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Sample records for adjuvant cholera toxin

  1. Targeted vaccine adjuvants based on modified cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Lycke, Nils

    2005-09-01

    The present review describes immunomodulation with targeted adjuvants that will allow for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines. We have studied cholera toxin (CT) and derivatives thereof, to rationally design vaccine adjuvant vectors that are both highly efficacious as well as safe and non-toxic. Two strategies were exploited; the first using CT or the enzymatically inactive receptor-binding B-subunit of CT (CTB) and the second, using CTA1 or an enzymatically inactive mutant CTA1R7K., that was linked, in a fusion protein, to the B-cell targeting moiety, DD, from Staphylococcus areus proteinA. Our studies provide compelling evidence that delivery of Ag in the absence of ADP-ribosylation can promote tolerance, whereas, ADP-ribosyltransferase-active conjugates, prevent tolerance but induce IgA immunity. Our analysis revealed unique subsets of mucosal and systemic DC that appeared to be responsible for the ADP-ribosyltransferase sensitive dichotomy between tolerance and IgA immunity. Whether targeting of B cells suffice for tolerance-induction or requires participation of DCs, is at present an unresolved issue. Nevertheless, enzymatic modulation differentiates and matures the DC to promote CD4 T cell help for IgA B cell development. Ag-presentation in the absence of enzyme, as seen with CTA1R7K-DD, expands specific T cells to a similar extent as enzymatically active CTA1-DD, but fails to recruit help for germinal center expansion of activated B cells. We have given special attention to the genes that adjuvants turn on using Affymetrix technology. In particular, modulation of the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on the targeted APC; CD80, CD86, CD83 and B7RP-1, play important roles for the effect of the ADP-ribosylating CTA1-based adjuvants for the development of tolerance or active IgA immunity. PMID:16178769

  2. A Second Generation of Double Mutant Cholera Toxin Adjuvants: Enhanced Immunity without Intracellular Trafficking1

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Yukari; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kataoka, Kosuke; Rahima, Bibi; Jackson, Raymond J.; Komase, Katsuhiro; Dohi, Taeko; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2015-01-01

    Nasal application of native cholera toxin (nCT) as a mucosal adjuvant has potential toxicity for the CNS through binding to GM1 gangliosides in the olfactory nerves. Although mutants of cholera toxin (mCTs) have been developed that show mucosal adjuvant activity without toxicity, it still remains unclear whether these mCTs will induce CNS damage. To help overcome these concerns, in this study we created new double mutant CTs (dmCTs) that have two amino acid substitutions in the ADP-ribosyltransferase active center (E112K) and COOH-terminal KDEL (E112K/KDEV or E112K/KDGL). Confocal microscopic analysis showed that intracellular localization of dmCTs differed from that of mCTs and nCTs in intestinal epithelial T84 cells. Furthermore, both dmCTs exhibited very low toxicity in the Y1 cell assay and mouse ileal loop tests. When mucosal adjuvanticity was examined, both dmCTs induced enhanced OVA-specific immune responses in both mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, although both dmCT E112K/KDEV and dmCT E112K/KDGL showed high Th2-type and significant Th1-type cytokine responses by OVA-specific CD4+ T cells, dmCT E112K/KDEV exhibited significantly lower Th1-type cytokine responses than did nCT and dmCT E112K/KDGL. These results show that newly developed dmCTs retain strong biological adjuvant activity without CNS toxicity. PMID:16920941

  3. Nod2-mediated recognition of the microbiota is critical for mucosal adjuvant activity of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Yun-Gi; Seo, Sang-Uk; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Prescott, Dave; Philpott, Dana J; Rosenstiel, Philip; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-05-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is a potent adjuvant for inducing mucosal immune responses. However, the mechanism by which CT induces adjuvant activity remains unclear. Here we show that the microbiota is critical for inducing antigen-specific IgG production after intranasal immunization. After mucosal vaccination with CT, both antibiotic-treated and germ-free (GF) mice had reduced amounts of antigen-specific IgG, smaller recall-stimulated cytokine responses, impaired follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses and reduced numbers of plasma cells. Recognition of symbiotic bacteria via the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (Nod2) sensor in cells that express the integrin CD11c (encoded by Itgax) was required for the adjuvanticity of CT. Reconstitution of GF mice with a Nod2 agonist or monocolonization with Staphylococcus sciuri, which has high Nod2-stimulatory activity, was sufficient to promote robust CT adjuvant activity, whereas bacteria with low Nod2-stimulatory activity did not. Mechanistically, CT enhanced Nod2-mediated cytokine production in dendritic cells via intracellular cyclic AMP. These results show a role for the microbiota and the intracellular receptor Nod2 in promoting the mucosal adjuvant activity of CT. PMID:27064448

  4. Construction and preclinical evaluation of mmCT, a novel mutant cholera toxin adjuvant that can be efficiently produced in genetically manipulated Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Lebens, Michael; Terrinoni, Manuela; Karlsson, Stefan L; Larena, Maximilian; Gustafsson-Hedberg, Tobias; Källgård, Susanne; Nygren, Erik; Holmgren, Jan

    2016-04-19

    There is an urgent need for new adjuvants that are effective with mucosally administered vaccines. Cholera toxin (CT) is the most powerful known mucosal adjuvant but is much too toxic for human use. In an effort to develop a useful mucosal adjuvant we have generated a novel non-toxic mutant CT molecule that retains much of the adjuvant activity of native CT. This was achieved by making the enzymatically active A subunit (CTA) recalcitrant to the site-specific proteolytic cleavage ("nicking") required for toxicity, which was found to require mutations not only in the two residues rendering the molecule resistant to trypsin but also in neighboring sites protecting against cleavage by Vibrio cholerae proteases. This multiple-mutated CT (mmCT) adjuvant protein could be efficiently produced in and purified from the extracellular medium of CT-deleted V. cholerae. The mmCT completely lacked detectable enterotoxicity in an infant mouse model and had >1000-fold reduced cAMP inducing activity compared to native CT in a sensitive mammalian target cell system. It nonetheless proved to have potent adjuvant activity on mucosal and systemic antibody as well as cellular immune responses to mucosally co-administered antigens including oral cholera and intranasal influenza vaccines. We conclude that mmCT is an attractive novel non-toxic mucosal adjuvant for enhancing immune responses to co-administered mucosal vaccines. PMID:26973069

  5. Nasal Administration of Cholera Toxin as a Mucosal Adjuvant Damages the Olfactory System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Okada, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) induces severe diarrhea in humans but acts as an adjuvant to enhance immune responses to vaccines when administered orally. Nasally administered CT also acts as an adjuvant, but CT and CT derivatives, including the B subunit of CT (CTB), are taken up from the olfactory epithelium and transported to the olfactory bulbs and therefore may be toxic to the central nervous system. To assess the toxicity, we investigated whether nasally administered CT or CT derivatives impair the olfactory system. In mice, nasal administration of CT, but not CTB or a non-toxic CT derivative, reduced the expression of olfactory marker protein (OMP) in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs and impaired odor responses, as determined with behavioral tests and optical imaging. Thus, nasally administered CT, like orally administered CT, is toxic and damages the olfactory system in mice. However, CTB and a non-toxic CT derivative, do not damage the olfactory system. The optical imaging we used here will be useful for assessing the safety of nasal vaccines and adjuvants during their development for human use and CT can be used as a positive control in this test. PMID:26422280

  6. Cholera toxin B subunit acts as a potent systemic adjuvant for HIV-1 DNA vaccination intramuscularly in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Ying; Hsi, Jenny; Wang, Hongzhi; Tao, Ran; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was investigated as a classical mucosal adjuvant that can increase vaccine immunogenicity. In this study, we found out the in vitro efficacy of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in activating mice bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. In vitro RNA and transcriptional level profiling arrays revealed that CTB guides high levels of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Based on the robustness of these profiling results, we examined the induction of HIV Env-specific immunity by CTB co-inoculated with HIV Env DNA vaccine intramuscularly in vivo. CTB enhanced HIV-Env specific cellular immune responses in Env-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, compared with DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, CTB induced high levels of Env specific humoral response and promoted antibody maturation after the third round of vaccination. This combination immunization strategy induced a Th2-type bias response which is indicative of a high ratio of IgG1/IgG2a. This study reports that CTB as a classical mucosal adjuvant could enhance HIV-1 DNA-based vaccine immunogenicity intramuscularly; therefore, these findings suggest that CTB could serve as an effective candidate adjuvant for DNA vaccination. PMID:24633335

  7. Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit is a more potent mucosal adjuvant than its vlosely related homologue, the B subunit of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Millar, D G; Hirst, T R; Snider, D P

    2001-05-01

    Although cholera toxin (Ctx) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (Etx) are known to be potent mucosal adjuvants, it remains controversial whether the adjuvanticity of the holotoxins extends to their nontoxic, receptor-binding B subunits. Here, we have systematically evaluated the comparative adjuvant properties of highly purified recombinant EtxB and CtxB. EtxB was found to be a more potent adjuvant than CtxB, stimulating responses to hen egg lysozyme when the two were coadministered to mice intranasally, as assessed by enhanced serum and secretory antibody titers as well as by stimulation of lymphocyte proliferation in spleen and draining lymph nodes. These results indicate that, although structurally very similar, EtxB and CtxB have strikingly different immunostimulatory properties and should not be considered equivalent as prospective vaccine adjuvants. PMID:11292779

  8. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  9. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  10. Comparison of Intranasal Outer Membrane Vesicles with Cholera Toxin and Injected MF59C.1 as Adjuvants for Malaria Transmission Blocking Antigens AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45.

    PubMed

    Pritsch, Michael; Ben-Khaled, Najib; Chaloupka, Michael; Kobold, Sebastian; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Peter, Annabell; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Sören; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Purified protein vaccines often require adjuvants for efficient stimulation of immune responses. There is no licensed mucosal adjuvant on the market to adequately boost the immune response to purified antigens for intranasal applications in humans. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are attractive candidates potentially combining antigenic and adjuvant properties in one substance. To more precisely characterize the potential of Escherichia coli OMV for intranasal vaccination with heterologous antigens, immune responses for AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45 as well as ovalbumin as a reference antigen were assessed in mice. The intranasal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) and parenteral adjuvant MF59C.1 were used in comparison. Vaccinations were administered intranasally or subcutaneously. Antibodies (total IgG and IgM as well as subclasses IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured by ELISA. T cell responses (cytotoxic T cells, Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cells) were determined by flow cytometry. When OMV were used as adjuvant for intranasal immunization, antibody and cellular responses against all three antigens could be induced, comparable to cholera toxin and MF59C.1. Antigen-specific IgG titres above 1 : 10(5) could be detected in all groups. This study provides the rationale for further development of OMV as a vaccination strategy in malaria and other diseases. PMID:27239480

  11. Comparison of Intranasal Outer Membrane Vesicles with Cholera Toxin and Injected MF59C.1 as Adjuvants for Malaria Transmission Blocking Antigens AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45

    PubMed Central

    Pritsch, Michael; Ben-Khaled, Najib; Chaloupka, Michael; Kobold, Sebastian; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Peter, Annabell; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Sören; Hoelscher, Michael; Löscher, Thomas; Wieser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Purified protein vaccines often require adjuvants for efficient stimulation of immune responses. There is no licensed mucosal adjuvant on the market to adequately boost the immune response to purified antigens for intranasal applications in humans. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are attractive candidates potentially combining antigenic and adjuvant properties in one substance. To more precisely characterize the potential of Escherichia coli OMV for intranasal vaccination with heterologous antigens, immune responses for AnAPN1 and Pfs48/45 as well as ovalbumin as a reference antigen were assessed in mice. The intranasal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) and parenteral adjuvant MF59C.1 were used in comparison. Vaccinations were administered intranasally or subcutaneously. Antibodies (total IgG and IgM as well as subclasses IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3) were measured by ELISA. T cell responses (cytotoxic T cells, Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cells) were determined by flow cytometry. When OMV were used as adjuvant for intranasal immunization, antibody and cellular responses against all three antigens could be induced, comparable to cholera toxin and MF59C.1. Antigen-specific IgG titres above 1 : 105 could be detected in all groups. This study provides the rationale for further development of OMV as a vaccination strategy in malaria and other diseases. PMID:27239480

  12. Strong differential regulation of serum and mucosal IgA responses as revealed in CD28-deficient mice using cholera toxin adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gärdby, Eva; Wrammert, Jens; Schön, Karin; Ekman, Lena; Leanderson, Tomas; Lycke, Nils

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we show that costimulation required for mucosal IgA responses is strikingly different from that needed for systemic responses, including serum IgA. Following oral immunization with cholera toxin (CT) adjuvant we found that whereas CTLA4-H1 transgenic mice largely failed to respond, CD28-/- mice developed near normal gut mucosal IgA responses but poor serum Ab responses. The local IgA response was functional in that strong antitoxic protection developed in CT-immunized CD28-/- mice. This was in spite of the fact that no germinal centers (GC) were observed in the Peyer's patches, spleen, or other peripheral lymph nodes. Moreover, significant somatic hypermutation was found in isolated IgA plasma cells from gut lamina propria of CD28-/- mice. Thus, differentiation to functional gut mucosal IgA responses against T cell-dependent Ags does not require signaling through CD28 and can be independent of GC formations and isotype-switching in Peyer's patches. By contrast, serum IgA responses, similar to IgG-responses, are dependent on GC and CD28. However, both local and systemic responses are impaired in CTLA4-Hgamma1 transgenic mice, indicating that mucosal IgA responses are dependent on the B7-family ligands, but require signaling via CTLA4 or more likely a third related receptor. Therefore, T-B cell interactions leading to mucosal as opposed to serum IgA responses are uniquely regulated and appear to represent separate events. Although CT is known to strongly up-regulate B7-molecules, we have demonstrated that it acts as a potent mucosal adjuvant in the absence of CD28, suggesting that alternative costimulatory pathways are involved. PMID:12496383

  13. Cholera toxin - a foe & a friend.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Joaquin; Holmgren, Jan

    2011-02-01

    After De΄s pivotal demonstration in 1959 of a diarrhoeogenic exo-enterotoxin in cell-free culture filtrates from Vibrio cholerae (of classical biotype), much insight has been gained about cholera toxin (CT), which is arguably now the best known of all microbial toxins. The subunit structure and function of CT, its receptor (the GM1 ganglioside), and its effects on the cyclic AMP system and on intestinal secretion were defined in the 1970s, and the essential aspects of the genetic organization in the 1980s. Recent findings have generated additional perspectives. The 3D-crystal structure of CT has been established, the CT-encoding operon has been shown to be carried by a non-lytic bacteriophage, and in depth knowledge has been gained on how the bacterium controls CT gene expression in response to cell density and various environmental signals. The mode of entry into target cells and the intracellular transport of CT are becoming clearer. CT has become the prototype enterotoxin and a widely used tool for elucidating important aspects of cell biology and physiology, e.g., cell membrane receptors, the cyclic AMP system, G proteins, as well as normal and pathological ion transport mechanisms. In immunology, CT has emerged as a potent, widely used experimental adjuvant, and the strong oral-mucosal immunogenicity of the non-toxic B-subunit (CTB) has led to the use of CTB as a protective antigen together with killed vibrios in a widely licensed oral cholera vaccine. CTB has also been shown to promote immunological tolerance against certain types of mucosally co-administered antigens, preferably tissue antigens linked to the CTB molecule; this has stimulated research and development to use CTB in this context for treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases. In summary, in the 50 years after De΄s discovery of CT, this molecule has emerged from being the cholera patient΄s "foe" to also becoming a highly useful scientist΄s "friend". PMID:21415489

  14. Cholera toxin, and the related nontoxic adjuvants mmCT and dmLT, promote human Th17 responses via cyclic AMP-protein kinase A and inflammasome-dependent IL-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Larena, Maximilian; Holmgren, Jan; Lebens, Michael; Terrinoni, Manuela; Lundgren, Anna

    2015-04-15

    We have examined the molecular pathways involved in the adjuvant action of cholera toxin (CT) and two novel nontoxic molecules, multiple-mutated CT (mmCT) and double-mutant heat-labile toxin (dmLT) on human T cell responses. Human PBMCs or isolated monocytes were stimulated in vitro with CT, mmCT, or dmLT plus a polyclonal stimulus (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) or specific bacterial Ags, and effects on expression of cytokines and signaling molecules were determined. CT, mmCT, and dmLT strongly enhanced IL-17A and to a lesser extent IL-13 responses, but had little effect on IFN-γ production or cell proliferation. Intracellular cytokine staining revealed that the enhanced IL-17A production was largely confined to CD4(+) T cells and coculture experiments showed that the IL-17A promotion was effectively induced by adjuvant-treated monocytes. Relative to CT, mmCT and dmLT induced at least 100-fold lower levels of cAMP, yet this cAMP was enough and essential for the promotion of Th17 responses. Thus, inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A was abolished, and stimulation with a cAMP analog mimicked the adjuvant effect. Furthermore, CT, mmCT, and dmLT induced IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation in monocytes, which was associated with increased expression of key proinflammatory and inflammasome-related genes, including NLRP1, NLRP3, and NLRC4. Inflammasome inhibition with a specific caspase-1 inhibitor, or blocking of IL-1 signaling by IL-1 receptor antagonist, abrogated the Th17-promoting effect. We conclude that CT, mmCT, and dmLT promote human Th17 responses via cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and caspase-1/inflammasome-dependent IL-1 signaling. PMID:25786687

  15. B subunits of cholera toxin and thermolabile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli have similar adjuvant effect as whole molecules on rotavirus 2/6-VLP specific antibody responses and induce a Th17-like response after intrarectal immunization.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Fatou; Charpilienne, Annie; Poncet, Didier; Kohli, Evelyne; Basset, Christelle

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adjuvant effect of the B subunits of cholera toxin (CT) and the thermolabile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT) by the intrarectal route of immunization and compare them to the whole molecules CT and LT-R192G, a non toxic mutant of LT, using 2/6-VLP as an antigen, in mice. All molecules induced similar antigen specific antibody titers in serum and feces, whereas different T cell profiles were observed. CTB and LTB, conversely to CT and LT-R192G, did not induce detectable production of IL-2 by antigen specific T cells. Moreover, CTB, conversely to LT-R192G, CT and LTB, did not induce antigen specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3- and Foxp3+ T cells, thus showing different effects between the B subunits themselves. However, all molecules induced an antigen specific Th17 response. In conclusion, B subunits are potent adjuvants on B cell responses by the intrarectal route. Although their impact on T cell responses are different, all molecules induce a 2/6-VLP-specific Th17 T cell response that may play a major role in helping B cell responses and thus in adjuvanticity and protection. PMID:26318874

  16. Actions of cholera toxin and the prevention and treatment of cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Jan

    1981-07-01

    The drastic intestinal secretion of fluid and electrolytes that is characteristic of cholera is the result of reasonably well understood cellular and biochemical actions of the toxin secreted by Vibrio cholerae. Based on this understanding it is possible to devise new techniques for the treatment and prophylaxis of cholera to complement those based on fluid replacement therapy and sanitation.

  17. Cholera toxin interactions with lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, M T; Tosteson, D C; Rubnitz, J

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to assess the binding of cholera toxin to bilayers containing its receptor, the monosialoganglioside, GMl. The assay was based on the fact that GMl confers on the bilayer a negative surface charge. The magnitude of this surface charge was estimated by measuring the electrical conductance (G) of the bilayers exposed to nonactin-K+ under conditions where G is directly proportional to the potassium concentration in the aqueous solutions immediatey adjacent to the membrane surface. When bilayers were formed from mixtures of GMl and glycerolmonooleate (GMO), it was found that the molar ratio of the lipids in the bilayer was the same as that in the membrane forming solution. It was further found that cholera toxin or the binding subunit of the toxin (choleragenoid) bind to GMO bilayers containing GMl (but not to GMO bilayers containing phosphatidyl serine or disialoganglioside GDla). The value of the apparent dissociation constant for the binding of choleragen to its receptor was found to be 10(-11) M, comparable to values found in intact cells. PMID:6933823

  18. Persistent Suppression of Type 1 Diabetes by a Multicomponent Vaccine Containing a Cholera Toxin B Subunit-Autoantigen Fusion Protein and Complete Freund's Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Béla; Fodor, István; Langridge, William H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Data presented here demonstrate multifunctional vaccination strategies that harness vaccinia virus mediated delivery of a gene encoding an immunoenhanced diabetes autoantigen in combination with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) that can maintain safe and durable immunologic homeostasis in NOD mice. Systemic coinoculation of prediabetic mice with recombinant vaccinia virus rVV-CTB::GAD and undiluted or 10-fold diluted CFA demonstrated a significant decrease in hyperglycemia and pancreatic islet inflammation in comparison with control animals during 17–61 and 17–105 weeks of age, respectively. Synergy in these beneficial effects was observed during 43–61 and 61–105 wks of age, respectively. Inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in GAD-stimulated splenocytes isolated from vaccinated mice were generally lower than those detected in unvaccinated mice. The overall health and humoral immune responses of the vaccinated animals remained normal throughout the duration of the experiments. PMID:24319466

  19. Cholera Toxin and Cell Growth: Role of Membrane Gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fishman, Peter H.; Bennett, Vann; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1974-01-01

    The binding of cholera toxin to three transformed mouse cell lines derived from the same parent strain, and the effects of the toxin on DNA synthesis and adenylate cyclase activity, vary in parallel with the ganglioside composition of the cells. TAL/N cells of early passage, which contain large quantities of gangliosides GM3, GM2, GM1, and GDla, as well as the glycosyltransferases necessary for the synthesis of these gangliosides, bind the most cholera toxin and are the most sensitive to its action. TAL/N cells of later passage, which lack chemically detectable GM1 and GDla and which have no UDP-Gal:GM2 galactosyltransferase activity, are intermediate in binding and response to the toxin. SVS AL/N cells, which lack GM2 in addition to GM1 and GDla and which have little detectable UDP-GalNAc:GM3N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity, bind the least amount of toxin. The SVS AL/N cells are the least responsive to inhibition of DNA synthesis and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin. Gangliosides (especially GM1), which appear to be the natural membrane receptors for cholera toxin, may normally have important roles in the regulation of cell growth and cAMP-mediated responses. PMID:4530298

  20. Isolation of isoelectrically pure cholera toxin for crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Brenda D.; Westbrook, Edwin M.

    1991-03-01

    We have determined that the failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well results from its isoelectric heterogeneity, which is probably due to a post-translational process such as deamidation of its B subunit. Every sample of cholera toxin we have examined from commercial or academic suppliers has been heterogeneous; heterogeneous cholera toxin does not crystallize satisfactorily. We have overcome this problem by using ion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) to obtain an isoelectrically homogeneous species of cholera toxin. Homogeneous cholera toxin crystallizes readily, forming single, nonmosaic crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. For this process, protein was applied to a MonoQ ion-exchange column, then eluted with an isocratic low salt buffer followed by a linear salt gradient (0-100 mM NaCl). Column fractions were analyzed on isoelectric focusing gels, and those fractions containing the desired homogeneous species were pooled and concentrated. Crystals formed within 24 to 48 h in a MOPS/PEG buffer, which made use of slow isoelectric precipitation to induce crystallization.

  1. Cholera toxin effects on body temperature changes induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Basilico, L; Parenti, M; Fumagalli, A; Parolaro, D; Giagnoni, G

    1997-03-01

    The present study evaluates the influence of cholera toxin and its B-subunit on thermic responses to morphine in the rats. The holotoxin (1 microg/rat) and the B-subunit (5 microg) were administered ICV and three days later rats were challenged ICV with morphine and tested for changes of body temperature. Cholera toxin, but not its B-subunit, modified the time course of the hyperthermic response induced by a low dose of morphine (2.5 microg), converted the hypothermia due to a higher dose of morphine (18 microg) to a consistent hyperthermia and only partially reduced the greater hypothermia induced by 36 microg of morphine. Cholera toxin-induced modifications of thermic responses to morphine were paralleled with a decreased Gs(alpha) immunoreactivity and a reduced ability for the toxin to catalyse the "in vitro" ADP-ribosylation of Gs(alpha) in hypothalamic membranes. In contrast, at the same time when morphine-induced effects on body temperature were assessed, no changes in pertussis toxin-mediated ADP-ribosylation of Gi(alpha)/Go(alpha), or basal adenylate cyclase activity, or binding of mu-opioid receptor selective ligand [3H]-DAMGO were observed in hypothalamic areas from rats treated with cholera toxin. These findings suggest that adaptative events secondary to prolonged activation of Gs(alpha) play a role in the modifications of thermic responses to morphine induced by CTX. PMID:9077589

  2. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baldauf, Keegan J.; Royal, Joshua M.; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT), which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA) and the B subunit (CTB). CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction. PMID:25802972

  3. Cholera toxin-like toxin released by Salmonella species in the presence of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Molina, N C; Peterson, J W

    1980-10-01

    Several serotypes of Salmonella were shown to release increased amounts of a cholera toxin-like toxin during culture in vitro with mitomycin C (MTC). Filter-sterilized culture supernatants containing the toxin caused elongation of Chinese hamster ovary cells, which could be blocked by heating the supernatants at 100 degrees C for 15 min or by adding mixed gangliosides or monospecific cholera antitoxin. When MTC was not added to the Salmonella cultures, little or no toxin was detected in crude, unconcentrated culture supernatants. Optimal production of toxin was observed in the presence of 0.5 micrograms of MTC per ml in shake flask cultures of Casamino Acids-yeast extract medium, Syncase, or peptone saline at 37 degrees C. Meat infusion media (heart infusion and brain heart infusion) plus MTC resulted in poor toxin yield. Culture filtrates frequently could be diluted 1:8 and still result in elongation of Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:7002788

  4. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  5. Synthetic multivalent ligands for cholera & cholera-like toxins: Protected cyclic neoglycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vajinder; Yadav, Narender; Kartha, K P Ravindranathan

    2016-08-01

    Synthesis of a set of novel glycopeptide analogues as potential cholera/cholera-like toxin inhibitors in their protected form is described. They include di-, tri-, tetra- and pentavalent scaffolds. The synthetic steps were achieved using a combination of solvent-free mechanochemical as well as the conventional solution-phase reactions. During the conventional DIC-HOBt-mediated peptide coupling followed for the preparation of certain glycopeptide analogues an interesting in situ Fmoc deprotection was observed which has been demonstrated to hold potential for synthesiszing glycopeptides/neoglycopeptides with extended polyamide chains. PMID:27309341

  6. Functional Characterization of Cholera Toxin Inhibitors Using Human Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Pukin, Aliaksei V; Fu, Ou; Quarles van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Pieters, Roland J

    2016-07-28

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of IC50 values over a wide range of potencies (15 pM to 9 mM). The results indicate for the first time that an organoid-based swelling assay is a useful preclinical method to evaluate inhibitor potencies of drugs that target pathogen-derived toxins. PMID:27347611

  7. Role of Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase in the function of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Galen, J E; Ketley, J M; Fasano, A; Richardson, S H; Wasserman, S S; Kaper, J B

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NANase) is hypothesized to act synergistically with cholera toxin (CT) and increase the severity of a secretory response by increasing the binding and penetration of CT to enterocytes. To test this hypothesis, the NANase gene (nanH) from V. cholerae Ogawa 395 was first cloned and sequenced. Isogenic wild-type and NANase- V. cholerae 395 strains were then constructed by using suicide vector-mediated mutagenesis. The influence of NANase on CT binding and penetration was examined in vitro by using culture filtrates from these isogenic strains. Fluorescence due to binding of fluorescein-conjugated CT to C57BL/6 and C3H mouse fibroblasts exposed to NANase+ filtrates increased five- and eightfold, respectively, relative to that with NANase- filtrates. In addition, NANase+ filtrates increased the short-circuit current measured in Ussing chambers 65% relative to that with NANase- filtrates, although this difference decreased as production of CT increased. The role of NANase in V. cholerae pathogenesis was examined in vivo by intragastric inoculation of the isogenic strains into CD1 suckling mice. No difference in fluid accumulation ratios was seen at doses of 10(4) to 10(8) CFU, but NANase+ strains produced 18% higher fluid accumulation ratios at 10(9) CFU than NANase- strains when inoculated into nonfasted suckling mice. It is concluded that NANase plays a subtle but significant role in the binding and uptake of CT by susceptible cells under defined conditions. Images PMID:1730470

  8. Cholera Toxin Subunit B as Adjuvant––An Accelerator in Protective Immunity and a Break in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) is the nontoxic portion of cholera toxin. Its affinity to the monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) that is broadly distributed in a variety of cell types including epithelial cells of the gut and antigen presenting cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells, allows its optimal access to the immune system. CTB can easily be expressed on its own in a variety of organisms, and several approaches can be used to couple it to antigens, either by genetic fusion or by chemical manipulation, leading to strongly enhanced immune responses to the antigens. In autoimmune diseases, CTB has the capacity to evoke regulatory responses and to thereby dampen autoimmune responses, in several but not all animal models. It remains to be seen whether the latter approach translates to success in the clinic, however, the versatility of CTB to manipulate immune responses in either direction makes this protein a promising adjuvant for vaccine development. PMID:26350596

  9. Local and systemic antibody responses to dextran-cholera toxin B subunit conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist, C; Lagergård, T; Lindblad, M; Holmgren, J

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test local and systemic immunity following mucosal immunization with a polysaccharide-protein conjugate. After preparing and characterizing dextran-cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) conjugates, we studied their immunogenicity in mice following systemic or mucosal immunizations. Dextran was chosen as a model polysaccharide antigen and conjugated via adipic acid dihydrazide and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate to CTB. Mice were immunized either subcutaneously, intranasally, or perorally three times, and cholera toxin was used as an adjuvant for the mucosal immunizations. Three conjugates with different molecular weights for dextran (40,000 and 76,000) or varying dextran/CTB molar ratios were tested. Peroral immunizations with all conjugates evoked local immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses against dextran in the small intestine, and intranasal immunizations did the same in the lung. Intranasal immunizations also elicited serum antibody titers that were significantly higher than or equal to those after subcutaneous immunizations. Intranasal immunizations evoked serum IgG antidextran titers which were dependent on the dextran/CTB molar ratio and inversely related to the local IgA response, which was not the case for subcutaneous immunizations. This is the first study of local and systemic immunity following mucosal immunization with a polysaccharide-protein conjugate. The results show that it is possible to evoke a local as well as a systemic antibody response against a polysaccharide by conjugating it to CTB and using an appropriate route of immunization. PMID:7537252

  10. Local and systemic antibody responses to dextran-cholera toxin B subunit conjugates.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, C; Lagergård, T; Lindblad, M; Holmgren, J

    1995-05-01

    This study was designed to test local and systemic immunity following mucosal immunization with a polysaccharide-protein conjugate. After preparing and characterizing dextran-cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) conjugates, we studied their immunogenicity in mice following systemic or mucosal immunizations. Dextran was chosen as a model polysaccharide antigen and conjugated via adipic acid dihydrazide and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate to CTB. Mice were immunized either subcutaneously, intranasally, or perorally three times, and cholera toxin was used as an adjuvant for the mucosal immunizations. Three conjugates with different molecular weights for dextran (40,000 and 76,000) or varying dextran/CTB molar ratios were tested. Peroral immunizations with all conjugates evoked local immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses against dextran in the small intestine, and intranasal immunizations did the same in the lung. Intranasal immunizations also elicited serum antibody titers that were significantly higher than or equal to those after subcutaneous immunizations. Intranasal immunizations evoked serum IgG antidextran titers which were dependent on the dextran/CTB molar ratio and inversely related to the local IgA response, which was not the case for subcutaneous immunizations. This is the first study of local and systemic immunity following mucosal immunization with a polysaccharide-protein conjugate. The results show that it is possible to evoke a local as well as a systemic antibody response against a polysaccharide by conjugating it to CTB and using an appropriate route of immunization. PMID:7537252

  11. The Effects of Cholera Toxin on Cellular Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Rachel M.; McKenzie, Jennifer R.; Kraft, Lewis; Kozlov, Eugene; Wikswo, John P.; Cliffel, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Multianalyte microphysiometry, a real-time instrument for simultaneous measurement of metabolic analytes in a microfluidic environment, was used to explore the effects of cholera toxin (CTx). Upon exposure of CTx to PC-12 cells, anaerobic respiration was triggered, measured as increases in acid and lactate production and a decrease in the oxygen uptake. We believe the responses observed are due to a CTx-induced activation of adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP production and resulting in a switch to anaerobic respiration. Inhibitors (H-89, brefeldin A) and stimulators (forskolin) of cAMP were employed to modulate the CTx-induced cAMP responses. The results of this study show the utility of multianalyte microphysiometry to quantitatively determine the dynamic metabolic effects of toxins and affected pathways. PMID:22069603

  12. Construction and characterization of recombinant Vibrio cholerae strains producing inactive cholera toxin analogs.

    PubMed

    Häse, C C; Thai, L S; Boesman-Finkelstein, M; Mar, V L; Burnette, W N; Kaslow, H R; Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Finkelstein, R A

    1994-08-01

    The catalytic A subunit of cholera toxin (CT-A) is capable of ADP-ribosylating the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which regulates cell adenylyl cyclase, leading to the life-threatening diarrhea of cholera. Amino acids involved in the enzymatic activity of CT-A have previously been identified. By means of site-directed mutagenesis, an analog of the CT-A subunit gene was created with codon substitutions for both Arg-7 and Glu-112, each of which has been shown to produce subunits lacking ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The mutated gene fragment was exchanged for the wild-type copy in the previously cloned ctxAB operon from El Tor biotype, Ogawa serotype Vibrio cholerae strain 3083, which produces CT-2. Further, the zonula occludens toxin gene, zot, was inactivated by an insertional mutation to create the new plasmid construct pCT-2*. Additionally, a DNA fragment encoding the B subunit of CT-1 (CT produced by classical biotype, Inaba serotype V. cholerae strain 569B) was exchanged for the homologous part in pCT-2*, resulting in the creation of pCT-1*. These plasmid constructs were introduced into the CT-negative V. cholerae mutant strain JBK70 (E1 Tor biotype, Inaba serotype); CT-A-B+ derivatives CVD101 and CVD103 of classical biotype Ogawa and Inaba serotype strains 395 and 569B, respectively; El Tor biotype Inaba and Ogawa serotype strains C6706 and C7258, respectively, recently isolated in Peru; and O139 (synonym Bengal) strain SG25-1 from the current epidemic in India. Recombinant toxins (CT-1* and CT-2*), partially purified from culture supernatants of transformed JBK70, were shown to be inactive on mouse Y1 adrenal tumor cells and in an in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase assay. CT-1* and CT-2* reacted with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against both A and B subunits of CT. The toxin analogs reacted with antibodies against CT-A and CT-B on cellulose acetate strips and in a GM1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; they reacted appropriately with B

  13. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously. PMID:26735874

  14. Induction of Cell Signaling Events by the Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Antigen-Presenting Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Aletta C.; Burke, Jennifer M.; Wetzler, Lee M.

    2007-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is one of the most effective and widely studied mucosal adjuvants. Although the ADP-ribosylating A subunit has been implicated in augmenting immune responses, the receptor-binding B subunit (CT-B) has greater immunogenicity and may be a repository of adjuvant activity without potential toxicity. In order to elucidate mechanisms of immune modulation by CT-B alone, primary B cells and macrophages were assessed for responses to CT-B in vitro, as measured by the expression of cell surface markers, cellular signaling events, and cytokine secretion. Increased phosphorylation of multiple signaling molecules, including Erk1/2 and p38, was detected. CT-B also induced transactivation of the transcription elements cyclic AMP-responsive element and NF-κB, the latter of which was inhibited by phosphotyrosine inhibition. While specific inhibition of MEK1/2 did not reduce CT-B induction of cell surface marker expression, it did attenuate CT-B-mediated interleukin-6 secretion. These data show that CT-B induces a set of signaling events related to cellular activation, surface molecule expression, and cytokine production that has potential implications for elucidating CT-B adjuvant activity in the absence of enzymatically active holotoxin. PMID:17353279

  15. Detection of Antibodies to Toxin-Coregulated Pili in Sera from Cholera Patients

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Stephen R.; Wallerström, Gun; Qadri, Firdausi; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared against toxin-coregulated pili (TCP) isolated from Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor. Despite their limited bactericidal potential, two MAbs were able to mediate biotype-specific protection against experimental cholera in infant mice. These MAbs were used in immunoblotting studies to assess seroconversion to El Tor TCP following cholera. Clear anti-pilus responses were observed in five of nine patients. PMID:14977996

  16. Fucosylation and protein glycosylation create functional receptors for cholera toxin

    PubMed Central

    Wands, Amberlyn M; Fujita, Akiko; McCombs, Janet E; Cervin, Jakob; Dedic, Benjamin; Rodriguez, Andrea C; Nischan, Nicole; Bond, Michelle R; Mettlen, Marcel; Trudgian, David C; Lemoff, Andrew; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Gustavsson, Bengt; Steentoft, Catharina; Clausen, Henrik; Mirzaei, Hamid; Teneberg, Susann; Yrlid, Ulf; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) enters and intoxicates host cells after binding cell surface receptors using its B subunit (CTB). The ganglioside (glycolipid) GM1 is thought to be the sole CT receptor; however, the mechanism by which CTB binding to GM1 mediates internalization of CT remains enigmatic. Here we report that CTB binds cell surface glycoproteins. Relative contributions of gangliosides and glycoproteins to CTB binding depend on cell type, and CTB binds primarily to glycoproteins in colonic epithelial cell lines. Using a metabolically incorporated photocrosslinking sugar, we identified one CTB-binding glycoprotein and demonstrated that the glycan portion of the molecule, not the protein, provides the CTB interaction motif. We further show that fucosylated structures promote CTB entry into a colonic epithelial cell line and subsequent host cell intoxication. CTB-binding fucosylated glycoproteins are present in normal human intestinal epithelia and could play a role in cholera. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09545.001 PMID:26512888

  17. Intranasal immunogenicity and adjuvanticity of site-directed mutant derivatives of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Douce, G; Fontana, M; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Dougan, G

    1997-07-01

    Genetically modified derivatives of cholera toxin (CT), harboring a single amino acid substitution in and around the NAD binding cleft of the A subunit, were isolated following site-directed mutagenesis of the ctxA gene. Two mutants of CT, designated CTS106 (with a proline-to-serine change at position 106) and CTK63 (with a serine-to-lysine change at position 63), were found to have substantially reduced ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity; CTK63 was completely nontoxic in all assays, whereas CTS106 was 10(4) times less toxic than wild-type CT. The mucosal adjuvanticity and immunogenicity of derivatives of CT were assessed by intranasal immunization of mice, with either ovalbumin or fragment C of tetanus toxin as a bystander antigen. Mice immunized with wild-type CT produced both local (immunoglobulin A in mucosal washes) and systemic immune responses to both CT and bystander antigens. CTS106 showed good local and systemic responses to bystander proteins and to itself. Interestingly, mice immunized with the nontoxic derivative of CT, CTK63, generated weak immune responses to the bystander antigens which were similar to those achieved when CT B subunit was used as an adjuvant. In parallel experiments, an equivalent nontoxic mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LTK63 (with a serine-to-lysine change at position 63), was tested (9). In contrast to CTK63, LTK63 was found to be more immunogenic and a better intranasal adjuvant than recombinant heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit or CTK63. This information, together with data on immunoglobulin subclass responses, suggests that although highly homologous, CT and heat-labile enterotoxin should not be considered biologically identical in terms of their ability to act as intranasal adjuvants. PMID:9199455

  18. Promotion of colonization and virulence by cholera toxin is dependent on neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Queen, Jessica; Satchell, Karla J F

    2013-09-01

    The innate immune response to Vibrio cholerae infection is poorly understood, but this knowledge is critical for the design of safe, effective vaccines. Using an adult mouse intestinal infection model, this study examines the contribution of neutrophils to host immunity, as well as the effect of cholera toxin and other secreted factors on this response. Depletion of neutrophils from mice with anti-Ly6G IA8 monoclonal antibody led to similar survival rates of mice infected with low or moderate doses of toxigenic V. cholerae El Tor O1. At a high dose, neutropenic mice showed increased rates of survival compared to neutrophil-replete animals. Expression of cholera toxin was found to be protective to the neutropenic host, and this phenotype can be replicated by the administration of purified toxin. Neutrophils do not effectively clear colonizing bacteria from the small intestine, nor do they alter induction of early immune-modulating signals. In both neutropenic and neutrophil-replete animals, the local response to infection is characterized by expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 alpha (MIP-2). Overall, these data indicate that the innate immune response to toxigenic V. cholerae infection differs dramatically from the host response to nontoxigenic infection or vaccination, where neutrophils are protective to the host. In the absence of neutrophils, cholera toxin induces immunomodulatory effects that increase host survival. In cholera toxin-producing strains, similar to nontoxigenic infection, accessory toxins are critical to virulence, indicating that cholera toxin and the other secreted toxins modulate the host response by different mechanisms, with both contributing to bacterial persistence and virulence. PMID:23798539

  19. Reinitiation of Growth in Senescent Mouse Mammary Epithelium in Response to Cholera Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Charles W.; Silberstein, Gary B.; Strickland, Phyllis

    1984-06-01

    Several lines of mouse mammary tissue that had been serially transplanted until mitotic senescence was reached were exposed in vivo to plastic implants that slowly released cholera toxin. Gland tissue surrounding the implants displayed new end buds, indicating reinitiation of growth and morphogenesis. The ability of cholera toxin, which elevates intracellular adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, to temporarily reverse the senescent phenotype suggests that this mitotic dysfunction results not from generalized cellular deterioration but from specific changes in cell regulation.

  20. A Vibrio cholerae ghost-based subunit vaccine induces cross-protective chlamydial immunity that is enhanced by CTA2B, the nontoxic derivative of cholera toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ekong, Eno E.; Okenu, Daniel N.; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti; He, Qing; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.; Lyn, Deborah; Black, Carolyn; Eko, Francis O.

    2011-01-01

    The Vibrio cholerae ghost (rVCG) platform is an effective carrier and delivery system for designing efficacious Chlamydia vaccines. We investigated whether CTA2B, the nontoxic derivative of cholera toxin, can augment protective immunity conferred by an rVCG-based chlamydial vaccine and enhance cross-protection against heterologous chlamydial strains. An rVCG vaccine coexpressing chlamydial major outer membrane protein and CTA2B was genetically constructed and antigens were targeted to the inner membrane of V. cholerae before ghost production by gene E-mediated lysis. Effective immunomodulation by CTA2B was demonstrated by the ability of the vaccine construct to enhance the activation and maturation of dendritic cells in vitro. Also, C57BL/6 mice immunized via mucosal and systemic routes showed increased specific mucosal and systemic antibody and T-helper type-1 (Th1) responses, irrespective of the route. The enhanced production of IFN-γ, but not IL-4 by genital mucosal and splenic T cells, indicated a predominantly Th1 response. Clearance of the Chlamydia muridarum vaginal infection was significantly enhanced by codelivery of the vaccine with CTA2B, with the intravaginal route showing a moderate advantage. These results indicate that the rVCG-based vaccine is capable of inducing cross-protection against heterologous chlamydial serovars and that incorporation of mucosal adjuvants, such as CTA2B in the rVCG delivery platform, may enhance protective immunity. PMID:19040663

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated in Nepal by southern hybridization with a cholera toxin gene probe.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Shrestha, J; Iida, T; Yoh, M; Honda, T

    1995-06-01

    A cholera epidemic broke out in 1992 due to Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in the eastern and southern belt of Nepal mainly among the Bhutanese refugees. Restriction fragment profiles (RFP) of DNA fragments of V. cholerae O1 isolates hybridized with an enzyme-labelled oligonucleotide probe for cholera toxin gene (ctx) by Southern Hybridization were compared. The probe hybridized with the 13- and 8-kb fragments of PstI-digested total DNA in all isolates observed in the epidemic. This RFP in the Nepalese strain was not observed in the strains isolated during other epidemics but was observed in the strains isolated from the exported marine products from Taiwan and Thailand. PMID:7594311

  2. Alga-produced cholera toxin-Pfs25 fusion proteins as oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Topol, Aaron B; Doerner, David Z; Mayfield, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Infectious diseases disproportionately affect indigent regions and are the greatest cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. Practical, low-cost vaccines for use in these countries are paramount to reducing disease burdens and concomitant poverty. Algae are a promising low-cost system for producing vaccines that can be orally delivered, thereby avoiding expensive purification and injectable delivery. We engineered the chloroplast of the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce a chimeric protein consisting of the 25-kDa Plasmodium falciparum surface protein (Pfs25) fused to the β subunit of the cholera toxin (CtxB) to investigate an alga-based whole-cell oral vaccine. Pfs25 is a promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidate that has been difficult to produce in traditional recombinant systems due to its structurally complex tandem repeats of epidermal growth factor-like domains. The noncatalytic CtxB domain of the cholera holotoxin assembles into a pentameric structure and acts as a mucosal adjuvant by binding GM1 ganglioside receptors on gut epithelial cells. We demonstrate that CtxB-Pfs25 accumulates as a soluble, properly folded and functional protein within algal chloroplasts, and it is stable in freeze-dried alga cells at ambient temperatures. In mice, oral vaccination using freeze-dried algae that produce CtxB-Pfs25 elicited CtxB-specific serum IgG antibodies and both CtxB- and Pfs25-specific secretory IgA antibodies. These data suggest that algae are a promising system for production and oral delivery of vaccine antigens, but as an orally delivered adjuvant, CtxB is best suited for eliciting secretory IgA antibodies for vaccine antigens against pathogens that invade mucosal surfaces using this strategy. PMID:23603678

  3. A capacitive immunosensor for detection of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Labib, Mahmoud; Hedström, Martin; Amin, Magdy; Mattiasson, Bo

    2009-02-23

    Contamination of food with biological toxins as well as their potential use as weapons of mass destruction has created an urge for rapid and cost effective analytical techniques capable of detecting trace amounts of these toxins. This paper describes the development of a sensitive method for detection of cholera toxin (CT) using a flow-injection capacitive immunosensor based on self-assembled monolayers. The sensing surface consists of monoclonal antibodies against the B subunit of CT (anti-CT), immobilized on a gold transducer. Experimental results show that the immunosensor responded linearly to CT concentrations in the range from 1.0x10(-13) to 1.0x10(-10) M under optimized conditions. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.0x10(-14) M. Two more analytical methods were employed for detection of CT using the same antibody namely, sandwich ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based immunosensor. The former had an LOD of 1.2x10(-12) M and a working range from 3.7x10(-11) to 2.9x10(-10) M whereas, the later had an LOD of 1.0x10(-11) M and a linearity ranging from 1.0x10(-9) to 1.0x10(-6) M. These results demonstrate that the developed capacitive immunosensor system has a higher sensitivity than the other two techniques. The binding affinity of CT to the immobilized anti-CT was determined using the SPR-based immunosensor and an association constant (K(A)) of 1.4x10(9) M(-1) was estimated. PMID:19185129

  4. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  5. Blood Group O-Dependent Cellular Responses to Cholera Toxin: Parallel Clinical and Epidemiological Links to Severe Cholera.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Santhanam, Srikanth; Kumar, Pardeep; Luo, Qingwei; Ciorba, Matthew A; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-08-01

    Because O blood group has been associated with more severe cholera infections, it has been hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) may bind non-O blood group antigens of the intestinal mucosae, thereby preventing efficient interaction with target GM1 gangliosides required for uptake of the toxin and activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in target epithelia. Herein, we show that after exposure to CT, human enteroids expressing O blood group exhibited marked increase in cAMP relative to cells derived from blood group A individuals. Likewise, using CRISPR/Cas9 engineering, a functional group O line (HT-29-A(-/-)) was generated from a parent group A HT-29 line. CT stimulated robust cAMP responses in HT-29-A(-/-) cells relative to HT-29 cells. These findings provide a direct molecular link between blood group O expression and differential cellular responses to CT, recapitulating clinical and epidemiologic observations. PMID:27162272

  6. Cholera toxin treatment stimulates tumorigenicity of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, M M; Roth, C; Vlahakis, G; Pastan, I

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus form tumors poorly in nude mice. Tumorigenicity was markedly stimulated by pretreatment of the cells with cholera toxin, which raises cyclic AMP levels and activates cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Increased tumorigenicity was manifested by a severalfold increase in the rate of tumor formation, as well as earlier appearance and more rapid growth of tumors. In contrast, spontaneously transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells showed decreased tumorigenicity after cholera toxin treatment. The activation of tumorigenic potential in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells by cholera toxin correlated with increased phosphorylation of the viral oncogene product pp60src and stimulation of its tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:6098816

  7. Single-mode tapered optical fiber loop immunosensor II: assay of anti-cholera toxin immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Robert S.; Hale, Zoe M.; Levine, Myron M.; Lowe, C. R.; Payne, Frank P.

    1994-07-01

    An evanescent wave immunoassay for cholera antitoxin immunoglobulins was performed using a single mode tapered optical fiber loop sensor. The transducer was silanized with 3- glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and chemically modified to link covalently either cholera toxin B subunit or a synthetic peptide derived from it, CTP3. The sensor was exposed to seral fluids, obtained from human volunteers having been exposed to live virulent Vibrio cholerae 01 and shown to produce rice-water stools. Other toxins of interest, such as Clostridium botulinum toxin A, have been tested on similar systems. The bound unlabelled immunoglobulins were then exposed to a mixture of FITC-anti-IgG and TRITC-anti-IgA, without requirement for a separation step. The emanating fluorescent emissions of fluorescein and rhodamine, excited by the input laser light, were coupled back into the guided mode of the tapered fiber, and used to determine the concentrations of the complementary antigens.

  8. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  9. Cholera toxin B suppresses allergic inflammation through induction of secretory IgA.

    PubMed

    Smits, H H; Gloudemans, A K; van Nimwegen, M; Willart, M A; Soullié, T; Muskens, F; de Jong, E C; Boon, L; Pilette, C; Johansen, F-E; Hoogsteden, H C; Hammad, H; Lambrecht, B N

    2009-07-01

    In healthy individuals, humoral immune responses to allergens consist of serum IgA and IgG4, whereas cellular immune responses are controlled by regulatory T (Treg) cells. In search of new compounds that might prevent the onset of allergies by stimulating this type of immune response, we have focused on the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin B (CTB), as it induces the formation of Treg cells and production of IgA. Here, we have found that CTB suppresses the potential of dendritic cells to prime for Th2 responses to inhaled allergen. When we administered CTB to the airways of naïve and allergic mice, it strongly suppressed the salient features of asthma, such as airway eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine synthesis, and bronchial hyperreactivity. This beneficial effect was only transferable to other mice by transfer of B but not of T lymphocytes. CTB caused a transforming growth factor-beta-dependent rise in antigen-specific IgA in the airway luminal secretions, which was necessary for its preventive and curative effect, as all effects of CTB were abrogated in mice lacking the luminal IgA transporting polymeric Ig receptor. Not only do these findings show a novel therapeutic avenue for allergy, they also help to explain the complex relationship between IgA levels and risk of developing allergy in humans. PMID:19404246

  10. Conformational Instability of the Cholera Toxin A1 Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Abhay H.; Scaglione, Patricia; Taylor, Michael; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Tuthill, Summer; Moe, David; Holmes, Randall K.; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cholera toxin (CT) moves from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by vesicular transport. In the ER, the catalytic CTA1 subunit dissociates from the holotoxin and enters the cytosol by exploiting the quality control system of ER-associated degradation (ERAD). It is hypothesized that CTA1 triggers its ERAD-mediated translocation into the cytosol by masquerading as a misfolded protein, but the process by which CTA1 activates the ERAD system remains unknown. Here, we directly assess the thermal stability of the isolated CTA1 polypeptide by biophysical and biochemical methods and correlate its temperature-dependent conformational state with susceptibility to degradation by the 20S proteasome. Measurements with circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that CTA1 is a thermally unstable protein with a disordered tertiary structure and a disturbed secondary structure at 37°C. A protease sensitivity assay likewise detected the temperature-induced loss of native CTA1 structure. This protease-sensitive conformation was not apparent when CTA1 remained covalently associated with the CTA2 subunit. Thermal instability in the dissociated CTA1 polypeptide could thus allow it to appear as a misfolded protein for ERAD-mediated export to the cytosol. In vitro, the disturbed conformation of CTA1 at 37°C rendered it susceptible to ubiquitin-independent degradation by the core 20S proteasome. In vivo, CTA1 was also susceptible to degradation by a ubiquitin-independent proteasomal mechanism. ADP-ribosylation factor 6, a cytosolic eukaryotic protein that enhances the enzymatic activity of CTA1, stabilized the heat-labile conformation of CTA1 and protected it from in vitro degradation by the 20S proteasome. Thermal instability in the reduced CTA1 polypeptide has not been reported before, yet both the translocation and degradation of CTA1 may depend upon this physical property. PMID:17976649

  11. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholerae. This same bacterium is also present in raw seafood, particularly shellfish. The best way to avoid ... contaminated with feces containing V. cholerae By eating raw shellfish contaminated with V. cholerae Who's At Risk ...

  12. Mechanism of cholera toxin activation by a guanine nucleotide-dependent 19 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1990-05-16

    Cholera toxin causes the devastating diarrheal syndrome characteristic of cholera by catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, a GTP-binding regulatory protein, resulting in activation of adenylyl cyclase. ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha is enhanced by 19 kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. We investigated the effects of agents known to alter toxin-catalyzed activation of adenylyl cyclase on the stimulation of toxin- and toxin subunit-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha and other substrates by an ADP-ribosylation factor purified from a soluble fraction of bovine brain (sARF II). In the presence of GTP, sARF II enhanced activity of both the toxin catalytic unit and a reduced and alkylated fragment ('A1'), as a result of an increase in substrate affinity with no significant effects on Vmax. Activation of toxin was independent of Gs alpha and was stimulated 4-fold by sodium dodecyl sulfate, but abolished by Triton X-100. sARF II therefore serves as a direct allosteric activator of the A1 protein and may thus amplify the pathological effects of cholera toxin. PMID:2112955

  13. Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium to potentiate immunoglobulin A responses to cholera toxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Simon, M V; Lee, J H; Ustunol, Z; Pestka, J J

    1999-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been reported to have benefits for the prevention and treatment of some forms of diarrhea and related conditions. To determine whether these effects might involve direct stimulation of the gastrointestinal immune response, we administered yogurt to try to enhance mucosal and systemic antibodies against an orally presented immunogen, cholera toxin. Yogurts were manufactured with starter cultures containing different species and strains of lactic acid bacteria. Mice were fed these yogurts for 3 wk, during which they were also orally immunized twice with 10 micrograms of cholera toxin. Blood was collected on d 0 and 21, and fecal pellets were collected weekly. Mice that were immunized orally with cholera toxin responded by producing specific intestinal and serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A anti-cholera toxin. Antibody responses of the IgA isotype were significantly increased in mice fed yogurts made with starters containing the conventional yogurt bacteria Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus supplemented with Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, and Bifidobacterium infantis. Yogurt that was manufactured with starters containing only conventional yogurt bacteria produced less IgA anti-cholera toxin than did the control group fed nonfat dry milk. Although strong responses were also observed for IgG anti-cholera toxin in serum, the responses did not differ among groups. Thus, administration of yogurt supplemented with L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium spp. enhanced mucosal and systemic IgA responses to the cholera toxin immunogen. PMID:10212452

  14. Intranasal immunization with SAG1 protein of Toxoplasma gondii in association with cholera toxin dramatically reduces development of cerebral cysts after oral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Debard, N; Buzoni-Gatel, D; Bout, D

    1996-01-01

    SAG1 protein of Toxoplasma gondii was evaluated as a protective antigen in mucosal immunization with cholera toxin as an adjuvant. CBA/J mice intranasally immunized with a combination of SAG1 and cholera toxin exhibited significantly fewer cysts in the brain after oral infection with the 76K strain of T. gondii than control mice. This acquired protection lasted at least 5 months. Protected mice developed high levels of serum anti-SAG1 immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as an enhanced systemic cellular response, as assessed by the proliferation of splenocytes in response to SAG1 restimulation in vitro. This cellular proliferation was associated with an increase of interleukin-2 and interleukin-5 synthesis and with barely detectable gamma interferon production. Splenic immune T cells were shown to convey modest protection to recipients against development of brain cysts following oral infection with T. gondii. Significant production of anti-SAG1 immunoglobulin A was induced in intestinal secretions of protected mice. These results indicate that intranasal immunization with SAG1 and cholera toxin can induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and affords partial and long-lasting resistance against the establishment of chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:8675321

  15. Cholera Toxin Production during Anaerobic Trimethylamine N-Oxide Respiration Is Mediated by Stringent Response in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M.; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-01-01

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae. PMID:24648517

  16. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  17. Biological and Biochemical Characterization of Variant A Subunits of Cholera Toxin Constructed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.; Holmes, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is the prototype for the Vibrio cholerae-Escherichia coli family of heat-labile enterotoxins having an AB5 structure. By substituting amino acids in the enzymatic A subunit that are highly conserved in all members of this family, we constructed 23 variants of CT that exhibited decreased or undetectable toxicity and we characterized their biological and biochemical properties. Many variants exhibited previously undescribed temperature-sensitive assembly of holotoxin and/or increased sensitivity to proteolysis, which in all cases correlated with exposure of epitopes of CT-A that are normally hidden in native CT holotoxin. Substitutions within and deletion of the entire active-site-occluding loop demonstrated a prominent role for His-44 and this loop in the structure and activity of CT. Several novel variants with wild-type assembly and stability showed significantly decreased toxicity and enzymatic activity (e.g., variants at positions R11, I16, R25, E29, and S68+V72). In most variants the reduction in toxicity was proportional to the decrease in enzymatic activity. For substitutions or insertions at E29 and Y30 the decrease in toxicity was 10- and 5-fold more than the reduction in enzymatic activity, but for variants with R25G, E110D, or E112D substitutions the decrease in enzymatic activity was 12- to 50-fold more than the reduction in toxicity. These variants may be useful as tools for additional studies on the cell biology of toxin action and/or as attenuated toxins for adjuvant or vaccine use. PMID:11395467

  18. Structure and function of cholera toxin and the related Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, B D

    1992-01-01

    Cholera and the related Escherichia coli-associated diarrheal disease are important problems confronting Third World nations and any area where water supplies can become contaminated. The disease is extremely debilitating and may be fatal in the absence of treatment. Symptoms are caused by the action of cholera toxin, secreted by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or by a closely related heat-labile enterotoxin, produced by Escherichia coli, that causes a milder, more common traveler's diarrhea. Both toxins bind receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and insert an enzymatic subunit that modifies a G protein associated with the adenylate cyclase complex. The consequent stimulated production of cyclic AMP, or other factors such as increased synthesis of prostaglandins by intoxicated cells, initiates a metabolic cascade that results in the excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes characteristic of the disease. The toxins have a very high degree of structural and functional homology and may be evolutionarily related. Several effective new vaccine formulations have been developed and tested, and a growing family of endogenous cofactors is being discovered in eukaryotic cells. The recent elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the heat-labile enterotoxin has provided an opportunity to examine and compare the correlations between structure and function of the two toxins. This information may improve our understanding of the disease process itself, as well as illuminate the role of the toxin in studies of signal transduction and G-protein function. Images PMID:1480112

  19. Oral immunization of mice with a glycoconjugate vaccine containing the O157 antigen of Escherichia coli O157:H7 admixed with cholera toxin fails to elicit protection against subsequent colonization by the pathogen.

