs have been reported in a wide spectrum of human tumors. Like normal tissue stem cells, CSCs similarly exhibit significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. The ability of CSCs to self-renew results in the immortality of malignant cells at the population level, whereas the ability of CSCs to differentiate, either fully or partially, generates the cellular hierarchy and heterogeneity commonly observed in solid tumors. CSCs also appear to have maximized their pro-survival mechanisms leading to their relative resistance to anti-cancer therapies and subsequent relapse. Studies in animal models of human cancers have also provided insight into the heterogeneity and characteristics of CSCs, helping to establish a platform for the development of novel targeted therapies against specific CSCs. In the present study, we briefly review the most recent progress in dissecting CSC heterogeneity and targeting CSCs in various human tumor systems. We also highlight a few examples of CSC-targeted drug development and clinical trials, with the ultimate aim of developing more effective therapeutic regimens that are capable of preventing tumor recurrence and metastasis.

  5. Cancer stem cells: a metastasizing menace!

    PubMed

    Bandhavkar, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and is estimated to be a reason of death of more than 18 billion people in the coming 5 years. Progress has been made in diagnosis and treatment of cancer; however, a sound understanding of the underlying cell biology still remains an unsolved mystery. Current treatments include a combination of radiation, surgery, and/or chemotherapy. However, these treatments are not a complete cure, aimed simply at shrinking the tumor and in majority of cases, there is a relapse of tumor. Several evidences suggest the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating stem-like cells, a small population of cells present in the tumor, capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny. The presence of these CSCs can be attributed to the failure of cancer treatments as these cells are believed to exhibit therapy resistance. As a result, increasing attention has been given to CSC research to resolve the therapeutic problems related to cancer. Progress in this field of research has led to the development of novel strategies to treat several malignancies and has become a hot topic of discussion. In this review, we will briefly focus on the main characteristics, therapeutic implications, and perspectives of CSCs in cancer therapy.

  6. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  7. Review of Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer and Results From Mayo Clinic for the 5th JUCTS Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C. Iott, Matthew J.; Corsini, Michele M.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To present an overview of Phase III trials in adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer and review outcomes at the Mayo Clinic after adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RT/CT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A literature review and a retrospective review of 472 patients who underwent an R0 resection for T1-3N0-1M0 invasive carcinoma of the pancreas from 1975 to 2005 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Patients with metastatic or unresectable disease at the time of surgery, positive surgical margins, or indolent tumors and those treated with intraoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the analysis. Median radiotherapy dose was 50.4Gy in 28 fractions, with 98% of patients receiving concurrent 5-fluorouracil- based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. Median overall survival (OS) was 1.8 years. Median OS after adjuvant RT/CT was 2.1 vs. 1.6 years for surgery alone (p = 0.001). The 2-y OS was 50% vs. 39%, and 5-y was 28% vs. 17% for patients receiving RT/CT vs. surgery alone. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that adverse prognostic factors were positive lymph nodes (risk ratio [RR] 1.3, p < 0.001) and high histologic grade (RR 1.2, p < 0.001). T3 tumor status was found significant on univariate analysis only (RR 1.1, p = 0.07). Conclusions: Results from recent clinical trials support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer. The role of radiochemotherapy in adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer remains a topic of debate. Results from the Mayo Clinic suggest improved outcomes after the administration of adjuvant radiochemotherapy after a complete resection of invasive pancreatic malignancies.

  8. [Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer by concomitant hormonotherapy and radiotherapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Azria, D; Lemanski, C; Zouhair, A; Gutowski, M; Belkacémi, Y; Dubois, J B; Romieu, G; Ozsahin, M

    2004-06-01

    Combining radiation and hormone therapy has become common clinical practice in recent years for locally advanced prostate cancer. The use of such concomitant therapy in the treatment of breast disease has been very infrequently reported in the literature, but such an application seems justified given the common hormonal dependence of breast cancer and the potential synergetic effect of these two treatment modalities. As adjuvant therapy, tamoxifen is the key drug in the hormonal treatment arsenal, providing a significant improvement in both local control and global survival rates. Aromatase inhibitors are currently being evaluated in this setting, and initial results are promising. In vitro, tamoxifen does not seem to offer a protective effect against radiation. In clinical use, the few available published studies confirm the superiority of the association of radiation with tamoxifen as opposed to radiation therapy alone in decreasing local recurrences of surgically removed breast tumors. Toxicity associated with such concomitant therapy includes mainly subcutaneous and pulmonary fibroses. However, subcutaneous fibrosis and its cosmetic impact on the treated breast are frequently described side effects of radiation therapy, and their incidence may actually be reduced when tamoxifen is associated. The evidence is less controversial for pulmonary fibrosis, which is more common with the concomitant therapy. The association of radiation and aromatase inhibitors has as of yet rarely been reported. Letrozole (Femara) has a radiosensitizing effect on breast-cancer cell lines transfected with the aromatase gene. Clinical data assessing this effect in vivo are not available. The FEMTABIG study (letrozole vs. tamoxifen vs. sequential treatment) did not specify the sequence of radiation and hormonal therapy. The ATAC study comparing the adjuvant use of anastrozole (Arimidex) and tamoxifen does not provide any information on the number of patients receiving radiation

  9. Zn- and Mg- Containing Tricalcium Phosphates-Based Adjuvants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Onuma, Kazuo; Sogo, Yu; Ohno, Tadao; Ito, Atsuo

    2013-07-01

    Zn-, and Mg-containing tricalcium phosphates (TCPs) loaded with a hydrothermal extract of a human tubercle bacillus (HTB) were prepared by immersing Zn-TCP and Mg-TCP in HTB-containing supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions. The in vitro and in vivo immunogenic activities of the HTB-loaded Zn-, and Mg-TCPs (Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB, respectively) were evaluated as potential immunopotentiating adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. The Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB adjuvants showed no obvious cytotoxicity and more effectively stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion by macrophage-like cells than unprocessed HTB or HTB-loaded TCP (T-Ap-HTB) in vitro. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB mixed with liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue markedly inhibited the in vivo development of rechallenged Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells compared with T-Ap-HTB and the unprocessed HTB mixed liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB contributed to eliciting potent systemic antitumor immunity in vivo.

  10. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for stages II and III colon cancer after complete resection: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B.M.; Cosby, R.; Quereshy, F.; Jonker, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Updated practice guidelines on adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected colon cancer are lacking. In 2008, Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care developed a guideline on adjuvant therapy for stages ii and iii colon cancer. With newer regimens being assessed in this patient population and older agents being either abandoned because of non-effectiveness or replaced by agents that are more efficacious, a full update of the original guideline was undertaken. Methods Literature searches (January 1987 to August 2015) of medline, embase, and the Cochrane Library were conducted; in addition, abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress were reviewed (the latter for January 2007 to August 2015). A practice guideline was drafted that was then scrutinized by internal and external reviewers whose comments were incorporated into the final guideline. Results Twenty-six unique reports of eighteen randomized controlled trials and thirteen unique reports of twelve meta-analyses or pooled analyses were included in the evidence base. The 5 recommendations developed included 3 for stage ii colon cancer and 2 for stage iii colon cancer. Conclusions Patients with completely resected stage iii colon cancer should be offered adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5fu)–based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin (based on definitive data for improvements in survival and disease-free survival). Patients with resected stage ii colon cancer without “high-risk” features should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients with “high-risk” features, 5fu-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin should be offered, although no clinical trials have been conducted to conclusively demonstrate the same benefits seen in stage iii colon cancer. PMID:28050138

  11. Targeting cancer stem cell lines as a new treatment of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, D; Rogers, I M

    2010-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that most cancers are clonal and are maintained by a cancer stem cell. Cancer stem cells have been identified in blood, breast, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal, prostate and ovarian cancer. Under normal homeostasis tissue specific stem cell division would be under strict control. When proliferation becomes independent of normal cellular controls, cancer develops. Studies indicate that cancer stem cells maintain their ability to differentiate, which explains the variety of cell types observed in tumors. Most therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor mass but not the slow dividing cancer stem cells and therefore the cancer is not eradicated. Understanding the process of transformation from a highly regulated stem cell to a cancer stem cell requires an understanding of genetic and epigenetic processes as well as having an understanding of the stem cell niche and the interaction of the stem cells with supportive cells in the niche. Current research is helping us to understand stem cells and stem cell regulation and in turn this will help to develop novel therapies to eliminate cancer and the initiating cancer stem cell. The relevant patents on the stem cell regulation and cancer therapy by stem cells are discussed.

  12. Immune adjuvants as critical guides directing immunity triggered by therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil; Tartour, Eric; Michalek, Jaroslav; Stathopoulos, Apostolos; Dobrovolskienė, Neringa T; Strioga, Marius M

    2014-04-01

    Tumor growth is controlled by natural antitumor immune responses alone or by augmented immune reactivity resulting from different forms of immunotherapy, which has demonstrated clinical benefit in numerous studies, although the overall percentage of patients with durable clinical responses remains limited. This is attributed to the heterogeneity of the disease, the inclusion of late-stage patients with no other treatment options and advanced tumor-associated immunosuppression, which may be consolidated by certain types of chemotherapy. Despite variable responsiveness to distinct types of immunotherapy, therapeutic cancer vaccination has shown meaningful efficacy for a variety of cancers. A key step during cancer vaccination involves the appropriate modeling of the functional state of dendritic cells (DCs) capable of co-delivering four critical signals for proper instruction of tumor antigen-specific T cells. However, the education of DCs, either directly in situ, or ex vivo by various complex procedures, lacks standardization. Also, it is questioned whether ex vivo-prepared DC vaccines are superior to in situ-administered adjuvant-guided vaccines, although both approaches have shown success. Evaluation of these variables is further complicated by a lack of consensus in evaluating vaccination clinical study end points. We discuss the role of signals needed for the preparation of classic in situ and modern ex vivo DC vaccines capable of proper reprogramming of antitumor immune responses in patients with cancer.

  13. Colon cancer: cancer stem cells markers, drug resistance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Zuzana; Gabrisova, Veronika; Kucerova, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Malignant tumours consist of heterogeneous populations of tumour cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a population of cells within a tumour with highly tumorigenic and chemoresistant properties. These cells may be identified by the expression of CSC markers. There are several key stem cells markers specified for colon cancer: CD133, CD44, ALDH1, ALCAM. These days, a major obstacle to effective cancer management is development of a multidrug resistance (MDR). The principal mechanism responsible for development of MDR phenotype is the over-expression of ABC transporters. Tumours and relapsing tumours after therapy are drived by subpopulations of tumour cells with aggressive phenotype resistant to chemotherapeutics. These cells are called CSC or tumour-initiating cells (TIC). Here we outline recent information about MDR of colon cancer and CSC markers. We have focused on novel therapeutic strategies which have been developed to prevent or overcome MDR. One such strategy is a combination of chemotherapy and modulators of MDR pumps or chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Colon cancer is characterized by the presence of colon CSC expressing specific stem cell markers. The divergent presence of these markers can help to adjust personalized therapy. The review provides a detailed overview of resistance of colon cancer cells and discusses how the presence of CSC markers can influence therapy and prognosis of patients.

  14. Positive esophageal proximal resection margin: an important prognostic factor for esophageal cancer that warrants adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Cang; Deng, Han-Yu; Wang, Wen-Ping; He, Du; Ni, Peng-Zhi; Hu, Wei-Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive esophageal proximal resection margin (ERM+) following esophagectomy was considered as incomplete or R1 resection. The clinicopathological data and long-term prognosis of esophageal cancer (EC) patients with ERM+ after esophagectomy were still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of ERM+ and its therapeutic option. Methods From November 2008 to December 2014, 3,594 patients with histologically confirmed EC underwent radical resection in our department. Among them there were 37 patients (1.03%) who had ERM+. ERM+ was defined as carcinoma or atypical hyperplasia (severe or moderate) at the residual esophageal margin in our study. For comparison, another 74 patients with negative esophageal proximal resection margin (ERM−) were propensity-matched at a ratio of 1:2 as control group according to sex, age, tumor location and TNM staging. The relevant prognostic factors were investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Results In this large cohort of patients, the rate of ERM+ was 1.03%. The median survival time was 35.000 months in patients with ERM+, significantly worse than 68.000 months in those with ERM− (Chi-square =4.064, P=0.044). Survival in patients with esophageal residual atypical hyperplasia (severe or moderate) was similar to those with esophageal residual carcinoma. Survival rate in stage I–II was higher than that in stage III–IV (Chi-square =27.598, P=0.000) in ERM−; But there was no difference between the two subgroups of patients in ERM+. Furthermore, in those patients with ERM+, survival was better in those who having adjuvant therapy, compared to those without adjuvant therapy (Chi-square =5.480, P=0.019). And the average survival time which was improved to a well situation for ERM+ patients who have adjuvant therapy was 68.556 months which is comparable to average survival time (65.815 months) of ERM− for those patients who are at earlier stages

  15. The treatment outcomes and the use of adjuvant therapies in breast cancer patients with severe co-morbidities

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaihong; Lee, Han-Byoel; Lee, Eun-Shin; Kang, Young Joon; Kim, Yumi; Choi, Jihye; Rhu, Jiyoung; Shin, Hee-Chul; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Studies have suggested a potential role of patient’s co-morbidity in determining the survival outcomes of breast cancer. In this study, we examined the long-term oncologic outcomes in breast cancer patients who underwent curative surgery according to their pre-existing comorbid conditions and analyzed the association between the co-morbidity and the use of adjuvant therapies. Methods The medical records of 2,501 patients who underwent surgery for primary breast cancer from June 2006 to June 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were classified into three groups according to preoperative ASA status determined by the anesthesiologists. Clinico-pathologic characteristics and survival outcomes of the patients were compared among the different co-morbidity groups. Results There were 1,792 (71.6%), 665 (26.6%), and 44 (1.8%) patients in ASA I, II, and III, respectively. Total 95 (3.8%) deaths and 269 (10.8%) recurrences (loco-regional and distant) occurred during the median follow-up period of 71 months. Patients with high comorbidity showed significantly higher rate of deaths (51 (2.8%), 38 (5.7%) and 6 (13.6%) deaths in ASA I, II and III group, respectively, p<0.001). The ASA 3 patients also showed significantly higher rate of breast cancer recurrence when compared to other groups (180 (10.0%), 80 (12.0%) and 9 (20.5%) in ASA I, II, and III, respectively, p = 0.041). Significantly fewer patients in the high co-morbidity group received adjuvant therapies (77 (4.3%), 44 (6.6%) and 8 (18.2%) in ASA I, II, and III, respectively, p<0.001). The increased recurrence of breast cancer in the high morbidity group was mostly seen in patients who did not receive adjuvant therapies. The incidence of serious adverse effect during the adjuvant therapy did not differ according to the co-morbidity conditions. Conclusions In this study, high comorbidity was related to increased risk of death and recurrence in breast cancer. The increased risk of recurrence in high

  16. Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In February 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on evidence-based reviews of published literature surrounding three pharmacogenomic tests. This project came about when Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) asked MAS to provide evidence-based analyses on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three oncology pharmacogenomic tests currently in use in Ontario. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these technologies. These have been completed in conjunction with internal and external stakeholders, including a Provincial Expert Panel on Pharmacogenomics (PEPP). Within the PEPP, subgroup committees were developed for each disease area. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed by the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and is summarized within the reports. The following reports can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Ecopnomic Analysis K-RAS testing in Treatment Decisions for Advanced Colorectal Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Objective To review and synthesize the available evidence regarding the laboratory performance, prognostic value, and predictive value of Oncotype-DX for the target population. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population The target population of this review is women with newly diagnosed early stage (stage I–IIIa) invasive breast cancer that is estrogen-receptor (ER) positive and/or progesterone-receptor (PR) positive. Much of this review, however, is relevant for women

  17. Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinct subpopulation of cancer cells which are shown to be relatively resistant to conventional anticancer therapies and have been correlated to disease recurrence. Oncolytic viruses utilize methods of cell killing that differ from traditional therapies and thus are able to elude the typical mechanisms that CSCs use to resist current chemotherapies and radiotherapies. Moreover, genetically engineered oncolytic viruses may further augment the oncolytic effects. Here we review the recent data regarding the ability of several oncolytic viruses to eradicate CSCs. PMID:27358866

  18. Infection, stem cells and cancer signals.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    2011-02-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells.

  19. Lung cancer stem cells: An epigenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Samriddhi; Khan, Sajid; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2017-02-05

    Lung cancer remains the major cause of human mortality among all the cancer types despite the colossal amount of efforts to prevent the cancer onset and to provide the appropriate cure. Recent reports have identified that important contributors of lung cancer-related mortality are the drug resistance and aggressive tumor relapse, the characteristics contributed by the presence of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs). The identification of lung CSCs is inherently complex due to the quiescent nature of lung epithelium, which makes the distinction between the normal lung epithelium and lung CSCs difficult. Recently, multiple researches have helped in the identification of lung CSCs based on the presence or absence of certain specific types of stem cell markers. Maintenance of lung CSCs is chiefly mediated through the epigenetic modifications of their genome. In this review, we will discuss about the origin of lung CSCs and the role of epigenetic modifications in their maintenance. We will also discuss in brief the major lung CSC markers and the therapeutic approaches to selectively target this population of cells.

  20. Infection, Stem Cells and Cancer Signals

    PubMed Central

    Sell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The association of cancer with preceding parasitic infections has been observed for over 200 years. Some such cancers arise from infection of tissue stem cells by viruses with insertion of viral oncogenes into the host DNA (mouse polyoma virus, mouse mammary tumor virus). In other cases the virus does not insert its DNA into the host cells, but rather commandeers the metabolism of the infected cells, so that the cells continue to proliferate and do not differentiate (human papilloma virus and cervical cancer). Cytoplasmic Epstein Barr virus infection is associated with a specific gene translocation (Ig/c-myc) that activates proliferation of affected cells (Burkitt lymphoma). In chronic osteomyelitis an inflammatory reaction to the infection appears to act through production of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radical formation to induce epithelial cancers. Infection with Helicobacter pylori leads to epigenetic changes in methylation and infection by a parasite. Clonorchis sinensis also acts as a promoter of cancer of the bile ducts of the liver (cholaniocarcinoma). The common thread among these diverse pathways is that the infections act to alter tissue stem cell signaling with continued proliferation of tumor transit amplifying cells. PMID:21044009

  1. Adverse prognostic value of peritumoral vascular invasion: is it abrogated by adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy? Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viale, G.; Giobbie-Hurder, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Maiorano, E.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Sonzogni, A.; Mallon, E.; Colleoni, M.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Regan, M. M.; Brown, R. W.; Golouh, R.; Crivellari, D.; Karlsson, P.; Öhlschlegel, C.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Coates, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peritumoral vascular invasion (PVI) may assist in assigning optimal adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early breast cancer. Patients and methods: Patients participated in two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials testing chemoendocrine adjuvant therapies in premenopausal (trial VIII) or postmenopausal (trial IX) node-negative breast cancer. PVI was assessed by institutional pathologists and/or central review on hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides in 99% of patients (analysis cohort 2754 patients, median follow-up >9 years). Results: PVI, present in 23% of the tumors, was associated with higher grade tumors and larger tumor size (trial IX only). Presence of PVI increased locoregional and distant recurrence and was significantly associated with poorer disease-free survival. The adverse prognostic impact of PVI in trial VIII was limited to premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive tumors randomized to therapies not containing goserelin, and conversely the beneficial effect of goserelin was limited to patients whose tumors showed PVI. In trial IX, all patients received tamoxifen: the adverse prognostic impact of PVI was limited to patients with receptor-negative tumors regardless of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy appears to abrogate the adverse impact of PVI in node-negative disease, while PVI may identify patients who will benefit particularly from adjuvant therapy. PMID:19633051

  2. Leptin and cancer: from cancer stem cells to metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-08-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity is a risk factor of cancer incidence and mortality. Hence, the identification of the mechanistic links between obesity and cancer progression is emerging as a topic of widespread interest. Recently, several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin, an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Zheng et al. study the role of leptin on tumor growth in a xenograft model of MMTV-Wnt1-derived cancer cells. They study growth of these cancer cells in the context of obese animals, such as ob/ob mice (lacking leptin) and db/db mice (lacking functional leptin receptors (LEPR)) and find that leptin triggers LEPR-positive cancer stem cell differentiation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential for leptin and leptin signaling in the context of mammary tumor growth.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Cognitive Impairment and Decline Associated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Miyuki; Ogilvie, James M.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Green, Heather J.; Chambers, Suzanne K.; Ownsworth, Tamara; Shum, David H. K.

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to quantify the magnitude and nature of the association between adjuvant chemotherapy and performance on a range of cognitive domains among breast cancer patients. A total of 27 studies (14 cross-sectional, 8 both cross-sectional and prospective, and 5 prospective) were included in the analyses, involving 1562 breast cancer patients who had undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and 2799 controls that included breast cancer patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. A total of 737 effect sizes (Cohen’s d) were calculated for cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies separately and classified into eight cognitive domains. The mean effect sizes varied across cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies (ranging from −1.12 to 0.62 and −0.29 to 1.12, respectively). Each cognitive domain produced small effect sizes for cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies (ranging from −0.25 to 0.41). Results from cross-sectional studies indicated a significant association between adjuvant chemotherapy and cognitive impairment that held across studies with varied methodological approaches. For prospective studies, results generally indicated that cognitive functioning improved over time after receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Greater cognitive impairment was reported in cross-sectional studies comparing chemotherapy groups with healthy control groups. Results suggested that cognitive impairment is present among breast cancer patients irrespective of a history of chemotherapy. Prospective longitudinal research is warranted to examine the degree and persisting nature of cognitive impairment present both before and after chemotherapy, with comparisons made to participants’ cognitive function prior to diagnosis. Accurate understanding of the effects of chemotherapy is essential to enable informed decisions regarding treatment and to improve quality of life among breast cancer patients. PMID:25806355

  4. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  5. [Recurrent micro-satellite stable colonic cancer: prolonged survival of 16 years without adjuvant therapy].

    PubMed

    Grothe, D; Kasperk, R

    2004-10-01

    Long-term survival in malignant disease is often linked to intensified therapeutic interventions. We report the case of a colonic cancer in a 78 years old female patient, who underwent her first operation in 1987 for a symptomatic T4 carcinoma. Since then, the patient has always denied any form of follow-up examination and adjuvant therapy. Recently, she has undergone her fourth operation, which for the first time demonstrated peritoneal carcinosis, and is still in very good health.Clinical experience shows that in some cases standard therapies may unexpectedly produce extremely long survival times. This has to be kept in mind when the value of prognostic markers is discussed and limits the validity of survival data in the context of small scale studies dealing with especially extended therapeutic protocols.

  6. Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence via Hedgehog-Mediated Sensitization of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    force these cells back into the cell cycle, possibly sensitizing them to adjuvant cancer therapeutics. To test this hypothesis we developed three...force these cells back into the cell cycle, possibly sensitizing them to adjuvant cancer therapeutics. To test this hypothesis we developed three...canonical hedgehog target gene, Patched1, was not altered in response to oral-gavage of Smoothened agonists. In vitro testing of the compounds

  7. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Methods Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Results Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24495453

  8. Getting to the heart of the matter in cancer: Novel approaches to targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Hugh; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. While cancers may initially show good response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it is not uncommon for them to recur at a later date. This phenomenon may be explained by the existence of a small population of cancer stem cells, which are inherently resistant to anti-cancer treatment as well as being capable of self-renewal. Therefore, while most of the tumour bulk consisting of cells that are not cancer stem cells respond to treatment, the cancer stem cells remain, leading to disease recurrence. Following this logic, the effective targeting of cancer stem cells holds promise for providing long-term cure in individuals with cancer. Cancer stem cells, like normal stem cells are endowed with mechanisms to protect themselves against a wide range of insults including anti-cancer treatments, such as the enhancement of the DNA damage response and the ability to extrude drugs. It is therefore important to develop new strategies if cancer stem cells are to be eradicated. In this review, we describe the strategies that we have developed to target cancer stem cells. These strategies include the targeting of the histone demethylase jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B), which we found to be functionally significant in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Other strategies being pursued include reprogramming of cancer stem cells and the targeting of a functional cell surface marker of liver cancer stem cells, the aminopeptidase CD13.

  9. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajan, Praveena S.; Rao, Vinay S.; Hale, James S.; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D.; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  10. Anti-metastatic functions of type 1 interferons: Foundation for the adjuvant therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Angélica; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumorigenic effects that type 1 interferons (IFN1) elicited in the in vitro studies prompted consideration of IFN1 as a potent candidate for clinical treatment. Though not all patients responded to IFN1, clinical trials have shown that patients with high risk melanoma, a highly refractory solid malignancy, benefit greatly from intermediate IFN1 treatment in regards to relapse-free and distant-metastasis-free survival. The mechanisms by which IFN1 treatment at early stages of disease suppress tumor recurrence or metastatic incidence are not fully understood. Intracellular IFN1 signaling is known to affect cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Moreover, recent studies have revealed specific IFN1-regulated genes that may contribute to IFN1-mediated suppression of cancer progression and metastasis. In concert, expression of these different IFN1 stimulated genes may impede numerous mechanisms that mediate metastatic process. Though, IFN1 treatment is still utilized as part of standard care for metastatic melanoma (alone or in combination with other therapies), cancers find the ways to develop insensitivity to IFN1 treatment allowing for unconstrained disease progression. To determine how and when IFN1 treatment would be most efficacious during disease progression, we must understand how IFN1 signaling affects different metastasis steps. Here, we specifically focus on the anti-metastatic role of endogenous IFN1 and parameters that may help to use pharmaceutical IFN1 in the adjuvant treatment to prevent cancer recurrence and metastatic disease.

  11. Adjuvant endocrine therapy of premenopausal women with early breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hubalek, Michael; Brantner, Christine; Marth, Christian

    2010-04-01

    Tamoxifen is currently the standard of care for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancers. However, endocrine strategies in premenopausal women include not only estrogen receptor blockade with tamoxifen but also temporary suppression of ovarian estrogen synthesis by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists, or permanent interruption of ovarian estrogen synthesis with oophorectomy or radiotherapy. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists have proven to be as effective as surgical oophorectomy in adjuvant treatment of premenopausal breast cancer. The addition of LHRH agonists compared to no therapy reduces the annual odds of recurrence and death in premenopausal women aged less than 50 years with estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists alone or in combination with tamoxifen have shown disease-free survival rates similar to chemotherapy with CMF (cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/5-fluorouracil) and other second-generation chemotherapies. The role of aromatase inhibitors in combination with ovarian suppression is still not established, especially as a large phase III randomized study (Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group Trial 12) did not show superior efficacy compared with ovarian suppression plus tamoxifen in premenopausal early stage disease. Patients currently continue to receive ovarian suppression and tamoxifen. CYP2D6 status may become an important discriminator for the type of endocrine therapy for the premenopausal patient in the future.

