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Sample records for adjuvant colon cancer

  1. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  2. [Adjuvant treatment of colon cancer MOSAIC study's main results].

    PubMed

    André, Thierry; Tournigand, Christophe; Achille, Emmanuel; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; Lledo, Gérard; Raoul, Yves; Carola, Elisabeth; Flesch, Michel; Muron, Thierry; Boutan-Laroze, Arnaud; Guérin Meyer, Véronique; Boaziz, Catherine; Maigre, Michel; Ganem, Gérard; Mousseau, Mireille; Mounedji-Boudiaf, Lamia; de Gramont, Aimery

    2006-02-01

    Oxaliplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (LV5FU) improves the response rate and survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The objective of the Mosaic study was to evaluate the efficacy of this association in the adjuvant treatment of stage II and III colon cancer. This international study, including 2,246 patients, compared the efficacy of standard treatment with LV5FU2 alone to that of oxaliplatin-LV5FU (Folfox4 regimen) following R0 resection of the primary tumour. Both treatments were administered every two weeks for six months. At 3-year follow-up, the risk of relapse was decreased by 23% in the Folfox4 group (p = 0.002). The protocol was well tolerated, with an identical overall mortality during treatment (0.5%) in both groups. The main specific complication, peripheral sensory neuropathy was reversible in the great majority of cases. A new analysis at 4-year follow-up (median 48.6 months) confirmed the superior efficacy of the Folfox4 regimen compared to the standard treatment, the reduction in relapse risk being 24% (p = 0.0008). On the strength of these results, oxaliplatin was granted a marketing authorization for the indication adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. Based on the data currently available, physicians should consider adjuvant treatment for stage II patients, making each individual decision for treatment on a case-by-case basis. PMID:16483940

  3. [Laparoscopic surgery and adjuvant therapy for colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kubicka, Stefan; Geissler, Michael; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Trarbach, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    At present, about 10% of all oncological procedures in the colon are carried out laparoscopically. Acceptance is increasing. After successful R0 resection, the rule for stage III patients is: adjuvant therapy is indicated regardless of age. Regimens containing oxaliplatin should be used. If there are contraindications for oxaliplatin, then fluoropyrimidine monotherapy is indicated, with oral fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine) being given precedence over infusional schemes. The use of 5-FU bolus regimens is regarded as obsolete. For stage II, the following applies: If an adjuvant chemotherapy is planned in these patients on the basis of the QUASAR data, then fluoropyrimidine monotherapy (e. g. capecitabine) can be given. Since patients whose tumours show a high frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) do not benefit from a fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, the MSI status should be determined before choosing therapy. PMID:19546595

  4. Surgery and Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use Among Veterans With Colon Cancer: Insights From a California Study

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Denise M.; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Perrin, Ruth; Zhang, Qiuying; Weichle, Thomas; Ferreira, M. Rosario; Lee, Todd; Benson, Al B.; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose US veterans have been shown to be a vulnerable population with high cancer rates, and cancer care quality in Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals is the focus of a congressionally mandated review. We examined rates of surgery and chemotherapy use among veterans with colon cancer at VA and non-VA facilities in California to gain insight into factors associated with quality of cancer care. Methods A retrospective cohort of incident colon cancer patients from the California Cancer Registry, who were ≥ 66 years old and eligible to use VA and Medicare between 1999 and 2001, were observed for 6 months after diagnosis. Results Among 601 veterans with colon cancer, 72% were initially diagnosed and treated in non-VA facilities. Among veterans with stage I to III cancer, those diagnosed and initially treated in VA facilities experienced similar colectomy rates as those at non-VA facilities. Stage III patients diagnosed and initially treated in VA versus non-VA facilities had similar odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. In both settings, older patients had lower odds of receiving chemotherapy than their younger counterparts even when race and comorbidity were considered (age 76 to 85 years: odds ratio [OR] = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.46; age ≥ 86 years: OR = 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.73). Conclusion In California, older veterans with colon cancer used both VA and non-VA facilities for cancer treatment, and odds of receiving cancer-directed surgery and chemotherapy were similar in both systems. Among stage III patients, older age lowered odds of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy in both systems. Further studies should continue to explore potential health system effects on quality of colon cancer care across the United States. PMID:20406940

  5. [A Case of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura during Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Colon Cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Shinichi; Ogasawara, Takeshi; Shida, Takashi; Nomura, Satoru; Sato, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The pathological finding was stage Ⅱ with a high-risk of recurrence (SI [bladder], l y0, v2, pN0, H0, P0, M0). He was treated with TS-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy. After the 1 course of chemotherapy, his platelet count was 4,000/mL. The high index of platelet associated IgG (PA-IgG) and bone marrow examination suggested that thrombocytopenia was caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The platelet count improved by prednisolone administration and Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment. After 6 months with no administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, the colon cancer recurred locally, and we performed a Hartmann's operation. PMID:26805292

  6. Palliative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy after exposure to oxaliplatin in the adjuvant setting for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aalok; Lim, Howard John

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the efficacy of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for metastatic colon cancer patients who have already received adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 22 consecutive patients who developed recurrence after adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer and received another course of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for their metastatic disease. The main endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results A total of 635 patients received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer at the British Columbia Cancer Agency from 2006 to 2011. A total of 176 patients recurred, 22 (12.5%) of whom were re-exposed to oxaliplatin in the metastatic scenario. Oxaliplatin in combination with fluoropyrimidine was given as first, second and third line in in 3 (13.6%), 14 (63.6%), and 5 (22.7%) patients respectively. Median time from the last cycle of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy to the first cycle of palliative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was 44.3 months. Median PFS and overall survival (OS) were 3.3 (95% CI, 1.4-5.1) and 10.0 months (95% CI, 5.3-14.6), respectively. There was no difference in PFS for patients re-exposed to oxaliplatin less than 36 months compared to longer (3.6 versus 3.1 months, P=0.793, HR =0.88). Conclusions In this population-based study, only a small proportion of pts who recurred after oxaliplatin-based adjuvant therapy received oxaliplatin in the metastatic setting. Re-exposure of oxaliplatin in combination with fluoropyrimidine is associated with only modest PFS benefit. Larger studies evaluating the role of oxaliplatin re-exposure are needed. PMID:26487941

  7. Stage III Colon Cancer: The Individualized Strategy of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Aged Under and Over 70