    PubMed

    Conlan, J W; KuoLee, R; Webb, A; Cox, A D; Perry, M B

    2000-03-01

    It has been postulated that a humoral immune response directed against the O157 antigen of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and expressed in the intestine, might afford protection from colonization and consequent infection by this enteric pathogen. The present study was conducted to determine whether such an immune response can be experimentally generated in mice. To this end, mice were orally immunized with a glycoconjugate vaccine consisting of horse serum albumin and the O157 polysaccharide admixed with the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin. Mice consistently developed robust local and systemic immune responses to the cholera toxin adjuvant, but were far from uniformly reactive to the test vaccine. Moreover, vaccinated mice were as susceptible to transient intestinal colonization following challenge with an isolate of E. coli O157:H7 as unvaccinated control mice. These results indicate that this vaccination approach is unlikely to be straightforward in target bovine or human hosts. PMID:10749542

  20. Role of 6-Gingerol in Reduction of Cholera Toxin Activity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Pallashri; Das, Bornita

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is one of the major bacterial pathogens responsible for the devastating diarrheal disease called cholera. Chemotherapy is often used against V. cholerae infections; however, the emergence of V. cholerae with multidrug resistance (MDR) toward the chemotherapeutic agents is a serious clinical problem. This scenario has provided us with the impetus to look into herbal remediation, especially toward blocking the action of cholera toxin (CT). Our studies were undertaken to determine the antidiarrheal potential of 6-gingerol (6G) on the basis of its effect on CT, the virulence factor secreted by V. cholerae. We report here that 6G binds to CT, hindering its interaction with the GM1 receptor present on the intestinal epithelial cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined to be 10 μg/ml. The detailed mechanistic study was conducted by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence spectroscopy, and isoelectric focusing. These results were validated with in vitro studies performed with the CHO, HeLa, and HT-29 cell lines, whereas a rabbit ileal loop assay was done to estimate the in vivo action, which confirms the efficacy of 6G in remediation of the choleragenic effects of CT. Thus, 6G can be an effective adjunctive therapy with oral rehydration solution for severe CT-mediated diarrhea. PMID:23817372

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  2. Determination of tolerable fatty acids and cholera toxin concentrations using human intestinal epithelial cells and BALB/c mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tamari, Farshad; Tychowski, Joanna; Lorentzen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The positive role of fatty acids in the prevention and alleviation of non-human and human diseases have been and continue to be extensively documented. These roles include influences on infectious and non-infectious diseases including prevention of inflammation as well as mucosal immunity to infectious diseases. Cholera is an acute intestinal illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It occurs in developing nations and if left untreated, can result in death. While vaccines for cholera exist, they are not always effective and other preventative methods are needed. We set out to determine tolerable concentrations of three fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids) and cholera toxin using mouse BALB/C macrophages and human intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. We solubilized the above fatty acids and used cell proliferation assays to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of the fatty acids that are not detrimental to human intestinal epithelial cell viability. We solubilized cholera toxin and used it in an assay to determine the concentration ranges and specific concentrations of cholera toxin that do not statistically decrease cell viability in BALB/C macrophages. We found the optimum fatty acid concentrations to be between 1-5 ng/μl, and that for cholera toxin to be < 30 ng per treatment. This data may aid future studies that aim to find a protective mucosal role for fatty acids in prevention or alleviation of cholera infections. PMID:23748896

  3. Cholera toxin, LT-I, LT-IIa, and LT-IIb: the critical role of ganglioside-binding in immunomodulation by Type I and Type II heat-labile enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Terry D.

    2010-01-01

    The heat-labile enterotoxins (HLT) expressed by Vibrio cholerae (cholera toxin) and Escherichia coli (LT-I, LT-IIa, and LT-IIb) are potent systemic and mucosal adjuvants. Co-administration of the enterotoxins with a foreign antigen (Ag) produces an augmented immune response to that antigen. Although each enterotoxin has potent adjuvant properties, the means by which the enterotoxins induce various immune responses are distinctive for each adjuvant. Various mutants have been engineered to dissect the functions of the enterotoxins required for their adjuvanticity. The capacity to strongly bind to one or more specific ganglioside receptors appears to drive the distinctive immunomodulatory properties associated with each enterotoxin. Mutant enterotoxins with ablated or altered ganglioside binding affinities have been employed to investigate the role of gangliosides in enterotoxin-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:17931161

  4. A Protein-Based Pentavalent Inhibitor of the Cholera Toxin B-Subunit**

    PubMed Central

    Branson, Thomas R; McAllister, Tom E; Garcia-Hartjes, Jaime; Fascione, Martin A; Ross, James F; Warriner, Stuart L; Wennekes, Tom; Zuilhof, Han; Turnbull, W Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins produced by bacteria are the cause of many life-threatening diarrheal diseases. Many of these toxins, including cholera toxin (CT), enter the cell by first binding to glycolipids in the cell membrane. Inhibiting these multivalent protein/carbohydrate interactions would prevent the toxin from entering cells and causing diarrhea. Here we demonstrate that the site-specific modification of a protein scaffold, which is perfectly matched in both size and valency to the target toxin, provides a convenient route to an effective multivalent inhibitor. The resulting pentavalent neoglycoprotein displays an inhibition potency (IC50) of 104 pm for the CT B-subunit (CTB), which is the most potent pentavalent inhibitor for this target reported thus far. Complexation of the inhibitor and CTB resulted in a protein heterodimer. This inhibition strategy can potentially be applied to many multivalent receptors and also opens up new possibilities for protein assembly strategies. PMID:24989497

  5. Vibrio cholerae O139 conjugate vaccines: synthesis and immunogenicity of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant in mice.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Shiloach, J; Johnson, V; Taylor, D N; Finkelstein, R A; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    2000-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data provide evidence that a critical level of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the surface polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 (lipopolysaccharide) and of Vibrio cholerae O139 (capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) is associated with immunity to the homologous pathogen. The immunogenicity of polysaccharides, especially in infants, may be enhanced by their covalent attachment to proteins (conjugates). Two synthetic schemes, involving 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents, were adapted to prepare four conjugates of V. cholerae O139 CPS with the recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant, CRMH21G. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a linker. When injected subcutaneously into young outbred mice by a clinically relevant dose and schedule, these conjugates elicited serum CPS antibodies of the IgG and IgM classes with vibriocidal activity to strains of capsulated V. cholerae O139. Treatment of these sera with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) reduced, but did not eliminate, their vibriocidal activity. These results indicate that the conjugates elicited IgG with vibriocidal activity. Conjugates also elicited high levels of serum diphtheria toxin IgG. Convalescent sera from 20 cholera patients infected with V. cholerae O139 had vibriocidal titers ranging from 100 to 3,200: absorption with the CPS reduced the vibriocidal titer of all sera to < or =50. Treatment with 2-ME reduced the titers of 17 of 20 patients to < or =50. These data show that, like infection with V. cholerae O1, infection with V. cholerae O139 induces vibriocidal antibodies specific to the surface polysaccharide of this bacterium (CPS) that are mostly of IgM class. Based on these data, clinical trials with the V. cholerae O139 CPS conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin are planned. PMID:10948122

  6. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae prototype vaccine strain O395-N1-E1 which accumulates cell-associated cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J

    2008-10-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine's efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was a technical problem that might be solved by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during the manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, O395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. O395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, O395-N1. Our results suggest that this prototype cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved and inexpensive oral BS-WC cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  7. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae Vaccine Candidate Strain O395-N1-E1 which Accumulates Cell-associated Cholera Toxin B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine’s efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was technical problem that might be solved simply by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, 0395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. 0395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, 0395-N1. Our results suggest that this type of cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved, effective, and inexpensive oral or parenteral cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  8. The three-dimensional crystal structure of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Nance, S.; Spangler, B.D.; Scott, D.L.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1996-02-01

    The clinical manifestations of cholera are largely attributable to the actions of a secreted hexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin (choleragen). We have solved the three-dimensional structure of choleragen at 2.5 {Angstrom} resolution and compared the refined coordinates with those of choleragenoid (isolated B pentamer) and the heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli (LT). The crystalline coordinates provide a detailed view of the stereochemistry implicated in binding to GM1 gangliosides and in carrying out ADP-ribosylation. The A2 chain of choleragen, in contrast to that of LT, is a nearly continuous {alpha}-helix with an interpretable carboxyl tail.

  9. Fusion proteins containing the A2 domain of cholera toxin assemble with B polypeptides of cholera toxin to form immunoreactive and functional holotoxin-like chimeras.

    PubMed

    Jobling, M G; Holmes, R K

    1992-11-01

    Cholera enterotoxin (CT) is produced by Vibrio cholerae and excreted into the culture medium as an extracellular protein. CT consists of one A polypeptide and five B polypeptides associated by noncovalent bonds, and CT-B interacts with CT-A primarily via the A2 domain. Treatment of CT with trypsin cleaves CT-A into A1 and A2 fragments that are linked by a disulfide bond. CT-B binds to ganglioside GM1, which functions as the plasma membrane receptor for CT, and the enzymatic activity of A1 causes the toxic effects of CT on target cells. We constructed translational fusions that joined foreign proteins via their carboxyl termini to the A2 domain of CT-A, and we studied the interactions of the fusion proteins with CT-B. The A2 domain was necessary and sufficient to enable bacterial alkaline phosphatase (BAP), maltose-binding protein (MBP) or beta-lactamase (BLA) to associate with CT-B to form stable, immunoreactive, holotoxin-like chimeras. Each holotoxin-like chimera was able to bind to ganglioside GM1. Holotoxin-like chimeras containing the BAP-A2 and BLA-A2 fusion proteins had BAP activity and BLA activity, respectively. We constructed BAP-A2 mutants with altered carboxyl-terminal sequences and tested their ability to assemble into holotoxin-like chimeras. Although the carboxyl-terminal QDEL sequence of the BAP-A2 fusion protein was not required for interaction with CT-B, most BAP-A2 mutants with altered carboxyl termini did not form holotoxin-like chimeras. When holotoxin-like chimeras containing BAP-A2, MBP-A2, or BLA-A2 were synthesized in V. cholerae, they were found predominantly in the periplasm. The toxin secretory apparatus of V. cholerae was not able, therefore, to translocate these holotoxin-like chimeras across the outer membrane. PMID:1399002

  10. Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jason B.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera is an acute, secretory diarrhea caused by infection with Vibrio cholerae of the O1 and O139 serogroups. Cholera is endemic in over 50 countries and also causes large epidemics. Since 1817, seven cholera pandemics have spread from Asia to much of the world. The 7th pandemic began in 1961 and affects 3–5 million people each year, killing 120,000. Although mild cholera may be indistinguishable from other diarrheal illnesses, the presentation of severe cholera is distinct, with dramatic diarrheal purging. Management of patients with cholera involves aggressive fluid replacement; effective therapy can decrease mortality from over 50% to less than 0.2%. Antibiotics decrease volume and duration of diarrhea by 50% and are recommended for patients with moderate to severe dehydration. Prevention of cholera depends on access to safe water and sanitation. Two oral cholera vaccines are available and the most effective use of these in integrated prevention programs is being actively evaluated. PMID:22748592

  11. Cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, J B; Morris, J G; Levine, M M

    1995-01-01

    Despite more than a century of study, cholera still presents challenges and surprises to us. Throughout most of the 20th century, cholera was caused by Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup and the disease was largely confined to Asia and Africa. However, the last decade of the 20th century has witnessed two major developments in the history of this disease. In 1991, a massive outbreak of cholera started in South America, the one continent previously untouched by cholera in this century. In 1992, an apparently new pandemic caused by a previously unknown serogroup of V. cholerae (O139) began in India and Bangladesh. The O139 epidemic has been occurring in populations assumed to be largely immune to V. cholerae O1 and has rapidly spread to many countries including the United States. In this review, we discuss all aspects of cholera, including the clinical microbiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of the disease. Special attention will be paid to the extraordinary advances that have been made in recent years in unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of this infection and in the development of new generations of vaccines to prevent it. PMID:7704895

  12. Quantitative detection of Vibrio cholera toxin by real-time and dynamic cytotoxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zheng, Min; Li, Haijing; Zhang, Jing; Stampfl, Melinda; Xu, Xiao; Ding, Gangqiang; Zhang, Yanjun; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-12-01

    We report here the quantitative detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT) in isolates and stool specimens by dynamic monitoring of the full course of CT-mediated cytotoxicity in a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system. Four cell lines, including Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, small intestine epithelial (FHs74Int) cells, and mouse adrenal gland (PC12-Adh) cells, were evaluated for their suitability for CT-induced cytotoxicity testing. Among them, the Y-1 line was demonstrated to be the most sensitive for CT-mediated cytotoxicity, with limits of detection of 7.0 pg/ml for purified CT and 0.11 ng/ml for spiked CT in pooled negative stool specimens. No CT-mediated cytotoxicity was observed for nontoxigenic V. cholerae, non-V. cholerae species, or non-V. cholerae enterotoxins. The CT-RTCA assay was further validated with 100 stool specimens consecutively collected from patients with diarrhea and 200 V. cholerae isolates recovered from patients and the environment, in comparison to a reference using three detection methods. The CT-RTCA assay had sensitivities and specificities of 97.5% and 100.0%, respectively, for V. cholerae isolates and 90.0% and 97.2% for stool specimens. For stool specimens spiked with CT concentrations ranging from 3.5 pg/ml to 1.8 ng/ml, the inoculation-to-detection time was 1.12 ± 0.38 h, and the values were inversely correlated with CT concentrations (ρ = -1; P = 0.01). The results indicate that the CT-RTCA assay with the Y-1 cell line provides a rapid and sensitive tool for the quantitative detection of CT activities in clinical specimens. PMID:24048535

  13. The ERdj5-Sel1L complex facilitates cholera toxin retrotranslocation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Banks, Lindsey; Tsai, Billy

    2013-03-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) traffics from the host cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the toxin's catalytic CTA1 subunit retrotranslocates to the cytosol to induce toxicity. In the ER, CT is captured by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1 via an undefined mechanism to prepare for retrotranslocation. Using loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that the ER-resident factor ERdj5 promotes CTA1 retrotranslocation, in part, via its J domain. This Hsp70 cochaperone regulates binding between CTA and the ER Hsp70 BiP, a chaperone previously implicated in toxin retrotranslocation. Importantly, ERdj5 interacts with the Hrd1 adaptor Sel1L directly through Sel1L's N-terminal lumenal domain, thereby linking ERdj5 to the Hrd1 complex. Sel1L itself also binds CTA and facilitates toxin retrotranslocation. By contrast, EDEM1 and OS-9, two established Sel1L binding partners, do not play significant roles in CTA1 retrotranslocation. Our results thus identify two ER factors that promote ER-to-cytosol transport of CTA1. They also indicate that ERdj5, by binding to Sel1L, triggers BiP-toxin interaction proximal to the Hrd1 complex. We postulate this scenario enables the Hrd1-associated retrotranslocation machinery to capture the toxin efficiently once the toxin is released from BiP. PMID:23363602

  14. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G.; Westbrook, E.M. |; Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z.

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  15. Mucosal immunization with a genetically engineered pertussis toxin S1 fragment-cholera toxin subunit B chimeric protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song F; Halperin, Scott A; Salloum, Danny F; MacMillan, Ann; Morris, Annette

    2003-04-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of a divalent pertussis toxin (PT) S1 fragment linked to the cholera toxin (Ctx) A(2)B fragment was constructed. The chimera induced a mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and a serum IgG immune response to PT and CtxB in BALB/c mice following intranasal immunization. The immune sera neutralized PT in vitro. In the mouse model of Bordetella pertussis respiratory infection, the chimera-immunized animals showed a significant reduction in bacterial lung counts (P = 0.01) from that of the sham control group. Thus, a divalent S1 fragment CtxA2B chimera is an immunogenic antigen and can elicit a protective immunity. PMID:12654855

  16. Lincomycin-induced over-expression of mature recombinant cholera toxin B subunit and the holotoxin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Ochi, Sadayuki; Sasaki, Keiko; Kato, Michio; Taniguchi, Koki; Oguma, Keiji; Tsuji, Takao

    2009-10-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) B subunit (CTB) was overproduced using a novel expression system in Escherichia coli. An expression plasmid was constructed by inserting the gene encoding the full-length CTB and the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence derived from CTB or from the heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) of enterotoxigenic E. coli into the lacZalpha gene fragment in the pBluescript SK(+) vector. The E. coli strain MV1184 was transformed with each plasmid and then cultured in CAYE broth containing lincomycin. Recombinant CTB (rCTB) was purified from each cell extract. rCTB was overproduced in both transformants without obvious toxicity and was structurally and biologically identical to that of CT purified from Vibrio cholerae, indicating that the original SD and CTB signal sequences were also sufficient to express rCTB in E. coli. Lincomycin-induced rCTB expression was inhibited by mutating the lac promoter, suggesting that lincomycin affects the lactose operon. Based on these findings, we constructed a plasmid that contained the wild-type CT operon and successfully overproduced CT (rCT) using the same procedure for rCTB. Although rCT had an intact A subunit, the amino-terminal modifications and biological properties of the A and B subunits of rCT were identical to those of CT. These results suggest that this novel rCTB over-expression system would also be useful to generate both wild-type and mutant CT proteins that will facilitate further studies on the characteristics of CT, such as mucosal adjuvant activity. PMID:19410003

  17. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived. PMID:25756608

  18. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed packets of salts that are mixed with clean water to help restore fluids. These are cheaper and ... cholera occur, efforts should be made to establish clean water, food, and sanitation. Vaccination is not very effective ...

  19. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... universal access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation, which is key in preventing both epidemic and endemic cholera. Actions targeting environmental conditions include: the development of piped water systems ...

  20. Analysis of a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and human mucin 1 (MUC1) conjugate protein in a MUC1-tolerant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pinkhasov, Julia; Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Mason, Hugh S; Walmsley, Amanda M; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2010-12-01

    Since epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) is associated with several adenocarcinomas at the mucosal sites, it is pertinent to test the efficacy of a mucosally targeted vaccine formulation. The B subunit of the Vibrio cholerae cholera toxin (CTB) has great potential to act as a mucosal carrier for subunit vaccines. In the present study we evaluated whether a MUC1 tandem repeat (TR) peptide chemically linked to CTB would break self-antigen tolerance in the transgenic MUC1-tolerant mouse model (MUC1.Tg) through oral or parenteral immunizations. We report that oral immunization with the CTB-MUC1 conjugate along with mucosal adjuvant, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) did not break self-antigen tolerance in MUC1.Tg mice, but induced a strong humoral response in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. However, self-antigen tolerance in the MUC1.Tg mouse model was broken after parenteral immunizations with different doses of the CTB-MUC1 conjugate protein and with the adjuvant CpG ODN co-delivered with CTB-MUC1. Importantly, mice immunized systemically with CpG ODN alone and with CTB-MUC1 exhibited decreased tumor burden when challenged with a mammary gland tumor cell line that expresses human MUC1. PMID:20824430

  1. Analysis of a Cholera Toxin B Subunit (CTB) and Human Mucin 1 (MUC1) Conjugate Protein in a MUC1 Tolerant Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinkhasov, Julia; Alvarez, M. Lucrecia; Pathangey, Latha B.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Mason, Hugh S.; Walmsley, Amanda M.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    Since epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) is associated with several adenocarcinomas at mucosal sites, it is pertinent to test the efficacy of a mucosally targeted vaccine formulation. The B subunit of the Vibrio cholerae cholera toxin (CTB) has great potential to act as a mucosal carrier for subunit vaccines. In the present study we evaluated whether a MUC1 tandem repeat (TR) peptide chemically linked to CTB would break self-antigen tolerance in the transgenic MUC1 tolerant mouse model (MUC1.Tg) through oral or parenteral immunizations. We report that oral immunization with the CTB-MUC1 conjugate along with mucosal adjuvant, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), did not break self-antigen tolerance in MUC1.Tg mice, but induced a strong humoral response in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. However, self-antigen tolerance in the MUC1.Tg mouse model was broken after parenteral immunizations with different doses of the CTB-MUC1 conjugate protein and with the adjuvant CpG ODN co-delivered with CTB-MUC1. Importantly, mice immunized systemically with CpG ODN alone and with CTB-MUC1 exhibited decreased tumor burden when challenged with a mammary gland tumor cell line that expresses human MUC1. PMID:20824430

  2. Real-time cell analysis for monitoring cholera toxin-induced human intestinal epithelial cell response.

    PubMed

    Ye, Julian; Luo, Yun; Fang, Weijia; Pan, Junhang; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yanjun; Chen, Zhiping; Jin, Dazhi

    2015-04-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of Vibrio cholerae manifests as diarrhea and causes life-threatening dehydration. Here, we observe the human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC) response to Cholera toxin (CT) by a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) platform, and disclose the difference from CT-induced cytotoxicity and others in HIEC. An HIEC cell of 1.0 × 10(5) cells/mL was characterized as the suitable concentration for each well. For experimentation, the assay requires an inoculation of CT dissolved in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline with 0.1 % gelatin for a period of 18-25 h. The dimensionless impedance cell index curve presented characteristic dose- and time-dependent drop responses at the first stage, and the CT-induced cytotoxicity was the most remarkable following exposure for 18-25 h (P = 0.0002). Following the obvious cytotoxic reaction, the CI curve gradually increased over time until the original CI value, indicating that self-recovery occurred. The CT-induced CI curve for HIEC was different from that induced by other toxins, including diphtheria and Clostridium difficile toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that the CT-induced cytotoxicity in HIEC was absolutely different from that induced by C. difficile and other toxins because of the different pathogeneses that were correlated with the specific CI curve generated by the RTCA system. In summary, our data show that the assay described here is a convenient and rapid high-throughput tool for real-time monitoring of host cellular responses to CT on the basis of the characteristic CI curve. PMID:25510171

  3. A Cholera Conjugate Vaccine Containing O-specific Polysaccharide (OSP) of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and Recombinant Fragment of Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain (OSP:rTTHc) Induces Serum, Memory and Lamina Proprial Responses against OSP and Is Protective in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Grace; Charles, Richelle C.; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md. Rasheduzzaman; Berger, Amanda; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Mandlik, Anjali; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Leung, Daniel T.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W. F.; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a severe watery diarrhea. Protection against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity is defined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methodology Here we describe a conjugate vaccine for cholera prepared via squaric acid chemistry from the OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba strain PIC018 and a recombinant heavy chain fragment of tetanus toxin (OSP:rTTHc). We assessed a range of vaccine doses based on the OSP content of the vaccine (10-50 μg), vaccine compositions varying by molar loading ratio of OSP to rTTHc (3:1, 5:1, 10:1), effect of an adjuvant, and route of immunization. Principle Findings Immunized mice developed prominent anti-OSP and anti-TT serum IgG responses, as well as vibriocidal antibody and memory B cell responses following intramuscular or intradermal vaccination. Mice did not develop anti-squarate responses. Intestinal lamina proprial IgA responses targeting OSP occurred following intradermal vaccination. In general, we found comparable immune responses in mice immunized with these variations, although memory B cell and vibriocidal responses were blunted in mice receiving the highest dose of vaccine (50 μg). We found no appreciable change in immune responses when the conjugate vaccine was administered in the presence or absence of immunoadjuvant alum. Administration of OSP:rTTHc resulted in 55% protective efficacy in a mouse survival cholera challenge model. Conclusion We report development of an Inaba OSP:rTTHc conjugate vaccine that induces memory responses and protection against cholera in mice. Development of an effective cholera conjugate vaccine that induces high level and long-term immune responses against OSP would be beneficial, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens. PMID:26154421

  4. Cholera toxin enhances vaccine-induced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kristin L; Stylianou, Elena; Poyntz, Hazel C; Betts, Gareth J; Fletcher, Helen A; McShane, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 is emerging as an important cytokine in vaccine-induced protection against tuberculosis disease in animal models. Here we show that compared to parenteral delivery, BCG delivered mucosally enhances cytokine production, including interferon gamma and IL-17, in the lungs. Furthermore, we find that cholera toxin, delivered mucosally along with BCG, further enhances IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells over mucosal BCG alone both in the lungs and systemically. This boosting effect of CT is also observed using a vaccine regimen of BCG followed by the candidate vaccine MVA85A. Using a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) aerosol challenge model, we demonstrate the ability of cholera toxin delivered at the time of a priming BCG vaccination to improve protection against tuberculosis disease in a manner at least partially dependent on the observed increase in IL-17. This observed increase in IL-17 in the lungs has no adverse effect on lung pathology following M.tb challenge, indicating that IL-17 can safely be boosted in murine lungs in a vaccine/M.tb challenge setting. PMID:24194918

  5. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually found in water or food contaminated by feces (poop). Cholera is rare in the US. You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation, and lack of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters. The ...

  6. Structural and Molecular Mechanism for Autoprocessing of MARTX Toxin of Vibrio cholerae at Multiple Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Prochazkova, Katerina; Shuvalova, Ludmilla A.; Minasov, George; Voburka, Zdeněk; Anderson, Wayne F.; Satchell, Karla J.F.

    2009-10-05

    The multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin of Vibrio cholerae causes destruction of the actin cytoskeleton by covalent cross-linking of actin and inactivation of Rho GTPases. The effector domains responsible for these activities are here shown to be independent proteins released from the large toxin by autoproteolysis catalyzed by an embedded cysteine protease domain (CPD). The CPD is activated upon binding inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}). In this study, we demonstrated that InsP{sub 6} is not simply an allosteric cofactor, but rather binding of InsP{sub 6} stabilized the CPD structure, facilitating formation of the enzyme-substrate complex. The 1.95-{angstrom} crystal structure of this InsP{sub 6}-bound unprocessed form of CPD was determined and revealed the scissile bond Leu{sup 3428}-Ala{sup 3429} captured in the catalytic site. Upon processing at this site, CPD was converted to a form with 500-fold reduced affinity for InsP{sub 6}, but was reactivated for high affinity binding of InsP{sub 6} by cooperative binding of both a new substrate and InsP{sub 6}. Reactivation of CPD allowed cleavage of the MARTX toxin at other sites, specifically at leucine residues between the effector domains. Processed CPD also cleaved other proteins in trans, including the leucine-rich protein YopM, demonstrating that it is a promiscuous leucine-specific protease.

  7. Comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA for Detection of the Vibrio cholerae Toxin in Culture Supernatants of Bacteria Isolated from Human and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Meza-Lucas, Antonio; Pérez-Villagómez, María-Fernanda; Martínez-López, José-Patricio; García-Rodea, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelán, María-Guadalupe; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Villanueva-Zamudio, Altagracia

    2016-09-01

    A comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA was made for detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin in culture supernatants of bacteria isolated from human and environmental samples. A total of 293 supernatants were tested in a double blind assay. A correlation of 100 % was obtained between both techniques. The cholera toxin was found in 20 Inaba and 3 Ogawa strains. Positive samples were from seafood (17 samples), potable water (1 sample) and sewage (5 samples). The DOT-ELISA was useful as the standard-ELISA to confirm the presence of cholera toxin in the environmental samples. PMID:27407304

  8. Immune adjuvant effect of V. cholerae O1 derived Proteoliposome coadministered by intranasal route with Vi polysaccharide from Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proteoliposome derived from Vibrio cholerae O1 (PLc) is a nanoscaled structure obtained by a detergent extraction process. Intranasal (i.n) administration of PLc was immunogenic at mucosal and systemic level vs. V. cholerae; however the adjuvant potential of this structure for non-cholera antigens has not been proven yet. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of coadministering PLc with the Vi polysaccharide antigen (Poli Vi) of S. Typhi by the i.n route. The results showed that Poli Vi coadministered with PLc (PLc+Poli Vi) induce a higher IgA response in saliva (p<0.01) and faeces (p<0.01) than Poli Vi administered alone. Likewise, the IgG response in sera was higher in animals immunised with PLc+Poli Vi (p<0.01). Furthermore, IgG induced in sera of mice immunised with PLc+Poli Vi was similar (p>0.05) to that induced in a group of mice immunised by the parenteral route with the Cuban anti-typhoid vaccine vax-TyVi®, although this vaccine did not induce a mucosal response. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that PLc can be used as a mucosal adjuvant to potentiate the immune response against a polysaccharide antigen like Poli Vi. PMID:23458379

  9. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xianliang; Ren, Zhiguang; Xu, Na; Meng, Lingnan; Yu, Zhijun; Feng, Na; Sang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shengnan; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Jin, Hongli; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Cao, Jinshan; Liu, Wensen; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and matrix protein (M1) of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1) with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB) or ricin toxin B (RTB) as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival). Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses. PMID:27110810

  10. Cholera toxin subunit B-mediated intracellular trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles toward the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, William Andrew

    In recent decades, pharmaceutical research has led to the development of numerous treatments for human disease. Nanoscale delivery systems have the potential to maximize therapeutic outcomes by enabling target specific delivery of these therapeutics. The intracellular localization of many of these materials however, is poorly controlled, leading to sequestration in degradative cellular pathways and limiting the efficacy of their payloads. Numerous proteins, particularly bacterial toxins, have evolved mechanisms to subvert the degradative mechanisms of the cell. Here, we have investigated a possible strategy for shunting intracellular delivery of encapsulated cargoes from these pathways by modifying mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with the well-characterized bacterial toxin Cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB). Using established optical imaging methods we investigated the internalization, trafficking, and subcellular localization of our modified MSNs in an in vitro animal cell model. We then attempted to demonstrate the practical utility of this approach by using CTxB-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles to deliver propidium iodide, a membrane-impermeant fluorophore.

  11. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ok; Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC) populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN). Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines. PMID:27271559

  12. Plasmon Coupling Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanobeacon for Single-Step, Ultrasensitive Detection of Cholera Toxin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong-Hua; Liu, Ling-Wei; Liang, Ping; Tang, Li-Juan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of a novel plasmon coupling enhanced Raman scattering (PCERS) method, PCERS nanobeacon, for ultrasensitive, single-step, homogeneous detection of cholera toxin (CT). This method relies on our design of the plasmonic nanoparticles, which have a bilayer phospholipid coating with embedded Raman indicators and CT-binding ligands of monosialoganglioside (GM1). This design allows a facile synthesis of the plasmonic nanoparticle via two-step self-assembly without any specific modification or chemical immobilization. The realization of tethering GM1 on the surface imparts the plasmonic nanoparticles with high affinity, excellent specificity, and multivalence for interaction with CT. The unique lipid-based bilayer coated structure also affords excellent biocompatibility and stability for the plasmonic nanoparticles. The plasmonic nanoparticles are able to show substantial enhancement of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals in a single-step interaction with CT, because of their assembly into aggregates in response to the CT-sandwiched interactions. The results reveal that the developed nanobeacon provides a simple but ultrasensitive sensor for rapid detection of CT with a large signal-to-background ratio and excellent reproducibility in a wide dynamic range, implying its potential for point-of-care applications in preventive and diagnostic monitoring of cholera. PMID:27348262

  13. N-Glycosylation of Cholera Toxin B Subunit: Serendipity for Novel Plant-Made Vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has attracted considerable interests from vaccinologists due to strong mucosal immunomodulatory effects and potential utility as a vaccine scaffold for heterologous antigens. Along with other conventional protein expression systems, various plant species have been used as production hosts for CTB and its fusion proteins. However, it has recently become clear that the protein is N-glycosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells—a eukaryotic post-translational modification that is not present in native CTB. While functionally active aglycosylated variants have been successfully engineered to circumvent potential safety and regulatory issues related to glycosylation, this modification may actually provide advantageous characteristics to the protein as a vaccine platform. Based on data from our recent studies, I discuss the unique features of N-glycosylated CTB produced in plants for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:26732492

  14. N-Glycosylation of Cholera Toxin B Subunit: Serendipity for Novel Plant-Made Vaccines?

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The non-toxic B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has attracted considerable interests from vaccinologists due to strong mucosal immunomodulatory effects and potential utility as a vaccine scaffold for heterologous antigens. Along with other conventional protein expression systems, various plant species have been used as production hosts for CTB and its fusion proteins. However, it has recently become clear that the protein is N-glycosylated within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells-a eukaryotic post-translational modification that is not present in native CTB. While functionally active aglycosylated variants have been successfully engineered to circumvent potential safety and regulatory issues related to glycosylation, this modification may actually provide advantageous characteristics to the protein as a vaccine platform. Based on data from our recent studies, I discuss the unique features of N-glycosylated CTB produced in plants for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:26732492

  15. Cellular Endocytosis and Trafficking of Cholera Toxin B-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William A.; Tarannum, Mubin; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were functionalized with Cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) protein to influence their intracellular trafficking pathways. The CTxB-MSN carrier was synthesized, and its chemical and structural properties were characterized. Endocytic pathway inhibition assays showed that the uptake of CTxB-MSNs in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells was partially facilitated by both chlatrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis mechanisms. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) experiments demonstrated that CTxB-MSNs were taken up by the cells and partially trafficked through the trans-Golgi network into to the endoplasmic reticulum in a retrograde fashion. The delivery abilities of CTxB-MSNs were evaluated using propidium iodide, an impermeable cell membrane dye. LSCM images depicted the release of propidium iodide in the endoplasmic reticulum and cell nucleus of HeLa cells. PMID:27134749

  16. Production of Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana Using GENEWARE® Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vector.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren; Hamorsky, Krystal; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (CTBp) using the GENEWARE(®) tobacco mosaic virus vector system. Infectious transcripts of the vector RNA are generated in vitro and inoculated on N. benthamiana seedlings. After 11 days, CTBp is extracted in a simple tris buffer at room temperature. No protease inhibitor is required. The leaf homogenate is treated with mild heat and a pH shift to selectively precipitate host-derived proteins. CTBp is purified to >95 % homogeneity by two-step chromatography using immobilized metal affinity and ceramic hydroxyapatite resins. This procedure yields on average 400 mg of low-endotoxin CTBp from 1 kg of fresh leaf material. PMID:26614286

  17. Induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in human dendritic cells by a cholera toxin B subunit-proinsulin vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  18. Immunogenicity of a West Nile Virus DIII-Cholera Toxin A2/B Chimera after Intranasal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Juliette K.; Yan, Jie; Knippel, Reece J.; Panayiotou, Panos; Cornell, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes potentially fatal neuroinvasive disease and persists at endemic levels in many parts of the world. Despite advances in our understanding of WNV pathogenesis, there remains a significant need for a human vaccine. The domain III (DIII) region of the WNV envelope protein contains epitopes that are the target of neutralizing antibodies. We have constructed a chimeric fusion of the non-toxic cholera toxin (CT) CTA2/B domains to DIII for investigation as a novel mucosally-delivered WNV vaccine. Purification and assembly of the chimera, as well as receptor-binding and antigen delivery, were verified by western blot, GM1 ELISA and confocal microscopy. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally with DIII-CTA2/B, DIII, DIII mixed with CTA2/B, or CTA2/B control, and boosted at 10 days. Analysis of serum IgG after 14 and 45 days revealed that mucosal immunization with DIII-CTA2/B induced significant DIII-specific humoral immunity and drove isotype switching to IgG2a. The DIII-CTA2/B chimera also induced antigen-specific IgM and IgA responses. Bactericidal assays indicate that the DIII-CTA2/B immunized mice produced DIII-specific antibodies that can trigger complement-mediated killing. A dose escalation resulted in increased DIII-specific serum IgG titers on day 45. DIII antigen alone, in the absence of adjuvant, also induced significant systemic responses after intranasal delivery. Our results indicate that the DIII-CTA2/B chimera is immunogenic after intranasal delivery and merits further investigation as a novel WNV vaccine candidate. PMID:24759174

  19. Induction of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Human Dendritic Cells by a Cholera Toxin B Subunit—Proinsulin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  20. NADP/sup +/ enhances cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Y.; Whitsel, C.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-05-01

    Cholera or pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation is frequently used to estimate the concentration of the stimulatory (Ns) or inhibitory (Ni) guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins which modulate the activity of adenylate cyclase. With this assay, however, the degradation of the substrate, NAD/sup +/, by endogenous enzymes such as NAD/sup +/-glycohydrolase (NADase) present in the test membranes can influence the results. In this study the authors show that both cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of liver membrane proteins is markedly enhanced by NADP/sup +/. The effect is concentration dependent; with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ as substrate maximal enhancement is obtained at 0.5-1.0 mM NADP/sup +/. The enhancement of (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation by NADP/sup +/ was much greater than that by other known effectors such as Mg/sup 2 +/, phosphate or isoniazid. The effect of NADP/sup +/ on ADP-ribosylation may occur by inhibition of the degradation of NAD/sup +/ probably by acting as an alternate substrate for NADase. Among inhibitors tested (NADP/sup +/, isoniazid, imidazole, nicotinamide, L-Arg-methyl-ester and HgCl/sub 2/) to suppress NADase activity, NADP/sup +/ was the most effective and, 10 mM, inhibited activity of the enzyme by about 90%. In membranes which contain substantial activities of NADase the inclusion of NADP/sup +/ in the assay is necessary to obtain maximal ADP-ribosylation.

  1. A Nanocoaxial-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Cholera Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Michelle M.; Rizal, Binod; Connolly, Timothy; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.

    2015-03-01

    Sensitive, real-time detection of biomarkers is of critical importance for rapid and accurate diagnosis of disease for point of care (POC) technologies. Current methods do not allow for POC applications due to several limitations, including sophisticated instrumentation, high reagent consumption, limited multiplexing capability, and cost. Here, we report a nanocoaxial-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of bacterial toxins using an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the detection of cholera toxin (CT). The linear dynamic range of detection was 10 ng/ml - 1 μg/ml, and the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 2 ng/ml. This level of sensitivity is comparable to the standard optical ELISA used widely in clinical applications. In addition to matching the detection profile of the standard ELISA, the nanocoaxial array provides a simple electrochemical readout and a miniaturized platform with multiplexing capabilities for the simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers, giving the nanocoax a desirable advantage over the standard method towards POC applications. Sensitive, real-time detection of biomarkers is of critical importance for rapid and accurate diagnosis of disease for point of care (POC) technologies. Current methods do not allow for POC applications due to several limitations, including sophisticated instrumentation, high reagent consumption, limited multiplexing capability, and cost. Here, we report a nanocoaxial-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of bacterial toxins using an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the detection of cholera toxin (CT). The linear dynamic range of detection was 10 ng/ml - 1 μg/ml, and the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 2 ng/ml. This level of sensitivity is comparable to the standard optical

  2. Revisiting the oligomerization mechanism of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a membrane-damaging beta-barrel pore-forming toxin (beta-PFT). VCC causes permeabilization of the target membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Oligomerization is a key step in the mode of action of any beta-PFT, including that of VCC. Earlier studies have identified some of the key residues in VCC that are directly involved in the generation of the inter-protomer contacts, thus playing critical roles in the oligomerization of the membrane-bound toxin. Analysis of the VCC oligomeric pore structure reveals a potential hydrogen-bond network that appears to connect the sidechain of an asparagine residue (Asn582; located within an inter-domain linker sequence) from one protomer to the backbone CO- and NH-groups of the neighbouring protomer, indirectly through water molecules at most of the inter-protomer interfaces. In the present study, we show that the mutation of Asn582Ala affects the oligomerization and the pore-forming activity of VCC in the membrane lipid bilayer of the synthetic lipid vesicles, while the replacement of Asn582Gln results into the restoration of the oligomeric pore-forming ability of the toxin. Using a number of truncated variants of VCC, having deletion in the C-terminal region of the toxin starting from the Asn582 residue or beyond, we also show that the presence of Asn582 is critically required for the oligomerization of the truncated form of the protein. PMID:27150630

  3. A Nanocoaxial-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Cholera Toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Michelle; Rizal, Binod; Connolly, Timothy; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Biology; Physics Collaboration

    We report a nanocoax-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of bacterial toxins using an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The device architecture is composed of vertically-oriented, nanoscale coaxial electrodes, with coax cores and shields serving as integrated working and counter electrodes, respectively. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the detection of cholera toxin (CT), with a linear dynamic range of detection was 10 ng/ml - 1 µg/ml, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 2 ng/ml. This level of sensitivity is comparable to the standard optical ELISA used widely in clinical applications. The nanocoax array thus matches the detection profile of the standard ELISA while providing a simple electrochemical readout and a miniaturized platform with multiplexing capabilities, toward point-of-care (POC) implementation. In addition, next generation nanocoax devices with extended cores are currently under development, which would provide a POC platform amenable for biofunctionalization of ELISA receptor proteins directly onto the device. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (National Cancer Institute Award No. CA137681 and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Award No. AI100216).

  4. Intranasal immunization with influenza antigens conjugated with cholera toxin subunit B stimulates broad spectrum immunity against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junwei; Arévalo, Maria T; Chen, Yanping; Posadas, Olivia; Smith, Jacob A; Zeng, Mingtao

    2014-01-01

    Frequent mutation of influenza viruses keep vaccinated and non-vaccinated populations vulnerable to new infections, causing serious burdens to public health and the economy. Vaccination with universal influenza vaccines would be the best way to effectively protect people from infection caused by mismatched or unforeseen influenza viruses. Presently, there is no FDA approved universal influenza vaccine. In this study, we expressed and purified a fusion protein comprising of influenza matrix 2 protein ectodomain peptides, a centralized influenza hemagglutinin stem region, and cholera toxin subunit B. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with this novel artificial antigen resulted in potent humoral immune responses, including induction of specific IgA and IgG, and broad protection against infection by multiple influenza viruses. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that when used as a mucosal antigen, cholera toxin subunit B improved antigen-stimulated T cell and memory B cell responses. PMID:24632749

  5. Evaluation of the bead enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of cholera toxin directly from stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, T; Bhattacharya, S K; Uesaka, Y; Horigome, K; Paul, M; Sen, D; Pal, S C; Takeda, T; Takeda, Y; Nair, G B

    1992-01-01

    A highly sensitive bead enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bead ELISA) for detection of cholera toxin (CT) was evaluated for direct detection of CT from stool specimens of patients with acute secretory diarrhea. Of the 75 stool samples examined, 59 yielded biochemically, and serologically confirmed strains of Vibrio cholerae O1. The bead ELISA was positive for CT in stool supernatants in 50 (84.7%) of the 59 samples from which V. cholerae O1 was isolated. In addition, the bead ELISA was positive for three stool specimens which were negative by culture. The free CT present in 48 of the 50 stool samples positive by culture for V. cholerae O1 and for CT by bead ELISA was completely absorbed by anti-CT immunoglobulin G. All of the 59 strains of V. cholerae O1 biotype eltor isolated in this study produced in vitro CT. The concentration of CT present in the bead ELISA-positive stool samples ranged between 26 pg/ml and greater than 100 ng/ml. This evaluation study demonstrates that the bead ELISA is a sensitive and simple method for direct detection of CT in nonsterile stool samples, and we recommend routine use of this assay for detection of CT in stool samples and culture supernatants in clinical and reference laboratories. PMID:1629335

  6. Cholera toxin disrupts barrier function by inhibiting exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins to intestinal cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Annabel; Moreno, Beatriz Cruz; Aguilar, Berenice; van Sorge, Nina M.; Kuang, Jennifer; Kurkciyan, Adrianne A.; Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Pineton de Chambrun, Guillaume P.; McCole, Declan F.; Watnick, Paula; Nizet, Victor; Bier, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera toxin (CT), a virulence factor elaborated by Vibrio cholerae, is sufficient to induce the severe diarrhea characteristic of cholera. The enzymatic moiety of CT (CtxA) increases cAMP synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells, leading to chloride ion (Cl−) efflux through the CFTR Cl− channel. To preserve electroneutrality and osmotic balance, sodium ions and water also flow into the intestinal lumen via a paracellular route. We find that CtxA-driven cAMP increase also inhibits Rab11/exocyst-mediated trafficking of host proteins including E-cadherin and Notch signaling components to cell-cell junctions in Drosophila, human intestinal epithelial cells, and ligated mouse ileal loops, thereby disrupting barrier function. Additionally, CtxA induces junctional damage, weight loss, and dye leakage in the Drosophila gut, contributing to lethality from live V. cholerae infection, all of which can be rescued by Rab11 over-expression. These barrier-disrupting effects of CtxA may act in parallel with Cl− secretion to drive the pathophysiology of cholera. PMID:24034615

  7. Lipid Rafts Alter the Stability and Activity of the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Supriyo; Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) travels from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an AB holotoxin. ER-specific conditions then promote the dissociation of the catalytic CTA1 subunit from the rest of the toxin. CTA1 is held in a stable conformation by its assembly in the CT holotoxin, but the dissociated CTA1 subunit is an unstable protein that spontaneously assumes a disordered state at physiological temperature. This unfolding event triggers the ER-to-cytosol translocation of CTA1 through the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation. The translocated pool of CTA1 must regain a folded, active structure to modify its G protein target which is located in lipid rafts at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Here, we report that lipid rafts place disordered CTA1 in a functional conformation. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of CTA1 is essential for binding to the plasma membrane and lipid rafts. These interactions inhibit the temperature-induced unfolding of CTA1. Moreover, lipid rafts could promote a gain of structure in the disordered, 37 °C conformation of CTA1. This gain of structure corresponded to a gain of function: whereas CTA1 by itself exhibited minimal in vitro activity at 37 °C, exposure to lipid rafts resulted in substantial toxin activity at 37 °C. In vivo, the disruption of lipid rafts with filipin substantially reduced the activity of cytosolic CTA1. Lipid rafts thus exhibit a chaperone-like function that returns disordered CTA1 to an active state and is required for the optimal in vivo activity of CTA1. PMID:22787142

  8. Cholera toxin B subunit pentamer reassembled from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies for use in vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yukihiro; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Miyata, Takeshi; Arakawa, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is secreted in its pentameric form from Escherichia coli if its leader peptide is replaced with one of E. coli origin. However, the secretion of the pentamer is generally severely impaired when the molecule is mutated or fused to a foreign peptide. Therefore, we attempted to regenerate pentameric CTB from the inclusion bodies (IBs) of E. coli. Stepwise dialysis of the IBs solubilized in guanidine hydrochloride predominantly generated soluble high-molecular-mass (HMM) aggregates and only a small fraction of pentamer. Three methods to reassemble homogeneous pentameric molecules were evaluated: (i) using a pentameric coiled-coil fusion partner, expecting it to function as an assembly core; (ii) optimizing the protein concentration during refolding; and (iii) eliminating contaminants before refolding. Coiled-coil fusion had some effect, but substantial amounts of HMM aggregates were still generated. Varying the protein concentration from 0.05 mg/mL to 5mg/mL had almost no effect. In contrast, eliminating the contaminants before refolding had a robust effect, and only the pentamer was regenerated, with no detectable HMM aggregates. Surprisingly, the protein concentration at refolding was up to 5mg/mL when the contaminants were removed, with no adverse effects on refolding. The regenerated pentamer was indistinguishable in its biochemical and immunological characteristics from CTB secreted from E. coli or choleragenoid from Vibrio cholerae. This study provides a simple but very efficient strategy for pentamerizing CTB with a highly homogeneous molecular conformation, with which it may be feasible to engineer CTB derivatives and CTB fusion antigens. PMID:26828455

  9. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    Discussing the symptomatology of cholera, the author deals first with the incubation period, the clinical types, choleraic diarrhoea, and cholerine; he then considers in detail the various stages of cholera gravis and the relapses and complications that may be met. This is followed by sections on diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and on prognosis and the various factors influencing it. The author's highly detailed review of the treatment of cholera which concludes this study is divided into three parts, dealing with attempts at specific therapy, with infusion treatment, and with adjuvant treatment. PMID:13426761

  10. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP. PMID:25877869

  11. A novel fluorescent retrograde neural tracer: cholera toxin B conjugated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Hao, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Maharjan, Suraj; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai; Lu, Laijin

    2015-09-01

    The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde tracers.The retrograde neuroanatomical tracing method is a key technique to study the complex interconnections of the nervous system. Traditional tracers have several drawbacks, including time-consuming immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining procedures, rapid fluorescence quenching and low fluorescence intensity. Carbon dots (CDs) have been widely used as a fluorescent bio-probe due to their ultrasmall size, excellent optical properties, chemical stability, biocompatibility and low toxicity. Herein, we develop a novel fluorescent neural tracer: cholera toxin B-carbon dot conjugates (CTB-CDs). It can be taken up and retrogradely transported by neurons in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Our results show that CTB-CDs possess high photoluminescence intensity, good optical stability, a long shelf-life and non-toxicity. Tracing with CTB-CDs is a direct and more economical way of performing retrograde labelling experiments. Therefore, CTB-CDs are reliable fluorescent retrograde

  12. Production of IgE antibody and allergic sensitization of intestinal and peripheral tissues after oral immunization with protein Ag and cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Snider, D P; Marshall, J S; Perdue, M H; Liang, H

    1994-07-15

    Cholera toxin (CTX) is a potent oral adjuvant for the induction of mucosal IgA Ab responses protein Ags. We examined the Ab responses and allergic sensitization of several strains of mice to protein Ags, administered orally with CTX. The mice made strong IgA and IgG1 serum Ab responses, but little IgG2a Ab to Ags such as hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and OVA. However, when given a subsequent i.p. challenge with Ag alone, the same mice had immediate hypersensitivity reactions that included respiratory distress and death. Within 10 min of i.p. challenge, immunized mice had high levels of plasma histamine and extensive degranulation of mast cells in target tissues. These mice had detectable serum IgE Ab. Ag administered orally with the B subunit (CTB) of CTX did not sensitize mice. Intestinal tissues taken from these mice had Ag-specific ion-secretory responses in vitro, typical of intestinal anaphylaxis. Ag given s.c. without adjuvant could also sensitize for systemic and intestinal anaphylaxis. Sensitization with HEL given s.c. was dose dependent and correlated with a critical amount of HEL in the circulation. HEL was detected in the circulation after oral immunization, but CTX did not increase the uptake of HEL. Thus, oral immunization with a protein Ag in the presence of CTX can sensitize an animal for systemic and intestinal anaphylaxis. These results suggest a cautious approach to the use of CTX as an adjuvant in oral vaccines, and provide a new model to study immediate hypersensitivity reactions to intestinal Ag. PMID:8021502

  13. Receptor Binding by Cholera Toxin B-Subunit and Amino Acid Modification Improves Minimal Peptide Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Boberg, Andreas; Stålnacke, Alexandra; Bråve, Andreas; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Carlin, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We increase our understanding of augmenting a cellular immune response, by using an HIV-1 protease-derived epitope (PR75–84), and variants thereof, coupled to the C-terminal, of the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Fusion proteins were used for immunizations of HLA-A0201 transgenic C57BL/6 mice. We observed different capacities to elicit a cellular immune response by peptides with additions of five to ten amino acids to the PR epitope. There was a positive correlation between the magnitude of the elicited cellular immune response and the capacity of the fusion protein to bind GM-1. This binding capacity is affected by its ability to form natural pentamers of CTB. Our results suggest that functional CTB pentamers containing a foreign amino acid-modified epitope is a novel way to overcome the limited cellular immunogenicity of minimal peptide antigens. This way of using a functional assay as readout for improved cellular immunogenicity might become highly valuable for difficult immunogens such as short peptides (epitopes).

  14. Novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D

    2001-11-01

    Vaccination remains the single most valuable tool in the prevention of infectious disease. Nevertheless, there exists a need to improve the performance of existing vaccines such that fewer boosts are needed or to develop novel vaccines. For the development of effective vaccines for humans, a great need exists for safe and effective adjuvants. A number of novel adjuvants have been reported in recent years including: i) bacterial toxins such as cholera toxin, CT, and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT; ii) less toxic derivatives of CT and LT; iii) endogenous human immunomodulators, such as IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF; iv) hormones; v) lipopeptides; vi) saponins, such as QS-21; vii) synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN); viii) lipid 'A derivatives, such as monophosphoryl lipid A, MPL, and ix) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivatives. Herein, we will review recent findings using these novel adjuvant systems. PMID:12455400

  15. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  16. The Relationship between Glycan Binding and Direct Membrane Interactions in Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin, a Channel-forming Toxin.