  12. ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids as Immunomodulators in Colorectal Cancer: New Potential Role in Adjuvant Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Miccadei, Stefania; Masella, Roberta; Mileo, Anna Maria; Gessani, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Diet composition may affect the onset and progression of chronic degenerative diseases, including cancer, whose pathogenesis relies on inflammatory processes. Growing evidence indicates that diet and its components critically contribute to human health, affecting the immune system, secretion of adipokines, and metabolic pathways. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Antineoplastic drugs are widely used for CRC treatment, but drug resistance and/or off-target toxicity limit their efficacy. Dietary ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been gaining great interest in recent years as possible anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents, especially in areas such as the large bowel, where the pro-inflammatory context promotes virtually all steps of colon carcinogenesis. Growing epidemiological, experimental, and clinical evidence suggests that ω3 PUFA may play a role in several stages of CRC management exhibiting antineoplastic activity against human CRC cells, improving the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy, ameliorating cancer-associated secondary complications, and preventing CRC recurrence. These effects are most likely related to the immunomodulatory activities of ω3 PUFA that are able to influence several aspects of the inflammatory process ranging from inflammasome activation, leukocyte recruitment, production of immune mediators to differentiation, and activation of immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the potential use of ω3 PUFA as adjuvant agents together with chemo/radiotherapy, highlighting the immunomodulatory effects most likely responsible for their beneficial effects in different stages of CRC management. PMID:27895640

  13. Intracellular delivery of tumor antigenic peptides in biodegradable-polymer adjuvant for enhancing cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Ma, W

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy; advantages include convenient synthesis and modification of antigenic peptides, as well as little toxicity associated with its administration. Vaccination of the peptides derived from tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was specifically designed for T cells in the context of MHC molecules. In the past decades, tumor antigenic peptides have been examined in clinic but numbered success has been obtained because of the stability of peptide and delivery approaches, consequently leading to an inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in cancer patients. Thus, the appropriate and efficient peptide vaccine carrier systems still continue to be a major obstacle. However, both sipuleucel-T vaccine and anti-CTLA-4 antibody have been approved by FDA for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively. PLGA has been recently used as the adjuvant to elicit enhanced immune responses while delivering tumor antigenic peptides. Intracellular delivery of the peptides derived from TAA into DCs would prolong antigen presentation of APC to T cells. This article aims to describe a new delivery method regarding tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of DCs-based vaccination.

  14. Antitumor Immunity and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSC) capable of spawning more differentiated tumor cell progeny are required for tumorigenesis and neoplastic progression of leukemias and several solid cancers. The mechanisms by which CSC cause tumor initiation and growth are currently unknown. Recent findings that suggest a negative correlation between degrees of host immunocompetence and rates of cancer development raise the possibility that only a restricted minority of malignant cells, namely CSC, may possess the phenotypic and functional characteristics to evade host antitumor immunity. In human malignant melanoma, a highly immunogenic cancer, we recently identified malignant melanoma initiating cells (MMIC), a novel type of CSC, based on selective expression of the chemoresistance mediator ABCB5. Here we present evidence of a relative immune privilege of ABCB5+ MMIC, suggesting refractoriness to current immunotherapeutic treatment strategies. We discuss our findings in the context of established immunomodulatory functions of physiologic stem cells and in relation to mechanisms responsible for the downregulation of immune responses against tumors. We propose that the MMIC subset might be responsible for melanoma immune evasion and that immunomodulation might represent one mechanism by which CSC advance tumorigenic growth and resistance to immunotherapy. Accordingly, the possibility of an MMIC-driven tumor escape from immune-mediated rejection has important implications for current melanoma immunotherapy. PMID:19796244

  15. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  16. Cancer stem cells in nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Clarke, Ian D; Hide, Takuichiro; Dirks, Peter B

    2004-09-20

    Most current research on human brain tumors is focused on the molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and more recently in solid tumors such as breast cancer suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. Recently, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in human brain tumors of different phenotypes from both children and adults. The finding of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) has been made by applying the principles for cell culture and analysis of normal neural stem cells (NSCs) to brain tumor cell populations and by identification of cell surface markers that allow for isolation of distinct tumor cell populations that can then be studied in vitro and in vivo. A population of brain tumor cells can be enriched for BTSCs by cell sorting of dissociated suspensions of tumor cells for the NSC marker CD133. These CD133+ cells, which also expressed the NSC marker nestin, but not differentiated neural lineage markers, represent a minority fraction of the entire brain tumor cell population, and exclusively generate clonal tumor spheres in suspension culture and exhibit increased self-renewal capacity. BTSCs can be induced to differentiate in vitro into tumor cells that phenotypically resembled the tumor from the patient. Here, we discuss the evidence for and implications of the discovery of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors. The identification of a BTSC provides a powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the central nervous system and to develop therapies targeted to the BTSC. Specific genetic and molecular analyses of the BTSC will further our understanding of the mechanisms of brain tumor growth, reinforcing parallels between normal neurogenesis and brain tumorigenesis.

  17. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  18. Racial/ethnic differences in initiation of adjuvant hormonal therapy among women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Livaudais, Jennifer C; Hershman, Dawn L; Habel, Laurel; Kushi, Lawrence; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Li, Christopher I; Neugut, Alfred I; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Thompson, Beti; Coronado, Gloria D

    2012-01-01

    Mortality after breast cancer diagnosis is known to vary by race/ethnicity even after adjustment for differences in tumor characteristics. As adjuvant hormonal therapy decreases risk of recurrence and increases overall survival among women with hormone receptor-positive tumors, treatment disparities may play a role. We explored racial/ethnic differences in initiation of adjuvant hormonal therapy, defined as two or more prescriptions for tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor filled within the first year after diagnosis of hormone receptor-positive localized or regional-stage breast cancer. The sample included women diagnosed with breast cancer enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). Odds ratios [OR] and 95% confidence intervals [CI] compared initiation by race/ethnicity (Hispanic, African American, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and South Asian vs. non-Hispanic White [NHW]) using logistic regression. Covariates included age and year of diagnosis, area-level socioeconomic status, co-morbidities, tumor stage, histology, grade, breast cancer surgery, radiation and chemotherapy use. Our sample included 13,753 women aged 20-79 years, diagnosed between 1996 and 2007, and 70% initiated adjuvant hormonal therapy. In multivariable analysis, Hispanic and Chinese women were less likely than NHW women to initiate adjuvant hormonal therapy ([OR] = 0.82; [CI] 0.71-0.96 and [OR] = 0.78; [CI] 0.63-0.98, respectively). Within an equal access, insured population, lower levels of initiation of adjuvant hormonal therapy were found for Hispanic and Chinese women. Findings need to be confirmed in other insured populations and the reasons for under-initiation among these groups need to be explored.

  19. The Promher Study: An Observational Italian Study on Adjuvant Therapy for HER2-Positive, pT1a-b pN0 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Stefania; Inno, Alessandro; Fiorio, Elena; Foglietta, Jennifer; Ferro, Antonella; Gulisano, Marcella; Pinotti, Graziella; Gubiotti, Marta; Cavazzini, Maria Giovanna; Turazza, Monica; Duranti, Simona; De Simone, Valeria; Iezzi, Laura; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Spazzapan, Simon; Cavanna, Luigi; Saggia, Chiara; Bria, Emilio; Cretella, Elisabetta; Vici, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Fabi, Alessandra; Garrone, Ornella; Frassoldati, Antonio; Amaducci, Laura; Saracchini, Silvana; Evangelisti, Lucia; Barni, Sandro; Gamucci, Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Laudadio, Lucio; Zoboli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Fabiana; Bogina, Giuseppe; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Boni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer is controversial and no data about the efficacy of trastuzumab in this setting are available from randomized clinical trials. The aims of this retrospective study were to assess how patients are managed in clinical practice in Italy, which clinical or biological characteristics influenced the choice of adjuvant systemic therapy and the outcome of patients. Methods Data of consecutive patients who underwent surgery from January 2007 to December 2012 for HER2-positive, pT1a-b pN0 M0 breast cancer were retrospectively collected from 28 Italian centres. Analysis of contingency tables and multivariate generalized logit models were used to investigate the association between the baseline clinical and biological features and the treatment strategy adopted. Results Among 303 enrolled patients, 204 received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, 65 adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and 34 did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy. At the multivariate analysis age, tumor size, proliferation index and hormone receptor status were significantly associated with the treatment choice. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) probability was 95%, 94.3% and 69.6% for patients treated with adjuvant systemic therapy and trastuzumab, with adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and for patients who did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions The majority of patients (66%) with pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer enrolled in this retrospective study received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, whereas only 11% patients did not receive any adjuvant systemic therapy. The choice of treatment type seems to be mainly influenced by tumor size, proliferation index, hormone receptor status and age. The 5-year DFS probability was significantly higher for patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab compared with patients not receiving adjuvant

  20. Chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic potential of pomegranate (Punica granatum) for human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Deuk; Mehta, Rajendra; Yu, Weiping; Neeman, Ishak; Livney, Talia; Amichay, Akiva; Poirier, Donald; Nicholls, Paul; Kirby, Andrew; Jiang, Wenguo; Mansel, Robert; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Rabi, Thangaiyan; Kaplan, Boris; Lansky, Ephraim

    2002-02-01

    Fresh organically grown pomegranates (Punica granatum L.) of the Wonderful cultivar were processed into three components: fermented juice, aqueous pericarp extract and cold-pressed or supercritical CO2-extracted seed oil. Exposure to additional solvents yielded polyphenol-rich fractions ('polyphenols') from each of the three components. Their actions, and of the crude whole oil and crude fermented and unfermented juice concentrate, were assessed in vitro for possible chemopreventive or adjuvant therapeutic potential in human breast cancer. The ability to effect a blockade of endogenous active estrogen biosynthesis was shown by polyphenols from fermented juice, pericarp, and oil, which inhibited aromatase activity by 60-80%. Fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols, and whole seed oil, inhibited 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 from 34 to 79%, at concentrations ranging from 100 to 1,000 microg/ml according to seed oil > fermented juice polyphenols > pericarp polyphenols. In a yeast estrogen screen (YES) lyophilized fresh pomegranate juice effected a 55% inhibition of the estrogenic activity of 17-beta-estradiol; whereas the lyophilized juice by itself displayed only minimal estrogenic action. Inhibition of cell lines by fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols was according to estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) > estrogen-independent (MB-MDA-231) > normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). In both MCF-7 and MB-MDA-231 cells, fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols consistently showed about twice the anti-proliferative effect as fresh pomegranate juice polyphenols. Pomegranate seed oil effected 90% inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 at 100 microg/ml medium, 75% inhibition of invasion of MCF-7 across a Matrigel membrane at 10 microg/ml, and 54% apoptosis in MDA-MB-435 estrogen receptor negative metastatic human breast cancer cells at 50 microg/ml. In a murine mammary gland organ culture, fermented juice polyphenols effected 47% inhibition of cancerous

  1. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use and Health Care Costs After Introduction of Genomic Testing in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Andrew J.; Wong, Yu-Ning; Mitra, Nandita; Vachani, Anil; Hin, Sakhena; Yang, Lin; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the associations between the 21-gene recurrence score assay (RS) receipt, subsequent chemotherapy use, and medical expenditures among patients with early-stage breast cancer. Patients and Methods Data from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry were used to assemble a retrospective cohort of women with early-stage breast cancer from 2007 to 2010 who underwent initial surgical treatment. These data were merged with administrative claims from the 12-month periods before and after diagnosis to identify comorbidities, treatments, and expenditures (n = 7,287). Propensity score–weighted regression models were estimated to identify the effects of RS receipt on chemotherapy use and medical spending in the year after diagnosis. Results The associations between RS receipt and outcomes varied markedly by patient age. RS use was associated with lower chemotherapy use among women younger than 55 (19.2% lower; 95% CI, 10.6 to 27.9). RS use was associated with higher chemotherapy use among women 75 to 84 years old (5.7% higher; 95% CI, 0.4 to 11.0). RS receipt was associated with lower adjusted 1-year medical spending among women younger than 55 ($15,333 lower; 95% CI, $2,841 to $27,824) and with higher spending among women who were 75 to 84 years old ($3,489 higher; 95% CI, $857 to $6,122). Conclusion RS receipt was associated with reduced use of adjuvant chemotherapy and lower health care spending among women with breast cancer who were younger than 55. Conversely, among women 75 and older, RS testing was associated with a modest increase in chemotherapy use and slightly higher spending. From a population perspective, the impact of RS testing on breast cancer treatment and health care costs is much greater in younger women. PMID:26598749

  2. The Nature and Severity of Cognitive Impairment Associated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of the Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falleti, Marina G.; Sanfilippo, Antonietta; Maruff, Paul; Weih, LeAnn; Phillips, Kelly-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have identified that adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is associated with cognitive impairment; however, the magnitude of this impairment is unclear. This study assessed the severity and nature of cognitive impairment associated with adjuvant chemotherapy by conducting a meta-analysis of the published literature to…

  3. Aflibercept and Ang1 supplementation improve neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy in a preclinical model of resectable breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T. H.; Paez-Ribes, Marta; Xu, Ping; Man, Shan; Bogdanovic, Elena; Thurston, Gavin; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Phase III clinical trials evaluating bevacizumab (an antibody to the angiogenic ligand, VEGF-A) in breast cancer have found improved responses in the presurgical neoadjuvant setting but no benefits in the postsurgical adjuvant setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate alternative antiangiogenic therapies, which target multiple VEGF family members or differentially modulate the Angiopoietin/Tie2 pathway, in a mouse model of resectable triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Neoadjuvant therapy experiments involved treating established orthotopic xenografts of an aggressive metastatic variant of the MDA-MB-231 human TNBC cell line, LM2-4. Adjuvant therapies were given after primary tumor resections to treat postsurgical regrowths and distant metastases. Aflibercept (‘VEGF Trap’, which neutralizes VEGF-A, VEGF-B and PlGF) showed greater efficacy than nesvacumab (an anti-Ang2 antibody) as an add-on to neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy. Concurrent inhibition of Ang1 and Ang2 signaling (through an antagonistic anti-Tie2 antibody) was not more efficacious than selective Ang2 inhibition. In contrast, short-term perioperative BowAng1 (a recombinant Ang1 variant) improved the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, concurrent VEGF pathway inhibition is more likely than Ang/Tie2 pathway inhibition (e.g., anti-Ang2, anti-Ang2/Ang1, anti-Tie2) to improve neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapies for TNBC. Short-term perioperative Ang1 supplementation may also have therapeutic potential in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy for TNBC. PMID:27841282

  4. Musashi signaling in stem cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fox, Raymond G; Park, Frederick D; Koechlein, Claire S; Kritzik, Marcie; Reya, Tannishtha

    2015-01-01

    How a single cell gives rise to an entire organism is one of biology's greatest mysteries. Within this process, stem cells play a key role by serving as seed cells capable of both self-renewal to sustain themselves as well as differentiation to generate the full diversity of mature cells and functional tissues. Understanding how this balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved is crucial to defining not only the underpinnings of normal development but also how its subversion can lead to cancer. Musashi, a family of RNA binding proteins discovered originally in Drosophila and named after the iconic samurai, Miyamoto Musashi, has emerged as a key signal that confers and protects the stem cell state across organisms. Here we explore the role of this signal in stem cells and how its reactivation can be a critical element in oncogenesis. Relative to long-established developmental signals such as Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch, our understanding of Musashi remains in its infancy; yet all evidence suggests that Musashi will emerge as an equally powerful paradigm for regulating development and cancer and may be destined to have a great impact on biology and medicine.

  5. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  6. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  7. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances.

  8. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  9. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Role of microRNAs in maintaining cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence sustains that the establishment and maintenance of many, if not all, human cancers are due to cancer stem cells (CSCs), tumor cells with stem cell properties, such as the capacity to self-renew or generate progenitor and differentiated cells. CSCs seem to play a major role in tumor metastasis and drug resistance, but albeit the potential clinical importance, their regulation at the molecular level is not clear. Recent studies have highlighted several miRNAs to be differentially expressed in normal and cancer stem cells and established their role in targeting genes and pathways supporting cancer stemness properties. This review focuses on the last advances on the role of microRNAs in the regulation of stem cell properties and cancer stem cells in different tumors.

  11. Adjuvant Oral Uracil-Tegafur with Leucovorin for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Tadatoshi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Ijichi, Masayoshi; Teruya, Masanori; Yoshimi, Fuyo; Kawasaki, Seiji; Koyama, Hiroto; Oba, Masaru; Takahashi, Michiro; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background The high recurrence rate after surgery for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CLM) remains a crucial problem. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant therapy with uracil-tegafur and leucovorin (UFT/LV). Methods In the multicenter, open-label, phase III trial, patients undergoing curative resection of CLM were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either the UFT/LV group or surgery alone group. The UFT/LV group orally received 5 cycles of adjuvant UFT/LV (UFT 300mg/m2 and LV 75mg/day for 28 days followed by a 7-day rest per cycle). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS). Results Between February 2004 and December 2010, 180 patients (90 in each group) were enrolled into the study. Of these, 3 patients (2 in the UFT/LV group and 1 in the surgery alone group) were excluded from the efficacy analysis. Median follow-up was 4.76 (range, 0.15–9.84) years. The RFS rate at 3 years was higher in the UFT/LV group (38.6%, n = 88) than in the surgery alone group (32.3%, n = 89). The median RFS in the UFT/LV and surgery alone groups were 1.45 years and 0.70 years, respectively. UFT/LV significantly prolonged the RFS compared with surgery alone with the hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.38–0.83; P = 0.003). The hazard ratio for death of the UFT/LV group against the surgery alone group was not significant (0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.48–1.35; P = 0.409). Conclusion Adjuvant therapy with UFT/LV effectively prolongs RFS after hepatic resection for CLM and can be recommended as an alternative choice. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry C000000013 PMID:27588959

  12. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study on Cardiotoxicity of Adjuvant Trastuzumab Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Erika; Jug, Borut; Blagus, Rok; Zakotnik, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiotoxicity is an important side effect of trastuzumab therapy and cardiac surveillance is recommended. Objectives The aim of our study was to prospectively assess baseline patients' characteristics, level of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and echocardiographic parameters as possible predictors of trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction. Methods In a prospective cohort study, clinical, echocardiographic and neurohumoral assessment was performed at baseline, after 4, 8 and 12 months in breast cancer patients undergoing post-anthracycline (3-4 cycles) adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction was defined as a decline of ≥ 10% in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Results 92 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 9.0 years) were included. Patients who developed trastuzumab-related LVEF decline ≥ 10% (20.6%) during treatment had significantly higher baseline LVEF (70.7 ± 4.4%) than those without (64.8 ± 5.5%) (p = 0.0035). All other measured baseline parameters (age, body mass index, arterial hypertension, level of NT-proBNP and other echocardiographic parameters) were not identified as significant. Conclusions Our findings suggest that baseline patient' characteristics, level of NT-proBNP and echocardiographic parameters, as long as they are within normal range, are not a reliable tool to predict early trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction in patients undergoing post-low dose anthracycline adjuvant trastuzumab therapy. A LVEF decline in patients with high-normal baseline level although statistically significant is not clinically relevant. PMID:27305108

  14. Prospective evaluation of mitotane toxicity in adrenocortical cancer patients treated adjuvantly.

    PubMed

    Daffara, Fulvia; De Francia, Silvia; Reimondo, Giuseppe; Zaggia, Barbara; Aroasio, Emiliano; Porpiglia, Francesco; Volante, Marco; Termine, Angela; Di Carlo, Francesco; Dogliotti, Luigi; Angeli, Alberto; Berruti, Alfredo; Terzolo, Massimo

    2008-12-01

    Toxicity of adjuvant mitotane treatment is poorly known; thus, our aim was to assess prospectively the unwanted effects of adjuvant mitotane treatment and correlate the findings with mitotane concentrations. Seventeen consecutive patients who were treated with mitotane after radical resection of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) from 1999 to 2005 underwent physical examination, routine laboratory evaluation, monitoring of mitotane concentrations, and a hormonal work-up at baseline and every 3 months till ACC relapse or study end (December 2007). Mitotane toxicity was graded using NCI CTCAE criteria. All biochemical measurements were performed at our center and plasma mitotane was measured by an in-house HPLC assay. All the patients reached mitotane concentrations >14 mg/l and none of them discontinued definitively mitotane for toxicity; 14 patients maintained consistently elevated mitotane concentrations despite tapering of the drug. Side effects occurred in all patients but were manageable with palliative treatment and adjustment of hormone replacement therapy. Mitotane affected adrenal steroidogenesis with a more remarkable inhibition of cortisol and DHEAS than aldosterone. Mitotane induced either perturbation of thyroid function mimicking central hypothyroidism or, in male patients, inhibition of testosterone secretion. The discrepancy between salivary and serum cortisol, as well as between total and free testosterone, is due to the mitotane-induced increase in hormone-binding proteins which complicates interpretation of hormone measurements. A low-dose monitored regimen of mitotane is tolerable and able to maintain elevated drug concentrations in the long term. Mitotane exerts a complex effect on the endocrine system that may require multiple hormone replacement therapy.

  15. Entomopathogenic Nematodes Combined with Adjuvants Presents a New Potential Biological Control Method for Managing the Wheat Stem Sawfly, Cephus cinctus (Hymenoptera: Cephidae)

    PubMed Central

    Portman, Scott L.; Krishnankutty, Sindhu M.

    2016-01-01

    The wheat stem sawfly, (Cephus cinctus Norton) Hymenoptera: Cephidae, has been a major pest of winter wheat and barley in the northern Great Plains for more than 100 years. The insect’s cryptic nature and lack of safe chemical control options make the wheat stem sawfly (WSS) difficult to manage; thus, biological control offers the best hope for sustainable management of WSS. Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) have been used successfully against other above-ground insect pests, and adding adjuvants to sprays containing EPNs has been shown to improve their effectiveness. We tested the hypothesis that adding chemical adjuvants to sprays containing EPNs will increase the ability of EPNs to enter wheat stems and kill diapausing WSS larvae. This is the first study to test the ability of EPNs to infect the WSS, C. cinctus, and test EPNs combined with adjuvants against C. cinctus in both the laboratory and the field. Infection assays showed that three different species of EPNs caused 60–100% mortality to WSS larvae. Adding Penterra, Silwet L-77, Sunspray 11N, or Syl-Tac to solutions containing EPNs resulted in higher WSS mortality than solutions made with water alone. Field tests showed that sprays containing S. feltiae added to 0.1% Penterra increased WSS mortality up to 29.1%. These results indicate a novel control method for WSS, and represent a significant advancement in the biological control of this persistent insect pest. PMID:28006820

  16. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  17. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Derzko, C; Elliott, S; Lam, W

    2007-12-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements-all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement-most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)-may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  18. The cancer stem cell theory: is it correct?

    PubMed

    Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2008-11-30

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumor growth is driven by a rare subpopulation of cells, designated cancer stem cells (CSC). Studies supporting this theory are based in large part on xenotransplantation experiments wherein human cancer cells are grown in immunocompromised mice and only CSC, often constituting less than 1% of the malignancy, generate tumors. Herein, we show that all colonies derived from randomly chosen single cells in mouse lung and breast cancer cell lines form tumors following allografting histocompatible mice. Our study suggests that the majority of malignant cells rather than CSC can sustain tumors and that the cancer stem cell theory must be reevaluated.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Sida rhombifolia stems and roots in adjuvant induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Limmy, T P

    2012-04-01

    Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer anti-oxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Herbal medicine provides a foundation for various traditional medicine systems worldwide. The Sida species is one of the most important families of medicinal plants in India. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Sida rhombifolia extracts for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. The altered levels of hematological parameters were reverted to near normal levels, especially the elevated rate of erythrocyte sedimentation was significantly reduced by S. rhombifolia extracts in experimental rats. Oral administration of root and stem of S. rhombifolia extracts significantly increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological and transmission electron microscopy observations made on the hind limb tissue.

  20. New Findings on Breast Cancer Stem Cells: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, Azam; Khazaei, Mohammad Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of the "cancer stem cell" theory, significant developments have been made in the understanding of cancer and the heterogenic structure of tumors. In 2003, with the isolation of cancer stem cells from the first solid tumor, breast cancer, and recognition of the tumorigenicity of these cells, this theory suggested that the main reason for therapy failure might be the presence of cancer stem cells. This review article describes breast cancer stem cell origin, the related cellular and molecular characteristics, signaling pathways, and therapy resistance mechanisms. The databases PubMed, SCOPUS, and Embase were explored, and articles published on these topics between 1992 and 2015 were investigated. It appears that this small subpopulation of cells, with the capacity for self-renewal and a high proliferation rate, originate from normal stem cells, are identified by specific markers such as CD44+/CD24-/low, and enhance a tumor's capacity for metastasis, invasion, and therapy resistance. Cancer stem cell characteristics depend on their interactions with their microenvironment as well as on the inducing factors and elements. Although uncertainties about breast cancer stem cells exist, many of researchers believe that cancer stem cells should be considered as possible therapeutic targets. PMID:26770236

  1. Cancer stem cells in lung cancer: Evidence and controversies.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer, Muhammad; Peacock, Craig D; Matsui, William; Ganju, Vinod; Watkins, D Neil

    2013-07-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model is based on a myriad of experimental and clinical observations suggesting that the malignant phenotype is sustained by a subset of cells characterized by the capacity for self-renewal, differentiation and innate resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. CSC may be responsible for disease recurrence after definitive therapy and may therefore be functionally synonymous with minimal residual disease. Similar to other solid tumours, several putative surface markers for lung CSC have been identified, including CD133 and CD44. In addition, expression and/or activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH and capacity of cells to exclude membrane permeable dyes (known as the 'side population') correlate with stem-like function in vitro and in vivo. Embryonic stem cell pathways such as Hedgehog, Notch and WNT may also be active in lung cancers stem cells and therefore may be therapeutically targetable for maintenance therapy in patients achieving a complete response to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This paper will review the evidence regarding the existence and function of lung CSC in the context of the experimental and clinical evidence and discuss some ongoing controversies regarding this model.

  2. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  3. Survival in gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and determinants

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Sevgi; Ozgen, Zerrin; Ozyurt, Hazan; Gemici, Cengiz; Yaprak, Gokhan; Tepetam, Huseyin; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival data in patients with gastric cancer in relation to postoperative adjuvant therapy and survival determinants METHODS: A total of 201 patients (mean ± SD age: 56.0 ± 11.9 years, 69.7% were males) with gastric carcinoma who were operated and followed up at Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital between 1998 and 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Follow up was evaluated divided into two consecutive periods (before 2008 and 2008-2010, respectively) based on introduction of 3-D conformal technique in radiotherapy at our clinic in 2008. Data on patient demographics, clinical and histopathological characteristics of gastric carcinoma and the type of treatment applied after surgery [postoperative adjuvant treatment protocols including chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and chemotherapy (CT), supportive therapy or follow up without any treatment] were recorded. The median duration and determinants of local recurrence free (LRF) survival, distant metastasis free (DMF) survival and overall survival were evaluated in the overall population as well as with respect to follow up years [1998-2008 (n = 127) vs 2008-2010 (n = 74)]. RESULTS: Median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival were 31.9, 24.1 and 31.9 mo, respectively in patients with postoperative adjuvant CRT. No significant difference was noted in median duration for LRF survival, DMF survival and overall survival with respect to treatment protocols in the overall population and also with respect to followed up periods. In the overall population, CT protocols FUFA [5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m2) and leucovorin-folinic acid (FA, 20 mg/m2)] (29.9 mo) and UFT® + Antrex® [a fixed combination of the oral FU prodrug tegafur (flouroprymidine, FT, 300 mg/m2 per day) with FA (Antrex®), 15 mg tablet, two times a day] (42.5 mo) was significantly associated with longer LRF survival times than other CT protocols (P = 0.036), while no difference was noted between CT

  4. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  5. Mitotane effects in a H295R xenograft model of adjuvant treatment of adrenocortical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindhe, O; Skogseid, B

    2010-09-01

    Adrenocortical cancer is one of the most aggressive endocrine malignancies. Growth through the capsule or accidental release of cancer cells during surgery frequently results in metastatic disease. We investigated the antitumoral effect of 2 adrenocorticolytic compounds, O, P'-DDD and MeSO2-DDE, in the adrenocortical cell line H295R both in vitro and as a xenograft model in vivo. H295R cells were injected s. c. in nude mice. O, P'-DDD, MeSO2-DDE, or oil (control) was administered i. p., either simultaneously with cell injection at day 0 (mimicking adjuvant treatment), or at day 48 (established tumors). Accumulation of PET tracers [ (11)C]methionine (MET), [ (11)C] metomidate (MTO), 2-deoxy-2-[ (18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG), and [ (18)F]-l-tyrosine (FLT) in the aggregates were assessed +/- drug treatment in vitro. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited when O, P'-DDD was given at the same time as injection of tumor cells. No significant growth inhibition was observed after treatment with O, P'-DDD at day 48. A significant reduction in FLT uptake and an increased FDG uptake, compared to control, were observed following treatment with 15 microM O, P'-DDD (p<0.01) in vitro. MeSO2-DDE (15 microM) treatment gave rise to a reduced MET and an increased FLT uptake (p<0.01). Both compounds reduced the uptake of MTO compared to control (p<0.01). Treatment with O, P'-DDD simultaneously to inoculation of H295R cells in mice, imitating release of cells during surgery, gave a markedly better effect than treatment of established H295R tumors. We suggest that FLT may be a potential PET biomarker when assessing adrenocortical cancer treatment with O,P'-DDD. Further studies in humans are needed to investigate this.