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Chang, Ping-Ying; Chen, Yu-Guang; Chen, Jia-Hong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Ho, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the specific chemoregimens selected for adjuvant therapy in the patients with stage III colon cancer. We investigated the trends in chemotherapeutic prescribing patterns and looked for adequate therapeutic setting for these patients. Methods 288 patients presenting with stage III colon cancer and undergoing adjuvant therapies after curative surgery for more than 3-month were enrolled between January 2006 and December 2011. Demographic characteristics and therapeutic factors were analyzed, including age, gender, histological grade, tumor sizes, tumor location, pathologic stage, performance status, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, regimens selection, interval from the operation to the start of adjuvant therapy and prolonged adjuvant therapy. Kaplan– Meier methods were utilized for drawing survival curves and Cox model was used to analyze survival, prognostic factors. Results The analysis showed that the patients aged under 70 received more intensive therapies than those aged over 70 (P<0.001). Later, advanced analysis in therapeutic factors was conducted between the patients aged under 70 and those over 70. In the patients aged under 70, significant differences in 4-year overall survival (OS) were noted between UFUR (oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin) groups and FOLFOX (5-FU plus oxaliplatin) [65.6% versus (vs) 89.8%, relative risk (RR) 3.780, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.263–11.315, P = 0.017]. There were also differences in 4-year OS between these patients with and without oxaliplatin-contained regimens (92.1% vs 83.4%, respectively, RR 0.385, 95% CI 0.157–0.946, P = 0.037). In addition, the patients who received intravenous or combined therapy also had higher 4-year OS than those only received oral regimens (92.1% vs 76.6%, P = 0.077), though the finding did not reach statistical significance. In contrast to the survival benefits of above therapeutic settings for the patients aged under 70, there was less

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Use and Adverse Events among Older Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Katherine L.; Adams, John L.; Weeks, Jane C.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Schrag, Deborah; Ayanian, John Z.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Potosky, Arnold L.; Harrington, David P.; Fletcher, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Context Randomized trials suggest adjuvant chemotherapy is effective for elderly patients with stage III colon cancer. However, the elderly are less likely to receive this therapy than younger patients, perhaps because of concern about adverse effects. Objective To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy use and outcomes for older patients with stage III colon cancer from well-defined population-based settings and healthcare systems. Design Observational study of adjuvant chemotherapy use and outcomes by age, using Poisson regression to estimate the number of adverse events adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, including comorbid illness and specific elements of chemotherapy regimens documented with clinically detailed medical record reviews and patient and surrogate surveys. Setting Five geographically defined regions (Alabama, Iowa, Los Angeles County, Northern California, and North Carolina), five integrated health-care delivery systems, and 15 Veterans hospitals. Patients All 675 patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer during 2003-2005 who underwent surgical resection were followed up to 15 months post-diagnosis. Main outcome measures Chemotherapy regimen, dose, duration and annualized mean number of adverse events stratified by age. Results Half of the 202 patients >=75 years received adjuvant chemotherapy compared with 87% of 473 younger patients (diff 37%, 95% CI 30%-45%). Among adjuvant chemotherapy users, 14 (14%) of patients >=75 years and 178 (44%) of younger patients received a regimen containing oxaliplatin (diff 30%, 95% CI 21%-38%). Older patients were less likely to continue. By 150 days, 99 (40%) patients >= 65 years and 68 (25%) younger patients had discontinued chemotherapy (diff 15%, 95% CI 7%-23%). Overall, 162 (24%) patients had at least one adverse clinical event, with more events among patients treated with vs. without adjuvant chemotherapy (mean 0.394 vs. 0.160, diff 0.234, 95% CI 0.11-0.36, p<0.001). Among adjuvant chemotherapy

  9. [Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage III Colon Cancer - Drug Selection, Tolerability, and Safety in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazutake; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Saito, Gota; Tanaka, Akira; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In the National Comprehensive Cancer Network(NCCN)guidelines, oxaliplatin(L-OHP)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin(LV), and L-OHP(FOLFOX); capecitabine and L-OHP(CapeOX); , and 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and L-OHP(FLOX)are designated as category 1 recommendations for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage III colon cancer, followed by capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil plus LV as category 2A recommendations. We studied the selection of drugs for adjuvant chemotherapy and assessed the tolerability and safety of CapeOX and tegafur- uraci(l UFT)plus LV(UFT/LV)in patients with Stage III colon cancer. The study group included 104 consecutive patients with Stage III colon cancer who underwent curative surgery. One patient changed hospitals immediately after surgery. Among the remaining 103 patients, 82(80%)received adjuvant chemotherapy and 21(20%)did not. CapeOX was administered to 32 patients(31%), UFT/LV to 49 patients(48%), and capecitabine to 1 patient(1%). In 59 patients, the treatment choice was determined according to the patient's preference; 32 patient(s 54%)selected CapeOX, 26(44%)selected UFT/LV, and 1(2%) selected no chemotherapy. The treatment completion rate was 80% for CapeOX and 84% for UFT/LV. Among patients who completed chemotherapy, dose reduction and drug withdrawal were not required in 22% of patients who received CapeOX and 80% of those who received UFT/LV. Neither CapeOX nor UFT/LV was associated with any serious adverse events. The tolerability and safety of CapeOX and UFT/LV were acceptable. However, CapeOX dose had to be carefully adjusted according to each patient's condition. PMID:27210088

  10. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with improved survival for all high-risk factors in stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Verhoeff, S R; van Erning, F N; Lemmens, V E P P; de Wilt, J H W; Pruijt, J F M

    2016-07-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy can be considered in high-risk stage II colon cancer comprising pT4, poor/undifferentiated grade, vascular invasion, emergency surgery and/or <10 evaluated lymph nodes (LNs). Adjuvant chemotherapy administration and its effect on survival was evaluated for each known risk factor. All patients with high-risk stage II colon cancer who underwent resection and were diagnosed in the Netherlands between 2008 and 2012 were included. After stratification by risk factor(s) (vascular invasion could not be included), Cox regression was used to discriminate the independent association of adjuvant chemotherapy with the probability of death. Relative survival was used to estimate disease-specific survival. A total of 4,940 of 10,935 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified as high risk, of whom 790 (16%) patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a pT4 received adjuvant chemotherapy more often (37%). Probability of death in pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy was lower compared to non-recipients (3-year overall survival 91% vs. 73%, HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.28-0.66). The relative excess risk (RER) of dying was also lower for pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy compared to non-recipients (3-year relative survival 94% vs. 85%, RER 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.74). For patients with only poor/undifferentiated grade, emergency surgery or <10 LNs evaluated, no association between receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy and survival was observed. In high-risk stage II colon cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with higher survival in pT4 only. To prevent unnecessary chemotherapy-induced toxicity, further refinement of patient subgroups within stage II colon cancer who could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy seems indicated. PMID:26914273

  11. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO.