    PubMed

    De, Swastik; Bubnys, Adele; Alonzo, Francis; Hyun, Jinsol; Lary, Jeffrey W; Cole, James L; Torres, Victor J; Olson, Rich

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are structurally diverse pathogen-secreted proteins that form cell-damaging channels in the membranes of host cells. Most PFTs are released as water-soluble monomers that first oligomerize on the membrane before inserting a transmembrane channel. To modulate specificity and increase potency, many PFTs recognize specific cell surface receptors that increase the local toxin concentration on cell membranes, thereby facilitating channel formation. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a toxin secreted by the human pathogen responsible for pandemic cholera disease and acts as a defensive agent against the host immune system. Although it has been shown that VCC utilizes specific glycan receptors on the cell surface, additional direct contacts with the membrane must also play a role in toxin binding. To better understand the nature of these interactions, we conducted a systematic investigation of the membrane-binding surface of VCC to identify additional membrane interactions important in cell targeting. Through cell-based assays on several human-derived cell lines, we show that VCC is unlikely to utilize high affinity protein receptors as do structurally similar toxins from Staphylococcus aureus. Next, we identified a number of specific amino acid residues that greatly diminish the VCC potency against cells and investigated the interplay between glycan binding and these direct lipid contacts. Finally, we used model membranes to parse the importance of these key residues in lipid and cholesterol binding. Our study provides a complete functional map of the VCC membrane-binding surface and insights into the integration of sugar, lipid, and cholesterol binding interactions. PMID:26416894

  17. Cholera toxin enhances Na(+) absorption across MCF10A human mammary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Schultz, Bruce D

    2014-03-01

    Cellular mechanisms to account for the low Na(+) concentration in human milk are poorly defined. MCF10A cells, which were derived from human mammary epithelium and grown on permeable supports, exhibit amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc; a sensitive indicator of net ion transport), suggesting activity of the epithelial Na(+) channel ENaC. When cultured in the presence of cholera toxin (Ctx), MCF10A cells exhibit greater amiloride-sensitive Isc at all time points tested (2 h to 7 days), an effect that is not reduced with Ctx washout for 12 h. Amiloride-sensitive Isc remains elevated by Ctx in the presence of inhibitors for PKA (H-89, Rp-cAMP), PI3K (LY294002), and protein trafficking (brefeldin A). Additionally, the Ctx B subunit, alone, does not replicate these effects. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicate no significant increase in either the mRNA or protein expression for α-, β-, or, γ-ENaC subunits. Ctx increases the abundance of both β- and γ-ENaC in the apical membrane. Additionally, Ctx increases both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated Nedd4-2 expression. These results demonstrate that human mammary epithelia express ENaC, which can account for the low Na(+) concentration in milk. Importantly, the results suggest that Ctx increases the expression but reduces the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which would tend to reduce the ENaC retrieval and increase steady-state membrane residency. The results reveal a novel mechanism in human mammary gland epithelia by which Ctx regulates ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport, which may have inferences for epithelial ion transport regulation in other tissues throughout the body. PMID:24371040

  18. Cholera toxin enhances Na+ absorption across MCF10A human mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms to account for the low Na+ concentration in human milk are poorly defined. MCF10A cells, which were derived from human mammary epithelium and grown on permeable supports, exhibit amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc; a sensitive indicator of net ion transport), suggesting activity of the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC. When cultured in the presence of cholera toxin (Ctx), MCF10A cells exhibit greater amiloride-sensitive Isc at all time points tested (2 h to 7 days), an effect that is not reduced with Ctx washout for 12 h. Amiloride-sensitive Isc remains elevated by Ctx in the presence of inhibitors for PKA (H-89, Rp-cAMP), PI3K (LY294002), and protein trafficking (brefeldin A). Additionally, the Ctx B subunit, alone, does not replicate these effects. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicate no significant increase in either the mRNA or protein expression for α-, β-, or, γ-ENaC subunits. Ctx increases the abundance of both β- and γ-ENaC in the apical membrane. Additionally, Ctx increases both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated Nedd4-2 expression. These results demonstrate that human mammary epithelia express ENaC, which can account for the low Na+ concentration in milk. Importantly, the results suggest that Ctx increases the expression but reduces the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which would tend to reduce the ENaC retrieval and increase steady-state membrane residency. The results reveal a novel mechanism in human mammary gland epithelia by which Ctx regulates ENaC-mediated Na+ transport, which may have inferences for epithelial ion transport regulation in other tissues throughout the body. PMID:24371040

  19. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Shows Transneuronal Tracing after Injection in an Injured Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Bi-Qin; Qiu, Xue-Chen; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Rong-Yi; Jin, Hui; Li, Ge; Shen, Hui-Yong; Wu, Jin-Lang; Ling, Eng-Ang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has been extensively used in the past for monosynaptic mapping. For decades, it was thought to lack the ability of transneuronal tracing. In order to investigate whether biotin conjugates of CTB (b-CTB) would pass through transneurons in the rat spinal cord, it was injected into the crushed left sciatic nerve. For experimental control, the first order afferent neuronal projections were defined by retrograde transport of fluorogold (FG, a non-transneuronal labeling marker as an experimental control) injected into the crushed right sciatic nerve in the same rat. Neurons containing b-CTB or FG were observed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at the L4-L6 levels ipsilateral to the tracer injection. In the spinal cord, b-CTB labeled neurons were distributed in all laminae ipsilaterally between C7 and S1 segments, but labeling of neurons at the cervical segment was abolished when the T10 segment was transected completely. The interneurons, distributed in the intermediate gray matter and identified as gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic), were labeled by b-CTB. In contrast, FG labeling was confined to the ventral horn neurons at L4-L6 spinal segments ipsilateral to the injection. b-CTB immunoreactivity remained to be restricted to the soma of neurons and often appeared as irregular patches detected by light and electron microscopy. Detection of monosialoganglioside (GM1) in b-CTB labeled neurons suggests that GM1 ganglioside may specifically enhance the uptake and transneuronal passage of b-CTB, thus supporting the notion that it may be used as a novel transneuronal tracer. PMID:26640949

  20. Vaccination by cholera toxin conjugated to a herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein D peptide.

    PubMed

    Drew, M D; Estrada-Correa, A; Underdown, B J; McDermott, M R

    1992-09-01

    Immunization of BALB/cJ mice with a peptide corresponding to residues 1 to 23 of glycoprotein D [gD(1-23)] from herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) elicits antibody responses which correlate with protection against lethal HSV-2 infection. In the present study, we examined the ability of cholera toxin (CTX) to act as an immunogenic carrier for gD(1-23). The number of gD(1-23) residues conjugated to CTX affected its binding to GM1 ganglioside and physiological toxicity, both of which are factors affecting oral immunogenicity. The antibody response elicited after intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization with the CTX-gD(1-23) conjugate was protective against a lethal i.p. challenge with HSV-2. In other experiments, mice were immunized i.p. on day 0 and subsequent immunizations conducted on days 14 and 28 were administered either intragastrically or intravaginally (i.vag.). Intraperitoneal priming followed by either i.p or intragastric boosting resulted in anti-HSV-2 antibodies in vaginal washings and in protection against a lethal i.vag. challenge with HSV-2. Intraperitoneal priming followed by i.vag. boosting did not elicit anti-HSV-2 antibodies in vaginal washings and did not protect mice against a lethal i.vag. challenge with HSV-2. These results suggest that CTX can act as a systemic and an oral delivery molecule for the covalently linked gD(1-23) peptide and that such conjugates can elicit protective immune responses against systemic and genital HSV-2 infection. PMID:1383408

  1. Cholera toxin conjugates for intragastric vaccination against herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Drew, M D; Estrada, A E; Underdown, B J; McDermott, M R

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that enteric immunization with cholera toxin (CTX) conjugated to glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or a peptide corresponding to residues (1-23) of gD (gD(1-23)) would induce relevant antiviral immunity. Intraperitoneal (IP) immunization of mice with CTX-gD(1-23) conjugate induced anti-HSV-2 sera antibody responses which correlated with protection from a lethal IP challenge with HSV-2. Intragastric (IG) immunization of mice with the same conjugate or a CTX-gD conjugate did not result in measurable anti-HSV-2 responses in sera or vaginal washings and only small numbers of anti-HSV-2 antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were found in intestinal lamina propria cell and splenocyte preparations. In comparison, anti-CTX responses were detected in sera and vaginal washings after IG immunization with CTX and anti-CTX ASC in lamina propria cell preparations accounted for 5-10% of total ASC detected at this site. No significant differences in the survival of mice immunized with the conjugates were noted after a lethal intravaginal (IVAG) challenge with HSV-2. The poor enteric immunogenicity of gD(1-23) and gD conjugated to CTX was attributable to proteolysis in the gastrointestinal tract. These results indicate that although peptide-CTX conjugates can induce protective immune responses when administered parenterally, it may not be feasible to use peptides as the basis of an oral vaccine unless methods are developed to protect these antigens from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:1503890

  2. Parenteral Adjuvant Effects of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Natural Heat-Labile Toxin Variant

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Catarina J. M.; Rodrigues, Juliana F.; Medina-Armenteros, Yordanka; Farinha-Arcieri, Luís E.; Ventura, Armando M.; Boscardin, Silvia B.; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Native type I heat-labile toxins (LTs) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains exert strong adjuvant effects on both antibody and T cell responses to soluble and particulate antigens following co-administration via mucosal routes. However, inherent enterotoxicity and neurotoxicity (following intra-nasal delivery) had reduced the interest in the use of these toxins as mucosal adjuvants. LTs can also behave as powerful and safe adjuvants following delivery via parenteral routes, particularly for activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the adjuvant effects of a new natural LT polymorphic form (LT2), after delivery via intradermal (i.d.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes, with regard to both antibody and T cell responses. A recombinant HIV-1 p24 protein was employed as a model antigen for determination of antigen-specific immune responses while the reference LT (LT1), produced by the ETEC H10407 strain, and a non-toxigenic LT form (LTK63) were employed as previously characterized LT types. LT-treated mice submitted to a four dose-base immunization regimen elicited similar p24-specific serum IgG responses and CD4+ T cell activation. Nonetheless, mice immunized with LT1 or LT2 induced higher numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and in vivo cytotoxic responses compared to mice immunized with the non-toxic LT derivative. These effects were correlated with stronger activation of local dendritic cell populations. In addition, mice immunized with LT1 and LT2, but not with LTK63, via s.c. or i.d. routes developed local inflammatory reactions. Altogether, the present results confirmed that the two most prevalent natural polymorphic LT variants (LT1 or LT2) display similar and strong adjuvant effects for subunit vaccines administered via i.d. or s.c. routes. PMID:24432018

  3. Escherichia coli K88ac Fimbriae Expressing Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable (STa) Toxin Epitopes Elicit Antibodies That Neutralize Cholera Toxin and STa Toxin and Inhibit Adherence of K88ac Fimbrial E. coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, 8LCSEYRNTQIYTIN21) and an STa toxoid epitope (5CCELCCNPQCAGCY18) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  4. Escherichia coli K88ac fimbriae expressing heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) toxin epitopes elicit antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin and STa toxin and inhibit adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengxian; Zhang, Weiping

    2010-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Bacterial adhesins and heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins are the virulence determinants in ETEC diarrhea. It is believed that vaccines inducing anti-adhesin immunity to inhibit bacterial adherence and anti-toxin immunity to eliminate toxin activity would provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. In this study, an ETEC fimbrial adhesin was used as a platform to express LT and STa for adhesin-toxin fusion antigens to induce anti-toxin and anti-adhesin immunity. An epitope from the B subunit of LT toxin (LTP1, (8)LCSEYRNTQIYTIN(21)) and an STa toxoid epitope ((5)CCELCCNPQCAGCY(18)) were embedded in the FaeG major subunit of E. coli K88ac fimbriae. Constructed K88ac-toxin chimeric fimbriae were harvested and used for rabbit immunization. Immunized rabbits developed anti-K88ac, anti-LT, and anti-STa antibodies. Moreover, induced antibodies not only inhibited adherence of K88ac fimbrial E. coli to porcine small intestinal enterocytes but also neutralized cholera toxin and STa toxin. Data from this study demonstrated that K88ac fimbriae expressing LT and STa epitope antigens elicited neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies and anti-adhesin antibodies and suggested that E. coli fimbriae could serve as a platform for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against ETEC. PMID:20980482

  5. Lipid-sorting by ceramide structure from plasma membrane to ER for the cholera toxin receptor ganglioside GM1

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapen, Daniel J.-F.; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; te Welscher, Yvonne M.; Saslowsky, David E.; Kaoutzani, Lydia; Brandsma, Eelke; D’Auria, Ludovic; Park, Hyejung; Wagner, Jessica S.; Drake, Kimberly R.; Kang, Minchul; Benjamin, Thomas; Ullman, M. David; Costello, Catherine E.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; Baumgart, Tobias; Massol, Ramiro H.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The glycosphingolipid GM1 binds cholera toxin (CT) on host cells and carries it retrograde from the plasma membrane (PM) through endosomes, the trans-Golgi (TGN), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to induce toxicity. To elucidate how a membrane lipid can specify trafficking in these pathways, we synthesized GM1 isoforms with alternate ceramide domains and imaged their trafficking in live cells. Only GM1 with unsaturated acyl chains sorted efficiently from PM to TGN and ER. Toxin binding, which effectively crosslinks GM1 lipids, was dispensable, but membrane cholesterol and the lipid raft-associated proteins actin and flotillin were required. The results implicate a protein-dependent mechanism of lipid-sorting by ceramide structure and provide a molecular explanation for the diversity and specificity of retrograde trafficking by CT in host cells. PMID:22975326

  6. Construction of nontoxic derivatives of cholera toxin and characterization of the immunological response against the A subunit.

    PubMed

    Fontana, M R; Manetti, R; Giannelli, V; Magagnoli, C; Marchini, A; Olivieri, R; Domenighini, M; Rappuoli, R; Pizza, M

    1995-06-01

    Using computer modelling, we have identified some of the residues of the A subunit of cholera toxin (CT) and heat-labile toxin that are involved in NAD binding, catalysis, and toxicity. Here we describe the site-directed mutagenesis of the CT gene and the construction of CT mutants. Nine mutations of the A subunit gene were generated. Six of them encoded proteins that were fully assembled in the AB5 structure and were nontoxic; these proteins were CT-D53 (Val-53-->Asp), CT-K63 (Ser-63-->Lys), CT-K97 (Val-97-->Lys), CT-K104 (Tyr-104-->Lys), CT-S106 (Pro-106-->Ser), and the double mutant CT-D53/K63 (Val-53-->Asp, Ser-63-->Lys). Two of the mutations encoded proteins that were assembled into the AB5 structure but were still toxic; these proteins were CT-H54 (Arg-54-->His) and CT-N107 (His-107-->Asn). Finally, one of the mutant proteins, CT-E114 (Ser-114-->Glu), was unable to assemble the A and the B subunits and produced only the B oligomer. The six nontoxic mutants were purified from the culture supernatants of recombinant Vibrio cholerae strains and further characterized. The CT-K63 mutant, which was the most efficient in assembly of the AB5 structure, was used to immunize rabbits and was shown to be able to induce neutralizing antibodies against both the A and B subunits. This molecule may be useful for the construction of improved vaccines against cholera. PMID:7768621

  7. Cholera studies*†

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.; Burrows, W.

    1955-01-01

    Relevant information regarding the numerous problems encountered in cholera immunity is dealt with in great detail in this study. Toxin production, bacterial virulence, serological reactions, and the antigenic structure of V. cholerae are discussed. Natural, passive, and active cholera immunity receives special attention, the authors describing the various means of vaccination as well as the evaluation of the immunity induced. PMID:13240451

  8. Toxin producing Vibrio cholerae O75 outbreak, United States, March to April 2011.

    PubMed

    Onifade, T J M; Hutchinson, R; Van Zile, K; Bodager, D; Baker, R; Blackmore, C

    2011-01-01

    The Florida Department of Health, Florida, United States, is investigating a Vibrio cholerae O75 outbreak. Ten cases with disease onsets from 23 March to 13 April 2011, presented with gastrointestinal symptoms of diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, cramps, chills, and/or fever, after consuming raw or lightly cooked oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. Symptoms were milder than those during outbreaks of epidemic (serogroup O1 and O139) Vibrio cholerae; no case required rehydration treatment or hospitalisation. PMID:21616048

  9. Rapid and Scalable Plant-based Production of a Cholera Toxin B Subunit Variant to Aid in Mass Vaccination against Cholera Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lauren J.; Baldauf, Keegan J.; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine. The protein induces neutralizing antibodies against the holotoxin, the virulence factor responsible for severe diarrhea. A field clinical trial has suggested that the addition of CTB to killed whole-cell bacteria provides superior short-term protection to whole-cell-only vaccines; however, challenges in CTB biomanufacturing (i.e., cost and scale) hamper its implementation to mass vaccination in developing countries. To provide a potential solution to this issue, we developed a rapid, robust, and scalable CTB production system in plants. Methodology/Principal Findings In a preliminary study of expressing original CTB in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, the protein was N-glycosylated with plant-specific glycans. Thus, an aglycosylated CTB variant (pCTB) was created and overexpressed via a plant virus vector. Upon additional transgene engineering for retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and optimization of a secretory signal, the yield of pCTB was dramatically improved, reaching >1 g per kg of fresh leaf material. The protein was efficiently purified by simple two-step chromatography. The GM1-ganglioside binding capacity and conformational stability of pCTB were virtually identical to the bacteria-derived original B subunit, as demonstrated in competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence-based thermal shift assay. Mammalian cell surface-binding was corroborated by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. pCTB exhibited strong oral immunogenicity in mice, inducing significant levels of CTB-specific intestinal antibodies that persisted over 6 months. Moreover, these antibodies effectively neutralized the cholera holotoxin in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results demonstrated that pCTB has robust producibility in Nicotiana plants and retains most, if not all, of major biological activities of

  10. Mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin lacking ADP-ribosyltransferase activity act as nontoxic, mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Douce, G; Turcotte, C; Cropley, I; Roberts, M; Pizza, M; Domenghini, M; Rappuoli, R; Dougan, G

    1995-02-28

    A nontoxic mutant (LTK7) of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) lacking ADP-ribosylating activity but retaining holotoxin formation was constructed. By using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine at position 7 of the A subunit was replaced with lysine. This molecule, which was nontoxic in several assays, was able to bind to eukaryotic cells and acted as a mucosal adjuvant for co-administered proteins; BALB/c mice immunized intranasally with LTK7 and ovalbumin developed high levels of serum and local antibodies to ovalbumin and toxin. In addition, mice immunized intranasally with fragment C of tetanus toxin and LTK7 were protected against lethal challenge with tetanus toxin. Thus nontoxic mutants of heat-labile toxin can act as effective intranasal mucosal adjuvants. PMID:7878032

  11. Molecular recognition and colorimetric detection of cholera toxin by poly(diacetylene) liposomes incorporating G{sub m1} ganglioside

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, J.J.; Charych, D.

    1997-03-19

    Molecular recognition sites on cell membranes serve as the main communication channels between the inside of a cell and its surroundings. Upon receptor binding, cellular messages such as ion channel opening or activation of enzymes are triggered. In this report, we demonstrate that artificial cell membranes made from conjugated lipid polymers (poly(diacetylene)) can, on a simple level, mimic membrane processes of molecular recognition and signal transduction. The ganglioside GM1 was incorporated into poly(diacetylene) liposomes. Molecular recognition of cholera toxin at the interface of the liposome resulted in a change of the membrane color due to conformational charges in the conjugated (ene-yne) polymer backbone. The `colored liposomes` might be used as simple colorimetric sensors for drug screening or as new tools to study membrane-membrane or membrane-receptor interactions. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Expression of recombinant T-cell epitopes of major Japanese cedar pollen allergens fused with cholera toxin B subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vinh Van; Zou, Yanshuang; Kurata, Kentaro; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Peptides containing T-cell epitopes from allergens, which are not reactive to allergen-specific IgE, are appropriate candidates as antigens for specific immunotherapy against allergies. To develop a vaccine that can be used in practical application to prevent and treat Japanese cedar pollen allergy, four major T-cell epitopes from the Cry j 1 antigen and six from the Cry j 2 antigen were selected to design cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi, DNA constructs encoding artificial polypeptides of the selected epitopes. To apply cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as an adjuvant, cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi were linked and then fused to the CTB gene in tandem to construct a fusion gene, ctb-linker-cry j 1 epi- cry j 2 epi-flag. The fusion gene was introduced into a pET-28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The expressed recombinant protein was purified by a His-tag affinity column and confirmed by western blot analysis using anti-CTB and anti-FLAG antibodies. The purified recombinant protein also proved to be antigenic against anti-Cry j 1 and anti-Cry j 2 antibodies. Expression of the recombinant protein induced with 1mM IPTG reached a maximum in 3-5h, and recovery of the affinity-purified recombinant protein was approximately 120mg/L of culture medium. The present study indicates that production of sufficient amounts of recombinant protein with antigenic epitopes may be possible by recombinant techniques using E. coli or other bacterial strains for protein expression. PMID:25665505

  13. Immunization with the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Fused to Fimbria 2 Protein Protects against Bordetella pertussis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castuma, Celina E.; Hozbor, Daniela; Gaillard, María E.; Rumbo, Martín; Gómez, Ricardo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the immunogenic properties of the fusion protein fimbria 2 of Bordetella pertussis (Fim2)—cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in the intranasal murine model of infection. To this end B. pertussis Fim2 coding sequence was cloned downstream of the cholera toxin B subunit coding sequence. The expression and assembly of the fusion protein into pentameric structures (CTB-Fim2) were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and monosialotetrahexosylgaglioside (GM1-ganglioside) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To evaluate the protective capacity of CTB-Fim2, an intraperitoneal or intranasal mouse immunization schedule was performed with 50 μg of CTB-Fim2. Recombinant (rFim2) or purified (BpFim2) Fim2, CTB, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. The results showed that mice immunized with BpFim2 or CTB-Fim2 intraperitoneally or intranasally presented a significant reduction in bacterial lung counts compared to control groups (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001 , resp.). Moreover, intranasal immunization with CTB-Fim2 induced significant levels of Fim2-specific IgG in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and Fim2-specific IgA in BAL. Analysis of IgG isotypes and cytokines mRNA levels showed that CTB-Fim2 results in a mixed Th1/Th2 (T-helper) response. The data presented here provide support for CTB-Fim2 as a promising recombinant antigen against Bordetella pertussis infection. PMID:24982881

  14. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  15. Mucosal immunogenicity of a recombinant Salmonella typhimurium-cloned heterologous antigen in the absence or presence of coexpressed cholera toxin A2 and B subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Harokopakis, E; Hajishengallis, G; Greenway, T E; Russell, M W; Michalek, S M

    1997-01-01

    An avirulent Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing a streptococcal protein adhesin and a similar clone which produces the same streptococcal antigen linked to the cholera toxin (CT) A2 and B subunits (CTA2/B) were compared for the ability to induce antibody responses to the expressed heterologous antigen after oral or intranasal immunization of mice. Expression of cloned immunogens in these systems is temperature regulated, being optimal at 37 degrees C, and the two clones under comparison were shown to produce similar levels of the streptococcal antigen. Both clones were found to stimulate high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA antibodies to the cloned immunogen. A consistent trend was observed toward higher mucosal IgA but lower serum IgG responses in the case of the S. typhimurium vector that coexpressed CTA2/B, a potential mucosal adjuvant, regardless of the route of administration. Also noteworthy was the capacity of these antigen delivery systems to induce anamnestic systemic and secretory responses to the cloned immunogen 15 weeks after the primary immunization, despite preexisting immunity to the Salmonella vectors. These antibody responses were sustained for at least 7 months following the booster immunization, at which time the secretory IgA antibody levels were significantly higher in mice given the Salmonella clone that coexpressed CTA2/B. Although the serum IgG response against the Salmonella vector was characterized by a high IgG2a/IgG1 ratio (indicative of the T helper type 1 [Th1]/Th2 profile), a mixed IgG1 and IgG2a pattern was observed for the carried heterologous antigen, which displayed a dominant IgG1 response when administered as a purified immunogen. Our findings indicate that the recombinant streptococcal antigen and CTA2/B are strong immunogens when expressed by the antigen delivery system used in this study and suggest that CTA2/B may have an additional immunoenhancing activity in the mucosal compartment

  16. Comparison of Shiga-like toxin I B-subunit expression and localization in Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae by using trc or iron-regulated promoter systems.

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, D W; Calderwood, S B; Boyko, S A; Lincicome, L L; Kane, A V; Donohue-Rolfe, A; Keusch, G T

    1993-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin I (SLT-I) B-subunit expression was examined by using the trc promoter in two different constructs, pSBC32 and pSBC54, in which 710 bp of DNA downstream of the B subunit in pSBC32 was deleted. The trc promoter in pSBC54 was replaced also with the SLT-I iron-regulated promoter to create a third plasmid, pSBC61. SLT-I B-subunit expression was examined from all three plasmids following transfer into Escherichia coli JM105 and the cholera toxin A-subunit gene deletion mutant Vibrio cholerae 0395-N1. The SLT-I B subunit was expressed from all constructs. pSBC61 was regulated by elemental iron and produced equivalent amounts of SLT-I B subunit from both E. coli and V. cholerae. In contrast to the cholera toxin B subunit, virtually all released into the medium, the SLT-I B subunit was predominantly cell associated in the pSBC61 constructs. Both pSBC32 and pSBC54 were inducible with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in the E. coli background but not the V. cholerae background; however, when E. coli cultures were allowed to grow for 24 h, the yield of SLT-I B subunit was not increased by IPTG induction. Both pSBC32 and -54 expressed more SLT-I B subunit in the V. cholerae host than in the E. coli host. Scale-up to a 9.9-liter fermentor culture of V. cholerae 0395 N1 (pSBC32) resulted in the isolation of 220 mg of SLT-I B. The purified B subunit was identical, in terms of binding to Vero cells, stoichiometry after chemical cross-linking, and ability to inhibit cytotoxicity of intact Shiga toxin, to native SLT-I B subunit from E. coli O157:H7. Images PMID:8432592

  17. Novel GM1 ganglioside-like peptide mimics prevent the association of cholera toxin to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Robert K; Usuki, Seigo; Itokazu, Yutaka; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract by the gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, and is a serious public health threat worldwide. There has not been any effective treatment for this infectious disease. Cholera toxin (CT), which is secreted by V. cholerae, can enter host cells by binding to GM1, a monosialoganglioside widely distributed on the plasma membrane surface of various animal epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to generate peptides that are conformationally similar to the carbohydrate epitope of GM1 for use in the treatment of cholera and related bacterial infection. For this purpose, we used cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit to select CTB-binding peptides that structurally mimic GM1 from a dodecamer phage-display library. Six GM1-replica peptides were selected by biopanning based on CTB recognition. Five of the six peptides showed inhibitory activity for GM1 binding to CTB. To test the potential of employing the peptide mimics for intervening with the bacterial infection, those peptides were examined for their binding capacity, functional inhibitory activity and in vitro effects using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2 cells. One of the peptides, P3 (IPQVWRDWFKLP), was most effective in inhibiting cellular uptake of CTB and suppressing CT-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in the cells. Our results thus provide convincing evidence that GM1-replica peptides could serve as novel agents to block CTB binding on epithelial cells and prevent the ensuing physiological effects of CT. PMID:26405107

  18. Mechanism of activation of cholera toxin by ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF): both low- and high-affinity interactions of ARF with guanine nucleotides promote toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Bobak, D A; Bliziotes, M M; Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J

    1990-01-30

    Activation of adenylyl cyclase by cholera toxin A subunit (CT-A) results from the ADP-ribosylation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (GS alpha). This process requires GTP and an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein known as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF). One membrane (mARF) and two soluble forms (sARF I and sARF II) of ARF have been purified from bovine brain. Because the conditions reported to enhance the binding of guanine nucleotides by ARF differ from those observed to promote optimal activity, we sought to characterize the determinants influencing the functional interaction of guanine nucleotides with ARF. High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II (apparent KD of approximately 70 nM) required Mg2+, DMPC, and sodium cholate. sARF II, in DMPC/cholate, also enhanced CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 50 nM), although there was a delay before achievement of a maximal rate of sARF II stimulated toxin activity. The delay was abolished by incubation of sARF II with GTP at 30 degrees C before initiation of the assay. In contrast, a maximal rate of activation of toxin by sARF II, in 0.003% SDS, occurred without delay (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 5 microM). High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II was not detectable in SDS. Enhancement of CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity by sARF II, therefore, can occur under conditions in which sARF II exhibits either a relatively low affinity or a relatively high affinity for GTP. The interaction of GTP with ARF under these conditions may reflect ways in which intracellular membrane and cytosolic environments modulate GTP-mediated activation of ARF. PMID:2111167

  19. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  20. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  1. Measurement of the binding of cholera toxin to GM1 gangliosides on solid supported lipid bilayer vesicles and inhibition by europium (III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas L; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2008-05-21

    In this paper the immobilization of small unilamellar DMPC/GM1 lipid vesicles containing a water-soluble bodipy dye is described. The binding of the complete alphabeta toxin expressed by Vibrio cholerae to the attached vesicles was measured using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and a value of the dissociation constant K d obtained. Further measurements showed that the interaction of both the alphabeta-toxin and the beta-subunit alone resulted in the permeation of the lipid membrane, with release of a fluorophore contained within the vesicle being measured by combined SPR and Surface Plasmon enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SPFS). The leakage of dye through the membrane, measured by following the change in fluorescence, was fitted to a simple diffusion model. Finally, SPFS measurements of the effect of europium(III) chloride (EuCl 3) showed that cholera toxin binding and subsequent membrane permeation could be blocked by 1 micromol dm (-3) europium chloride. In view of the low oral toxicity of europium chloride, we speculate on the potential pharmaceutical applications of this molecule in the treatment of cholera infection. PMID:18412339

  2. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini remained unaffected even after increased oxidation. Staining with the subunit was also reduced significantly by adding galactose to the incubation medium. Binding of CTB to cell surfaces apparently requires intact sialic groups on most, but not all, cell surfaces. Oxidation of the sialic acid residues may influence the structure of the sialylated GM1 molecules on the cell surface in different ways. It is possible that both the sialic acid residue and the terminal galactose are oxidized. Alternatively, the sialic acid may be resistant to acid hydrolysis in gangliosides in which the sialic acid is attached to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human milk contains high levels of sialic acid glycoconjugates that may provide defense mechanisms. PMID:26472148

  3. GTP but not GDP analogues promote association of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa protein activators of cholera toxin, with phospholipids and PC-12 cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M W; Bobak, D A; Tsai, S C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-02-15

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins initially identified by their ability to enhance cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in the presence of GTP. ARFs have been purified from both membrane and cytosolic fractions. ARF purified from bovine brain cytosol requires phospholipid plus detergent for high affinity guanine nucleotide binding and for optimal enhancement of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The phospholipid requirements, combined with a putative role for ARF in vesicular transport, suggested that the soluble protein might interact reversibly with membranes. A polyclonal antibody against purified bovine ARF (sARF II) was used to detect ARF by immunoblot in membrane and soluble fractions from rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell homogenates. ARF was predominantly cytosolic but increased in membranes during incubation of homogenates with nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), guanylyl-(beta gamma-imido)-diphosphate, and guanylyl-(beta gamma-methylene)-diphosphate, and to a lesser extent, adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). GTP, GDP, GMP, and ATP were inactive. Cytosolic ARF similarly associated with added phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, or cardiolipin in GTP gamma S-dependent fashion. ARF binding to phosphatidylserine was reversible and coincident with stimulation of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. These observations may reflect a mechanism by which ARF could cycle between soluble and membrane compartments in vivo. PMID:1737779

  4. Oral Immunization with Cholera Toxin Provides Protection against Campylobacter jejuni in an Adult Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M. John; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Islam, Anjum; Haridas, Shilpa

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunity to Campylobacter jejuni, a major diarrheal pathogen, is largely Penner serotype specific. For broad protection, a vaccine should be based on a common antigen(s) present in all strains. In our previous study (M. J. Albert, S. Haridas, D. Steer, G. S. Dhaunsi, A. I. Smith, and B. Adler, Infect. Immun. 75:3070–3073, 2007), we demonstrated that antibody to cholera toxin (CT) cross-reacted with the major outer membrane proteins (MOMPs) of all Campylobacter jejuni strains tested. In the current study, we investigated whether immunization with CT protects against intestinal colonization by C. jejuni in an adult mouse model and whether the nontoxic subunit of CT (CT-B) is the portion mediating cross-reaction. Mice were orally immunized with CT and later challenged with C. jejuni strains (48, 75, and 111) of different serotypes. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline. Fecal shedding of challenge organisms was studied daily for 9 days. Serum and fecal antibody responses were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. The cross-reactivity of rabbit CT-B antibody to MOMP was studied by immunoblotting. The reactivity of 21 overlapping 30-mer oligopeptides (based on MOMP’s sequence) against rabbit CT antibody was tested by ELISA. Test animals produced antibodies to CT and MMP in serum and feces and showed resistance to colonization, the vaccine efficacies being 49% (for strain 48), 37% (for strain 75), and 34% (for strain 111) (P, ≤0.05 to ≤0.001). One peptide corresponding to a variable region of MOMP showed significant reactivity. CT-B antibody cross-reacted with MOMP. Since CT-B is a component of oral cholera vaccines, it might be possible to control C. jejuni diarrhea with these vaccines. PMID:23653448

  5. Expression of the Native Cholera Toxin B Subunit Gene and Assembly as Functional Oligomers in Transgenic Tobacco Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, Henry; Lee, Seung-Bum; Panchal, Tanvi; Wiebe, Peter O.

    2012-01-01

    The B subunits of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (LTB) and cholera toxin of Vibrio cholerae (CTB) are candidate vaccine antigens. Integration of an unmodified CTB-coding sequence into chloroplast genomes (up to 10,000 copies per cell), resulted in the accumulation of up to 4.1% of total soluble tobacco leaf protein as functional oligomers (410-fold higher expression levels than that of the unmodified LTB gene expressed via the nuclear genome). However, expresssion levels reported are an underestimation of actual accumulation of CTB in transgenic chloroplasts, due to aggregation of the oligomeric forms in unboiled samples similar to the aggregation observed for purified bacterial antigen. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of the CTB gene into the chloroplast genome. Western blot analysis showed that the chloroplast-synthesized CTB assembled into oligomers and were antigenically identical with purified native CTB. Also, binding assays confirmed that chloroplast- synthesized CTB binds to the intestinal membrane GM1-ganglioside receptor, indicating correct folding and disulfide bond formation of CTB pentamers within transgenic chloroplasts. In contrast to stunted nuclear transgenic plants, chloroplast transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from untransformed plants, when CTB was constitutively expressed in chloroplasts. Introduced genes were inherited stably in subsequent generations, as confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Increased production of an efficient transmucosal carrier molecule and delivery system, like CTB, in transgenic chloroplasts makes plant-based oral vaccines and fusion proteins with CTB needing oral administration commercially feasible. Successful expression of foreign genes in transgenic chromoplasts and availability of marker-free chloroplast transformation techniques augurs well for development of vaccines in edible parts of transgenic plants. Furthermore, since the quaternary structure of

  6. Synthetic peptides with antigenic specificity for bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sela, M; Arnon, R; Jacob, C O

    1986-01-01

    The attachment of a diphtheria toxin-specific synthetic antigenic determinant and a synthetic adjuvant to a synthetic polymeric carrier led to production of a totally synthetic macromolecule which provoked protective antibodies against diphtheria when administered in aqueous solution. When peptides related to the B subunit of cholera toxin were synthesized and attached to tetanus toxoid, antibodies produced against the conjugate reacted in some but not all cases with intact cholera toxin and (especially with peptide CTP 3, residues 50-64) neutralized toxin reactivity, as tested by permeability in rabbit skin, fluid accumulation in ligated small intestinal loops and adenylate cyclase activation. Polymerization of the peptide without any external carrier, or conjugation with the dipalmityl lysine group, had as good an effect in enhancing the immune response as its attachment to tetanus toxoid. Prior exposure to the carrier suppressed the immune response to the epitope attached to it, whereas prior exposure to the synthetic peptide had a good priming effect when the intact toxin was given; when two different peptides were attached to the same carrier, both were expressed. Antisera against peptide CTP 3 were highly cross-reactive with the heat-labile toxin of Escherichia coli and neutralized it to the same extent as cholera toxin, which is not surprising in view of the great homology between the two proteins. A synthetic oligonucleotide coding for CTP 3 has been used to express the peptide in a form suitable for immunization. It led to a priming effect against the intact cholera toxin. PMID:2426052

  7. Evaluation in Mice of a Conjugate Vaccine for Cholera Made from Vibrio cholerae O1 (Ogawa) O-Specific Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kalsy, Anuj; Yu, Y.; Freeman, Y. Wu; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md. Rasheduzzaman; Desai, Ishaan; Eckhoff, Grace; Leung, Daniel T.; Charles, Richelle C.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Clements, John D.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W. F.; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Protective immunity against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity in Vibrio cholerae is determined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Generally, polysaccharides are poorly immunogenic, especially in young children. Methodology Here we report the evaluation in mice of a conjugate vaccine for cholera (OSP:TThc) made from V. cholerae O1 Ogawa O-Specific Polysaccharide–core (OSP) and recombinant tetanus toxoid heavy chain fragment (TThc). We immunized mice intramuscularly on days 0, 21, and 42 with OSP:TThc or OSP only, with or without dmLT, a non-toxigenic immunoadjuvant derived from heat labile toxin of Escherichia coli. Principal Findings We detected significant serum IgG antibody responses targeting OSP following a single immunization in mice receiving OSP:TThc with or without adjuvant. Anti-LPS IgG responses were detected following a second immunization in these cohorts. No anti-OSP or anti-LPS IgG responses were detected at any time in animals receiving un-conjugated OSP with or without immunoadjuvant, and in animals receiving immunoadjuvant alone. Responses were highest following immunization with adjuvant. Serum anti-OSP IgM responses were detected in mice receiving OSP:TThc with or without immunoadjuvant, and in mice receiving unconjugated OSP. Serum anti-LPS IgM and vibriocidal responses were detected in all vaccine cohorts except in mice receiving immunoadjuvant alone. No significant IgA anti-OSP or anti-LPS responses developed in any group. Administration of OSP:TThc and adjuvant also induced memory B cell responses targeting OSP and resulted in 95% protective efficacy in a mouse lethality cholera challenge model. Conclusion We describe a protectively immunogenic cholera conjugate in mice. Development of a cholera conjugate vaccine could assist in inducing long-term protective immunity, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens. PMID:24516685

  8. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of experimental group B streptococcus type III polysaccharide-cholera toxin B subunit conjugate vaccine for intranasal immunization.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Lagergård, T; Yang, Y; Lindblad, M; Fredriksson, M; Holmgren, J

    2000-11-22

    Streptococcus group B (GBS) is usually carried asymptomatically in the vaginal tract of women and can be transferred to the newborn during parturition. Serum antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) can prevent invasive diseases, whereas immunity acting at the mucosal surface may be more important to inhibit the mucosal colonization of GBS and thus the risk of infection for the newborn. We prepared different GBS type III CPS-protein conjugate vaccines and evaluated their systemic and mucosal immunogenicity in mice. GBS type III CPS was conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) either directly or to rCTB indirectly via TT. The conjugation was performed by different methods: (1) CPS was coupled to TT with 1-ethyl-3 (3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDAC), using adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer; (2) CPS was conjugated with rCTB using reductive amination; or, (3) N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) was used to bind rCTB to the TT of the CPS-TT conjugate. Mice were immunized with these conjugates or purified CPS by subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i. n.) routes. Antibodies to GBS III in serum, lungs and vagina were measured with ELISA. All of the CPS-protein conjugates were superior to unconjugated CPS in eliciting CPS-specific immune responses in serum and mucosal tissue extracts. The conjugates, when administrated s.c., induced only IgG responses in serum, lung and vagina, while i.n. vaccination also elicited IgA responses in the lungs and vagina. The CPS-TT conjugate administrated i.n. induced a strong serum IgG, but only a weak mucosal IgA response, while the CPS-rCTB conjugate elicited high IgG as well as IgA antibodies in the lungs after i.n. immunization. GBS III CPS-TT conjugated with rCTB produced a strong systemic and local anti-CPSIII response after i.n. administration. Co-administration of CT as adjuvant enhanced the anti-CPS systemic and mucosal immune responses further after i

  9. NAD metabolism in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J W; Brestel, C

    1982-01-01

    Extracts of Vibrio cholerae were assayed for various enzymatic activities associated with pyridine nucleotide cycle metabolism. The activities measured include NAD glycohydrolase, nicotinamide deamidase, nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase, and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. The results obtained demonstrate the existence in V. cholerae of the five-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle and the potential for a four-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle. The data presented also suggest that most of the NAD glycohydrolase in V. cholerae extracts is not directly related to cholera toxin. PMID:6119307

  10. Enterotoxigenicity of Mature 45-Kilodalton and Processed 35-Kilodalton Forms of Hemagglutinin Protease Purified from a Cholera Toxin Gene-Negative Vibrio cholerae Non-O1, Non-O139 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, A.; Saha, D. R.; Hoque, K. M.; Asakuna, M.; Yamasaki, S.; Koley, H.; Das, S. S.; Chakrabarti, M. K.; Pal, A.

    2006-01-01

    Cholera toxin gene-negative Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 strain PL-21 is the etiologic agent of cholera-like syndrome. Hemagglutinin protease (HAP) is one of the major secretory proteins of PL-21. The mature 45-kDa and processed 35-kDa forms of HAP were purified in the presence and absence of EDTA from culture supernatants of PL-21. Enterotoxigenicities of both forms of HAP were tested in rabbit ileal loop (RIL), Ussing chamber, and tissue culture assays. The 35-kDa HAP showed hemorrhagic fluid response in a dose-dependent manner in the RIL assay. Histopathological examination of 20 μg of purified protease-treated rabbit ileum showed the presence of erythrocytes and neutrophils in the upper part of the villous lamina propria. Treatment with 40 μg of protease resulted in gross damage of the villous epithelium with inflammation, hemorrhage, and necrosis. The 35-kDa form of HAP, when added to the lumenal surface of rat ileum loaded in an Ussing chamber, showed a decrease in the intestinal short-circuit current and a cell rounding effect on HeLa cells. The mature 45-kDa form of HAP showed an increase in intestinal short-circuit current in an Ussing chamber and a cell distending effect on HeLa cells. These results show that HAP may play a role in the pathogenesis of PL-21. PMID:16622232

  11. Comparative Adjuvant Effects of Type II Heat-Labile Enterotoxins in Combination with Two Different Candidate Ricin Toxin Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vance, David J.; Greene, Christopher J.; Rong, Yinghui; Mandell, Lorrie M.; Connell, Terry D.

    2015-01-01

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (HLTs) constitute a promising set of adjuvants that have been shown to enhance humoral and cellular immune responses when coadministered with an array of different proteins, including several pathogen-associated antigens. However, the adjuvant activities of the four best-studied HLTs, LT-IIa, LT-IIb, LT-IIbT13I, and LT-IIc, have never been compared side by side. We therefore conducted immunization studies in which LT-IIa, LT-IIb, LT-IIbT13I, and LT-IIc were coadministered by the intradermal route to mice with two clinically relevant protein subunit vaccine antigens derived from the enzymatic A subunit (RTA) of ricin toxin, RiVax and RVEc. The HLTs were tested with low and high doses of antigen and were assessed for their abilities to stimulate antigen-specific serum IgG titers, ricin toxin-neutralizing activity (TNA), and protective immunity. We found that all four HLTs tested were effective adjuvants when coadministered with RiVax or RVEc. LT-IIa was of particular interest because as little as 0.03 μg when coadministered with RiVax or RVEc proved effective at augmenting ricin toxin-specific serum antibody titers with nominal evidence of local inflammation. Collectively, these results justify the need for further studies into the mechanism(s) underlying LT-IIa adjuvant activity, with the long-term goal of evaluating LT-IIa's activity in humans. PMID:26491037

  12. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fil'kova, S.L.; Il'ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-11-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc/sup R/) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production.

  13. A subpopulation of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin-B injected into the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kim, D O; Yang, X M; Ye, Y

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that: (1) raphe neurons respond to acoustic and vestibular stimuli, some with a latency of 10-15 ms; (2) alterations of the raphe nuclei alter the acoustic startle reflex; (3) the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the major source of serotonergic neurons; and (4) approximately 57% of the DRN neurons are nonserotonergic. In the present study, cholera toxin subunit-B (CTB) was injected into cat cochleas, and the brain tissue was examined after a survival period of 5-7 days. Aside from neurons which were known to project to the inner ear, i.e., olivocochlear and vestibular efferent neurons, a surprising new finding was made that somata of a subpopulation of DRN neurons were intensely labeled with CTB. These CTB-labeled neurons were densely distributed in a dorsomedian part of the DRN with some in a surrounding area outside the DRN. The present results suggest that a novel raphe-labyrinthine projection may exist. A future study of anterograde labeling with injections of a tracer in the DRN will be needed to establish the existence of a raphe-labyrinthine projection more thoroughly. A raphe-labyrinthine descending input, together with an ascending input from the inner ear to the DRN through intervening neurons, such as the juxta-acousticofloccular raphe neurons (JAFRNs) described by Ye and Kim, may mediate a brain stem reflex whereby a salient multisensory (including auditory and vestibular) stimulus may alter the sensitivity of the inner ear. As a mammal responds to a biologically important auditory-vestibular multisensory event, the raphe projections to the inner ear and other auditory and vestibular structures may enhance the mammal's ability to localize and recognize the sound and respond properly. The raphe-labyrinthine projection may also modulate the inner ear's sensitivity as a function of the sleep-wake arousal state of an organism on a slower time course. PMID:12961055

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of human ADP-ribosylation factors: two guanine nucleotide-dependent activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, D A; Nightingale, M S; Murtagh, J J; Price, S R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance the enzymatic activities of cholera toxin. Two ARF cDNAs, ARF1 and ARF3, were cloned from a human cerebellum library. Based on deduced amino acid sequences and patterns of hybridization of cDNA and oligonucleotide probes with mammalian brain poly(A)+ RNA, human ARF1 is the homologue of bovine ARF1. Human ARF3, which differs from bovine ARF1 and bovine ARF2, appears to represent a newly identified third type of ARF. Hybridization patterns of human ARF cDNA and clone-specific oligonucleotides with poly(A)+ RNA are consistent with the presence of at least two, and perhaps four, separate ARF messages in human brain. In vitro translation of ARF1, ARF2, and ARF3 produced proteins that behaved, by SDS/PAGE, similar to a purified soluble brain ARF. Deduced amino acid sequences of human ARF1 and ARF3 contain regions, similar to those in other G proteins, that are believed to be involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. ARFs also exhibit a modest degree of homology with a bovine phospholipase C. The observations reported here support the conclusion that the ARFs are members of a multigene family of small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Definition of the regulation of ARF mRNAs and of function(s) of recombinant ARF proteins will aid in the elucidation of the physiologic role(s) of ARFs. Images PMID:2474826

  15. Toxin Mediated Diarrhea in the 21st Century: The Pathophysiology of Intestinal Ion Transport in the Course of ETEC, V. cholerae and Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kopic, Sascha; Geibel, John P.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 4 billion episodes of diarrhea occur each year. As a result, 2–3 million children and 0.5–1 million adults succumb to the consequences of this major healthcare concern. The majority of these deaths can be attributed to toxin mediated diarrhea by infectious agents, such as E. coli, V. cholerae or Rotavirus. Our understanding of the pathophysiological processes underlying these infectious diseases has notably improved over the last years. This review will focus on the cellular mechanism of action of the most common enterotoxins and the latest specific therapeutic approaches that have been developed to contain their lethal effects. PMID:22069677

  16. Oral immunization of interleukin-4 (IL-4) knockout mice with a recombinant Salmonella strain or cholera toxin reveals that CD4+ Th2 cells producing IL-6 and IL-10 are associated with mucosal immunoglobulin A responses.

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, N; Yamamoto, M; Vancott, J L; Chatfield, S N; Roberts, M; Bluethmann, H; Hiroi, T; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R

    1996-01-01

    Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses are often associated with Th2-type cells and derived cytokines, and interleukin-4 (IL-4) knockout (IL-4-/-) mice with impaired Th2 cells respond poorly to oral antigens. However, we have noted that IL-4-/- mice have normal mucosal IgA levels, which led us to query whether different oral delivery systems could elicit mucosal immunity. Two oral regimens were used: (i) a live recombinant Salmonella strain which expresses fragment C (ToxC) of tetanus toxin, and (ii) soluble tetanus toxoid (TT) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. Oral immunization of IL-4-/- mice with recombinant Salmonella vaccine expressing ToxC induced brisk mucosal IgA and serum IgG (mainly IgG2a) anti-TT antibody responses. TT-specific CD4+ T cells from spleen or Peyer's patches produced gamma interferon, indicative of Th1 responses; however, IL-6 and IL-10 were also seen. Oral immunization of IL-4-/- mice with TT and CT induced weak mucosal IgA to TT; however, brisk IgA anti-CT-B responses and CT-B-specific CD4+ T cells producing IL-6 and IL-10 were also noted. These results show that although IL-4-dependent antibody responses are impaired, mucosal IgA responses are induced in IL-4-/- mice. These result suggest that certain cytokines, i.e., IL-6 and IL-10 from Th2-type cells, play an important compensatory role in the induction and regulation of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:8613355

  17. N-glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana: impacts on host stress response, production yield and vaccine potential.

    PubMed

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Kouokam, J Calvin; Jurkiewicz, Jessica M; Nelson, Bailey; Moore, Lauren J; Husk, Adam S; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based transient overexpression systems enable rapid and scalable production of subunit vaccines. Previously, we have shown that cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), an oral cholera vaccine antigen, is N-glycosylated upon expression in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. Here, we found that overexpression of aglycosylated CTB by agroinfiltration of a tobamoviral vector causes massive tissue necrosis and poor accumulation unless retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the re-introduction of N-glycosylation to its original or an alternative site significantly relieved the necrosis and provided a high CTB yield without ER retention. Quantitative gene expression analysis of PDI, BiP, bZIP60, SKP1, 26Sα proteasome and PR1a, and the detection of ubiquitinated CTB polypeptides revealed that N-glycosylation significantly relieved ER stress and hypersensitive response, and facilitated the folding/assembly of CTB. The glycosylated CTB (gCTB) was characterized for potential vaccine use. Glycan profiling revealed that gCTB contained approximately 38% plant-specific glycans. gCTB retained nanomolar affinity to GM1-ganglioside with only marginal reduction of physicochemical stability and induced an anti-cholera holotoxin antibody response comparable to native CTB in a mouse oral immunization study. These findings demonstrated gCTB's potential as an oral immunogen and point to a potential role of N-glycosylation in increasing recombinant protein yields in plants. PMID:25614217

  18. N-Glycosylation of cholera toxin B subunit in Nicotiana benthamiana: impacts on host stress response, production yield and vaccine potential

    PubMed Central

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Kouokam, J. Calvin; Jurkiewicz, Jessica M.; Nelson, Bailey; Moore, Lauren J.; Husk, Adam S.; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based transient overexpression systems enable rapid and scalable production of subunit vaccines. Previously, we have shown that cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), an oral cholera vaccine antigen, is N-glycosylated upon expression in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana. Here, we found that overexpression of aglycosylated CTB by agroinfiltration of a tobamoviral vector causes massive tissue necrosis and poor accumulation unless retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the re-introduction of N-glycosylation to its original or an alternative site significantly relieved the necrosis and provided a high CTB yield without ER retention. Quantitative gene expression analysis of PDI, BiP, bZIP60, SKP1, 26Sα proteasome and PR1a, and the detection of ubiquitinated CTB polypeptides revealed that N-glycosylation significantly relieved ER stress and hypersensitive response, and facilitated the folding/assembly of CTB. The glycosylated CTB (gCTB) was characterized for potential vaccine use. Glycan profiling revealed that gCTB contained approximately 38% plant-specific glycans. gCTB retained nanomolar affinity to GM1-ganglioside with only marginal reduction of physicochemical stability and induced an anti-cholera holotoxin antibody response comparable to native CTB in a mouse oral immunization study. These findings demonstrated gCTB's potential as an oral immunogen and point to a potential role of N-glycosylation in increasing recombinant protein yields in plants. PMID:25614217

  19. Differential expression during development of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding protein activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Tsuchiya, M; Chang, P P; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-05-01

    Cholera toxin exerts its effects on cells in large part through the ADP-ribosylation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation is enhanced by approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins termed ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are allosteric activators of the toxin catalytic unit. Rabbit antiserum against a purified bovine brain ARF (sARF II) reacted on immunoblots with two approximately 20-kDa ARF-like proteins (sARF I and II) in tissue extracts from bovine, rat, frog, and chicken. Levels of ARF were higher in brain than in non-neural tissues. In rat brain, on the second postnatal day, amounts of sARF I and II were similar. By the 10th postnatal day and thereafter, sARF II predominated. Relative levels of ARF determined by immunoreactivity were in agreement with levels assessed in functional assays of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Based on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of human and bovine cDNAs, there appear to be at least six different ARF-like genes. Northern blots of rat brain poly(A)+ RNA were hybridized with cDNA and oligonucleotide probes specific for each of the human and bovine ARF genes. From the second to the 27th postnatal day, ARF 3 mRNA increased, whereas mRNAs for ARFs 2 and 4 decreased; and those for ARFs 1, 5, and 6 were apparently unchanged. Partial amino acid sequence of sARF II is consistent with it being either the ARF 1 or 3 gene product. The developmental changes in rat brain ARF parallel neuronal maturation and synapse formation. PMID:1902473

  20. Evidence for TLR4 and FcRγ-CARD9 activation by cholera toxin B subunit and its direct bindings to TREM2 and LMIR5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Hara, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Cholera toxin (CTX) is a virulent factor of Vibrio cholerae that causes life-threatening diarrheal disease. Its non-toxic subunit CTB has been extensively studied for vaccine delivery. In immune cells, CTB induces a number of signaling molecules related to cellular activation and cytokine production. The mechanisms by which CTB exerts its immunological effects are not understood. We report here the immunological targets of CTB. The unexpected finding that GM1 ganglioside inhibited NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated with CTX and agonists of Toll-like receptors (TLR) suggests the possibility of CTX-TLR interaction. Indeed, CTX-induced IL-6 production was substantially reduced in MyD88(-/-) or TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Ectopic expression of TLR4 was required for CTX-induced NF-κB activation in HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, the inflammatory capacity of CTB was lost in the absence of TLR4, adaptor protein FcRγ, or its downstream signaling molecule CARD9. Attempts have been made to identify CTB-binding targets from various C-type lectin and immunoglobulin-like receptors. CTB targeted not only GM1 and TLR4 but also TREM2 and LMIR5/CD300b. CTB-TREM2 interaction initiated signal transduction through adaptor protein DAP12. The binding of CTB inhibited LMIR5 activation induced by its endogenous ligand 3-O-sulfo-β-d-galactosylceramide C24:1. In summary, CTB targets TLR4, FcRγ-CARD9, TREM2, and LMIR5. These findings provide new insights into the immunobiology of cholera toxin. PMID:26021803

  1. Effectiveness of Liposomes Possessing Surface-Linked Recombinant B Subunit of Cholera Toxin as an Oral Antigen Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Harokopakis, Evlambia; Hajishengallis, George; Michalek, Suzanne M.

    1998-01-01

    Liposomes appear to be a promising oral antigen delivery system for the development of vaccines against infectious diseases, although their uptake efficiency by Peyer’s patches in the gut and the subsequent induction of mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses remain a major concern. Aiming at targeted delivery of liposomal immunogens, we have previously reported the conjugation via a thioether bond of the GM1 ganglioside-binding subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) to the liposomal outer surface. In the present study, we have investigated the effectiveness of liposomes containing the saliva-binding region (SBR) of Streptococcus mutans AgI/II adhesin and possessing surface-linked recombinant CTB (rCTB) in generating mucosal (salivary, vaginal, and intestinal) IgA as well as serum IgG responses to the parent molecule, AgI/II. Responses in mice given a single oral dose of the rCTB-conjugated liposomes were compared to those in mice given one of the following unconjugated liposome preparations: (i) empty liposomes, (ii) liposomes containing SBR, (iii) liposomes containing SBR and coadministered with rCTB, and (iv) liposomes containing SBR plus rCTB. Three weeks after the primary immunization, significantly higher levels of mucosal IgA and serum IgG antibodies to AgI/II were observed in the rCTB-conjugated group than in mice given the unconjugated liposome preparations, although the latter mice received a booster dose at week 9. The antibody responses in mice immunized with rCTB-conjugated liposomes persisted at high levels for at least 6 months, at which time (week 26) a recall immunization significantly augmented the responses. In general, mice given unconjugated liposome preparations required one or two booster immunizations to develop a substantial anti-AgI/II antibody response, which was more prominent in the group given coencapsulated SBR and rCTB. These data indicate that conjugation of rCTB to liposomes greatly enhances their effectiveness as an antigen delivery

  2. Group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide-cholera toxin B subunit conjugate vaccines prepared by different methods for intranasal immunization.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Lagergård, T; Yang, Y; Lindblad, M; Fredriksson, M; Holmgren, J

    2001-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS III) was conjugated to recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) using three different methods which employed (i) cystamine and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP), (ii) carbodiimide with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer, or (iii) reductive amination (RA). The CPS III-rCTB conjugates were divided into large- and small-molecular-weight (M(r)) fractions, and the immunogenicities of the different preparations after intranasal (i.n.) immunization were studied in mice. Both large- and small-M(r) conjugates of CPS III-rCTB(RA) or CPS III-rCTB(ADH) induced high, almost comparable levels of CPS-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum, lungs, and vagina that were generally superior to those obtained with CPS III-rCTB(SPDP) conjugates or a CPS III and rCTB mixture. However, the smaller-M(r) conjugates of CPS III-rCTB(RA) or CPS III-rCTB(ADH) in most cases elicited a lower anti-CPS IgA immune response than the large-M(r) conjugates, and the highest anti-CPS IgA titers in both tissues and serum were obtained with the large-M(r) CPS III-rCTB(RA) conjugate. Serum IgG anti-CPS titers induced by the CPS III-rCTB(RA) conjugate had high levels of specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 antibodies. Based on the effectiveness of RA for coupling CPS III to rCTB, RA was also tested for conjugating GBS CPS Ia with rCTB. As for the CPS III-rCTB conjugates, the immunogenicity of CPS Ia was greatly increased by conjugation to rCTB. Intranasal immunization with a combination of CPS Ia-rCTB and CPS III-rCTB conjugates was shown to induce anti-CPS Ia and III immune responses in serum and lungs that were fully comparable with the responses to immunization with the monovalent CPS Ia-rCTB or CPS III-rCTB conjugates. These results suggest that the GBS CPS III-rCTB and CPS Ia-rCTB conjugates prepared by the RA method may be used in bivalent and possibly also in multivalent mucosal GBS conjugate vaccines. PMID

  3. Group B Streptococcus Capsular Polysaccharide-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Conjugate Vaccines Prepared by Different Methods for Intranasal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xuzhuang; Lagergård, Teresa; Yang, Yonghong; Lindblad, Marianne; Fredriksson, Margareta; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS III) was conjugated to recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) using three different methods which employed (i) cystamine and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP), (ii) carbodiimide with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer, or (iii) reductive amination (RA). The CPS III-rCTB conjugates were divided into large- and small-molecular-weight (Mr) fractions, and the immunogenicities of the different preparations after intranasal (i.n.) immunization were studied in mice. Both large- and small-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH induced high, almost comparable levels of CPS-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum, lungs, and vagina that were generally superior to those obtained with CPS III-rCTBSPDP conjugates or a CPS III and rCTB mixture. However, the smaller-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH in most cases elicited a lower anti-CPS IgA immune response than the large-Mr conjugates, and the highest anti-CPS IgA titers in both tissues and serum were obtained with the large-Mr CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate. Serum IgG anti-CPS titers induced by the CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate had high levels of specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 antibodies. Based on the effectiveness of RA for coupling CPS III to rCTB, RA was also tested for conjugating GBS CPS Ia with rCTB. As for the CPS III-rCTB conjugates, the immunogenicity of CPS Ia was greatly increased by conjugation to rCTB. Intranasal immunization with a combination of CPS Ia-rCTB and CPS III-rCTB conjugates was shown to induce anti-CPS Ia and III immune responses in serum and lungs that were fully comparable with the responses to immunization with the monovalent CPS Ia-rCTB or CPS III-rCTB conjugates. These results suggest that the GBS CPS III-rCTB and CPS Ia-rCTB conjugates prepared by the RA method may be used in bivalent and possibly also in multivalent mucosal GBS conjugate vaccines. PMID:11119518

  4. Comprehensive Functional Analysis of the 18 Vibrio cholerae N16961 Toxin-Antitoxin Systems Substantiates Their Role in Stabilizing the Superintegron

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Naeem; Guérout, Anne-Marie; Krin, Evelyne; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The role of chromosomal toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems, which are ubiquitous within the genomes of free-living bacteria, is still debated. We have scanned the Vibrio cholerae N16961 genome for class 2 TA genes and identified 18 gene pair candidates. Interestingly, all but one are located in the chromosome 2 superintegron (SI). The single TA found outside the SI is located on chromosome 1 and is related to the well-characterized HipAB family, which is known to play a role in antibiotic persistence. We investigated this clustering within the SI and its possible biological consequences by performing a comprehensive functional analysis on all of the putative TA systems. We demonstrate that the 18 TAs identified encode functional toxins and that their cognate antitoxins are able to neutralize their deleterious effects when expressed in Escherichia coli. In addition, we reveal that the 17 predicted TA systems of the SI are transcribed and expressed in their native context from their own promoters, a situation rarely found in integron cassettes. We tested the possibility of interactions between noncognate pairs of all toxins and antitoxins and found no cross-interaction between any of the different TAs. Although these observations do not exclude other roles, they clearly strengthen the role of TA systems in stabilizing the massive SI cassette array of V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE The chromosomal toxin-antitoxin systems have been shown to play various, sometimes contradictory roles, ranging from genomic stabilization to bacterial survival via persistence. Determining the interactions between TA systems hosted within the same bacteria is essential to understand the hierarchy between these different roles. We identify here the full set of class 2 TAs carried in the Vibrio cholerae N16961 genome and found they are all, with a single exception, located in the chromosome 2 superintegron. Their characterization, in terms of functionality, expression, and possible cross

  5. Characterization of a Mutant Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin, LT(R192G/L211A), as a Safe and Effective Oral Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Elizabeth B.; Lawson, Louise B.; Freytag, Lucy C.; Clements, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the adjuvant properties of the heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli (LT) and Vibrio cholerae (CT) have been known for more than 20 years, there are no available oral vaccines containing these molecules as adjuvants, primarily because they are both very potent enterotoxins. A number of attempts with various degrees of success have been made to reduce or eliminate the enterotoxicity of LT and CT so they can safely be used as oral adjuvants or immunogens. In this report we characterize the structural, enzymatic, enterotoxic, and adjuvant properties of a novel mutant of LT, designated LT(R192G/L211A), or dmLT. dmLT was not sensitive to trypsin activation, had reduced enzymatic activity for induction of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells, and exhibited no enterotoxicity in the patent mouse assay. Importantly, dmLT retained the ability to function as an oral adjuvant for a coadministered antigen (tetanus toxoid) and to elicit anti-LT antibodies. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that the reduced enterotoxicity of this molecule compared to native LT or the single mutant, LT(R192G), is a consequence of increased sensitivity to proteolysis and rapid intracellular degradation in mammalian cells. In conclusion, dmLT is a safe and powerful detoxified enterotoxin with the potential to function as a mucosal adjuvant for coadministered antigens and to elicit anti-LT antibodies without undesirable side effects. PMID:21288994

  6. Characterization of a mutant Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin, LT(R192G/L211A), as a safe and effective oral adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Lawson, Louise B; Freytag, Lucy C; Clements, John D

    2011-04-01

    Despite the fact that the adjuvant properties of the heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli (LT) and Vibrio cholerae (CT) have been known for more than 20 years, there are no available oral vaccines containing these molecules as adjuvants, primarily because they are both very potent enterotoxins. A number of attempts with various degrees of success have been made to reduce or eliminate the enterotoxicity of LT and CT so they can safely be used as oral adjuvants or immunogens. In this report we characterize the structural, enzymatic, enterotoxic, and adjuvant properties of a novel mutant of LT, designated LT(R192G/L211A), or dmLT. dmLT was not sensitive to trypsin activation, had reduced enzymatic activity for induction of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells, and exhibited no enterotoxicity in the patent mouse assay. Importantly, dmLT retained the ability to function as an oral adjuvant for a coadministered antigen (tetanus toxoid) and to elicit anti-LT antibodies. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that the reduced enterotoxicity of this molecule compared to native LT or the single mutant, LT(R192G), is a consequence of increased sensitivity to proteolysis and rapid intracellular degradation in mammalian cells. In conclusion, dmLT is a safe and powerful detoxified enterotoxin with the potential to function as a mucosal adjuvant for coadministered antigens and to elicit anti-LT antibodies without undesirable side effects. PMID:21288994

  7. Genetically Detoxified Mutants of Heat-Labile Toxin from Escherichia coli Are Able To Act as Oral Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Douce, Gill; Giannelli, Valentina; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Lewis, David; Everest, Paul; Rappuoli, Rino; Dougan, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Detoxified mutants of the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) act as mucosal adjuvants to intranasally presented coadministered antigens. Here, we compare the adjuvant activity of a panel of detoxified derivatives of LT, using both intranasal (i.n.) and oral (p.o.) routes of administration. The mutants used as adjuvants varied in sensitivity to proteases and toxicity. With keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as the bystander antigen, the immune responses to i.n. immunizations were consistently higher than the equivalent p.o.-delivered proteins. LT-G192, a mutant which demonstrates a 10-fold reduction in toxicity in vitro, demonstrated wild-type adjuvant activity both i.n. and p.o., inducing similar titers of KLH specific antibody in the sera and immunoglobulin A in local mucosal secretions as wild-type LT. In line with previous data, the nontoxic holotoxoid LT-K63 induced intermediate immune responses in both the serum and mucosal secretions which were lower than those achieved with wild-type LT but at least 10-fold higher than those measured when the antigen was administered with LT-B. Although significant levels of local and systemic anti-KLH antibodies were induced following p.o. immunization with LT-K63, cellular proliferative responses to KLH was poor or undetectable. In contrast, LT and LT-G192 induced significant T-cell responses to KLH following p.o. immunization. These proliferating cells secreted both gamma interferon and interleukin-5, suggesting that the type of immune response induced following p.o. coimmunization with LT and purified protein is a mixed Th1/Th2 response. PMID:10456880

  8. Genetically detoxified mutants of heat-labile toxin from Escherichia coli are able to act as oral adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Douce, G; Giannelli, V; Pizza, M; Lewis, D; Everest, P; Rappuoli, R; Dougan, G

    1999-09-01

    Detoxified mutants of the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) act as mucosal adjuvants to intranasally presented coadministered antigens. Here, we compare the adjuvant activity of a panel of detoxified derivatives of LT, using both intranasal (i.n.) and oral (p.o.) routes of administration. The mutants used as adjuvants varied in sensitivity to proteases and toxicity. With keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as the bystander antigen, the immune responses to i. n. immunizations were consistently higher than the equivalent p.o. -delivered proteins. LT-G192, a mutant which demonstrates a 10-fold reduction in toxicity in vitro, demonstrated wild-type adjuvant activity both i.n. and p.o., inducing similar titers of KLH specific antibody in the sera and immunoglobulin A in local mucosal secretions as wild-type LT. In line with previous data, the nontoxic holotoxoid LT-K63 induced intermediate immune responses in both the serum and mucosal secretions which were lower than those achieved with wild-type LT but at least 10-fold higher than those measured when the antigen was administered with LT-B. Although significant levels of local and systemic anti-KLH antibodies were induced following p.o. immunization with LT-K63, cellular proliferative responses to KLH was poor or undetectable. In contrast, LT and LT-G192 induced significant T-cell responses to KLH following p.o. immunization. These proliferating cells secreted both gamma interferon and interleukin-5, suggesting that the type of immune response induced following p.o. coimmunization with LT and purified protein is a mixed Th1/Th2 response. PMID:10456880

  9. Secretion of TcpF by the Vibrio cholerae Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Biogenesis Apparatus Requires an N-Terminal Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Megli, Christina J.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV pili are important for microcolony formation, biofilm formation, twitching motility, and attachment. We and others have shown that type IV pili are important for protein secretion across the outer membrane, similar to type II secretion systems. This study explored the relationship between protein secretion and pilus formation in Vibrio cholerae. The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IV pilus required for V. cholerae pathogenesis, is necessary for the secretion of the colonization factor TcpF (T. J. Kirn, N. Bose, and R. K. Taylor, Mol. Microbiol. 49:81–92, 2003). This phenomenon is not unique to V. cholerae; secreted virulence factors that are dependent on the presence of components of the type IV pilus biogenesis apparatus for secretion have been reported with Dichelobacter nodosus (R. M. Kennan, O. P. Dhungyel, R. J. Whittington, J. R. Egerton, and J. I. Rood, J. Bacteriol. 183:4451–4458, 2001) and Francisella tularensis (A. J. Hager et al., Mol. Microbiol. 62:227–237, 2006). Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the secretion of TcpF is dependent on the presence of selected amino acid R groups at position five. We were unable to find other secretion determinants, suggesting that Y5 is the major secretion determinant within TcpF. We also report that proteins secreted in a type IV pilus biogenesis apparatus-dependent manner have a YXS motif within the first 15 amino acids following the Sec cleavage site. The YXS motif is not present in proteins secreted by type II secretion systems, indicating that this is unique to type IV pilus-mediated secretion. Moreover, we show that TcpF interacts with the pilin TcpA, suggesting that these proteins are secreted by the type IV pilus biogenesis system. These data provide a starting point for understanding how type IV pili can mediate secretion of virulence factors important for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:23564177

  10. Adjuvant effect of non-toxic mutants of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin following intranasal, oral and intravaginal immunization.