  6. Health-related Quality of Life in Metastatic and Adjuvant Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallwiener, M.; Simoes, E.; Sokolov, A. N.; Brucker, S. Y.; Fasching, P. A.; Graf, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: When cancer patients have advanced disease and a primary cure is no longer possible, the focus is on maintaining the patientʼs quality of life. Recent therapeutic advances in breast cancer treatment mean that even patients with metastatic disease can remain stable for long periods of time. The aim of this study was to look at the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of these patients and compare it with data for the general population and to show the differences in outcomes for different survey instruments used to measure quality of life. Material and Methods: A total of 96 breast cancer patients with metastatic disesae or receiving adjuvant therapy were questioned about their quality of life. Patients were investigated using the established survey instruments EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-BR23, EQ-5D-5L and EQ VAS. All patients filled out questionnaires. Statistical analysis was done using MS Excel and SPSS. Results: Although the questionnaires were completed at the same time, the different questionnaires showed significant differences with regard to the level of stress experienced by the patient. When the EQ VAS questionnaire was used, the patientʼs current state of health was assessed as significantly better than with the EORTC QLQ-C30. Overall, all aspects of patientsʼ quality of life were found to be in need of optimization and HRQL of patients was significantly poorer in all areas compared to the reference population. Conclusion: To improve the quality of life of patients with metastatic disease, it is necessary to continuously monitor the success of therapy. The choice of survey tools is highly relevant as assessments differ considerably depending on the choice of questionnaire. PMID:27761027

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  8. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  9. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Joseph M.; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A.; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    tumor can actually determine clinical outcome, likely by providing high-energy mitochondrial “fuels” for proliferative cancer cells to burn. Finally, we also show that in normal mucosal tissue, the basal epithelial “stem cell” layer is hyper-proliferative (Ki-67+), mitochondrial-rich (TOMM20+/COX+) and is metabolically programmed to use mitochondrial fuels (MCT1+), such as ketone bodies and L-lactate. Thus, oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) is a common feature of both (1) normal stem cells and (2) proliferating cancer cells. As such, we should consider metabolically treating cancer patients with mitochondrial inhibitors (such as Metformin), and/or with a combination of MCT1 and MCT4 inhibitors, to target “metabolic symbiosis.” PMID:23574725

  10. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...some oncogene function in determining molecular phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural

  11. Disease-Free Survival as a Surrogate for Overall Survival in Adjuvant Trials of Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Xavier; Alberts, Steven; Bang, Yung-Jue; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Bleiberg, Harry; Catalano, Paul; Lordick, Florian; Michiels, Stefan; Morita, Satoshi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Pignon, Jean-pierre; Rougier, Philippe; Sasako, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Junichi; Sargent, Daniel; Shitara, Kohei; Cutsem, Eric Van; Buyse, Marc; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background In investigations of the effectiveness of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancers, overall survival (OS) is considered the gold standard endpoint. However, the disadvantage of using OS as the endpoint is that it requires an extended follow-up period. We sought to investigate whether disease-free survival (DFS) is a valid surrogate for OS in trials of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer. Methods The GASTRIC group initiated a meta-analysis of individual patient data collected in randomized clinical trials comparing adjuvant chemotherapy vs surgery alone for patients with curatively resected gastric cancer. Surrogacy of DFS was assessed through the correlation between the endpoints as well as through the correlation between the treatment effects on the endpoints. External validation of the prediction based on DFS was also evaluated. Results Individual patient data from 14 randomized clinical trials that included a total of 3288 patients were analyzed. The rank correlation coefficient between DFS and OS was 0.974 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.971 to 0.976). The coefficient of determination between the treatment effects on DFS and on OS was as high as 0.964 (95% CI = 0.926 to 1.000), and the surrogate threshold effect based on adjusted regression analysis was 0.92. In external validation, the six hazard ratios for OS predicted according to DFS were in very good agreement with those actually observed for OS. Conclusions DFS is an acceptable surrogate for OS in trials of cytotoxic agents for gastric cancer in the adjuvant setting. PMID:24108812

  12. Elapsed time from breast cancer detection to first adjuvant therapy in a Canadian province, 1999–2000

    PubMed Central

    Rayson, Daniel; Chiasson, Darrell; Dewar, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Background A number of studies have examined time intervals between care steps in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to document the elapsed time from first clinical or mammographic detection of breast abnormality to initiation of first adjuvant therapy in women with invasive breast cancer in Nova Scotia and to examine the effect of age, disease stage and place of residence on these intervals. Methods All dates were abstracted from patient charts and the Oncology Patient Information System. Eligible women were those with invasive breast cancer detected by Sept. 1, 1999, who were referred to 1 of 2 provincial cancer treatment centres by Sept. 1, 2000. All time intervals were calculated in days, and only patients experiencing both care events defining an interval were included in the analysis of time to event for that interval. We used proportional hazards regression analysis to evaluate the influence of patient age, disease stage and place of residence on times between care events. Results A total of 776 new diagnoses of breast cancer were reported to the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry over the study period. Of the 776, 467 met the inclusion criteria, and 364 patients were eligible for analysis. The overall median time from clinical or mammographic detection of breast cancer to initiation of first adjuvant therapy was 91 days (interquartile range 72–123 days). Disease stage was the strongest predictor of elapsed time: the median interval from disease detection to initiation of first adjuvant therapy for patients with stage I disease was 118 days, as compared with 85 days for those with stage II disease and 75 days for those with stage III disease (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–2.8). Patients aged 70 years or more at diagnosis experienced longer elapsed times (median interval 98 days) than did younger patients (93 days for those aged 50–69 years and 82 days for those aged 49 years or less

  13. Implications of cancer stem cell theory for cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S; Schwartz, Steven J; Sun, Duxin

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anticancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anticancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine and vitamin D(3), are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor-initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival.

  14. For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54 months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

  15. Cancer stem cells as a target population for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bouvard, Claire; Barefield, Colleen; Zhu, Shoutian

    2014-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in a growing list of malignancies and are believed to be responsible for cancer initiation, metastasis and relapse following certain therapies, even though they may only represent a small fraction of the cells in a given cancer. Like somatic stem cells and embryonic stem cells, CSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into more mature, less tumorigenic cells that make up the bulk populations of cancer cells. Elimination of CSCs promises intriguing therapeutic potential and this concept has been adopted in preclinical drug discovery programs. Herein we will discuss the progress of these efforts, general considerations in practice, major challenges and possible solutions.

  16. Cytokines, fatigue, and cutaneous erythema in early stage breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Agolli, Linda; Visco, Vincenzo; Monaco, Flavia; Muni, Roberta; Spagnoli, Alessandra; Campanella, Barbara; Valeriani, Maurizio; Minniti, Giuseppe; Osti, Mattia F; Amanti, Claudio; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Brunetti, Serena; Costantini, Anna; Alfò, Marco; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Marchetti, Paolo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that patients developing high-grade erythema of the breast skin during radiation treatment could be more likely to present increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines which may lead, in turn, to associated fatigue. Forty women with early stage breast cancer who received adjuvant radiotherapy were enrolled from 2007 to 2010. Fatigue symptoms, erythema, and cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-2, IL6, IL-8, TNF-α, and MCP-1) were registered at baseline, during treatment, and after radiotherapy completion. Seven (17.5%) patients presented fatigue without associated depression/anxiety. Grade ≥2 erythema was observed in 5 of these 7 patients. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α were statistically increased 4 weeks after radiotherapy (P < 0.05). After the Heckman two-step analysis, a statistically significant influence of skin erythema on proinflammatory markers increase (P = 0.00001) was recorded; in the second step, these blood markers showed a significant impact on fatigue (P = 0.026). A seeming increase of fatigue, erythema, and proinflammatory markers was observed between the fourth and the fifth week of treatment followed by a decrease after RT. There were no significant effects of hormone therapy, breast volume, and anemia on fatigue. Our study seems to suggest that fatigue is related to high-grade breast skin erythema during radiotherapy through the increase of cytokines levels.

  17. Cancer stem cells and early stage basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a category of early stage, non-invasive breast tumor defined by the intraductal proliferation of malignant breast epithelial cells. DCIS is a heterogeneous disease composed of multiple molecular subtypes including luminal, HER2 and basal-like types, which are characterized by immunohistochemical analyses and gene expression profiling. Following surgical and radiation therapies, patients with luminal-type, estrogen receptor-positive DCIS breast tumors can benefit from adjuvant endocrine-based treatment. However, there are no available targeted therapies for patients with basal-like DCIS (BL-DCIS) tumors due to their frequent lack of endocrine receptors and HER2 amplification, rendering them potentially susceptible to recurrence. Moreover, multiple lines of evidence suggest that DCIS is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast carcinoma. This raises the possibility that targeting precursor BL-DCIS is a promising strategy to prevent BL-DCIS patients from the development of invasive basal-like breast cancer. An accumulating body of evidence demonstrates the existence of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in BL-DCIS, which potentially determine the features of BL-DCIS and their ability to progress into invasive cancer. This review encompasses the current knowledge in regard to the characteristics of BL-DCIS, identification of CSCs, and their biological properties in BL-DCIS. We summarize recently discovered relevant molecular signaling alterations that promote the generation of CSCs in BL-DCIS and the progression of BL-DCIS to invasive breast cancer, as well as the influence of the tissue microenvironment on CSCs and the invasive transition. Finally, we discuss the translational implications of these findings for the prognosis and prevention of BL-DCIS relapse and progression.

  18. Regulation of apoptosis pathways in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-09-10

    Cancer stem cell are considered to represent a population within the bulk tumor that share many similarities to normal stem cells as far as their capacities to self-renew, differentiate, proliferate and to reconstitute the entire tumor upon serial transplantation are concerned. Since cancer stem cells have been shown to be critical for maintaining tumor growth and have been implicated in treatment resistance and tumor progression, they constitute relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, it has been postulated that eradication of cancer stem cells will be pivotal in order to achieve long-term relapse-free survival. However, one of the hallmarks of cancer stem cells is their high resistance to undergo cell death including apoptosis in response to environmental cues or cytotoxic stimuli. Since activation of apoptosis programs in tumor cells underlies the antitumor activity of most currently used cancer therapeutics, it will be critical to develop strategies to overcome the intrinsic resistance to apoptosis of cancer stem cells. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of cancer stem cells to evade apoptosis will likely open new avenues to target this critical pool of cells within the tumor in order to develop more efficient treatment options for patients suffering from cancer.

  19. S-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer: a randomized phase III study (ACTS-CC trial)

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Ikejiri, K.; Mochizuki, I.; Nakamoto, Y.; Kinugasa, Y.; Takagane, A.; Endo, T.; Shinozaki, H.; Takii, Y.; Mochizuki, H.; Kotake, K.; Kameoka, S.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, M.; Boku, N.; Tomita, N.; Nakatani, E.; Sugihara, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine whose antitumor effects have been demonstrated in treating various gastrointestinal cancers, including metastatic colon cancer, when administered as monotherapy or in combination chemotherapy. We conducted a randomized phase III study investigating the efficacy of S-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer by evaluating its noninferiority to tegafur–uracil plus leucovorin (UFT/LV). Patients and methods Patients aged 20–80 years with curatively resected stage III colon cancer were randomly assigned to receive S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28 every 42 days; four courses) or UFT/LV (UFT: 300–600 mg/day and LV: 75 mg/day on days 1–28 every 35 days; five courses). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS) at 3 years. Results A total of 1518 patients (758 and 760 in the S-1 and UFT/LV group, respectively) were included in the full analysis set. The 3-year DFS rate was 75.5% and 72.5% in the S-1 and UFT/LV group, respectively. The stratified hazard ratio for DFS in the S-1 group compared with the UFT/LV group was 0.85 (95% confidence interval: 0.70–1.03), demonstrating the noninferiority of S-1 (noninferiority stratified log-rank test, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, no significant interactions were identified between the major baseline characteristics and the treatment groups. Conclusion Adjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 for stage III colon cancer was confirmed to be noninferior in DFS compared with UFT/LV. S-1 could be a new treatment option as adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00660894. PMID:24942277

  20. Targeting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells for chemoresistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junli; Wang, Li; Chen, Hongmin; Hao, Jingli; Ni, Jie; Chang, Lei; Duan, Wei; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance is the main challenge for the recurrent ovarian cancer therapy and responsible for treatment failure and unfavorable clinical outcome. Understanding mechanisms of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer would help to predict disease progression, develop new therapies and personalize systemic therapy. In the last decade, accumulating evidence demonstrates that epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells play important roles in ovarian cancer chemoresistance and metastasis. Treatment of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells holds promise for improving current ovarian cancer therapies and prolonging the survival of recurrent ovarian cancer patients in the future. In this review, we focus on the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer chemoresistance and explore the therapeutic implications for developing epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells associated therapies for future ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27304054

  1. Combined Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy With IMRT/XELOX Improves Outcome With Low Renal Toxicity in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Weiss, Christel; Mennemeyer, Philipp; Mai, Sabine K.; Hermes, Petra; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Post, Stefan; Massner, Bernd; Hieber, Udo; Hochhaus, Andreas; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2009-11-15

    Objectives: Adjuvant radiochemotherapy improves survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. We assessed in two sequential cohorts whether improved radiotherapy technique (IMRT) together with intensified chemotherapy improves outcome vs. conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and standard chemotherapy in these patients while maintaining or reducing renal toxicity. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients treated for gastric cancer either with 3D-CRT (n = 27) and IMRT (n = 33) were evaluated. More than 70% had undergone D2 resection. Although there was a slight imbalance in R0 status between cohorts, N+ status was balanced. Chemotherapy consisted predominantly of 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (n = 36) in the earlier cohort and mostly of oxaliplatin/capecitabine (XELOX, n = 24) in the later cohort. Primary end points were overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and renal toxicity based on creatinine levels. Results: Median follow-up (FU) of all patients in the 3D-CRT group was 18 months and in the IMRT group 22 months (median FU of surviving patients 67 months in the 3D-CRT group and 25 months in the IMRT group). Overall median survival (and DFS) were 18 (13) months in the 3D-CRT group and both not reached in the IMRT group (p = 0.0492 and 0.0216). Actuarial 2-year survival was 37% and 67% in the 3D-CRT and IMRT groups, respectively. No late renal toxicity >Grade 2 (LENT-SOMA scale) was observed in either cohort. Conclusion: When comparing sequentially treated patient cohorts with similar characteristics, OS and DFS improved with the use of IMRT and intensified chemotherapy without signs of increased renal toxicity.

  2. Frailty and Adherence to Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy in Older Women With Breast Cancer: CALGB Protocol 369901

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Faul, Leigh Anne; Luta, George; Clapp, Jonathan D.; Yung, Rachel L.; Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Kimmick, Gretchen; Isaacs, Claudine; Tallarico, Michelle; Barry, William T.; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric P.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Hurria, Arti; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most patients with breast cancer age ≥ 65 years (ie, older patients) are eligible for adjuvant hormonal therapy, but use is not universal. We examined the influence of frailty on hormonal therapy noninitiation and discontinuation. Patients and Methods A prospective cohort of 1,288 older women diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic breast cancer recruited from 78 sites from 2004 to 2011 were included (1,062 had estrogen receptor–positive tumors). Interviews were conducted at baseline, 6 months, and annually for up to 7 years to collect sociodemographic, health care, and psychosocial data. Hormonal initiation was defined from records and discontinuation from self-report. Baseline frailty was measured using a previously validated 35-item scale and grouped as prefrail or frail versus robust. Logistic regression and proportional hazards models were used to assess factors associated with noninitiation and discontinuation, respectively. Results Most women (76.4%) were robust. Noninitiation of hormonal therapy was low (14%), but in prefrail or frail (v robust) women the odds of noninitiation were 1.63 times as high (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.40; P = .013) after covariate adjustment. Nonwhites (v whites) had higher odds of noninitiation (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.80; P = .033) after covariate adjustment. Among initiators, the 5-year continuation probability was 48.5%. After adjustment, the risk of discontinuation was higher with increasing age (P = .005) and lower for stage ≥ IIB (v stage I) disease (P = .003). Conclusion Frailty is associated with noninitiation of hormonal therapy, but it does not seem to be a major predictor of early discontinuation in older patients. PMID:24934786

  3. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  4. Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT) trial: overview of efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Twelves, Chris J

    2006-11-01

    The X-ACT (Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy) trial compared the efficacy and safety of the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine with bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (LV; Mayo Clinic regimen) as adjuvant therapy for stage III colon cancer. A total of 1987 patients were enrolled at 164 centers worldwide. Disease-free survival (primary study endpoint) in the capecitabine arm was at least equivalent to that in the 5-FU/LV arm; the upper limit of the hazard ratio was significantly (P < 0.001) below the predefined margins for noninferiority. Capecitabine was also associated with significantly fewer fluoropyrimidine-related grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs; P < 0.001) and fewer AE-related hospital admissions/days than 5-FU/LV. Pharmacoeconomic analyses performed in several countries show that the savings in direct costs (drug administration and AE-related costs) associated with capecitabine versus 5-FU/LV offset the acquisition costs of the drug. Furthermore, capecitabine reduces patient travel time and costs, making it a "dominant" strategy (ie, less costly and more effective) in the adjuvant setting. In conclusion, efficacy, safety, convenience, and cost findings from the X-ACT trial show that capecitabine offers at least equivalent clinical benefit compared with bolus 5-FU/LV and can replace intravenous 5-FU/LV in the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. The X-ACT trial has not only helped to better define the role of capecitabine but has also broadened the options available to patients with early-stage disease to include a uniquely effective oral outpatient treatment.

  5. Breast cancer stem cells are regulated by mesenchymal stem cells through cytokine networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Ginestier, Christophe; Ou, Sing J.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Patel, Shivani H.; Monville, Florence; Korkaya, Hasan; Heath, Amber; Dutcher, Julie; Kleer, Celina G.; Jung, Younghun; Dontu, Gabriela; Taichman, Russell; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    We have utilized in vitro and mouse xenograft models to examine the interaction between breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We demonstrate that both of these cell populations are organized in a cellular hierarchy in which primitive aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) expressing mesenchymal cells regulate breast CSCs through cytokine loops involving IL6 and CXCL7. In NOD/SCID mice, labeled MSCs introduced into the tibia traffic to sites of growing breast tumor xenografts where they accelerate tumor growth by increasing the breast cancer stem cell population. Utilizing immunochemistry, we identified “MSC-CSC niches” in these tumor xenografts as well as in frozen sections from primary human breast cancers. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell may accelerate human breast tumor growth by generating cytokine networks that regulate the cancer stem cell population. PMID:21224357

  6. Efficacy of Cotargeting Angiopoietin-2 and the VEGF Pathway in the Adjuvant Postsurgical Setting for Early Breast, Colorectal, and Renal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Florence T H; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Chow, Annabelle; Paez-Ribes, Marta; Lee, Christina R; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R; Emmenegger, Urban; Kerbel, Robert S

    2016-12-01

    Antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) have not been effective as adjuvant treatments for micrometastatic disease in phase III clinical trials. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) is a proangiogenic and proinflammatory vascular destabilizer that cooperates with VEGF. The purpose of this study was to test whether CVX-060 (an Ang2-specific CovX-body) can be combined with VEGFR2-targeting TKIs (sunitinib or regorafenib) to successfully treat postsurgical metastatic disease in multiple orthotopically implanted human tumor xenograft and syngeneic murine tumor models. In the MDA-MB-231.LM2-4 human breast cancer model, adjuvant sunitinib was ineffective, whereas adjuvant CVX-060 delayed the progression of pulmonary or distant lymphatic metastases; however, overall survival was only improved with the adjuvant use of a VEGF-A/Ang2-bispecific CovX-body (CVX-241) but not when CVX-060 is combined with sunitinib. Adjuvant CVX-241 also showed promise in the EMT-6/CDDP murine breast cancer model, with or without an immune checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1). In the RENCA model of mouse renal cancer, however, combining CVX-060 with sunitinib in the adjuvant setting was superior to CVX-241 as treatment for postsurgical lung metastases. In the HCT116 and HT29 xenograft models of colorectal cancer, both CVX-060 and regorafenib inhibited liver metastases. Overall, our preclinical findings suggest differential strategies by which Ang2 blockers can be successfully combined with VEGF pathway targeting in the adjuvant setting to treat micrometastatic disease-particularly, in combination with VEGF-A blockers (but not VEGFR2 TKIs) in resected breast cancer; in combination with VEGFR2 TKIs in resected kidney cancer; and as single agents or with VEGFR2 TKIs in resected colorectal cancer. Cancer Res; 76(23); 6988-7000. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wood, Laura D.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Ellsworth, Susannah; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Hidalgo, Manuel; Donehower, Ross C.; Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H.; Choti, Michael A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; and others

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

  8. Desmoplasia Influenced Recurrence of Disease and Mortality in Stage III Colorectal Cancer within Five Years after Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572, P = 0.05). Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients. PMID:28139499

  9. Targeting cancer stem cell in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Eun-Jin; Zhou, Jiancheng; Lin, Chun-Jung; Hernandez, Elizabeth; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical evidence suggests an increased CSC in tumor mass may contribute to the failure of conventional therapies since CSCs seem to be more resistant than differentiated tumor cells. Thus, unveiling the mechanism regulating CSCs and candidate target molecules will provide new strategy to cure the patients. Experimental design The stem-like cell properties were determined by a prostasphere assay, and dye exclusion assay. To find critical stem cell marker and reveal regulation mechanism, basic biochemical and molecular biological methods such as qRT-PCR, Western blot, reporter gene assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay were employed. In addition, to determine the effect of combination therapy targeting both CSCs and its progeny, in vitro MTT assay and in vivo xenograft model was used. Results We demonstrate immortalized normal human prostate epithelial cells, appeared non-tumorigenic in vivo, become tumorigenic and acquire stem cell phenotype after knocking down a tumor suppressor gene. Also, those stem-like cells increase chemoresistance to conventional anti-cancer reagent. Mechanistically, we unveil that Wnt signaling is a key pathway regulating well-known stem cell marker CD44 by directly interacting to the promoter. Thus, by targeting CSCs using Wnt inhibitors synergistically enhances the efficacy of conventional drugs. Furthermore, the in vivo mice model bearing xenografts showed a robust inhibition of tumor growth after combination therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study provides strong evidence of CSC in CRPC. This new combination therapy strategy targeting CSC could significantly enhance therapeutic efficacy of current chemotherapy regimen only targeting non-CSC cells. PMID:26490309

  10. 5-Fluorouracil Adjuvant Chemotherapy Does Not Increase Survival in Patients with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jover, Rodrigo; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Zapater, Pedro; Payá, Artemio; Alenda, Cristina; Rojas, Estefanía; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Morillas, Juan D.; Clofent, Juan; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Bessa, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M.; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Castells, Antoni; Andreu, Montserrat; Llor, Xavier; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy does not increase survival times of patients with colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability. We determined the response of patients with colorectal tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) to 5-FU-based therapy. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of 302 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) for a median follow-up time of 50.7 months. CIMP status was determined by analysis of the CACNAG1, SOCS1, RUNX3, NEUROG1, and MLH1 promoters; tumors were considered to be CIMP-positive (CIMP+) if at least 3 promoters were methylated. Results Tumors from 29.5% (89/302) of patients were CIMP+; this did not influence disease-free survival (log rank=.26). Of tumors of TNM stages II–III (n=196), 32.7% were CIMP+. Among patients with CRC stages II–III who did not receive adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, those with CIMP+ tumors had longest times of disease-free survival (log rank=.04); patients with CIMP+ tumors who received chemotherapy had shorter times of disease-free survival (log rank=0.02). In patients with CIMP-negative tumors, adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy significantly increased time of disease-free survival (log-rank=.00001). However, in patients with CIMP+ tumors, adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy did not affect time of disease-free survival (log rank=.7). Multivariate analysis showed a significant, independent interaction between 5-FU treatment and CIMP status (hazard ratio [HR]=0.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], .5–.8). Among patients with CIMP+ tumors, adjuvant chemotherapy was not an independent predictor of outcome (HR=0.8; 95% CI, 0.3–2.0). In patients who did not receive adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, CIMP status was the only independent predictor of survival (HR=2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.8) Conclusion Patients with CIMP+ colorectal tumors do not benefit from 5-FU–based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:21185836

  11. Effects of physical exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment on physical and psychosocial dimensions of cancer-related fatigue: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Vulpen, Jonna K; Peeters, Petra H M; Velthuis, Miranda J; van der Wall, Elsken; May, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    Cancer-related fatigue has a multidimensional nature and complaints typically increase during adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Physical exercise might prevent or reduce cancer-related fatigue. So far, no meta-analysis has investigated the effects of physical exercise on different dimensions of fatigue. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of physical exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment on physical and psychosocial dimensions of fatigue. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library in June 2015. Randomised controlled trials reporting the effects of physical exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment on different dimensions of fatigue were included. Pooled effects of 6 exercise programmes (including 784 patients) showed significant beneficial exercise effects on general fatigue (ES: -0.22, 95% CI -0.38; -0.05) and physical fatigue (ES: -0.35, 95% CI -0.49; -0.21). Effects on fatigue subscales 'reduced activity' (ES: -0.22, 95% CI -0.38; -0.05) and 'reduced motivation' (ES: -0.18, 95% CI -0.35; -0.01) were also in favour of physical exercise. No effects were found on cognitive and affective fatigue. Including only the supervised exercise programmes (n=4 studies), slightly larger pooled effect estimates were found on general fatigue (ES: -0.25, 95% CI -0.47; -0.04) and physical fatigue (-0.39, 95% CI -0.56; -0.23). In conclusion, physical exercise during adjuvant breast cancer treatment has beneficial effects on general fatigue, physical fatigue, 'reduced activity' and 'reduced motivation', but did not show effects on cognitive and affective fatigue. Largest effect sizes are found for physical fatigue, suggesting that this is the fatigue dimension most sensitive to physical exercise.