    PubMed

    Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Souglakos, John; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Xynos, Evaghelos; Ziras, Nikolaos; Papamichael, Demetris

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the Western world both in men and women. In this manuscript a concise overview and recommendations on adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer are presented. An executive team from the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology was assigned to develop a consensus statement and guidelines on the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. Fourteen statements on adjuvant treatment were subjected to the Delphi methodology. Voting experts were 68. All statements achieved a rate of consensus above than 80% (>87%) and none revised and entered to a second round of voting. Three and 8 of them achieved a 100 and an over than 90% consensus, respectively. These statements describe evaluations of therapies in clinical practice. They could be considered as general guidelines based on best available evidence for assistance in treatment decision-making. Furthermore, they serve to identify questions and targets for further research and the settings in which investigational therapy could be considered. PMID:26751386

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO*

    PubMed Central

    Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Souglakos, John; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Xynos, Evaghelos; Ziras, Nikolaos; Papamichael, Demetris

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in the Western world both in men and women. In this manuscript a concise overview and recommendations on adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer are presented. An executive team from the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology was assigned to develop a consensus statement and guidelines on the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. Fourteen statements on adjuvant treatment were subjected to the Delphi methodology. Voting experts were 68. All statements achieved a rate of consensus above than 80% (>87%) and none revised and entered to a second round of voting. Three and 8 of them achieved a 100 and an over than 90% consensus, respectively. These statements describe evaluations of therapies in clinical practice. They could be considered as general guidelines based on best available evidence for assistance in treatment decision-making. Furthermore, they serve to identify questions and targets for further research and the settings in which investigational therapy could be considered. PMID:26751386

  14. Is distance to chemotherapy an obstacle to adjuvant care among the N.C. Medicaid—enrolled colon cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eunyoung; Klepin, Heidi D.; Foley, Kristie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer has been linked to patient and provider characteristics but little is known about whether distance to chemotherapy providers constitutes an obstacle to chemotherapy. Methods A total of 1,184 Medicaid patients diagnosed with colon cancer in North Carolina in 1999–2002 comprised the sample. Data from the N.C. Central Cancer Registry, N.C. Medicaid Claims, American Hospital Directory and US Census were merged. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between chemotherapy receipt and the distance to nearest chemotherapy provider. Results Compared to the referent group of SEER-staged II (local) cancer patients living less than 2 miles from the nearest chemotherapy provider, the odds of receiving chemotherapy fell as the distance to the nearest provider increased. The odds ratio (OR) for those living ≥5 to <15 miles away was 0.13 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.04–0.39], and OR for those living ≥15 miles away was 0.06 (95% CI, 0.01–0.52). Patients diagnosed with regional, SEER-staged III (regional) cancer were less likely to receive chemotherapy if they lived in rural areas more than 20 miles away from the nearest provider (OR =0.08; 95% CI, 0.01–0.72). However, we found no evidence of association between chemotherapy receipt and distance to the nearest provider for regional cancer patients living in urban areas and those living in rural areas within 20 miles from the nearest chemotherapy provider. Conclusions Distance to provider may be an obstacle to chemotherapy for some groups of low-income colon cancer patients. Relieving travel burdens of rural patients living far from providers may help Medicaid increase guideline-consistent adjuvant care for regional cancer patients. PMID:27284464

  15. Cost-effectiveness of adjuvant FOLFOX and 5FU/LV chemotherapy for patients with stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaci, Mehmet U.S.; Shi, Jinghua; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Lubner, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin (5FU/LV), and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) compared with 5FU/LV alone and 5FU/LV compared with observation alone for patients who had resected stage II colon cancer. Methods We developed two Markov models to represent the adjuvant chemotherapy and follow-up periods and a single Markov model to represent the observation group. We used calibration to estimate the transition probabilities among different toxicity levels. The base-case considered 60-year-old patients who had undergone an uncomplicated hemicolectomy for stage II colon cancer and was medically fit to receive 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy. We measured health outcomes in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and estimated costs using 2007 US$. Results In the base-case, adjuvant chemotherapy of FOLFOX regimen had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $54,359/QALY compared with the 5FU/LV regimen and the 5FU/LV regimen had an ICER of $14,584/QALY compared with the observation group from the third-party payer perspective. The ICER values were most sensitive to 5-year relapse probability, cost of adjuvant chemotherapy, and the discount rate for the FOLFOX arm, whereas the ICER value of 5FU/LV was most sensitive to the 5-year relapse probability, 5-year survival probability, and the relapse cost. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicate that the ICER of 5FU/LV is less than $50,000/QALY with a probability of 99.62% and the ICER of FOLFOX as compared to 5FU/LV is less than $50,000/QALY and $100,000/QALY with a probability of 44.48% and 97.24%, respectively. Conclusion While adjuvant chemotherapy with 5FU/LV is cost-effective at all ages for patients who had undergone an uncomplicated hemicolectomy for stage II colon cancer, FOLFOX is not likely to be cost-effective as compared to 5FU/LV. PMID:23313932

  16. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: comparison of administrative versus medical record data.

    PubMed

    Amlani, Adam; Kumar, Aalok; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to examine the frequency of treatment delays as well as the reasons and appropriateness of such delays in early stage colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant capecitabine by comparing data from pharmacy dispensing versus medical records. Patients diagnosed with stage II or III colon cancer from 2008 to 2012 and who received at least two cycle of adjuvant capecitabine were reviewed for treatment delays. Data from pharmacy dispensing and patient medical records were compared. Multivariate regression models were constructed to identify predictors of treatment delays. A total of 697 patients were analyzed: median age was 70 years (IQR 30-89), 394 (57%) were men, 598 (86%) reported Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0/1, and 191 (27%) had stage II disease. In this study cohort, 396 (57%) patients experienced at least 1 treatment delay during their adjuvant treatment. Upon medical record review, half of treatment delays identified using pharmacy administrative data were actually attributable to side effects, of which over 90% were considered clinically appropriate for patients to withhold rather than to continue the drug. The most prevalent side effects were hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea which occurred in 176 (44%) and 67 (17%) patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed a statistically significant association between stage and inappropriate treatment delays whereby patients with stage II disease were more likely to experience drug noncompliance (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.27-2.53, P < 0.001) than those with stage III disease. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine was reasonable. Adherence ascertained from pharmacy administrative data differs significantly from that obtained from medical records. PMID:27228415

  17. Intravenous Calcium and Magnesium for Oxaliplatin-Induced Sensory Neurotoxicity in Adjuvant Colon Cancer: NCCTG N04C7