    PubMed

    De Magistris, M T; Pizza, M; Douce, G; Ghiara, P; Dougan, G; Rappuoli, R

    1998-01-01

    Cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are known to be very effective mucosal adjuvants, but their toxicity limits their use in humans. We genetically detoxified LT by substituting single residues in the active site of the enzymatic A subunit and obtained mutant molecules that retain mucosal adjuvant activity but are devoid of toxicity. These mutant LT molecules induce mucosal and systemic responses to antigens delivered intranasally, orally and intravaginally in mice. Furthermore, mucosal immunization with these molecules confers protection against systemic challenge with tetanus toxin (TT) and mucosal challenge with Helicobacter pylori. PMID:9554265

  11. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in Water and Seafood, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nicole; Kahler, Amy M.; Jones, Jessica L.; Bopp, Cheryl A.; Marano, Nina; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Garrett, Nancy M.; Boncy, Jacques; Henry, Ariel; Gómez, Gerardo A.; Wellman, Michael; Curtis, Maurice; Freeman, Molly M.; Turnsek, Maryann; Benner, Ronald A.; Dahourou, Georges; Espey, David; DePaola, Angelo; Tappero, Jordan W.; Handzel, Tom; Tauxe, Robert V.

    2011-01-01

    During the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti, water and seafood samples were collected to detect Vibrio cholerae. The outbreak strain of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa was isolated from freshwater and seafood samples. The cholera toxin gene was detected in harbor water samples. PMID:22099121

  12. Mapping the glycation sites in the neoglycoconjugate from hexasaccharide antigen of Vibrio cholerae, serotype Ogawa and the recombinant tetanus toxin C-fragment carrier.

    PubMed

    Jahouh, Farid; Xu, Peng; Vann, Willie F; Kováč, Pavol; Banoub, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    We report herein the glycation sites in a vaccine candidate for cholera formed by conjugation of the synthetic hexasaccharide fragment of the O-specific polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae, serotype Ogawa, to the recombinant tetanus toxin C-fragment (rTT-Hc) carrier. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of the vaccine revealed that it is composed of a mixture of neoglycoconjugates with carbohydrate : protein ratios of 1.9 : 1, 3.0 : 1, 4.0 : 1, 4.9 : 1, 5.9 : 1, 6.9 : 1, 7.9 : 1 and 9.1 : 1. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the tryptic and GluC V8 digests allowed identification of 12 glycation sites in the carbohydrate-protein neoglycoconjugate vaccine. The glycation sites are located exclusively on lysine (Lys) residues and are listed as follows: Lys 22, Lys 61, Lys 145, Lys 239, Lys 278, Lys 318, Lys 331, Lys 353, Lys 378, Lys 389, Lys 396 and Lys 437. Based on the 3-D representation of the rTT-Hc protein, all the glycation sites correspond to lysines located at the outer surface of the protein. PMID:24130011

  13. Expression of cholera toxin B subunit and the B chain of human insulin as a fusion protein in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Dora; O'Leary, Jennifer; Huang, Yan; Huner, Norman P A; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2006-05-01

    A DNA construct containing the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) gene genetically fused to a nucleotide sequence encoding three copies of tandemly repeated diabetes-associated autoantigen, the B chain of human insulin, was produced and transferred into low-nicotine tobaccos by Agrobacterium. Integration of the fusion gene into the plant genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results of immunoblot analysis verified the synthesis and assembly of the fusion protein into pentamers in transgenic tobacco. GM1-ELISA showed that the plant-derived fusion protein retained GM1-ganglioside receptor binding specificity. The fusion protein accounted for 0.11% of the total leaf protein. The production of transgenic plants expressing CTB-InsB3 offers a new opportunity to test plant-based oral antigen therapy against autoimmune diabetes by inducing oral tolerance. PMID:16322994

  14. Mucosally administered Lactobacillus surface-displayed influenza antigens (sM2 and HA2) with cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) Induce broadly protective immune responses against divergent influenza subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Koo, Wan-Seo; Park, Min-Eun; Yoon, Ji-Eun; Roh, Jong-Bok; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2015-09-30

    The development of a universal influenza vaccine that provides broad cross protection against existing and unforeseen influenza viruses is a critical challenge. In this study, we constructed and expressed conserved sM2 and HA2 influenza antigens with cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface of Lactobacillus casei (pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei). Oral and nasal administrations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and their isotypes (IgG1 & IgG2a) as well as mucosal IgA. The mucosal administration of pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei may also significantly increase the levels of sM2- or HA2-specific cell-mediated immunity because increased release of both IFN-γ and IL-4 was observed. The recombinant pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei provided better protection of BALB/c mice against 10 times the 50% mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of homologous A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1) or A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W81/2005 (H5N2) and heterologous A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), or A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) or A/Philippines/2/08(H3N2) viruses, compared with L. casei harboring sM2HA2 and also the protection was maintained up to seven months after administration. These results indicate that recombinant L. casei expressing the highly conserved sM2, HA2 of influenza and CTA1 as a mucosal adjuvant could be a potential mucosal vaccine candidate or tool to protect against divergent influenza viruses for human and animal. PMID:26210951

  15. The Cholera Toxin B Subunit (CTB) Fused to the Porcine Arterivirus Matrix M and GP5 Envelope Proteins Fails to Enhance the GP5-Specific Antibody Response in Pigs Immunized with Adenovectors.

    PubMed

    Roques, Elodie; Lessard, Martin; Archambault, Denis

    2015-08-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an arterivirus of the Arteriviridae family. As the current commercial vaccines are incompletely protective effective against PRRSV infection, we developed a vaccine strategy using replicating but non-disseminating adenovectors (rAdVs) expressing the PRRSV M matrix protein in fusion with the neutralizing major epitope-carrying GP5 envelope protein (Roques et al. in Vet Res 44:17, 2013). Although production of GP5-specific antibodies (Abs) was observed, no PRRSV-specific neutralizing Abs (NAbs) were induced in pigs given the rAdVs expressing M-GP5 or M-GP5m (GP5m being a mutant form of GP5). Nevertheless, partial protection was observed in the M-GP5m-rAdV-inoculated pigs experimentally infected with PRRSV. Here, we determined the impact of the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, known for its adjuvant effect) in fusion with the C-terminus of M-GP5m on the Ab response to PRRSV. Three-week-old pigs were immunized twice both intramuscularly and intranasally at 3-week intervals with rAdV-expressing the green fluorescent protein (rAdV-GFP), rAdV-M-GP5m, or rAdV-M-GP5m-CTB. Pigs immunized with rAdV-M-GP5m showed a high level of serum GP5-specific Abs (as determined by an indirect ELISA). In contrast, CTB in fusion with M-GP5m had an unexpected severe negative impact on GP5-specific Ab production. PRRSV-specific NAbs could not be detected in any pigs of all groups. PMID:25801418

  16. A Mutational Analysis of Residues in Cholera Toxin A1 Necessary for Interaction with Its Substrate, the Stimulatory G Protein Gsα

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.; Gotow, Lisa F.; Yang, Zhijie; Holmes, Randall K.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea requires cholera toxin (CT)-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation of stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in enterocytes. CT is an AB5 toxin with an inactive CTA1 domain linked via CTA2 to a pentameric receptor-binding B subunit. Allosterically activated CTA1 fragment in complex with NAD+ and GTP-bound ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6-GTP) differs conformationally from the CTA1 domain in holotoxin. A surface-exposed knob and a short α-helix (formed, respectively, by rearranging “active-site” and “activation” loops in inactive CTA1) and an ADP ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) motif, all located near the CTA1 catalytic site, were evaluated for possible roles in recognizing Gsα. CT variants with one, two or three alanine substitutions at surface-exposed residues within these CTA1 motifs were tested for assembly into holotoxin and ADP-ribosylating activity against Gsα and diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)-guanidine (DEABAG), a small substrate predicted to fit into the CTA1 active site). Variants with single alanine substitutions at H55, R67, L71, S78, or D109 had nearly wild-type activity with DEABAG but significantly decreased activity with Gsα, suggesting that the corresponding residues in native CTA1 participate in recognizing Gsα. As several variants with multiple substitutions at these positions retained partial activity against Gsα, other residues in CTA1 likely also participate in recognizing Gsα. PMID:25793724

  17. Protective antitumor immunity induced by tumor cell lysates conjugated with diphtheria toxin and adjuvant epitope in mouse breast tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Yu; Xing, Yun; Liu, Bin; Lu, Lei; Huang, Xiao; Ge, Chi-Yu; Yao, Wen-Jun; Xu, Mao-Lei; Gao, Zhen-Qiu; Cao, Rong-Yue; Wu, Jie; Li, Tai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell vaccine-based immunotherapy has received increasing interest in many clinical trials involving patients with breast cancer. Combining with appropriate adjuvants can enhance the weak immunogenic properties of tumor cell lysates (TCL). In this study, diphtheria toxin (DT) and two tandem repeats of mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (mHSP70) fragment 407-426 (M2) were conjugated to TCL with glutaraldehyde, and the constructed cancer cell vaccine was named DT-TCL-M2. Subcutaneous injection of DT-TCL-M2 in mice effectively elicited tumor-specific polyclonal immune responses, including humoral and cellular immune responses. High levels of antibodies against TCL were detected in the serum of immunized mice with ELISA and verified with Western blot analyses. The splenocytes from immunized mice showed potent cytotoxicity on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Moreover, the protective antitumor immunity induced by DT-TCL-M2 inhibited tumor growth in a mouse breast tumor model. DT-TCL-M2 also attenuated tumor-induced angiogenesis and slowed tumor growth in a mouse intradermal tumor model. These findings demonstrate that TCL conjugated with appropriate adjuvants induced effective antitumor immunity in vivo. Improvements in potency could further make cancer cell vaccines a useful and safe method for preventing cancer recurrence after resection. PMID:22464650

  18. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Acts as an Allosteric Activator for the Folded but not Disordered Cholera Toxin A1 Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Taylor, Michael; Jobling, Michael G.; Burress, Helen; Yang, ZhiJie; Serrano, Albert; Holmes, Randall K.; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CTA1) has a disordered structure at 37°C. An interaction with host factors must therefore place CTA1 in a folded conformation for the modification of its Gsα target which resides in a lipid raft environment. Host ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) act as in vitro allosteric activators of CTA1, but the molecular events of this process are not fully characterized. Isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy monitored ARF6-induced structural changes to CTA1, which were correlated to changes in CTA1 activity. We found ARF6 prevents the thermal disordering of structured CTA1 and stimulates the activity of stabilized CTA1 over a range of temperatures. Yet ARF6 alone did not promote the refolding of disordered CTA1 to an active state. Instead, lipid rafts shifted disordered CTA1 to a folded conformation with a basal level of activity that could be further stimulated by ARF6. Thus, ARF alone is unable to activate disordered CTA1 at physiological temperature: additional host factors such as lipid rafts place CTA1 in the folded conformation required for its ARF-mediated activation. Interaction with ARF is required for in vivo toxin activity, as enzymatically active CTA1 mutants that cannot be further stimulated by ARF6 fail to intoxicate cultured cells. PMID:25257027

  19. Cholera-like enterotoxins and Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Basset, Christelle; Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Holton, John; Clements, John D; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-07-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) and the heat-labile enterotoxin of E. coli (LT), as well as their non toxic mutants, are potent mucosal adjuvants of immunization eliciting mucosal and systemic responses against unrelated co-administered antigens in experimental models and in humans (non toxic mutants). These enterotoxins are composed of two subunits, the A subunit, responsible for an ADP-ribosyl transferase activity and the B subunit, responsible for cell binding. Paradoxically, whereas the whole toxins have adjuvant properties, the B subunits of CT (CTB) and of LT (LTB) have been shown to induce antigen specific tolerance when administered mucosally with antigens in experimental models as well as, recently, in humans, making them an attractive strategy to prevent or treat autoimmune or allergic disorders. Immunomodulation is a complex process involving many cell types notably antigen presenting cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this review, we focus on Treg cells and cholera-like enterotoxins and their non toxic derivates, with regard to subtype, in vivo/in vitro effects and possible role in the modulation of immune responses to coadministered antigens. PMID:22069660

  20. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus. PMID:25796990

  1. NKp46+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Dampen Vaginal CD8 T Cell Responses following Local Immunization with a Cholera Toxin-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Luci, Carmelo; Bekri, Selma; Bihl, Franck; Pini, Jonathan; Bourdely, Pierre; Nouhen, Kelly; Malgogne, Angélique; Walzer, Thierry; Braud, Véronique M.; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune cells work in concert to generate efficient protection at mucosal surface. Vaginal mucosa is an epithelial tissue that contains innate and adaptive immune effector cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that vaginal administration of Cholera toxin -based vaccines generate antigen-specific CD8 T cells through the stimulation of local dendritic cells (DC). Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a group of lymphocytes localized in epithelial tissues that have important immune functions against pathogens and in tissue homeostasis. Their contribution to vaccine-induced mucosal T cell responses is an important issue for the design of protective vaccines. We report here that the vaginal mucosa contains a heterogeneous population of NKp46+ ILC that includes conventional NK cells and ILC1-like cells. We show that vaginal NKp46+ ILC dampen vaccine-induced CD8 T cell responses generated after local immunization. Indeed, in vivo depletion of NKp46+ ILC with anti-NK1.1 antibody or NKG2D blockade increases the magnitude of vaginal OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, such treatments also increase the number of DC in the vagina. NKG2D ligands being expressed by vaginal DC but not by CD8 T cells, these results support that NKp46+ ILC limit mucosal CD8 T cell responses indirectly through the NKG2D-dependent elimination of vaginal DC. Our data reveal an unappreciated role of NKp46+ ILC in the regulation of mucosal CD8 T cell responses. PMID:26630176

  2. Cholera toxin B subunit-five-stranded α-helical coiled-coil fusion protein: "five-to-five" molecular chimera displays robust physicochemical stability.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takeshi; Harakuni, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    To create a physicochemically stable cholera toxin (CT) B subunit (CTB), it was fused to the five-stranded α-helical coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). The chimeric fusion protein (CTB-COMP) was expressed in Pichia pastoris, predominantly as a pentamer, and retained its affinity for the monosialoganglioside GM1, a natural receptor of CT. The fusion protein displayed thermostability, tolerating the boiling temperature of water for 10min, whereas unfused CTB readily dissociated to its monomers and lost its affinity for GM1. The fusion protein also displayed resistance to strong acid at pHs as low as 0.1, and to the protein denaturant sodium dodecyl sulfate at concentrations up to 10%. Intranasal administration of the fusion protein to mice induced anti-B subunit serum IgG, even after the protein was boiled, whereas unfused CTB showed no thermostable mucosal immunogenicity. This study demonstrates that CTB fused to a pentameric α-helical coiled coil has a novel physicochemical phenotype, which may provide important insight into the molecular design of enterotoxin-B-subunit-based vaccines and vaccine delivery molecules. PMID:25045819

  3. Effects of prostaglandin E2, cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of cytokines in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, W W; Burke, P A; Drotar, M E; Chavali, S R; Forse, R A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) appears to regulate macrophage cytokine production through the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs protein)-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent transmembrane signal transduction pathway. In this study, we used PGE2, cholera toxin (CT; a direct G alpha s protein stimulator) and 8-bromo-cAMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) to stimulate this pathway, and investigated their influence on cytokine gene expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated human macrophages. The mRNA expression for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6 and IL-8 were determined employing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. We demonstrated that PGE2, CT and 8-bromo-cAMP inhibited the LPS-induced gene activation of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha, and had no effect on the gene activation of IL-1 beta and IL-8. Further, our data indicate that PGE2 suppressed the gene activation of IL-6 following LPS stimulation, but neither CT nor 8-bromo-cAMP had an effect. These data suggest that PGE2 alters LPS-stimulated gene activation of only some of the early macrophage cytokines, and does so either by a Gs transmembrane cAMP-dependent or an independent system. Images Figure 1 PMID:7751029

  4. Structural and Functional Interactions between the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit and ERdj3/HEDJ, a Chaperone of the Endoplasmic Reticulum▿

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Burress, Helen; Taylor, Michael; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Ray, Supriyo; Haslam, David B.; Teter, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is endocytosed and transported by vesicle carriers to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The catalytic CTA1 subunit then crosses the ER membrane and enters the cytosol, where it interacts with its Gsα target. The CTA1 membrane transversal involves the ER chaperone BiP, but few other host proteins involved with CTA1 translocation are known. BiP function is regulated by ERdj3, an ER-localized Hsp40 chaperone also known as HEDJ. ERdj3 can also influence protein folding and translocation by direct substrate binding. In this work, structural and functional assays were used to examine the putative interaction between ERdj3 and CTA1. Cell-based assays demonstrated that expression of a dominant negative ERdj3 blocks CTA1 translocation into the cytosol and CT intoxication. Binding assays with surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that monomeric ERdj3 interacts directly with CTA1. This interaction involved the A12 subdomain of CTA1 and was further dependent upon the overall structure of CTA1: ERdj3 bound to unfolded but not folded conformations of the isolated CTA1 subunit. This was consistent with the chaperone function of ERdj3, as was the ability of ERdj3 to mask the solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues of CTA1. Our data identify ERdj3 as a host protein involved with the CT intoxication process and provide new molecular details regarding CTA1-chaperone interactions. PMID:21844235

  5. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  6. The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae: molecular cloning of genes involved in pilus biosynthesis and evaluation of TCP as a protective antigen in the infant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D P; Stroeher, U H; Thomas, C J; Manning, P A; Attridge, S R

    1989-12-01

    A serum containing antibodies to non-lipopolysaccharide (non-LPS) protective antigens of Vibrio cholerae has been used, after extensive absorption, to facilitate the cloning of genes involved in the synthesis of toxin-coregulated pili (TCP). A gene bank was constructed from V. cholerae Z17561 DNA using a mobilizable cosmid vector in Escherichia coli, and subsequently transferred by conjugation into V. cholerae O17. This strain does not produce TCP in vitro and lacks non-LPS protective antigens. Eight positive clones were isolated, and of these, four produced TCP as determined by electron microscopic and immunoblotting analyses. TCP-positive O17 clones were 70-fold more virulent than TCP-negative clones or O17 in the infant mouse cholera model. Only the former could remove protective antibodies from the clone-probing serum by absorption. As a corollary, serum containing antibodies to TCP protected mice from challenge with TCP-positive clones, but not with TCP-negative clones or O17. Our data indicate that TCP can function as both a virulence determinant and a protective antigen in the infant mouse model. PMID:2576091

  7. Vibrio cholerae-induced inflammation in the neonatal mouse cholera model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne L; Patimalla, Bharathi; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the acute diarrheal disease of cholera. Innate immune responses to V. cholerae are not a major cause of cholera pathology, which is characterized by severe, watery diarrhea induced by the action of cholera toxin. Innate responses may, however, contribute to resolution of infection and must be required to initiate adaptive responses after natural infection and oral vaccination. Here we investigated whether a well-established infant mouse model of cholera can be used to observe an innate immune response. We also used a vaccination model in which immunized dams protect their pups from infection through breast milk antibodies to investigate innate immune responses after V. cholerae infection for pups suckled by an immune dam. At the peak of infection, we observed neutrophil recruitment accompanied by induction of KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), NOS-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17a. Pups suckled by an immunized dam did not mount this response. Accessory toxins RtxA and HlyA played no discernible role in neutrophil recruitment in a wild-type background. The innate response to V. cholerae deleted for cholera toxin-encoding phage (CTX) and part of rtxA was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for CTX-carried genes or for RtxA in the absence of cholera toxin (CTX). Two extracellular V. cholerae DNases were not required for neutrophil recruitment, but DNase-deficient V. cholerae caused more clouds of DNA in the intestinal lumen, which appeared to be neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), suggesting that V. cholerae DNases combat NETs. Thus, the infant mouse model has hitherto unrecognized utility for interrogating innate responses to V. cholerae infection. PMID:24686062

  8. Electrogenerated trisbipyridyl Ru(II)-/nitrilotriacetic-polypyrene copolymer for the easy fabrication of label-free photoelectrochemical immunosensor and aptasensor: application to the determination of thrombin and anti-cholera toxin antibody.

    PubMed

    Wenjuan, Yao; Le Goff, Alan; Spinelli, Nicolas; Holzinger, Michael; Diao, Guo-Wang; Shan, Dan; Defrancq, Eric; Cosnier, Serge

    2013-04-15

    A bifunctional copolymer was electrogenerated, which allows efficient bioreceptor immobilization and transduction of the biorecognition event. This copolymer was formed using pyrenebutyric acid Nα',Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine amide (NTA-pyrene) and [tris-(2,2'-bipyridine) (4,4'-bis(4-pyrenyl-1-ylbutyloxy)-2,2'-bipyridine] ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate (Ru(II)-pyrene) complex. The pyrene groups, present in both compounds, undergo oxidative electropolymerization on platinum electrodes. The resulting copolymer contains NTA moieties, which were used as a versatile immobilization system for biotin- and histidine-tagged biomolecules, while Ru(II)-pyrene was employed as a photoelectrochemical transducing molecule. The efficiency of this copolymer for biomolecule anchoring was investigated with biotin- and histidine- tagged glucose oxidases, biotin-tagged cholera toxin and a histidine-tagged thrombin aptamer. The constructed enzyme electrodes exhibited an amperometric response toward glucose at 0.6 V vs SCE, demonstrating the anchoring of this enzyme via two coordination systems. An immunosensor configuration based on the immobilization of biotin-tagged cholera toxin was applied to the detection of anti-cholera antibody while the aptasensor based on the immobilization of histidine-tagged thrombin aptamer was tested for thrombin determination. The biorecognition events were monitored via the evolution of the photocurrent intensity generated by the polymerized Ru(II)-pyrene in the presence of visible light and a sacrificial donor (ascorbate). The binding of the targets hinders the diffusion of the sacrificial donor, inducing thus a photocurrent decrease. The constructed immunosensor presents a specific label-free photoelectrochemical response to anti-cholera antibody without labeling step, the detection limit being 0.2 μg mL⁻¹. The label-free photoelectrochemical response of the aptasensor varies linearly with thrombin concentrations up to 10 pmol L⁻¹, the

  9. Designing an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine against Vibrio cholerae via combined immunoinformatics and protein interaction based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Karimi, Zeinab; Eslami, Mahboobeh; Mohkam, Milad; Zandian, Sanam; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a major global health concern. Among different Vibrio cholerae strains, only O1 and O139 cause acute diarrheal diseases that are related to epidemic and pandemic outbreaks. The currently available cholera vaccines are mainly lived and attenuated vaccines consisting of V. cholerae virulence factors such as toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), outer membrane proteins (Omps), and nontoxic cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). Nowadays, there is a great interest in designing an efficient epitope vaccine against cholera. Epitope vaccines consisting of immunodominant epitopes and adjuvant molecules enhance the possibility of inciting potent protective immunity. In this study, V. cholerae protective antigens (OmpW, OmpU, TcpA and TcpF) and the CTB, which is broadly used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant, were analyzed using different bioinformatics and immunoinformatics tools. The common regions between promiscuous epitopes, binding to various HLA-II supertype alleles, and B-cell epitopes were defined based upon the aforementioned protective antigens. The ultimately selected epitopes and CTB adjuvant were fused together using proper GPGPG linkers to enhance vaccine immunogenicity. A three-dimensional model of the thus constructed vaccine was generated using I-TASSER. The model was structurally validated using the ProSA-web error-detection software and the Ramachandran plot. The validation results indicated that the initial 3D model needed refinement. Subsequently, a high-quality model obtained after various refinement cycles was used for defining conformational B-cell epitopes. Several linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were determined within the epitope vaccine, suggesting likely antibody triggering features of our designed vaccine. Next, molecular docking was performed between the 3D vaccine model and the tertiary structure of the toll like receptor 2 (TLR2). To gain further insight into the interaction between vaccine and TLR2, molecular dynamics

  10. Transcutaneous Immunization with Bacterial ADP-Ribosylating Exotoxins, Subunits, and Unrelated Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Scharton-Kersten, Tanya; Yu, Jian-mei; Vassell, Russell; O'Hagan, Derek; Alving, Carl R.; Glenn, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    We have recently described a needle-free method of vaccination, transcutaneous immunization, consisting of the topical application of vaccine antigens to intact skin. While most proteins themselves are poor immunogens on the skin, we have shown that the addition of cholera toxin (CT), a mucosal adjuvant, results in cellular and humoral immune responses to the adjuvant and coadministered antigens. The present study explores the breadth of adjuvants that have activity on the skin, using diphtheria toxoid (DTx) and tetanus toxoid as model antigens. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) displayed adjuvant properties similar to those of CT when used on the skin and induced protective immune responses against tetanus toxin challenge when applied topically at doses as low as 1 μg. Interestingly, enterotoxin derivatives LTR192G, LTK63, and LTR72 and the recombinant CT B subunit also exhibited adjuvant properties on the skin. Consistent with the latter finding, non-ADP-ribosylating exotoxins, including an oligonucleotide DNA sequence, as well as several cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] fragment, IL-2, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and lipopolysaccharide also elicited detectable anti-DTx immunoglobulin G titers in the immunized mice. These results indicate that enhancement of the immune response to topical immunization is not restricted to CT or the ADP-ribosylating exotoxins as adjuvants. This study also reinforces earlier findings that addition of an adjuvant is important for the induction of robust immune responses to vaccine antigens delivered by topical application. PMID:10948159

  11. Induction of Systemic Antifimbria and Antitoxin Antibody Responses in Egyptian Children and Adults by an Oral, Killed Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli plus Cholera Toxin B Subunit Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Eric R.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Åhrén, Christina; Rao, Malla R.; Bassily, Samir; Francis, Wagdy; Girgis, Fouad Y.; Safwat, Mohamed; Lee, Young J.; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Clemens, John D.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    We assessed serologic responses to an oral, killed whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli plus cholera toxin B-subunit (ETEC-rCTB) vaccine in 73 Egyptian adults, 105 schoolchildren, and 93 preschool children. Each subject received two doses of vaccine or placebo 2 weeks apart, giving blood before immunization and 7 days after each dose. Plasma antibodies to rCTB and four vaccine-shared colonization factors (CFs) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to rCTB and CFA/I were measured in all subjects, and those against CS1, CS2, and CS4 were measured in all children plus a subset of 33 adults. IgG antibodies to these five antigens were measured in a subset of 30 to 33 subjects in each cohort. Seroconversion was defined as a >2-fold increase in titer after vaccination. IgA and IgG seroconversion to rCTB was observed in 94 to 95% of adult vaccinees, with titer increases as robust as those previously reported for these two pediatric cohorts. The proportion showing IgA seroconversion to each CF antigen among vaccinated children (range, 70 to 96%) and adults (31 to 69%), as well as IgG seroconversion in children (44 to 75%) and adults (25 to 81%), was significantly higher than the corresponding proportion in placebo recipients, except for IgA responses to CS2 in adults. IgA anti-CF titers peaked after one dose in children, whereas in all age groups IgG antibodies rose incrementally after each dose. Independently, both preimmunization IgA titer and age were inversely related to the magnitude of IgA responses. In conclusion, serologic responses to the ETEC-rCTB vaccine may serve as practical immune outcome measures in future pediatric trials in areas where ETEC is endemic. PMID:11292698

  12. Binding Cooperativity Matters: A GM1-Like Ganglioside-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Binding Study Using a Nanocube-Based Lipid Bilayer Array.

    PubMed

    Worstell, Nolan C; Krishnan, Pratik; Weatherston, Joshua D; Wu, Hung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-glycan recognition is often mediated by multivalent binding. These multivalent bindings can be further complicated by cooperative interactions between glycans and individual glycan binding subunits. Here we have demonstrated a nanocube-based lipid bilayer array capable of quantitatively elucidating binding dissociation constants, maximum binding capacity, and binding cooperativity in a high-throughput format. Taking cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as a model cooperativity system, we studied both GM1 and GM1-like gangliosides binding to CTB. We confirmed the previously observed CTB-GM1 positive cooperativity. Surprisingly, we demonstrated fucosyl-GM1 has approximately 7 times higher CTB binding capacity than GM1. In order to explain this phenomenon, we hypothesized that the reduced binding cooperativity of fucosyl-GM1 caused the increased binding capacity. This was unintuitive, as GM1 exhibited higher binding avidity (16 times lower dissociation constant). We confirmed the hypothesis using a theoretical stepwise binding model of CTB. Moreover, by taking a mixture of fucosyl-GM1 and GM2, we observed the mild binding avidity fucosyl-GM1 activated GM2 receptors enhancing the binding capacity of the lipid bilayer surface. This was unexpected as GM2 receptors have negligible binding avidity in pure GM2 bilayers. These unexpected discoveries demonstrate the importance of binding cooperativity in multivalent binding mechanisms. Thus, quantitative analysis of multivalent protein-glycan interactions in heterogeneous glycan systems is of critical importance. Our user-friendly, robust, and high-throughput nanocube-based lipid bilayer array offers an attractive method for dissecting these complex mechanisms. PMID:27070150

  13. Binding Cooperativity Matters: A GM1-Like Ganglioside-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Binding Study Using a Nanocube-Based Lipid Bilayer Array

    PubMed Central

    Weatherston, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-glycan recognition is often mediated by multivalent binding. These multivalent bindings can be further complicated by cooperative interactions between glycans and individual glycan binding subunits. Here we have demonstrated a nanocube-based lipid bilayer array capable of quantitatively elucidating binding dissociation constants, maximum binding capacity, and binding cooperativity in a high-throughput format. Taking cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as a model cooperativity system, we studied both GM1 and GM1-like gangliosides binding to CTB. We confirmed the previously observed CTB-GM1 positive cooperativity. Surprisingly, we demonstrated fucosyl-GM1 has approximately 7 times higher CTB binding capacity than GM1. In order to explain this phenomenon, we hypothesized that the reduced binding cooperativity of fucosyl-GM1 caused the increased binding capacity. This was unintuitive, as GM1 exhibited higher binding avidity (16 times lower dissociation constant). We confirmed the hypothesis using a theoretical stepwise binding model of CTB. Moreover, by taking a mixture of fucosyl-GM1 and GM2, we observed the mild binding avidity fucosyl-GM1 activated GM2 receptors enhancing the binding capacity of the lipid bilayer surface. This was unexpected as GM2 receptors have negligible binding avidity in pure GM2 bilayers. These unexpected discoveries demonstrate the importance of binding cooperativity in multivalent binding mechanisms. Thus, quantitative analysis of multivalent protein-glycan interactions in heterogeneous glycan systems is of critical importance. Our user-friendly, robust, and high-throughput nanocube-based lipid bilayer array offers an attractive method for dissecting these complex mechanisms. PMID:27070150

  14. Expression of cholera toxin B–proinsulin fusion protein in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts – oral administration protects against development of insulitis in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlman, Tracey; Ahangari, Raheleh; Devine, Andrew; Samsam, Mohtahsem; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lettuce and tobacco chloroplast transgenic lines expressing the cholera toxin B subunit–human proinsulin (CTB-Pins) fusion protein were generated. CTB-Pins accumulated up to ~16% of total soluble protein (TSP) in tobacco and up to ~2.5% of TSP in lettuce. Eight milligrams of powdered tobacco leaf material expressing CTB-Pins or, as negative controls, CTB–green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP) or interferon–GFP (IFN-GFP), or untransformed leaf, were administered orally, each week for 7 weeks, to 5-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. The pancreas of CTB-Pins-treated mice showed decreased infiltration of cells characteristic of lymphocytes (insulitis); insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreatic islets of CTB-Pins-treated mice were significantly preserved, with lower blood or urine glucose levels, by contrast with the few β-cells remaining in the pancreatic islets of the negative controls. Increased expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-4 and IL-10), was observed in the pancreas of CTB-Pins-treated NOD mice. Serum levels of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), but not IgG2a, were elevated in CTB-Pins-treated mice. Taken together, T-helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-mediated oral tolerance is a likely mechanism for the prevention of pancreatic insulitis and the preservation of insulin-producing β-cells. This is the first report of expression of a therapeutic protein in transgenic chloroplasts of an edible crop. Transplastomic lettuce plants expressing CTB-Pins grew normally and transgenes were maternally inherited in T1 progeny. This opens up the possibility for the low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins, and a strategy for the treatment of various other autoimmune diseases. PMID:17490448

  15. Intranasal Immunization with the Cholera Toxin B Subunit-Pneumococcal Surface Antigen A Fusion Protein Induces Protection against Colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Has Negligible Impact on the Nasopharyngeal and Oral Microbiota of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, F. C.; Miyaji, E. N.; Arêas, A. P. M.; Oliveira, M. L. S.; de Andrade, A. L. S. S.; Ho, P. L.; Hollingshead, S. K.; Leite, L. C. C.

    2006-01-01

    One of the candidate proteins for a mucosal vaccine antigen against Streptococcus pneumoniae is PsaA (pneumococcal surface antigen A). Vaccines targeting mucosal immunity may raise concerns as to possible alterations in the normal microbiota, especially in the case of PsaA, which was shown to have homologs with elevated sequence identity in other viridans group streptococci. In this work, we demonstrate that intranasal immunization with a cholera toxin B subunit-PsaA fusion protein is able to protect mice against colonization with S. pneumoniae but does not significantly alter the natural oral or nasopharyngeal microbiota of mice. PMID:16861686

  16. Induction of melanin biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, V E; al-Harthi, L

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae synthesized the pigment melanin in response to specific physiological conditions that were stressful to the bacterium. Pigmentation was induced when V. cholerae was subjected to hyperosmotic stress in conjunction with elevated growth temperatures (above 30 degrees C). The salt concentration tolerated by V. cholerae was lowered by additional abiotic factors such as acidic starting pH of the growth medium and limitation of organic nutrients. Although the amount of toxin detected in the culture supernatant decreased significantly in response to stressful culture conditions, no correlation between the physiological conditions that induced melanogenesis and expression of OmpU or cholera toxin was detected. Since conditions that induce melanin production in V. cholerae occur in both the aquatic environment and the human host, it is possible that melanogenesis has a specific function with respect to the survival of the bacterium in these habitats. PMID:1444398

  17. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  18. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed. PMID:23651092

  19. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria. PMID:27118300

  20. Intranasal hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-adjuvanted influenza vaccine protects against sub-heterologous virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Takato; Ozasa, Koji; Kobari, Shingo; Momota, Masatoshi; Kishishita, Natsuko; Kobiyama, Kouji; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    Intranasal vaccination with inactivated influenza viral antigens is an attractive and valid alternative to currently available influenza (flu) vaccines; many of which seem to need efficient and safe adjuvant, however. In this study, we examined whether hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), a widely used pharmaceutical excipient to improve solubility and drug delivery, can act as a mucosal adjuvant for intranasal flu vaccines. We found that intranasal immunization of mice with hemagglutinin split- as well as inactivated whole-virion influenza vaccine with HP-β-CD resulted in secretion of antigen-specific IgA and IgGs in the airway mucosa and the serum as well. As a result, both HP-β-CD adjuvanted-flu intranasal vaccine protected mice against lethal challenge with influenza virus, equivalent to those induced by experimental cholera toxin-adjuvanted ones. Of note, intranasal use of HP-β-CD as an adjuvant induced significantly lower antigen-specific IgE responses than that induced by aluminum salt adjuvant. These results suggest that HP-β-CD may be a potent mucosal adjuvant for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:27160037

  1. Contributions of edema factor and protective antigen to the induction of protective immunity by Bacillus anthracis edema toxin as an intranasal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Alexandra; Carré, Jeanne-Marie; Jee, Junbae; Leppla, Stephen H; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Tang, Wei-Jen; Tomé, Daniel; Boyaka, Prosper N

    2010-11-15

    We have shown that intranasal coapplication of Bacillus anthracis protective Ag (PA) together with a B. anthracis edema factor (EF) mutant having reduced adenylate cyclase activity (i.e., EF-S414N) enhances anti-PA Ab responses, but also acts as a mucosal adjuvant for coadministered unrelated Ags. To elucidate the role of edema toxin (EdTx) components in its adjuvanticity, we examined how a PA mutant lacking the ability to bind EF (PA-U7) or another mutant that allows the cellular uptake of EF, but fails to efficiently mediate its translocation into the cytosol (PA-dFF), would affect EdTx-induced adaptive immunity. Native EdTx promotes costimulatory molecule expression by macrophages and B lymphocytes, and a broad spectrum of cytokine responses by cervical lymph node cells in vitro. These effects were reduced or abrogated when cells were treated with EF plus PA-dFF, or PA-U7 instead of PA. We also intranasally immunized groups of mice with a recombinant fusion protein of Yersinia pestis F1 and LcrV Ags (F1-V) together with EdTx variants consisting of wild-type or mutants PA and EF. Analysis of serum and mucosal Ab responses against F1-V or EdTx components (i.e., PA and EF) revealed no adjuvant activity in mice that received PA-U7 instead of PA. In contrast, coimmunization with PA-dFF enhanced serum Ab responses. Finally, immunization with native PA and an EF mutant lacking adenylate cyclase activity (EF-K346R) failed to enhance Ab responses. In summary, a fully functional PA and a minimum of adenylate cyclase activity are needed for EdTx to act as a mucosal adjuvant. PMID:20952678

  2. Contributions of Edema Factor and Protective Antigen to the Induction of Protective Immunity by Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin as an Intranasal Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Carré, Jeanne-Marie; Jee, Junbae; Leppla, Stephen H.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Tang, Wei-Jen; Tomé, Daniel; Boyaka, Prosper N.

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that intranasal coapplication of Bacillus anthracis protective Ag (PA) together with a B. anthracis edema factor (EF) mutant having reduced adenylate cyclase activity (i.e., EF-S414N) enhances anti-PAAb responses, but also acts as a mucosal adjuvant for coadministered unrelated Ags. To elucidate the role of edema toxin (EdTx) components in its adjuvanticity, we examined how a PA mutant lacking the ability to bind EF (PA-U7) or another mutant that allows the cellular uptake of EF, but fails to efficiently mediate its translocation into the cytosol (PA-dFF), would affect EdTx-induced adaptive immunity. Native EdTx promotes costimulatory molecule expression by macrophages and B lymphocytes, and a broad spectrum of cytokine responses by cervical lymph node cells in vitro. These effects were reduced or abrogated when cells were treated with EF plus PA-dFF, or PA-U7 instead of PA. We also intranasally immunized groups of mice with a recombinant fusion protein of Yersinia pestis F1 and LcrVAgs (F1-V) together with EdTx variants consisting of wild-type or mutants PA and EF. Analysis of serum and mucosal Ab responses against F1-V or EdTx components (i.e., PA and EF) revealed no adjuvant activity in mice that received PA-U7 instead of PA. In contrast, coimmunization with PA-dFF enhanced serum Ab responses. Finally, immunization with native PA and an EF mutant lacking adenylate cyclase activity (EF-K346R) failed to enhance Ab responses. In summary, a fully functional PA and a minimum of adenylate cyclase activity are needed for EdTx to act as a mucosal adjuvant. PMID:20952678

  3. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    The first section of this study deals with areas where cholera is endemic and with the conditions normally favouring endemicity. Turning next to epidemics, the author discusses their origin and types, climatic influences on them, their periodicity and the possibility of forecasting them, the role played in them by different serological races of V. cholerae, and the causes of their decline. In a section on the factors governing the local spread of cholera, he considers contact and water-borne infection; the role of contaminated food and drink, of fomites, of flies, and of carriers; and the incidence according to sex, age, race, and occupation. The last part deals with factors governing the spread of cholera over longer distances, and includes discussion of the effect of movements of individuals and groups and of assemblies of the population on pilgrimages or at religious festivals. PMID:13472431

  4. Oral Administration of a Fusion Protein between the Cholera Toxin B Subunit and the 42-Amino Acid Isoform of Amyloid-β Peptide Produced in Silkworm Pupae Protects against Alzheimer's Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  5. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  6. Chitosan as an adjuvant for a Helicobacter pylori therapeutic vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanfeng; Tao, Liming; Wang, Fucai; Liu, Wei; Jing, Lei; Liu, Dongsheng; Hu, Sijun; Xie, Yong; Zhou, Nanjin

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to delineate the therapeutic effect of a Helicobacter pylori vaccine with chitosan as an adjuvant, as well as to identify the potential mechanism against H. pylori infection when compared with an H. pylori vaccine, with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. Mice were first infected with H. pylori and, following the establishment of an effective infection model, were vaccinated using an H. pylori protein vaccine with chitosan as an adjuvant. Levels of H. pylori colonization, H. pylori‑specific antibodies and cytokines were determined by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The TLR4 and Foxp3 mRNA and protein levels were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. It was identified that the H. pylori elimination rate of the therapeutic vaccine with chitosan as an adjuvant (58.33%) was greater than the therapeutic vaccine with CT as an adjuvant (45.45%). The therapeutic H. pylori vaccine with chitosan as an adjuvant induced significantly greater antibody and cytokine levels when compared with the control groups. Notably, the IL‑10 and IL‑4 levels in the groups with chitosan as an adjuvant to the H. pylori vaccine were significantly greater than those in the groups with CT as an adjuvant. The mRNA expression levels of TLR4 and Foxp3 were significantly elevated in the mice that were vaccinated with chitosan as an adjuvant to the H. pylori vaccine, particularly in mice where the H. pylori infection had been eradicated. The H. pylori vaccine with chitosan as an adjuvant effectively increased the H. pylori elimination rate, the humoral immune response and the Th1/Th2 cell immune reaction; in addition, the therapeutic H. pylori vaccine regulated the Th1 and Th2 response. The significantly increased TLR4 expression and decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cell number contributed to the immune clearance of the H. pylori infection. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that in mice the H

  7. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Pollitzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    In this study, figures relating to cholera deaths occurring in individual countries, from 1900 to 1952, are recorded as well as the incidence of the disease from 1923 up to the present time. The mode of spread of cholera from its endemic home in India to outside countries is described in relation to favourable seasons, main routes followed by the infection, and the role played by large religious gatherings. The incidence of the disease in the various seaports infected within recent years is discussed. PMID:14364186

  8. Biochemistry of Vibrio cholerae virulence: purification of cholera enterotoxin by preparative disc electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A C; Richardson, S H; Sheridan, B

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for cholera enterotoxin purification previously developed in this labarotory were not applicable to large-scale purification, and these methods resulted in low yields of pure toxin. An efficient scheme has been developed whereby pure cholera enterotoxin can be obtained from 6 to 8 liters of culture supernatant fluid. This method consists of concentration by membrane ultrafiltration followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. Pure cholera enterotoxin of high biological potency was obtained after a final step of preparative acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The degree of purity of the toxin-antigen as well as its biological activity were determined at various setps of purification. This alternate technique for purification is offered because of the widespread interest in cholera enterotoxin as a specific stimulator of adenyl cyclase. Images PMID:987751

  9. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    After a general consideration of the loss of fluids and salts in evacuations from the gastro-intestinal tract, the author discusses in detail both the physical and the chemical changes in the blood of cholera patients. The author then deals exhaustively with the problems of circulatory and renal failure. PMID:13413649

  10. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1956-01-01

    The first portion of this study describes in detail the different aspects of stool examinations, including the collection, preservation, and pooling of specimens, macroscopic and bacterioscopic examination, enrichment methods, and cultivation on a variety of solid media. The author also deals with the examination of vomits and of water. The performance and value of different identification tests (agglutination, haemolysis, and bacteriophage) and confirmatory tests are then considered. An annex is included on bacteriological procedures in the laboratory diagnosis of cholera. PMID:13356145

  11. Association of Heavy Rainfall on Genotypic Diversity in V. cholerae Isolates from an Outbreak in India

    PubMed Central

    Goel, A. K.; Jiang, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The outbreak of waterborne disease cholera has been associated with rainfall and flooding events by contamination of potable water with environmental Vibrio cholerae. The continuation of the epidemic in a region, however, is often due to secondary transmission of the initial outbreak strain through human waste. This paper reports, on the contrary, a rapid shift of genotype from one V. cholerae strain to another one in an epidemic region. V. cholerae isolated from patients during 2005 cholera epidemic in Chennai, India were characterized using PCR identification of toxin genes, antibiogram, and genomic fingerprinting analysis. The results showed that in spite of the similarity of toxin genes and antibiogram, the Vibrio isolates grouped into two different clusters based on the ERIC-PCR fingerprinting. Each cluster corresponded to a distinct peak of cholera outbreak, which occurred after separate heavy rainfall. The results suggest that the rainfall event can bring various genotypes of V. cholerae strains causing multiple outbreaks. PMID:22194751

  12. Mucosal Pre-Exposure to Th17-Inducing Adjuvants Exacerbates Pathology after Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Radha; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mallon, Daniel J.; Chen, Kong; Pociask, Derek A.; Connell, Terry D.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Alcorn, John F.; Ross, Ted M.; Kolls, Jay K.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccines are thought to confer superior protection against mucosal infectious diseases. In addition, mucosal routes of vaccine delivery preferentially induce the generation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells, which produce the cytokine IL-17. Th17 cells are critical in mediating vaccine-induced immunity against several mucosal infectious diseases. However, IL-17 is also a potent proinflammatory cytokine, and we recently showed that IL-17 mediates immunopathology and lung injury after influenza infection in mice. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal pre-exposure to Th17-inducing adjuvants can promote disease exacerbation upon subsequent infection with influenza virus. Mice mucosally pre-exposed to Th17-inducing adjuvants, such as type II heat-labile enterotoxin or cholera toxin, resulted in increased morbidity and exacerbated lung inflammation upon subsequent infection with influenza virus. Furthermore, the increased morbidity was accompanied by increased expression of inflammatory chemokines and increased accumulation of neutrophils. Importantly, blockade of the IL-17 pathway in mice pre-exposed to Th17-inducing adjuvants resulted in attenuation of the inflammatory phenotype seen in influenza-infected mice. Our findings indicate that, before mucosal Th17-inducing adjuvants can be used in vaccine strategies, the short- and long-term detrimental effects of such adjuvants on disease exacerbation and lung injury in response to infections, such as influenza, should be carefully studied. PMID:24183780

  13. Merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium yoelii fused via an oligosaccharide moiety of cholera toxin B subunit glycoprotein expressed in yeast induced protective immunity against lethal malaria infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Takeshi; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Taira, Toki; Matsuzaki, Goro; Arakawa, Takeshi

    2012-01-20

    Methylotrophic yeast (Pichia pastoris) secreted cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) predominantly as a biologically active pentamer (PpCTB) with identical ganglioside binding affinity profiles to that of choleragenoid. Unlike choleragenoid, however, the PpCTB did not induce a footpad edema response in mice. Of the two potential glycosylation sites (NIT(4-6) and NKT(90-92)) for this protein, a N-linked oligosaccharide was identified at Asn4. The oligosaccharide, presumed to extend from the lateral circumference of the CTB pentamer ring structure, was exploited as a site-specific anchoring scaffold for the C-terminal 19-kDa merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1-19) of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii. Conjugation of MSP1-19 to PpCTB via its oligosaccharide moiety induced higher protective efficacy against lethal parasite infection than conjugation directly to the PpCTB protein body in both intranasal and subcutaneous immunization regimes. Such increased protection was potentially due to the higher antigen loading capacity of CTB achieved when the antigen was linked to the extended branches of the oligosaccharide. This might have allowed the antigen to reside in more spacious molecular environment with less steric hindrance between the constituent molecules of the fusion complex. PMID:22119928

  14. Expression of cholera toxin B-lumbrokinase fusion protein in Pichia pastoris--the use of transmucosal carriers in the delivery of therapeutic proteins to protect rats against thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chunfeng, Guan; Xiaozhou, Li; Gang, Wang; Jing, Ji; Chao, Jin; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi

    2013-01-01

    Cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) has been widely used to facilitate antigen delivery by serving as an effective mucosal carrier molecule for the induction of oral tolerance. However, whether CTB can be used as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins has not been widely studied. Thus, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of lumbrokinase (LK) proteins which is an important fibrinolytic enzyme derived from earthworm. CTB and LK, separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via Pichia pastoris. The activity and proper folding of recombinant protein in yeast were confirmed by Western blot analysis, fibrin plate assays, and G(M1)-ganglioside ELISA. Following oral administration of recombinant protein, the thrombosis model of rats and mice revealed that the oral treatment of rCTB-LK has a more significant anti-thrombotic effect on animals compared with rLK. It is possible to conclude that CTB can successfully enhance its fusion protein LK to be absorbed. The use of CTB as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins was supported. PMID:23269637

  15. Proteosomes, emulsomes, and cholera toxin B improve nasal immunogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus gp160 in mice: induction of serum, intestinal, vaginal, and lung IgA and IgG.

    PubMed

    Lowell, G H; Kaminski, R W; VanCott, T C; Slike, B; Kersey, K; Zawoznik, E; Loomis-Price, L; Smith, G; Redfield, R R; Amselem, S; Birx, D L

    1997-02-01

    Intranasal immunization of mice with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) rgp160 complexed to proteosomes improved anti-gp160 serum IgA and IgG titers, increased the number of gp160 peptides recognized, and stimulated anti-gp160 intestinal IgA compared with immunization with uncomplexed rgp160 in saline. These enhanced responses were especially evident when either a bioadhesive nanoemulsion (emulsomes) or cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was added to the proteosome-rgp160 vaccine. Furthermore, anti-gp160 IgG and IgA in vaginal secretions and fecal extracts were induced after intranasal immunization with proteosome-rgp160 delivered either in saline or with emulsomes. Formulation of uncomplexed rgp160 with emulsomes or CTB also enhanced serum and selected mucosal IgA responses. Induction of serum, vaginal, bronchial, intestinal, and fecal IgA and IgG by intranasal proteosome-rgp160 vaccines delivered in saline or with emulsomes or CTB is encouraging for mucosal vaccine development to help control the spread of HIV transmission and AIDS. PMID:9203649

  16. Antibody-secreting cell responses after Vibrio cholerae O1 infection and oral cholera vaccination in adults in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Atiqur; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Islam, Kamrul; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Wrammert, Jens; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Harris, Jason B

    2013-10-01

    Infection with Vibrio cholerae and oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) induce transient circulating plasmablast responses that peak within approximately 7 days after infection or vaccination. We previously demonstrated that plasmablast responses strongly correlate with subsequent levels of V. cholerae-specific duodenal antibodies up to 6 months after V. cholerae infection. Hence, plasmablast responses provide an early window into the immunologic memory at the mucosal surface. In this study, we characterized plasmablast responses following V. cholerae infection using a flow cytometrically defined population and compared V. cholerae-specific responses in adult patients with V. cholerae O1 infection and vaccinees who received the OCV Dukoral (Crucell Vaccines Canada). Among flow cytometrically sorted populations of gut-homing plasmablasts, almost 50% of the cells recognized either cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB) or V. cholerae O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISPOT), we found that infection with V. cholerae O1 and OCVs induce similar responses to the protein antigen CtxB, but responses to LPS were diminished after OCV compared to those after natural V. cholerae infection. A second dose of OCV on day 14 failed to boost circulating V. cholerae-specific plasmablast responses in Bangladeshi adults. Our results differ from those in studies from areas where cholera is not endemic, in which a second vaccination on day 14 significantly boosts plasmablast responses. Given these results, it is likely that the optimal boosting strategies for OCVs differ significantly between areas where V. cholerae infection is endemic and those where it is not. PMID:23945156

  17. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  18. Adjuvant requirement for successful immunization with recombinant derivatives of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 delivered via the intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Bargieri, Daniel Y; Rosa, Daniela S; Lasaro, Melissa Ang Simões; Ferreira, Luis Carlos S; Soares, Irene S; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2007-06-01

    Recently, we generated two bacterial recombinant proteins expressing 89 amino acids of the C-terminal domain of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 and the hexa-histidine tag (His6MSP1(19)). One of these recombinant proteins contained also the amino acid sequence of the universal pan allelic T-cell epitope (His6MSP1(19)-PADRE). In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenic properties of these antigens when administered via the intra-nasal route in the presence of distinct adjuvant formulations. We found that C57BL/6 mice immunized with either recombinant proteins in the presence of the adjuvants cholera toxin (CT) or the Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT) developed high and long lasting titers of specific serum antibodies. The induced immune responses reached maximum levels after three immunizing doses with a prevailing IgG1 subclass response. In contrast, mice immunized by intranasal route with His6MSP1(19)-PADRE in the presence of the synthetic oligonucleotides adjuvant CpG ODN 1826 developed lower antibody titers but when combined to CT, CpG addition resulted in enhanced IgG responses characterized by lower IgG1 levels. Considering the limitations of antigens formulations that can be used in humans, mucosal adjuvants can be a reliable alternative for the development of new strategies of immunization using recombinant proteins of P. vivax. PMID:17568936

  19. Mutants of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin Act as Effective Mucosal Adjuvants for Nasal Delivery of an Acellular Pertussis Vaccine: Differential Effects of the Nontoxic AB Complex and Enzyme Activity on Th1 and Th2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Elizabeth J.; McNeela, Edel; Murphy, Geraldine A.; Stewart, Helen; O'hagan, Derek; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mills, Kingston H. G.