  12. Cancer Stem Cell Biomarker Discovery Using Antibody Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rob; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving hundreds of pathways and numerous levels of disease progression. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence that the origins and growth rates of specific types of cancer may involve "cancer stem cells," which are defined as "cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the development of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor.(1)" Many types of cancer are now thought to harbor cancer stem cells. These cells themselves are thought to be unique in comparison to other cells types present within the tumor and to exhibit characteristics that allow for the promotion of tumorigenesis and in some cases metastasis. In addition, it is speculated that each type of cancer stem cell exhibits a unique set of molecular and biochemical markers. These markers, alone or in combination, may act as a signature for defining not only the type of cancer but also the progressive state. These biomarkers may also double as signaling entities which act autonomously or upon neighboring cancer stem cells or other cells within the local microenvironment to promote tumorigenesis. This review describes the heterogeneic properties of cancer stem cells and outlines the identification and application of biomarkers and signaling molecules defining these cells as they relate to different forms of cancer. Other examples of biomarkers and signaling molecules expressed by neighboring cells in the local tumor microenvironment are also discussed. In addition, biochemical signatures for cancer stem cell autocrine/paracrine signaling, local site recruitment, tumorigenic potential, and conversion to a stem-like phenotype are described.

  13. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  14. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anticancer Phytochemicals on Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisun; Hlatky, Lynn; Jeong, Yong-Seob; Kim, Dohoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide helpful insights for the development of therapeutic or preventive strategies against cancers. Dietary phytochemicals with anticancer properties are promising candidates and have selective impact on CSCs. This review summarizes the influence of phytochemicals on heterogeneous cancer cell populations as well as on specific targeting of CSCs. PMID:27376325

  15. Iodine and doxorubicin, a good combination for mammary cancer treatment: antineoplastic adjuvancy, chemoresistance inhibition, and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although mammary cancer (MC) is the most common malignant neoplasia in women, the mortality for this cancer has decreased principally because of early detection and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of several preparations that cause MC regression, doxorubicin (DOX) is the most active, first-line monotherapeutic. Nevertheless, its use is limited due to the rapid development of chemoresistance and to the cardiotoxicity caused by free radicals. In previous studies we have shown that supplementation with molecular iodine (I2) has a powerful antineoplastic effect in methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced experimental models of MC. These studies also showed a consistent antioxidant effect of I2 in normal and tumoral tissues. Methods Here, we analyzed the effect of I2 in combination with DOX treatment in female Sprague Dawley rats with MNU-induced MC. In the first experiment (short) animals were treated with the therapeutic DOX dose (16 mg/kg) or with lower doses (8 and 4 mg/Kg), in each case with and without 0.05% I2 in drinking water. Iodine treatment began on day 0, a single dose of DOX was injected (ip) on day 2, and the analysis was carried out on day 7. In the second experiment (long) animals with and without iodine supplement were treated with one or two injections of 4 mg/kg DOX (on days 0 and 14) and were analyzed on day 56. Results At all DOX doses, the short I2 treatment induced adjuvant antineoplastic effects (decreased tumor size and proliferating cell nuclear antigen level) with significant protection against body weight loss and cardiotoxicity (creatine kinase MB, cardiac lipoperoxidation, and heart damage). With long-term I2, mammary tumor tissue became more sensitive to DOX, since a single injection of the lowest dose of DOX (4 mg/Kg) was enough to stop tumor progression and a second DOX4 injection on day 14 caused a significant and rapid decrease in tumor size, decreased the expression of chemoresistance markers (Bcl2 and survivin), and increased

  16. Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment: Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eunice Yuen-Ting; Ho, Nicole Pui-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Tumor consists of heterogeneous cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can terminally differentiate into tumor bulk. Normal stem cells in normal organs regulate self-renewal within a stem cell niche. Likewise, accumulating evidence has also suggested that CSCs are maintained extrinsically within the tumor microenvironment, which includes both cellular and physical factors. Here, we review the significance of stromal cells, immune cells, extracellular matrix, tumor stiffness, and hypoxia in regulation of CSC plasticity and therapeutic resistance. With a better understanding of how CSC interacts with its niche, we are able to identify potential therapeutic targets for the development of more effective treatments against cancer. PMID:28337221

  17. The Development of a Mindfulness-Based Music Therapy (MBMT) Program for Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesiuk, Teresa

    2016-08-09

    Problems with attention and symptom distress are common clinical features reported by women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Mindfulness practice significantly improves attention and mindfulness programs significantly reduce symptom distress in patients with cancer, and, more specifically, in women with breast cancer. Recently, a pilot investigation of a music therapy program, built on core attitudes of mindfulness practice, reported significant benefits of enhanced attention and decreased negative mood and fatigue in women with breast cancer. This paper delineates the design and development of the mindfulness-based music therapy (MBMT) program implemented in that pilot study and includes clients' narrative journal responses. Conclusions and recommendations, including recommendation for further exploration of the function of music in mindfulness practice are provided.

  18. The Development of a Mindfulness-Based Music Therapy (MBMT) Program for Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lesiuk, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Problems with attention and symptom distress are common clinical features reported by women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Mindfulness practice significantly improves attention and mindfulness programs significantly reduce symptom distress in patients with cancer, and, more specifically, in women with breast cancer. Recently, a pilot investigation of a music therapy program, built on core attitudes of mindfulness practice, reported significant benefits of enhanced attention and decreased negative mood and fatigue in women with breast cancer. This paper delineates the design and development of the mindfulness-based music therapy (MBMT) program implemented in that pilot study and includes clients’ narrative journal responses. Conclusions and recommendations, including recommendation for further exploration of the function of music in mindfulness practice are provided. PMID:27517966

  19. Stacking the DEK: From chromatin topology to cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; Kappes, Ferdinand; Nassar, Nicolas; Wells, Susanne I.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are essential for development and tissue maintenance and display molecular markers and functions distinct from those of differentiated cell types in a given tissue. Malignant cells that exhibit stem cell-like activities have been detected in many types of cancers and have been implicated in cancer recurrence and drug resistance. Normal stem cells and cancer stem cells have striking commonalities, including shared cell surface markers and signal transduction pathways responsible for regulating quiescence vs. proliferation, self-renewal, pluripotency and differentiation. As the search continues for markers that distinguish between stem cells, progenitor cells and cancer stem cells, growing evidence suggests that a unique chromatin-associated protein called DEK may confer stem cell-like qualities. Here, we briefly describe current knowledge regarding stem and progenitor cells. We then focus on new findings that implicate DEK as a regulator of stem and progenitor cell qualities, potentially through its unusual functions in the regulation of local or global chromatin organization. PMID:23255114

  20. Is Duodenal Invasion a Relevant Prognosticator in Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Distal Common Bile Duct Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer who underwent curative surgery, and to identify the prognostic factors for these patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 1991 and December 2002, 38 patients with adenocarcinoma of the distal CBD underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. There were 27 men and 11 women, and the median age was 60 years (range, 34-73). Adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered to the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes up to 40 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with a 2-week planned rest. Intravenous 5-fluorouracil (500mg/m{sup 2}/day) was given on day 1 to day 3 of each split course. The median follow-up period was 39 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival rate of all patients was 49.1%. On univariate analysis, only histologic differentiation (p = 0.0005) was associated with overall survival. Tumor size ({<=}2cm vs. >2cm) had a marginally significant impact on the treatment outcome (p = 0.0624). However, there was no difference in overall survival rates between T3 and T4 tumors (p = 0.6189), for which the main determinants were pancreatic and duodenal invasion, respectively. On multivariate analysis, histologic differentiation (p = 0.0092) and tumor size (p = 0.0046) were independent risk factors for overall survival. Conclusions: Long-term survival can be expected in patients with distal CBD cancer undergoing curative surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Histologic differentiation and tumor size were significant prognostic factors predicting overall survival, whereas duodenal invasion was not. This finding suggests the need for further refinement in tumor staging.

  1. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m{sup 2} intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of >=180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  2. Race and Insurance Differences in the Receipt of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Harlan, Linda C.; Warren, Joan L.; Geiger, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence and mortality of colon cancer in the United States has declined over the past two decades, blacks have worse outcomes than whites. Variations in treatment may contribute to mortality differentials. Methods Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer were randomly sampled from the SEER program from the years 1990, 1991, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Patients were categorized as non-Hispanic white (n = 835) or black (n = 384). Treatment data were obtained from a review of the medical records, and these data were verified through contact with the original treating physicians. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate the association between race and receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy. Effect modification by insurance was assessed with use of single referent models. Results Receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy among both white and black patients increased from the period encompassing the years 1990 and 1991 (white, 58%; black, 45%) to the year 2005 (white, 72%; black, 71%) and then decreased in the year 2010 (white, 66%; black, 57%). There were marked racial disparities in the time period of 1990 to 1991 and again in 2010, with black patients less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy as compared with white patients (risk ratio [RR], .82; 95% CI, .72 to .93). For black patients, receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy did not differ across insurance categories (RR for private insurance, .80; 95% CI, .69 to .93; RR for Medicare, .84; 95% CI, .69 to 1.02; and RR for Medicaid, .84; 95% CI, .69 to 1.02), although a larger proportion had Medicaid in all years of the study as compared with white patients. Conclusion The chemotherapy differential narrowed after the time period of 1990 to 1991, but our findings suggest that the disparity reemerged in 2010. Recent decreases in chemotherapy use may be due, in part, to the economic downturn and an increase in Medicaid coverage. PMID:26150445

  3. A hard pill to swallow: a qualitative study of women's experiences of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Alison; Dryden, Ruth; McCowan, Colin; Radley, Andrew; Parsons, Mark; Thompson, Alastair M; Wells, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore women's experiences of taking adjuvant endocrine therapy as a treatment for breast cancer and how their beliefs about the purpose of the medication, side effects experienced and interactions with health professionals might influence adherence. Design Qualitative study using semistructured, one-to-one interviews. Setting 2 hospitals from a single health board in Scotland. Participants 30 women who had been prescribed tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole or letrozole) and had been taking this medication for 1–5 years. Results Women clearly wished to take their adjuvant endocrine therapy medication as prescribed, believing that it offered them protection against breast cancer recurrence. However, some women missed tablets and did not recognise that this could reduce the efficacy of the treatment. Women did not perceive that healthcare professionals were routinely or systematically monitoring their adherence. Side effects were common and impacted greatly on the women’s quality of life but did not always cause women to stop taking their medication, or to seek advice about reducing the side effects they experienced. Few were offered the opportunity to discuss the impact of side effects or the potential options available. Conclusions Although most women in this study took adjuvant endocrine therapy as prescribed, many endured a range of side effects, often without seeking help. Advice, support and monitoring for adherence are not routinely offered in conventional follow-up settings. Women deserve more opportunity to discuss the pros, cons and impact of long-term adjuvant endocrine therapy. New service models are needed to support adherence, enhance quality of life and ultimately improve survival. These should ideally be community based, in order to promote self-management in the longer term. PMID:24928595

  4. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  5. [Cancer stem cells as the therapeutic target of tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Hatina, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The concept of hierarchical organization of tumour cell population, with cancer stem cells positioned at the apex of the cell hierarchy, can explain at least some crucial aspects of biological and clinical behaviour of cancer, like its propensity to relapse as well as the development of therapeutic resistance. The underlying biological properties of cancer stem cells are crucially dependent on various signals, inhibition of which provides an attractive opportunity to attack pharmacologically cancer stem cells. Currently, a lot of such stemness-inhibitors undergo various phases of clinical testing. Interestingly, numerous old drugs that are in routine use in human and veterinary medicine for non-oncological indications appear to be able to specifically target cancer stem cells as well. As cancer stem cells, at least for most tumours, represent usually only a minor tumour cell fraction, it is quite probable that the main focus of the clinical use of the stemness inhibitors would consist in their rational combinations with traditional anticancer treatment modalities. A highly important goal for the future research is to identify reliable and clinically applicable predictive markers that would allow to apply these novel anticancer drugs on the individual basis within the context of personalized medicine.

  6. Potential gene therapy strategies for cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-10-01

    To be maximally effective, therapy of cancer must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. The cell populations of both normal and cancer tissues consist of resting stem cells, proliferating transit-amplifying cells, terminally differentiating cells and dying (apoptotic) cells. The difference between normal tissue renewal and growth of cancers is that some of the transit-amplifying cells in the cancer population do not mature into terminally differentiating cells, but instead continue to proliferate and do not die (maturation arrest). Because of this the number of cancer cells increase, whereas the cell population of normal tissues remains a relatively constant. Conventional radiation treatment and chemotherapy kill the actively proliferating transit- amplifying cells of the cancer. Differentiation therapy, using specific targeted inhibitors of activation, effectively induces differentiation of the proliferating transit-amplifying cancer cells. However, even if the proliferating cancer cells are completely inhibited or eliminated, the cancer stem cells may restore the transit-amplifying population, so that clinical remission is usually temporary. The hypothesis presented in this paper is that successful cancer therapy must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. This may be possible if specific stem cell signals are inhibited using gene therapy, while at the same time attacking proliferating cells by conventional radiation treatment or chemotherapy. With advances in approaches using specific inhibitory RNA, such combination therapy may now be possible, but critical problems in delivering the inhibitory effect specifically to the cancer stem cells have yet to be worked out.

  7. [Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage III Colon Cancer--Drug Selection, Tolerability, and Safety in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazutake; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Saito, Gota; Tanaka, Akira; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin (LV), and L-OHP (FOLFOX); capecitabine and L-OHP (CapeOX); and 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and L-OHP (FLOX) are designated as category 1 recommendations for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage III colon cancer, followed by capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil plus LV as category 2A recommendations. We studied the selection of drugs for adjuvant chemotherapy and assessed the tolerability and safety of CapeOX and tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus LV (UFT/LV) in patients with Stage III colon cancer. The study group included 104 consecutive patients with Stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgery. One patient changed hospitals immediately after surgery. Among the remaining 103 patients, 82 (80%) received adjuvant chemotherapy and 21 (20%) did not. CapeOX was administered to 32 patients (31%), UFT/LV to 49 patients (48%), and capecitabine to 1 patient (1%). In 59 patients, the treatment choice was determined according to the patient's preference; 32 patients (54%) selected CapeOX, 26 (44%) selected UFT/LV, and 1 (2%) selected no chemotherapy. The treatment completion rate was 80% for CapeOX and 84% for UFT/LV. Among patients who completed chemotherapy, dose reduction and drug withdrawal were not required in 22% of patients who received CapeOX and 80% of those who received UFT/LV. Neither CapeOX nor UFT/LV was associated with any serious adverse events. The tolerability and safety of CapeOX and UFT/LV were acceptable. However, CapeOX dose had to be carefully adjusted according to each patient's condition.

  8. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  9. Association of osteoprotegerin and bone loss after adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oostra, Drew R.; Lustberg, Maryam B.; Reinbolt, Raquel E.; Pan, Xueliang; Wesolowski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure (CIOF) results in rapid bone loss. Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (RANK)-RANK ligand (RANK-L) signaling balances bone resorption and formation. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) acts as a decoy receptor for RANK, interrupting osteoclast activation and bone resorption. This study examined the relationship between OPG and bone loss in women with CIOF. Methods Premenopausal women with stage I/II breast cancers receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were evaluated at chemotherapy initiation, 6 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), ionized calcium, osteocalcin, and OPG were serially measured. CIOF was defined as a negative pregnancy test, FSH levels >30 MIU/mL, and ≥3 months of amenorrhea. Results Forty women were enrolled; 31 (77.5%) met CIOF criteria. BMD significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in the CIOF group at both time points: LS BMD decreased from a median of 0.993 g/cm2 to 0.976 g/cm2 and 0.937 g/cm2 at 6 and 12 months, respectively. OPG was significantly elevated at 6 months (median increase 0.30 pmol/L, p = 0.015) and then decreased at 12 months to levels still above baseline (median difference 0.2 pmol/L, p = 0.70). Conclusions In what was likely a compensatory response to rapid bone loss, CIOF patients’ OPG levels increased at 6 months and then decreased at 12 months to values greater than baseline assessments. This phenomenon is described in other diseases, but never before in CIOF. PMID:25575458

  10. Hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gschweng, Eric; De Oliveira, Satiro; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) provide an attractive target for immunotherapy of cancer and leukemia by the introduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) directed against tumor-associated antigens. HSCs engraft for long-term blood cell production and could provide a continuous source of targeted anti-cancer effector cells to sustain remissions. T cells produced de novo from HSCs may continuously replenish anti-tumor T cells that have become anergic or exhausted from ex vivo expansion or exposure to the intratumoral microenvironment. In addition, transgenic T cells produced in vivo undergo allelic exclusion, preventing co-expression of an endogenous TCR that could mis-pair with the introduced TCR chains and blunt activity or even cause off-target reactivity. CAR-engineered HSCs may produce myeloid and natural killer cells in addition to T cells expressing the CAR, providing broader anti-tumor activity that arises quickly after transplant and does not solely require de novo thymopoiesis. Use of TCR- or CAR-engineered HSCs would likely require cytoreductive conditioning to achieve long-term engraftment, and this approach may be used in clinical settings where autologous HSC transplant is being performed to add a graft-versus-tumor effect. Results of experimental and preclinical studies performed to date are reviewed.

  11. Isolation of cancer stem cells from human prostate cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Samuel J; Quinn, S Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-03-14

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice.

  12. Clinical Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Radical Hysterectomy for FIGO Stage IB-IIA Cervical Cancer: Comparison with Adjuvant RT/CCRT Using Inverse-Probability-of-Treatment Weighting

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Phill-Seung; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Wha; Park, Jeong-Yeol; Suh, Dae-Shik; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Young-Tak; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical role of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in FIGO stage IB-IIA cervical cancer patients. Study Design A cohort of 262 patients with cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant therapy at Asan Medical Center between 1992 and 2012 was enrolled. In this cohort, 85 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), and 177 received adjuvant radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (AR). Oncologic outcomes and adverse events in both treatment arms were compared using weighted Cox proportional hazards regression models with inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) to reduce the impact of treatment selection bias and potential confounding factors. Results During a 46.8-month median follow-up duration, 39 patients (14.9%) had recurrences, and 18 patients (6.9%) died of disease. In multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence and death was not significantly different in patients in either treatment arm (p=0.62 and 0.12, respectively). Also, after IPTW matching, the HR for recurrence did not significantly differ between the arms (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.68-3.62, p=0.29). Similarly, disease-free survival and overall survival were not significantly different between the arms (p=0.47 and 0.13, respectively). In addition, patients with AC had a much lower prevalence of long-term complications (lymphedema: n=8 (9.4%) vs. 46 (26.0%), p=0.03; ureteral stricture: n=0 vs. 9 (6.2%), p=0.05). Conclusion Patients with FIGO stage IB-IIA cervical cancer can benefit from AC after RH with fewer long-term complications and non-inferior therapeutic effect to AR. Chemotherapy may therefore be an alternative adjuvant treatment option for cervical cancer, particularly in younger patients. PMID:26176626

  13. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation.

  14. Adjuvant Lapatinib and Trastuzumab for Early Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer: Results From the Randomized Phase III Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization Trial

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Eileen; Baselga, José; de Azambuja, Evandro; Dueck, Amylou C.; Viale, Giuseppe; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Goldhirsch, Aron; Armour, Alison; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; McCullough, Ann E.; Dolci, Stella; McFadden, Eleanor; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tonghua, Liu; Eidtmann, Holger; Dinh, Phuong; Di Cosimo, Serena; Harbeck, Nadia; Tjulandin, Sergei; Im, Young-Hyuck; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Diéras, Véronique; Hillman, David W.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Smith, Ian; Boyle, Frances; Xu, Binghe; Gomez, Henry; Suter, Thomas; Gelber, Richard D.; Perez, Edith A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lapatinib (L) plus trastuzumab (T) improves outcomes for metastatic human epidermal growth factor 2–positive breast cancer and increases the pathologic complete response in the neoadjuvant setting, but their role as adjuvant therapy remains uncertain. Methods In the Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization trial, patients with centrally confirmed human epidermal growth factor 2–positive early breast cancer were randomly assigned to 1 year of adjuvant therapy with T, L, their sequence (T→L), or their combination (L+T). The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS), with 850 events required for 80% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.8 for L+T versus T. Results Between June 2007 and July 2011, 8,381 patients were enrolled. In 2011, due to futility to demonstrate noninferiority of L versus T, the L arm was closed, and patients free of disease were offered adjuvant T. A protocol modification required P ≤ .025 for the two remaining pairwise comparisons. At a protocol-specified analysis with a median follow-up of 4.5 years, a 16% reduction in the DFS hazard rate was observed with L+T compared with T (555 DFS events; HR, 0.84; 97.5% CI, 0.70 to 1.02; P = .048), and a 4% reduction was observed with T→L compared with T (HR, 0.96; 97.5% CI, 0.80 to 1.15; P = .61). L-treated patients experienced more diarrhea, cutaneous rash, and hepatic toxicity compared with T-treated patients. The incidence of cardiac toxicity was low in all treatment arms. Conclusion Adjuvant treatment that includes L did not significantly improve DFS compared with T alone and added toxicity. One year of adjuvant T remains standard of care. PMID:26598744

  15. Cancer stem cells: constantly evolving and functionally heterogeneous therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Rycaj, Kiera; Liu, Zhong-Min; Tang, Dean G

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the origin of and dynamic interrelationship between intratumoral cell subpopulations has clear clinical significance in helping to understand the cellular basis of treatment response, therapeutic resistance, and tumor relapse. Cancer stem cells (CSC), together with clonal evolution driven by genetic alterations, generate cancer cell heterogeneity commonly observed in clinical samples. The 2013 Shanghai International Symposium on Cancer Stem Cells brought together leaders in the field to highlight the most recent progress in phenotyping, characterizing, and targeting CSCs and in elucidating the relationship between the cell-of-origin of cancer and CSCs. Discussions from the symposium emphasize the urgent need in developing novel therapeutics to target the constantly evolving CSCs.

  16. Top Notch cancer stem cells by paracrine NF-κB signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weizhou; Grivennikov, Sergei I

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are likely to play critical roles in metastasis, therapy resistance, and recurrence of hematological and solid malignancies. It is well known that the stem cell niche plays a key role for asymmetric division and homeostasis of normal stem cells, whereas cancer stem cells seem to use these niches. Among many pathways involved in self-renewal of cancer stem cells, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling has been documented to promote their expansion in a cell-autonomous fashion. A recent study, however, suggests that paracrine NF-κB activation promotes the expansion of cancer stem cells through the activation of Notch in basal-type breast cancer cells.

  17. Implications of the Cancer Stem-Cell Hypothesis for Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research in breast biology has provided support for the cancer stem-cell hypothesis. Two important components of this hypothesis are that tumors originate in mammary stem or progenitor cells as a result of dysregulation of the normally tightly regulated process of self-renewal. As a result, tumors contain and are driven by a cellular subcomponent that retains key stem-cell properties including self-renewal, which drives tumorigenesis and differentiation that contributes to cellular heterogeneity. Advances in stem-cell technology have led to the identification of stem cells in normal and malignant breast tissue. The study of these stem cells has helped to elucidate the origin of the molecular complexity of human breast cancer. The cancer stem-cell hypothesis has important implications for early detection, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer. Both hereditary and sporadic breast cancers may develop through dysregulation of stem-cell self-renewal pathways. These aberrant stem cells may provide targets for the development of cancer prevention strategies. Furthermore, because breast cancer stem cells may be highly resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, the development of more effective therapies for this disease may require the effective targeting of this cell population. PMID:18539959

  18. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    from a 19 y/ o boy who died after a traumatic accident. This line has been maintained in culture for several years and is non-tumorigenic in animals...accomplishments: • Coursework: o Attended local seminars on cell biology, stem cell biology and cancer biology in the Texas Medical Center • Conferences...journal clubs: o Attend weekly cancer stem cell seminar with Jeffrey Rosen PhD at Baylor College of Medicine o Continue to meet with mentors

  19. Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells by Tissue Rigidity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AD ____________ __ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0133 TITLE: Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells by Tissue Rigidity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Adam J...CONTRACT NUMBER Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity W81XWH-13-1-0133 Sb. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...in breast tumors is associated with a 1 0-50-fold increase in tissue stiffness and correlates with distant metastasis and poor outcome. Recent studies

  20. Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0132 TITLE: Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jing...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...fibrotic focus in breast tumors is associated with a 10-50-fold increase in tissue stiffness and correlates with distant metastasis and poor outcome. Recent

  1. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  2. Splenomegaly and Its Associations with Genetic Polymorphisms and Treatment Outcome in Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Adjuvant FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Han, Sae-Won; Lee, Dae-Won; Cha, Yongjun; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Yong; Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Se Hyung; Im, Seock-Ah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Splenomegaly is a clinical surrogate of oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). We investigated development of splenomegaly and its association with treatment outcome and genetic polymorphisms following adjuvant 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Materials and Methods Splenomegaly was determined by spleen volumetry using computed tomography images obtained before initiation of chemotherapy and after completion of adjuvant FOLFOX in CRC patients. Ten genetic polymorphisms in 4 SOS-related genes (VEGFA, MMP9, NOS3, and GSTP1) were analyzed using DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Of 124 patients included, increase in spleen size was observed in 109 (87.9%). Median change was 31% (range, –42% to 168%). Patients with splenomegaly had more severe thrombocytopenia compared to patients without splenomegaly during the chemotherapy period (p < 0.0001). The cumulative dose of oxaliplatin and the lowest platelet count during the chemotherapy period were clinical factors associated with splenomegaly. However, no significant associations were found between genetic polymorphisms and development of splenomegaly. Disease-free survival was similar regardless of the development of splenomegaly. Conclusion Splenomegaly was frequently observed in patients receiving adjuvant FOLFOX and resulted in more severe thrombocytopenia but did not influence treatment outcome. Examined genetic polymorphisms did not predict development of splenomegaly. PMID:26790967

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms as Prognostic and Predictive Factors of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Colorectal Cancer of Stages I and II

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Matej; Potočnik, Uroš; Repnik, Katja; Kavalar, Rajko; Štabuc, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly heterogeneous disease regarding the stage at time of diagnosis and there is special attention regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in unselected patients with stage I and stage II. The clinicohistologically based TNM staging system with emphasis on histological evaluation of primary tumor and resected regional lymph nodes remains the standard of staging, but it has restricted sensitivity resulting in false downward stage migration. Molecular characteristics might predispose tumors to a worse prognosis and identification of those enables identifying patients with high risk of disease recurrence. Suitable predictive markers also enable choosing the most appropriate therapy. The current challenge facing adjuvant chemotherapy in stages I and II CRC is choosing patients with the highest risk of disease recurrence who are going to derive most benefit without facing unnecessary adverse effects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are one of the potential molecular markers that might help us identify patients with unfavorable prognostic factors regarding disease initiation and recurrence and could determine selection of an appropriate chemotherapy regimen in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. In this paper, we discuss SNPs of genes involved in the multistep processes of cancerogenesis, metastasis, and the metabolism of chemotherapy that might prove clinically significant. PMID:26884752

  4. Implications of Cancer Stem Cell Theory for Cancer Chemoprevention by Natural Dietary Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Sun, Duxin

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anti-cancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally-occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anti-cancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine, and vitamin D3, are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival. PMID:21295962

  5. Distant Metastasis Risk Stratification for Patients Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prognostic factors predicting distant metastasis in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1995 and August 2006, 166 patients with EHBD cancer underwent resection with curative intent, followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. There were 120 males and 46 females, and median age was 61 years (range, 34-86). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered to tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose, 40 Gy; range, 34-56 Gy). A total of 157 patients also received fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer, and fluoropyrimidine-based maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 127 patients. Median follow-up duration was 29 months. Results: The treatment failed for 97 patients, and the major pattern of failure was distant metastasis (76 patients, 78.4%). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was 49.4%. The most common site of distant failure was the liver (n = 36). On multivariate analysis, hilar tumor, tumor size {>=}2 cm, involved lymph node, and poorly differentiated tumor were associated with inferior distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.0348, 0.0754, 0.0009, and 0.0078, respectively), whereas T stage was not (p = 0.8081). When patients were divided into four groups based on these risk factors, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates for patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 risk factors were 86.4%, 59.9%, 32.5%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Despite maintenance chemotherapy, distant metastasis was the major pattern of failure in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for EHBD cancer after resection with curative intent. Intensified chemotherapy is warranted to improve the treatment outcome, especially in those with multiple risk factors.