    PubMed Central

    Grothey, Axel; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Kugler, John W.; Silberstein, Peter T.; Dentchev, Todor; Wender, Donald B.; Novotny, Paul J.; Chitaley, Umesh; Alberts, Steven R.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cumulative sensory neurotoxicity (sNT) is the dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin, which commonly leads to early discontinuation of oxaliplatin-based therapy in the palliative and adjuvant settings. In a nonrandomized, retrospective study, intravenous (IV) calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) was associated with reduced oxaliplatin-induced sNT. Methods Patients with colon cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy with infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) were randomly assigned to Ca/Mg (1g calcium gluconate plus 1g magnesium sulfate pre- and post-oxaliplatin) or placebo, in a double-blinded manner. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with grade 2 or greater sNT at any time during or after oxaliplatin-based therapy by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE; version 3) criteria. An oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale and patient questionnaires were also used to assess sNT. After 104 of 300 planned patients were enrolled, the study was closed. This was due to preliminary reports from another trial that suggested that Ca/Mg decreased treatment efficacy; these data were subsequently found to be incorrect. Results Overall, 102 patients were available for analysis. Ca/Mg decreased the incidence of chronic, cumulative, grade 2 or greater sNT, as measured by NCI CTCAE (P = .038) and also by the oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale (P = .018). In addition, acute muscle spasms associated with oxaliplatin were significantly reduced (P = .01) No effect on acute, cold-induced sNT was found. No substantial differences in adverse effects were noted between Ca/Mg and placebo. Conclusion Despite early termination and decreased statistical power, this study supports IV Ca/Mg as an effective neuroprotectant against oxaliplatin-induced cumulative sNT in adjuvant colon cancer. PMID:21189381

  18. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Bosman, Fred; Tejpar, Sabine; Roth, Arnaud; Brunner, Nils; Hansen, Anker; Knudsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether gene signatures for chemosensitivity for irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derived from in vitro grown cancer cell lines can predict clinical sensitivity to these drugs. Methods To test if an irinotecan signature and a SN-38 signature could identify patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. Results There was no statistically significant association between the irinotecan or SN-38 profiles and benefit from irinotecan. The 5-FU sensitivity profile showed a statistically significant association with relapse free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.54 (0.41–0.71), p<1e-05) and overall survival (HR = 0.47 (0.34–0.63), p<1e-06) in the PETACC-3 subpopulation. The effect of the 5-FU profile remained significant in a multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards model, adjusting for several relevant clinicopathological parameters. No statistically significant effect of the 5-FU profile was observed in the untreated cohort of 359 patients (relapse free survival, p = 0.671). Conclusion The irinotecan predictor had no predictive value. The 5-FU predictor was prognostic in stage III patients in PETACC-3 but not in stage II patients with no adjuvant therapy. This suggests a potential predictive ability of the 5-FU sensitivity profile to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences

  19. Systemic capillary leak syndrome in a patient receiving adjuvant oxaliplatin for locally advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brandon J; Peterson, Lindsay L

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the USA each year. Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapy agent, is part of the standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX (oxaliplatin with 5-fluorouracil [5-FU] and leucovorin [LV]) for the treatment of stage III and some high-risk stage II colorectal cancers. Although oxaliplatin is generally well tolerated, certain side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and peripheral neuropathy are common. We report a case of oxaliplatin-induced capillary-leak syndrome in a 63-year-old man undergoing his 12th and final cycle of FOLFOX for stage III colorectal cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first case of systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) reported in association with oxaliplatin. Currently, there is no prevention for SCLS. Documenting future cases of SCLS attributed to oxaliplatin is vital, as SCLS is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and no standard treatments beyond supportive care measures exist. Early recognition and diagnosis are therefore essential to improving patient outcomes. PMID:26071595

  20. Economic comparison of capecitabine + oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aitini, Enrico; Rossi, Anna; Morselli, Patrizia; Vivorio, Beatrice; Bruschi, Alessandra; Bottura, Chiara; Colombo, Giorgio L

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent and lethal cancers. The aim of this study was to analyze the costs relating to treatment of colorectal cancer between Xelox and Folfox-4 at a regional level according to the clinical experience at an Italian hospital in Lombardy. Methods A cost analysis was carried out regarding resource consumption by patients suffering from colorectal cancer based on data collected over a 12-month period between 2010 and 2011. The analysis involved 40 patients who attended the Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology at Carlo Poma Hospital to undergo adjuvant therapy for colorectal cancer. A chart was created for each patient containing their medical history, their pharmacological therapy indicating the number and duration of chemotherapy cycles, dose in mg administered for each cycle, number of day hospital visits for each cycle, number of days spent in hospital to position the central vein catheter, type of infusion pump used, any subsequent supportive therapy, and any side effects and outpatient visits connected with side effects. Results The cost analysis shows the savings involved in using Xelox for a single cycle of treatment, ie, approximately €1414.00 per patient (53% compared with Folfox-4). For each single cycle of treatment, the savings generated by using capecitabine compared with 5-FU can be attributed mostly to the fact that oral administration of chemotherapy requires fewer resources and does not require use of a central vein catheter (approximately 70% of overall cost) which amply compensates for the higher cost of capecitabine compared with 5-FU-LV. Sensibility analysis confirms the results of the base-case scenario. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that infusion via a central vein catheter represents a significant cost, and that substitution with an oral therapy, even when associated with drugs administered intravenously, represents a consistent saving of hospital resources. PMID

  1. High Risk Stage 2 and Stage 3 Colon Cancer, Predictors of Recurrence and Effect of Adjuvant Therapy in a Nonselected Population

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart; Loffeld, Ruud J. L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer often are treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. However, patients seen in daily practice have more comorbidity than those enrolled in clinical trials. This study aims to evaluate prognostic factors for recurrence and to ascertain the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy on recurrence-free survival (RFS) of patients in a nonselected population. Furthermore, the impact of relative dose intensity (RDI) of adjuvant therapy on RFS is examined. Chart review was performed for 243 consecutive patients diagnosed and treated at a single center for stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer from 2002 to 2008. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 66 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 5.84 years and median RFS was 5.37 years. For stage 2 disease, patients treated with or without adjuvant therapy had a median RFS of 5.49 and 5.73, respectively (p = ns). For stage 3 disease, median RFS rates were 5.08 and 1.19, respectively (p = 0.084). Overall RDI of oxaliplatin based chemotherapy higher than median was associated with increased RFS (p = 0.045). In conclusion, adjuvant therapy did not significantly increase recurrence-free survival. This could be the result of comorbidity in patients. Relative dose intensity of oxaliplatin based therapy is associated with RFS.