    1999-01-01

    Mucosal delivery of vaccines is dependent on the identification of safe and effective adjuvants that can enhance the immunogenicity of protein antigens administered by nasal or oral routes. In this study we demonstrate that two mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT), LTK63, which lacks ADP-ribosylating activity, and LTR72, which has partial enzyme activity, act as potent mucosal adjuvants for the nasal delivery of an acellular pertussis (Pa) vaccine. Both LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), secretory IgA, and local and systemic T-cell responses. Furthermore, using the murine respiratory challenge model for infection with Bordetella pertussis, we demonstrated that a nasally delivered diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTPa) combination vaccine formulated with LTK63 as an adjuvant conferred a high level of protection, equivalent to that generated with a parenterally delivered DTPa vaccine formulated with alum. This study also provides significant new information on the roles of the binding and enzyme components of LT in the modulation of Th1 and Th2 responses. LTK63, which lacks enzyme activity, promoted T-cell responses with a mixed Th1–Th2 profile, but LTR72, which retains partial enzyme activity, and the wild-type toxin, especially at low dose, induced a more polarized Th2-type response and very high IgA and IgG antibody titers. Our findings suggest that the nontoxic AB complex has broad adjuvant activity for T-cell responses and that the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the A subunit also appears to modulate cytokine production, but its effect on T-cell subtypes, as well as enhancing, may be selectively suppressive. PMID:10569737

  20. Mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin act as effective mucosal adjuvants for nasal delivery of an acellular pertussis vaccine: differential effects of the nontoxic AB complex and enzyme activity on Th1 and Th2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E J; McNeela, E; Murphy, G A; Stewart, H; O'hagan, D; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Mills, K H

    1999-12-01

    Mucosal delivery of vaccines is dependent on the identification of safe and effective adjuvants that can enhance the immunogenicity of protein antigens administered by nasal or oral routes. In this study we demonstrate that two mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT), LTK63, which lacks ADP-ribosylating activity, and LTR72, which has partial enzyme activity, act as potent mucosal adjuvants for the nasal delivery of an acellular pertussis (Pa) vaccine. Both LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), secretory IgA, and local and systemic T-cell responses. Furthermore, using the murine respiratory challenge model for infection with Bordetella pertussis, we demonstrated that a nasally delivered diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTPa) combination vaccine formulated with LTK63 as an adjuvant conferred a high level of protection, equivalent to that generated with a parenterally delivered DTPa vaccine formulated with alum. This study also provides significant new information on the roles of the binding and enzyme components of LT in the modulation of Th1 and Th2 responses. LTK63, which lacks enzyme activity, promoted T-cell responses with a mixed Th1-Th2 profile, but LTR72, which retains partial enzyme activity, and the wild-type toxin, especially at low dose, induced a more polarized Th2-type response and very high IgA and IgG antibody titers. Our findings suggest that the nontoxic AB complex has broad adjuvant activity for T-cell responses and that the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the A subunit also appears to modulate cytokine production, but its effect on T-cell subtypes, as well as enhancing, may be selectively suppressive. PMID:10569737

  1. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    SciTech Connect

    Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David C; Challacombe, Jean F; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Munik, A C; Chertkov, Olga; Meincke, Linda; Saunders, Elizabeth; Choi, Seon Y; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Jeon, Yoon - Seong; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae - Hak; Walters, Ronald A; Hug, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to define pathogenic V

  2. Adjuvant action of Chenopodium quinoa saponins on the induction of antibody responses to intragastric and intranasal administered antigens in mice.

    PubMed

    Estrada, A; Li, B; Laarveld, B

    1998-07-01

    Saponins extracted from the seed of Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) were studied for their ability to act as mucosal adjuvants upon their intragastric or intranasal administration together with model antigens in mice. Quinoa saponins, co-administered intragastrically or intranasally with cholera toxin or ovalbumin, potentiated specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the antigens in serum, intestinal and lung secretions. The potentiating effect of the saponins appeared, to some extent, mediated by increased permeability of the mucosa, allowing increased uptake of the antigen. The intragastric administration of 99mTc-radio-labeled human serum albumin together with quinoa saponins revealed an increased presence of the radiolabeled protein in blood, liver, spleen and lungs of mice. This study indicates the potential of quinoa saponins as adjuvants for mucosally administered vaccines. PMID:9681245

  3. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C.; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K.; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004–2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004–2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera. PMID:27555841

  4. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera. PMID:27555841

  5. Cholera outbreaks (2012) in three districts of Nepal reveal clonal transmission of multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although endemic cholera causes significant morbidity and mortality each year in Nepal, lack of information about the causal bacterium often hinders cholera intervention and prevention. In 2012, diarrheal outbreaks affected three districts of Nepal with confirmed cases of mortality. This study was designed to understand the drug response patterns, source, and transmission of Vibrio cholerae associated with 2012 cholera outbreaks in Nepal. Methods V. cholerae (n = 28) isolated from 2012 diarrhea outbreaks {n = 22; Kathmandu (n = 12), Doti (n = 9), Bajhang (n = 1)}, and surface water (n = 6; Kathmandu) were tested for antimicrobial response. Virulence properties and DNA fingerprinting of the strains were determined by multi-locus genetic screening employing polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results All V. cholerae strains isolated from patients and surface water were confirmed to be toxigenic, belonging to serogroup O1, Ogawa serotype, biotype El Tor, and possessed classical biotype cholera toxin (CTX). Double-mismatch amplification mutation assay (DMAMA)-PCR revealed the V. cholerae strains to possess the B-7 allele of ctx subunit B. DNA sequencing of tcpA revealed a point mutation at amino acid position 64 (N → S) while the ctxAB promoter revealed four copies of the tandem heptamer repeat sequence 5'-TTTTGAT-3'. V. cholerae possessed all the ORFs of the Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-I but lacked the ORFs 498–511 of VSP-II. All strains were multidrug resistant with resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), nalidixic acid (NA), and streptomycin (S); all carried the SXT genetic element. DNA sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence of gyrA and parC of the NAR strains (n = 4) revealed point mutations at amino acid positions 83 (S → I), and 85 (S → L), respectively. Similar PFGE (NotI) pattern revealed the Nepalese V. cholerae to be clonal

  6. Progress towards development of a cholera subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ronald K; Kirn, Thomas J; Bose, Niranjan; Stonehouse, Emily; Tripathi, Shital A; Kovác, Pavol; Wade, William F

    2004-07-01

    Cholera, an enteric disease that can reach pandemic proportions, remains a world-wide problem that is positioned to increase in incidence as changes in global climate or armed conflict spawn the conditions that enhance transmission to humans and, thus, precipitate epidemic cholera. An effective subunit cholera vaccine that can provide protective immunity with one parenteral immunization would be a major advantage over the existing oral vaccines that can require two doses for optimal protection. The existing vaccines are clearly effective in some settings, but are less so in others, especially with respect to specific groups such as young (2-5 years) children. In our efforts to develop a cholera subunit vaccine, we focused on two Vibrio cholerae antigens, LPS (lipopolysaccharide) and TCP (toxin co-regulated pilus), that are known to induce protective antibodies in animal models and, in the case of anti-LPS antibodies, to be associated with clinical protection of V. cholerae exposed or vaccinated individuals. This review discusses the current cholera vaccines and compares the advantages of a cholera subunit vaccine to that of the whole cell vaccines. We discuss the possible subunit antigens and prospective targeted use of a subunit cholera vaccine. PMID:17191897

  7. Cholera studies*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1957-01-01

    In discussing prevention, the author deals first with the provision of permanently safe water, supplied from waterworks or wells, and with other improvements in environmental sanitation. Control of food and drinks, public health propaganda and education, and vaccination are also considered under this heading. The greater part of this study is devoted to suppressive measures, affecting the individual, the environment, and persons in the mass. Discussion of the isolation, detection and management of cholera patients, the management of contacts, and the management and treatment of carriers is followed by sections on, inter alia, disinfection, temporary improvements in water supplies, fly control, and personal prophylaxis. In dealing with mass prophylaxis, the author pays particular attention to vaccination. In the concluding sections he goes into the control of pilgrimages and local and international quarantine measures. PMID:13479774

  8. Release from Th1-type immune tolerance in spleen and enhanced production of IL-5 in Peyer's patch by cholera toxin B induce the glomerular deposition of IgA.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takahiro; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Terashima, Masazumi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Habu, Sonoko; Okumura, Ko; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We examined the pathogenesis of glomerular damage in Th2 type-dependent GATA-3 transgenic (GATA-3 Tg) mice with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). GATA-3 Tg mice were immunized orally using OVA plus cholera toxin B (CTB), and measurement of the serum IgA antibody level and histopathological examination were performed. Marked increases in the serum levels of OVA-specific IgA antibody, IgA and IgG, C3 deposits analogous to those seen in IgAN, and expansion of the matrix in association with mesangial cell proliferation were observed. Furthermore, glomerular IgA deposits were co-localized with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deposits, which might actually have been abnormal IgA deposits. In GATA-3/TCR-Tg mice that had been orally sensitized with CTB plus OVA and were re-stimulated with OVA in vitro, cultured Peyer's patch cells showed the enhanced production of IL-5 and supernatants from cultures of spleen cells showed a reduction of TGF-β production with a simultaneous increase in IL-2 production and the recovery of IFN-γ formation. The amount of TGF-β produced by the spleen cells was found to be correlated with the amount of IFN-γ and IL-IL-2 produced by the cells. Also, the percentage of regulatory T cells (Treg) in the spleens of mice sensitized with OVA plus CTB was lower than that in mice orally sensitized with OVA alone. These results suggest that the increased production of IL-5 from Peyer's patch cells (PPc) and the restored Th1-type immune response might cause the production of abnormal IgA and might induce the deposition of IgA in glomeruli. PMID:26719095

  9. The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system employs diverse effector modules for intraspecific competition

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Daniel; Miyata, Sarah T.; Bachmann, Verena; Brooks, Teresa M.; Mullins, Travis; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that consists of over 200 serogroups with differing pathogenic potential. Only strains that express the virulence factors cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) are capable of pandemic spread of cholera diarrhoea. Regardless, all V. cholerae strains sequenced to date harbour genes for the type VI secretion system (T6SS) that translocates effectors into neighbouring eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here we report that the effectors encoded within these conserved gene clusters differ widely among V. cholerae strains, and that immunity proteins encoded immediately downstream from the effector genes protect their host from neighbouring bacteria producing corresponding effectors. As a consequence, strains with matching effector-immunity gene sets can coexist, while strains with different sets compete against each other. Thus, the V. cholerae T6SS contributes to the competitive behaviour of this species. PMID:24686479

  10. High-Resolution Crystal Structures Elucidate the Molecular Basis of Cholera Blood Group Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Heggelund, Julie Elisabeth; Burschowsky, Daniel; Bjørnestad, Victoria Ariel; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Krengel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is the prime example of blood-group-dependent diseases, with individuals of blood group O experiencing the most severe symptoms. The cholera toxin is the main suspect to cause this relationship. We report the high-resolution crystal structures (1.1–1.6 Å) of the native cholera toxin B-pentamer for both classical and El Tor biotypes, in complexes with relevant blood group determinants and a fragment of its primary receptor, the GM1 ganglioside. The blood group A determinant binds in the opposite orientation compared to previously published structures of the cholera toxin, whereas the blood group H determinant, characteristic of blood group O, binds in both orientations. H-determinants bind with higher affinity than A-determinants, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. Together, these findings suggest why blood group O is a risk factor for severe cholera. PMID:27082955

  11. Effect of Cholera Enterotoxin on Ion Transport across Isolated Ileal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Field, Michael; Fromm, David; Al-Awqati, Qais; Greenough, William B.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of cholera enterotoxin on intestinal ion transport were examined in vitro. Addition of dialyzed filtrate of Vibrio cholerae (crude toxin) to the luminal side of isolated rabbit ileal mucosa caused a delayed and gradually progressive increase in transmural electric potential difference (PD) and shortcircuit current (SCC). A similar pattern was observed upon addition of a highly purified preparation of cholera toxin, although the changes in PD and SCC were smaller. Na and Cl fluxes across the short-circuited mucosa were determined with radioisotopes 3-4 hr after addition of crude toxin or at a comparable time in control tissues. The toxin caused a net secretory flux of Cl and reduced to zero the net absorptive flux of Na. Similar flux changes were observed when either crude or purified toxin was added in vivo and tissues were mounted in vitro 3-4 hr later. Additon of D-glucose to the luminal side of toxin-treated mucosa produced a large net absorptive flux of Na without altering the net Cl and residual ion fluxes. Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic phosphate (cyclic AMP) and theophylline had previously been shown to cause a rapid increase in SCC and ion flux changes similar to those induced by cholera toxin. Pretreatment of ileal mucosa with either crude or purified cholera toxin greatly reduced the SCC response to theophylline and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, which, together with the flux data, suggest that both cyclic AMP and cholera toxin stimulate active secretion by a common pathway. Inhibition of the SCC response to theophylline was observed after luminal but not after serosal addition of toxin. In vitro effects of cholera toxin correlated closely with in vivo effects: heating toxin destroyed both; two V. cholerae filtrates which were inactive in vivo proved also to be inactive in vitro; PD and volume flow measurements in isolated, in vivo ileal loops of rabbit revealed that the PD pattern after addition of toxin is similar to that seen in vitro and also

  12. Whole-genome sequence comparisons reveal the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Chan Hee; Nair, G Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of the whole-genome sequences of Vibrio cholerae strains from previous and current cholera pandemics has demonstrated that genomic changes and alterations in phage CTX (particularly in the gene encoding the B subunit of cholera toxin) were major features in the evolution of V. cholerae. Recent studies have revealed the genetic mechanisms in these bacteria by which new variants of V. cholerae are generated from type-specific strains; these mechanisms suggest that certain strains are selected by environmental or human factors over time. By understanding the mechanisms and driving forces of historical and current changes in the V. cholerae population, it would be possible to predict the direction of such changes and the evolution of new variants; this has implications for the battle against cholera. PMID:25913612

  13. Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Transport of Biologically Active Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin (VCC) from V. cholerae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Elluri, Sridhar; Enow, Constance; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Rompikuntal, Pramod K.; Dongre, Mitesh; Carlsson, Sven; Pal, Amit; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from Gram-negative bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of virulence factors. Vibrio cholerae produce OMVs but their putative role in translocation of effectors involved in pathogenesis has not been well elucidated. The V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC), is a pore-forming toxin that lyses target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. It is considered a potent toxin that contributes to V. cholerae pathogenesis. The mechanisms involved in the secretion and delivery of the VCC have not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings OMVs from V. cholerae strains were isolated and purified using a differential centrifugation procedure and Optiprep centrifugation. The ultrastructure and the contents of OMVs were examined under the electron microscope and by immunoblot analyses respectively. We demonstrated that VCC from V. cholerae strain V:5/04 was secreted in association with OMVs and the release of VCC via OMVs is a common feature among V. cholerae strains. The biological activity of OMV-associated VCC was investigated using contact hemolytic assay and epithelial cell cytotoxicity test. It showed toxic activity on both red blood cells and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the OMVs architecture might play a role in stability of VCC and thereby can enhance its biological activities in comparison with the free secreted VCC. Furthermore, we tested the role of OMV-associated VCC in host cell autophagy signalling using confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. We observed that OMV-associated VCC triggered an autophagy response in the target cell and our findings demonstrated for the first time that autophagy may operate as a cellular defence mechanism against an OMV-associated bacterial virulence factor. Conclusion/Significance Biological assays of OMVs from the V. cholerae strain V:5/04 demonstrated that OMV-associated VCC is indeed biologically active and

  14. Immunizing adult female mice with a TcpA-A2-CTB chimera provides a high level of protection for their pups in the infant mouse model of cholera.

    PubMed

    Price, Gregory A; Holmes, Randall K

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae expresses two primary virulence factors, cholera toxin (CT) and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). CT causes profuse watery diarrhea, and TCP (composed of repeating copies of the major pilin TcpA) is required for intestinal colonization by V. cholerae. Antibodies to CT or TcpA can protect against cholera in animal models. We developed a TcpA holotoxin-like chimera (TcpA-A2-CTB) to elicit both anti-TcpA and anti-CTB antibodies and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in the infant mouse model of cholera. Adult female CD-1 mice were immunized intraperitoneally three times with the TcpA-A2-CTB chimera and compared with similar groups immunized with a TcpA+CTB mixture, TcpA alone, TcpA with Salmonella typhimurium flagellin subunit FliC as adjuvant, or CTB alone. Blood and fecal samples were analyzed for antigen-specific IgG or IgA, respectively, using quantitative ELISA. Immunized females were mated; their reared offspring were challenged orogastrically with 10 or 20 LD50 of V. cholerae El Tor N16961; and vaccine efficacy was assessed by survival of the challenged pups at 48 hrs. All pups from dams immunized with the TcpA-A2-CTB chimera or the TcpA+CTB mixture survived at both challenge doses. In contrast, no pups from dams immunized with TcpA+FliC or CTB alone survived at the 20 LD50 challenge dose, although the anti-TcpA or anti-CTB antibody level elicited by these immunizations was comparable to the corresponding antibody level achieved by immunization with TcpA-A2-CTB or TcpA+CTB. Taken together, these findings comprise strong preliminary evidence for synergistic action between anti-TcpA and anti-CTB antibodies in protecting mice against cholera. Weight loss analysis showed that only immunization of dams with TcpA-A2-CTB chimera or TcpA+CTB mixture protected their pups against excess weight loss from severe diarrhea. These data support the concept of including both TcpA and CTB as immunogens in development of an effective multivalent

  15. The discovery of cholera - like enterotoxins produced by Escherichia coli causing secretory diarrhoea in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sack, R. Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Non-vibrio cholera has been recognized as a clinical entity for as long as cholera was known to be caused by Vibrio cholerae. Until 1968, the aetiologic agent of this syndrome was not known. Following a series of studies in patients with non-vibrio cholera it was found that these patients had large concentrations of Escherichia coli in the small bowel and stools which produced cholera toxin-like enterotoxins, and had fluid and electrolyte transport abnormalities in the small bowel similar to patients with documented cholera. Furthermore, these patients developed antibodies to the cholera-like enterotoxin. Later studies showed that these strains, when fed to volunteers produced a cholera-like disease and that two enterotoxins were found to be produced by these organisms: a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) which is nearly identical to cholera toxin, and a heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a small molecular weight polypeptide. E. coli that produced one or both of these enterotoxins were designated enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). ETEC are now known not only to cause a severe cholera-like illness, but to be the most common bacterial cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, and to be the most common cause of travellers’ diarrhoea in persons who visit the developing world. PMID:21415491

  16. A tripartite fusion, FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B, of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) elicits antibodies that neutralize cholera toxin, inhibit adherence of K88 (F4) and F18 fimbriae, and protect pigs against K88ac/heat-labile toxin infection.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Liu, Mei; Casey, Thomas A; Zhang, Weiping

    2011-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxins are the major cause of diarrhea in young pigs. Effective vaccines inducing antiadhesin (anti-K88 and anti-F18) and antitoxin (anti-LT and anti-ST) immunity would provide broad protection to young pigs against ETEC. In this study, we genetically fused nucleotides coding for peptides from K88ac major subunit FaeG, F18 minor subunit FedF, and LT toxoid (LT(192)) A2 and B subunits for a tripartite adhesin-adhesin-toxoid fusion (FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B). This fusion was used for immunizations in mice and pigs to assess the induction of antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies. In addition, protection by the elicited antiadhesin and antitoxin antibodies against a porcine ETEC strain was evaluated in a gnotobiotic piglet challenge model. The data showed that this FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B fusion elicited anti-K88, anti-F18, and anti-LT antibodies in immunized mice and pigs. In addition, the anti-porcine antibodies elicited neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence against both K88 and F18 fimbriae. Moreover, immunized piglets were protected when challenged with ETEC strain 30302 (K88ac/LT/STb) and did not develop clinical disease. In contrast, all control nonvaccinated piglets developed severe diarrhea and dehydration after being challenged with the same ETEC strain. This study clearly demonstrated that this FaeG-FedF-LT(192)A2:B fusion antigen elicited antibodies that neutralized LT toxin and inhibited the adherence of K88 and F18 fimbrial E. coli strains and that this fusion could serve as an antigen for vaccines against porcine ETEC diarrhea. In addition, the adhesin-toxoid fusion approach used in this study may provide important information for developing effective vaccines against human ETEC diarrhea. PMID:21813665

  17. Molecular Insights Into the Evolutionary Pathway of Vibrio cholerae O1 Atypical El Tor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Dokyung; Moon, Se Hoon; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Ouk; Song, Manki; Das, Bhabatosh; Clemens, John D.; Pape, Jean William; Nair, G. Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic V. cholerae strains in the O1 serogroup have 2 biotypes: classical and El Tor. The classical biotype strains of the sixth pandemic, which encode the classical type cholera toxin (CT), have been replaced by El Tor biotype strains of the seventh pandemic. The prototype El Tor strains that produce biotype-specific cholera toxin are being replaced by atypical El Tor variants that harbor classical cholera toxin. Atypical El Tor strains are categorized into 2 groups, Wave 2 and Wave 3 strains, based on genomic variations and the CTX phage that they harbor. Whole-genome analysis of V. cholerae strains in the seventh cholera pandemic has demonstrated gradual changes in the genome of prototype and atypical El Tor strains, indicating that atypical strains arose from the prototype strains by replacing the CTX phages. We examined the molecular mechanisms that effected the emergence of El Tor strains with classical cholera toxin-carrying phage. We isolated an intermediary V. cholerae strain that carried two different CTX phages that encode El Tor and classical cholera toxin, respectively. We show here that the intermediary strain can be converted into various Wave 2 strains and can act as the source of the novel mosaic CTX phages. These results imply that the Wave 2 and Wave 3 strains may have been generated from such intermediary strains in nature. Prototype El Tor strains can become Wave 3 strains by excision of CTX-1 and re-equipping with the new CTX phages. Our data suggest that inter-chromosomal recombination between 2 types of CTX phages is possible when a host bacterial cell is infected by multiple CTX phages. Our study also provides molecular insights into population changes in V. cholerae in the absence of significant changes to the genome but by replacement of the CTX prophage that they harbor. PMID:25233006

  18. Recombinant fusion protein of cholera toxin B subunit with YVAD secreted by Lactobacillus casei inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1 beta secretion in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus species are used as bacterial vectors to deliver functional peptides to the intestine because they are delivered live to the intestine, colonize the mucosal surface, and continue to produce the desired protein. Previously, we generated a recombinant Lactobacillus casei secreting the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), which can translocate into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) through GM1 ganglioside. Recombinant fusion proteins of CTB with functional peptides have been used as carriers for the delivery of these peptides to IECs because of the high cell permeation capacity of recombinant CTB (rCTB). However, there have been no reports of rCTB fused with peptides expressed or secreted by Lactobacillus species. In this study, we constructed L. casei secreting a recombinant fusion protein of CTB with YVAD (rCTB–YVAD). YVAD is a tetrapeptide (tyrosine–valine–alanine–aspartic acid) that specifically inhibits caspase-1, which catalyzes the production of interleukin (IL)-1β, an inflammatory cytokine, from its inactive precursor. Here, we examined whether rCTB–YVAD secreted by L. casei binds to GM1 ganglioside and inhibits caspase-1 activation in Caco-2 cells used as a model of IECs. Results We constructed the rCTB–YVAD secretion vector pSCTB–YVAD by modifying the rCTB secretion vector pSCTB. L. casei secreting rCTB–YVAD was generated by transformation with pSCTB–YVAD. Both the culture supernatant of pSCTB–YVAD-transformed L. casei and purified rCTB–YVAD bound to GM1 ganglioside, as did the culture supernatant of pSCTB-transformed L. casei and purified rCTB. Interestingly, although both purified rCTB–YVAD and rCTB translocated into Caco-2 cells, regardless of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), only purified rCTB–YVAD but not rCTB inhibited LPS-induced caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion in Caco-2 cells, without affecting cell viability. Conclusions The rCTB protein fused to a functional peptide secreted by L. casei

  19. MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic lymphocyte responses induced by enterotoxin-based mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Simmons, C P; Mastroeni, P; Fowler, R; Ghaem-maghami, M; Lycke, N; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Dougan, G

    1999-12-15

    The ability of enterotoxin-based mucosal adjuvants to induce CD8+ MHC class I-restricted CTL responses to a codelivered bystander Ag was examined. Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT), or derivatives of LT carrying mutations in the A subunit (LTR72, LTK63), were tested in parallel with cholera toxin (CT) or a fusion protein consisting of the A1 subunit of CT fused to the Ig binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (called CTA1-DD). Intranasal (i.n.) immunization of C57BL/6 mice with CT, CTA1-DD, LT, LTR72, LTK63, but not rLT-B, elicited MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cell responses to coadministered OVA or the OVA CTL peptide SIINFEKL (OVA257-264). CT, LT, and LTR72 also induced CTL responses to OVA after s.c. or oral coimmunization whereas LTK63 only activated responses after s.c. coimmunization. rLT-B was unable to adjuvant CTL responses to OVA or OVA257-264 administered by any route. Mice treated with an anti-CD4 mAb to deplete CD4+ T cells mounted significant OVA-specific CTL responses after i.n. coadministration of LT with OVA or OVA257-264. Both 51Cr release assays and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays indicated that IFN-gamma-/- and IL-12 p40-/- gene knockout mice developed CTL responses equivalent to those detected in normal C57BL/6 mice. The results highlight the versatility of toxin-based adjuvants and suggest that LT potentiates CTL responses independently of IL-12 and IFN-gamma and probably by a mechanism unrelated to cross-priming. PMID:10586042

  20. Survival and proliferation of the lysogenic bacteriophage CTXΦ in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fenxia; Kan, Biao

    2015-02-01

    The lysogenic phage CTXΦ of Vibrio cholerae can transfer the cholera toxin gene both horizontally (inter-strain) and vertically (cell proliferation). Due to its diversity in form and species, the complexity of regulatory mechanisms, and the important role of the infection mechanism in the production of new virulent strains of V. cholerae, the study of the lysogenic phage CTXΦ has attracted much attention. Based on the progress of current research, the genomic features and their arrangement, the host-dependent regulatory mechanisms of CTXΦ phage survival, proliferation and propagation were reviewed to further understand the phage's role in the evolutionary and epidemiological mechanisms of V. cholerae. PMID:25613689

  1. Detection of ctx gene positive non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in shrimp aquaculture environments.

    PubMed

    Madhusudana, Rao B; Surendran, P K

    2013-06-01

    Water and post-larvae samples from black tiger (Penaeus monodon) shrimp hatcheries; pond water, pond sediment and shrimp from aquaculture farms were screened for the presence of V. cholerae. A V. cholerae-duplex PCR method was developed by utilizing V. cholerae species specific sodB primers and ctxAB genes specific primers. Incidence of V. cholerae was not observed in shrimp hatchery samples but was noticed in aquaculture samples. The incidence of V. cholerae was higher in pond water (7.6%) than in pond sediment (5.2%). Shrimp head (3.6%) portion had relatively higher incidence than shrimp muscle (1.6%). All the V. cholerae isolates (n = 42) belonged to non-O1/non-O139 serogroup, of which 7% of the V. cholerae isolates were potentially cholera-toxigenic (ctx positive). All the ctx positive V. cholerae (n = 3) were isolated from the pond water. Since, cholera toxin (CT) is the major contributing factor for cholera gravis, it is proposed that the mere presence of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae need not be the biohazard criterion in cultured black tiger shrimp but only the presence of ctx carrying non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae may be considered as potential public health risk. PMID:24425944

  2. Crystal structure of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin, which is a potent mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, F; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Hol, W G

    1997-12-01

    Two closely related bacterial toxins, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I) and cholera toxin (CT), not only invoke a toxic activity that affects many victims worldwide but also contain a beneficial mucosal adjuvant activity that significantly enhances the potency of vaccines in general. For the purpose of vaccine design it is most interesting that the undesirable toxic activity of these toxins can be eliminated by the single-site mutation Ser63Lys in the A subunit while the mucosal adjuvant activity is still present. The crystal structure of the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I is determined at 2.0 A resolution. Its structure appears to be essentially the same as the wild-type LT-I structure. The substitution Ser63Lys was designed, based on the wild-type LT-I crystal structure, to decrease toxicity by interfering with NAD binding and/or catalysis. In the mutant crystal structure, the newly introduced lysine side chain is indeed positioned such that it could potentially obstruct the productive binding mode of the substrate NAD while at the same time its positive charge could possibly interfere with the critical function of nearby charged groups in the active site of LT-I. The fact that the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I does not disrupt the wild-type LT-I structure makes the non-toxic mutant potentially suitable, from a structural point of view, to be used as a vaccine to prevent enterotoxigenic E. coli infections. The structural similarity of mutant and wild-type toxin might also be the reason why the inactive Ser63Lys variant retains its adjuvant activity. PMID:9416617

  3. Mucosal immunization of mice using CpG DNA and/or mutants of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli as adjuvants.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D; Clements, J D; Davis, H L

    2001-06-14

    Cholera toxin (CT) and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) are potent mucosal adjuvants in animals associated, at least in part, with their ability to induce cAMP. While toxicity generally precludes their use in humans, a number of different subunit or genetically detoxified mutants of CT and LT have been developed. Another type of adjuvant that has been shown to be effective at mucosal surfaces comprises synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG ODN). We have previously demonstrated a synergy between CpG ODN and native toxins after intranasal (IN) administration to mice, and herein have examined whether this synergy is linked to the cAMP activity. The adjuvanticity of CpG ODN was evaluated with IN and oral delivery of tetanus toxoid or the hepatitis B surface antigen, relative to and in combination with native LT holotoxin (LTh), three active site mutants (LTS61F, LTA69G, LTE112K), a protease site mutant (LTR192G), and the B subunit of LT (LTB). At an equivalent dose, the adjuvants could generally be divided into two groups: one that included CpG ODN, LTh, LTR192G, and LTA69G which acted as strong adjuvants; and the second which comprised LTB, LTS61F, and LTE112K, which produced significantly weaker immune responses. When CpG ODN was co-administered with bacterial toxin-derivatives, in most cases, no synergy between CpG and the LT derivatives was found for strength of the humoral response. Nevertheless, for both routes and antigens, CpG ODN combined with any LT derivative induced a more Type 1-like response than LT derivative alone. These results suggest that while the synergy seen previously with native toxins may have been due in part to inherent cAMP activity, it may have also depended on the particular antigen used and the route of immunization. PMID:11395211

  4. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  5. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  6. Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis and MON810 cry1Ab-transgenic maize exerts no adjuvant effect after airway exposure.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, M; Bøhn, T; Wikmark, O-G; Van den Berg, J; Løvik, M; Traavik, T; Nygaard, U C

    2015-03-01

    The genetically modified (GM) maize event MON810 has been inserted with a processed version of the transgene, cry1Ab, derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to express proteins with insecticidal properties. Such proteins may introduce new allergens and also act as adjuvants that promote allergic responses. While focus has been on safe consumption and hence the oral exposure to GM food and feed, little is known regarding inhalation of pollen and desiccated airborne plant material from GM crops. The aim of this study was to investigate whether plant material from the Cry1Ab-expressing maize variety MON810, or trypsin-activated Cry1Ab (trypCry1Ab) protein produced in recombinant bacteria, may act as adjuvants against the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) in a mouse model of airway allergy. A clear proallergic adjuvant effect of the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) was demonstrated, determined as increased specific IgE, eosinophils and Th2 cytokines in MLN cell supernates, while no elevation in OVA-specific antibodies or cytokine release from MLN cells after stimulation with OVA were observed in mice receiving Cry1Ab-containing plant materials or the trypCry1Ab protein. Our data suggest that Cry1Ab proteins had no detectable systemic adjuvant effect in mice after airway exposure. Further experiments with purified plant proteins, as well as long-term exposures needs be conducted to further evaluate exposures experienced in real-life situations. PMID:25564738

  7. Cholera studies*†

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    In this study, the author describes in detail experimental cholera infection of mammals (infection by the oral route, intragastric inoculation, and intestinal, gall-bladder, and parenteral infection). The pathogenicity for lower animals is examined, and certain observations on insects are included. The second part of the study is devoted to the pathology of human cholera (morbid anatomy distribution of the causative organisms in the dead bodies of cholera victims, and pathogenesis). PMID:13284569

  8. Modeling cholera outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Longini, Ira M.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling can be a valuable tool for studying infectious disease outbreak dynamics and simulating the effects of possible interventions. Here, we describe approaches to modeling cholera outbreaks and how models have been applied to explore intervention strategies, particularly in Haiti. Mathematical models can play an important role in formulating and evaluating complex cholera outbreak response options. Major challenges to cholera modeling are insufficient data for calibrating models and the need to tailor models for different outbreak scenarios. PMID:23412687

  9. Mutants of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin as safe and strong adjuvants for intranasal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Peppoloni, Samuele; Ruggiero, Paolo; Contorni, Mario; Morandi, Maurizio; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Podda, Audino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2003-04-01

    Cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin are powerful mucosal adjuvants but their high toxicity hampers their use in humans. Site-directed mutagenesis has allowed the generation of several cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin mutants with abolished or strongly reduced toxicity that still retain strong mucosal adjuvanticity. Among them, LTK63 (Ser to Lys substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) is completely nontoxic and LTR72 (Ala to Arg at position 72) retains a very low residual enzymatic activity. Both of them have been shown to be safe and effective in enhancing the immunogenicity of intranasally coadministered vaccines, also resulting in protective responses in several animal models. Clinical grade preparations of these mutants have now been produced, tested in animals and proven to be totally safe. Indeed, they did not induce any inflammatory event in the respiratory tract nor, more importantly, in the olfactory bulbs and in the meninges. The fully nontoxic LTK63 mutant has now been successfully tested in human volunteers with a trivalent subunit influenza vaccine. PMID:12899578

  10. Mucosal vaccines: non toxic derivatives of LT and CT as mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pizza, M; Giuliani, M M; Fontana, M R; Monaci, E; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Mills, K H; Rappuoli, R; Del Giudice, G

    2001-03-21

    Most vaccines are still delivered by injection. Mucosal vaccination would increase compliance and decrease the risk of spread of infectious diseases due to contaminated syringes. However, most vaccines are unable to induce immune responses when administered mucosally, and require the use of strong adjuvant on effective delivery systems. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) are powerful mucosal adjuvants when co-administered with soluble antigens. However, their use in humans is hampered by their extremely high toxicity. During the past few years, site-directed mutagenesis has permitted the generation of LT and CT mutants fully non toxic or with dramatically reduced toxicity, which still retain their strong adjuvanticity at the mucosal level. Among these mutants, are LTK63 (serine-to-lysine substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) and LTR72 (alanine-to-arginine substitution at position 72 in the A subunit). The first is fully non toxic, whereas the latter retains some residual enzymatic activity. Both of them are extremely active as mucosal adjuvants, being able to induce very high titers of antibodies specific for the antigen with which they are co-administered. Both mutants have now been tested as mucosal adjuvants in different animal species using a wide variety of antigens. Interestingly, mucosal delivery (nasal or oral) of antigens together with LTK63 or LTR72 mutants also conferred protection against challenge in appropriate animal models (e.g. tetanus, Helicobacter pylori, pertussis, pneumococci, influenza, etc). In conclusion, these LTK63 and LTR72 mutants are safe adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines at the mucosal level, and will be tested soon in humans. PMID:11257389

  11. Cholera studies*†

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1955-01-01

    The morphological characteristics, biochemical properties, and cultural characteristics of V. cholerae are described in great detail in this study. The author also discusses the resistance of the organism to temperature, humidity, sunlight, and various chemicals, as well as the viability of V. cholerae outside the body (in faeces, contaminated material, food, beverages, water, etc.). PMID:14379012

  12. Mucosal immunologic responses in cholera patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Taher; Harris, Jason B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Shirin, Tahmina; Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Chowdhury, Fahima; LaRocque, Regina C; Alam, Nur Haque; Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 causes dehydrating diarrhea with a high mortality rate if untreated. The infection also elicits long-term protective immunity. Since V. cholerae is noninvasive, mucosal immunity is likely important for protection. In this study, we compared humoral immune responses in the duodenal mucosa and blood of cholera patients at different time points after the onset of disease and compared them with those of healthy controls (HCs). Immune responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. Significant increases in V. cholerae LPS-specific IgA and IgG antibody levels were seen in duodenal extracts on day 30, but the levels decreased to baseline by day 180; plasma V. cholerae LPS-specific IgA levels remained elevated longer. Levels of mucosal CTB antibodies also peaked on day 30, but the increase reached statistical significance only for IgG. A significant correlation was found between the CTB antibody-secreting cell (ASC) response in the circulatory system on day 7 and subsequent CTB-specific IgA levels in duodenal extracts on day 30 and the numbers of CTB-specific IgA ASCs in duodenal tissues on day 180. The proportion (0.07%) of mucosal V. cholerae LPS IgA ASCs peaked on day 30 and remained elevated through day 180 compared to that of HCs (P = 0.03). These results suggest that protective immunity against V. cholerae is not likely mediated by the constitutive secretion of antibodies at the mucosal surface; our results are consistent with those of other studies that suggest instead that anamnestic immune responses of mucosal lymphocytes may play a major role in protection against cholera. PMID:21248157

  13. Construction and Evaluation of V. cholerae O139 Mutant, VCUSM21P, as a Safe Live Attenuated Cholera Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Murugaiah, Chandrika; Nik Mohd Noor, Nik Zuraina; Mustafa, Shyamoli; Manickam, Ravichandran; Pattabhiraman, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is a major infectious disease, affecting millions of lives annually. In endemic areas, implementation of vaccination strategy against cholera is vital. As the use of safer live vaccine that can induce protective immunity against Vibrio cholerae O139 infection is a promising approach for immunization, we have designed VCUSM21P, an oral cholera vaccine candidate, which has ctxA that encodes A subunit of ctx and mutated rtxA/C, ace and zot mutations. VCUSM21P was found not to disassemble the actin of HEp2 cells. It colonized the mice intestine approximately 1 log lower than that of the Wild Type (WT) strain obtained from Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. In the ileal loop assay, unlike WT challenge, 1×106 and 1×108 colony forming unit (CFU) of VCUSM21P was not reactogenic in non-immunized rabbits. Whereas, the reactogenicity caused by the WT in rabbits immunized with 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P was found to be reduced as evidenced by absence of fluid in loops administered with 1×102–1×107 CFU of WT. Oral immunization using 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P induced both IgA and IgG against Cholera Toxin (CT) and O139 lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The serum vibriocidal antibody titer had a peak rise of 2560 fold on week 4. Following Removable Intestinal Tie Adult Rabbit Diarrhoea (RITARD) experiment, the non-immunized rabbits were found not to be protected against lethal challenge with 1×109 CFU WT, but 100% of immunized rabbits survived the challenge. In the past eleven years, V. cholerae O139 induced cholera has not been observed. However, attenuated VCUSM21P vaccine could be used for vaccination program against potentially fatal endemic or emerging cholera caused by V. cholerae O139. PMID:24505241

  14. Mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase by Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V; Cuatrecasas, P

    1975-06-01

    The kinetics and properties of the activation of adenylate cyclase by cholera enterotoxin have been examined primarily in toad erythrocytes, but also in avian erythrocytes, rat fat cells and cultured melanoma cells. When cholera toxin is incubated with intact cells it stimulates adenylate cyclase activity, as measured in the subsequently isolated plasma membranes, according to a triphasic time course. This consists of a true lag period of about 30 min, followed by a stage of exponentially increasing adenylate cyclase activity which continues for 110 to 130 min, and finally a period of slow activation which may extend as long as 30 hr in cultured melanoma cells. The progressive activation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin is interrupted by cell lysis; continued incubation of the isolated membranes under nearly identical conditions does not lead to further activation of the enzyme. The delay in the action of the toxin is not grossly dependent of the number of toxin-receptor (GM1 ganglioside) complexes, and is still seen upon adding a second dose of toxin to partially stimulated cells. Direct measurements indicate negligible intracellular levels of biologically active radioiodinated toxin in either a soluble or a nuclear-bound form. The effects are not prevented by Actinomycin D (20 mug/ml), uromycin (30 mug/ml), cycloheximide (30 mug/ml), sodium fluoride (10 mM) or sodium azide (1 mM); KCN, however, almost completely prevents the action of cholera toxin. The action of the toxin is temperature dependent, occurring at very slow or negligible rates below certain critical temperatures, the values of which depend on the specific animal species. Thetransition for toad erythrocytes occurs at 15 to 17 degrees C, while rat adipocytes and turkey erythrocytes demonstrate a discontinuity at 26 to 30 degrees C. The temperature effects are evident during the lag period as well as during the exponential phase of activation. The rate of decay of the stimulated adenylate

  15. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae identified in estuaries of Tanzania using PCR techniques.

    PubMed

    Dalusi, Lucy; Lyimo, Thomas J; Lugomela, Charles; Hosea, Ken M M; Sjöling, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The current study assessed the occurrence of the Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in environmental samples along salinity gradients in three selected estuaries of Tanzania both through culture independent methods and by cultured bacteria. Occurrence of V. cholerae was determined by PCR targeting the V. cholerae outer membrane protein gene ompW. Furthermore, the presence of toxigenic strains and serogroups O1 and O139 was determined using multiplex PCR with specific primers targeting the cholera toxin gene subunit A, ctxA, and serotype specific primers, O1-rfb and O139-rfb, respectively. Results showed that V. cholerae occurred in approximately 10% (n = 185) of both the environmental samples and isolated bacteria. Eight of the bacteria isolates (n = 43) were confirmed as serogroup O1 while one belonged to serogroup O139, the first reported identification of this epidemic strain in East African coastal waters. All samples identified as serogroup O1 or O139 and a number of non-O1/O139 strains were ctxA positive. This study provides in situ evidence of the presence of pathogenic V. cholerae O1 and O139 and a number of V. cholerae non-O1/O139 that carry the cholera toxin gene in estuaries along the coast of Tanzania. PMID:25743072

  16. Phage-bacterial interactions in the evolution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Shah M; Mekalanos, John J

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the genetic and ecological factors which support the emergence of new clones of pathogenic bacteria is vital to develop preventive measures. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics represents a paradigm for this process in that this organism evolved from environmental non-pathogenic strains by acquisition of virulence genes. The major virulence factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) are encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage (CTXφ) and a pathogenicity island, respectively. Additional phages which cooperate with the CTXφ in horizontal transfer of genes in V. cholerae have been characterized, and the potential exists for discovering yet new phages or genetic elements which support the transfer of genes for environmental fitness and virulence leading to the emergence of new epidemic strains. Phages have also been shown to play a crucial role in modulating seasonal cholera epidemics. Thus, the complex array of natural phenomena driving the evolution of pathogenic V. cholerae includes, among other factors, phages that either participate in horizontal gene transfer or in a bactericidal selection process favoring the emergence of new clones of V. cholerae. PMID:23076327

  17. Effect of Different Adjuvants on Protection and Side-Effects Induced by Helicobacter suis Whole-Cell Lysate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bosschem, Iris; Bayry, Jagadeesh; De Bruyne, Ellen; Van Deun, Kim; Smet, Annemieke; Vercauteren, Griet; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter suis (H. suis) is a widespread porcine gastric pathogen, which is also of zoonotic importance. The first goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of several vaccine adjuvants (CpG-DNA, Curdlan, Freund’s Complete and Incomplete, Cholera toxin), administered either subcutaneously or intranasally along with H. suis whole-cell lysate, to protect against subsequent H. suis challenge in a BALB/c infection model. Subcutaneous immunization with Freund’s complete (FC)/lysate and intranasal immunization with Cholera toxin (CT)/lysate were shown to be the best options for vaccination against H. suis, as determined by the amount of colonizing H. suis bacteria in the stomach, although adverse effects such as post-immunization gastritis/pseudo-pyloric metaplasia and increased mortality were observed, respectively. Therefore, we decided to test alternative strategies, including sublingual vaccine administration, to reduce the unwanted side-effects. A CCR4 antagonist that transiently inhibits the migration of regulatory T cells was also included as a new adjuvant in this second study. Results confirmed that immunization with CT (intranasally or sublingually) is among the most effective vaccination protocols, but increased mortality was still observed. In the groups immunized subcutaneously with FC/lysate and CCR4 antagonist/lysate, a significant protection was observed. Compared to the FC/lysate immunized group, gastric pseudo-pyloric metaplasia was less severe or even absent in the CCR4 antagonist/lysate immunized group. In general, an inverse correlation was observed between IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17, KC, MIP-2 and LIX mRNA expression and H. suis colonization density, whereas lower IL-10 expression levels were observed in partially protected animals. PMID:26115373

  18. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vibrio cholerae O1].

    PubMed

    Giono-Cerezo, S; Rodríguez Angeles, M G; Gutiérrez-Cogco, L; Valdespino-Gómez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We made 52180 tests for isolation and identification of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 from rectal swabs and reference strains. We isolated 17.6% V. cholerae O1 strains in 1991, 43.5% in 1992 and 38.9% in 1993. The main serovar in 1991 was Inaba, whereas in 1993 a similar percentage was serovar Ogawa. The phenotype of V. cholerae strains was determined by hemolysis test, Voges-Proskauer test, polymyxin B resistance and phages 4 and 5 resistance. All of the mexican strains were El Tor. There were 2.9-0.75% hemolytic strains from 1991 to 1993, but they were negative when the test was made in tube with human erythrocytes. The resistotypes were performed in 24526 selected strains by Kirby-Bauer method and MIC tests. All of the strains were sensitive, except more than 100 strains isolated in Veracruz that were resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. Detection of cholera toxin was made by ELISA and on culture of Vero and CHO cells. All the V. cholerae O1 strains were toxigenic. The genotype was determined by PCR and ribotyping. The PCR amplified one 564 pb fragment on V. cholerae O1. The ribotypes of mexican strains were 5 and 6a. PMID:7701133

  19. Cholera outbreaks in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Martin A; Delrieu, Isabelle; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-01-01

    During the current seventh cholera pandemic, Africa bore the major brunt of global disease burden. More than 40 years after its resurgence in Africa in 1970, cholera remains a grave public health problem, characterized by large disease burden, frequent outbreaks, persistent endemicity, and high CFRs, particularly in the region of the central African Great Lakes which might act as reservoirs for cholera. There, cases occur year round with a rise in incidence during the rainy season. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, cholera occurs mostly in outbreaks of varying size with a constant threat of widespread epidemics. Between 1970 and 2011, African countries reported 3,221,050 suspected cholera cases to the World Health Organization, representing 46 % of all cases reported globally. Excluding the Haitian epidemic, sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 86 % of reported cases and 99 % of deaths worldwide in 2011. The number of cholera cases is possibly much higher than what is reported to the WHO due to the variation in modalities, completeness, and case definition of national cholera data. One source on country specific incidence rates for Africa, adjusting for underreporting, estimates 1,341,080 cases and 160,930 deaths (52.6 % of 2,548,227 estimated cases and 79.6 % of 209,216 estimated deaths worldwide). Another estimates 1,411,453 cases and 53,632 deaths per year, respectively (50 % of 2,836,669 estimated cases and 58.6 % of 91,490 estimated deaths worldwide). Within Africa, half of all cases between 1970 and 2011 were notified from only seven countries: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, Tanzania, and South Africa. In contrast to a global trend of decreasing case fatality ratios (CFRs), CFRs have remained stable in Africa at approximately 2 %. Early propagation of cholera outbreaks depends largely on the extent of individual bacterial shedding, host and organism characteristics, the likelihood of people coming into contact with

  20. The Role of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Cholera Epidemic in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagir Ahmed, Md.; Raknuzzaman, Md.; Akther, Hafeza; Ahmed, Sumaiya

    A study was conducted on association of Vibrio cholerae with plankton specially emphasis on cyanobacteria in relation to some physico-chemical parameters in the River Buriganga, Dhaka, from January to December 2002. Monthly abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton varied from 457 to 14166 and from 169 to 1055 individual L-1, respectively. Monthly average of faecal coliform in water, zooplankton and phytoplankton samples were 3.99x109, 4.54x103 and 4.28x102 (CFU L-1), respectively. During epidemics, toxigenic V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were isolated from the patients as well as from the surface water. V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were also isolated from plankton samples. More over, it was observed that ctx (cholera toxic) positive in water and phytoplankton samples of the river. A bloom of Oscillatoria sp. (1.6x104 individual L-1) occurred in the upper reaches of the River Buriganga in May 2002. Methanol-water extract of bloom sample was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection and Mass Spectrum (MS) detected microcystin-RR. Cyanobacteria are abundant in the aquatic environment of Bangladesh and it was established that V. cholerae maintain a symbiotic relationship with these algae particularly mucilaginous cyanobacteria. During epidemics, patients symptoms included diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis and in severe cases hemorrhagic diarrhea. So, question has arisen that which is responsible, microcystins or cholera for death of cholera/diarrhea patients in Bangladesh. Future research should be directed to isolate microcystins and cholera toxins from the epidemic areas to clarify the fact.

  1. Inhibition of virulence potential of Vibrio cholerae by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinji; Asakura, Masahiro; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Iwaoka, Emiko; Aoki, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    The rise in multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae strains is a big problem in treatment of patients suffering from severe cholera. Only a few studies have evaluated the potential of natural compounds against V. cholerae. Extracts from plants like ‘neem’, ‘guazuma’, ‘daio’, apple, hop, green tea and elephant garlic have been shown to inhibit bacterial growth or the secreted cholera toxin (CT). However, inhibiting bacterial growth like common antimicrobial agents may also impose selective pressure facilitating development of resistant strains. A natural compound that can inhibit virulence in V. cholerae is an alternative choice for remedy. Recently, some common spices were examined to check their inhibitory capacity against virulence expression of V. cholerae. Among them methanol extracts of red chili, sweet fennel and white pepper could substantially inhibit CT production. Fractionation of red chili methanol extracts indicated a hydrophobic nature of the inhibitory compound(s), and the n-hexane and 90 per cent methanol fractions could inhibit >90 per cent of CT production. Purification and further fractionation revealed that capsaicin is one of the major components among these red chili fractions. Indeed, capsaicin inhibited the production of CT in various V. cholerae strains regardless of serogroups and biotypes. The quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR assay revealed that capsaicin dramatically reduced the expression of major virulence-related genes such as ctxA, tcpA and toxT but enhanced the expression of hns gene that transcribes a global prokaryotic gene regulator (H-NS). This indicates that the repression of CT production by capsaicin or red chili might be due to the repression of virulence genes transcription by H-NS. Regular intake of spices like red chili might be a good approach to fight against devastating cholera. PMID:21415500

  2. Cholera in the Americas.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The cholera epidemic 1st hit South America in January 1991 in the coastal town of Chancay, Peru. In 2 weeks, it spread over 2000 km of the Pacific coast. By the end of the 1st month, it had already reached the mountains and tropical forests. By August 1991, cholera cases were reported in order of appearances in Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Brazil, the US, Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia, and El Salvador. Health authorities still do not know how it was introduced into South America. The case fatality rate has remained at a low of 1%, probably due to the prompt actions of health authorities in informing the public of the epidemic and what preventive cautions should be taken. This epidemic is part of the 7th pandemic which originated in Celebes, Indonesia in 1961. Cholera can spread relatively unchecked in Latin America because sewage in urban areas is not treated even though they do have sewage collection systems. The untreated wastewater enters rivers and the ocean. Consumption of raw seafood is not unusual and has been responsible for cholera infection in some cases. In fact, many countries placed import restrictions on marine products from Peru following the outbreak at a loss of $US10-$US40 million. Municipal sewage treatment facilities, especially stabilization ponds, would prevent the spread of cholera and other pathogens. In rural areas, pit latrines located away from wells can effectively dispose of human wastes. Most water supplies in Latin America are not disinfected. Disinfection drinking water with adequate levels of chlorine would effectively destroy V. cholera. If this is not possible, boiling the water for 2-3 minutes would destroy the pathogen. Any cases of cholera must be reported to PAHO. PAHO has responded to the outbreak by forming a Cholera Task Force and arranged transport of oral rehydration salts, intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and other essential medical supplies. PMID:1742573

  3. Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae Associated with a Large Cholera Outbreak in Ghana in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Eibach, Daniel; Herrera-León, Silvia; Gil, Horacio; Hogan, Benedikt; Ehlkes, Lutz; Adjabeng, Michael; Kreuels, Benno; Nagel, Michael; Opare, David; Fobil, Julius N; May, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Ghana is affected by regular cholera epidemics and an annual average of 3,066 cases since 2000. In 2014, Ghana experienced one of its largest cholera outbreaks within a decade with more than 20,000 notified infections. In order to attribute this rise in cases to a newly emerging strain or to multiple simultaneous outbreaks involving multi-clonal strains, outbreak isolates were characterized, subtyped and compared to previous epidemics in 2011 and 2012. Methodology/Principal Findings Serotypes, biotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 92 Vibrio cholerae isolates collected in 2011, 2012 and 2014 from Southern Ghana. For a subgroup of 45 isolates pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus-variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were performed. Eighty-nine isolates (97%) were identified as ctxB (classical type) positive V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and three (3%) isolates were cholera toxin negative non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae. Among the selected isolates only sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance was detectable in 2011, while 95% of all 2014 isolates showed resistance towards sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, ampicillin and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. MLVA achieved the highest subtype discrimination, revealing 22 genotypes with one major outbreak cluster in each of the three outbreak years. Apart from those clusters genetically distant genotypes circulate during each annual epidemic. Conclusions/Significance This analysis suggests different endemic reservoirs of V. cholerae in Ghana with distinct annual outbreak clusters accompanied by the occurrence of genetically distant genotypes. Preventive measures for cholera transmission should focus on aquatic reservoirs. Rapidly emerging multidrug resistance must be monitored closely. PMID:27232338

  4. Protective immunity against Naegleria fowleri infection on mice immunized with the rNfa1 protein using mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Hee-kyoung; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    The free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes a fatal disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. Of the pathogenic mechanism of N. fowleri concerning host tissue invasion, the adherence of amoeba to hose cells is the most important. We previously cloned the nfa1 gene from N. fowleri. The protein displayed immunolocalization in the pseudopodia, especially the food-cups structure, and was related to the contact-dependent mechanism of the amoebic pathogenicity in N. fowleri infection. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) have been used as potent mucosal adjuvants via the parenteral route of immunization in most cases. In this study, to examine the effect of protective immunity of the Nfa1 protein for N. fowleri infection with enhancement by CTB or LTB adjuvants, intranasally immunized BALB/c mice were infected with N. fowleri trophozoites for the development of PAM. The mean time to death of mice immunized with the Nfa1 protein using LTB or CTB adjuvant was prolonged by 5 or 8 days in comparison with that of the control mice. In particular, the survival rate of mice immunized with Nfa1 plus CTB was 100% during the experimental period. The serum IgG levels were significantly increased in mice immunized with Nfa1 protein plus CTB or LTB adjuvants. These results suggest that the Nfa1 protein, with CTB or LTB adjuvants, induces strong protective immunity in mice with PAM due to N. fowleri infection. PMID:25604672

  5. Extraintestinal Infections Caused by Non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Joshi, Sangeeta; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Sekar, Uma; Birajdar, Balaji; Bhattacharyya, Arpita; Shinoda, Sumio; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aerobic, sucrose fermentative Gram-negative bacterium that generally prevails in the environment. Pathogenic V. cholerae is well-known as causative agent of acute diarrhea. Apart from enteric infections, V. cholerae may also cause other diseases. However, their role in causing extraintestinal infections is not fully known as it needs proper identification and evaluation. Four cases of extraintestinal infections due to V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 have been investigated. The isolates were screened for phenotypic and genetic characteristics with reference to their major virulence genes. Serologically distinct isolates harbored rtx, msh, and hly but lacked enteric toxin encoding genes that are generally present in toxigenic V. cholerae. Timely detection of this organism can prevent fatalities in hospital settings. The underlying virulence potential of V. cholerae needs appropriate testing and intervention. PMID:26904017

  6. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  7. Mutations in the IMD Pathway and Mustard Counter Vibrio cholerae Suppression of Intestinal Stem Cell Division in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is an estuarine bacterium and an intestinal pathogen of humans that causes severe epidemic diarrhea. In the absence of adequate mammalian models in which to study the interaction of V. cholerae with the host intestinal innate immune system, we have implemented Drosophila melanogaster as a surrogate host. We previously showed that immune deficiency pathway loss-of-function and mustard gain-of-function mutants are less susceptible to V. cholerae infection. We find that although the overall burden of intestinal bacteria is not significantly different from that of control flies, intestinal stem cell (ISC) division is increased in these mutants. This led us to examine the effect of V. cholerae on ISC division. We report that V. cholerae infection and cholera toxin decrease ISC division. Because IMD pathway and Mustard mutants, which are resistant to V. cholerae, maintain higher levels of ISC division during V. cholerae infection, we hypothesize that suppression of ISC division is a virulence strategy of V. cholerae and that accelerated epithelial regeneration protects the host against V. cholerae. Extension of these findings to mammals awaits the development of an adequate experimental model. PMID:23781070

  8. The global burden of cholera

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Anna Lena; You, Young Ae; Kim, Young Eun; Sah, Binod; Maskery, Brian; Clemens, John

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the global burden of cholera using population-based incidence data and reports. Methods Countries with a recent history of cholera were classified as endemic or non-endemic, depending on whether they had reported cholera cases in at least three of the five most recent years. The percentages of the population in each country that lacked access to improved sanitation were used to compute the populations at risk for cholera, and incidence rates from published studies were applied to groups of countries to estimate the annual number of cholera cases in endemic countries. The estimates of cholera cases in non-endemic countries were based on the average numbers of cases reported from 2000 to 2008. Literature-based estimates of cholera case-fatality rates (CFRs) were used to compute the variance-weighted average cholera CFRs for estimating the number of cholera deaths. Findings About 1.4 billion people are at risk for cholera in endemic countries. An estimated 2.8 million cholera cases occur annually in such countries (uncertainty range: 1.4–4.3) and an estimated 87 000 cholera cases occur in non-endemic countries. The incidence is estimated to be greatest in children less than 5 years of age. Every year about 91 000 people (uncertainty range: 28 000 to 142 000) die of cholera in endemic countries and 2500 people die of the disease in non-endemic countries. Conclusion The global burden of cholera, as determined through a systematic review with clearly stated assumptions, is high. The findings of this study provide a contemporary basis for planning public health interventions to control cholera. PMID:22461716

  9. Genome Sequencing Reveals Unique Mutations in Characteristic Metabolic Pathways and the Transfer of Virulence Genes between V. mimicus and V. cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanyan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Fanfei; Du, Pengcheng; Wang, Shujing; Chen, Chen; Kan, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus, the species most similar to V. cholerae, is a microbe present in the natural environmental and sometimes causes diarrhea and internal infections in humans. It shows similar phenotypes to V. cholerae but differs in some biochemical characteristics. The molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in biochemical metabolism between V. mimicus and V. cholerae are currently unclear. Several V. mimicus isolates have been found that carry cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and cause cholera-like diarrhea in humans. Here, the genome of the V. mimicus isolate SX-4, which carries an intact CTX element, was sequenced and annotated. Analysis of its genome, together with those of other Vibrio species, revealed extensive differences within the Vibrionaceae. Common mutations in gene clusters involved in three biochemical metabolism pathways that are used for discrimination between V. mimicus and V. cholerae were found in V. mimicus strains. We also constructed detailed genomic structures and evolution maps for the general types of genomic drift associated with pathogenic characters in polysaccharides, CTX elements and toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) gene clusters. Overall, the whole-genome sequencing of the V. mimicus strain carrying the cholera toxin gene provides detailed information for understanding genomic differences among Vibrio spp. V. mimicus has a large number of diverse gene and nucleotide differences from its nearest neighbor, V. cholerae. The observed mutations in the characteristic metabolism pathways may indicate different adaptations to different niches for these species and may be caused by ancient events in evolution before the divergence of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Horizontal transfers of virulence-related genes from an uncommon clone of V. cholerae, rather than the seventh pandemic strains, have generated the pathogenic V. mimicus strain carrying cholera toxin genes. PMID:21731695

  10. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Deborah R; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  11. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Deborah R.; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G.; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  12. Inhibition of heat-labile cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins by brefeldin A.