  6. TP53 Mutational Status and Prediction of Benefit from Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kandioler, Daniela; Mittlböck, Martina; Kappel, Sonja; Puhalla, Harald; Herbst, Friedrich; Langner, Cord; Wolf, Brigitte; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Schippinger, Walter; Steger, Günther; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Samonigg, Hellmut; Gnant, Michael; Teleky, Bela; Kührer, Irene

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the varying treatment efficacy of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in stage III colon cancer is linked to the TP53 mutational status. ABCSG-90 was a prospective randomized trial in which effect of adjuvant 5FU was studied in stage III colon cancer patients. Tumor material of 70% of these patients (389/572) was available for analysis of the biomarker TP53 using a TP53-gene-specific Sanger sequencing protocol. Median follow-up was 88 months. TP53 mutation frequency was 33%. A significant interaction between TP53 status, outcomes and nodal category was found (P = 0.0095). In the N1 category, TP53 wildtype patients had significantly better overall survival than TP53 mutated (81.0% vs. 62.0% overall survival at 5 years; HR = 2.131; 95% CI: 1.344-3.378; P = 0.0010). In the N2 category, the TP53 status did not affect survival (P = 0.4992). In TP53 wildtype patients, the prognostic significance of N category was significantly enhanced (P = 0.0002). In TP53 mutated patients, survival curves of N1 and N2 patients overlapped and nodal category was no longer prognostic. The biomarker TP53 independently predicted effect of adjuvant 5FU in N1 colon cancer patients. TP53 was not predictive in N2 patients, in whom 5FU is known to have no effect.

  7. Second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer: A report from the International Breast Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Lorenzo; Gelber, Shari; Ravaioli, Alberto; Price, Karen N.; Panzini, Ilaria; Fantini, Manuela; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Pagani, Olivia; Simoncini, Edda; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant treatment was evaluated using data from patients enrolled from 1978 to 1999 in four International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) trials. The occurrence of these tumours as sites of first failure was assessed separately for two treatment comparisons: toremifene versus tamoxifen for five years in 1035 patients in IBCSG Trials 12-93 and 14-93 with a median follow-up of eight years and endocrine therapy (toremifene or tamoxifen) versus chemoendocrine therapy (CMF or AC plus toremifene or tamoxifen) in 1731 patients from IBCSG Trials III, VII and 12-93, with a combined median follow-up of 14 years. No significant differences in second non-breast primary tumours were observed in either comparison. In particular the incidences of second primary uterine tumours with toremifene and tamoxifen were similar and no significant increase of secondary leukaemias was observed with chemoendocrine therapy compared with endocrine therapy. PMID:19062268

  8. Implementation and evaluation of an Asbru-based decision support system for adjuvant treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Eccher, Claudio; Seyfang, Andreas; Ferro, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    The domain of cancer treatment is a promising field for the implementation and evaluation of a protocol-based clinical decision support system, because of the algorithmic nature of treatment recommendations. However, many factors can limit such systems' potential to support the decision of clinicians: technical challenges related to the interoperability with existing electronic patient records and clinical challenges related to the inherent complexity of the decisions, often collectively taken by panels of different specialists. In this paper, we evaluate the performances of an Asbru-based decision support system implementing treatment protocols for breast cancer, which accesses data from an oncological electronic patient record. Focusing on the decision on the adjuvant pharmaceutical treatment for patients affected by early invasive breast cancer, we evaluate the matching of the system's recommendations with those issued by the multidisciplinary panel held weekly in a hospital.

  9. A prospective cohort study of early discontinuation of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer: the breast cancer quality of care study (BQUAL).

    PubMed

    Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Kushi, Lawrence H; Lamerato, Lois; Buono, Donna L; Nathanson, S David; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Jacobson, Judith S; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    For many women with non-metastatic breast cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy prevents recurrence and extends survival. Women who discontinue chemotherapy early may reduce those benefits, but little is known about what predicts early discontinuation. We sought to determine prospectively the rate and reasons for early discontinuation of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective cohort study among three U.S. health care organizations. Of 1158 women with newly diagnosed non-metastatic breast cancer, 2006-2010, we analyzed 445 (38.4 %) patients who initiated standard adjuvant chemotherapy as defined by accepted guidelines. We interviewed patients at baseline and twice during treatment regarding sociodemographic/psychosocial factors and treatment decision-making and collected clinical data. They were categorized according to the number of cycles required by the chemotherapy regimen they had initiated. The outcome was early discontinuation (<80 % of planned cycles). Of patients analyzed, 392 (88.1 %) completed the prescribed therapy. The strongest predictor was receipt of a regimen entailing >4 cycles of therapy (18.1 % for longer regimens, 7.4 % for 4 cycles) (odds ratio [OR] 2.59, 95 % CI 1.32-5.08), controlling for race, age, stage, hormone receptor status, social support, optimism, spirituality, stress, and physical symptoms. Higher levels of psychological symptoms on the Memorial symptom assessment scale also increased the odds of early discontinuation (OR 1.92, 95 % CI 0.998-3.68). The large majority of patients who initiated adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer completed their prescribed regimens, but early discontinuation was associated with lengthier regimens and, with borderline statistical significance, for those with psychological side effects.

  10. CD44 integrates signaling in normal stem cell, cancer stem cell and (pre)metastatic niches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karin; Motiani, Karan; Giridhar, Premkumar Vummidi; Kasper, Susan

    2013-03-01

    The stem cell niche provides a regulatory microenvironment for cells as diverse as totipotent embryonic stem cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs) which exhibit stem cell-like characteristics and have the capability of regenerating the bulk of tumor cells while maintaining self-renewal potential. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is a common component of the stem cell niche and exists as a standard isoform (CD44s) and a range of variant isoforms (CD44v) generated though alternative splicing. CD44 modulates signal transduction through post-translational modifications as well as interactions with hyaluronan, extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors and their cognate receptor tyrosine kinases. While the function of CD44 in hematopoietic stem cells has been studied in considerable detail, our knowledge of CD44 function in tissue-derived stem cell niches remains limited. Here we review CD44s and CD44v in both hematopoietic and tissue-derived stem cell niches, focusing on their roles in regulating stem cell behavior including self-renewal and differentiation in addition to cell-matrix interactions and signal transduction during cell migration and tumor progression. Determining the role of CD44 and CD44v in normal stem cell, CSC and (pre)metastatic niches and elucidating their unique functions could provide tools and therapeutic strategies for treating diseases as diverse as fibrosis during injury repair to cancer progression.

  11. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-08-02

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype.

  12. Prospective cohort study of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy: CSPOR-BC FN study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Narui, Kazutaka; Kaise, Hiroshi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Mukai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for treating early breast cancer, febrile neutropenia management has become crucial. Guidelines for febrile neutropenia management are mostly based on a Caucasian population survey although ethnic differences are reported in terms of adverse events. We survey the current status of febrile neutropenia and risk factors in Japanese female breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens potential for febrile neutropenia. Subsequently, we plan to conduct a multicenter prospective cohort study involving 1000 patients with operable breast cancer. With the current state of oral antibiotics being routinely prescribed without hematology tests, we survey febrile neutropenia based on two different definitions, namely, true febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and Grade 4 neutropenia, and surrogate febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and oral antibiotic and antipyretic intake. The comparison of true febrile neutropenia and surrogate febrile neutropenia incidences is anticipated to provide information on the safety and feasibility of chemotherapy management without performing blood tests.

  13. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype. PMID:27340922

  14. Prediction of metastatic relapse in node-positive breast cancer: establishment of a clinicogenomic model after FEC100 adjuvant regimen.

    PubMed

    Campone, Mario; Campion, Loïc; Roché, Henry; Gouraud, Wilfried; Charbonnel, Catherine; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stéphane; Genève, Jean; Martin, Anne-Laure; Bataille, Régis; Jézéquel, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease, and markers for disease subtypes and therapy response remain poorly defined. For that reason, we employed a retrospective study in node-positive breast cancer to identify molecular signatures of gene expression correlating with metastatic free survival. Patients were primarily included in FEC100 (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 100 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2)) arms of two multicentric prospective adjuvant clinical trials (PACS01 and PEGASE01-FNCLCC cooperative group). Data from nylon microarrays containing 8,032 cDNA unique sequences, representing 5,776 distinct genes, have been used to develop a predictive model for treatment outcome. We obtained the gene expression profiles for 150 of these patients, and used stringent univariate selection techniques based on Cox regression combined with principal component analysis to identify a genomic signature of metastatic relapse after adjuvant FEC100 regimen. Most of the 14 selected genes have a clear role in breast cancer, carcinogenesis or chemotherapy resistance. Six genes have been previously described in other genomic studies (UBE2C, CENPF, C16orf61 [DC13], STMN1, CCT5 and BCL2A1). Furthermore, we showed the interest of combining transcriptomic data with clinical data into a clinicogenomic model for patients subtyping. The described model adds predictive accuracy to that provided by the well-established Nottingham prognostic index or by our genomic signature alone.

  15. Pre-adjuvant chemotherapy leukocyte count may predict the outcome for advanced gastric cancer after radical resection.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dong; Zhu, Fang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Qian, Jing; He, Shaohua; Qian, Yingying; Shen, Hua; Liu, Yiqian; Xu, Jiali; Shu, Yongqian

    2014-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has a high morbidity worldwide each year especially in China and advanced GC is well known with poor prognosis, for which surgical resection combine adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal choice for therapy. Leukocyte is an important index during the treatment for its influence on drugs' dosage and tolerance. Therefore, peripheral blood leukocyte and its subsets during adjuvant chemotherapy may have great clinical value for predicting prognostic. In this retrospective study, we showed the distribution of white blood cell and its subsets in the baseline period before adjuvant chemotherapy in 399 patients who underwent radical resection for advanced GC from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2012. We investigated the relationship between leukocyte count and overall survival (OS) as well as disease-free survival (DFS). In these patients, females were more likely to have less white blood cells after operation (P=0.016). Patients with pre-chemotherapy leukocyte count less than 4×10(9)/L got worse DFS (P=0.028) and OS (P=0.016). In multivariate analysis, tumor size ≥ 6cm (P=0.033), TNM stage IV (P=0.024), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.005) and leukocyte count less than 4.0×10(9)/L (P=0.019) was associated with poor DFS. TNM stage IV (P=0.008), vascular or nerval invasion (P=0.001) and lower leukocyte count (P=0.045) were independent risk factors for poor OS. Taken together, our findings suggest that pre-adjuvant chemotherapy peripheral blood leukocyte count correlates with clinical outcome of patients with advanced GC after radical resection.

  16. Spinal infarction related to the adjuvant chemotherapy for surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of spinal infarction during adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur, gimeracil and oteracil (TS-1) after surgery for lung adenocarcinoma. A 69-year-old female had a left upper lobectomy for pulmonary adenocarcinoma, T2aN0M0. Six weeks after the surgery, tegafur, gimeracil and oteracil were administered orally as adjuvant chemotherapy for 1 year. After 10 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, the patient suddenly showed signs of numbness and weakness in both lower limbs. The patient did not have a previous medical history, and was receiving only tegafur, gimeracil and oteracil with the stomach medication. Neurological findings showed muscle weakness, numbness and a loss of tendon reflex in both lower limbs, as well as bladder and rectal disturbance. Blood tests, brain magnetic resonance imaging and chest computed tomography showed no signs of abnormalities or metastasis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed a hyperintense lesion between the Th12 and L1 spinal levels by T2-weighted image. A spinal fluid test indicated no abnormalities, and cytological diagnosis was class II. Anti-aquaporin 4, anti-ganglioside and anti-neuronal autoantibodies were all negative. These results indicated that the patient had a spinal infarction, rather than myelitis or paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. The patient was treated with heparin and steroid pulse treatment followed by rehabilitation, and recovered sufficiently to be able to walk using a cane after 2 months. The development of spinal infarction during anti-cancer chemotherapy has not been previously reported. In this case, an association of spinal infarction with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy was strongly indicated due to the lack of abnormalities in coagulability, atherosclerotic lesions and aortic disease.

  17. Hide-and-seek: the interplay between cancer stem cells and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mohammad; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Vidovic, Dejan; Thomas, Margaret Lois; Gujar, Shashi; Marcato, Paola

    2016-11-19

    The enhanced ability of cancer stem cells (CSCs) to give rise to new tumors suggests that these cells may also have an advantage in evading immune detection and elimination. This tumor-forming ability, combined with the known plasticity of the immune system, which can play both protumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles, has motivated investigations into the interaction between CSCs and the immune system. Herein, we review the interplay between host immunity and CSCs by examining the immune-related mechanisms that favor CSCs and the CSC-mediated expansion of protumorigenic immune cells. Furthermore, we discuss immune cells, such as natural killer cells, that preferentially target CSCs and the strategies used by CSCs to evade immune detection and destruction. An increased understanding of these interactions and the pathways that regulate them may allow us to harness immune system components to create new adjuvant therapies that eradicate CSCs and improve patient survival.

  18. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; He, Yanli; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Jinghui; Huang, Tao

    2007-07-01

    Although all normal tissue cells, including stem cells, are genetically homologous, variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to the occurrence of epigenetic modification. This is of special importance for the existence of tissue stem cells because they are exclusively immortal within the body, capable of self-replicating and differentiating by which tissues renew and repair itself and the total tissue cell population maintains a steady-state. Impairment of tissue stem cells is usually accompanied by a reduction in cell number, slows down the repair process and causes hypofunction. For instance, chemotherapy usually leads to depression of bone marrow and hair loss. Cellular aging is closely associated with the continuous erosion of the telomere while activation of telomerase repairs and maintains telomeres, thus slowing the aging process and prolonging cell life. In normal adults, telomerase activation mainly presents in tissue stem cells and progenitor cells giving them unlimited growth potential. Despite the extensive demonstration of telomerase activation in malignancy (> 80%), scientists found that heterogeneity also exists among the tumor cells and only minorities of cells, designated as cancer stem cells, undergo processes analogous to the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells while the rest have limited lifespans. In this study, telomerase activity was measured and compared in breast cancer stem cells and non-stem cells that were phenotypically sorted by examining surface marker expression. The results indicated that cancer stem cells show a higher level of enzyme activity than non-stem cells. In addition, associated with the repair of cancer tissue (or relapse) after chemotherapy, telomerase activity in stem cells was markedly increased.

  19. Primary cultures of human colon cancer as a model to study cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koshkin, Sergey; Danilova, Anna; Raskin, Grigory; Petrov, Nikolai; Bajenova, Olga; O'Brien, Stephen J; Tomilin, Alexey; Tolkunova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The principal cause of death in cancer involves tumor progression and metastasis. Since only a small proportion of the primary tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are the most aggressive, have the capacity to metastasize and display properties of stem cells, it is imperative to characterize the gene expression of diagnostic markers and to evaluate the drug sensitivity in the CSCs themselves. Here, we have examined the key genes that are involved in the progression of colorectal cancer and are expressed in cancer stem cells. Primary cultures of colorectal cancer cells from a patient's tumors were studied using the flow cytometry and cytological methods. We have evaluated the clinical and stem cell marker expression in these cells, their resistance to 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, and the ability of cells to form tumors in mice. The data shows the role of stem cell marker Oct4 in the resistance of primary colorectal cancer tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil.

  20. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  1. Self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tianhui; Xu, Jinghong; Zhu, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) represent a small fraction of the colorectal cancer cell population that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential and drive tumorigenicity. Self-renewal is essential for the malignant biological behaviors of colorectal cancer stem cells. While the self-renewal molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood, the aberrant activation of signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Hedgehog-Gli (HH-GLI), specific roles mediated by cell surface markers and micro-environmental factors are involved in the regulation of self-renewal. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind self-renewal may lead to the development of novel targeted interventions for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27909729

  2. Harnessing the apoptotic programs in cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Hua; Scadden, David T

    2015-09-01

    Elimination of malignant cells is an unmet challenge for most human cancer types even with therapies targeting specific driver mutations. Therefore, a multi-pronged strategy to alter cancer cell biology on multiple levels is increasingly recognized as essential for cancer cure. One such aspect of cancer cell biology is the relative apoptosis resistance of tumor-initiating cells. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms affecting the apoptotic process in tumor cells emphasizing the differences in the tumor-initiating or stem-like cells of cancer. Further, we summarize efforts to exploit these differences to design therapies targeting that important cancer cell population.

  3. Are adjuvant bisphosphonates now standard of care of women with early stage breast cancer? A debate from the Canadian Bone and the Oncologist New Updates meeting.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Carmel; Amir, Eitan; Paterson, Alexander; Zhu, Xiaofu; Clemons, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The 9th Bone and the Oncologist New Updates conference was held in Ottawa, Canada during 2014. This annual meeting focuses on innovative research into the mechanisms and consequences of treatment-induced and metastatic bone disease. Given the recent presentation of the Oxford overview's "Effects of bisphosphonate treatment on recurrence and cause-specific mortality in women with early breast cancer: A meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomized trials" at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, a debate as to the pro's and con's of adjuvant bisphosphonate use in early stage breast cancer was undertaken. As bisphosphonate treatment in post-menopausal women appeared to demonstrate a similar magnitude of benefit to that of other commonly used adjuvant strategies the debate assessed whether or not there was sufficient data to incorporate adjuvant bisphosphonates into standard practice and if so, in which patient populations.

  4. Identification of high-risk factors as indicators for adjuvant therapy in stage II colon cancer patients treated at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    YAMAGUCHI, KEIZO; OGATA, YUTAKA; AKAGI, YOSHITO; SHIROUZU, KAZUO

    2013-01-01

    Although post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is only recommended for patients with stage II colon cancer who are at a high risk of recurrence, the definition of high risk remains unclear. The present study aimed to identify the risk factors for recurrence, which may also be indicators for adjuvant therapy, using a retrospective analysis of clinicopathological data obtained from stage II colon cancer patients who had undergone a curative resection. The present study also investigated the effects of ACT in patients who displayed the risk factors for recurrence. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the data collected from 377 stage II colon cancer patients, treated at Kurume University Hospital (Fukuoka, Japan) between 1982 and 2005, was conducted in order to determine and compare the risk factors for recurrence between the 163 patients who had undergone adjuvant therapy and the 214 patients who had not undergone adjuvant therapy. The risk factors for recurrence in patients who had not undergone adjuvant therapy were a serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level that was twice the cut-off value and pre-operative bowel obstruction. Adjuvant therapy provided no benefit to patients who presented with neither risk factor, but significantly decreased the recurrence rate in patients presenting with one or both risk factors. Based on these findings, serum CEA levels of twice the cut-off value and pre-operative bowel obstruction were proposed as indicators in the assessment for adjuvant chemotherapy following a curative resection for stage II colon cancer. These results warrant further clinical study of ACT in patients with one or both risk factors. PMID:24137386

  5. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  6. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: new insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Jorge; Lonardo, Enza; Miranda-Lorenzo, Irene; Heeschen, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Since the identification of self-renewing cells in the hematopoietic system several decades ago, stem cells have changed the way we study biology and medicine. Solid tumors contain a distinct subpopulation of cells that have stem cell characteristics and are exclusively responsible for tumorigenicity. This discovery has led to the development of the stem cell concept of cancer, which proposes that a subpopulation of self-renewing tumor cells, also termed cancer stem cells, is responsible for tumorigenesis and metastasis. This contrasts with the stochastic model of tumor development, which holds that all tumor cells are capable of tumor initiation. Different subpopulations of cancer stem cells have been identified in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, based on the use of combinations of surface markers that allow their isolation, propagation, and further characterization. Importantly, cancer stem cells are not only capable of self-renewal and differentiation, but may also confer virulence via immune system evasion and multidrug resistance, and potentially via vasculogenic mimicry and transition to migratory and metastasizing derivatives. Therapeutic targeting of this subset of cells and the pathways defining their virulence holds great promise for the development of more effective strategies for the amelioration and eradication of this most lethal form of cancer.

  7. Stem cells and cancer immunotherapy: Arrowhead’s 2nd annual cancer immunotherapy conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from academia and industry gathered on April 4 and 5, 2013, in Washington DC at the Arrowhead’s 2nd Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Conference. Two complementary concepts were discussed: cancerstem cells” as targets and therapeutic platforms based on stem cells.

  8. The Impact of the Duration of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival in Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer – A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Veronika; Reinthaller, Alexander; Koelbl, Heinz; Concin, Nicole; Nehoda, Regina; Polterauer, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic role of the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer (EOC). Materials and Methods Within the present study we retrospectively evaluated the data of 165 consecutive patients with EOC treated with primary surgery followed by six completed cycles of platinum-taxan based intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy. Medians of total duration of chemotherapy were compared with clinical-pathological parameters. Patients were stratified into four risk groups according to the delay in days of total duration of chemotherapy, and univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Results The median duration of six completed cycles of chemotherapy comprised 113 days (IQR 107–124 days). Uni- and multivariable survival analyses revealed a delay of total duration of chemotherapy of at least 9 days to be associated with progression-free (PFS), cancer-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS). Hazard ratios (HR), confidence intervals (95% CI) and p-values for PFS, CSS and OS due to delay of chemo-duration were 2.9 (1.6–5.4; p = 0.001), 2.9 (1.3–6.2; p = 0.008) and 2.6 (1.3–5.4; p = 0.008), respectively. Prolonged total chemo-duration was associated with the amount of postoperative residual disease (p = 0.001) and the patients’ age (p = 0.03). Conclusion The present study suggests a prolonged duration of adjuvant chemotherapy after primary surgery to adversely affect PFS, CSS and OS in patients with EOC. Yet larger studies are required to validate our results. PMID:28060918

  9. S100B Mediates Stemness of Ovarian Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Cheng, Jianan; Yang, Yang; Qi, Wei; Zhao, Yuetao; Long, Haixia; Xie, Rongkai; Zhu, Bo

    2017-02-01

    S100B is one of the members of the S100 protein family and is involved in the progression of a variety of cancers. Ovarian cancer is driven by cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) that are involved in tumorigenesis, metastasis, chemo-resistance and relapse. We then hypothesized that S100B might exert pro-tumor effects by regulating ovarian CSLCs stemness, a key characteristic of CSLCs. First, we observed the high expression of S100B in ovarian cancer specimens when compared to that in normal ovary. The S100B upregulation associated with more advanced tumor stages, poorer differentiation and poorer survival. In addition, elevated S100B expression correlated with increased expression of stem cell markers including CD133, Nanog and Oct4. Then, we found that S100B was preferentially expressed in CD133(+) ovarian CSLCs derived from both ovarian cancer cell lines and primary tumors of patients. More importantly, we revealed that S100B knockdown suppressed the in vitro self-renewal and in vivo tumorigenicity of ovarian CSLCs and decreased their expression of stem cell markers. S100B ectopic expression endowed non-CSLCs with stemness, which has been demonstrated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Mechanically, we demonstrated that the underlying mechanism of S100B-mediated effects on CSLCs stemness was not dependent on its binding with a receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but might be through intracellular regulation, through the inhibition of p53 expression and phosphorylation. In conclusion, our results elucidate the importance of S100B in maintenance of ovarian CSLCs stemness, which might provide a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Stem Cells 2017;35:325-336.

  10. [Adjuvant hormonal treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer-a questionnaire survey conducted by Japanese breast cancer society-authorized facilities in Hokkaido].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masato; Ohmura, Tousei; Kitada, Masahiro; Kutomi, Goro; Hosoda, Mitsuchika; Masuoka, Hideji; Watanabe, Kenichi; Watanabe, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Hiroko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    According to the Japanese Breast Cancer Society national breast cancer registration, 71.8%of breast cancer cases reported in 2004 and 79.8% of cases reported in 2010 were estrogen receptor(ER)positive. The frequency of ER-positive breast cancer is increasing annually in Japan. Many clinical trials have proven that adjuvant hormonal treatment affects both progression- free survival and overall survival in ER-positive breast cancer cases. However, some clinical questions remain, including those regarding the definition of preoperative hormonal treatment, appropriate dosage period, and therapeutic drug choice. In January 2013, we conducted a questionnaire survey of 53 medical doctors engaged in breast cancer treatment at 15 Japanese Breast Cancer Society-authorized facilities in Hokkaido. This survey included 6 clinical questions about preoperative hormonal treatment, 5 clinical questions about postoperative hormonal treatment for premenopausal breast cancer, and 4 clinical questions about postoperative hormonal treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. We obtained replies from 35 medical doctors at 27 facilities. The response rate was 66%. We accumulated and analyzed these data. The discussion of questionnaire results in the medical administration field facilitates the sharing of information regarding differences in the approaches of different facilities to breast cancer patients. As a result, standardization of the breast cancer medical treatment system in this area has been accomplished.