  2. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of adjuvant oral capecitabine vs intravenous 5-FU/LV in Dukes' C colon cancer: the X-ACT trial

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, J; Douillard, J-Y; Twelves, C; McKendrick, J J; Scheithauer, W; Bustová, I; Johnston, P G; Lesniewski-Kmak, K; Jelic, S; Fountzilas, G; Coxon, F; Díaz-Rubio, E; Maughan, T S; Malzyner, A; Bertetto, O; Beham, A; Figer, A; Dufour, P; Patel, K K; Cowell, W; Garrison, L P

    2006-01-01

    Oral capecitabine (Xeloda®) is an effective drug with favourable safety in adjuvant and metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin-based therapy is becoming standard for Dukes' C colon cancer in patients suitable for combination therapy, but is not yet approved by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the adjuvant setting. Adjuvant capecitabine is at least as effective as 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV), with significant superiority in relapse-free survival and a trend towards improved disease-free and overall survival. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant capecitabine from payer (UK National Health Service (NHS)) and societal perspectives. We used clinical trial data and published sources to estimate incremental direct and societal costs and gains in quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). Acquisition costs were higher for capecitabine than 5-FU/LV, but higher 5-FU/LV administration costs resulted in 57% lower chemotherapy costs for capecitabine. Capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV-associated adverse events required fewer medications and hospitalisations (cost savings £3653). Societal costs, including patient travel/time costs, were reduced by >75% with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV (cost savings £1318), with lifetime gain in QALMs of 9 months. Medical resource utilisation is significantly decreased with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV, with cost savings to the NHS and society. Capecitabine is also projected to increase life expectancy vs 5-FU/LV. Cost savings and better outcomes make capecitabine a preferred adjuvant therapy for Dukes' C colon cancer. This pharmacoeconomic analysis strongly supports replacing 5-FU/LV with capecitabine in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer in the UK. PMID:16622438

  3. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red or processed meats Have colorectal polyps Have inflammatory bowel disease ( Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis ) Have a family history of colon cancer Have a personal history of breast cancer Some inherited diseases also increase the risk ...

  4. The effect of comorbidity on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and type of regimen for curatively resected stage III colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Thompson, Trevor; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Styles, Timothy; O'Flarity, Mary B; Morris, Cyllene R; Chen, Vivien W

    2016-05-01

    Postsurgical chemotherapy is guideline-recommended therapy for stage III colon cancer patients. Factors associated with patients not receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were identified in numerous studies; comorbidity was recognized as an important factor besides patient's age. We assessed the association between comorbidity and the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and type of chemotherapy regimen. Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent surgical resection were obtained from ten Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-NPCR Specialized Registries which participated in the Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) project. Comorbidity was classified into no comorbidity recorded, Charlson, non-Charlson comorbidities, number, and severity of Charlson comorbidity. Pearson chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression were employed. Of 3180 resected stage III colon cancer patients, 64% received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjusting for patient's demographic and tumor characteristics, there were no significant differences in receipt of chemotherapy between Charlson and non-Charlson comorbidity. However, patients who had two or more Charlson comorbidities or had moderate to severe disease were significantly less likely to have chemotherapy (ORs 0.69 [95% CI, 0.51-0.92] and 0.62 [95% CI, 0.42-0.91], respectively) when compared with those with non-Charlson comorbidity. In addition, those with moderate or severe comorbidities were more likely to receive single chemotherapy agent (P < 0.0001). Capecitabine and FOLFOX were the most common single- and multi-agent regimens regardless of type of comorbidity grouping. Both the number and severity of comorbidity were significantly associated with receipt of guideline-recommended chemotherapy and type of agent in stage III resected colon cancer patients. Better personalized care based on individual patient's condition ought to be recognized. PMID:26773804

  5. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  6. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  7. Adjuvant therapy of Dukes' C colon cancer by intra-arterial P-32 colloid for internal radiation therapy of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    To prevent probable occult metastatic liver cancer from progressing to clinical disease, the author used internal radiation therapy as an effective adjuvant to surgical excision of primary Dukes' C colonic cancer. A calculated radiation dose of 5000 rads was delivered to the liver by injecting radioactive 32-P chromic phosphate colloid through the superior mesenteric and celiac arteries. When this was done, the colloid passed through the intestines and was mixed thoroughly with the blood and delivered to the liver by the portal vein. The Kupffer cells in the liver trapped the colloid, and a minimum amount passed through the liver and got into the general circulation. This kept the amount of colloid deposited in the bone marrow to a minimum. In a phase-I pilot study in which nine patients were treated, no serious side effects were noted. In eight patients, the liver has remained free of cancer for more than 1 year.

  8. LINE-1 Methylation Status Correlates Significantly to Post-Therapeutic Recurrence in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients Receiving FOLFOX-4 Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, I-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylation levels of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) are representative of genome-wide methylation status and crucial in maintaining genomic stability and expression. Their prognostic impact on colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy has not been well established. We evaluated the association between LINE-1 methylation status and clinicopathologic features and postoperative oncological outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients. Materials and Methods 129 UICC stage III colon cancer patients who had received radical resection and FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Global methylation was estimated by analyzing tumor LINE-1 methylation status using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing assay. Demographics, clinicopathological data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded by trained abstractors. Outcome measurements included postoperative recurrence and disease-free survival. Univariate, multivariate, and survival analyses were conducted to identify prognostic factors of oncological outcomes. Results The LINE-1 methylation of all 129 patients was measured on a 0–100 scale (mean 63.3; median 63.7, standard deviation 7.1), LINE-1 hypomethylation was more common in patients aged 65 years and above (61.7%±7.6% vs. 64.6±6.4, p=0.019) and those with post-therapeutic recurrence (61.7±7.4 vs 64.3±6.7, p=0.041). Considering risk adjustment, LINE-1 hypomethylation was found to be an independent risk factor of post-therapeutic recurrence (Adjusted OR=14.1, p=0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients in the low methylation group had shorter period of disease free survival (p=0.01). In a stratified analysis that included 48 patients with post-therapeutic recurrence, it was found that those who experienced shorter period of disease free survival (≦6 months) appeared to have lower LINE-1 methylation levels than patients who reported of recurrence after 6 months (56.68±15.75 vs. 63.55±7

  9. Randomized phase III trial of treatment duration for oral uracil and tegafur plus leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer: final results of JFMC33-0502

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kondo, K.; Katsumata, K.; Nishimura, G.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Sato, S.; Koda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Morita, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Usuki, H.; Hamada, C.; Kodaira, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While adjuvant chemotherapy is preferable for high-risk colon cancer, treatment duration is controversial. Oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/leucovorin (LV) is widely used as a standard adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer in Japan. We conducted a phase III trial to investigate the optimal duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Patients and methods Patients with curatively resected stage IIB/III colon cancer were eligible for enrollment in this trial. Patients were registered within 6 weeks after surgery and were randomly assigned to receive UFT/LV for 28 of 35 days for 6 months in the control group or for 5 consecutive days per week for 18 months in the study group. The primary end point was the disease-free survival (DFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and safety. Result A total of 1071 patients were registered from 233 centers. A statistically significant difference in DFS was not observed between the study group and the control group; the 5-year DFS was 69% in the study group and 69% in the control group. The 5-year OS was 85% in the study group and 85% in the control group. Conclusion Eighteen-month treatment with UFT/LV did not improve DFS or OS compared with 6-month UFT/LV treatment in patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer. The important finding from this study is that not 18 months but 6 months of treatment is enough for postoperative UFT/LV for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Clinical trial number UMIN-CTR C000000245. PMID:26347106

  10. Colon cancer - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. Risk factors include a diet low ... The treatment of colon cancer depends on the stage of the disease. Stage I cancer is limited to the inner lining of the colon; ...