    PubMed

    Donta, S T; Beristain, S; Tomicic, T K

    1993-08-01

    Cholera enterotoxin and the related heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli enter their target cells through noncoated vesicles, but how the toxins are processed intracellularly and how they get to their targeted enzyme, adenylate cyclase, remain to be defined. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the trans-Golgi network, is shown herein to transiently block the morphologic and enzymatic effects of the toxin at a step distal to the initial binding process but prior to activation of adenylate cyclase by the toxin. It is likely, therefore, that these toxins are processed by the Golgi apparatus before trafficking to the membrane adenylate cyclase. PMID:8392970

  13. Inhibition of heat-labile cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins by brefeldin A.

    PubMed Central

    Donta, S T; Beristain, S; Tomicic, T K

    1993-01-01

    Cholera enterotoxin and the related heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli enter their target cells through noncoated vesicles, but how the toxins are processed intracellularly and how they get to their targeted enzyme, adenylate cyclase, remain to be defined. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the trans-Golgi network, is shown herein to transiently block the morphologic and enzymatic effects of the toxin at a step distal to the initial binding process but prior to activation of adenylate cyclase by the toxin. It is likely, therefore, that these toxins are processed by the Golgi apparatus before trafficking to the membrane adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:8392970

  14. Cholera studies*†

    PubMed Central

    Pollitzer, R.

    1954-01-01

    In this, the first of a series of cholera studies, the history of the disease from its earliest recorded appearance up to 1923 is outlined, and its geographical distribution described. The origins and main routes of spread of the six great pandemics are indicated; possible causes of the variations in mortality which accompanied them are discussed. PMID:13160764

  15. Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–ϕ prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

  16. A long-term carrier of cholera: Cholera Dolores

    PubMed Central

    Azurin, J. C.; Kobari, Kazumine; Barua, D.; Alvero, M.; Gomez, C. Z.; Dizon, J. J.; Nakano, Ei-Ichi; Suplido, R.; Ledesma, L.

    1967-01-01

    The first known long-term carrier of cholera, found in the Philippines, is described. The carrier, Dolores M., who had suffered from El Tor cholera in August 1962, continued intermittently to excrete vibrios of the same characteristics as the original isolates until the date of reporting (1966). Duodenal intubation proved that the vibrios are lodged in her biliary tract. Her serum antibody titre continued to remain high in the absence of vaccination against cholera. PMID:5300877

  17. [Cases of gastroenteritis associated to Vibrio cholerae no 01 in Oran, Salta].

    PubMed

    Rivas, M; Cacace, M L; Ayala, L T; Baschkier, A; Miliwebsky, E; Caffer, M I

    1996-01-01

    Forty-one sporadic cases of non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae gastroenteritis were detected in Orán, Salta, between February 1992 and February 1995. The frequency of isolation was 0.9% of the diarrhea cases. Out of 41 patients, 21 (51.2%) were older than 15 years and 25 (60.9%) were male. All the patients had diarrhea, 24 (58.5%) had watery stools and 6 (14.6%) cholera-like diarrhea; 10 (24.4%) presented vomiting and 12 (29%) mild dehydration. Six malnourished children who suffered from diarrhea with moderate dehydration for more than a week, were hospitalized. V. cholerae non O1 and Shigella flexneri were isolated from one patient, during the first outbreak and V. cholerae non O1 and Salmonella IV 50:b:- were recovered simultaneously from another patient during the fourth outbreak. A 72 year old woman died during the second cholera outbreak. The symptoms were: watery diarrhea, vomiting, fever and mild dehydration. A strain of V. cholerae O5, that did not produce cholera toxin, heat-stable enterotoxin, Kanagawa-like hemolysin or verocitotoxin was detected. It was positive for El Tor hemolysin and D-mannose and L-fucose resistant cells-associated hemagglutinins. Among the 41 isolates studied, all were oxidase and indole positive, fermented glucose, saccharose and mannitol. They were all motile, produced lysine and ornithine decarboxylases but not arginine dihydrolase or hydrogen sulfide. They were sensitive to O129 vibriostatic compound. None of them belonged to O1 or O139 serogroup and they did not produce cholera troxin. Among the V. cholerae non O1 strains isolated, 9.5% were resistant to ampicillin and 4.9% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Active surveillance had shown that V. cholerae non-O1 is not an important agent of diarrhea in Orán, Salta. PMID:9102658

  18. Subcomponent Vaccine Based on CTA1-DD Adjuvant with Incorporated UreB Class II Peptides Stimulates Protective Helicobacter pylori Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nedrud, John G.; Bagheri, Nayer; Schön, Karin; Xin, Wei; Bergroth, Hilda; Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Lycke, Nils Y.

    2013-01-01

    A mucosal vaccine against Helicobacter pylori infection could help prevent gastric cancers and peptic ulcers. While previous attempts to develop such a vaccine have largely failed because of the requirement for safe and effective adjuvants or large amounts of well defined antigens, we have taken a unique approach to combining our strong mucosal CTA1-DD adjuvant with selected peptides from urease B (UreB). The protective efficacy of the selected peptides together with cholera toxin (CT) was first confirmed. However, CT is a strong adjuvant that unfortunately is precluded from clinical use because of its toxicity. To circumvent this problem we have developed a derivative of CT, the CTA1-DD adjuvant, that has been found safe in non-human primates and equally effective compared to CT when used intranasally. We genetically fused the selected peptides into the CTA1-DD plasmid and found after intranasal immunizations of Balb/c mice using purified CTA1-DD with 3 copies of an H. pylori urease T cell epitope (CTA1-UreB3T-DD) that significant protection was stimulated against a live challenge infection. Protection was, however, weaker than with the gold standard, bacterial lysate+CT, but considering that we only used a single epitope in nanomolar amounts the results convey optimism. Protection was associated with enhanced Th1 and Th17 immunity, but immunizations in IL-17A-deficient mice revealed that IL-17 may not be essential for protection. Taken together, we have provided evidence for the rational design of an effective mucosal subcomponent vaccine against H. pylori infection based on well selected protective epitopes from relevant antigens incorporated into the CTA1-DD adjuvant platform. PMID:24391754

  19. Subcomponent vaccine based on CTA1-DD adjuvant with incorporated UreB class II peptides stimulates protective Helicobacter pylori immunity.

    PubMed

    Nedrud, John G; Bagheri, Nayer; Schön, Karin; Xin, Wei; Bergroth, Hilda; Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Lycke, Nils Y

    2013-01-01

    A mucosal vaccine against Helicobacter pylori infection could help prevent gastric cancers and peptic ulcers. While previous attempts to develop such a vaccine have largely failed because of the requirement for safe and effective adjuvants or large amounts of well defined antigens, we have taken a unique approach to combining our strong mucosal CTA1-DD adjuvant with selected peptides from urease B (UreB). The protective efficacy of the selected peptides together with cholera toxin (CT) was first confirmed. However, CT is a strong adjuvant that unfortunately is precluded from clinical use because of its toxicity. To circumvent this problem we have developed a derivative of CT, the CTA1-DD adjuvant, that has been found safe in non-human primates and equally effective compared to CT when used intranasally. We genetically fused the selected peptides into the CTA1-DD plasmid and found after intranasal immunizations of Balb/c mice using purified CTA1-DD with 3 copies of an H. pylori urease T cell epitope (CTA1-UreB3T-DD) that significant protection was stimulated against a live challenge infection. Protection was, however, weaker than with the gold standard, bacterial lysate+CT, but considering that we only used a single epitope in nanomolar amounts the results convey optimism. Protection was associated with enhanced Th1 and Th17 immunity, but immunizations in IL-17A-deficient mice revealed that IL-17 may not be essential for protection. Taken together, we have provided evidence for the rational design of an effective mucosal subcomponent vaccine against H. pylori infection based on well selected protective epitopes from relevant antigens incorporated into the CTA1-DD adjuvant platform. PMID:24391754

  20. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. PMID:21635554

  1. From cholera to corals: Viruses as drivers of virulence in a major coral bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Weynberg, Karen D.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Neave, Matthew J.; Buerger, Patrick; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Disease is an increasing threat to reef-building corals. One of the few identified pathogens of coral disease is the bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus. In Vibrio cholerae, infection by a bacterial virus (bacteriophage) results in the conversion of non-pathogenic strains to pathogenic strains and this can lead to cholera pandemics. Pathogenicity islands encoded in the V. cholerae genome play an important role in pathogenesis. Here we analyse five whole genome sequences of V. coralliilyticus to examine whether virulence is similarly driven by horizontally acquired elements. We demonstrate that bacteriophage genomes encoding toxin genes with homology to those found in pathogenic V. cholerae are integrated in V. coralliilyticus genomes. Virulence factors located on chromosomal pathogenicity islands also exist in some strains of V. coralliilyticus. The presence of these genetic signatures indicates virulence in V. coralliilyticus is driven by prophages and other horizontally acquired elements. Screening for pathogens of coral disease should target conserved regions in these elements. PMID:26644037

  2. Engineered bacterial communication prevents Vibrio cholerae virulence in an infant mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Faping; March, John C.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of using commensal bacteria as signal mediators for inhibiting the disease cholera, we stably transformed Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (Nissle) to express the autoinducer molecule cholera autoinducer 1 (CAI-1) (shown previously to prevent virulence when present with another signaling molecule, autoinducer 2, at high concentrations) and determined the effect on Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression and colonization in an infant mouse model. We found that pretreatment of mice for 8 h with Nissle engineered to express CAI-1 (Nissle-cqsA) greatly increased the mice’s survival (92%) from ingestion of V. cholerae. Pretreatment with Nissle-cqsA for only 4 h increased survival by 77%, whereas ingesting Nissle-cqsA at the same time as V. cholerae increased survival rates by 27%. Immunostaining revealed an 80% reduction in cholera toxin binding to the intestines of mice pretreated for 8 h with Nissle-cqsA. Further, the numbers of V. cholerae in treated mouse intestines was reduced by 69% after 40 h. This finding points to an easily administered and inexpensive approach where commensal bacteria are engineered to communicate with invasive species and potentially prevent human disease. PMID:20534565

  3. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae from aquatic birds in Colorado and Utah.

    PubMed Central

    Ogg, J E; Ryder, R A; Smith, H L

    1989-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae was isolated from cloacal swabs and freshly voided feces collected from 20 species of aquatic birds in Colorado and Utah during 1986 and 1987. About 17% (198 of 1,131) fecal specimens collected from July 1986 through August 1987 contained the organism. Both O1 and non-O1 V. cholerae strains were isolated from the fecal specimens. Isolates from eight birds (representing five species) agglutinated in O group 1 antiserum. Supernatants of broth cultures from three isolates which typed as V. cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa gave reactions typical of cholera toxin when tested on Y-1 mouse adrenal cell cultures. Several serovars of non-O1 V. cholerae were isolated from the fecal specimens; serovar 22 was the most prevalent type. All non-O1 isolates were cytotoxic to Y-1 mouse adrenal cells. Only non-O1 V. cholerae was detected in water samples collected from the habitat of the birds. The results of this study suggest that aquatic birds serve as carriers and disseminate V. cholerae over a wide area. PMID:2705773

  4. A Vibrio cholerae pathogenicity island associated with epidemic and pandemic strains.

    PubMed

    Karaolis, D K; Johnson, J A; Bailey, C C; Boedeker, E C; Kaper, J B; Reeves, P R

    1998-03-17

    The bacterial species Vibrio cholerae includes harmless aquatic strains as well as strains capable of causing epidemics and global pandemics of cholera. While investigating the relationship between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains, we identified a chromosomal pathogenicity island (PAI) that is present in epidemic and pandemic strains but absent from nonpathogenic strains. Initially, two ToxR-regulated genes (aldA and tagA) were studied and were found to be associated with epidemic and pandemic strains but absent in nontoxigenic strains. The region containing aldA and tagA comprises 13 kb of previously unidentified DNA and is part of a PAI that contains a regulator of virulence genes (ToxT) and a gene cluster encoding an essential colonization factor and the cholera toxin phage receptor (toxin-coregulated pilus; TCP). The PAI is 39.5 kb in size, has low %G+C (35%), contains putative integrase and transposase genes, is flanked by att sites, and inserts near a 10Sa RNA gene (ssrA), suggesting it may be of bacteriophage origin. We found this PAI in two clinical non-O1/non-O139 cholera toxin-positive strains, suggesting that it can be transferred within V. cholerae. The sequence within this PAI includes an ORF with homology to a gene associated with the type IV pilus gene cluster of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, a transposase from Vibrio anguillarum, and several ORFs with no known homology. As the PAI contains the CTXPhi receptor, it may represent the initial genetic factor required for the emergence of epidemic and pandemic cholera. We propose to call this island VPI (V. cholerae pathogenicity island). PMID:9501228

  5. Bicarbonate Induces Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression by Enhancing ToxT Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of cholera, a severe diarrheal illness. The two biotypes of V. cholerae O1 capable of causing cholera, classical and El Tor, require different in vitro growth conditions for induction of virulence gene expression. Growth under the inducing conditions or infection of a host initiates a complex regulatory cascade that results in production of ToxT, a regulatory protein that directly activates transcription of the genes encoding cholera toxin (CT), toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and other virulence genes. Previous studies have shown that sodium bicarbonate induces CT expression in the V. cholerae El Tor biotype. However, the mechanism for bicarbonate-mediated CT induction has not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that bicarbonate stimulates virulence gene expression by enhancing ToxT activity. Both the classical and El Tor biotypes produce inactive ToxT protein when they are cultured statically in the absence of bicarbonate. Addition of bicarbonate to the culture medium does not affect ToxT production but causes a significant increase in CT and TCP expression in both biotypes. Ethoxyzolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, inhibits bicarbonate-mediated virulence induction, suggesting that conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by carbonic anhydrase plays a role in virulence induction. Thus, bicarbonate is the first positive effector for ToxT activity to be identified. Given that bicarbonate is present at high concentration in the upper small intestine where V. cholerae colonizes, bicarbonate is likely an important chemical stimulus that V. cholerae senses and that induces virulence during the natural course of infection. PMID:19564378

  6. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  7. Molecular analysis of non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae isolated from hospitalised patients in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cholera is still a significant public health issue in developing countries. The aetiological agent is Vibrio cholerae and only two serogroups, O1 and O139, are known to cause pandemic or epidemic cholera. In contrast, non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae has only been reported to cause sporadic cholera-like illness and localised outbreaks. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates from hospitalised diarrhoeal patients in Zhejiang Province, China. Results In an active surveillance of enteric pathogens in hospitalised diarrhoeal patients, nine non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates were identified from 746 diarrhoeal stool samples at a rate of 1.2%. These isolates and an additional 31 isolates from sporadic cases and three outbreaks were analysed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PFGE divided the isolates into 25 PFGE types while MLST divided them into 15 sequence types (STs). A single ST, ST80, was predominant which persisted over several years in different cities and caused two outbreaks in recent years. Antibiotic resistance varied with the majority of the isolates resistant to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim and nearly all isolates either resistant or intermediate to erythromycin and rifampicin. None of the isolates carried the cholera toxin genes or toxin co-regulated pilus genes but the majority carried a type III secretion system as the key virulence factor. Conclusions Non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is an important contributor to diarrhoeal infections in China. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics limits treatment options. Continuous surveillance of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is important for control and prevention of diarrhoeal infections. PMID:23497008

  8. Antibiotic therapy of cholera*

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbaum, John; Greenough, William B.; Islam, M. R.

    1967-01-01

    Recent clinical trials having established the value of tetracycline as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement in cholera treatment, a controlled trial of antibiotic therapy was conducted in Dacca on 318 adults hospitalized for cholera. The effects of 4 antibiotics orally administered in varying dosage schedules were studied. Cholera therapy with tetracycline or chloramphenicol caused a highly significant reduction in the duration of diarrhoea and of positive culture, in stool volume, and in intravenous fluid requirement as compared with the results in controls who received intravenous fluid therapy only. Streptomycin was also effective, but to a lesser degree; paromomycin was of little value. The severity of dehydration on admission was significantly related to subsequent duration of diarrhoea regardless of whether antibiotics were given. Increasing age was associated with more prolonged purging in patients receiving antibiotics. Increasing the dose of tetracycline to 2 to 3 times that usually administered, or prolonging treatment from 2 to 4 days, did not enhance the therapeutic results. The effect of tetracycline was apparent within a few hours of administration. Bacteriological relapses were seen after discontinuation of therapy in all treatment groups, but were not due to the development of resistant bacteria. PMID:4865453

  9. Vulnerability to coastal cholera ecology.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrew E

    2003-10-01

    The battle to completely control cholera continues. Multiple strains, high levels of morbidity in some regions of the world, and a complex of influences on its distribution in people and the environment are accompanied by only rough resolution prediction of outbreaks. Uncertainty as to the most effective array of interventions for one of the most researched infectious diseases thwarts further progress in providing cost-effective solutions. Progress on the research front consistently points towards the importance of disease ecology, coastal environments, and the sea. However, evaluation of the link between cholera in people and environment can only be effective with analysis of human vulnerability to variable coastal cholera ecologies. As there are some clear links between the organism, cholera incidence and the sea, it is appropriate that cholera research should examine the nature of coastal population vulnerability to the disease. The paper reviews the cholera risks of human-environment interactions in coastal areas as one component of the evaluation of cholera management. This points to effective intervention through integrative knowledge of changing human and environmental ecologies, requiring improved detection, but also an acceptance of complex causality. The challenge is to identify indicators and interventions for case specific ecologies in variable locales of human vulnerability and disease hazard. Further work will therefore aim to explore improved surveillance and intervention across the socio-behavioural and ecological spectrum. Furthermore, the story of cholera continues to inform us about how we should more effectively view emergent and resurgent infectious disease hazards more generally. PMID:12927470

  10. Environmental Monitoring of Endemic Cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElNemr, W.; Jutla, A. S.; Constantin de Magny, G.; Hasan, N. A.; Islam, M.; Sack, R.; Huq, A.; Hashem, F.; Colwell, R.

    2012-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat. Since Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease, is autochthonous to riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, it is unlikely the bacteria can be eradicated from its natural habitat. Prediction of disease, in conjunction with preventive vaccination can reduce the prevalence rate of a disease. Understanding the influence of environmental parameters on growth and proliferation of bacteria is an essential first step in developing prediction methods for outbreaks. Large scale geophysical variables, such as SST and coastal chlorophyll, are often associated with conditions favoring growth of V. cholerae. However, local environmental factors, meaning biological activity in ponds from where the bulk of populations in endemic regions derive water for daily usage, are either neglected or oversimplified. Using data collected from several sites in two geographically distinct locations in South Asia, we have identified critical local environmental factors associated with cholera outbreak. Of 18 environmental variables monitored for water sources in Mathbaria (a coastal site near the Bay of Bengal) and Bakergonj (an inland site) of Bangladesh, water depth and chlorophyll were found to be important factors associated with initiation of cholera outbreaks. Cholera in coastal regions appears to be related to intrusion. However, monsoonal flooding creates conditions for cholera epidemics in inland regions. This may be one of the first attempts to relate in-situ environmental observations with cholera. We anticipate that it will be useful for further development of prediction models in the resource constrained regions.

  11. Protective Mucosal Immunity to Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Mice by Using Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin B Subunit as an Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C. M.; Aman, A. T.; Hirst, T. R.; Hill, T. J.; Williams, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of nontoxic recombinant B subunits of cholera toxin (rCtxB) and its close relative Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (rEtxB) to act as mucosal adjuvants for intranasal immunization with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoproteins was assessed. Doses of 10 μg of rEtxB or above with 10 μg of HSV-1 glycoproteins elicited high serum and mucosal anti-HSV-1 titers comparable with that obtained using CtxB (10 μg) with a trace (0.5 μg) of whole toxin (Ctx-CtxB). By contrast, doses of rCtxB up to 100 μg elicited only meager anti-HSV-1 responses. As for Ctx-CtxB, rEtxB resulted in a Th2-biased immune response with high immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1)/IgG2a antibody ratios and production of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-10 as well as gamma interferon by proliferating T cells. The protective efficacy of the immune response induced using rEtxB as an adjuvant was assessed following ocular challenge of immunized and mock-immunized mice. Epithelial disease was observed in both groups, but the immunized mice recovered by day 6 whereas mock-immunized mice developed more severe corneal disease leading to stromal keratitis. In addition, a significant reduction in the incidence of lid disease and zosteriform spread was observed in immunized animals and there was no encephalitis compared with 95% encephalitis in mock-immunized mice. The potential of such mucosal adjuvants for use in human vaccines against pathogens such as HSV-1 is discussed. PMID:11160664

  12. Environmental Factors Influencing Epidemic Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Jutla, Antarpreet; Whitcombe, Elizabeth; Hasan, Nur; Haley, Bradd; Akanda, Ali; Huq, Anwar; Alam, Munir; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cholera outbreak following the earthquake of 2010 in Haiti has reaffirmed that the disease is a major public health threat. Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to aquatic environment, hence, it cannot be eradicated but hydroclimatology-based prediction and prevention is an achievable goal. Using data from the 1800s, we describe uniqueness in seasonality and mechanism of occurrence of cholera in the epidemic regions of Asia and Latin America. Epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. This causal mechanism is markedly different from endemic cholera where tidal intrusion of seawater carrying bacteria from estuary to inland regions, results in outbreaks. PMID:23897993

  13. Epidemic cholera spreads like wildfire

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Manojit; Zinck, Richard D.; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is on the rise globally, especially epidemic cholera which is characterized by intermittent and unpredictable outbreaks that punctuate periods of regional disease fade-out. These epidemic dynamics remain however poorly understood. Here we examine records for epidemic cholera over both contemporary and historical timelines, from Africa (1990–2006) and former British India (1882–1939). We find that the frequency distribution of outbreak size is fat-tailed, scaling approximately as a power-law. This pattern which shows strong parallels with wildfires is incompatible with existing cholera models developed for endemic regions, as it implies a fundamental role for stochastic transmission and local depletion of susceptible hosts. Application of a recently developed forest-fire model indicates that epidemic cholera dynamics are located above a critical phase transition and propagate in similar ways to aggressive wildfires. These findings have implications for the effectiveness of control measures and the mechanisms that ultimately limit the size of outbreaks. PMID:24424273

  14. Critical analysis of compositions and protective efficacies of oral killed cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Shahjahan

    2014-09-01

    Two cholera vaccines, sold as Shanchol and Dukoral, are currently available. This review presents a critical analysis of the protective efficacies of these vaccines. Children under 5 years of age are very vulnerable to cholera and account for the highest incidence of cholera cases and more than half of the resulting deaths. Both Shanchol and Dukoral are two-spaced-dose oral vaccines comprising large numbers of killed cholera bacteria. The former contains Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 cells, and the latter contains V. cholerae O1 cells with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin. In a field trial in Kolkata (India), Shanchol, the preferred vaccine, protected 45% of the test subjects in all of the age groups and only 17% of the children under 5 years of age during the first year of surveillance. In a field trial in Peru, two spaced doses of Dukoral offered negative protection in children under 5 years of age and little protection (15%) in vaccinees over 6 years of age during the first year of surveillance. Little is known about Dukoral's long-term protective efficacy. Both of these vaccines have questionable compositions, using V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in 1947 that have been inactivated by heat and formalin treatments that may denature protein. Immunological studies revealed Dukoral's reduced and short-lived efficacy, as measured by several immunological endpoints. Various factors, such as the necessity for multiple doses, poor protection of children under 5 years of age, the requirement of a cold supply chain, production costs, and complex logistics of vaccine delivery, greatly reduce the suitability of either of these vaccines for endemic or epidemic cholera control in resource-poor settings. PMID:25056361

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O139 in China: polymorphism of ribotypes and CTX elements.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mei; Xu, Jing; Ding, Yanpeng; Wang, Ruibai; Liu, Peng; Kan, Biao; Qi, Guoming; Liu, Yanqing; Gao, Shouyi

    2003-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139, the second etiological serogroup of cholera, triggered the first outbreak of O139 cholera in China in 1993. To analyze the clone polymorphism of O139 isolates in China, 117 strains of V. cholerae O139, isolated from different areas in China between 1993 and 1999, were selected to characterize the phylogenetic relationships by molecular techniques. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism in the conserved 16S rRNA gene revealed seven different ribotypes within the 117 strains. Among these strains, there were eight that lacked the cholera toxin gene (ctxAB), zot, and the repetitive sequence (RS); these eight strains belonged to three individual ribotypes. Our results suggested that V. cholerae O139 strains in China had clone diversity in phylogeny. The results of our hybridization patterns for CTX genetic elements (ctxAB, zot, and RS) showed that CTXPhi genomes in most V. cholerae O139 strains had two or more copies and had extensive restriction patterns even for the strains which belong to the same ribotype. For 22 (20.1%) strains, the copies of ctxAB were different from those of zot, suggesting that a ctxAB-negative CTXPhi genome may exist in O139 strains. This ctxAB-negative CTXPhi genome may coexist with the intact CTXPhi genome in a strain. In addition, the dendrogram for I-CeuI-generated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns showed that V. cholerae serogroup O139 has a closer relationship with one strain of serogroup O22 than with the strains of serogroup O1. The results of this study showed the clonal diversity and the distribution of O139 strains in China, suggesting multiple origins of the O139 cholera epidemic or sporadic events. PMID:12791841

  16. Cholera in Vietnam: changes in genotypes and emergence of class I integrons containing aminoglycoside resistance gene cassettes in vibrio cholerae O1 strains isolated from 1979 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, A; Forslund, A; Tam, N V; Vinh, D X; Cam, P D

    1999-03-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water supplies. All cases were associated with Vibrio cholerae O1. Using ribotyping, cholera toxin (CT) genotyping, and characterization of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiotic resistance genes by PCR, we show that strains isolated after 1990 were clearly different from strains isolated before 1991. In contrast to strains isolated before 1991, 94% of 104 strains isolated after 1990 showed an identical ribotype R1, were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin, and showed a different CT genotype. Furthermore, PCR analysis revealed that sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains harbored class I integrons containing a gene cassette ant(3")-1a encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of class I integrons in V. cholerae. The development of cholera and the changes in the phenotypic and genotypic properties of V. cholerae O1 shown in the present study highlight the importance of monitoring V. cholerae O1 in Vietnam as in other parts of the world. In particular, the emergence of the new ribotype R1 strain containing class I integrons should be further studied. PMID:9986842

  17. In Silico Screening of Antibacterial Compounds from Herbal Sources Against Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Perveen, Sabah; Chaudhary, Hotam Singh

    2015-01-01

    , found two compound Luteolin from Tulsi and Catechin from Green Tea which showed good binding energy and druggish property. Abbreviations used: V. cholerae: Vibrio cholera, ADME: Absorption, digestion, metabolism and excretion, CT: Cholera toxin, TCP: Toxin co-regulated Pilus, GOLD: Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking, Asp: Aspartic acid, Arg: Arginine, Lys: Lysine, Thr: Threonine, Tyr: Tyrosine, KEGG: Kyoto encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. PMID:27013793

  18. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Orata, Fabini D.; Kirchberger, Paul C.; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E. Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Boucher, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86–87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93–94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  19. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Orata, Fabini D; Kirchberger, Paul C; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86-87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93-94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  20. VGJphi integration and excision mechanisms contribute to the genetic diversity of Vibrio cholerae epidemic strains.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhabatosh; Bischerour, Julien; Barre, François-Xavier

    2011-02-01

    Most strains of Vibrio cholerae are not pathogenic or cause only local outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Acquisition of the capacity to produce the cholera toxin results from a lysogenic conversion event due to a filamentous bacteriophage, CTX. Two V. cholerae tyrosine recombinases that normally serve to resolve chromosome dimers, XerC and XerD, promote CTX integration by directly recombining the ssDNA genome of the phage with the dimer resolution site of either or both V. cholerae chromosomes. This smart mechanism renders the process irreversible. Many other filamentous vibriophages seem to attach to chromosome dimer resolution sites and participate in the rapid and continuous evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains. We analyzed the molecular mechanism of integration of VGJ, a representative of the largest family of these phages. We found that XerC and XerD promote the integration of VGJ into a specific chromosome dimer resolution site, and that the dsDNA replicative form of the phage is recombined. We show that XerC and XerD can promote excision of the integrated prophage, and that this participates in the production of new extrachromosomal copies of the phage genome. We further show how hybrid molecules harboring the concatenated genomes of CTX and VGJ can be produced efficiently. Finally, we discuss how the integration and excision mechanisms of VGJ can explain the origin of recent epidemic V. cholerae strains. PMID:21262799

  1. Non-O1/Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Carrying Multiple Virulence Factors and V. cholerae O1 in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Rashed, Shah M.; Huq, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae inhabits estuarine and coastal waters globally, but its clinical significance has not been sufficiently investigated, despite the fact that it has been associated with septicemia and gastroenteritis. The emergence of virulent non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is consistent with the recognition of new pathogenic variants worldwide. Oyster, sediment, and water samples were collected during a vibrio surveillance program carried out from 2009 to 2012 in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. V. cholerae O1 was detected by a direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) assay but was not successfully cultured, whereas 395 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae were confirmed by multiplex PCR and serology. Only a few of the non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates were resistant to ampicillin and/or penicillin. Most of the isolates were sensitive to all antibiotics tested, and 77 to 90% carried the El Tor variant hemolysin gene hlyAET, the actin cross-linking repeats in toxin gene rtxA, the hemagglutinin protease gene hap, and the type 6 secretion system. About 19 to 21% of the isolates carried the neuraminidase-encoding gene nanH and/or the heat-stable toxin (NAG-ST), and only 5% contained a type 3 secretion system. None of the non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates contained Vibrio pathogenicity island-associated genes. However, ctxA, ace, or zot was present in nine isolates. Fifty-five different genotypes showed up to 12 virulence factors, independent of the source of isolation, and represent the first report of both antibiotic susceptibility and virulence associated with non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae from the Chesapeake Bay. Since these results confirm the presence of potentially pathogenic non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, monitoring for total V. cholerae, regardless of serotype, should be done within the context of public health. PMID:25556194

  2. ToxR regulates the production of lipoproteins and the expression of serum resistance in Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Parsot, C.; Taxman, E.; Mekalanos, J.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The genes encoding three lipoproteins of Vibrio cholerae were identified by a combination of DNA sequence analysis and ({sup 3}H)palmitate labeling of hybrid proteins encoded by TnphoA gene fusions. The expression of these three lipoproteins, TagA, AcfD, and TcpC, was controlled by ToxR, the cholera toxin transcriptional activator. The involvement of other bacterial lipoproteins in conferring resistance ot the bactericidal effects of complement prompted us to examine this possibility in V. cholerae. Remarkably, mutations in toxR and tcp genes (including tcpC), involved in the biogenesis of the toxin coregulated pili, rendered V. cholerae about 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} times more sensitive to the vibriocidal activity of antibody and complement. Since V. cholerae is a noninvasive organism and toxR and tcp mutants are highly defective in intestinal colonization in animals and humans, these results raise the possibility that resistance to a gut-associated, complement-like bactericidal activity may be a major virulence determinant of V. cholerae and other enterobacterial species.

  3. Cholera and the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching the scientific method where an outbreak of cholera within the school is simulated. Students act like epidemiologists in an attempt to track down the source of the contamination. (PR)

  4. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  5. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  6. Evaluation of synthetic schemes to prepare immunogenic conjugates of Vibrio cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide with chicken serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Szu, S C

    2000-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae serotype O139 is a new etiologic agent of epidemic cholera. There is no vaccine available against cholera caused by this serotype. V. cholerae O139 is an encapsulated bacterium, and its polysaccharide capsule is an essential virulent factor and likely protective antigen. This study evaluated several synthetic schemes for preparation of conjugates of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide (CPS) with chicken serum albumin as the carrier protein (CSA) using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) or 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents. Four conjugates described here as representative of many experiments were synthesized in 2 steps: 1) preparation of adipic acid hydrazide derivative of CPS (CPS(AH)) or of CSA (CSA(AH)), and 2) binding of CPS(AH) to CSA or of CPS to CSA(AH). Although all conjugates induced CPS antibodies, the conjugate prepared by EDC-mediated binding of CPS and CSA(AH) (EDC:CPS-CSA(AH)) was statistically significantly less immunogenic than the other three conjugates. Representative sera from mice injected with these three conjugates contained antibodies that mediated the lysis of V. cholerae O139 inoculum. Evaluation of the different synthetic schemes and reaction conditions in relation to the immunogenicity of the resultant conjugates provided the basis for the preparation of a V. cholerae O139 conjugate vaccine with a medically useful carrier protein such as diphtheria toxin mutant. PMID:11294508

  7. Intranasal coadministration of Cholera toxin with amoeba lysates modulates the secretion of IgA and IgG antibodies, production of cytokines and expression of pIgR in the nasal cavity of mice in the model of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Yepez, Maricela; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Lopez-Reyes, Israel; Bonilla-Lemus, Patricia; Rodriguez-Cortes, Antonio Yahve; Contis-Montes de Oca, Arturo; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Miliar-Garcia, Angel; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul

    2014-11-01

    The nasal mucosa is the first contact with antigens to induce IgA response. The role of this site has rarely been studied. We have shown than intranasal administration with Naegleria fowleri lysates plus Cholera toxin (CT) increased the protection (survival up to 100%) against N. fowleri infection in mice and apparently antibodies IgA and IgG together with polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells avoid the attachment of N. fowleri to apical side of the nasal epithelium. We also observed that nasal immunization resulted in the induction of antigen-specific IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in nasal washes at days 3 and 9 after the challenge and IgA and IgG in the nasal cavity, compared to healthy and infected mice. We found that immunization with both treatments, N. fowleri lysates plus CT or CT alone, increased the expression of the genes for alpha chain, its receptor (pIgR), and it also increased the expression of the corresponding proteins evidenced by the ∼65 and ∼74kDa bands, respectively. Since the production of pIgR, IgA and IgG antibodies, is up-regulated by some factors, we analyzed the expression of genes for IL-10, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β by using RT-PCR of nasal passages. Immunization resulted in an increased expression of IL-10, IL-6, and IFN-γ cytokines. We also aimed to examine the possible influences of immunization and challenge on the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β). We observed that the stimulus of immunization inhibits the production of TNF-α compared to the infected group where the infection without immunization causes an increase in it. Thus, it is possible that the coexistence of selected cytokines produced by our immunization model may provide a highly effective immunological environment for the production of IgA, IgG and pIgR as well as a strong activation of the PMN in mucosal effector tissue such as nasal passages. PMID:24731967

  8. Clonal transmission, dual peak, and off-season cholera in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, Munirul; Islam, Atiqul; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Rahim, Niaz; Hossain, Anowar; Khan, G Yeahia; Ahmed, Dilruba; Watanabe, Haruo; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Faruque, Abu S G; Akanda, Ali S; Islam, Shafiqul; Sack, R Bradley; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an estuarine bacterium associated with a single peak of cholera (March-May) in coastal villages of Bangladesh. For an unknown reason, however, cholera occurs in a unique dual peak (March-May and September-November) pattern in the city of Dhaka that is bordered by a heavily polluted freshwater river system and flood embankment. In August 2007, extreme flooding was accompanied by an unusually severe diarrhea outbreak in Dhaka that resulted in a record high illness. This study was aimed to understand the unusual outbreak and if it was related to the circulation of a new V. cholerae clone. Nineteen V. cholerae isolated during the peak of the 2007 outbreak were subjected to extensive phenotypic and molecular analyses, including multi-locus genetic screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequence-typing of the ctxB gene, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Factors associated with the unusual incidence of cholera were determined and analysis of the disease severity was done. Overall, microbiological and molecular data confirmed that the hypervirulent V. cholerae was O1 biotype El Tor (ET) that possessed cholera toxin (CT) of the classical biotype. The PFGE (NotI) and dendrogram clustering confirmed that the strains were clonal and related to the pre-2007 variant ET from Dhaka and Matlab and resembled one of two distinct clones of the variant ET confirmed to be present in the estuarine ecosystem of Bangladesh. Results of the analyses of both diarrheal case data for three consecutive years (2006-2008) and regional hydroclimatology over three decades (1980-2009) clearly indicate that the pattern of cholera occurring in Dhaka, and not seen at other endemic sites, was associated with flood waters transmitting the infectious clone circulating via the fecal-oral route during and between the dual seasonal cholera peaks in Dhaka. Circular river systems and flood embankment likely facilitate transmission of infectious V. cholerae throughout the

  9. Molecular characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae non-O1.

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, A.; Serichantalergs, O.; Pitarangsi, C.; Echeverria, P.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of 64 clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strains isolated in Asia and Peru were characterized by molecular methods and antibiotic susceptibility testing. All strains were resistant to at least 1 and 80% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Several strains showed multiple antibiotic resistance (> or = three antibiotics). Plasmids most often of low molecular weight were found in 21/64 (33%) strains. The presence of plasmids did not correlate with antibiotic resistance or influence ribotype patterns. In colony hybridization studies 63/64 (98%) V. cholerae non-O1 strains were cholera toxin negative, whereas only strains recovered from patients were heat-stable enterotoxin positive. Forty-seven Bgl I ribotypes were observed. No correlation was shown between ribotype and toxin gene status. Ribotype similarity was compared by cluster analysis and two main groups of 13 and 34 ribotypes was found. Ribotyping is apparently a useful epidemiological tool in investigations of V. cholerae non-O1 infections. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7867743

  10. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: An extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  11. Cholera Vaccination in Urban Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Rouzier, Vanessa; Severe, Karine; Juste, Marc Antoine Jean; Peck, Mireille; Perodin, Christian; Severe, Patrice; Deschamps, Marie Marcelle; Verdier, Rose Irene; Prince, Sabine; Francois, Jeannot; Cadet, Jean Ronald; Guillaume, Florence D.; Wright, Peter F.; Pape, Jean W.

    2013-01-01

    Successful and sustained efforts have been made to curtail the major cholera epidemic that occurred in Haiti in 2010 with the promotion of hygiene and sanitation measures, training of health personnel and establishment of treatment centers nationwide. Oral cholera vaccine (OCV) was introduced by the Haitian Ministry of Health as a pilot project in urban and rural areas. This paper reports the successful OCV pilot project led by GHESKIO Centers in the urban slums of Port-au-Prince where 52,357 persons received dose 1 and 90.8% received dose 2; estimated coverage of the at-risk community was 75%. This pilot study demonstrated the effort, community mobilization, and organizational capacity necessary to achieve these results in a challenging setting. The OCV intervention paved the way for the recent launching of a national cholera vaccination program integrated in a long-term ambitious and comprehensive plan to address Haiti's critical need in water security and sanitation. PMID:24106194

  12. The Type II secretion system delivers matrix proteins for biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tanya L; Fong, Jiunn C; Rule, Chelsea; Rogers, Andrew; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Sandkvist, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have evolved several highly dedicated pathways for extracellular protein secretion, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Since substrates secreted via the T2S system include both virulence factors and degradative enzymes, this secretion system is considered a major survival mechanism for pathogenic and environmental species. Previous analyses revealed that the T2S system mediates the export of ≥ 20 proteins in Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is indigenous to the marine environment. Here we demonstrate a new role in biofilm formation for the V. cholerae T2S system, since wild-type V. cholerae was found to secrete the biofilm matrix proteins RbmC, RbmA, and Bap1 into the culture supernatant, while an isogenic T2S mutant could not. In agreement with this finding, the level of biofilm formation in a static microtiter assay was diminished in T2S mutants. Moreover, inactivation of the T2S system in a rugose V. cholerae strain prevented the development of colony corrugation and pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface. In contrast, extracellular secretion of the exopolysaccharide VPS, an essential component of the biofilm matrix, remained unaffected in the T2S mutants. Our results indicate that the T2S system provides a mechanism for the delivery of extracellular matrix proteins known to be important for biofilm formation by V. cholerae. Because the T2S system contributes to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae by secreting proteins such as cholera toxin and biofilm matrix proteins, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of T2S has the potential to lead to the development of novel preventions and therapies. PMID:25266381

  13. The Type II Secretion System Delivers Matrix Proteins for Biofilm Formation by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tanya L.; Fong, Jiunn C.; Rule, Chelsea; Rogers, Andrew; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have evolved several highly dedicated pathways for extracellular protein secretion, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Since substrates secreted via the T2S system include both virulence factors and degradative enzymes, this secretion system is considered a major survival mechanism for pathogenic and environmental species. Previous analyses revealed that the T2S system mediates the export of ≥20 proteins in Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is indigenous to the marine environment. Here we demonstrate a new role in biofilm formation for the V. cholerae T2S system, since wild-type V. cholerae was found to secrete the biofilm matrix proteins RbmC, RbmA, and Bap1 into the culture supernatant, while an isogenic T2S mutant could not. In agreement with this finding, the level of biofilm formation in a static microtiter assay was diminished in T2S mutants. Moreover, inactivation of the T2S system in a rugose V. cholerae strain prevented the development of colony corrugation and pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface. In contrast, extracellular secretion of the exopolysaccharide VPS, an essential component of the biofilm matrix, remained unaffected in the T2S mutants. Our results indicate that the T2S system provides a mechanism for the delivery of extracellular matrix proteins known to be important for biofilm formation by V. cholerae. Because the T2S system contributes to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae by secreting proteins such as cholera toxin and biofilm matrix proteins, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of T2S has the potential to lead to the development of novel preventions and therapies. PMID:25266381

  14. Glucose- but Not Rice-Based Oral Rehydration Therapy Enhances the Production of Virulence Determinants in the Human Pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

  15. Pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Sekura, R.D.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic and Functional Studies of Pertussis Toxin Substrates; Effect of Pertussis Toxin on the Hormonal Responsiveness of Different Tissues; Extracellular Adenylate Cyclase of Bordetella pertussis; and GTP-Regulatory Proteins are Introcellular Messagers: A Model for Hormone Action.

  16. Inactivated Eyedrop Influenza Vaccine Adjuvanted with Poly(I:C) Is Safe and Effective for Inducing Protective Systemic and Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Do; Han, Soo Jung; Byun, Young-Ho; Yoon, Sang Chul; Choi, Kyoung Sub; Seong, Baik Lin; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The eye route has been evaluated as an efficient vaccine delivery routes. However, in order to induce sufficient antibody production with inactivated vaccine, testing of the safety and efficacy of the use of inactivated antigen plus adjuvant is needed. Here, we assessed various types of adjuvants in eyedrop as an anti-influenza serum and mucosal Ab production-enhancer in BALB/c mice. Among the adjuvants, poly (I:C) showed as much enhancement in antigen-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody production as cholera toxin (CT) after vaccinations with trivalent hemagglutinin-subunits or split H1N1 vaccine antigen in mice. Vaccination with split H1N1 eyedrop vaccine antigen plus poly(I:C) showed a similar or slightly lower efficacy in inducing antibody production than intranasal vaccination; the eyedrop vaccine-induced immunity was enough to protect mice from lethal homologous influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1) virus challenge. Additionally, ocular inoculation with poly(I:C) plus vaccine antigen generated no signs of inflammation within 24 hours: no increases in the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines nor in the infiltration of mononuclear cells to administration sites. In contrast, CT administration induced increased expression of IL-6 cytokine mRNA and mononuclear cell infiltration in the conjunctiva within 24 hours of vaccination. Moreover, inoculated visualizing materials by eyedrop did not contaminate the surface of the olfactory bulb in mice; meanwhile, intranasally administered materials defiled the surface of the brain. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the use of eyedrop inactivated influenza vaccine plus poly(I:C) is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine strategy for inducing protective anti-influenza immunity. PMID:26355295

  17. Intranasal immunization of mice with CpG DNA induces strong systemic and mucosal responses that are influenced by other mucosal adjuvants and antigen distribution.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskie, M. J.; Weeratna, R. D.; Davis, H. L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory cytosine-guanine phosphate-linked dinucleotide (CpG) motifs are potent systemic and mucosal adjuvants in mice that have synergistic action with numerous other adjuvants, including alum and cholera toxin (CT). Herein, we evaluate CpG ODN with intranasal (IN) delivery of purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), relative to and in combination with CT, Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin (LT), the B subunit of CT (CTB), and a nontoxic derivative of LT (LTK63). MATERIALS AND METHODS: BALB/c mice were immunized by IN administration of HBsAg, alone or combined with CT, LT, CTB, or LTK63, and/or CpG ODN, or non-CpG control ODN. In addition, the effect of low-or high-volume administration was assessed, in order to target upper respiratory or entire respiratory tract, respectively. HBsAg-specific systemic (immunoglobulins: IgG, IgG1, IgG2a in plasma) and mucosal (IgA in fecal, lung, vaginal, saliva, and gut samples) humoral responses, as well as cell-mediated immune responses including T-cell proliferation and cytokines (interleukins: IL-4, IL-5; interferon: IFN-gamma) were evaluated. RESULTS: CpG ODN, CT, and LT augmented anti-HBs titers equally, and more so than did CTB or LTK63. CpG ODN acted synergistically with CT and LT, but not CTB or LTK63 to enhance anti-HBs titers. Nevertheless, CpG ODN induced a more Th1-like response for all combinations, compared with the same formulation without CpG. Strength of induced systemic and mucosal immune responses was better with IN delivery of a large volume. A small volume required multiple administrations and higher doses of antigen and adjuvant for equal results. This suggests that delivery of antigen to the lung and/or diges-tive system is superior to delivery to the nasal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the synergy between CpG ODN and native toxins (CT, LT) may depend on their enzymatic activity and that the lack of synergy

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, prepared from new master and working cell banks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wilbur H; Greenberg, Richard N; Pasetti, Marcela F; Livio, Sofie; Lock, Michael; Gurwith, Marc; Levine, Myron M

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no cholera vaccine is available for persons traveling from the United States to areas of high cholera transmission and who for reasons of occupation or host factors are at increased risk for development of the disease. A single-dose oral cholera vaccine with a rapid onset of protection would be particularly useful for such travelers and might also be an adjunct control measure for cholera outbreaks. The attenuated Vibrio cholerae O1 vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR harbors a 94% deletion of the cholera toxin A subunit gene (ctxA) and has a mercury resistance gene inserted in the gene encoding hemolysin A. We undertook a phase I randomized placebo-controlled two-site trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of a preliminary formulation of CVD 103-HgR prepared from new master and working cell banks. Healthy young adults were randomized (5:1 vaccinees to placebo recipients) to receive a single oral dose of ∼4.4 × 10(8) CFU of vaccine or a placebo. Blood serum vibriocidal and cholera toxin-specific IgG antibodies were measured before and 10, 14, and 28 days following vaccination or placebo. Excretion of the vaccine strain in the stool was assessed during the first week postvaccination. A total of 66 subjects were enrolled, comprising 55 vaccinees and 11 placebo recipients. The vaccine was well tolerated. The overall vibriocidal and anti-cholera toxin seroconversion rates were 89% and 57%, respectively. CVD 103-HgR is undergoing renewed manufacture for licensure in the United States under the auspices of PaxVax. Our data mimic those from previous commercial formulations that elicited vibriocidal antibody seroconversion (a correlate of protection) in ∼90% of vaccinees. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01585181.). PMID:24173028

  19. Epidemiology of Cholera in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Anna Lena; Macasaet, Lino Y.; Ylade, Michelle; Tayag, Enrique A.; Ali, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being a cholera-endemic country, data on cholera in the Philippines remain sparse. Knowing the areas where cholera is known to occur and the factors that lead to its occurrence will assist in planning preventive measures and disaster mitigation. Methods Using sentinel surveillance data, PubMed and ProMED searches covering information from 2008–2013 and event-based surveillance reports from 2010–2013, we assessed the epidemiology of cholera in the Philippines. Using spatial log regression, we assessed the role of water, sanitation and population density on the incidence of cholera. Results and Discussion We identified 12 articles from ProMED and none from PubMed that reported on cholera in the Philippines from 2008 to 2013. Data from ProMed and surveillance revealed 42,071 suspected and confirmed cholera cases reported from 2008 to 2013, among which only 5,006 were confirmed. 38 (47%) of 81 provinces and metropolitan regions reported at least one confirmed case of cholera and 32 (40%) reported at least one suspected case. The overall case fatality ratio in sentinel sites was 0.62%, but was 2% in outbreaks. All age groups were affected. Using both confirmed and suspected cholera cases, the average annual incidence in 2010–2013 was 9.1 per 100,000 population. Poor access to improved sanitation was consistently associated with higher cholera incidence. Paradoxically, access to improved water sources was associated with higher cholera incidence using both suspected and confirmed cholera data sources. This finding may have been due to the breakdown in the infrastructure and non-chlorination of water supplies, emphasizing the need to maintain public water systems. Conclusion Our findings confirm that cholera affects a large proportion of the provinces in the country. Identifying areas most at risk for cholera will support the development and implementation of policies to minimize the morbidity and mortality due to this disease. PMID:25569505

  20. Multi-scale molecular dynamics study of cholera pentamer binding to a GM1-phospholipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Akshay; Kumar, Amit; Dasmahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The AB5 type toxin produced by the Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the causative agent of the cholera disease. The cholera toxin (CT) has been shown to bind specifically to GM1 glycolipids on the membrane surface. This binding of CT to the membrane is the initial step in its endocytosis and has been postulated to cause significant disruption to the membrane structure. In this work, we have carried out a combination of coarse-grain and atomistic simulations to study the binding of CT to a membrane modelled as an asymmetrical GM1-DPPC bilayer. Simulation results indicate that the toxin binds to the membrane through only three of its five B subunits, in effect resulting in a tilted bound configuration. Additionally, the binding of the CT can increase the area per lipid of GM1 leaflet, which in turn can cause the membrane regions interacting with the bound subunits to experience significant bilayer thinning and lipid tail disorder across both the leaflets. PMID:27474868

  1. Crystal structures of a CTXphi pIII domain unbound and in complex with a Vibrio cholerae TolA domain reveal novel interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher G; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Phan, Hanh T H; Waldor, Matthew K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Craig, Lisa

    2012-10-19

    Vibrio cholerae colonize the small intestine where they secrete cholera toxin, an ADP-ribosylating enzyme that is responsible for the voluminous diarrhea characteristic of cholera disease. The genes encoding cholera toxin are located on the genome of the filamentous bacteriophage, CTXϕ, that integrates as a prophage into the V. cholerae chromosome. CTXϕ infection of V. cholerae requires the toxin-coregulated pilus and the periplasmic protein TolA. This infection process parallels that of Escherichia coli infection by the Ff family of filamentous coliphage. Here we demonstrate a direct interaction between the N-terminal domain of the CTXϕ minor coat protein pIII (pIII-N1) and the C-terminal domain of TolA (TolA-C) and present x-ray crystal structures of pIII-N1 alone and in complex with TolA-C. The structures of CTXϕ pIII-N1 and V. cholerae TolA-C are similar to coliphage pIII-N1 and E. coli TolA-C, respectively, yet these proteins bind via a distinct interface that in E. coli TolA corresponds to a colicin binding site. Our data suggest that the TolA binding site on pIII-N1 of CTXϕ is accessible in the native pIII protein. This contrasts with the Ff family phage, where the TolA binding site on pIII is blocked and requires a pilus-induced unfolding event to become exposed. We propose that CTXϕ pIII accesses the periplasmic TolA through retraction of toxin-coregulated pilus, which brings the phage through the outer membrane pilus secretin channel. These data help to explain the process by which CTXϕ converts a harmless marine microbe into a deadly human pathogen. PMID:22942280

  2. Infectious CTXΦ and the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island Prophage in Vibrio mimicus: Evidence for Recent Horizontal Transfer between V. mimicus and V. cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, E. Fidelma; Moyer, Kathryn E.; Shi, Lei; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2000-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus differs from Vibrio cholerae in a number of genotypic and phenotypic traits but like V. cholerae can give rise to diarrheal disease. We examined clinical isolates of V. mimicus for the presence of CTXΦ, the lysogenic filamentous bacteriophage that carries the cholera toxin genes in epidemic V. cholerae strains. Four V. mimicus isolates were found to contain complete copies of CTXΦ. Southern blot analyses revealed that V. mimicus strain PT5 contains two CTX prophages integrated at different sites within the V. mimicus genome whereas V. mimicus strains PT48, 523-80, and 9583 each contain tandemly arranged copies of CTXΦ. We detected the replicative form of CTXΦ, pCTX, in all four of these V. mimicus isolates. The CTX prophage in strain PT5 was found to produce infectious CTXΦ particles. The nucleotide sequences of CTXΦ genes orfU and zot from V. mimicus strain PT5 and V. cholerae strain N16961 were identical, indicating contemporary horizontal transfer of CTXΦ between these two species. The receptor for CTXΦ, the toxin-coregulated pilus, which is encoded by another lysogenic filamentous bacteriophage, VPIΦ, was also present in the CTXΦ-positive V. mimicus isolates. The nucleotide sequences of VPIΦ genes aldA and toxT from V. mimicus strain PT5 and V. cholerae N16961 were identical, suggesting recent horizontal transfer of this phage between V. mimicus and V. cholerae. In V. mimicus, the vibrio pathogenicity island prophage was integrated in the same chromosomal attachment site as in V. cholerae. These results suggest that V. mimicus may be a significant reservoir for both CTXΦ and VPIΦ and may play an important role in the emergence of new toxigenic V. cholerae isolates. PMID:10678967

  3. Fatal bacteremia due to immotile Vibrio cholerae serogroup O21 in Vientiane, Laos – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Nakatsu, Masami; Arakawa, Eiji; Davong, Viengmone; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Lattana, Olay; Moore, Catrin E; Nakamura, Satoshi; Newton, Paul N

    2008-01-01

    Background Human infections with non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from Laos. Elsewhere, non cholera-toxin producing, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from blood cultures and ascitic fluid, although they are exceedingly rare isolates. Case presentation We describe a farmer who died with Vibrio cholerae O21 bacteremia and peritonitis in Vientiane, Laos, after eating partially cooked apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) and mussels (Ligumia species). The cultured V. cholerae were non-motile. PCR detected ompW and toxR gene regions but not the ctxA, ompU, omp K and TCP gene regions. Although the organisms lacked flagellae on scanning electron microscopy, they possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Conclusion Severe bacteremic non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae is reported from Laos. The organisms were unusual in being non-motile. They possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Further research to determine the reasons for the non-motility and virulence is required. PMID:18439249

  4. Successful application of enzyme-labeled oligonucleotide probe for rapid and accurate cholera diagnosis in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, K; Matsumoto, Y; Hayashi, K; Yoh, M; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1994-01-01

    Two cholera cases were diagnosed using an enzyme-labeled oligonucleotide probe (ELONP) hybridization test for detection of cholera toxin gene (ctx) in a clinical laboratory at Osaka Airport Quarantine Station. The ELONP test with suspicious colonies of Vibrio cholerae O1 grown on TCBS or Vibrio agar plates gave positive result for ctx within 3 hr. We also tried to apply the ELONP test for direct detection of ctx in their stool and their non-selective culture. Specimens from Case #1, which contained 5.9 x 10(5) CFU/g of V. cholerae O1 in the stool, cultured for 7-8 hr or longer in alkaline peptone water or Marine broth at 37C, became positive for ctx. On the other hand, specimens from Case #2, which contained 8.7 x 10(8) CFU/ml (of V. cholerae O1 in the stool), gave positive result in this stool itself without any further culture. These data suggest that the ELONP test provides successfully a more rapid and accurate means of identifying "toxigenic" V. cholerae O1 in a clinical laboratory. PMID:7935049

  5. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Epidemic Cholera in Haiti to Assess Spectrum of Illness and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Brendan R.; Talkington, Deborah F.; Pruckler, James M.; Fouché, M. D. Bernadette; Lafosse, Elsie; Nygren, Benjamin; Gómez, Gerardo A.; Dahourou, Georges A.; Archer, W. Roodly; Payne, Amanda B.; Hooper, W. Craig; Tappero, Jordan W.; Derado, Gordana; Magloire, Roc; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Mintz, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the spectrum of illness from toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and risk factors for severe cholera in Haiti, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in a rural commune with more than 21,000 residents. During March 22–April 6, 2011, we interviewed 2,622 residents ≥ 2 years of age and tested serum specimens from 2,527 (96%) participants for vibriocidal and antibodies against cholera toxin; 18% of participants reported a cholera diagnosis, 39% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 320, and 64% had vibriocidal titers ≥ 80, suggesting widespread infection. Among seropositive participants (vibriocidal titers ≥ 320), 74.5% reported no diarrhea and 9.0% had severe cholera (reported receiving intravenous fluids and overnight hospitalization). This high burden of severe cholera is likely explained by the lack of pre-existing immunity in this population, although the virulence of the atypical El Tor strain causing the epidemic and other factors might also play a role. PMID:24106192

  6. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  7. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. Objectives To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Selection criteria Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Main results Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43

  8. Millipede toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxin are: Hydrochloric acid Hydrogen cyanide Organic acids Phenol Cresols Benzoquinones Hydroquinones (in some millipedes) ... with plenty of soap and water. Do NOT use alcohol to wash the area. Wash eyes with ...