  11. Cardioprotective Effect of Dexrazoxane in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Receive Anthracycline Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Ho; Lee, Ji Eun; Youn, Ho-Joong; Song, Byung Joo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We intended to determine whether dexrazoxane (DZR) is cardioprotective during administration of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy followed by a 1-year trastuzumab treatment. Methods The medical records of 228 patients who underwent surgical resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab for human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed. Approximately 25% of patients received DZR prior to each administration of doxorubicin during doxorubicin with cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy. DZR was not administered during the 1-year trastuzumab maintenance period. Rates of cardiac events (reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] by 10% or more; reduction in absolute LVEF to <45%) and cardiac event-free duration (CFD) were examined. The trastuzumab interruption rate was also assessed. Results Twelve percent of patients experienced a cardiac event. Repeated-measures analysis of variance for ejection fraction revealed a significant main effect of time, and a significant group (DZR)×time interaction. The group treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and DZR experienced significantly lower frequencies of cardiac events than the adjuvant chemotherapy only group. In multivariate analysis, DZR administration was associated with significantly fewer cardiac events. Moreover, DZR administration was an independent good prognostic factor for CFD. Only one patient (2.3%) experienced early interruption of trastuzumab in the adjuvant chemotherapy with DZR group due to cardiac toxicity, whereas 10 patients (7.6%) experienced a trastuzumab stop event in the adjuvant chemotherapy only group. Conclusion DZR is cardioprotective in HER2-positive breast cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab. A large cohort randomized trial is needed to determine if DZR has an effect on trastuzumab interruption and completion of 12-month trastuzumab. Because

  12. Stemness in Human Thyroid Cancers and Derived Cell Lines: The Role of Asymmetrically Dividing Cancer Stem Cells Resistant to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Noga; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell division. CSCs may arise from mutations within an embryonic stem cell/progenitor cell population or via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and recent advances in the study of thyroid stem cells have led to a growing recognition of the likely central importance of CSCs in thyroid tumorigenesis. Objective: The objectives of this study were to establish the presence of a stem cell population in human thyroid tumors and to identify, isolate, and characterize CSCs in thyroid cancer cell lines. Results: 1) Human thyroid cancers (n = 10) and thyroid cancer cell lines (n = 6) contained a stem cell population as evidenced by pluripotent stem cell gene expression. 2) Pulse-chase experiments with thyroid cancer cells identified a label-retaining cell population, a primary characteristic of CSCs, which at mitosis divided their DNA both symmetrically and asymmetrically and included a population of cells expressing the progenitor marker, stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1). 3) Cells positive for SSEA-1 expressed additional stem cell markers including Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog were confirmed as CSCs by their tumor-initiating properties in vivo, their resistance to chemotherapy, and their multipotent capability. 4) SSEA-1-positive cells showed enhanced vimentin expression and decreased E-cadherin expression, indicating their likely derivation via EMT. Conclusions: Cellular diversity in thyroid cancer occurs through both symmetric and asymmetric cell division, and SSEA-1-positive cells are one form of CSCs that appear to have arisen via EMT and may be the source of malignant thyroid tumor formation. This would suggest that thyroid cancer CSCs were the result of thyroid cancer transformation rather than the source. PMID:24823711

  13. The NF-κB Pathway and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rinkenbaugh, Amanda L.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB transcription factor pathway is a crucial regulator of inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, aberrant NF-κB signaling has been identified in many types of cancer. Downstream of key oncogenic pathways, such as RAS, BCR-ABL, and Her2, NF-κB regulates transcription of target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, and mediate invasion and metastasis. The cancer stem cell model posits that a subset of tumor cells (cancer stem cells) drive tumor initiation, exhibit resistance to treatment, and promote recurrence and metastasis. This review examines the evidence for a role for NF-κB signaling in cancer stem cell biology. PMID:27058560

  14. Accuracy of MRI for prediction of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer compared to other subtypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Gaurav J; Santosh, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the prediction of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative (TN) breast cancer, with respect to other subtypes. Materials and Methods: There were a total of 1610 breast cancers diagnosed between March 2009 and August 2014, out of which 82 patients underwent MRI before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy but just before surgery. TN cancers were analyzed with respect to others subtypes. Accuracy of MRI for prediction of pathological complete response was compared between different subtypes by obtaining receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21 was used for all data analysis, with P value of 0.05 as statistically significant. Results: Out of 82 patients, 29 were luminal (HR+/HER2−), 23 were TN (HR−, HER2−), 11 were HER2 positive (HR−, HER2+), and 19 were of hybrid subtype (HR+/HER2+). TN cancers presented as masses on the pre-chemotherapy MRI scan, were grade 3 on histopathology, and showed concentric shrinkage following chemotherapy. TN cancers were more likely to have both imaging and pathological complete response following chemotherapy (P = 0.055) in contrast to luminal cancers, which show residual cancer. ROC curves were constructed for the prediction of pathological complete response with MRI. For the TN subgroup, MR had a sensitivity of 0.745 and specificity of 0.700 (P = 0.035), with an area under curve of 0.745 (95% confidence interval: 0.526–0.965), which was significantly better compared to other subtypes. Conclusion: TN breast cancers present as masses and show concentric shrinkage following chemotherapy. MRI is most accurate in predicting response to chemotherapy in the TN group, compared to others subtypes. MRI underestimates residual disease in luminal cancers. PMID:28104942

  15. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0301 TITLE: Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paolo Ceppi CONTRACTING...sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis, while the BCSCs part is more sensitive to the death induced by the elimination of CD95 (a phenomenon we have recently...identification of novel molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer. I have in fact observed a significant enhancement of cancer cell death by

  16. Efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy using oral fluorinated pyrimidines for curatively resected gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of centrally randomized controlled clinical trials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Oba, K; Morita, S; Tsuburaya, A; Kodera, Y; Kobayashi, M; Sakamoto, J

    2006-06-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer has been extensively explored in Japan since the 1950s, and a combination of oral fluorinated pyrimidines (o-FP) and mitomycin C (MMC) has been mainly utilized for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, there is no sufficient evidence for the efficacy of adjuvant therapy. Therefore, we assessed the efficacy of o-FPs over surgery alone (control) by means of a meta-analysis of Japanese centrally randomized controlled clinical trials conducted between 1980 and 2005. For inclusion in this study, studies had to compare adjuvant chemotherapy for curatively resected gastric cancer with surgery alone, mainly targeting o-FP, and central randomization designed to comply with contemporary standards for clinical trials in Japan. For the 4 trials that met the eligibility criteria, the estimated hazard ratio was 0.73 (95%CI=0.60-0.89). Our findings show that in Japan adjuvant chemotherapy using o-FP for long-term maintenance therapy appears to be effective for gastric cancer patients after curative resection.

  17. Comparison of two adjuvant hormone therapy regimens in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy: primary results of study CU1005.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Bo; Zhu, Yao; Shi, Guo-Hai; Shen, Yi-Jun; Zhu, Yi-Ying; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant hormonal therapy and optimized regimens for high-risk localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy remains controversial. Herein, the clinical trial CU1005 prospectively evaluated two regimens of maximum androgen blockage  or bicalutamide 150 mg daily as immediate adjuvant therapy for high-risk localized prostate cancer. Overall, 209 consecutive patients were recruited in this study, 107 of whom received 9 months of adjuvant maximum androgen blockage, whereas 102 received 9 months of adjuvant bicalutamide 150 mg. The median postoperative follow-up time was 27.0 months. The primary endpoint was biochemical recurrence. Of the 209 patients, 59 patients developed biochemical recurrence. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to clinical characteristics, including age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, surgical margin status, or pathological stages. The maximum androgen blockage group experienced longer biochemical recurrence-free survival (P = 0.004) compared with the bicalutamide 150 mg group. Side-effects in the two groups were similar and could be moderately tolerated in all patients. In conclusion, immediate, 9-month maximum androgen blockage should be considered as an alternative to bicalutamide 150 mg as adjuvant treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy.

  18. Adjuvant pamidronate therapy prevents the development of bone metastases in breast cancer patients with four or more positive nodes.

    PubMed

    Kokufu, Ikuo; Kohno, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Takao, Shintaro

    2010-03-01

    Bisphosphonates are strongly efficacious in inhibiting osteoclast bone resorption and have beneficial effects on bone metastasis. Due to their mechanism of action, bisphosphonates are expected to prevent the development of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. Pamidronate is a potent inhibitor of osteoclast activity. We examined whether pamidronate was able to prevent the development of bone metastases in breast cancer patients at high risk for bone metastasis. Between 1997 and 2001, 90 patients with primary breast cancer with ≥4 positive nodes were assigned to receive 45 mg pamidronate 4 times every 2 weeks (33 patients) or standard follow-up (57 patients) based on patient self-preference. Patients underwent surgery and adjuvant therapy. The characteristics of the patients in the two groups were well-balanced. The median follow-up period was 5 years. Bone metastases were detected in 12.1% of patients in the pamidronate group and 40.4% in the control group (p=0.005). Distant metastases (36.4 vs. 56.1%, p=0.071) and non-osseous metastases (33.3 vs. 52.6%, p=0.077) were detected at a lower frequency in the pamidronate group. Thus, the rate of bone metastasis-free survival was significantly higher in the pamidronate group (85.9 vs. 64.0% at 5 years, p=0.023). Overall and disease-free survival rates did not differ between the two groups. In the pamidronate group, the incidence of bone metastases was significantly reduced and bone metastasis-free survival was significantly higher. Adjuvant pamidronate therapy therefore prevents the development of bone metastases in breast cancer patients with ≥4 positive nodes.

  19. Prognostic impact of progesterone receptor status combined with body mass index in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Masahiro; Akimoto, Etsushi; Noma, Midori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Doi, Mihoko; Kagawa, Naoki; Itamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have played a central role in endocrine therapy for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal patients. However, prognostic factors for recurrence following such treatment have not been identified. The current study aimed to validate the prognostic value of endocrine-related progesterone receptor (PgR) status combined with body mass index (BMI). Among 659 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2012, 184 postmenopausal patients with ER-positive (ER+) and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy were assessed. The patients were assigned to groups based on BMI, according to the WHO cut-off value: ≥25 kg/m(2) (high, H) or <25 kg/m(2) (low, L). Positive nodal status, negative PgR status, BMI-H and a high Ki-67 labeling index (≥20%) were found to be significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) upon univariate analysis (P=0.048, 0.007, 0.027, and 0.012, respectively). The patients were further grouped based on their combined PgR/BMI status. The RFI was significantly shorter in the PgR- and/or BMI-H group compared with that of the PgR+/BMI-L group (P=0.012). Multivariate analysis revealed PgR- tumors and/or BMI-H and positive nodal status to be independent prognostic factors (P=0.012 and 0.020, respectively). The present findings indicate that PgR/BMI status may serve as a practical tool in the management of ER+ and HER2- breast cancer in patients treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitors.

  20. Intestinal stem cell injury and protection during cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy remain the most effective and widely used cancer treatments. These treatments cause DNA damage and selectively target rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells, as well as inevitably cause damage to normal tissues, particularly those undergoing rapid self renewal. The side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapy are most pronounced in the hematopoietic (HP) system and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These tissues are fast renewing and have a well-defined stem cell compartment that plays an essential role in homeostasis, and in treatment-induced acute injury that is dose limiting. Using recently defined intestinal stem cell markers and mouse models, a great deal of insight has been gained in the biology of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), which will undoubtedly help further mechanistic understanding of their injury. This review will cover historic discoveries and recent advances in the identification and characterization of intestinal stem cells, their responses to genotoxic stress, and a new crypt and intestinal stem cell culture system. The discussion will include key pathways regulating intestinal crypt and stem cell injury and regeneration caused by cancer treatments, and strategies for their protection. The focus will be on the acute phase of cell killing in mouse radiation models, where our understanding of the mechanisms in relation to intestinal stem cells is most advanced and interventions appear most effective. PMID:24683536

  1. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  2. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-11-26

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  3. Racial differences in receipt of adjuvant hormonal therapy among Medicaid enrollees in South Carolina diagnosed with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Felder, Tisha M; Do, D Phuong; Lu, Z Kevin; Lal, Lincy S; Heiney, Sue P; Bennett, Charles L

    2016-05-01

    Several factors contribute to the pervasive Black-White disparity in breast cancer mortality in the U.S., such as tumor biology, access to care, and treatments received including adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT), which significantly improves survival for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers (HR+). We analyzed South Carolina Central Cancer Registry-Medicaid linked data to determine if, in an equal access health care system, racial differences in the receipt of AHT exist. We evaluated 494 study-eligible, Black (n = 255) and White women (n = 269) who were under 65 years old and diagnosed with stages I-III, HR+ breast cancers between 2004 and 2007. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess receipt of ≥1 AHT prescriptions at any point in time following (ever-use) or within 12 months of (early-use) breast cancer diagnosis. Seventy-two percent of the participants were ever-users (70 % Black, 74 % White) and 68 % were early-users (65 % Black, 71 % White) of AHT. Neither ever-use (adjusted OR (AOR) = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.48-1.17) nor early-use (AOR = 0.70, 95 % CI 0.46-1.06) of AHT differed by race. However, receipt of other breast cancer-specific treatments was independently associated with ever-use and early-use of AHT [ever-use: receipt of surgery (AOR = 2.15, 95 % CI 1.35-3.44); chemotherapy (AOR = 1.97, 95 % CI 1.22-3.20); radiation (AOR = 2.33, 95 % CI 1.50-3.63); early-use: receipt of surgery (AOR = 2.03, 95 % CI 1.30-3.17); chemotherapy (AOR = 1.90, 95 % CI 1.20-3.03); radiation (AOR = 1.73, 95 % CI 1.14-2.63)]. No racial variations in use of AHT among women with HR+ breast cancers insured by Medicaid in South Carolina were identified, but overall rates of AHT use by these women is low. Strategies to improve overall use of AHT should include targeting breast cancer patients who do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation.

  4. Loco-regional control after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and conservative treatment for locally advanced breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Borget, Isabelle; Bahri, Manel; Arnedos, Monica; Rivin, Eleonor; Vielh, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne; Rimareix, Françoise; Bourgier, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving treatment (BCT) has been validated for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the difference in loco-regional recurrence (LRR) rates between BCT and mastectomy in patients receiving radiation therapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). A retrospective data base was used to identify all patients with breast cancer undergoing NCT from 2002 to 2007. Patients with initial metastatic disease were excluded from this analysis. LRR was compared between those undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Individual variables associated with LRR were evaluated. Two hundred eighty-four patients were included, 111 (39%) underwent BCT and 173 (61%) mastectomy. Almost all patients (99%) in both groups received postoperative radiation. Pathologic complete response was seen in 37 patients, of which 28 underwent BCT (p < 0.001). Patients receiving mastectomy had more invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.007) and a higher American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (p < 0.001) at diagnosis than those with BCT. At a median follow-up of 6.3 years, the loco-regional control rate was 91% (95% CI: 86-94%). The 10-year LRR rate was similar in the BCT group (9.2% [95% CI: 4.9-16.7%]) and in the mastectomy group (10.7% [95% CI: 5.9-15.2%]; p = 0.8). Ten-year overall survival (OS) rates (63% [95% CI: 46-79%] in the BCT group; 60% [95% CI: 47-73%] in the mastectomy group, p = 0.8) were not statistically different between the two patient populations. Multivariate analysis showed that AJCC stage ≥ III (HR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2-5.8; p = 0.02), negative PR (HR: 6; 95% CI: 1.2-30.6, p = 0.03), and number of positive lymph nodes ≥3 (HR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1-5.9; p = 0.03) were independent predictors of LRR. Ten-year OS was similar in the BCT and in the mastectomy group (p = 0.1). The rate of LRR was low and did not significantly differ between the BCT and the mastectomy group after NCT. Randomized trials assessing whether mastectomy can be safely

  5. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Bosman, Fred; Tejpar, Sabine; Roth, Arnaud; Brunner, Nils; Hansen, Anker; Knudsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether gene signatures for chemosensitivity for irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derived from in vitro grown cancer cell lines can predict clinical sensitivity to these drugs. Methods To test if an irinotecan signature and a SN-38 signature could identify patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. Results There was no statistically significant association between the irinotecan or SN-38 profiles and benefit from irinotecan. The 5-FU sensitivity profile showed a statistically significant association with relapse free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.54 (0.41–0.71), p<1e-05) and overall survival (HR = 0.47 (0.34–0.63), p<1e-06) in the PETACC-3 subpopulation. The effect of the 5-FU profile remained significant in a multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards model, adjusting for several relevant clinicopathological parameters. No statistically significant effect of the 5-FU profile was observed in the untreated cohort of 359 patients (relapse free survival, p = 0.671). Conclusion The irinotecan predictor had no predictive value. The 5-FU predictor was prognostic in stage III patients in PETACC-3 but not in stage II patients with no adjuvant therapy. This suggests a potential predictive ability of the 5-FU sensitivity profile to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences

  6. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy.

  7. Stem cell origin of cancer and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2004-07-01

    Our forefathers in pathology, on observing cancer tissue under the microscope in the mid-19th century, noticed the similarity between embryonic tissue and cancer, and suggested that tumors arise from embryo-like cells [Recherches dur le Traitement du Cancer, etc. Paris. (1829); Editoral Archiv fuer pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und fuer klinische Medizin 8 (1855) 23]. The concept that adult tissues contain embryonic remnants that generally lie dormant, but that could be activated to become cancer was later formalized by Cohnheim [Path. Anat. Physiol. Klin. Med. 40 (1867) 1-79; Virchows Arch. 65 (1875) 64] and Durante [Arch. Memori ed Osservazioni di Chirugia Practica 11 (1874) 217-226], as the "embryonal rest" theory of cancer. An updated version of the embryonal rest theory of cancer is that cancers arise from tissue stem cells in adults. Analysis of the cellular origin of carcinomas of different organs indicates that there is, in each instance, a determined stem cell required for normal tissue renewal that is the most likely cell of origin of carcinomas [Lab. Investig. 70 (1994) 6-22]. In the present review, the nature of normal stem cells (embryonal, germinal and somatic) is presented and their relationships to cancer are further expanded. Cell signaling pathways shared by embryonic cells and cancer cells suggest a possible link between embryonic cells and cancer cells. Wilm's tumors (nephroblastomas) and neuroblastomas are presented as possible tumors of embryonic rests in children. Teratocarcinoma is used as the classic example of the totipotent cancer stem cell which can be influenced by its environment to differentiate into a mature adult cell. The observation that "promotion" of an epidermal cancer may be accomplished months or even years after the initial exposure to carcinogen ("initiation"), implies that the original carcinogenic event occurs in a long-lived epithelial stem cell population. The cellular events during hepatocarcinogenesis

  8. mTOR plays critical roles in pancreatic cancer stem cells through specific and stemness-related functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Shyuichiro; Ding, Qiang; Miyazaki, Yumi; Kuwahata, Taisaku; Tsukasa, Koichiro; Takao, Sonshin

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by near-universal mutations in KRAS. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions downstream of RAS, has divergent effects on stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the significance of the mTOR pathway in maintaining the properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, reduced the viability of CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells and sphere formation which is an index of self-renewal of stem-like cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway functions to maintain cancer stem-like cells. Further, rapamycin had different effects on CD133+ cells compared to cyclopamine which is an inhibitor of the Hedgehog pathway. Thus, the mTOR pathway has a distinct role although both pathways maintain pancreatic cancer stem cells. Therefore, mTOR might be a promising target to eliminate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy and HER-2-directed therapy for early-stage breast cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J; Chia, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of sufficient evidence-based data defining the optimal adjuvant systemic therapies in older women. Recommendations are mainly based on retrospective studies, subgroup analyses within larger randomised trials and expert opinion. Treatment decisions should consider the functional fitness of the patient, co-morbidities, in addition to chronological age with the aim to balance risks and potential benefits from treatment(s). In this review, we discuss assessment tools to aid clinicians to select elderly patients who are ‘fit' for chemotherapy, and review the literature on the use of chemotherapy and of the anti-HER 2 antibody trastuzumab in this population. We will also review two commonly used prediction models to assess their accuracy in predicting survival outcomes in elderly patients. Ongoing clinical trials specifically focusing on older patients may help to clarify the absolute benefits and risks of adjuvant systemic therapy in this age group. PMID:27875517

  10. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy combined with intracavitary brachytherapy in early-stage cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Zhang, Linlin; Du, Xuelian; Sheng, Xiugui

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of postoperative adjuvant therapy on survival of patients with intermediate risk early-stage cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Methods A total of 133 consecutive patients with intermediate risk early-stage cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated at Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute from February 2010 to March 2014 were enrolled in our study. All patients received adjuvant therapy and were subdivided into three groups: pelvic radiotherapy (RT; N=42), adjuvant chemotherapy + intracavitary radiotherapy (CT+ICRT; N=47), or concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT; N=44). Disease-free survival (DFS) and therapeutic complications were evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in DFS for patients treated with RT, CT+ICRT, and CCRT (P>0.05) with 3-year rates of 94.0%, 93.4%, and 97.6%, respectively. Frequencies of grade III–IV acute toxicities were higher in patients treated with CCRT (34.1%) than those treated with RT (9.5%) or CT+ICRT (16.7%; P<0.05), with no significant differences observed between RT and CT+ICRT groups (P>0.05). Grade I–II late toxicities were higher in CCRT (25%), followed by RT (19.0%), and finally, the CT+ICRT group (4.3%; P<0.05); with no significant differences observed between CCRT and RT groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Treatment with CT+ICRT or RT resulted in the equivalent of 3-year DFS compared to CCRT, but fewer therapeutic complications were observed with CT for patients with intermediate risk early-stage cervical squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27942225

  11. IL-33 facilitates endocrine resistance of breast cancer by inducing cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiyan; Sun, Jiaxing; Wang, Chunhong; Bu, Xiangmao; Liu, Xiangping; Mao, Yan; Wang, Haibo

    2017-02-16

    Breast cancers with estrogen receptor (ER) expressions account for the majority of all clinical cases. Due to hormone therapy with tamoxifen, prognoses of patients with ER-positive breast cancer are significantly improved. However, endocrine resistance to tamoxifen is common and inevitable, leading to compromised efficacy of hormone therapy. Herein, we identify a crucial role of IL-33 in inducing endocrine resistance of breast cancer. IL-33 overexpression in breast cancer cells results in resistance to tamoxifen-induced tumor growth inhibition, while IL-33 knockdown corrects this problem. Mechanistically, IL-33 induces breast cancer stem cell properties evidenced by mammosphere formation and xenograft tumorigenesis, as well as expression of cancer stem cell genes including ALDH1A3, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2. In breast cancer patients, higher serum IL-33 levels portend advanced clinical stages, poorly differentiated cancer cells and tumor recurrence. IL-33 expression levels in patients' freshly isolated breast cancer cells predicts tamoxifen resistance and cancer stem cell features in individual patient. Collectively, IL-33 induces endocrine resistance of breast cancer by promoting cancer stem cell properties. These findings provide novel mechanisms connecting IL-33 with cancer pathogenesis and pinpoint IL-33 as a promising target for optimizing hormone therapy in clinical practice.

  12. CD24 negative lung cancer cells, possessing partial cancer stem cell properties, cannot be considered as cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haineng; Mu, Jiasheng; Xiao, Jing; Wu, Xiangsong; Li, Maolan; Liu, Tianrun; Liu, Xinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play vital role in lung cancer progression, resistance, metastasis and relapse. Identifying lung CSCs makers for lung CSCs targeting researches are critical for lung cancer therapy. In this study, utilizing previous identified lung CSCs as model, we compared the expression of CD24, CD133 and CD44 between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells. Increased ratio of CD24- cells were found in CSCs. CD24- cells were then sorted by flow cytometry and their proliferative ability, chemo-resistance property and in vivo tumor formation abilities were detected. A549 CD24- cells formed smaller colonies, slower proliferated in comparison to A549 CD24+ cells. Besides, A549 CD24- exhibited stronger resistance to chemotherapy drug. However, A549 CD24- didn't exert any stronger tumor formation ability in vivo, which is the gold standard of CSCs. These results showed that CD24- A549 cells showed some properties of CSCs but not actually CSCs. This study provides evidence that CD24 cannot be considered as lung CSCs marker.

  13. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of adjuvant oral capecitabine vs intravenous 5-FU/LV in Dukes' C colon cancer: the X-ACT trial.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J; Douillard, J-Y; Twelves, C; McKendrick, J J; Scheithauer, W; Bustová, I; Johnston, P G; Lesniewski-Kmak, K; Jelic, S; Fountzilas, G; Coxon, F; Díaz-Rubio, E; Maughan, T S; Malzyner, A; Bertetto, O; Beham, A; Figer, A; Dufour, P; Patel, K K; Cowell, W; Garrison, L P

    2006-04-24

    Oral capecitabine (Xeloda) is an effective drug with favourable safety in adjuvant and metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin-based therapy is becoming standard for Dukes' C colon cancer in patients suitable for combination therapy, but is not yet approved by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the adjuvant setting. Adjuvant capecitabine is at least as effective as 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV), with significant superiority in relapse-free survival and a trend towards improved disease-free and overall survival. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant capecitabine from payer (UK National Health Service (NHS)) and societal perspectives. We used clinical trial data and published sources to estimate incremental direct and societal costs and gains in quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). Acquisition costs were higher for capecitabine than 5-FU/LV, but higher 5-FU/LV administration costs resulted in 57% lower chemotherapy costs for capecitabine. Capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV-associated adverse events required fewer medications and hospitalisations (cost savings pound3653). Societal costs, including patient travel/time costs, were reduced by >75% with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV (cost savings pound1318), with lifetime gain in QALMs of 9 months. Medical resource utilisation is significantly decreased with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV, with cost savings to the NHS and society. Capecitabine is also projected to increase life expectancy vs 5-FU/LV. Cost savings and better outcomes make capecitabine a preferred adjuvant therapy for Dukes' C colon cancer. This pharmacoeconomic analysis strongly supports replacing 5-FU/LV with capecitabine in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer in the UK.

  14. Febrile neutropenia in adjuvant docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) with prophylactic pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngamphaiboon, Nuttapong; O'Connor, Tracey L; Advani, Pooja P; Levine, Ellis G; Kossoff, Ellen B

    2012-09-01

    US Oncology Research Trial 9735 reported that TC improved overall survival when compared to doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in early-stage breast cancer. Despite 61% grades 3-4 neutropenia in the TC arm, only 5% of patients developed febrile neutropenia (FN) without primary prophylactic GCSF (ppGCSF). TC has risen in popularity, particularly in older patients or in those where an anthracycline is contraindicated. Other studies examining the toxicity of TC without ppGCSF reported a higher incidence of FN between 23 and 46%. We reviewed our institutional experience with ppGCSF and the TC regimen. Women treated with adjuvant TC and pegfilgrastim at Roswell Park Cancer Institute were identified from the pharmacy database between 8/2006 and 11/2010. Patient characteristics and comorbidities were abstracted. Endpoints included incidence of FN, hematologic toxicities, relative dose intensity (RDI), and other acute complications. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) were given every 21 day/cycle for a planned four cycles. All patients received pegfilgrastim 6 mg on day 3. One hundred and eleven women with median age of 56 years (27-79) were identified. Twenty-two percent of patients were ≥ 65 at diagnosis. Eight patients developed FN (7%). Ninety-five patients (86%) were able to complete four cycles. Completion rate was significantly lower in patients with age ≥ 65 (71% vs. 90%; P = 0.02). Incidence of hospitalization, delay, RDI <85%, and dose reduction were not significantly different between the age groups. The overall incidence of FN was 7%. Older patients were significantly less likely to complete four cycles of TC as planned. ppGCSF should be strongly considered in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant TC chemotherapy.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database: The First Comprehensive Database for Therapeutic Targets of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Cong, Ye; Luo, Huizhe Howard; Wu, Sijin; Zhao, Liyuan Eric; Liu, Quentin; Yang, Yongliang

    2017-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells that have strong self-renewal capabilities and may contribute to the failure of conventional cancer therapies. Hence, therapeutics homing in on CSCs represent a novel and promising approach that may eradicate malignant tumors. However, the lack of information on validated targets of CSCs has greatly hindered the development of CSC-directed therapeutics. Herein, we describe the Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database (CSCTT), the first online database to provide a rich bioinformatics resource for the display, search, and analysis of structure, function, and related annotation for therapeutic targets of cancer stem cells. CSCTT contains 135 proteins that are potential targets of CSCs, with validated experimental evidence manually curated from existing literatures. Proteins are carefully annotated with a detailed description of protein families, biological process, related diseases, and experimental evidences. In addition, CSCTT has compiled 213 documented therapeutic methods for cancer stem cells, including 118 small molecules and 20 biotherapy methods. The CSCTT may serve as a useful platform for the development of CSC-directed therapeutics against various malignant tumors. The CSCTT database is freely available to the public at http://www.csctt.org/. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:331-334.

  16. Tumoral stem cell reprogramming as a driver of cancer: Theory, biological models, implications in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Hauer, Julia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Ingenhag, Deborah; Rodríguez-Meira, Alba; Auer, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a clonal malignant disease originated in a single cell and characterized by the accumulation of partially differentiated cells that are phenotypically reminiscent of normal stages of differentiation. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumor cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that cancer stem cells could arise through a tumor stem cell reprogramming mechanism, suggesting that genetic lesions that initiate the cancer process might be dispensable for tumor progression and maintenance. This review addresses the impact of these results toward a better understanding of cancer development and proposes new approaches to treat cancer in the future.