  11. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Tepper, J E; Skates, S J; Wood, W C; Orlow, E C; Duttenhaver, J R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three patients with Stage B2, B3, and C colonic carcinoma had resection for curative intent followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates for these 133 patients were 82% and 61%, respectively. Stage for stage, the development of local regional failure was reduced for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy compared with a historic control series. Local recurrence occurred in 8%, 21%, and 31% of patients with Stage B3, C2, and C3 tumors who had radiation therapy, respectively, whereas the local failure rates were 31%, 36%, and 53% in patients treated with surgery alone. There was a 13% and 12% improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate in the patients with Stage B3 and C3 lesions who had radiotherapy compared with the historic controls. For patients with Stage C disease, local control and disease-free survival rates decreased progressively with increasing nodal involvement; however, local control and disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients who had radiotherapy than in those who had surgery alone. Failure patterns in the patients who had radiotherapy did not show any notable changes compared with those for patients who had surgery alone. Postoperative radiation therapy for Stage B3, C2, and C3 colonic carcinoma is a promising treatment approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:3689006

  12. Regorafenib as a potential adjuvant chemotherapy agent in disseminated small colon cancer: Drug selection outcome of a novel screening system using nanoimprinting 3-dimensional culture with HCT116-RFP cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Aoyama, Hironori; Adachi, Naoya; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-04-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy following primary surgical treatment is suggested to be beneficial in eradicating invisible disseminated small tumors in colon cancer; however, an effective drug remains to be developed. Recently, we reported a novel drug screening system using a nanoimprinting 3-dimensional (3D) culture that creates multicellular spheroids, which simulate in vivo conditions and, thereby, predict effective drugs in vivo. This study aimed to perform drug selection using our recently developed 3D culture system in a human colon cancer HCT116 cell line stably expressing red fluorescent protein (HCT116-RFP), to determine the most effective agent in a selection of clinically used antitumor agents for colon cancer. In addition, we confirmed the efficacy of the selected drug regorafenib, in vivo using a mouse model of disseminated small tumors. HCT116-RFP cells were cultured using a nanoimprinting 3D culture and in vitro drug selection was performed with 8 clinically used drugs [bevacizumab, capecitabine, cetuximab, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan, oxaliplatin, panitumumab and regorafenib]. An in vivo study was performed in mice bearing HCT116-RFP intraperitoneally disseminated small tumors using 3'-[18F]-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine-positron emission tomography and fluorescence microscopy imaging to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Regorafenib was determined to be the most effective drug in the 3D culture, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo, compared to the untreated control and 5-FU-treated group. The drug 5-FU is commonly used in colon cancer treatment and was used as a reference. Our results demonstrate that regorafenib is a potentially efficacious adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of disseminated small colon cancer and, therefore, warrants further preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26820693

  13. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  14. Recent advances in the treatment of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Zhou, B; Fung, P C W; Li, X

    2006-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although surgical resection is still the only treatment capable of curing colon cancer, adjuvant therapy continues to play an important role in preventing recurrence and metastasis. In recent years remarkable progress has been made in the treatment of colon cancer. This review discusses recent advances in adjuvant therapy for colon cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, antiangiogenic therapy and apoptosis induction. In the meantime, molecular therapy is also elucidated in the above methods. All these new advances will provide new promises for patients of colon cancer. PMID:16691539

  15. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  16. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bobanga, Iuliana D.; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y.

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24967094

  17. Colon cancer - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series To use the sharing features on ... 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  18. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  19. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  20. Relationship Between Tumor Gene Expression and Recurrence in Four Independent Studies of Patients With Stage II/III Colon Cancer Treated With Surgery Alone or Surgery Plus Adjuvant Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L.; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J. Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. Patients and Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. Results A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. Conclusion RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study. PMID:20679606

  1. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test ... death and complications caused by colorectal cancer. SCREENING TESTS There are several ways to screen for colon ...

  2. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  3. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  4. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  5. Liver Colonization Competence Governs Colon Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Tsong-Hong; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Furukawa, Toshiharu; Teramoto, Tatuso; Ishibiki, Kyuya; Kitajima, Masaki; Rahim Moosa, A.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors that metastasize do so to preferred target organs. To explain this apparent specificity, Paget, >100 years ago, formulated his seed and soil hypothesis; i.e., the cells from a given tumor would "seed" only favorable "soil" offered by certain organs. The hypothesis implies that cancer cells must find a suitable "soil" in a target organ-i.e., one that supports colonization-for metastasis to occur. We demonstrate in this report that ability of human colon cancer cells to colonize liver tissue governs whether a particular colon cancer is metastatic. In the model used in this study, human colon tumors are transplanted into the nude mouse colon as intact tissue blocks by surgical orthotopic implantation. These implanted tumors closely simulate the metastatic behavior of the original human patient tumor and are clearly metastatic or nonmetastatic to the liver. Both classes of tumors were equally invasive locally into tissues and blood vessels. However, the cells from each class of tumor behave very differently when directly injected into nude mouse livers. Only cells from metastasizing tumors are competent to colonize after direct intrahepatic injection. Also, tissue blocks from metastatic tumors affixed directly to the liver resulted in colonization, whereas no colonization resulted from nonmetastatic tumor tissue blocks even though some growth occurred within the tissue block itself. Thus, local invasion (injection) and even adhesion to the metastatic target organ (blocks) are not sufficient for metastasis. The results suggest that the ability to colonize the liver is the governing step in the metastasis of human colon cancer.

  6. Sphingolipids in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Barros, Mónica; Coant, Nicolas; Truman, Jean-Philip; Snider, Ashley J.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of death in the western world. Despite increasing knowledge of the molecular signaling pathways implicated in colon cancer, therapeutic outcomes are still only moderately successful. Sphingolipids, a family of N-acyl linked lipids, have not only structural functions but are also implicated in important biological functions. Ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate are the most important bioactive lipids, and they regulate several key cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that many cancers present alterations in sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes. The aim of this review is to discuss the emerging roles of sphingolipids, both endogenous and dietary, in colon cancer and the interaction of sphingolipids with WNT/β-catenin pathway, one of the most important signaling cascades that regulate development and homeostasis in intestine PMID:24060581

  7. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  8. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  9. Hereditary and Familial Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jasperson, Kory W.; Tuohy, Thérèse M.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Burt, Randall W.