  9. Millipede toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... release keeps away most predators. Some large millipede species can secrete these toxins as far as 80 ... reactions are mainly seen from contact with tropical species of millipedes. The outlook may be more serious ...

  10. Marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Whittle, K; Gallacher, S

    2000-01-01

    Seafood products are important both nutritionally and economically. Within Europe, some 12 billion Pounds of fishery products are consumed annually and an enormous variety of species are available. Although seafood is rarely implicated in food poisoning, compared to other food sources, it does provide some specific human health hazards unique to this particular resource. Generally, these are toxins from toxic microscopic algae which accumulate through the food-chain. The toxins can cause various neurological and gastrointestinal illnesses and, potentially, consumers are exposed from seafood produced within Europe, from imported products, or from seafood eaten while travelling abroad. The symptoms of illness which may be encountered, the source and mode of action of the toxins, and some emerging problems are described. European legislation aims to ensure the quality and safety of seafood products by prohibiting sale of some toxic species, setting toxin limits, requiring monitoring and controlling imports. PMID:10885118

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Melanin-Producing (mel) Mutants of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ivins, Bruce E.; Holmes, Randall K.

    1980-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae strain Htx-3, a hypertoxinogenic mutant of V. cholerae 569B Inaba, produces a dark brown pigment under certain growth conditions, whereas strain 569B does not. We investigated the biochemical basis for this pigment production and the possible relationships between pigmentation and other phenotypic properties in V. cholerae. After mutagenesis of V. cholerae 569B with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 28 independently derived pigment-forming (mel) mutants were isolated and characterized. The mel mutants frequently differed from wild type in toxinogenicity or motility and occasionally differed in other phenotypic traits. Individual mel mutants differed from wild type both in the amount of toxin produced and in the growth conditions optimal for toxin production. It has not yet been established whether multiple phenotypic changes in individual mel mutants represent pleiotropic effects of single mutations or induction of multiple mutations by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or both. Production of pigment by mel mutants occurred at temperatures from 22 to 40°C, was inhibited by anaerobiosis, and was stimulated by supplementation of growth media with the amino acid precursors of melanin (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, or l-tyrosine plus l-cysteine). The pigment possessed several other properties reported for microbial melanins. We conclude that a biochemical pathway for melanin production is present in V. cholerae, that this pathway cannot be fully expressed in wild-type strain 569B, and that mutations in the gene(s) which we have designated mel can permit hyperproduction of melanin under appropriate conditions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7380551

  12. Development of a dry reagent-based triplex PCR for the detection of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chua, Ang Lim; Elina, Husni Tan; Lim, Boon Huat; Yean, Chan Yean; Ravichandran, Manickam; Lalitha, Pattabhiraman

    2011-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused severe outbreaks of cholera worldwide with thousands of recorded deaths annually. Molecular diagnosis for cholera has become increasingly important for rapid detection of cholera as the conventional methods are time-consuming and labour intensive. However, traditional PCR tests still require cold-chain transportation and storage as well as trained personnel to perform, which makes them user-unfriendly. The aim of this study was to develop a thermostabilized triplex PCR test for cholera which is in a ready-to-use form and requires no cold chain. The PCR test specifically detects both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of V. cholerae based on the cholera toxin A (ctxA) and outer-membrane lipoprotein (lolB) genes. The thermostabilized triplex PCR also incorporates an internal amplification control that helps to check for PCR inhibitors in samples. PCR reagents and the specific primers were lyophilized into a pellet form in the presence of trehalose, which acts as an enzyme stabilizer. The triplex PCR was validated with 174 bacteria-spiked stool specimens and was found to be 100 % sensitive and specific. The stability of the thermostabilized PCR was evaluated using the Q10 method and it was found to be stable for approximately 7 months at 24 °C. The limit of detection of the thermostabilized triplex PCR assay was 2×10(4) c.f.u. at the bacterial cell level and 100 pg DNA at the genomic DNA level, comparable to conventional PCR methods. In conclusion, a rapid thermostabilized triplex PCR assay was developed for detecting toxigenic and non-toxigenic V. cholerae which requires minimal pipetting steps and is cold chain-free. PMID:21183596

  13. Novel ctxB variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2013-12-01

    We screened 650 isolates from historical collection of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the 7th cholera pandemic in China, by amplifying and sequencing the cholera toxin subunit gene ctxB. Ten isolates were identified as harboring three novel ctxB genotypes based on amino acid residue substitutions. Within them one isolate from a patient in 1964 was similar to the El Tor genotype, except for an 11 amino acid repeat sequence (LAGKREMAIIT) that was inserted after position 62. Six environmental isolates from different regions and years were identified as the Australia El Tor genotype, except at positions 36(T→A), 39(H→Y), and 55(K→N), while three environmental isolates were similar to genotype 5, except at position 24(Q→H). Sequencing of rstR, the marker gene for the CTXΦ allele typing, revealed that two isolates carried the rstR gene of the El Tor type, five carried the classical type rstR, while other isolates carried the rstR232 type. All 10 isolates contained the repeat in the toxin gene rtxC, an El Tor biotype-specific marker, and the El Tor toxin-coregulated pili subunit A gene tcpA, showing the El Tor traits of these isolates. Additionally, by phenotypic biotyping (susceptibility to polymyxin B, positive for chicken erythrocyte agglutination, and Voges-Proskauer test), all isolates except two were typical of the prototype El Tor isolate, while these two isolates had mixed classical phenotypes (hybrid biotype). Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis suggested that the new ctxB altered isolates possessed potential transmissibility and thatthey propagated in the local region(s). Taken together, these novel ctxB variants of V. cholerae O1 experienced complex hybrid and genetic exchange but belong to the El Tor lineage, and the pathogenic and epidemic potential of these lineages should be monitored. PMID:23954417

  14. Development and preclinical evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of an oral ETEC vaccine containing inactivated E. coli bacteria overexpressing colonization factors CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 combined with a hybrid LT/CT B subunit antigen, administered alone and together with dmLT adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Bourgeois, L; Carlin, N; Clements, J; Gustafsson, B; Lundgren, A; Nygren, E; Tobias, J; Walker, R; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-05-01

    A first-generation oral inactivated whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine, comprising formalin-killed ETEC bacteria expressing different colonization factor (CF) antigens combined with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), when tested in phase III studies did not significantly reduce overall (generally mild) ETEC diarrhea in travelers or children although it reduced more severe ETEC diarrhea in travelers by almost 80%. We have now developed a novel more immunogenic ETEC vaccine based on recombinant non-toxigenic E. coli strains engineered to express increased amounts of CF antigens, including CS6 as well as an ETEC-based B subunit protein (LCTBA), and the optional combination with a nontoxic double-mutant heat-labile toxin (LT) molecule (dmLT) as an adjuvant. Two test vaccines were prepared under GMP: (1) A prototype E. coli CFA/I-only formalin-killed whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine, and (2) A "complete" inactivated multivalent ETEC-CF (CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 antigens) whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine. These vaccines, when given intragastrically alone or together with dmLT in mice, were well tolerated and induced strong intestinal-mucosal IgA antibody responses as well as serum IgG and IgA responses to each of the vaccine CF antigens as well as to LT B subunit (LTB). Both mucosal and serum responses were further enhanced (adjuvanted) when the vaccines were co-administered with dmLT. We conclude that the new multivalent oral ETEC vaccine, both alone and especially in combination with the dmLT adjuvant, shows great promise for further testing in humans. PMID:23541621

  15. Sequence analyses of type IV pili from Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Alisha M; Häse, Claudia C

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial surface structures called pili have been studied extensively for their role as possible colonization factors. Most sequenced Vibrio genomes predict a variety of pili genes in these organisms, including several types of type IV pili. In particular, the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) and the PilA pili, also known as the chitin-regulated pilus (ChiRP), are type IVa pili commonly found in Vibrio genomes and have been shown to play a role in the colonization of Vibrio species in the environment and/or host tissue. Here, we report sequence comparisons of two type IVa pilin subunit genes, mshA and pilA, and their corresponding amino acid sequences, for several strains from the three main human pathogenic Vibrio species, V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. We identified specific groupings of these two genes in V. cholerae, whereas V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus strains had no apparent allelic clusters, and these genes were strikingly divergent. These results were compared with other genes from the MSHA and PilA operons as well as another Vibrio pili from the type IVb group, the toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) from V. cholerae. Our data suggest that a selective pressure exists to cause these strains to vary their MSHA and PilA pilin subunits. Interestingly, V. cholerae strains possessing TCP have the same allele for both mshA and pilA. In contrast, V. cholerae isolates without TCP have polymorphisms in their mshA and pilA sequences similar to what was observed for both V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. This data suggests a possible linkage between host interactions and maintaining a highly conserved type IV pili sequence in V. cholerae. Although the mechanism underlying this intriguing diversity has yet to be elucidated, our analyses are an important first step towards gaining insights into the various aspects of Vibrio ecology. PMID:22383120

  16. Effectiveness of the WC/rBS oral cholera vaccine in the prevention of traveler's diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    López-Gigosos, Rosa; Campins, Magda; Calvo, María J.; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Salleras, Luis; Azuara, María T.; Martínez, Xavier; Bayas, José M.; Ramón Torrell, Josep M.; Pérez-Cobaleda, María A.; Núñez-Torrón, María E.; Gorgojo, Lydia; García-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Díez-Díaz, Rosa; Armadans, Luis; Sánchez-Fernández, Concepción; Mejías, Teresa; Masuet, Cristina; Pinilla, Rafael; Antón, Nieves; Segarra, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Traveler’s diarrhea (TD) is the most frequent disease among people from industrialized countries who travel to less developed ones, especially sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Asia and South America. The most common bacteria causing TD is enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The WC/rBS cholera vaccine (Dukoral®) has been shown to induce cross-protection against ETEC by means of the B subunit of the cholera toxin. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the WC/rBS cholera vaccine in preventing TD. Methods: Between May 1 and September 30 (2007), people seeking pre-travel advice in ten Spanish international vaccination centers were included in a prospective cohort study of travelers to cholera risk countries. The incidence rates of TD were adjusted for variables whose frequencies were statistically different (entry point 0.10) between the vaccinated and non-vaccinated cohorts. Findings: The vaccinated cohort (n = 544 travelers) included people vaccinated with the WC/rBS cholera vaccine, and the non-vaccinated cohort (n = 530 travelers) by people not vaccinated. The cumulative incidence rate of TD was 1.69 in vaccinated and 2.14 in non-vaccinated subjects. The adjusted relative risk of TD in vaccinated travelers was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.58–0.88) and the adjusted vaccination effectiveness was 28% (95% CI: 12–42). Conclusions: The WC/rBS cholera vaccine prevents TD in 2 out of 7 travelers (preventive fraction: 28%). The number needed to vaccinate (NNV) to prevent 1 case of TD is 10. PMID:23324573

  17. 1.65 Å resolution structure of the AraC-family transcriptional activator ToxT from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaqin; Wehmeyer, Graham; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Egan, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    ToxT is an AraC-family transcriptional activator protein that controls the expression of key virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. ToxT directly activates the expression of the genes that encode the toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin, and also positively auto-regulates its own expression from the tcp promoter. The crystal structure of ToxT has previously been solved at 1.9 Å resolution (PDB entry 3gbg). In this study, a crystal structure of ToxT at 1.65 Å resolution with a similar overall structure to the previously determined structure is reported. However, there are distinct differences between the two structures, particularly in the region that extends from Asp101 to Glu110. This region, which can influence ToxT activity but was disordered in the previous structure, can be traced entirely in the current structure. PMID:27599865

  18. 1.65 Å resolution structure of the AraC-family transcriptional activator ToxT from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaqin; Wehmeyer, Graham; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Egan, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    ToxT is an AraC-family transcriptional activator protein that controls the expression of key virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. ToxT directly activates the expression of the genes that encode the toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin, and also positively auto-regulates its own expression from the tcp promoter. The crystal structure of ToxT has previously been solved at 1.9 Å resolution (PDB entry 3gbg). In this study, a crystal structure of ToxT at 1.65 Å resolution with a similar overall structure to the previously determined structure is reported. However, there are distinct differences between the two structures, particularly in the region that extends from Asp101 to Glu110. This region, which can influence ToxT activity but was disordered in the previous structure, can be traced entirely in the current structure. PMID:27599865

  19. Bacteriocin Typing of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, A. N.; Adhya, Sati; Basu, Jayantisri; Dastidar, Sujata G.

    1970-01-01

    Bacteriocins of Vibrio cholerae have been demonstrated against enterobacterial and vibrio indicator organisms by conventional techniques. Abundant bacteriocin production took place on casein hydrolysate-yeast extract, tryptic soy, digest broth, proteose-peptone, and neopeptone agars. Essential factors were a citrate-phosphate buffer concentration of 0.5 to 0.7%, at pH 7.5 to 7.6, and cold shock. Thermal treatment of indicator organisms at 45 C for 12 min increased the percentage of typable strains. The bacteriocins of V. cholerae appeared to be powerful diffusible bactericidal agents. By using 8 indicator strains, 11 bacteriocin types have been recognized among 425 strains, of which 87% are typable at present. Images PMID:16557731

  20. BOTULINUM TOXIN

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, P K; Nigam, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C1, C2, D, E, F and G). All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice. PMID:20418969

  1. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M.; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  2. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  3. Nonimmunoglobulin fraction of human milk inhibits bacterial adhesion (hemagglutination) and enterotoxin binding of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ahrén, C

    1981-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum samples were divided into an immunoglobulin and a nonimmunoglobulin fraction by immunosorbent chromatography. The ability of these fractions to inhibit bacterial cell adhesion and enterotoxin receptor binding of Vibrio cholerae and various Escherichia coli isolates was then tested by in vitro assays. The strongest effect was generally seen with the nonimmunoglobulin fractions, which were shown to significantly inhibit E. coli cell adhesion (hemagglutination) mediated by CFA/I, CFA/II, or K88 fimbriae (but not type 1 pili) and V. cholerae hemagglutination, as well as the binding of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin to GM1 ganglioside. Also, the immunoglobulin fractions had significant inhibitory activity in some of these systems. The results are interpreted to suggest that human milk and colostrum may contain secreted structure analogs of the cell receptors for some bacterial adhesions and enterotoxins; this might contribute to the protective effect of milk against enteric infections. PMID:7021421

  4. The epitope analysis of an antibody specifically against Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa by phage library study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiliang; Lin, Zhen; Liu, Xinfeng; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Gang; Tu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Jian; Yu, Xiaolin

    2015-10-01

    To prevent epidemic and pandemic cholera disease, an indispensible approach is to develop cholera vaccines based on comprehensive epitope information of this pathogen. This study aimed to utilize our previously raised monoclonal antibody IXiao3G6, which can recognize an epitope in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sites of Ogawa, to identify mimetic peptides, which may represent Ogawa LPS's epitope information. A phage display library screening using IXiao3G6 antibody resulted in identification of a mimic peptide (MP) with high avidity. A recombinant protein, containing one cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) and two MP repeats (CTB-(MP)2), was subsequently constructed and investigated for its immunological characteristics. The findings collectively demonstrated that the MP presenting phages and CTB-(MP)2 recombinant protein were both capable of inhibiting the interaction between IXiao3G6 and Ogawa/Ogawa LPS specifically in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26172085

  5. Effect of LexA on Chromosomal Integration of CTXϕ in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Archana; Anbumani, D; Bag, Satyabrata; Mehta, Ojasvi; Kumar, Pawan; Saxena, Shruti; Nair, G. Balakrish

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genesis of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae involves acquisition of CTXϕ, a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) filamentous phage that encodes cholera toxin (CT). The phage exploits host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) for chromosomal integration and lysogenic conversion. The replicative genome of CTXϕ produces ssDNA by rolling-circle replication, which may be used either for virion production or for integration into host chromosome. Fine-tuning of different ssDNA binding protein (Ssb) levels in the host cell is crucial for cellular functioning and important for CTXϕ integration. In this study, we mutated the master regulator gene of SOS induction, lexA, of V. cholerae because of its known role in controlling levels of Ssb proteins in other bacteria. CTXϕ integration decreased in cells with a ΔlexA mutation and increased in cells with an SOS-noninducing mutation, lexA (Ind−). We also observed that overexpression of host-encoded Ssb (VC0397) decreased integration of CTXϕ. We propose that LexA helps CTXϕ integration, possibly by fine-tuning levels of host- and phage-encoded Ssbs. IMPORTANCE Cholera toxin is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute diarrheal disease cholera. CT is encoded in the genome of a lysogenic filamentous phage, CTXϕ. Vibrio cholerae has a bipartite genome and harbors single or multiple copies of CTXϕ prophage in one or both chromosomes. Two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) recognize the folded ssDNA genome of CTXϕ and catalyze its integration at the dimer resolution site of either one or both chromosomes. Fine-tuning of ssDNA binding proteins in host cells is crucial for CTXϕ integration. We engineered the V. cholerae genome and created several reporter strains carrying ΔlexA or lexA (Ind−) alleles. Using the reporter strains, the importance of LexA control of Ssb expression in the integration efficiency of CTXϕ was demonstrated. PMID:26503849

  6. Trends in vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Lavelle, Ed C

    2011-04-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a century and have been particularly effective at promoting protective humoral immunity. However, alum is not optimally effective for diseases where cell-mediated immunity is required for protection. Furthermore, adjuvants including oil-in-water emulsions have shown improved efficacy for avian influenza protection suggesting that even for diseases where humoral immunity can confer protection, there is scope for developing improved adjuvants. There have been major developments in antigen discovery over the past decade, which has accelerated the vaccine development process for new indications and this demands a new generation of adjuvants that can drive and specifically direct the desired immune responses. A number of systems are under investigation that combine different types of adjuvants into specific formulations with greater activity. Additionally, targeting of vaccines to specific immune cells shows great promise. In the case of cancer and chronic infectious diseases, it may be difficult to develop effective vaccines without blocking immune regulatory pathways, which impede cell-mediated responses. However, increased understanding of immunology and particularly the innate immune system is informing vaccine adjuvant research and consequently driving the development of novel and specifically directed vaccine adjuvant strategies. In this article we address the importance of adjuvants in vaccine development, the known mode of action of specific adjuvants and recent developments in this important field. PMID:21506650

  7. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  8. Bile Salts Modulate the Mucin-Activated Type VI Secretion System of Pandemic Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Daniel; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Ogg, Stephen; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, regulates its diverse virulence factors to thrive in the human small intestine and environmental reservoirs. Among this pathogen’s arsenal of virulence factors is the tightly regulated type VI secretion system (T6SS). This system acts as an inverted bacteriophage to inject toxins into competing bacteria and eukaryotic phagocytes. V. cholerae strains responsible for the current 7th pandemic activate their T6SS within the host. We established that T6SS-mediated competition occurs upon T6SS activation in the infant mouse, and that this system is functional under anaerobic conditions. When investigating the intestinal host factors mucins (a glycoprotein component of mucus) and bile for potential regulatory roles in controlling the T6SS, we discovered that once mucins activate the T6SS, bile acids can further modulate T6SS activity. Microbiota modify bile acids to inhibit T6SS-mediated killing of commensal bacteria. This interplay is a novel interaction between commensal bacteria, host factors, and the V. cholerae T6SS, showing an active host role in infection. PMID:26317760

  9. Outer Membrane Vesicle-Mediated Export of Processed PrtV Protease from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Johnson, Tanya L.; Åhlund, Monika; Lundmark, Richard; Oscarsson, Jan; Sandkvist, Maria; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are known to release from almost all Gram-negative bacteria during normal growth. OMVs carry different biologically active toxins and enzymes into the surrounding environment. We suggest that OMVs may therefore be able to transport bacterial proteases into the target host cells. We present here an analysis of the Vibrio cholerae OMV-associated protease PrtV. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrated that PrtV was secreted from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 via the type II secretion system in association with OMVs. By immunoblotting and electron microscopic analysis using immunogold labeling, the association of PrtV with OMVs was examined. We demonstrated that OMV-associated PrtV was biologically active by showing altered morphology and detachment of cells when the human ileocecum carcinoma (HCT8) cells were treated with OMVs from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 whereas cells treated with OMVs from the prtV isogenic mutant showed no morphological changes. Furthermore, OMV-associated PrtV protease showed a contribution to bacterial resistance towards the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that OMVs released from V. cholerae can deliver a processed, biologically active form of PrtV that contributes to bacterial interactions with target host cells. PMID:26222047

  10. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. PMID:27297393

  11. Activation-Induced TIM-4 Expression Identifies Differential Responsiveness of Intestinal CD103+ CD11b+ Dendritic Cells to a Mucosal Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alfonso J.; Ronchese, Franca

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) populations residing in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are highly heterogeneous and have disparate yet collaborative roles in the promotion of adaptive immune responses towards intestinal antigen. Under steady-state conditions, macrophages are efficient at acquiring antigen but are non-migratory. In comparison, intestinal DC are inefficient at antigen uptake but migrate to the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) where they present antigen to T cells. Whether such distinction in the roles of DC and macrophages in the uptake and transport of antigen is maintained under immunostimulatory conditions is less clear. Here we show that the scavenger and phosphatidylserine receptor T cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin (TIM)-4 is expressed by the majority of LP macrophages at steady-state, whereas DC are TIM-4 negative. Oral treatment with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) induces expression of TIM-4 on a proportion of CD103+ CD11b+ DC in the LP. TIM-4+ DC selectively express high levels of co-stimulatory molecules after CT treatment and are detected in the mLN a short time after appearing in the LP. Importantly, intestinal macrophages and DC expressing TIM-4 are more efficient than their TIM-4 negative counterparts at taking up apoptotic cells and soluble antigen ex vivo. Taken together, our results show that CT induces phenotypic changes to migratory intestinal DC that may impact their ability to take up local antigens and in turn promote the priming of mucosal immunity. PMID:27379516

  12. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  13. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  14. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  15. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  16. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  17. 9 CFR 311.3 - Hog cholera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... kidneys and the lymph nodes which resemble lesions of hog cholera, they shall be regarded as those of hog... kidneys and lymph nodes of carcasses of hogs which appeared normal on ante-mortem inspection, further..., characteristic lesions of hog cholera are found in some organ or tissue in addition to those in the kidneys or...

  18. Can chatter between microbes prevent cholera?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jessica A; Oliveira, Rita Almeida; Xavier, Karina B

    2014-12-01

    Tackling the global rise in antibiotic resistance requires new therapies against infectious microbes. A recent microbiome study identified commensal gut bacteria that reduce colonisation by the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This antagonistic interaction might be mediated by quorum sensing, suggesting that these natural microbe-microbe interactions can help prevent infectious disease. PMID:25468792

  19. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine. PMID:22129866

  20. Genomic diversity of 2010 Haitian cholera outbreak strains.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nur A; Choi, Seon Young; Eppinger, Mark; Clark, Philip W; Chen, Arlene; Alam, Munirul; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Hine, Erin; Su, Qi; Tallon, Luke J; Prosper, Joseph B; Furth, Keziah; Hoq, M M; Li, Huai; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M; Cravioto, Alejandro; Huq, Anwar; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A; Colwell, Rita R

    2012-07-17

    The millions of deaths from cholera during the past 200 y, coupled with the morbidity and mortality of cholera in Haiti since October 2010, are grim reminders that Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, remains a scourge. We report the isolation of both V. cholerae O1 and non-O1/O139 early in the Haiti cholera epidemic from samples collected from victims in 18 towns across eight Arrondissements of Haiti. The results showed two distinct populations of V. cholerae coexisted in Haiti early in the epidemic. As non-O1/O139 V. cholerae was the sole pathogen isolated from 21% of the clinical specimens, its role in this epidemic, either alone or in concert with V. cholerae O1, cannot be dismissed. A genomic approach was used to examine similarities and differences among the Haitian V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae non-O1/O139 strains. A total of 47 V. cholerae O1 and 29 V. cholerae non-O1/O139 isolates from patients and the environment were sequenced. Comparative genome analyses of the 76 genomes and eight reference strains of V. cholerae isolated in concurrent epidemics outside Haiti and 27 V. cholerae genomes available in the public database demonstrated substantial diversity of V. cholerae and ongoing flux within its genome. PMID:22711841

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae associated with flood in Brahamputra River valley, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soubhagya K; Vairale, Mohan G; Arya, Neha; Yadav, Priti; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Yadava, Pramod K; Kumar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    Cholera is often caused when drinking water is contaminated through environmental sources. In recent years, the drastic cholera epidemics in Odisha (2007) and Haiti (2010) were associated with natural disasters (flood and Earthquake). Almost every year the state of Assam India witnesses flood in Brahamputra River valley during reversal of wind system (monsoon). This is often followed by outbreak of diarrheal diseases including cholera. Beside the incidence of cholera outbreaks, there is lack of experimental evidence for prevalence of the bacterium in aquatic environment and its association with cholera during/after flood in the state. A molecular surveillance during 2012-14 was carried out to study prevalence, strain differentiation, and clonality of Vibrio cholerae in inland aquatic reservoirs flooded by Brahamputra River in Assam. Water samples were collected, filtered, enriched in alkaline peptone water followed by selective culturing on thiosulfate bile salt sucrose agar. Environmental isolates were identified as V. cholerae, based on biochemical assays followed by sero-grouping and detailed molecular characterization. The incidence of the presence of the bacterium in potable water sources was higher after flood. Except one O1 isolate, all of the strains were broadly grouped under non-O1/non-O139 whereas some of them did have cholera toxin (CT). Surprisingly, we have noticed Haitian ctxB in two non-O1/non-O139 strains. MLST analyses based on pyrH, recA and rpoA genes revealed clonality in the environmental strains. The isolates showed varying degree of antimicrobial resistance including tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. The strains harbored the genetic elements SXT constins and integrons responsible for multidrug resistance. Genetic characterization is useful as phenotypic characters alone have proven to be unsatisfactory for strain discrimination. An assurance to safe drinking water, sanitation and monitoring of the aquatic reservoirs is of utmost importance for

  2. Nepalese origin of cholera epidemic in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, R R; Keim, P S; Barrais, R; Piarroux, R

    2012-06-01

    Cholera appeared in Haiti in October 2010 for the first time in recorded history. The causative agent was quickly identified by the Haitian National Public Health Laboratory and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor. Since then, >500 000 government-acknowledged cholera cases and >7000 deaths have occurred, the largest cholera epidemic in the world, with the real death toll probably much higher. Questions of origin have been widely debated with some attributing the onset of the epidemic to climatic factors and others to human transmission. None of the evidence on origin supports climatic factors. Instead, recent epidemiological and molecular-genetic evidence point to the United Nations peacekeeping troops from Nepal as the source of cholera to Haiti, following their troop rotation in early October 2010. Such findings have important policy implications for shaping future international relief efforts. PMID:22510219

  3. Zinc: Role in the management of diarrhea and cholera

    PubMed Central

    Qadir, M Imran; Arshad, Arfa; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea and cholera are major health problems. Vibrio cholera, the causative agent of cholera, infects the small intestine, resulting in vomiting, massive watery diarrhea and dehydration. Reduced water and electrolyte absorption is also due to zinc deficiency. Zinc has an important role in recovery from the disease. The combination of zinc with cholera vaccine and oral rehydration solutions has a positive impact on cholera and diarrhea. It has led to a decrease in the mortality and morbidity associated with diarrhea. PMID:24303485

  4. Antimicrobials & cholera: are we stranded?

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Ramamurthy, T

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a major threat in the treatment of infectious diseases. Though significant progress in the management of diarrhoeal diseases has been achieved by improved hygiene, development of new antimicrobials and vaccines, the burden remains the same, especially in children below 5 yr of age. In the case of cholera, though oral rehydration treatment is the mainstay, antimicrobial therapy is mandatory at times to reduce the volume of stool and shorten the duration of the disease. Though for many pathogens, antimicrobial resistance emerged soon after the introduction of antibiotics, Vibrio cholerae remained sensitive to most of the antibiotics for quite a long period. However, the scenario changed over the years and today, V. cholerae strains isolated world over are resistant to multiple antibiotics. A myriad number of mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, enhanced multi-drug efflux pump activity, plasmid-mediated quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance, and chromosomal mutations. Horizontal transfer of resistance determinants with mobile genetic elements like integrons and the integrating conjugative elements (ICEs), SXTs help in the dissemination of drug resistance. Though all strains isolated are not resistant to all antibiotics and we are not as yet "stranded", expanding spectrum of drug resistance is a definite cause for concern. Pipelines of discovery of new antibiotics are drying up as major pharmaceutical companies are losing interest in investing money in this endeavour, mainly due to the short shelf-life of the antibiotics and also due to the fast emergence of drug resistance. To address this issue, attempts are now being made to discover drugs which are pathogen specific and target their "virulence mechanisms". It is expected that development of resistance against such antibiotics would take much longer. This review briefly focuses on all these issues. PMID:21415499

  5. Cholera Epidemiology in Nigeria: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Adagbada, Ajoke Olutola; Adesida, Solayide Abosede; Nwaokorie, Francisca Obiageri; Niemogha, Mary-Theresa; Coker, Akitoye Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium, Vibrio cholera. Choleragenic V. cholera O1 and O139 are the only causative agents of the disease. The two most distinguishing epidemiologic features of the disease are its tendency to appear in explosive outbreaks and its predisposition to causing pandemics that may progressively affect many countries and spread into continents. Despite efforts to control cholera, the disease continues to occur as a major public health problem in many developing countries. Numerous studies over more than a century have made advances in the understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients, but the mechanism of emergence of new epidemic strains, and the ecosystem supporting regular epidemics, remain challenging to epidemiologists. In Nigeria, since the first appearance of epidemic cholera in 1972, intermittent outbreaks have been occurring. The later part of 2010 was marked with severe outbreak which started from the northern part of Nigeria, spreading to the other parts and involving approximately 3,000 cases and 781 deaths. Sporadic cases have also been reported. Although epidemiologic surveillance constitutes an important component of the public health response, publicly available surveillance data from Nigeria have been relatively limited to date. Based on existing relevant scientific literature on features of cholera, this paper presents a synopsis of cholera epidemiology emphasising the situation in Nigeria. PMID:22937199

  6. [Cholera in a district of Peru].

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodríguez, A E; Monté Boada, R; de la Vega Díaz, J E; Molina, R; García Gómez, V; Arca González, J M

    1996-01-01

    Taking to consideration the low report of cholera patients and with the main knowing the reality about the introduction of Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) in Peru, a sample of 101 cases with acute diarrheal disease (ADD) was taken at the Distrito Villa El Salvador. They were selected by a systematic randomized sampling defined for each health care unit in the District, according to the daily average occurrence of ADD cases attended a week before the beginning of the study. All of them took part in a epidemiological survey. A sample was taken by rectal swab in order to isolate V. cholerae. 53 positive cases were found (52.2% and a confidence interval from 42.29 to 62.5%) with significant differences (p < 0.01) between the frequency in adults (67.3%) and children (34.8%). V. cholerae was isolated only in 13 (61.9%) of the 21 cases who had contact with cholera patients, for a relative risk of 1.24 (0.83 < RR < 1.85). A high positivity was also found, 21 cases (72.4%) among those who had raw food. A significant difference (p < 0.01) was observed in connection with those who had cooked food. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis it was only found a significant relationship with age and with the ingestion of raw food as regards the occurrence of cholera. PMID:9805053

  7. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 isolated from German and Austrian patients.

    PubMed

    Schirmeister, F; Dieckmann, R; Bechlars, S; Bier, N; Faruque, S M; Strauch, E

    2014-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae belonging to the non-O1, non-O139 serogroups are present in the coastal waters of Germany and in some German and Austrian lakes. These bacteria can cause gastroenteritis and extraintestinal infections, and are transmitted through contaminated food and water. However, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae infections are rare in Germany. We studied 18 strains from German and Austrian patients with diarrhea or local infections for their virulence-associated genotype and phenotype to assess their potential for infectivity in anticipation of possible climatic changes that could enhance the transmission of these pathogens. The strains were examined for the presence of genes encoding cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), as well as other virulence-associated factors or markers, including hemolysins, repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxins, Vibrio seventh pandemic islands VSP-1 and VSP-2, and the type III secretion system (TTSS). Phenotypic assays for hemolysin activity, serum resistance, and biofilm formation were also performed. A dendrogram generated by incorporating the results of these analyses revealed genetic differences of the strains correlating with their clinical origin. Non-O1, non-O139 strains from diarrheal patients possessed the TTSS and/or the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin, which were not found in the strains from ear or wound infections. Routine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of all strains provided reliable identification of the species but failed to differentiate between strains or clusters. The results of this study indicate the need for continued surveillance of V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 in Germany, in view of the predicted increase in the prevalence of Vibrio spp. due to the rise in surface water temperatures. PMID:24213848

  8. Review of the Inhibition of Biological Activities of Food-Related Selected Toxins by Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Mendel; Rasooly, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to develop food-compatible conditions to alter the structures of fungal, bacterial, and plant toxins, thus transforming toxins to nontoxic molecules. The term ‘chemical genetics’ has been used to describe this approach. This overview attempts to survey and consolidate the widely scattered literature on the inhibition by natural compounds and plant extracts of the biological (toxicological) activity of the following food-related toxins: aflatoxin B1, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A produced by fungi; cholera toxin produced by Vibrio cholerae bacteria; Shiga toxins produced by E. coli bacteria; staphylococcal enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria; ricin produced by seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis; and the glycoalkaloid α-chaconine synthesized in potato tubers and leaves. The reduction of biological activity has been achieved by one or more of the following approaches: inhibition of the release of the toxin into the environment, especially food; an alteration of the structural integrity of the toxin molecules; changes in the optimum microenvironment, especially pH, for toxin activity; and protection against adverse effects of the toxins in cells, animals, and humans (chemoprevention). The results show that food-compatible and safe compounds with anti-toxin properties can be used to reduce the toxic potential of these toxins. Practical applications and research needs are suggested that may further facilitate reducing the toxic burden of the diet. Researchers are challenged to (a) apply the available methods without adversely affecting the nutritional quality, safety, and sensory attributes of animal feed and human food and (b) educate food producers and processors and the public about available approaches to mitigating the undesirable effects of natural toxins that may present in the diet. PMID:23612750

  9. Review of the inhibition of biological activities of food-related selected toxins by natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Rasooly, Reuven

    2013-04-01

    There is a need to develop food-compatible conditions to alter the structures of fungal, bacterial, and plant toxins, thus transforming toxins to nontoxic molecules. The term 'chemical genetics' has been used to describe this approach. This overview attempts to survey and consolidate the widely scattered literature on the inhibition by natural compounds and plant extracts of the biological (toxicological) activity of the following food-related toxins: aflatoxin B1, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A produced by fungi; cholera toxin produced by Vibrio cholerae bacteria; Shiga toxins produced by E. coli bacteria; staphylococcal enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus bacteria; ricin produced by seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis; and the glycoalkaloid α-chaconine synthesized in potato tubers and leaves. The reduction of biological activity has been achieved by one or more of the following approaches: inhibition of the release of the toxin into the environment, especially food; an alteration of the structural integrity of the toxin molecules; changes in the optimum microenvironment, especially pH, for toxin activity; and protection against adverse effects of the toxins in cells, animals, and humans (chemoprevention). The results show that food-compatible and safe compounds with anti-toxin properties can be used to reduce the toxic potential of these toxins. Practical applications and research needs are suggested that may further facilitate reducing the toxic burden of the diet. Researchers are challenged to (a) apply the available methods without adversely affecting the nutritional quality, safety, and sensory attributes of animal feed and human food and (b) educate food producers and processors and the public about available approaches to mitigating the undesirable effects of natural toxins that may present in the diet. PMID:23612750

  10. The deadliest wake-up call. Cholera.

    PubMed

    Dajer, T

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that cholera has caused an uproar in Latin America, but the meaning of the epidemic is not so certain. In January 1991, cases of cholera began to spring up along the coast north of Lima. A year later, 1/2 million people in the continent had fallen ill from the disease and over 4000 had died from it. There is not effective antibiotic of vaccine against it. Sanitation is the only "cure" for cholera, a disease which can dehydrate and kill an otherwise strong and healthy person in 6 hours. There are 4 ways of looking at the significance of the epidemic: 1) Who cares? 4000 deaths -- less and 1% of all cholera cases -- is a minuscule figure. Last year in Africa, over 11,000 cholera deaths went unnoticed by the press. 2) The Lost 80s. Economically disastrous for Latin America, the 1980s saw billions of dollars being siphoned out of the continent by multinational banks, money that should have gone into public works and water systems. 3) Just Nature Doing Her Thing. The outbreak of cholera in Latin America is simply the most recent stop of a worldwide cholera epidemic which began in Indonesia in 1961. And 4) Kids Don't Count. In 1991, some 200,000 mostly poor Latin American children died of common diarrheal diseases. Only when bad water began affecting adults was rehydration therapy emphasized. None of these 4 explanations, however, fully explains the commotions surrounding the cholera outbreak. Cholera is one of those diseases that can brand a country as backwards. At bottom, the epidemic represents an embarrassment to the ruling classes of the Latin America. PMID:12159273

  11. A De in the life of cholera.

    PubMed

    Hall, Robert H

    2011-02-01

    The 50-year commemoration of S.N. De's seminal 1959 publication in Nature provides an opportunity to reflect on scientific discovery, recognition, and public health. De's paper marked the first major conceptual advance in cholera research since 1884, when Robert Koch definitively identified Der Kommabazillus as the aetiological agent of cholera. Unfortunately, Koch reported that systemic toxinosis and multi-organ failure led to severe dehydrating diarrhoea, thereby mistaking cause for effect. As a consequence, while work on other microbial pathogens advanced into the development of vaccines and therapeutics, cholera research languished as scientists injected animals parenterally in decades of futile effort to develop an animal model of diarrhoea. This fundamental misconception in cholera pathogenesis was swept away when S.N. De used ligated loops of rabbit ileum to demonstrate lumenal fluid accumulation in the presence of Vibrio cholerae culture filtrates. After some delay, De's observation of a diarrhoeagenic exotoxin became the founding principle of modern cholera research, vaccination, and treatment; and a burst of discovery saw V. cholerae transformed into the enteric pathogen best understood at the molecular level. The scientific basis for orally administering vaccines to induce mucosal immunity was established, and the success of oral rehydration, what has been described as one of the 20 th century's most important medical advances, was explained. Nobel laureate Joshua Lederberg wrote of De's iconoclastic creativity, experimental skill, and observational mastery, and many other leaders in the field concurred. De was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine more than once. But despite the passage of half a century from De's work, cholera remains a frustrating problem: we are clearly missing something. In reviewing the scientific and programmatic impact of S.N. De on cholera, it is clear that a defining victory against the disease is achievable

  12. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  13. A case of cholera in Kingston, Ont.

    PubMed Central

    Bourdages, R.; Beck, I. T.

    1976-01-01

    A case of cholera occurred in Kingston, Ont. in 1974 in a traveller from South Africa. Treatment, based on an understanding of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and the mechanism of action of the Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin on gastrointestinal fluid loss, consisted of correcting the severe loss of fluid and electrolytes and the metabolic acidosis, as soon as the patient could tolerate taking fluids orally, further fluid replacement consisted increasingly of oral administration of glucose and saline. Tetracycline therapy was given only to shorten the duration of the acute illness. PMID:953912

  14. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains. PMID:24889424

  15. Identification of Molecular Signatures from Different Vaccine Adjuvants in Chicken by Integrative Analysis of Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Won, Kyeong Hye; Moon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the differential functions of two groups of adjuvants, Montanide incomplete Seppic adjuvant (ISA) series and Quil A, cholesterol, dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide, and Carbopol (QCDC) formulations, in chicken by analyzing published microarray data associated with each type of vaccine adjuvants. In the biological function analysis for differentially expressed genes altered by two different adjuvant groups, ISA series and QCDC formulations showed differential effects when chickens were immunized with a recombinant immunogenic protein of Eimeria. Among the biological functions, six categories were modified in both adjuvant types. However, with respect to “Response to stimulus”, no biological process was modified by the two adjuvant groups at the same time. The QCDC adjuvants showed effects on the biological processes (BPs) including the innate immune response and the immune response to the external stimulus such as toxin and bacterium, while the ISA adjuvants modified the BPs to regulate cell movement and the response to stress. In pathway analysis, ISA adjuvants altered the genes involved in the functions related with cell junctions and the elimination of exogenous and endogenous macromolecules. The analysis in the present study could contribute to the development of precise adjuvants based on molecular signatures related with their immunological functions. PMID:26954188

  16. Identification of Molecular Signatures from Different Vaccine Adjuvants in Chicken by Integrative Analysis of Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Kyung; Won, Kyeong Hye; Moon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2016-07-01

    The present study compared the differential functions of two groups of adjuvants, Montanide incomplete Seppic adjuvant (ISA) series and Quil A, cholesterol, dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide, and Carbopol (QCDC) formulations, in chicken by analyzing published microarray data associated with each type of vaccine adjuvants. In the biological function analysis for differentially expressed genes altered by two different adjuvant groups, ISA series and QCDC formulations showed differential effects when chickens were immunized with a recombinant immunogenic protein of Eimeria. Among the biological functions, six categories were modified in both adjuvant types. However, with respect to "Response to stimulus", no biological process was modified by the two adjuvant groups at the same time. The QCDC adjuvants showed effects on the biological processes (BPs) including the innate immune response and the immune response to the external stimulus such as toxin and bacterium, while the ISA adjuvants modified the BPs to regulate cell movement and the response to stress. In pathway analysis, ISA adjuvants altered the genes involved in the functions related with cell junctions and the elimination of exogenous and endogenous macromolecules. The analysis in the present study could contribute to the development of precise adjuvants based on molecular signatures related with their immunological functions. PMID:26954188

  17. Thermodynamic properties of the effector domains of MARTX toxins suggest their unfolding for translocation across the host membrane.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Heisler, David; Zywiec, Andrew; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2014-06-01

    MARTX (multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin) family toxins are produced by Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, Aeromonas hydrophila and other Gram-negative bacteria. Effector domains of MARTX toxins cross the cytoplasmic membrane of a host cell through a putative pore formed by the toxin's glycine-rich repeats. The structure of the pore is unknown and the translocation mechanism of the effector domains is poorly understood. We examined the thermodynamic stability of the effector domains of V. cholerae and A. hydrophila MARTX toxins to elucidate the mechanism of their translocation. We found that all but one domain in each toxin are thermodynamically unstable and several acquire a molten globule state near human physiological temperatures. Fusion of the most stable cysteine protease domain to the adjacent effector domain reduces its thermodynamic stability ∼ 1.4-fold (from D G H 2 O 21.8 to 16.1 kJ mol(-1) ). Precipitation of several individual domains due to thermal denaturation is reduced upon their fusion into multi-domain constructs. We speculate that low thermostability of the MARTX effector domains correlates with that of many other membrane-penetrating toxins and implies their unfolding for cell entry. This study extends the list of thermolabile bacterial toxins, suggesting that this quality is essential and could be susceptible for selective targeting of pathogenic toxins. PMID:24724536

  18. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  19. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERA INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association or modification of antecedent growth conditions. uring the course of investigating a major waterborne V. Cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA investigat...

  20. Are wetlands the reservoir for avian cholera?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands have long been suspected to be an important reservoir for Pasteurella multocida and therefore the likely source of avian cholera outbreaks. During the fall of 1995a??98 we collected sediment and water samples from 44 wetlands where avian cholera epizootics occurred the previous winter or spring. We attempted to isolate P. multocida in sediment and surface water samples from 10 locations distributed throughout each wetland. We were not able to isolate P. multocida from any of the 440 water and 440 sediment samples collected from these wetlands. In contrast, during other investigations of avian cholera we isolated P. multocida from 20 of 44 wetlands, including 7% of the water and 4.5% of the sediment samples collected during or shortly following epizootic events. Our results indicate that wetlands are an unlikely reservoir for the bacteria that causes avian cholera.

  1. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number). PMID:26119824

  2. Pursuing Justice in Haiti's Cholera Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Weinmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the nation of Haiti was leveled by a shattering earthquake that killed thousands and devastated its already fragile infrastructure. During relief efforts to aid Haiti's suffering population, the United Nations sent troops to Haiti to assist the rebuilding of country's most basic services. But those troops unknowingly carried with them the bacteria that cause cholera, and through the UN's negligent actions, it triggered a horrifying cholera epidemic that continues to harm the Haitian people. Those injured by the cholera epidemic have sought relief in the US federal court system to obtain justice for those killed or sickened by the cholera outbreak. The UN has declared legal immunity for causing the epidemic, yet the litigation on this matter is ongoing. PMID:27437822

  3. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  4. Chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens confer dual immunity against cholera and malaria by oral or injectable delivery

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza; Schreiber, Melissa; Nallapali, Samson; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Banks, Robert K.; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cholera and malaria are major diseases causing high mortality. The only licensed cholera vaccine is expensive; immunity is lost in children within 3 years and adults are not fully protected. No vaccine is yet available for malaria. Therefore, in this study, the cholera toxin-B subunit (CTB) of Vibrio cholerae fused to malarial vaccine antigens apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) was expressed in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts. Southern blot analysis confirmed homoplasmy and stable integration of transgenes. CTB-AMA1 and CTB-MSP1 fusion proteins accumulated up to 13.17% and 10.11% (total soluble protein, TSP) in tobacco and up to 7.3% and 6.1% (TSP) in lettuce respectively. Nine groups of mice (n = 10/group) were immunized subcutaneously (SQV) or orally (ORV) with purified antigens or transplastomic tobacco leaves. Significant levels of antigen-specific antibody titres of immunized mice completely inhibited proliferation of the malarial parasite and cross-reacted with the native parasite proteins in immunoblots and immunofluorescence studies. Protection against cholera toxin challenge in both ORV (100%) and SQV (89%) mice correlated with CTB-specific titres of intestinal, serum IgA and IgG1 in ORV and only IgG1 in SQV mice, but no other immunoglobulin. Increasing numbers of interleukin-10+ T cell but not Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, suppression of interferon-γ and absence of interleukin-17 were observed in protected mice, suggesting that immunity is conferred via the Tr1/Th2 immune response. Dual immunity against two major infectious diseases provided by chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens for long-term (>300 days, 50% of mouse life span) offers a realistic platform for low cost vaccines and insight into mucosal and systemic immunity. PMID:20051036

  5. Endochitinase Is Transported to the Extracellular Milieu by the eps-Encoded General Secretory Pathway of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Terry D.; Metzger, Daniel J.; Lynch, Jennifer; Folster, Jason P.

    1998-01-01

    The chiA gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a polypeptide which degrades chitin, a homopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) found in cell walls of fungi and in the integuments of insects and crustaceans. chiA has a coding capacity corresponding to a polypeptide of 846 amino acids having a predicted molecular mass of 88.7 kDa. A 52-bp region with promoter activity was found immediately upstream of the chiA open reading frame. Insertional inactivation of the chromosomal copy of the gene confirmed that expression of chitinase activity by V. cholerae required chiA. Fluorescent analogues were used to demonstrate that the enzymatic activity of ChiA was specific for β,1-4 glycosidic bonds located between GlcNAc monomers in chitin. Antibodies against ChiA were obtained by immunization of a rabbit with a MalE-ChiA hybrid protein. Polypeptides with antigenic similarity to ChiA were expressed by classical and El Tor biotypes of V. cholerae and by the closely related bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. Immunoblotting experiments using the wild-type strain 569B and the secretion mutant M14 confirmed that ChiA is an extracellular protein which is secreted by the eps system. The eps system is also responsible for secreting cholera toxin, an oligomeric protein with no amino acid homology to ChiA. These results indicate that ChiA and cholera toxin have functionally similar extracellular transport signals that are essential for eps-dependent secretion. PMID:9791107

  6. The Hybrid Pre-CTXΦ-RS1 Prophage Genome and Its Regulatory Function in Environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Pang, Bo; Xiong, Lifeng; Wang, Duochun; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Lijuan; Kan, Biao

    2015-10-01

    The cholera toxin genes of Vibrio cholerae are encoded by CTXΦ, a lysogenic bacteriophage. Infection with this phage plays a determinant role in toxigenicity conversion and the emergence of new clones of pathogenic V. cholerae. Multiple phage alleles, defined by sequence types of the repressor gene rstR, have been found, showing the divergence of phage genomes. Pre-CTXΦ, which is characterized by the absence of toxin genes, is predicted to be the precursor of CTXΦ. We have found a new pre-CTXΦ prophage genome (named pre-CTXZJΦ for its novel rstR allele) in nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates that were obtained during surveillance of the estuary water of the Zhujiang River. A novel hybrid genome of the helper phage RS1 was identified in an environmental strain carrying pre-CTXZJΦ in this study. The chromosomal integration and genomic arrangement of pre-CTXZJΦ and RS1 were determined. The RS2 of pre-CTXZJΦ was shown to have a function in replication, but it seemed to have lost its ability to integrate. The RstR of pre-CTXZJΦ exerted the highest repression of its own rstA promoter compared to other RstRs, suggesting rstR-specific phage superinfection immunity and potential coinfection with other pre-CTXΦ/CTXΦ alleles. The environmental strain carrying pre-CTXZJΦ could still be infected by CTXETΦ, the most common phage allele in the strains of the seventh cholera pandemic, suggesting that this nontoxigenic clone could potentially undergo toxigenicity conversion by CTXΦ infection and become a new toxigenic clone despite already containing the pre-CTXΦ prophage. PMID:26253680

  7. O-Specific Polysaccharide-Specific Memory B Cell Responses in Young Children, Older Children, and Adults Infected with Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Aktar, Amena; Rahman, M Arifur; Afrin, Sadia; Faruk, M Omar; Uddin, Taher; Akter, Aklima; Sami, M Israk Nur; Yasmin, Tahirah; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Charles, Richelle C; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Mandlik, Anjali; Kelly, Meagan; Kováč, Pavol; Xu, Peng; Calderwood, Stephen B; Harris, Jason B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2016-05-01

    Cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 confers at least 3 to 10 years of protection against subsequent disease regardless of age, despite a relatively rapid fall in antibody levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that memory B cell responses may play an important role in protection. The V. cholerae O1-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for serogroup specificity, and it is unclear if young children are capable of developing memory B cell responses against OSP, a T cell-independent antigen, following cholera. To address this, we assessed OSP-specific memory B cell responses in young children (2 to 5 years, n = 11), older children (6 to 17 years, n = 21), and adults (18 to 55 years, n = 28) with cholera caused by V. cholerae O1 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We also assessed memory B cell responses against LPS and vibriocidal responses, and plasma antibody responses against OSP, LPS, and cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB; a T cell-dependent antigen) on days 2 and 7, as well as days 30, 90, and 180 after convalescence. In all age cohorts, vibriocidal responses and plasma OSP, LPS, and CtxB-specific responses peaked on day 7 and fell toward baseline over the follow-up period. In comparison, we were able to detect OSP memory B cell responses in all age cohorts of patients with detectable responses over baseline for 90 to 180 days. Our results suggest that OSP-specific memory B cell responses can occur following cholera, even in the youngest children, and may explain in part the age-independent induction of long-term immunity following naturally acquired disease. PMID:27009211

  8. Genome Sequences of Clinical Vibrio cholerae Isolates from an Oyster-Borne Cholera Outbreak in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Bradd J.; Choi, Seon Young; Hasan, Nur A.; Abdullah, Abdul Shakur H.; Cebula, Thomas A.; Huq, Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Between November 2010 and April 2011, 11 cases of cholera were identified and associated with the consumption of raw oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The etiological agent was the ctxAB-positive Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75. The genome sequences of the isolates provide useful information and are deposited in the public genome databases. PMID:24265497

  9. Genome Sequences of Clinical Vibrio cholerae Isolates from an Oyster-Borne Cholera Outbreak in Florida.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Choi, Seon Young; Hasan, Nur A; Abdullah, Abdul Shakur H; Cebula, Thomas A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2013-01-01

    Between November 2010 and April 2011, 11 cases of cholera were identified and associated with the consumption of raw oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The etiological agent was the ctxAB-positive Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75. The genome sequences of the isolates provide useful information and are deposited in the public genome databases. PMID:24265497

  10. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... with suspected enteric infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... with diarrhea and malabsorption. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  11. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  12. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... While You Travel Dengue Fever Malaria Typhoid Fever Ebola First Aid: Diarrhea Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Do ... Food Poisoning Why Is Hand Washing So Important? Ebola Why Do I Need to Wash My Hands? ...

  13. Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) regulates Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Anna D.; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary While studying virulence gene regulation in Vibrio cholerae during infection of the host small intestine, we identified VieA as a two-component response regulator that contributes to activating expression of cholera toxin. Here we report that VieA represses transcription of Vibrio exopolysaccharide synthesis (vps) genes involved in biofilm formation by a mechanism independent of its phosphorelay and DNA-binding activities. VieA controls the intracellular concentration of the cyclic nucleotide second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) using an EAL domain that functions as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Two-dimensional thin layer chromatography of nucleotide extracts confirmed that VieA reduces the concentration of c-di-GMP, opposing the action of c-di-GMP synthetase proteins. Expression of unrelated V. cholerae c-di-GMP synthetase or phosphodiesterae proteins also modulated c-di-GMP concentration and vps gene expression. We propose that c-di-GMP synthetase and phosphodiesterase domain-containing proteins contribute to regulating biofilm formation by controlling c-di-GMP concentration. PMID:15255898

  14. Purification and characterization of a pilus of a Vibrio cholerae strain: a possible colonization factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, T; Iwanaga, M

    1996-01-01

    A new flexible type of pilus was purified from Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-0139 strain NAGV14 and characterized. The molecular mass of the pilin was estimated to be 20 kDa, and the antigenicity differed from that of known pili such as toxin-coregulated pili, mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating pili, V10 pili, and Al-1841 pili. The NAGV14 pilus was regarded as a colonization factor because the purified pili adhered to rabbit intestine and adhesion was inhibited by treating the organisms with the Fab fraction of an antipilus antibody. An intestinal receptor blockade using purified pili failed to inhibit adhesion of the organisms. The NAGV14 pili adhered to the surface of live V. cholerae. An antigen cross-reacting with the NAGV14 pili was widely and specifically distributed among V. cholerae strains irrespective of serotype and biotype. The amino acid sequence of the pilin was homologous with that of MshA. The NAGV14 pili did not agglutinate human and rabbit erythrocytes. PMID:8945571

  15. Avian cholera in Nebraska's Rainwater Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurt, J.J.; Trout, A.K.; Cary, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first report of avian cholera in North America occurred in northwestern Texas in winter 1944 (Quortrup et al. 1946). In 1975, mortality from avian cholera occurred for the first time in waterfowl in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska when an estimated 25,000 birds died (Zinkl et al. 1977). Avian cholera has continued to cause mortality in wild birds in specific areas of the Basin each spring since. Losses of waterfowl from avian cholera continue to be much greater in some of the wetlands in the western part of the Basin than in the east. Several wetlands in the west have consistently higher mortality and are most often the wetlands where initial mortality is noticed each spring (Figure 1). The establishment of this disease in Nebraska is of considerable concern because of the importance of the Rainwater Basin as a spring staging area for waterfowl migrating to their breeding grounds. The wetlands in this area are on a major migration route used by an estimated 5 to 9 million ducks and several hundred thousand geese. A large portion of the western mid-continental greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) population stage in the Basin each spring. Occasionally, whooping cranes (Grus americana) use these wetlands during migration, and lesser sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging on the nearby Platte River sometimes use wetlands where avian cholera occurs (Anonymous 1981). Our objectives were to determine whether certain water quality variables in the Rainwater Basin differed between areas of high and low avian cholera incidence. These results would then be used for laboratory studies involving the survivability of Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera. Those studies will be reported elsewhere.

  16. Cholera risk factors, Papua New Guinea, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cholera is newly emergent in Papua New Guinea but may soon become endemic. Identifying the risk factors for cholera provides evidence for targeted prevention and control measures. Methods We conducted a hospital-based case–control study to identify cholera risk factors. Using stool culture as the standard, we evaluated a cholera point of care test in the field. Results 176 participants were recruited: 54 cases and 122 controls. Independent risk factors for cholera were: being over 20 years of age (aOR 2.5; 95%CI 1.1, 5.4), defecating in the open air (or river) (aOR 4.5; 95% CI 1.4, 14.4) and knowing someone who travelled to a cholera affected area (aOR 4.1; 95%CI 1.6, 10.7); while the availability of soap for handwashing at home was protective (aOR 0.41; 95%CI 0.19, 0.87). Those reporting access to a piped water distribution system in the home were twice as likely to report the availability of soap for handwashing. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 72% (95% CI 47–90) and 71% (95%CI 44–90%). Conclusions Improving population access to the piped water distribution system and sanitation will likely reduce transmission by enabling enhanced hygiene and limiting the contamination of water sources. The One step V. cholerae O1/O139 Antigen Test is of limited utility for clinical decision making in a hospital setting with access to traditional laboratory methods. Settlement dwellers and mobile populations of all age groups should be targeted for interventions in Papua New Guinea. PMID:23126504

  17. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could

  18. Cholera dynamics and El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Rodó, X; Ellner, S P; Colwell, R; Bouma, M J

    2000-09-01

    Analysis of a monthly 18-year cholera time series from Bangladesh shows that the temporal variability of cholera exhibits an interannual component at the dominant frequency of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Results from nonlinear time series analysis support a role for both ENSO and previous disease levels in the dynamics of cholera. Cholera patterns are linked to the previously described changes in the atmospheric circulation of south Asia and, consistent with these changes, to regional temperature anomalies. PMID:10976073

  19. Steady-state levels of G-protein beta-subunit expression are regulated by treatment of cells with bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.C.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    Cultures of 3T3-L1 cells were incubated with either 10 ng/ml cholera toxin or 10 ng/ml pertussis toxin from 4 days prior to the initiation of differentiation and throughout the subsequent incubation. Toxin concentrations were sufficient to completely prevent the labelling of alpha-subunits with (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and pertussis toxin and to prevent by more than 90% the labelling with (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and cholera toxin in membranes prepared from these cells. Neither toxin prevented the differentiation to the adipocyte phenotype. Neither toxin prevented the increases in the relative amounts of G-proteins which occur upon differentiation. Both toxins dramatically decreased the amount of beta-subunits. As measured by quantitative immunoblotting with antisera specific for both the 35 kDa and 36 kDa beta-subunits, levels of beta-subunit were decreased by more than 50% of steady-state level of control cells. Thus, bacterial toxins which modifies G-protein alpha-subunits are capable of modulating the levels of beta-subunits in vivo. The basis for the regulation of G-protein subunit expression by bacterial toxins is under study.