  17. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Falconi, Massimo; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo; Alfieri, Sergio; Calvo, Felipe A.; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fastner, Gerd; Herman, Joseph M.; Maidment, Bert W.; Miller, Robert C.; Regine, William F.; Reni, Michele; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ippolito, Edy; and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  18. Comparison of hematopoietic cancer stem cells with normal stem cells leads to discovery of novel differentially expressed SSRs.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Mirabbassi, Seyedeh Maryam; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-10-15

    Tandem repeat expansion in the transcriptomics level has been considered as one of the underlying causes of different cancers. Cancer stem cells are a small portion of cancer cells within the main neoplasm and can remain alive during chemotherapy and re-induce tumor growth. The EST-SSR background of cancer stem cells and possible roles of expressed SSRs in altering normal stem cells to cancer ones have not been investigated yet. Here, SSR distributions in hematopoietic normal and cancer stem cells were compared based on the expressed EST-SSR. One hundred eighty nine and 223 EST-SSRs were identified in cancer and normal stem cells, respectively. The EST-SSR expression pattern was significantly different between normal and cancer stem cells. The frequencies of AC/GT and TA/TA EST-SSRs were about 10% higher in cancer than normal stem cells. Remarkably, the number of triplets in cancer stem cells was 1.5 times higher than that in normal stem cells. GAT EST-SSR was frequent in cancer stem cells, but, conversely, normal stem cells did not express GAT EST-SSR. We suggest this EST-SSR as a novel triplet in cancer stem cell induction. Translating EST-SSRs to amino acids demonstrated that Asp and Ile were more abundant in cancer stem cells compared to normal stem cells. Finally, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis was carried out on genes containing triplet SSRs and showed that SSRs intentionally visit some specific GO classes. Interestingly, a NF-kappa (nuclear factor-kB) binding transcription factor was significantly hit by SSR instability which is a hallmark for leukemia stem cells. NF-kappa is an over represented transcription factor during cancer progression. It seems that there is a crosstalk between the NF-kB transcription factor and expressed GAT tandem repeat which negatively regulate apoptosis. In addition to better understanding of tumorigenesis, the findings of this study offer new DNA markers for diagnostic purposes and identifying at risk populations. In

  19. Cancer Stem Cells: A Novel Paradigm for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, D.; Ramalingam, S.; Houchen, C.W.; Anant, S.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause for mortality in US only after heart disease and lacks a good or effective therapeutic paradigm. Despite the emergence of new, targeted agents and the use of various therapeutic combinations, none of the treatment options available is curative in patients with advanced cancer. A growing body of evidence is supporting the idea that human cancers can be considered as a stem cell disease. Malignancies are believed to originate from a fraction of cancer cells that show self renewal and pluripotency and are capable of initiating and sustaining tumor growth. The cancer-initiating cells or cancer stem cells were originally identified in hematological malignancies but is now being recognized in several solid tumors. The hypothesis of stem cell-driven tumorigenesis raises questions as to whether the current treatments, most of which require rapidly dividing cells are able to efficiently target these slow cycling tumorigenic cells. Recent characterization of cancer stem cells should lead to the identification of key signaling pathways that may make cancer stem cells vulnerable to therapeutic interventions that target drug-effluxing capabilities, anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and induction of differentiation. Dietary phytochemicals possess anti-cancer properties and represent a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of many cancers. PMID:20370703

  20. Cancer stem cells, pluripotency, and cellular heterogeneity: a WNTer perspective.

    PubMed

    Atlasi, Yaser; Looijenga, Leendert; Fodde, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to represent the "beating heart" of malignant growth as they continuously fuel tumors through their ability to self-renew and differentiate. Moreover, they are also believed to underlie malignant behavior, local invasion, and metastasis in distal organ sites upon reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs). Nevertheless, the CSC concept has been the object of controversy, mainly due to the absence of robust operational definitions and to the lack of consistency in the use of the often incorrect nomenclature employed to refer to these cells. Notwithstanding the controversies, it is now generally accepted that primary cancers are organized in hierarchical fashion with neoplastic stem-like cells able to give rise to new CSCs and to more committed malignant cells. Notably, these hierarchical structures are not unidirectional, but are rather characterized by a more dynamic equilibrium where stem-like and more committed cancer cells transit from one meta-state to the other partly because of cues from the microenvironment (niche), but also because of intrinsic and yet incompletely understood characteristics in the activation/silencing of specific signal transduction pathways. Here, we will focus on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as one of the major regulator of stemness in homeostasis and cancer, and on germ cell tumors as the type of malignancy that most closely mimics normal embryonic development and as such serve as a unique model to study the role of stem cells in neoplasia.

  1. Targeting cancer stem cells in solid tumors by vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Jae Young, So; Nanjoo, Suh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells that may be responsible for initiation, progression and recurrence of tumors. Recent studies have demonstrated that CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to conventional chemotherapies, making them a promising target for the development of preventive/therapeutic agents. A single or combination of various markers, such as CD44, EpCAM, CD49f, CD133, CXCR4, ALDH-1 and CD24, were utilized to isolate CSCs fromvarious types of human cancers. Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signalingregulate self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells andare aberrantly activated in CSCs. In addition, many studies have demonstrated that these stem cell-associated signaling pathways are required for the maintenance of CSCs in differentmalignancies, including breast, colorectal, prostate and pancreatic cancers. Accumulating evidence hasshowninhibitory effects of vitamin D and its analogs on the cancer stem cell signaling pathways, suggesting vitamin D as a potential preventive/therapeutic agent against CSCs.In this review, we summarize recent findings about the roles of Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signaling in CSCs as well as the effects of vitamin D on these stem cell signaling pathways. PMID:25460302

  2. Ki67 proliferation in core biopsies versus surgical samples - a model for neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing number of neo-adjuvant breast cancer studies are being conducted and a novel model for tumor biological studies, the "window-of-opportunity" model, has revealed several advantages. Change in tumor cell proliferation, estimated by Ki67-expression in pre-therapeutic core biopsies versus post-therapeutic surgical samples is often the primary end-point. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in proliferation scores between core biopsies and surgical samples when patients have not received any intervening anti-cancer treatment. Also, a lack of consensus concerning Ki67 assessment may raise problems in the comparison of neo-adjuvant studies. Thus, the secondary aim was to present a novel model for Ki67 assessment. Methods Fifty consecutive breast cancer cases with both a core biopsy and a surgical sample available, without intervening neo-adjuvant therapy, were collected and tumor proliferation (Ki67, MIB1 antibody) was assessed immunohistochemically. A theoretical model for the assessment of Ki67 was constructed based on sequential testing of the null hypothesis 20% Ki67-positive cells versus the two-sided alternative more or less than 20% positive cells.. Results Assessment of Ki67 in 200 tumor cells showed an absolute average proliferation difference of 3.9% between core biopsies and surgical samples (p = 0.046, paired t-test) with the core biopsies being the more proliferative sample type. A corresponding analysis on the log-scale showed the average relative decrease from the biopsy to the surgical specimen to be 19% (p = 0.063, paired t-test on the log-scale). The difference was significant when using the more robust Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test (p = 0.029). After dichotomization at 20%, 12 of the 50 sample pairs had discrepant proliferation status, 10 showed high Ki67 in the core biopsy compared to two in the surgical specimen (p = 0.039, McNemar's test). None of the corresponding results for 1000

  3. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  4. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  5. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology.

  6. Emerging role of Notch in stem cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2009-06-28

    The Notch signaling pathway is known to be responsible for maintaining a balance between cell proliferation and death and, as such, plays important roles in the formation of many types of human tumors. Recently, Notch signaling pathway has been shown to control stem cell self-renewal and multi-potency. As many cancers are thought to be developed from a number of cancer stem-like cells, which are also known to be linked with the acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); and thus suggesting an expanding role of Notch signaling in human tumor progression.

  7. c-Myc and Her2 cooperate to drive a stem-like phenotype with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nair, R; Roden, D L; Teo, W S; McFarland, A; Junankar, S; Ye, S; Nguyen, A; Yang, J; Nikolic, I; Hui, M; Morey, A; Shah, J; Pfefferle, A D; Usary, J; Selinger, C; Baker, L A; Armstrong, N; Cowley, M J; Naylor, M J; Ormandy, C J; Lakhani, S R; Herschkowitz, J I; Perou, C M; Kaplan, W; O'Toole, S A; Swarbrick, A

    2014-07-24

    The HER2 (ERBB2) and MYC genes are commonly amplified in breast cancer, yet little is known about their molecular and clinical interaction. Using a novel chimeric mammary transgenic approach and in vitro models, we demonstrate markedly increased self-renewal and tumour-propagating capability of cells transformed with Her2 and c-Myc. Coexpression of both oncoproteins in cultured cells led to the activation of a c-Myc transcriptional signature and acquisition of a self-renewing phenotype independent of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme or regulation of conventional cancer stem cell markers. Instead, Her2 and c-Myc cooperated to induce the expression of lipoprotein lipase, which was required for proliferation and self-renewal in vitro. HER2 and MYC were frequently coamplified in breast cancer, associated with aggressive clinical behaviour and poor outcome. Lastly, we show that in HER2(+) breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (but not targeted anti-Her2 therapy), MYC amplification is associated with a poor outcome. These findings demonstrate the importance of molecular and cellular context in oncogenic transformation and acquisition of a malignant stem-like phenotype and have diagnostic and therapeutic consequences for the clinical management of HER2(+) breast cancer.

  8. MET: roles in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hye-Min

    2017-01-01

    In a number of cancers, deregulated MET pathway leads to aberrantly activated proliferative and invasive signaling programs that promote malignant transformation, cell motility and migration, angiogenesis, survival in hypoxia, and invasion. A better understanding of oncogenic MET signaling will help us to discover effective therapeutic approaches and to identify which tumors are likely to respond to MET-targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we will summarize the roles of MET signaling in cancer, with particular focus on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stemness. Then, we will provide update on MET targeting agents and discuss the challenges that should be overcome for the development of an effective therapy. PMID:28164090

  9. Drug-Loaded Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Stem Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binbin; Li, Qinghua; Mo, Jingxin; Dai, Honglian

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been reported to play critical roles in tumor initiation, propagation, and regeneration of cancer. Nano-size vehicles are employed to deliver drugs to target the CSCs for cancer therapy. Polymeric nanoparticles have been considered as the most efficient vehicles for drug delivery due to their excellent pharmacokinetic properties. The CSCs specific antibodies or ligands can be conjugated onto the surface or interior of nanoparticles to successfully target and finally eliminate CSCs. In this review, we focus on the approaches of polymeric nanoparticles design for loading drug, and their potential application for CSCs targeting in cancer therapy. PMID:28261093

  10. Discovery of the cancer stem cell related determinants of radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, Claudia; Kurth, Ina; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Tumors are known to be heterogeneous containing a dynamic mixture of phenotypically and functionally different tumor cells. The two concepts attempting to explain the origin of intratumor heterogeneity are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. The stochastic model argues that tumors are biologically homogenous and all cancer cells within the tumor have equal ability to propagate the tumor growth depending on continuing mutations and selective pressure. By contrast, the stem cells model suggests that cancer heterogeneity is due to the hierarchy that originates from a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are biologically distinct from the bulk tumor and possesses self-renewal, tumorigenic and multilineage potential. Although these two hypotheses have been discussed for a long time as mutually exclusive explanations of tumor heterogeneity, they are easily reconciled serving as a driving force of cancer evolution and diversity. Recent discovery of the cancer cell plasticity and heterogeneity makes the CSC population a moving target that could be hard to track and eradicate. Understanding the signaling mechanisms regulating CSCs during the course of cancer treatment can be indispensable for the optimization of current treatment strategies.

  11. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photosensitizer photosens for superficial bladder cancer: experimental investigations to treat prostate cancer by PDT with photosens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolikhin, Oleg I.; Chernishov, Igor V.; Sivkov, Andrey V.; Altunin, Denis V.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2007-07-01

    14 patients with transional-cell bladder cancer in stage T1N0M0G2 after transurethral bladder resection were offered adjuvant treatment with PDT. Adjuvant PDT was performed 1-1.5 months after transurethral bladder resection for superficial bladder cancer. Prior to PDT conventional and fluorescent cystoscopy were performed. In the absence of inflammation and after full epitalisation of postoperative wound a session of therapy was performed. 24 hours prior to PDT-session photosensitizer Photosens was injected intravenously in the dose of 0.8 mg per kg of body weight. Prior to PDT local anesthesia of urethra with lidocain-gel was performed. Cystoscopy was carried out. PDT was performed with diode laser "Biospec" (675 nm). During the session the place of standing diffuser and the volume of a bladder were controlled. After 7 months of observation no tumor recidivists were observed. Registered side effects were not life-threatened. 5 patients had pain or discomfort in suprapubic area, ceasing spontaneously or requiring administration of analgetics. No systemic side-effects or allergic reactions were observed. The method can be used in out-patient practice. Absence of early recidivists shows efficiency of PDT in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Further study is necessary to estimate optimal regimen of PDT. The further controlling of condition on the patients in this group is required. At the laboratory animals' experiment, we conducted the explorations devoted to the influence of the photodynamic effect at the prostate's tissues.

  12. Does timing of adjuvant chemotherapy influence the prognosis after early breast cancer? Results of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG).

    PubMed

    Cold, S; Düring, M; Ewertz, M; Knoop, A; Møller, S

    2005-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect on survival of delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer for up to 3 months after surgery. In the nation-wide clinical trials of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, 7501 breast cancer patients received chemotherapy within 3 months of surgery between 1977 and 1999: 352 with classical cyclofosfamide, metotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF); 6065 with CMF i.v. and 1084 with cyclofosfamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil. For the analysis, the time between surgery and the start of chemotherapy was divided into four strata (1-3, 4, 5 and 6-13 weeks). The results show that within the three groups of chemotherapy, there was an even distribution of known prognostic factors across the four strata of initiation of chemotherapy. There was no pattern indicating a benefit from early start of chemotherapy. No significant interactions were found for subgroups of patients with a poorer prognosis (many involved lymph nodes, high-grade malignancies or hormone receptor negative disease). In conclusion, we have found no evidence for a survival benefit due to early initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy within the first 2-3 months after surgery.

  13. Does timing of adjuvant chemotherapy influence the prognosis after early breast cancer? Results of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG)

    PubMed Central

    Cold, S; Düring, M; Ewertz, M; Knoop, A; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect on survival of delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer for up to 3 months after surgery. In the nation-wide clinical trials of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, 7501 breast cancer patients received chemotherapy within 3 months of surgery between 1977 and 1999: 352 with classical cyclofosfamide, metotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF); 6065 with CMF i.v. and 1084 with cyclofosfamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil. For the analysis, the time between surgery and the start of chemotherapy was divided into four strata (1–3, 4, 5 and 6–13 weeks). The results show that within the three groups of chemotherapy, there was an even distribution of known prognostic factors across the four strata of initiation of chemotherapy. There was no pattern indicating a benefit from early start of chemotherapy. No significant interactions were found for subgroups of patients with a poorer prognosis (many involved lymph nodes, high-grade malignancies or hormone receptor negative disease). In conclusion, we have found no evidence for a survival benefit due to early initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy within the first 2–3 months after surgery. PMID:16136052

  14. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2017-01-01

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells. PMID:28125050

  15. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  16. Incidence and risk of central nervous system metastases as site of first recurrence in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with adjuvant trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Olson, E. M.; Abdel-Rasoul, M.; Maly, J.; Wu, C. S.; Lin, N. U.; Shapiro, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) disease as the site of first relapse after exposure to adjuvant trastuzumab has been reported. We carried out comprehensive meta-analysis to determine the risk of CNS metastases as the first site of recurrence in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who received adjuvant trastuzumab. Methods Eligible studies include randomized trials of adjuvant trastuzumab administered for 1 year to patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who reported CNS metastases as first site of disease recurrence. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the incidence, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using fixed-effects inverse variance and random-effects models. Results A total of 9020 patients were included. The incidence of CNS metastases as first site of disease recurrence in HER2-positive patients receiving adjuvant trastuzumab was 2.56% (95% CI 2.07% to 3.01%) compared with 1.94% (95% CI 1.54% to 2.38%) in HER2-positive patients who did not receive adjuvant trastuzumab. The RR of the CNS as first site of relapse in trastuzumab-treated patients was 1.35 (95% CI 1.02–1.78, P = 0.038) compared with control arms without trastuzumab therapy. The ratio of CNS metastases to total number of recurrence events was 16.94% (95% CI 10.85% to 24.07%) and 8.33% (95% CI 6.49% to 10.86%) for the trastuzumab-treated and control groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found based on trastuzumab schedule or median follow-up time. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusions Adjuvant trastuzumab is associated with a significant increased risk of CNS metastases as the site of first recurrence in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. PMID:23463626

  17. Adjuvant for vaccine immunotherapy of cancer--focusing on Toll-like receptor 2 and 3 agonists for safely enhancing antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Takeda, Yohei; Tatematsu, Megumi; Takashima, Ken; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-12-01

    Immune-enhancing adjuvants usually targets antigen (Ag)-presenting cells to tune up cellular and humoral immunity. CD141(+) dendritic cells (DC) represent the professional Ag-presenting cells in humans. In response to microbial pattern molecules, these DCs upgrade the maturation stage sufficient to improve cross-presentation of exogenous Ag, and upregulation of MHC and costimulators, allowing CD4/CD8 T cells to proliferate and liberating cytokines/chemokines that support lymphocyte attraction and survival. These DCs also facilitate natural killer-mediated cell damage. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their signaling pathways in DCs play a pivotal role in DC maturation. Therefore, providing adjuvants in addition to Ag is indispensable for successful vaccine immunotherapy for cancer, which has been approved in comparison with antimicrobial vaccines. Mouse CD8α(+) DCs express TLR7 and TLR9 in addition to the TLR2 family (TLR1, 2, and 6) and TLR3, whereas human CD141(+) DCs exclusively express the TLR2 family and TLR3. Although human and mouse plasmacytoid DCs commonly express TLR7/9 to respond to their agonists, the results on mouse adjuvant studies using TLR7/9 agonists cannot be simply extrapolated to human adjuvant immunotherapy. In contrast, TLR2 and TLR3 are similarly expressed in both human and mouse Ag-presenting DCs. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin peptidoglycan and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid are representative agonists for TLR2 and TLR3, respectively, although they additionally stimulate cytoplasmic sensors: their functional specificities may not be limited to the relevant TLRs. These adjuvants have been posted up to a certain achievement in immunotherapy in some cancers. We herein summarize the history and perspectives of TLR2 and TLR3 agonists in vaccine-adjuvant immunotherapy for cancer.

  18. Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

    2014-11-01

    Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer.

  19. p53 status identifies triple-negative breast cancer patients who do not respond to adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coradini, Danila; Biganzoli, Elia; Ardoino, Ilaria; Ambrogi, Federico; Boracchi, Patrizia; Demicheli, Romano; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Moliterni, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Genomic analysis and protein expression assimilate triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) with basal-like breast tumors. TNBCs, however, have proved to encompass also tumors with normal-like phenotype and known to have favorable prognosis and to respond to chemotherapy. In a recent paper, we have provided evidence that p53 status is able to subdivide TNBCs into two distinct subgroups with different outcome, and consistent with basal- and normal-like phenotypes. Based on this finding, we explored the contribution of p53 status in predicting the response to adjuvant CMF or CMF followed doxorubicin chemotherapy of a group of TNBC patients. Results indicated that TNBC patients with a p53-positive tumor had a shorter relapse-free and overall survival than patients carrying a p53-negative TNBC, corroborating our hypothesis about the relationship between TNBC phenotype (basal-like versus normal-like) and p53 status as predictor of response to anthracycline/CMF-based chemotherapy.

  20. Radiation induces the generation of cancer stem cells: A novel mechanism for cancer radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengsheng; Zhou, Kunming; Gao, Ling; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wei; Yan, Weijuan; Song, Xiujun; Yu, Huijie; Wang, Sinian; Yu, Nan; Jiang, Qisheng

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance remains a major obstacle for the radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that the radioresistance of cancer is due to the existence of intrinsic cancer stem cells (CSCs), which represent a small, but radioresistant cell subpopulation that exist in heterogeneous tumors. By contrast, non-stem cancer cells are considered to be radiosensitive and thus, easy to kill. However, recent studies have revealed that under conditions of radiation-induced stress, theoretically radiosensitive non-stem cancer cells may undergo dedifferentiation subsequently obtaining the phenotypes and functions of CSCs, including high resistance to radiotherapy, which indicates that radiation may directly result in the generation of novel CSCs from non-stem cancer cells. These findings suggest that in addition to intrinsic CSCs, non-stem cancer cells may also contribute to the relapse and metastasis of cancer following transformation into CSCs. This review aims to investigate the radiation-induced generation of CSCs, its association with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its significance with regard to the radioresistance of cancer. PMID:27899964

  1. Mammary gland stem cells and their application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Baowei

    2017-02-07

    The mammary gland is an organ comprising two primary lineages, specifically the inner luminal and the outer myoepithelial cell layers. Mammary gland stem cells (MaSCs) are highly dynamic and self-renewing, and can give rise to these mammary gland lineages. The lineages are responsible for gland generation during puberty as well as expansion during pregnancy. In recent years, researchers have focused on understanding how MaSCs are regulated during mammary gland development and transformation of breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, and how they are regulated by the signaling transduction pathways, mammary gland microenvironment, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Moreover, we debate the evidence for their serving as the origin of breast cancer, and discuss the therapeutic perspectives of targeting breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In conclusion, a better understanding of the key regulators of MaSCs is crucial for the clinical treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cancer stem cells: potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to current chemotherapeutic or radiation-based cancer treatment strategies is a serious concern. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically able to evade treatment and establish a recurrent tumor or metastasis, and it is these that lead to the majority of cancer deaths. Therefore, a major current goal is to develop treatment strategies that eliminate the resistant CSCs as well as the bulk tumor cells in order to achieve complete disease clearance. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important for maintenance and differentiation of stem cells as well as normal development. There is expanding evidence that ALDH expression increases in response to therapy and promotes chemoresistance and survival mechanisms in CSCs. This perspective will discuss a paper by Cojoc and colleagues recently published in Cancer Research, that indicates ALDHs play a key role in resistance to radiation therapy and tumor recurrence in prostate cancer. The authors suggest that ALDHs are a potential therapeutic target for treatment prostate cancer patients to limit radiation resistance and disease recurrence. The findings are consistent with work from other cancers showing ALDHs are major contributors of CSC signaling and resistance to anti-cancer treatments. This perspective will address representative work concerning the validity of ALDH and the associated retinoic acid signaling pathway as chemotherapeutic targets for prostate as well as other cancers. PMID:28149880

  3. Values of Sleep/Wake, Activity/Rest, Circadian Rhythms, and Fatigue Prior to Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Ann M.; Farr, Lynne A.; Kuhn, Brett R.; Fischer, Patricia; Agrawal, Sangeeta

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue is the most prevalent and distressing symptom experienced by patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer. Higher fatigue levels have been related to sleep maintenance problems and low daytime activity in patients who have received chemotherapy, but knowledge is sparse describing these relationships prior to chemotherapy. The Piper Integrated Fatigue Model© guided this study, which describes sleep/wake, activity/rest, circadian rhythms and fatigue, and how they inter-relate in women with Stage I, II or IIIA breast cancer during the 48 hours prior to the first adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. The present report describes these variables in 130 females, mean age = 51.4 years; the majority were married and employed. Subjective sleep was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and fatigue was measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS). Wrist actigraphy was used to objectively measure sleep/wake, activity/rest, and circadian rhythms. Mean PSQI score was 6.73 ±3.4, indicating poor sleep. Objective sleep/wake results were within limits of normal (WNL) established for healthy individuals, except for the number and length of night awakenings. Objective activity/rest results were WNL except for low mean daytime activity. Circadian rhythm mesor was 132.3(24.6) and amplitude was 97.2(22.8). Mean PFS score was 2.56 ±2.0, with 72% reporting mild fatigue. There were significant relationships between subjective and objective sleep, but no consistent patterns. Higher total and subscale fatigue scores were correlated with most components of poorer subjective sleep quality (r= 0.25 to 0.42, P = <0.005). PMID:17397701

  4. Antioxidant activity of ginger extract as a daily supplement in cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Danwilai, Kwanjit; Konmun, Jitprapa; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Subongkot, Suphat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the antioxidant activity of ginger extract oral supplement in newly diagnosed cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy compared to placebo. Patients and methods Newly diagnosed cancer patients receiving moderate-to-high emetogenic potential adjuvant chemotherapy were randomized to receive either a ginger extract (standardized 6-gingerol 20 mg/day) or a placebo 3 days prior to chemotherapy, which they continued daily. Oxidant/antioxidant parameters, including the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), total glutathione (GSH/GSSG), lipid peroxidation products detected as malondialdehyde (MDA) and NO2−/NO3−, were measured at baseline and at days 1, 22, 43 and 64 after undergoing chemotherapy. Two-sided statistical analysis, with P < 0.05, was used to determine statistical significance. Results A total of 43 patients were included in the study: 19 and 24 patients were randomly assigned to the ginger group and placebo group, respectively. Antioxidant activity parameters, including SOD, CAT, GPx and GSH/GSSG, were significantly increased at day 64 in the ginger group compared to those in the placebo group, while MDA and NO2−/NO3− levels were significantly decreased (P < 0.0001). When compared to the baseline, the activities of SOD and CAT and the levels of GPx and GSH/GSSG were significantly higher on day 64 (P = 0.01), while the blood levels of MDA and NO2−/NO3− were significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Conclusion Daily supplement of ginger extract started 3 days prior to chemotherapy has been shown to significantly elevate antioxidant activity and reduce oxidative marker levels in patients who received moderate-to-high emetogenic potential chemotherapy compared to placebo. PMID:28203106

  5. Lung cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ze-hong; White, James; Zhang, Lin-bo

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most dreaded of all cancers because of the higher mortality rates associated with it worldwide. The various subtypes of lung cancer respond differently to a particular treatment regime, which makes the therapeutic interventions all the more complicated. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. They are considered as the factors responsible for the cases of tumor relapse. The CSCs may have significant role in the development of lung tumorigenesis based on the identification of the CSCs which respond during injury. The properties of multi-potency and self-renewal are shared in common by the lung CSCs with the normal pluripotent stem cells which can be isolated using the similar markers. This review deals with the origin and characteristics of the lung cancer stem cells. The role of different markers used to isolate lung CSCs like CD44, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), CD133 and ABCG2 (ATP binding cassette sub family G member 2) have been discussed in detail. Analysis of the developmental signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog in the regulation and maintenance of the lung CSCs have been done. Finally, before targeting the lung CSC biomarkers for potential therapeutics, challenges faced in lung cancer stem cell research need to be taken into account. With the accepted notion that the CSCs are to blame for cancer relapse and drug resistance, targeting them can be an important aspect of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  6. The Role of SIRT1 in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    molecular mechanism of SIRT1 inhibitors in blocking EMT and reducing cancer stem cells is likely associated with blocking the Wnt pathway. Several down...sensitivity to chemotherapy in xenograft mouse model. Task 4. Wnt pathway is highly activated in breast CSCs and EMT of human breast cancer...reducing EMT . Task 6. Using cell line in vitro study to demonstrate that SIRT1 regulates CSCs and EMT through activation of Wnt pathway via interaction

  7. Rewriting the Histone Code of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    in- breast-cancer-stem-cells. Rivenbark AG, Beltran AS, Yuan X, Rots MG, Strahl BD, Blancafort P. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Cancer Cells via...Targeted DNA Methylation. Epigenetics (2012) Apr 1;7(4) Stolzenburg S, Rots MG, Beltran AS, Rivenbark AS, Yuan X, Strahl BS, Blancafort P (2012... disease . Cell 126, 257-68 (2006). 19. Lee, D.Y., Teyssier, C., Strahl, B.D. & Stallcup, M.R. Role of protein methylation in regulation of

  8. Cancer Stem Cells: Potential Target for Bioactive Food Components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Farrar, William; Colburn, Nancy H.; Milner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells often have phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to normal stem cells including the properties of self-renewal and differentiation. Recent findings suggest that uncontrolled self-renewal may explain cancer relapses and may represent a critical target for cancer prevention. It is conceivable that the loss of regulatory molecules resulting from inappropriate consumption of specific foods and their constituents may foster the aberrant self-renewal of cancer stem cells. In fact, increasing evidence points to the network delivering signals for self-renewal from extracellular compartments to the nucleus including changes in stem cell environments, inducible expression of microRNAs, hyperplastic nuclear chromatin structures, and the on/off of differentiation process as possible sites of action for bioactive food components. Diverse dietary constituents such as vitamins A and D, genistein, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane, curcumin, piperine, theanine, and choline have been shown to modify self-renewal properties of cancer stem cells. The ability of these bioactive food components to influence the balance between proliferative and quiescent cells by regulating critical feedback molecules in the network including dickkopf 1 (DKK-1), secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2), B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (Bmi-1), and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) may account for their biological response. Overall, the response to food components does not appear to be tissue or organ specific, suggesting there may be common cellular mechanisms. Unquestionably, additional studies are needed to clarify the physiological role of these dietary components in preventing the resistance of tumor cells to traditional drugs and cancer recurrence. PMID:22704055

  9. The association between population-based treatment guidelines and adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. British Columbia/Ontario Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sawka, C.; Olivotto, I.; Coldman, A.; Goel, V.; Holowaty, E.; Hislop, T. G.