    2011-01-01

    Between 2% to 5% of all colon cancers arise in the setting of well defined inherited syndromes, including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, and certain hamartomatous polyposis conditions. Each is associated with a high risk of colon cancer. In addition to the syndromes, up to one-third of colon cancers exhibit increased familial risk, likely related to inheritance. A number of less penetrant, but possibly more frequent susceptibility genes have been identified for this level of inheritance. Clarification of predisposing genes allows for accurate risk assessment and more precise screening approaches. This review examines the colon cancer syndromes, their genetics and management, and also the common familial colon cancers with current genetic advances and screening guidelines. PMID:20420945

  10. Colon polyps and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kronborg, O

    2004-01-01

    Screening for colorectal neoplasia still is the best method of reducing the mortality due to colorectal cancer, and it is to be hoped that fecal occult blood test programs will expand in the near future and be combined with appropriate endoscopy. There are substantial problems with compliance in large programs with occult blood tests as well as endoscopy. Colonography and DNA testing in feces are not yet suitable for population screening. Diagnostic strategies in symptomatic patients are becoming more selective, in the hope of avoiding many superfluous examinations without increasing the risk of missing cancers. New results have confirmed the preventive effect of long-term aspirin use on adenoma recurrence, but the most cost-effective dosage is not clear; the mechanism of action is also uncertain, but seems to involve cyclooxygenase-2. The risk of adenomas does not appear to be associated with low consumption of folate, but with low intake of fiber. A number of biomarkers have been evaluated in polyp patients, but so far surveillance is still based on endoscopic experience, which is less than optimal. Attempts have been made to restrict the number of surveillance endoscopies and reduce the pathologist's workload. The place of argon plasma coagulation has been clearly defined in connection with piecemeal removal of large sessile adenomas. Advances have been achieved in surgery and radiotherapy for rectal cancer, and acute surgery for colonic cancer with severe obstruction will be less common after the introduction of the metal stent. PMID:14722849

  11. A Case of Sigmoid Colon Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Min; Kim, Min-Dae; Lee, Hee-Ryong; Jung, Peel; Ryu, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Il-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the sigmoid colon is a rare disorder. An 80-year-old man visited Bongseng Memorial Hospital for medical examination. A colonoscopy was performed, and a lesion in the sigmoid colon that was suspected to be colon cancer was found. A biopsy was performed, and tuberculous enteritis with chronic granulomatous inflammation was diagnosed. Intestinal tuberculosis is most frequent in the ileocecal area, followed by the ascending colon, transverse colon, duodenum, stomach, and sigmoid colon, in descending order. Hence, we report a case of intestinal tuberculosis in the sigmoid colon, which is rare and almost indistinguishable from colon cancer. PMID:23185709

  12. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  13. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  14. [Adjuvant drug therapies for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Riikka; Auvinen, Päivi; Mattson, Johanna; Joensuu, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Most breast cancers are hormone receptor positive and exhibit a slow growth pattern. Based on biological properties, breast cancers are divided into four different biological subtypes. Furthermore, these subtypes are indicative of the risk of recurrence, which is also influenced by the size of the tumor and extension to lymph nodes. Postoperative adjuvant drug therapy is chosen on the basis of the biological type. Chemotherapy can be used in all subtypes. Hormonal therapies are used exclusively for the treatment of hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab antibody belongs to the treatment of the HER2 positive subtype. PMID:26245052

  15. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colorectal carcinoma above the peritoneal reflection. II. Antimesenteric wall ascending and descending colon and cecum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelson, G.

    1983-08-15

    From 1970 to 1981, 50 patients had curative surgery for carcinoma of the cecum, ascending, or descending colon and were Stage greater than or equal to B2. In 15 cases, the lesion originated on the antimesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall. Of seven cases (with minimum three-year follow-up) not receiving adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation, four recurred in the tumor bed/abdominal wall versus 0/3 irradiated patients. Similarly, the five-year survival was improved in the irradiated group (2/3) versus only 2/9 in the unirradiated group. Patients with transmural extension of right or left colon cancers originating on the anti mesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall may have a high incidence of postoperative regional failure which may be decreased by adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation.

  16. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  17. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  18. Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159004.html Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50 Incidence up ... TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although overall colon cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans ...

  19. Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    From 2000 until 2010 with the support from the National Cancer Institute, the Mouse Models for Human Cancer Consortium, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute workshops and conferences to advance the understanding and use of animal models in colorectal cancer research have been organized .

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  2. Update on Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rampurwala, Murtuza M; Rocque, Gabrielle B; Burkard, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Although most women are diagnosed with early breast cancer, a substantial number recur due to persistent micro-metastatic disease. Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy improves outcomes and has advanced from first-generation regimens to modern dose-dense combinations. Although chemotherapy is the cornerstone of adjuvant therapy, new biomarkers are identifying patients who can forego such treatment. Neo-adjuvant therapy is a promising platform for drug development, but investigators should recognize the limitations of surrogate endpoints and clinical trials. Previous decades have focused on discovering, developing, and intensifying adjuvant chemotherapy. Future efforts should focus on customizing therapy and reducing chemotherapy for patients unlikely to benefit. In some cases, it may be possible to replace chemotherapy with treatments directed at specific genetic or molecular breast cancer subtypes. Yet, we anticipate that chemotherapy will remain a critical component of adjuvant therapy for years to come. PMID:25336961

  3. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ejlertsen, Bent

    2016-05-01

    these CMF regimens has not been compared within the context of a randomised trial. Shifting from the 77B's classic CMF regimen to the 82B four-weekly IV regimen or the 89B three-weekly IV regimen was associated with a 30% increased risk of a DFS event in a multivariate analysis of a population-based cohort study. Furthermore, the four-weekly regimen used in 82B was associated with a 40% increase in mortality. The strengths of the design include identical selection criteria, uniform and prospective registration of treatment, tumour and patient characteristics. Caution is still required due to the non-experimental design of the comparison. Another finding was a substantial difference in the risk of amenorrhoea; and while 15% of patients aged 40 or younger in 77B had regular menses throughout chemotherapy, the corresponding percentage was 37 in 82B and 47 in 89B. The DBCG in collaboration with a Swedish and a Dutch centre participating in the DBCG trial 89B compared CMF with ovarian ablation in premenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumours. No significant differences were found in DFS or OS in the preplanned analysis, suggesting that the benefits of CMF may, at least in part, be explained by ovarian suppression in premenopausal patients with ER-positive tumours. However, these results are not clinically useful by themselves as other chemotherapy regimens have been more efficacious, and knowledge is still lacking regarding the benefits from adding ovarian suppression to chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. The results from the DBCG 77B and 82C are in accordance with other large adjuvant trials and the EBCTCG meta-analyses. The benefits obtained with any individual anticancer drug are largely determined by the cancer (somatic) genome; and by being a molecular target of anthracyclines, TOP2A aberrations could obviously be associated with cancer drug benefits. In the DBCG 89D, a significant heterogeneity was observed between a beneficial effect on DFS and OS

  5. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say ... 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon ...