  20. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  1. The corn smut-made cholera oral vaccine is thermostable and induces long-lasting immunity in mouse.

    PubMed

    Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Navarro-Tovar, Gabriela; León-Gallo, Amalia; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2016-09-20

    The use of corn smut for the production of recombinant vaccines has been recently implemented by our group. In this study, the stability and immunogenic properties of the corn smut-based cholera vaccine, based on the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), were determined in mouse. The immunogenic potential of distinct corn smut CTB doses ranging from 1 to 30μg were assessed, with maximum humoral responses at both the systemic (IgG) and intestinal (IgA) levels at a dose of 15μg. The humoral response last for up to 70days after the third boost. Mice were fully protected against a challenge with cholera toxin after receiving three 15μg-doses. Remarkably, the corn smut-made vaccine retained its immunogenic activity after storage at room temperature for a period of 1year and no reduction on CTB was observed following exposure at 50°C for 2h. These data support the use of the corn smut-made CTB vaccine as a highly stable and effective immunogen and justify its evaluation in target animal models, such as piglet and sheep, as well as clinical evaluations in humans. PMID:27165506

  2. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  3. Immunization with Recombinant Brucella Species Outer Membrane Protein Omp16 or Omp19 in Adjuvant Induces Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells as Well as Systemic and Oral Protection against Brucella abortus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Pasquevich, Karina A.; Estein, Silvia M.; Samartino, Clara García; Zwerdling, Astrid; Coria, Lorena M.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Available vaccines against Brucella spp. are live attenuated Brucella strains. In order to engineer a better vaccine to be used in animals and humans, our laboratory aims to develop an innocuous subunit vaccine. Particularly, we are interested in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. abortus: Omp16 and Omp19. In this study, we assessed the use of these proteins as vaccines against Brucella in BALB/c mice. Immunization with lipidated Omp16 (L-Omp16) or L-Omp19 in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) conferred significant protection against B. abortus infection. Vaccination with unlipidated Omp16 (U-Omp16) or U-Omp19 in IFA induced a higher degree of protection than the respective lipidated versions. Moreover, the level of protection induced after U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 immunization in IFA was similar to that elicited by live B. abortus S19 immunization. Flow cytometric analysis showed that immunization with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 induced antigen-specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells producing gamma interferon. In vivo depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in mice immunized with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 plus IFA resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that both cell types are mediating immune protection. U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 vaccination induced a T helper 1 response, systemic protection in aluminum hydroxide formulation, and oral protection with cholera toxin adjuvant against B. abortus infection. Both immunization routes exhibited a similar degree of protection to attenuated Brucella vaccines (S19 and RB51, respectively). Overall these results indicate that U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 would be a useful candidate for a subunit vaccine against human and animal brucellosis. PMID:18981242

  4. Immunization with recombinant Brucella species outer membrane protein Omp16 or Omp19 in adjuvant induces specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as systemic and oral protection against Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Pasquevich, Karina A; Estein, Silvia M; García Samartino, Clara; Samartino, Clara García; Zwerdling, Astrid; Coria, Lorena M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Available vaccines against Brucella spp. are live attenuated Brucella strains. In order to engineer a better vaccine to be used in animals and humans, our laboratory aims to develop an innocuous subunit vaccine. Particularly, we are interested in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. abortus: Omp16 and Omp19. In this study, we assessed the use of these proteins as vaccines against Brucella in BALB/c mice. Immunization with lipidated Omp16 (L-Omp16) or L-Omp19 in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) conferred significant protection against B. abortus infection. Vaccination with unlipidated Omp16 (U-Omp16) or U-Omp19 in IFA induced a higher degree of protection than the respective lipidated versions. Moreover, the level of protection induced after U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 immunization in IFA was similar to that elicited by live B. abortus S19 immunization. Flow cytometric analysis showed that immunization with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 induced antigen-specific CD4(+) as well as CD8(+) T cells producing gamma interferon. In vivo depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in mice immunized with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 plus IFA resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that both cell types are mediating immune protection. U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 vaccination induced a T helper 1 response, systemic protection in aluminum hydroxide formulation, and oral protection with cholera toxin adjuvant against B. abortus infection. Both immunization routes exhibited a similar degree of protection to attenuated Brucella vaccines (S19 and RB51, respectively). Overall these results indicate that U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 would be a useful candidate for a subunit vaccine against human and animal brucellosis. PMID:18981242

  5. Effect of carrier on the immunogenic capacity of synthetic cholera vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jacob, C O; Arnon, R; Sela, M

    1985-12-01

    In the design of the synthetic antigens and synthetic vaccines, primary consideration should be given to the choice of the carrier. Since small peptides which are being used as the relevant antigenic determinants are likely to be poor immunogens as such, the augmentation of their immunogenic capacity by the carrier or any other means is crucial for the induction of immunity. In the present study, we explored several approaches for the enhancement of the immune response towards synthetic peptides derived from the B-subunit of cholera toxin. The results indicate that the use of tetanus toxoid as a macromolecular carrier, polymerization of the peptide without any external carrier and the conjugation of dipalmityl side chain had comparable effects in enhancing the immune response to several synthetic peptides. This effect was manifested both at the level of antibodies produced and in their capacity to neutralize the biological activity of the cholera toxin. Prior exposure to the carrier resulted in a dose-dependent suppression against the synthetic epitope attached to it. PMID:2421153

  6. Phylogenetic Diversity of Vibrio cholerae Associated with Endemic Cholera in Mexico from 1991 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon Young; Rashed, Shah M.; Hasan, Nur A.; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Tarequl; Sadique, Abdus; Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Eppinger, Mark; Huq, Anwar; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An outbreak of cholera occurred in 1991 in Mexico, where it had not been reported for more than a century and is now endemic. Vibrio cholerae O1 prototype El Tor and classical strains coexist with altered El Tor strains (1991 to 1997). Nontoxigenic (CTX−) V. cholerae El Tor dominated toxigenic (CTX+) strains (2001 to 2003), but V. cholerae CTX+ variant El Tor was isolated during 2004 to 2008, outcompeting CTX− V. cholerae. Genomes of six Mexican V. cholerae O1 strains isolated during 1991 to 2008 were sequenced and compared with both contemporary and archived strains of V. cholerae. Three were CTX+ El Tor, two were CTX− El Tor, and the remaining strain was a CTX+ classical isolate. Whole-genome sequence analysis showed the six isolates belonged to five distinct phylogenetic clades. One CTX− isolate is ancestral to the 6th and 7th pandemic CTX+ V. cholerae isolates. The other CTX− isolate joined with CTX− non-O1/O139 isolates from Haiti and seroconverted O1 isolates from Brazil and Amazonia. One CTX+ isolate was phylogenetically placed with the sixth pandemic classical clade and the V. cholerae O395 classical reference strain. Two CTX+ El Tor isolates possessing intact Vibrio seventh pandemic island II (VSP-II) are related to hybrid El Tor isolates from Mozambique and Bangladesh. The third CTX+ El Tor isolate contained West African-South American (WASA) recombination in VSP-II and showed relatedness to isolates from Peru and Brazil. Except for one isolate, all Mexican isolates lack SXT/R391 integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) and sensitivity to selected antibiotics, with one isolate resistant to streptomycin. No isolates were related to contemporary isolates from Asia, Africa, or Haiti, indicating phylogenetic diversity. PMID:26980836

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices regarding Diarrhea and Cholera following an Oral Cholera Vaccination Campaign in the Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Eleanor; Dalipanda, Tenneth; Ogaoga, Divi; Gaiofa, Jenny; Jilini, Gregory; Halpin, Alison; Dietz, Vance; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Hyde, Terri; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Yen, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background In response to a 2011 cholera outbreak in Papua New Guinea, the Government of the Solomon Islands initiated a cholera prevention program which included cholera disease prevention and treatment messaging, community meetings, and a pre-emptive cholera vaccination campaign targeting 11,000 children aged 1–15 years in selected communities in Choiseul and Western Provinces. Methodology and Principal Findings We conducted a post-vaccination campaign, household-level survey about knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea and cholera in areas targeted and not targeted for cholera vaccination. Respondents in vaccinated areas were more likely to have received cholera education in the previous 6 months (33% v. 9%; p = 0.04), to know signs and symptoms (64% vs. 22%; p = 0.02) and treatment (96% vs. 50%; p = 0.02) of cholera, and to be aware of cholera vaccine (48% vs. 14%; p = 0.02). There were no differences in water, sanitation, and hygiene practices. Conclusions This pre-emptive OCV campaign in a cholera-naïve community provided a unique opportunity to assess household-level knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding diarrhea, cholera, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). Our findings suggest that education provided during the vaccination campaign may have reinforced earlier mass messaging about cholera and diarrheal disease in vaccinated communities. PMID:27548678

  8. XerD-mediated FtsK-independent integration of TLCϕ into the Vibrio cholerae genome.

    PubMed

    Midonet, Caroline; Das, Bhabatosh; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, Francois-Xavier

    2014-11-25

    As in most bacteria, topological problems arising from the circularity of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes, chrI and chrII, are resolved by the addition of a crossover at a specific site of each chromosome, dif, by two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD. The reaction is under the control of a cell division protein, FtsK, which activates the formation of a Holliday Junction (HJ) intermediate by XerD catalysis that is resolved into product by XerC catalysis. Many plasmids and phages exploit Xer recombination for dimer resolution and for integration, respectively. In all cases so far described, they rely on an alternative recombination pathway in which XerC catalyzes the formation of a HJ independently of FtsK. This is notably the case for CTXϕ, the cholera toxin phage. Here, we show that in contrast, integration of TLCϕ, a toxin-linked cryptic satellite phage that is almost always found integrated at the chrI dif site before CTXϕ, depends on the formation of a HJ by XerD catalysis, which is then resolved by XerC catalysis. The reaction nevertheless escapes the normal cellular control exerted by FtsK on XerD. In addition, we show that the same reaction promotes the excision of TLCϕ, along with any CTXϕ copy present between dif and its left attachment site, providing a plausible mechanism for how chrI CTXϕ copies can be eliminated, as occurred in the second wave of the current cholera pandemic. PMID:25385643

  9. The 1.8 Å Cholix Toxin Crystal Structure in Complex with NAD+ and Evidence for a New Kinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Jørgensen, René; Lugo, Miguel R.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2012-01-01

    Certain Vibrio cholerae strains produce cholix, a potent protein toxin that has diphthamide-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase activity against eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Here we present a 1.8 Å crystal structure of cholix in complex with its natural substrate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). We also substituted hallmark catalytic residues by site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed both NAD+ binding and ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using a fluorescence-based assay. These data are the basis for a new kinetic model of cholix toxin activity. Further, the new structural data serve as a reference for continuing inhibitor development for this toxin class. PMID:22535961

  10. Monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Rosén, A; Holme, T

    1982-01-01

    A cell line producing monoclonal antibodies directed against the core region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide has been established. These antibodies were inhibited by lipopolysaccharide preparations of both O-group 1 vibrios and some non-O-group 1 vibrios as detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-inhibition experiments. Coagglutination experiments with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies adsorbed to protein A-carrying staphylococci were performed. All V. cholerae strains tested, regardless of serotype, were agglutinated when mixed with staphylococci coated with the monoclonal antibodies, whereas staphylococci coated with group-specific (O1) polyclonal antibodies only agglutinated with O-group 1 vibrios. Images PMID:6183214

  11. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  12. Does Water Hyacinth on East African Lakes Promote Cholera Outbreaks?

    PubMed Central

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Tabu, Collins W.; Gichuki, John

    2010-01-01

    Cholera outbreaks continue to occur regularly in Africa. Cholera has been associated with proximity to lakes in East Africa, and Vibrio cholerae has been found experimentally to concentrate on the floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth, which is periodically widespread in East African lakes since the late 1980s. From 1994 to 2008, Nyanza Province, which is the Kenyan province bordering Lake Victoria, accounted for a larger proportion of cholera cases than expected by its population size (38.7% of cholera cases versus 15.3% of national population). Yearly water-hyacinth coverage on the Kenyan section of Lake Victoria was positively associated with the number of cholera cases reported in Nyanza Province (r = 0.83; P = 0.0010). Water hyacinth on freshwater lakes might play a role in initiating cholera outbreaks and causing sporadic disease in East Africa. PMID:20682884

  13. Population-Level Effect of Cholera Vaccine on Displaced Populations, South Sudan, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rumunu, John; Abubakar, Abdinasir; West, Haley; Ciglenecki, Iza; Helderman, Trina; Wamala, Joseph Francis; Vázquez, Olimpia de la Rosa; Perea, William; Sack, David A.; Legros, Dominique; Martin, Stephen; Lessler, Justin; Luquero, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Following mass population displacements in South Sudan, preventive cholera vaccination campaigns were conducted in displaced persons camps before a 2014 cholera outbreak. We compare cholera transmission in vaccinated and unvaccinated areas and show vaccination likely halted transmission within vaccinated areas, illustrating the potential for oral cholera vaccine to stop cholera transmission in vulnerable populations. PMID:27192187

  14. Population-Level Effect of Cholera Vaccine on Displaced Populations, South Sudan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Azman, Andrew S; Rumunu, John; Abubakar, Abdinasir; West, Haley; Ciglenecki, Iza; Helderman, Trina; Wamala, Joseph Francis; Vázquez, Olimpia de la Rosa; Perea, William; Sack, David A; Legros, Dominique; Martin, Stephen; Lessler, Justin; Luquero, Francisco J

    2016-06-01

    Following mass population displacements in South Sudan, preventive cholera vaccination campaigns were conducted in displaced persons camps before a 2014 cholera outbreak. We compare cholera transmission in vaccinated and unvaccinated areas and show vaccination likely halted transmission within vaccinated areas, illustrating the potential for oral cholera vaccine to stop cholera transmission in vulnerable populations. PMID:27192187

  15. H/KDEL receptors mediate host cell intoxication by a viral A/B toxin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Becker, Björn; Blum, Andrea; Gießelmann, Esther; Dausend, Julia; Rammo, Domenik; Müller, Nina C; Tschacksch, Emilia; Steimer, Miriam; Spindler, Jenny; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens; Breinig, Frank; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2016-01-01

    A/B toxins such as cholera toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin and killer toxin K28 contain a KDEL-like amino acid motif at one of their subunits which ensures retrograde toxin transport through the secretory pathway of a target cell. As key step in host cell invasion, each toxin binds to distinct plasma membrane receptors that are utilized for cell entry. Despite intensive efforts, some of these receptors are still unknown. Here we identify the yeast H/KDEL receptor Erd2p as membrane receptor of K28, a viral A/B toxin carrying an HDEL motif at its cell binding β-subunit. While initial toxin binding to the yeast cell wall is unaffected in cells lacking Erd2p, binding to spheroplasts and in vivo toxicity strongly depend on the presence of Erd2p. Consistently, Erd2p is not restricted to membranes of the early secretory pathway but extends to the plasma membrane where it binds and internalizes HDEL-cargo such as K28 toxin, GFP(HDEL) and Kar2p. Since human KDEL receptors are fully functional in yeast and restore toxin sensitivity in the absence of endogenous Erd2p, toxin uptake by H/KDEL receptors at the cell surface might likewise contribute to the intoxication efficiency of A/B toxins carrying a KDEL-motif at their cytotoxic A-subunit(s). PMID:27493088

  16. H/KDEL receptors mediate host cell intoxication by a viral A/B toxin in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Björn; Blum, Andrea; Gießelmann, Esther; Dausend, Julia; Rammo, Domenik; Müller, Nina C.; Tschacksch, Emilia; Steimer, Miriam; Spindler, Jenny; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens; Breinig, Frank; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    A/B toxins such as cholera toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin and killer toxin K28 contain a KDEL-like amino acid motif at one of their subunits which ensures retrograde toxin transport through the secretory pathway of a target cell. As key step in host cell invasion, each toxin binds to distinct plasma membrane receptors that are utilized for cell entry. Despite intensive efforts, some of these receptors are still unknown. Here we identify the yeast H/KDEL receptor Erd2p as membrane receptor of K28, a viral A/B toxin carrying an HDEL motif at its cell binding β-subunit. While initial toxin binding to the yeast cell wall is unaffected in cells lacking Erd2p, binding to spheroplasts and in vivo toxicity strongly depend on the presence of Erd2p. Consistently, Erd2p is not restricted to membranes of the early secretory pathway but extends to the plasma membrane where it binds and internalizes HDEL-cargo such as K28 toxin, GFPHDEL and Kar2p. Since human KDEL receptors are fully functional in yeast and restore toxin sensitivity in the absence of endogenous Erd2p, toxin uptake by H/KDEL receptors at the cell surface might likewise contribute to the intoxication efficiency of A/B toxins carrying a KDEL-motif at their cytotoxic A-subunit(s). PMID:27493088

  17. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E.; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Ikhtear Uddin, Muhammad; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Clemens, John D.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Methods Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Findings Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. Conclusion These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs. PMID:26562418

  18. Cost-effectiveness of oral cholera vaccine in a stable refugee population at risk for epidemic cholera and in a population with endemic cholera.

    PubMed

    Murray, J; McFarland, D A; Waldman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Recent large epidemics of cholera with high incidence and associated mortality among refugees have raised the question of whether oral cholera vaccines should be considered as an additional preventive measure in high-risk populations. The potential impact of oral cholera vaccines on populations prone to seasonal endemic cholera has also been questioned. This article reviews the potential cost-effectiveness of B-subunit, killed whole-cell (BS-WC) oral cholera vaccine in a stable refugee population and in a population with endemic cholera. In the population at risk for endemic cholera, mass vaccination with BS-WC vaccine is the least cost-effective intervention compared with the provision of safe drinking-water and sanitation or with treatment of the disease. In a refugee population at risk for epidemic disease, the cost-effectiveness of vaccination is similar to that of providing safe drinking-water and sanitation alone, though less cost-effective than treatment alone or treatment combined with the provision of water and sanitation. The implications of these data for public health decision-makers and programme managers are discussed. There is a need for better information on the feasibility and costs of administering oral cholera vaccine in refugee populations and populations with endemic cholera. PMID:9803585

  19. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl− secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl− secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl− current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl− channel activity (IC50∼10 µM) via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na+-K+ ATPases and Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channels with IC50 of ∼3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, inwardly rectifying Cl− channels, and Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment) had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT)-induced Cl− secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg) reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  20. *CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are naturally-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. These photosynthesizing prokaryotes thrive in warm, shallow, nutrient-rich waters. Many produce potent toxins as secondary metabolites. Cyanobacteria toxins have been document...

  1. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy-guided botulinum toxin Treatment; ...

  2. Stool C. difficile toxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003590.htm Stool C. difficile toxin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The stool C. difficile toxin test detects harmful substances produced by ...

  3. Botox (Botulinum Toxin)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people when there are many effective and safe cosmetic procedures that can temporarily reduce a very prominent ... form of botulinum toxin is Type A (Botox® Cosmetic, Allergan, Inc). Botulinum toxin, what we will now ...

  4. ACD toxin-produced actin oligomers poison formin-controlled actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, David B.; Kudryashova, Elena; Grinevich, Dmitry O.; Suarez, Cristian; Winkelman, Jonathan D.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Kovar, David R.; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin crosslinking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin crosslinking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently “poisoned” the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by employing actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses. PMID:26228148

  5. [A boy with cholera from India].

    PubMed

    van Furth, A M; Croughs, R D; Terpstra, L; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E; van Well, G T H

    2006-01-28

    A 7-year-old Indian boy travelling from India to the United Kingdom was brought to the Emergency Clinic of Airport Medical Services at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He had had watery diarrhoea in the aircraft and had lost consciousness. In view of the strong indications for cholera and the rice water-like diarrhoea, he was admitted to the paediatric ward of the VU Medical Centre where intravenous rehydration was carried out. He recovered within three days. A large number of comma-shaped, motile, Gram-negative rods were found in the faeces. After two days, the faeces culture revealed Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, serotype Inaba. On the day of the flight, the patient had drunk a litre of water from a bottle that later turned out to have been from the New Delhi water supply. Cholera is rare as an import disease in the Netherlands. Due to the severe dehydration, the infection can run a serious course and even be fatal. The infection is not transmitted from person to person. Therefore, no special measures are needed when a patient with cholera is admitted to hospital. PMID:16471238

  6. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  7. Surface-attachment sequence in Vibrio Cholerae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the human disease cholera. It is found natively in brackish costal waters in temperate climates, where it attaches to the surfaces of a variety of different aquatic life. V. cholerae has a single polar flagellum making it highly motile, as well as a number of different pili types, enabling it to attach to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Using in-house built tracking software we track all surface-attaching bacteria from high-speed movies to examine the early-time attachment profile of v. cholerae onto a smooth glass surface. Similar to previous work, we observe right-handed circular swimming trajectories near surfaces; however, in addition we see a host of distinct motility mechanisms that enable rapid exploration of the surface before forming a more permanent attachment. Using isogenic mutants we show that the motility mechanisms observed are due to a complex combination of hydrodynamics and pili-surface interactions. Lauga, E., DiLuzio, W. R., Whitesides, G. M., Stone, H. A. Biophys. J. 90, 400 (2006).

  8. Detection of Protein Toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have focused on ricin, shiga-like toxin, botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), developing sensitive test methods for toxins and marker compounds in food matrices. Although animal models provide the best means for risk assessment, especially for crude toxins in compl...

  9. A yeast killer toxin screen provides insights into A/B toxin entry, trafficking and killing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susheela Y.; Stirling, Peter C.; Stimpson, Helen E. M.; Gießelmann, Esther; Schmitt, Manfred J.; Drubin, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Like Ricin, Shiga, and Cholera toxins, yeast K28 is an A/B toxin that depends on endocytosis and retrograde trafficking for toxicity. Knowledge of the specific proteins, lipids, and mechanisms required for trafficking and killing by these toxins remains incomplete. Since K28 is a model for clinically relevant toxins, we screened over 5000 yeast mutants, identifying 365 that affect K28 sensitivity. Hypersensitive mutants revealed cytoprotective pathways, including stress-activated signaling and protein degradation. Resistant mutants clustered to endocytic, lipid organization and cell wall biogenesis pathways. Furthermore, GPI anchors and transcriptional regulation are important for K28-cell binding. Strikingly, the AP2 complex, which in metazoans links endocytic cargo to the clathrin coat, but had no assigned function in yeast, was critical for K28 toxicity. Yeast AP2 localizes to endocytic sites and has a cargo-specific function in K28 uptake. This comprehensive genetic analysis identified conserved processes important for A/B toxin trafficking and killing. PMID:19853568

  10. Cholera: Environmental Reservoirs and Impact on Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    ALMAGRO-MORENO, SALVADOR; TAYLOR, RONALD K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is widely known to be the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. Cholera remains a major scourge in many developing countries, infecting hundreds of thousands every year. Remarkably, V. cholerae is a natural inhabitant of brackish riverine, estuarine, and coastal waters, and only a subset of strains are known to be pathogenic to humans. Recent studies have begun to uncover a very complex network of relationships between V. cholerae and other sea dwellers, and the mechanisms associated with the occurrence of seasonal epidemics in regions where cholera is endemic are beginning to be elucidated. Many of the factors required for the organism’s survival and persistence in its natural environment have been revealed, as well as the ubiquitous presence of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of pathogenic strains of V. cholerae. In this article, we will focus on the environmental stage of pathogenic V. cholerae and the interactions of the microorganism with other inhabitants of aquatic environments. We will discuss the impact that its environmental reservoirs have on disease transmission and the distinction between reservoirs of V. cholerae and the vectors that establish cholera as a zoonosis. PMID:25674360

  11. Tracking Cholera in Coastal Regions using Satellite Observations

    PubMed Central

    Jutla, Antarpreet S; Akanda, Ali S; Islam, Shafiqul

    2010-01-01

    Cholera remains a significant health threat across the globe. The pattern and magnitude of the seven global pandemics suggest that cholera outbreaks primarily originate in coastal regions and then spread inland through secondary means. Cholera bacteria show strong association with plankton abundance in coastal ecosystems. This review study investigates relationship(s) between cholera incidence and coastal processes and explores utility of using remote sensing data to track coastal plankton blooms, using chlorophyll as a surrogate variable for plankton abundance, and subsequent cholera outbreaks. Most studies over the last several decades have primarily focused on the microbiological and epidemiological understanding of cholera outbreaks. Accurate identification and mechanistic understanding of large scale climatic, geophysical and oceanic processes governing cholera-chlorophyll relationship is important for developing cholera prediction models. Development of a holistic understanding of these processes requires long and reliable chlorophyll dataset(s), which are beginning to be available through satellites. We have presented a schematic pathway and a modeling framework that relate cholera with various hydroclimatic and oceanic variables for understanding disease dynamics using latest advances in remote sensing. Satellite data, with its unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage, have potentials to monitor coastal processes and track cholera outbreaks in endemic regions. PMID:21072249

  12. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  13. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  14. Common features of the NAD-binding and catalytic site of ADP-ribosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Domenighini, M; Magagnoli, C; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    Computer analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ADP-ribosylating toxins showed that in all toxins the NAD-binding site is located in a cavity. This cavity consists of 18 contiguous amino acids that form an alpha-helix bent over a beta-strand. The tertiary folding of this structure is strictly conserved despite the differences in the amino acid sequence. Catalysis is supported by two spatially conserved amino acids, each flanking the NAD-binding site. These are: a glutamic acid that is conserved in all toxins, and a nucleophilic residue, which is a histidine in the diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and an arginine in the cholera toxin, the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins, the pertussis toxin and the mosquitocidal toxin of Bacillus sphaericus. The latter group of toxins presents an additional histidine that appears important for catalysis. This structure suggests a general mechanism of ADP-ribosylation evolved to work on different target proteins. PMID:7830559

  15. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Stavroula K.; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Davis, Brigid M.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human cholera stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, while genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance and binding of an intestinal lectin—intelectin—to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialogue in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  16. Adjuvant Therapy: Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad; Kirkwood, John M.

    2011-01-01

    With an incidence that is increasing at 2–5% per year, cutaneous melanoma is an international scourge that disproportionately targets young individuals. Despite much research, the treatment of advanced disease is still quite challenging. Immunotherapy with high-dose interferon-α2b or interleukin-2 benefits a select group of patients in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, respectively, with significant attendant toxicity. Advances in the biology of malignant melanoma and the role of immunomodulatory therapy have produced advances that have stunned the field. In this paper, we review the data for the use of interferon-α2b in various dosing ranges, vaccine therapy, and the role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma. Recent trials in the metastatic setting using anticytoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti-CTLA-4) monoclonal antibody therapy and BRAF inhibitor therapy have demonstrated clear benefit with prolongation of survival. Trials investigating combinations of these novel agents with existing immunomodulators are at present underway. PMID:22220281

  17. Fish as Reservoirs and Vectors of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Senderovich, Yigal; Izhaki, Ido; Halpern, Malka

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, is autochthonous to various aquatic environments, but despite intensive efforts its ecology remains an enigma. Recently, it was suggested that copepods and chironomids, both considered as natural reservoirs of V. cholerae, are dispersed by migratory waterbirds, thus possibly distributing the bacteria between water bodies within and between continents. Although fish have been implicated in the scientific literature with cholera cases, as far as we know, no study actually surveyed the presence of the bacteria in the fish. Here we show for the first time that fish of various species and habitats contain V. cholerae in their digestive tract. Fish (n = 110) were randomly sampled from freshwater and marine habitats in Israel. Ten different fish species sampled from freshwater habitats (lake, rivers and fish ponds), and one marine species, were found to carry V. cholerae. The fish intestine of Sarotherodon galilaeus harboured ca. 5×103 V. cholerae cfu per 1 gr intestine content—high rates compared with known V. cholerae cfu numbers in the bacteria's natural reservoirs. Our results, combined with evidence from the literature, suggest that fish are reservoirs of V. cholerae. As fish carrying the bacteria swim from one location to another (some fish species move from rivers to lakes or sea and vice versa), they serve as vectors on a small scale. Nevertheless, fish are consumed by waterbirds, which disseminate the bacteria on a global scale. Moreover, V. cholerae isolates had the ability to degrade chitin, indicating a commensal relationship between V. cholerae and fish. Better understanding of V. cholerae ecology can help reduce the times that human beings come into contact with this pathogen and thus minimize the health risk this poses. PMID:20066040

  18. Updated Global Burden of Cholera in Endemic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad; Nelson, Allyson R.; Lopez, Anna Lena; Sack, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The global burden of cholera is largely unknown because the majority of cases are not reported. The low reporting can be attributed to limited capacity of epidemiological surveillance and laboratories, as well as social, political, and economic disincentives for reporting. We previously estimated 2.8 million cases and 91,000 deaths annually due to cholera in 51 endemic countries. A major limitation in our previous estimate was that the endemic and non-endemic countries were defined based on the countries’ reported cholera cases. We overcame the limitation with the use of a spatial modelling technique in defining endemic countries, and accordingly updated the estimates of the global burden of cholera. Methods/Principal Findings Countries were classified as cholera endemic, cholera non-endemic, or cholera-free based on whether a spatial regression model predicted an incidence rate over a certain threshold in at least three of five years (2008-2012). The at-risk populations were calculated for each country based on the percent of the country without sustainable access to improved sanitation facilities. Incidence rates from population-based published studies were used to calculate the estimated annual number of cases in endemic countries. The number of annual cholera deaths was calculated using inverse variance-weighted average case-fatality rate (CFRs) from literature-based CFR estimates. We found that approximately 1.3 billion people are at risk for cholera in endemic countries. An estimated 2.86 million cholera cases (uncertainty range: 1.3m-4.0m) occur annually in endemic countries. Among these cases, there are an estimated 95,000 deaths (uncertainty range: 21,000-143,000). Conclusion/Significance The global burden of cholera remains high. Sub-Saharan Africa accounts for the majority of this burden. Our findings can inform programmatic decision-making for cholera control. PMID:26043000

  19. The Highly Conserved Bacterial RNase YbeY Is Essential in Vibrio cholerae, Playing a Critical Role in Virulence, Stress Regulation, and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W.; Arnold, Markus F. F.; Mekalanos, John J.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3′ end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3′ end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes. PMID:24901994

  20. Expression of ToxR, the transcriptional activator of the virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, is modulated by the heat shock response.

    PubMed Central

    Parsot, C; Mekalanos, J J

    1990-01-01

    The toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a transmembrane, DNA-binding protein that positively controls transcription of the genes for cholera toxin, TCP pili, and other proteins important in cholera pathogenesis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the toxR upstream region has revealed that the heat shock gene htpG, encoding the bacterial homologue of the eukaryotic Hsp90 protein, was located immediately upstream and was divergently transcribed from toxR. Using lacZ transcriptional fusions, we have shown that neither toxR nor htpG expression was regulated by ToxR. However, the growth temperature had a coordinate but reciprocal effect on the expression from both the toxR and htpG promoters in V. cholerae; the decrease of toxR expression between 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C was proportional to the increase of htpG expression observed within that temperature range. A similar pattern of expression of the htpG and toxR promoters was observed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli, where this regulation was controlled by the level of the E. coli rpoH (htpR) gene product, sigma-32. Consistent with the temperature-regulated expression of the V. cholerae htpG promoter in E. coli, a sequence similar to the consensus sequence of the E. coli heat shock promoters was detected upstream from the V. cholerae htpG gene. We propose a model in which the regulation of toxR expression by temperature is controlled by the level of sigma-32 (RpoH) RNA polymerase. Images PMID:2124707

  1. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  4. Modern Cholera in the Americas: An Opportunistic Societal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    In the Americas, the only two cholera epidemics of the past century have occurred in the past 25 years. Lessons from the 1991 Peruvian cholera epidemic can help to focus and refine the response to the current Haitian epidemic. After three years of acute epidemic response, we have an opportunity to refocus on the chronic conditions that make societies vulnerable to cholera. More importantly, even as international attention wanes in the aftermath of the earthquake and acute epidemic, we are faced with a need for continued and coordinated investment in improving Haiti’s structural defenses against cholera, in particular access to improved water and sanitation. PMID:24028256

  5. Recombination shapes the structure of an environmental Vibrio cholerae population.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Daniel P; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae consists of pathogenic strains that cause sporadic gastrointestinal illness or epidemic cholera disease and nonpathogenic strains that grow and persist in coastal aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies of disease-causing strains have shown V. cholerae to be a primarily clonal bacterial species, but isolates analyzed have been strongly biased toward pathogenic genotypes, while representing only a small sample of the vast diversity in environmental strains. In this study, we characterized homologous recombination and structure among 152 environmental V. cholerae isolates and 13 other putative Vibrio isolates from coastal waters and sediments in central California, as well as four clinical V. cholerae isolates, using multilocus sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes. Recombinant regions were identified by at least three detection methods in 72% of our V. cholerae isolates. Despite frequent recombination, significant linkage disequilibrium was still detected among the V. cholerae sequence types. Incongruent but nonrandom associations were observed for maximum likelihood topologies from the individual loci. Overall, our estimated recombination rate in V. cholerae of 6.5 times the mutation rate is similar to those of other sexual bacteria and appears frequently enough to restrict selection from purging much of the neutral intraspecies diversity. These data suggest that frequent recombination among V. cholerae may hinder the identification of ecotypes in this bacterioplankton population. PMID:21075874

  6. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. The adjuvanted influenza vaccines with novel adjuvants: experience with the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine.

    PubMed

    Podda, A

    2001-03-21

    Elderly people and subjects with underlying chronic diseases are at increased risk for influenza and related complications. Conventional influenza vaccines provide only limited protection in the elderly population. In order to enhance the immune response to influenza vaccines, several adjuvants have been evaluated. Among these, an oil in water adjuvant emulsion containing squalene, MF59, has been combined with subunit influenza antigens and tested in clinical trials in comparison with non-adjuvanted conventional vaccines. Data from a clinical database of over 10000 elderly subjects immunised with this adjuvanted vaccine (Fluad, Chiron Vaccines, Siena, Italy) demonstrate that, although common postimmunisation reactions are more frequent in recipients of the adjuvanted vaccine, this vaccine is well tolerated, also after re-immunisation in subsequent influenza seasons. Immunogenicity analyses demonstrate a consistently higher immune response with statistically significant increases of postimmunisation geometric mean titres, and of seroconversion and seroprotection rates compared to non-adjuvanted subunit and split influenza vaccines, particularly for the A/H3N2 and the B strains. The higher immunogenicity profile of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine is maintained also after subsequent immunisations. An even higher adjuvant effect was shown in subjects with low pre-immunisation titre and in those affected by chronic underlying diseases. In conclusion, the addition of MF59 to subunit influenza vaccines enhances significantly the immune response in elderly subjects without causing clinically important changes in the safety profile of the influenza vaccine. PMID:11257408

  9. Active surveillance for Vibrio cholerae O1 and vibriophages in sewage water as a potential tool to predict cholera outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Madico, G; Checkley, W; Gilman, R H; Bravo, N; Cabrera, L; Calderon, M; Ceballos, A

    1996-01-01

    The 1991 Peruvian cholera epidemic has thus far been responsible for 600,000 cholera cases in Peru. In an attempt to design a cholera surveillance program in the capital city of Lima, weekly sewage samples were collected between August 1993 and May 1996 and examined for the presence of Vibrio cholerae O1 bacteria and V. cholerae O1 bacteriophages (i.e., vibriophages). During the 144 weeks of surveillance, 6,323 cases of clinically defined cholera were recorded in Lima. We arbitrarily defined an outbreak as five or more reported cases of cholera in a week. The odds of having an outbreak were 7.6 times greater when V. cholerae O1 was present in sewage water during the four previous weeks compared with when it was not (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the odds of having an outbreak increased as the number of V. cholerae O1 isolations during the previous 4 weeks increased (P < 0.001). The odds of having an outbreak were 2.4 times greater when vibriophages were present in sewage water during the four previous weeks compared with when they were not, but this increase was not statistically significant (P = 0.15). The odds of having an outbreak increased as the number of vibriophage isolations during the previous 4 weeks increased (P < 0.05). The signaling of a potential cholera outbreak 1 month in advance may be a valuable tool for implementation of preventive measures. In Peru, active surveillance for V. cholerae O1 and possibly vibriophages in sewage water appears to be a feasible and effective means of predicting and outbreak of cholera. PMID:8940432

  10. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  11. Antibacterial and Antitoxin Responses in the Serum and Milk of Cholera Patients

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anis S.; Dutta, Phalguni; Dutta, Dharitri; Ghose, Asoke C.

    1981-01-01

    Antibacterial and antitoxin responses in the acute and convalescent (7 to 10 days) sera of 14 cholera patients were determined by various serological techniques. Similar studies were also carried out with corresponding milk samples of six of these patients who were lactating women. A significant rise in antibacterial titers was observed in all convalescent serum and milk samples. A similar rise in antitoxin titers was observable in all serum and four milk samples. Specificity of the antibacterial titers was further evaluated by the indirect hemagglutination test using lipopolysaccharide antigen, and close correlations were noted between these titers and vibrio agglutination (P<0.001) and vibriocidal (P<0.001) titers of sera. Serum and milk convalescent cholera patients could effectively neutralize cholera toxin action in vivo, although the neutralizing activity of serum was higher than that of milk. Determination of antibody titers by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that anti-lipopolysaccharide activity in sera belonged predominantly to immunoglobulin M (IgM) and, to a lesser extent, to IgG and IgA, whereas such activity in milk was mostly contributed by secretory IgA, although some IgM antibodies also could be detected. On the other hand, antitoxic activity in convalescent sera primarily belonged to IgG, whereas such activity in milk was almost exclusively contributed by secretory IgA. These results demonstrate that an antibody response in the mammary gland was stimulated due to the antigen exposure in the gut and are consistent with the idea of a common homing pattern of immunocytes within the secretory immune system. Moreover, some differences in the antibody production mechanism between the systemic and secretory immune systems are indicated. PMID:7216479

  12. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolates from a US Gulf Coast cholera outbreak.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Choi, Seon Young; Grim, Christopher J; Onifade, Tiffiani J; Cinar, Hediye N; Tall, Ben D; Taviani, Elisa; Hasan, Nur A; Abdullah, Abdulshakur H; Carter, Laurenda; Sahu, Surasri N; Kothary, Mahendra H; Chen, Arlene; Baker, Ron; Hutchinson, Richard; Blackmore, Carina; Cebula, Thomas A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2014-01-01

    Between November 2010, and May 2011, eleven cases of cholera, unrelated to a concurrent outbreak on the island of Hispaniola, were recorded, and the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75, was traced to oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. From the 11 diagnosed cases, eight isolates of V. cholerae were isolated and their genomes were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of a suite of mobile elements previously shown to be involved in the disease process of cholera (ctxAB, VPI-1 and -2, and a VSP-II like variant) and a phylogenomic analysis showed the isolates to be sister taxa to toxigenic V. cholerae V51 serogroup O141, a clinical strain isolated 23 years earlier. Toxigenic V. cholerae O75 has been repeatedly isolated from clinical cases in the southeastern United States and toxigenic V. cholerae O141 isolates have been isolated globally from clinical cases over several decades. Comparative genomics, phenotypic analyses, and a Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection for the isolates were conducted. This analysis coupled with isolation data of V. cholerae O75 and O141 suggests these strains may represent an underappreciated clade of cholera-causing strains responsible for significant disease burden globally. PMID:24699521

  13. Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Non-O1 Isolates from a US Gulf Coast Cholera Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Onifade, Tiffiani J.; Cinar, Hediye N.; Tall, Ben D.; Taviani, Elisa; Hasan, Nur A.; Abdullah, AbdulShakur H.; Carter, Laurenda; Sahu, Surasri N.; Kothary, Mahendra H.; Chen, Arlene; Baker, Ron; Hutchinson, Richard; Blackmore, Carina; Cebula, Thomas A.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2014-01-01

    Between November 2010, and May 2011, eleven cases of cholera, unrelated to a concurrent outbreak on the island of Hispaniola, were recorded, and the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75, was traced to oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. From the 11 diagnosed cases, eight isolates of V. cholerae were isolated and their genomes were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of a suite of mobile elements previously shown to be involved in the disease process of cholera (ctxAB, VPI-1 and -2, and a VSP-II like variant) and a phylogenomic analysis showed the isolates to be sister taxa to toxigenic V. cholerae V51 serogroup O141, a clinical strain isolated 23 years earlier. Toxigenic V. cholerae O75 has been repeatedly isolated from clinical cases in the southeastern United States and toxigenic V. cholerae O141 isolates have been isolated globally from clinical cases over several decades. Comparative genomics, phenotypic analyses, and a Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection for the isolates were conducted. This analysis coupled with isolation data of V. cholerae O75 and O141 suggests these strains may represent an underappreciated clade of cholera-causing strains responsible for significant disease burden globally. PMID:24699521

  14. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Lisa C; Stutzmann, Sandrine; Scrignari, Tiziana; Van der Henst, Charles; Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-05-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey's DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction. PMID:27117415

  15. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Lisa C.; Stutzmann, Sandrine; Scrignari, Tiziana; Van der Henst, Charles; Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey’s DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction. PMID:27117415

  16. Spatially explicit modelling of cholera epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, F.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Knox, A. C.; Gatto, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological models can provide crucial understanding about the dynamics of infectious diseases. Possible applications range from real-time forecasting and allocation of health care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. We apply a spatially explicit model to the cholera epidemic that struck Haiti in October 2010 and is still ongoing. The dynamics of susceptibles as well as symptomatic and asymptomatic infectives are modelled at the scale of local human communities. Dissemination of Vibrio cholerae through hydrological transport and human mobility along the road network is explicitly taken into account, as well as the effect of rainfall as a driver of increasing disease incidence. The model is calibrated using a dataset of reported cholera cases. We further model the long term impact of several types of interventions on the disease dynamics by varying parameters appropriately. Key epidemiological mechanisms and parameters which affect the efficiency of treatments such as antibiotics are identified. Our results lead to conclusions about the influence of different intervention strategies on the overall epidemiological dynamics.

  17. Single-Dose Doxycycline for Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Sack, David A.; Islam, Sirajul; Rabbani, Hassan; Islam, Asma

    1978-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of single-dose doxycycline in the treatment of cholera, we carried out a randomized prospective trial in 65 patients. Treatment consisted of either a single dose of 200 mg of doxycycline (or 4 mg/kg in patients less than 15 years old) or multiple doses of doxycycline, 500 mg over 4 days (or 10 mg/kg in patients less than 15 years old). There were no differences between the groups in the volumes of intravenous fluid required, volumes of diarrheal stool, or durations of diarrhea. The mean duration of positive stool cultures for Vibrio cholerae was similar for the two groups, although in both groups several patients continued to excrete Vibrios in the stool for more than 3 days. Blood levels of antibiotic demonstrated that the doxycycline was absorbed in spite of the rapid transit time associated with severe diarrhea. These results suggest that although tetracycline remains the drug of choice for cholera, doxycycline is a reasonable alternative, and that a single dose of 200 mg (4 mg/kg in children) is effective clinically. PMID:708024

  18. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Shiga-like toxin from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Strockbine, N A; Marques, L R; Holmes, R K; O'Brien, A D

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies, designated MAb 16E6, MAb 13C4, and MAb 19G8, were produced which recognize Shiga-like toxin (SLT) from Escherichia coli. All three monoclonal antibodies neutralized the cytotoxicity of E. coli SLT and were able to immunoprecipitate intact labeled toxin with Staphylococcus aureus protein A. The three antibodies were of the G1 heavy and kappa light chain classes. MAb 16E6 bound to the B subunit of SLT in Western blots and also neutralized the lethality of the toxin for mice and the enterotoxicity of the toxin in ligate rabbit ileal loops. The ability of MAb 16E6 to neutralize the cytotoxicity, lethality, and enterotoxicity of E. coli confirms the hypothesis that all three activities are associated with a single toxin. MAb 16E6 and MAb 13C4 also neutralized the cytotoxicity of purified Shiga toxin from Shigella dysenteriae type 1 and Shiga-like toxic activities in crude cell extracts from Shigella flexneri, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, Shiga toxin and the SLTs from E. coli, Shigella flexneri, V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium share a common B subunit epitope that is involved in neutralization. MAb 13C4 has been successfully used in a colony blot assay for the detection of bacterial colonies which produce high levels of SLT. Sixty-two different strains of bacteria were tested by both the cytotoxicity and colony blot assays for the presence of SLT. The colony blot assay detected all strains of bacteria which produce greater than or equal to 10(5) 50% cytotoxic doses of SLT per ml of sonic lysate. There were no false-positive results among the 62 samples tested. Images PMID:3905611

  19. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon. PMID:26449577

  20. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  1. Experimental non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae gastroenteritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J G; Takeda, T; Tall, B D; Losonsky, G A; Bhattacharya, S K; Forrest, B D; Kay, B A; Nishibuchi, M

    1990-01-01

    In this study, 27 volunteers received one of three non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae strains in doses as high as 10(9) CFU. Only one strain (strain C) caused diarrhea: this strain was able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract, and produced a heat-stable enterotoxin (NAG-ST). Diarrhea was not seen with a strain (strain A) that colonized the intestine but did not produce NAG-ST, nor with a strain (strain B) that produced NAG-ST but did not colonize. Persons receiving strain C had diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Diarrheal stool volumes ranged from 154 to 5,397 ml; stool samples from the patient having 5,397 ml of diarrhea were tested and found to contain NAG-ST. The median incubation period for illness was 10 h. There was a suggestion that occurrence of diarrhea was dependent on inoculum size. Immune responses to homologous outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, and whole-cell lysates were demonstrable with all three strains. Our data demonstrate that V. cholerae of O groups other than 1 are able to cause severe diarrheal disease. However, not all strains are pathogenic for humans: virulence of strain C may be dependent on its ability both to colonize the intestine and to produce a toxin such as NAG-ST. Images PMID:2312721

  2. [Microbiological characterization of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae isolated in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Bravo Fariñas, Laura; Fernández, Anabel; Ramírez, María M; Llop, Alina; Martínez, Gerardo; Hernández, Raquel I; Cabrera, Luis E; Morier, Luis; Fraga, Jorge; Núñez, Fidel A; Aguila, Adalberto

    2007-01-01

    The study of 422 non-01 Vibrio cholerae strains from nine provinces, 9 of them isolated from a water-borne disease outbreak, was performed. All the strains exhibited antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors. The nine strains from the outbreak were subjected to a DNA macrorestriction study based on the pulsed field electrophoresis technique. For the first time in Cuba and the Caribbean. The circulation of atypical non-01 V cholerae strains (resistent to vibriostatic compound 0129 and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole). The behavior of antimicrobial susceptibility evinced for the first time the circulation of two different resistence patterns in Cuba (ampicilline, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole, sulfonamide and tetracycline, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole, sulfonamide). The frequency of trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole-resistent strains was similar during the whole period of study. However, resistance to ampicilline decreased whereas resistance to tetracycline increased. The main found virulence factors were gelatinase, hemolysine, elastase and adherence to Hep-2 cells. On the other hand, the outbreak strains showed higher percentages than the others due to the presence of heat-liable toxin and fimbriae. The results of the molecular and epidemiological studies allowed giving a speedy and accurate response that explained the etiology of the first food-borne disease outbreak. PMID:23427461

  3. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  4. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1 carrying Haitian ctxB and attributes of classical and El Tor biotypes isolated from Silvassa, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Moon Moon; Bhotra, Tilothama; Zala, Dolatsinh; Singh, Durg Vijai

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor, the causative agent of the seventh pandemic, has recently been replaced by strains carrying classical and Haitian ctxB in India, Haiti and other parts of the world. We conducted phenotypic and genetic tests to characterize V. cholerae O1 isolated between 2012 and 2014 from Silvassa, India, to examine the presence of virulence and regulatory genes, seventh pandemic marker, ctxB type and biofilm formation and to study genomic diversity. Of the 59 V. cholerae O1, eight isolates belong to El Tor prototype, one to classical prototype and the remaining isolates have attributes of both classical and El Tor biotypes. PCR and ctxB gene sequencing revealed the presence of classical ctxB in four strains and Haitian ctxB in 55 isolates; indicating that isolates were either an El Tor or hybrid variant. All isolates carried virulence, regulatory, adherence, Vibrio seventh pandemic pathogenicity island I and seventh pandemic group-specific marker VC2346, in addition to tcpAET and rstRET, the features of seventh pandemic strains, and produced cholera toxin and biofilm. PFGE analysis showed that the majority of isolates are clonal and belong to fingerprint pattern A; however, pattern B is unrelated and patterns C and D are distinct, suggesting considerable diversity in the genomic content among them. These data thus show that isolates from Silvassa are genetically diverse and that Haitian ctxB and hybrid phenotypes are undergoing global dissemination. PMID:27255911

  5. Hybridoma as a specific, sensitive, and ready to use sensing element: a rapid fluorescence assay for detection of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Parichehr; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Zeinoddini, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade, isolation and purification of monoclonal antibodies, for diagnostic analysis, have been carried out using the hybridoma expression system. The present study describes a novel example of a detection system using hybridoma cells containing antibody against O1 antigen directly for V. cholerae diagnosis, which is a major health problem in many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. This method has advantages such as simplicity, ease of process, and it does not require manipulation of hybridoma cell. For this approach, an efficient amount of fluorescence calcium indicator, fura 2-AM, was utilized, which emitted light when the intracellular calcium concentration increased as result of antigen binding to specific antibody. More reliable results are obtained via this method and it is considerably faster than other methods, which has the response time of less than 45 s for detection of V. Cholerae O1. Also, the limit of detection was computed to be 50 CFU/mL (<13 CFU per assay). In addition, no significant responses were observed in the presence of other bacteria with specific hybridoma or other cell lines exposed to V. cholerae O1. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to V. cholerae O1 detection in spiked environmental samples, including water and stool samples without any pretreatment. All results reveal that hybridoma cells can provide a valuable, simple, and ready to use tool for rapid detection of other pathogenic bacteria, toxins, and analytes. PMID:27438715

  6. Intraoral administration of botulinum toxin for trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Herrero Babiloni, Alberto; Kapos, Flavia P; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    This article presents 2 cases of different neuropathic trigeminal pain conditions treated with intraoral botulinum toxin injections. There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of this substance when administered subcutaneously in the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as in extraoral injections for trigeminal neuralgia. However, reports of intraoral submucosal administration are still lacking. In the 2 cases presented here, neuropathic pain was refractory to treatment with an important intraoral peripheral component, so onabotulinum toxin A was introduced as an adjuvant therapy. The technique, doses, and dilution are discussed. The patients reported significant reductions in pain frequency and intensity, with minimal side effects of temporary mucosal dryness and smile droopiness. The analgesic benefits of botulinum toxin may be utilized to address intraoral neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to confirm safety and effectiveness in larger samples. PMID:27181448

  7. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Live Oral Recombinant Cholera Vaccine VA1.4: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial in Healthy Adults in a Cholera Endemic Area in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Suman; Sen, Bandana; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Sur, Dipika; Manna, Byomkesh; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Chowdhury, Goutam; Jhunjhunwala, Puja; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Koley, Hemanta; Bhattacharya, Mihir Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay; Goel, Gaurav; Dey, Bindu; M, Thungapathra; Nair, G. Balakrish; Ghosh, Amit; Mahalanabis, Dilip

    2014-01-01

    Background A live oral cholera vaccine VA 1.4 developed from a non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain using ctxB gene insertion was further developed into a clinical product following cGMP and was evaluated in a double-blind randomized placebo controlled parallel group two arm trial with allocation ratio of 1∶1 for safety and immunogenicity in men and women aged 18–60 years from Kolkata, India. Method A lyophilized dose of 1.9×109 CFU (n = 44) or a placebo (n = 43) reconstituted with a diluent was administered within 5 minutes of drinking 100 ml of a buffer solution made of sodium bicarbonate and ascorbic acid and a second dose on day 14. Result The vaccine did not elicit any diarrhea related adverse events. Other adverse events were rare, mild and similar in two groups. One subject in the vaccine group excreted the vaccine strain on the second day after first dose. The proportion of participants who seroconverted (i.e. had 4-folds or higher rise in reciprocal titre) in the vaccine group were 65.9% (95% CI: 50.1%–79.5%) at both 7 days (i.e. after 1st dose) and 21 days (i.e. after 2nd dose). None of the placebo recipients seroconverted. Anti-cholera toxin antibody was detected in very few recipients of the vaccine. Conclusion This study demonstrates that VA 1.4 at a single dose of 1.9×109 is safe and immunogenic in adults from a cholera endemic region. No additional benefit after two doses was seen. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registry-India, National Institute of Medical Statistics (Indian Council of Medical Research) CTRI/2012/04/002582 PMID:24983989

  8. Risk Factors Early in the 2010 Cholera Epidemic, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Emily; Loharikar, Anagha; Routh, Janell; Gaines, Joanna; Fouché, Marie-Délivrance Bernadette; Jean-Louis, Reginald; Ayers, Tracy; Johnson, Dawn; Tappero, Jordan W.; Roels, Thierry H.; Archer, W. Roodly; Dahourou, Georges A.; Mintz, Eric; Quick, Robert; Mahon, Barbara E.

    2011-01-01

    During the early weeks of the cholera outbreak that began in Haiti in October 2010, we conducted a case–control study to identify risk factors. Drinking treated water was strongly protective against illness. Our results highlight the effectiveness of safe water in cholera control. PMID:22099118

  9. Spatial and demographic patterns of Cholera in Ashanti region - Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Frank B; Duker, Alfred A

    2008-01-01

    Background Cholera has claimed many lives throughout history and it continues to be a global threat, especially in countries in Africa. The disease is listed as one of three internationally quarantinable diseases by the World Health organization, along with plague and yellow fever. Between 1999 and 2005, Africa alone accounted for about 90% of over 1 million reported cholera cases worldwide. In Ghana, there have been over 27000 reported cases since 1999. In one of the affected regions in Ghana, Ashanti region, massive outbreaks and high incidences of cholera have predominated in urban and overcrowded communities. Results A GIS based spatial analysis and statistical analysis, carried out to determine clustering of cholera, showed that high cholera rates are clustered around Kumasi Metropolis (the central part of the region), with Moran's Index = 0.271 and P < 0.001. Furthermore, A Mantel-Haenszel Chi square for trend analysis reflected a direct spatial relationship between cholera and urbanization (χ2 = 2995.5, P < 0.0001), overcrowding (χ2 = 1757.2, P < 0.0001), and an inverse relationship between cholera and order of neighborhood with Kumasi Metropolis (χ2 = 831.38, P < 0.0001). Conclusion The results suggest that high urbanization, high overcrowding, and neighborhood with Kumasi Metropolis are the most important predictors of cholera in Ashanti region. PMID:18700026

  10. PREVENTION OF WATERBORNE CHOLERA IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the outbreak of cholera in Peru in January 1991, the disease has spread to other Latin-American countries and on several occasions has been imported into the United States. n order to assess the risk of transmission of cholera by water in the United States, an ad hoc commit...

  11. Avian cholera and organochlorine residues in an American oystercatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Locke, L.N.; Cromartie, E.

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera, was isolated from cultures of the liver and heart blood of a female, adult American oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) found dead on the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina, in May 1973. This is apparently the first record of avian cholera in the oystercatcher. Low levels of DDE were identified in tissues of the oystercatcher.

  12. Understanding the Hydrology of Cholera in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2007-12-01

    Cholera is an acute waterborne illness caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The disease remains a major public health issue in several regions of the developing world, mainly in coastal areas around the tropics. Cholera incidences have been historically linked to climate variables and more recently with El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The occurrence of cholera shows bi-annual seasonal peaks and strong inter-annual variability in the Ganges basin region of South Asia. However, the role of hydrologic variables in the seasonal patterns of cholera epidemics is less understood. Preliminary results suggest that a unique combination of increasing water temperature and higher salinity in the coastal zone during the low flow season provide the situation amenable to the first outbreak of cholera in the spring season. Other major factors contributing to the subsequent spread of the disease are sea surface height, monsoon precipitation, and coastal phytoplankton concentration. We will further examine the lag periods between the dominant environmental variables and cholera incidences to understand the seasonal dynamics of cholera in South Asia.

  13. Risk Factors for Sustained Cholera Transmission, Juba County, South Sudan, 2014.

    PubMed

    Ujjiga, Thomas T A; Wamala, Joseph F; Mogga, Juma J H; Othwonh, Thabo O; Mutonga, David; Kone-Coulibaly, Asta; Shaikh, Masood Ali; Mpairwe, Allan M; Abdinasir, Abubaker; Abdi, Mohamed A; Yoti, Zabulon; Olushayo, Olu; Nyimol, Pinyi; Lul, Riek; Lako, Richard L; Rumunu, John

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for the 2014 cholera outbreak in Juba County, South Sudan. Illness was associated with traveling or eating away from home; treating drinking water and receiving oral cholera vaccination were protective. Oral cholera vaccination should be used to complement cholera prevention efforts. PMID:26402715

  14. Defense against toxin weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide basic information on biological toxins to military leaders and health-care providers at all levels to help them make informed decisions on protecting their troops from toxins. Much of the information contained herein will also be of interest to individuals charged with countering domestic and international terrorism. We typically fear what we do not understand.

  15. Preformed bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Crane, J K

    1999-09-01

    Food poisoning syndromes caused by four different bacteria are described. For all types, food kept at a permissive temperature allows growth of the vegetative forms of the bacteria and production of a toxin or toxins. The key features of these syndromes, as well as possible new trends of concern, are summarized in Table 1. PMID:10549427

  16. Toxins from Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, James S.; Baldwin, Michael R.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial toxins damage the host at the site of bacterial infection or distanced from the site of infections. Bacterial toxins can be single proteins or organized as oligomeric protein complexes and are organized with distinct AB structure-function properties. The A domain encodes a catalytic activity; ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is the earliest post-translational modification determine to be performed by bacterial toxin, and now include glucosylation and proteolysis among other s. Bacterial toxins also catalyze the non-covalent modification of host protein function or can modify host cell properties through direct protein-protein interactions. The B domain includes two functional domains: a receptor-binding domain, which defines the tropism of a toxin for a cell and