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of province-wide treatment guidelines on consistency of adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, which has province-wide guidelines, and Ontario, which does not. All eligible 1991 incident cases of node-negative breast cancer in British Columbia (n = 942) and a similar number of randomly selected 1991 incident cases in Ontario (n = 938) were reviewed. Consistency of adjuvant therapy received was evaluated by stratifying cases into discrete diagnostic groups using several grouping systems, and by then comparing the distribution of treatments received within each diagnostic group in the two provinces. Recursive partitioning was also performed. We observed that patterns of pathology reporting were consistent with awareness of the factors used in the British Columbia guidelines to define indications for adjuvant therapy. Consistency of care was greater in British Columbia than in Ontario by all diagnostic grouping systems and by recursive partitioning (P < 0.001), and the observed patterns in British Columbia corresponded to the British Columbia guidelines. We conclude that population-based treatment guidelines can play a role in promoting consistent patterns of adjuvant therapy for women with node-negative breast cancer. PMID:9166950

  10. PrPC from stem cells to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Hirsch, Théo Z.; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Halliez, Sophie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Launay, Jean-Marie; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The cellular prion protein PrPC was initially discovered as the normal counterpart of the pathological scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. While clues as to the physiological function of this ubiquitous protein were greatly anticipated from the development of knockout animals, PrP-null mice turned out to be viable and to develop without major phenotypic abnormalities. Notwithstanding, the discovery that hematopoietic stem cells from PrP-null mice have impaired long-term repopulating potential has set the stage for investigating into the role of PrPC in stem cell biology. A wealth of data have now exemplified that PrPC is expressed in distinct types of stem cells and regulates their self-renewal as well as their differentiation potential. A role for PrPC in the fate restriction of embryonic stem cells has further been proposed. Paralleling these observations, an overexpression of PrPC has been documented in various types of tumors. In line with the contribution of PrPC to stemness and to the proliferation of cancer cells, PrPC was recently found to be enriched in subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by PrPC in stem cell biology and discuss how the subversion of its function may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:25364760

  11. Photothermal therapy with immune-adjuvant nanoparticles together with checkpoint blockade for effective cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Ligeng; Liang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-10-01

    A therapeutic strategy that can eliminate primary tumours, inhibit metastases, and prevent tumour relapses is developed herein by combining adjuvant nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy with checkpoint-blockade immunotherapy. Indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and imiquimod (R837), a Toll-like-receptor-7 agonist, are co-encapsulated by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). The formed PLGA-ICG-R837 nanoparticles composed purely by three clinically approved components can be used for near-infrared laser-triggered photothermal ablation of primary tumours, generating tumour-associated antigens, which in the presence of R837-containing nanoparticles as the adjuvant can show vaccine-like functions. In combination with the checkpoint-blockade using anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), the generated immunological responses will be able to attack remaining tumour cells in mice, useful in metastasis inhibition, and may potentially be applicable for various types of tumour models. Furthermore, such strategy offers a strong immunological memory effect, which can provide protection against tumour rechallenging post elimination of their initial tumours.

  12. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours. PMID:9010027

  13. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, M; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours.

  14. Photothermal therapy with immune-adjuvant nanoparticles together with checkpoint blockade for effective cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Ligeng; Liang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutic strategy that can eliminate primary tumours, inhibit metastases, and prevent tumour relapses is developed herein by combining adjuvant nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy with checkpoint-blockade immunotherapy. Indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and imiquimod (R837), a Toll-like-receptor-7 agonist, are co-encapsulated by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). The formed PLGA-ICG-R837 nanoparticles composed purely by three clinically approved components can be used for near-infrared laser-triggered photothermal ablation of primary tumours, generating tumour-associated antigens, which in the presence of R837-containing nanoparticles as the adjuvant can show vaccine-like functions. In combination with the checkpoint-blockade using anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), the generated immunological responses will be able to attack remaining tumour cells in mice, useful in metastasis inhibition, and may potentially be applicable for various types of tumour models. Furthermore, such strategy offers a strong immunological memory effect, which can provide protection against tumour rechallenging post elimination of their initial tumours. PMID:27767031

  15. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy following cystectomy for invasive bladder cancer: a prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D G; Daniels, J R; Russell, C A; Lieskovsky, G; Boyd, S D; Nichols, P; Kern, W; Sakamoto, J; Krailo, M; Groshen, S

    1991-03-01

    We assigned 91 patients with deeply invasive, pathological stage P3, P4 or N+ and Mo transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (with or without squamous or glandular differentiation) to adjuvant chemotherapy or to observation after radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. For most patients chemotherapy was planned as 4 courses at 28-day intervals of 100 mg./M.2 cisplatin, 60 mg./M.2 doxorubicin and 600 mg./M.2 cyclophosphamide. A significant delay was shown in the time to progression (p = 0.0010) with 70% of the patients assigned to chemotherapy free of disease at 3 years compared to 46% in the observation group. Median survival time for patients in the chemotherapy group was 4.3 years compared to 2.4 years in the observation group (p = 0.0062). In addition to treatment groups, important prognostic factors included age, gender and lymph node status. The number of involved lymph nodes was the single most important variable. We recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma after definitive surgical resection.

  16. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy for adult onset non-CNS cancer; cognitive impairment, brain structure and risk of dementia.

    PubMed

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Breteler, Monique M B; Boogerd, Willem; Seynaeve, Caroline; Schagen, Sanne B

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the late (i.e. ≥ 5 years post-treatment) effects of chemotherapy for non-central nervous system (non-CNS) cancer on the brain. Here we discuss the studies that have investigated the late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-CNS cancer on cognitive function (n=6); brain structure and function (n=5); and incidence of dementia (n=4). The neuropsychological studies showed long-term adverse cognitive problems in chemotherapy-exposed breast cancer survivors. This is in line with results from neuroimaging studies that report long-term brain structural alterations after chemotherapy. The studies exploring the association between chemotherapy and the incidence of dementia were contradictive and showed no clear relationship between the two phenomena. Although several methodological issues limit the validity and interpretation of some of the results of these studies, they suggest that chemotherapy is associated with subtle, yet long-lasting cognitive deficits, possibly related to brain structural and functional differences, but as yet not with an increased risk of dementia.

  17. Modulation of 5-fluorouracil as adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in colorectal cancer: the IGCS-COL multicentre, randomised, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    De Placido, S; Lopez, M; Carlomagno, C; Paoletti, G; Palazzo, S; Manzione, L; Iannace, C; Ianniello, G P; De Vita, F; Ficorella, C; Farris, A; Pistillucci, G; Gemini, M; Cortesi, E; Adamo, V; Gebbia, N; Palmeri, S; Gallo, C; Perrone, F; Persico, G; Bianco, A R

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this multicentre, randomised phase III trial were to evaluate: (1) the role of levamisol (LEV); and (2) the role of folinic acid (FA), added to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in the adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients with histologically proven, radically resected stage II or III colon or rectal cancer were eligible. The study had a 2 × 2 factorial design with four treatment arms: (a) 5FU alone, (b) 5FU+LEV, (c) 5FU+FA, (d) 5FU+LEV+FA, and two planned comparisons, testing the role of LEV and of FA, respectively. From March 1991, to September 1998, 1327 patients were randomised. None of the two comparisons resulted in a significant disease-free (DFS) or overall (OAS) survival advantage. The hazard ratio (HR) of relapse was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.73–1.09) for patients receiving FA and 0.99 (95% CI 0.80–1.21) for those receiving LEV; corresponding HRs of death were 1.02 (95% CI: 0.80–1.30) and 0.94 (95% CI 0.73–1.20). Nonhaematological toxicity (all grade vomiting, diarrhoea, mucositis, congiuntivitis, skin, fever and fatigue) was significantly worse with FA, while all other toxicities were similar. In the present trial, there was no evidence that the addition of FA or LEV significantly prolongs DFS and OAS of radically resected colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16222322

  18. Mechanisms of cisplatin resistance and targeting of cancer stem cells: Adding glycosylation to the equation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José Alexandre; Peixoto, Andreia; Neves, Manuel; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Reis, Celso A; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are the most frequently used (neo)adjuvant treatments for the majority of solid tumors. While platinum-based chemotherapeutic regimens have proven effective against highly proliferative malignant tumors, significant relapse and progression rates as well as decreased overall survival are still observed. Currently, it is known that sub-populations of chemoresistant cells share biological properties with cancer stem cells (CSC), which are believed to be responsible for tumor relapse, invasion and ultimately disease dissemination through acquisition of mesenchymal cell traits. In spite of concentrated efforts devoted to decipher the mechanisms underlying CSC chemoresistance and to design targeted therapeutics to these cells, proteomics has failed to unveil molecular signatures capable of distinguishing between malignant and non-malignant stem cells. This has hampered substantial developments in this complex field. Envisaging a novel rationale for an effective therapy, the current review summarizes the main cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance and the impact of chemotherapy challenge in CSC selection and clinical outcome. It further emphasizes the growing amount of data supporting a role for protein glycosylation in drug resistance. The dynamic and context-dependent nature of protein glycosylation is also comprehensively discussed, hence highlighting its potentially important role as a biomarker of CSC. As the paradigm of cancer therapeutics shifts towards precision medicine and patient-tailored therapeutics, we bring into focus the need to introduce glycomics and glycoproteomics in holistic pan-omics models, in order to integrate diverse, multimodal and clinically relevant information towards more effective cancer therapeutics.

  19. Non-initiation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: The Breast Cancer Quality of Care Study (BQUAL).

    PubMed

    Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Kushi, Lawrence H; Lamerato, Lois; Leoce, Nicole; Nathanson, S David; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Magai, Carol; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Jacobson, Judith S; Hershman, Dawn L

    2012-07-01

    Adjuvant hormonal therapy for non-metastatic hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer decreases risk of breast cancer recurrence and increases survival. However, some women do not initiate this life-saving treatment. We used a prospective cohort design to investigate factors related to non-initiation of hormonal therapy among women with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic HR-positive breast cancer recruited from three U.S. sites. Serial interviews were conducted at baseline and during treatment to examine sociodemographic factors, tumor characteristics, and treatment decision-making factors. Multivariate modeling assessed associations between variables of interest and hormonal therapy initiation. Of 1,050 breast cancer patients recruited, 725 (69%) had HR-positive breast cancer, of whom 87 (12.0%) based on self-report and 122 (16.8%) based on medical record/pharmacy fill rates did not initiate hormonal therapy. In a multivariable analysis, non-initiation of hormonal therapy, defined by medical record/pharmacy, was associated with having greater negative beliefs about efficacy of treatment (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.18-1.70). Non-initiation was less likely in those who found the quality of patient/physician communication to be higher (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99), the hormonal therapy treatment decision an easy one to make (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.23-0.90) or neither easy nor difficult (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.58); and had more positive beliefs about hormonal therapy efficacy (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.34-0.62). Factors influencing non-initiation of adjuvant hormonal therapy are complex and influenced by patient beliefs regarding treatment efficacy and side effects. Educational interventions to women about the benefits of hormonal therapy may decrease negative beliefs and increase hormone therapy initiation.

  20. Targeting autophagy in cancer stem cells as an anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Jin; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Jianwei; Yang, Shiming

    2017-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which comprise a small proportion of total cancer cells, have special capacities for self-renewal, differentiation and tumor formation. Currently, CSCs are regarded as the major cause of the failure in anticancer therapy, such as chemoresistance and/or radioresistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Autophagy, a process of cellular self-digestion and response to stress, has a role in tumor formation and progression, and it may play a dual role in CSCs-related resistance to anticancer therapy. Most researchers believe that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance of CSCs and is responsible for the failure of anticancer therapy. Unexpectedly, several studies have also suggested that loss of stemness in CSCs could be mediated by autophagy. Here, we review the recent advances in CSCs and autophagy, especially analyze the complex relationship between them, and hope to apply this new knowledge to the strategies for anticancer therapy.

  1. Concise reviews: cancer stem cells: from concept to cure.

    PubMed

    Matchett, K B; Lappin, T R

    2014-10-01

    In 1953, noting a remarkable consistency between the agents causing mutations and those associated with cancer, Carl Nordling, a Finnish-born architect, proposed that cancer results from an accumulation of genetic mutations. It is now generally accepted that inherited mutations and environmental carcinogens can lead to the development of premalignant clones. After further mutations, one cell reaches a critical state which confers a survival or growth advantage over normal cells. Such cells have the ability to initiate a malignant tumour. They share many of the features of normal stem cells, including the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and are widely termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). Although CSCs have been well characterized in hematological malignancies, their existence in some other tissues has been questioned. Here, we review recent work in which stem cells and stem cell-like cells have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of cancer and potential anticancer treatment strategies, in the context of both hematological and somatic tissue disease.

  2. Cancer stem cells as the engine of unstable tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard V; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Saldaña, Joan

    2008-08-21

    Genomic instability is considered by many authors the key engine of tumorigenesis. However, mounting evidence indicates that a small population of drug resistant cancer cells can also be a key component of tumor progression. Such cancer stem cells would define a compartment effectively acting as the source of most tumor cells. Here we study the interplay between these two conflicting components of cancer dynamics using two types of tissue architecture. Both mean field and multicompartment models are studied. It is shown that tissue architecture affects the pattern of cancer dynamics and that unstable cancers spontaneously organize into a heterogeneous population of highly unstable cells. This dominant population is in fact separated from the low-mutation compartment by an instability gap, where almost no cancer cells are observed. The possible implications of this prediction are discussed.

  3. Validity of Adjuvant! Online in Older Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer Based on 2,967 Patients from the ACCENT Database

    PubMed Central

    Papamichael, Demetris; Renfro, Lindsay A.; Matthaiou, Christiana; Yothers, Greg; Saltz, Leonard; Guthrie, Katherine; Van Cutsem, Eric; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Labianca, Roberto; André, Thierry; O’Connell, Michael; Alberts, Steven R.; Haller, Daniel G.; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant! Online is a tool used for clinical decision making in patients with early stage colon cancer. As details of the tool’s construction are not published, the ability of Adjuvant! Online to accurately predict outcomes for older patients (age 70+) with node positive colon cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy is unclear. Methods Individual data from older patients with stage III colon cancer who enrolled into multiple trials within the ACCENT database were entered into the Adjuvant! Online program to obtain predicted probabilities of 5-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Median predictions were compared with known rates. As co-morbidities were not known for ACCENT patients, but required for calculator entry, patients were assumed to have either “minor” or “average for age” co-morbidities. Results 2,967 older patients from 10 randomized studies were included. When “minor” co-morbidities were assumed, the median predicted 5-year OS rate of 64% nearly matched the actual rate of 65%; when “average for age” co-morbidities were assumed, the median prediction dropped to 58%, outside the CI for the actual rate. On the other hand, assuming “minor” co-morbidities gave a median 5-year RFS prediction of 62%, outside the 95% CI for the actual rate of 58%, while assuming “average for age” co-morbidities yielded a better median prediction of 57%. Conclusion Adjuvant! Online is reasonably accurate overall for predicting outcomes in older trial patients with stage III colon cancer, though accuracy may differ between 5-year RFS and 5-year OS predictions when a fixed degree of co-morbidities is assumed. PMID:27468630

  4. Arsenic Exposure Transforms Human Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells into a Cancer Stem-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inorganic arsenic is a ubiquitous environmental carcinogen affecting millions of people worldwide. Evolving theory predicts that normal stem cells (NSCs) are transformed into cancer stem cells (CSCs) that then drive oncogenesis. In humans, arsenic is carcinogenic in the urogenital system (UGS), including the bladder and potentially the prostate, whereas in mice arsenic induces multiorgan UGS cancers, indicating that UGS NSCs may represent targets for carcinogenic initiation. However, proof of emergence of CSCs induced by arsenic in a stem cell population is not available. Methods We continuously exposed the human prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cell line WPE-stem to an environmentally relevant level of arsenic (5 μM) in vitro and determined the acquired cancer phenotype. Results WPE-stem cells rapidly acquired a malignant CSC-like phenotype by 18 weeks of exposure, becoming highly invasive, losing contact inhibition, and hypersecreting matrix metalloproteinase-9. When hetero-transplanted, these cells (designated As-CSC) formed highly pleomorphic, aggressive tumors with immature epithelial- and mesenchymal-like cells, suggesting a highly pluripotent cell of origin. Consistent with tumor-derived CSCs, As-CSCs formed abundant free-floating spheres enriched in CSC-like cells, as confirmed by molecular analysis and the fact that only these floating cells formed xenograft tumors. An early loss of NSC self-renewal gene expression (p63, ABCG2, BMI-1, SHH, OCT-4, NOTCH-1) during arsenite exposure was subsequently reversed as the tumor suppressor gene PTEN was progressively suppressed and the CSC-like phenotype acquired. Conclusions Arsenite transforms prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells into CSC-like cells, indicating that it can produce CSCs from a model NSC population. PMID:20056578

  5. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth.

  6. Lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Gadepalli, Venkat Sundar; Deb, Swati Palit; Deb, Sumitra; Rao, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in cancer research have enabled us to understand the different mechanisms that contribute to the aberrant proliferation of normal cells into abnormal cells that result in tumors. In the pursuit to find cures, researchers have primarily focused on various molecular level changes that are unique to cancerous cells. In humans, about 50 % or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Despite the identification of numerous triggers that causes lung cancer specific cure still remain elusive. One of the primary reasons attributed to this is due to the fact that the tumor tissue is heterogeneous and contains numerous sub-populations of cells. Studies have shown that a specific sub-population of cells termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive the recurrence of cancer in response to standard chemotherapy. These CSCs are mutated cells with core properties similar to those of adult stem cells. They reside in a microenvironment within the tumor tissue that supports their growth and make them less susceptible to drug treatment. These cells possess properties of symmetric self-renewal and migration thus driving tumor formation and metastasis. Therefore, research specifically targeting these cells has gained prominence towards developing new therapeutic agents against cancer. This chapter focuses on lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations noted in these cells, and importance of MDM2 interactions. Further, research approaches for better understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive CSC function and developing appropriate therapies are discussed.

  7. Detection of sentinel lymph node in breast cancer recurrence may change adjuvant treatment decision in patients with breast cancer recurrence and previous axillary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, Octavi; Perez-Ceresuela, Francesc; Espinosa-Bravo, Martin; Cortadellas, Tomas; Esgueva, Antonio; Rodriguez-Revuelto, Robert; Peg, Vicente; Reyes, Victoria; Xercavins, Jordi; Rubio, Isabel T

    2014-08-01

    Use of sentinel lymph node dissection in patients with ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence is still controversial. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer recurrence (SLNBR) and whether the positivity had impact in the adjuvant treatment. Between 2008 and 2012 we performed SLNBR in patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. We included 53 patients in a prospective study. Forty-three patients (81%) had a previous axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and ten (19%) had a previous sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). Identification rate after SLNB was 50% and after ALND was 60.5% (p = 0.4). Nine patients (26%) had a positive SLNBR. Adjuvant systemic treatment was given to all the patients with a positive SLNBR and to 23 (85%) with a negative SLNBR (p = 0.29). Six patients (66%) with positive SLNBR and 4 patients (14%) with negative SLNBR underwent radiation therapy (p < 0.01). As conclusions of our study we conclude that sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast tumor recurrence is feasible and significant differences were found in the use of radiation therapy in patients with a positive SLNBR.

  8. Study protocol of the SACURA trial: a randomized phase III trial of efficacy and safety of UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy, but the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer remains controversial. The major Western guidelines recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for “high-risk stage II” cancer, but this is not clearly defined and the efficacy has not been confirmed. Methods/design SACURA trial is a multicenter randomized phase III study which aims to evaluate the superiority of 1-year adjuvant treatment with UFT to observation without any adjuvant treatment after surgery for stage II colon cancer in a large population, and to identify “high-risk factors of recurrence/death” in stage II colon cancer and predictors of efficacy and adverse events of the chemotherapy. Patients aged between 20 and 80 years with curatively resected stage II colon cancer are randomly assigned to a observation group or UFT adjuvant therapy group (UFT at 500–600 mg/day as tegafur in 2 divided doses after meals for 5 days, followed by 2-day rest. This 1-week treatment cycle is repeated for 1 year). The patients are followed up for 5 years until recurrence or death. Treatment delivery and adverse events are entered into a web-based case report form system every 3 months. The target sample size is 2,000 patients. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival, and the secondary endpoints are overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and incidence and severity of adverse events. In an additional translational study, the mRNA expression of 5-FU-related enzymes, microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability, and histopathological factors including tumor budding are assessed to evaluate correlation with recurrences, survivals and adverse events. Discussion A total of 2,024 patients were enrolled from October 2006 to July 2010. The results of this study will provide important information that help to improve the therapeutic strategy for

  9. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27657126

  10. Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database: The First Comprehensive Database for Therapeutic Targets of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Cong, Ye; Luo, Huizhe Howard; Wu, Sijin; Zhao, Liyuan Eric; Liu, Quentin; Yang, Yongliang

    2016-09-02

    SummaryCancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumor cells that have strong self-renewal capabilities and may contribute to the failure of conventional cancer therapies. Hence, therapeutics homing in on CSCs represent a novel and promising approach that may eradicate malignant tumors. However, the lack of information on validated targets of CSCs has greatly hindered the development of CSC-directed therapeutics. Herein, we describe the Cancer Stem Cells Therapeutic Target Database (CSCTT), the first online database to provide a rich bioinformatics resource for the display, search, and analysis of structure, function, and related annotation for therapeutic targets of cancer stem cells. CSCTT contains 135 proteins that are potential targets of CSCs, with validated experimental evidence manually curated from existing literatures. Proteins are carefully annotated with a detailed description of protein families, biological process, related diseases, and experimental evidences. In addition, CSCTT has compiled 213 documented therapeutic methods for cancer stem cells, including 118 small molecules and 20 biotherapy methods. The CSCTT may serve as a useful platform for the development of CSC-directed therapeutics against various malignant tumors. The CSCTT database is freely available to the public at http://www.csctt.org/ SIGNIFICANCE: Although the definition and role of cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called tumor-initiating cells) remain a topic of much debate, increasing evidence suggests that CSCs may be the driving force behind chemotherapy/radiotherapy resistance, as well as metastasis. Consequently, the elimination or differentiation of CSCs is critical for treating malignant tumors and improving clinical outcomes. Unfortunately, the progress of research into the development of anti-CSC therapeutics has been rather slow, and no anti-CSC drugs are yet in clinical use. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop a database that compiles useful information for

  11. A new adjuvant delivery system 'cyclic di-GMP/YSK05 liposome' for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Hiroko; Hyodo, Mamoru; Nakamura, Takashi; Sato, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-06-28

    Cyclic dinucleotides are of importance in the field of microbiology and immunology. They function as second messengers and are thought to participate in the signal transduction of cytosolic DNA immune responses. One such dinucleotide, cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), stimulates the immune system. It is thought that c-di-GMP is recognized by ATP dependent RNA helicase (DDX41) in the cytosol, forms a complex with the Stimulator of interferon genes protein (STING), triggers a signal via the tank binding kinase 1-interferon regulatory factor 3 (TBK1-IRF3) pathway and induces the production of type I interferons. Therefore c-di-GMP can be thought of as a new class of adjuvant. However, because c-di-GMP contains two phosphate groups, this prevents its use as an adjuvant because it cannot pass through the cell membrane, even though the target molecule of c-di-GMP is located in the cytoplasm. Our group has been developing a series of liposomal drug delivery systems and recently investigated YSK05 which is a synthetic, pH sensitive lipid that has a high fusogenicity. We utilized this lipid as a carrier to transport c-di-GMP into the cytosol to then use c-di-GMP as an adjuvant. Based on screening experiments, YSK05/POPE/cholesterol=40/25/35 was found to induce IFN-β in Raw264.7 cells. The induction of IFN-β from c-di-GMP liposomes was inhibited by adding BX795, a TBK1 inhibitor, indicating that the production of IFN-β caused the activation of the STING-TBK1 pathway. C-di-GMP liposomes also showed significantly higher levels of expression of CD80, CD86 and MHC class I. The c-di-GMP/YSK05 liposome facilitated antigen specific cytotoxic T cell activity and the inhibition of tumor growth in a mouse model. These findings indicate that c-di-GMP/YSK05 liposomes could be used, not only to transfer c-di-GMP to the cytosol and induce an innate immune system but also as a platform for investigating the mechanism of immune sensing with cyclic dinucleotides in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  13. Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage MutantK-ras Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    would expect the results that we have seen. However, according to the cancer stem cell theory (5), transient amplifying cells have limited capacity...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0338 TITLE: Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung Cancer...COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage

  14. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    apoptosis and DICE in breast cancer cells, with many potential therapeutical applications. I could also demonstrate the involvement of miRNA in the...process. Moreover, I have developed a novel plasmid-based tool to isolate BCSCS by the activity of miRNAs , and I am going to optimize and test the...relevance of its use in the next reporting period. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fas, FasL, Cancer, Cancer Stem cells, Apoptosis, miRNA , EMT, cell death. 16

  15. Cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapeutic implications based on stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite advances in its diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC remains unfavorable. Recent advances in stem cell biology and associated technologies have enabled the identification of minor components of tumorigenic cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells, in cancers such as HCC. Furthermore, because CSC play a central role in tumor development, metastasis and recurrence, they are considered to be a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Hepatic CSC have been successfully identified using functional and cell surface markers. The analysis of purified hepatic CSC has revealed the molecular machinery and signaling pathways involved in their maintenance. In addition, epigenetic transcriptional regulation has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of CSC. Although inhibitors of CSC show promise as CSC-targeting drugs, novel therapeutic approaches for the eradication of CSC are yet to be established. In this review, we describe recent progress in hepatic CSC research and provide a perspective on the available therapeutic approaches based on stem cell biology.

  16. Tackling Cancer Stem Cells via Inhibition of EMT Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mladinich, Megan; Ruan, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) has become recognized for its role in both tumorigenesis and poor patient prognosis in recent years. Traditional therapeutics are unable to effectively eliminate this group of cells from the bulk population of cancer cells, allowing CSCs to persist posttreatment and thus propagate into secondary tumors. The therapeutic potential of eliminating CSCs, to decrease tumor relapse, has created a demand for identifying mechanisms that directly target and eliminate cancer stem cells. Molecular profiling has shown that cancer cells and tumors that exhibit the CSC phenotype also express genes associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) feature. Ample evidence has demonstrated that upregulation of master transcription factors (TFs) accounting for the EMT process such as Snail/Slug and Twist can reprogram cancer cells from differentiated to stem-like status. Despite being appealing therapeutic targets for tackling CSCs, pharmacological approaches that directly target EMT-TFs remain impossible. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in the regulation of Snail/Slug and Twist at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels and discuss the clinical implication and application for EMT blockade as a promising strategy for CSC targeting. PMID:27840647