  6. STUDIES OF DBP-INDUCED COLON CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of colon carcinomas by trihalomethanes in rats may be relevant to epidemiological findings of increased incidences of colon-rectal cancer associated with exposure to chlorination byproducts. These studies have demonstrated that the brominated THMs in drinking water ind...

  7. Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159556.html Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer But researchers say ... 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon ...

  8. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  9. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  10. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. [Recent advance in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Chikako; Watanabe, Toru

    2002-12-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to a significant improvement of disease-free and overall survival in addition to surgery and irradiation to the local disease. The adjuvant therapy to a patient is determined integrating the information on estimated risk of recurrence, benefit and harm of the therapy and the patient's value. In this review, the state of the art of adjuvant therapy is discussed from several aspects, such as interpretation and evaluation of risk, the best available evidences on adjuvant systemic therapy, the future direction of primary therapy for breast cancer, and patient-oriented decision making. PMID:12506467

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  13. Colon Cancer After Acute Diverticulitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Je Hoon; Choi, Kyu Un; Han, Myung Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulitis is the most common clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10-25% of the patients with diverticula. The prevalences of diverticulitis and colon cancer tend to increase with age and are higher in industrialized countries. Consequently, diverticulitis and colon cancer have been reported to have similar epidemiological characteristics. However, the relationship between these diseases remains controversial, as is the performance of routine colonoscopy after an episode of diverticulitis to exclude colon cancer. Recently, we experienced three cases of colon cancer after treating acute diverticulitis, based on which we suggest the importance of follow-up colonoscopy after acute diverticulitis. PMID:24032118

  14. Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159699.html Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer Early detection improves likelihood of survival, researchers ... increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is ...

  15. Microbes, Microbiota and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural therefore to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta’omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:24629338

  16. Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159004.html Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50 Incidence up more than 10 percent in ... cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans under 50 have jumped more than 11 percent in ...

  17. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  18. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... explains the most commonly used screening methods, including test preparation, in simple language. View video Narrator : If ... cancer or even going for a colon cancer test can be frightening to you. “What if they ...

  19. Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: Current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Marcus; Leong, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The management of gastric cancer continues to evolve. Whilst surgery alone is effective when tumours present early, a large proportion of patients are diagnosed with loco-regionally advanced disease, resulting in high loco-regional and distant relapse rates, with subsequent poor survival. Early attempts at improving outcomes following resection were disappointing; however, randomized trials have now established either post-operative chemoradiotherapy (INT0116) or peri-operative chemotherapy as standard adjuvant therapies in the Western world. There remain, however, significant differences in the approach to management between the West and East. In Asia, where there is the highest incidence of gastric cancer, extended resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy represents the standard of care. This review discusses current standard adjuvant therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as recent and ongoing trials investigating novel (neo)adjuvant approaches, which hope to build on the successes of previous studies. PMID:25320509

  20. Targeted Sequencing for Discovery and Validation of DNA Methylation Markers of Colon Cancer Metastasis — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. A key issue in treating colon cancer patients is inability to accurately predict tumors that have metastatic potential and require adjuvant chemotherapy. This project will test the model that tumor metastases arise from intra-tumor heterogeneity generated by DNA methylation events, and that detecting these events can provide a predictve signature of tumors with poor outcome

  1. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Mery, Les

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers. PMID:24281033

  2. UFT/leucovorin vs 5-FU/leucovorin in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E; Lembersky, B C; Wieand, H S; Colangelo, L; Mamounas, E P

    2000-10-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to alter the natural history of resected colon cancer. Two regimens (fluorouracil [5-FU] plus leucovorin and 5-FU plus levamisole) have been found to prolong disease-free survival and overall survival in affected patients. Previous comparisons of these two regimens indicate that 5-FU plus leucovorin may offer a small disease-free survival and overall survival advantage. Evidence that UFT (uracil and tegafur) plus oral leucovorin is associated with significant antitumor activity and has an acceptable toxicity profile makes this a logical formulation for the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol C-06 is a randomized comparison of the relative efficacies of 5-FU plus leucovorin vs UFT plus leucovorin. Preliminary analysis of the toxicity findings among 1,530 evaluable patients indicates that both regimens are well tolerated and have similar toxicity profiles. PMID:11098486

  3. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  4. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD. PMID:27144209

  5. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  7. Cancer of the Colon and Rectum

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 134,490 % of All New Cancer Cases 8.0% Estimated Deaths in 2016 49,190 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 1,177,556 people living with colon and ...

  8. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  9. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  10. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  11. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  12. Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Peter; Mallmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is indicated in patients who can tolerate the side effects of a chemotherapy and with preoperative presentation of one of the following clinical risk situations: bulky disease with a maximal tumor diameter of > 4 cm, suspicious lymph nodes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan or endosonography, histopathologically confirmed lymph node metastasis, or histopathologically documented risk factors such as G3 and L1V1. A neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery should be performed with cisplatin at a dosage of > 25 mg/m2 per week and an application interval of < 14 days. The previously published data suggests an improved rate of complete resection and reduced incidences of positive lymph nodes and parametric infiltration. Accordingly, the percentage of patients in need for adjuvant radiochemotherapy after operation can be significantly reduced. Some studies demonstrated a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Following the previously published studies, adjuvant chemotherapy after operation or after radiochemotherapy has no significant effect on the overall survival and, following the current guidelines, should be avoided. PMID:27614740

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with breast cancer: key challenges.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Noam; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Azim, Hatem A

    2016-06-01

    Elderly women with early breast cancer (BC) form a heterogeneous and large subgroup (41.8% of women with BC are over 65). Decision making in this subgroup is made more difficult by lack of familiarity with their physical, cognitive and social issues. Adequate management depends on biological factors and accurate clinical evaluation through comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). CGA can help to better select and determine potential risks factors for patients who are candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy. It is still recently introduced in geriatric oncology and there is a lack of awareness of its importance. Available data on adjuvant chemotherapy for BC is limited but suggests it can be of benefit for well selected patients, though the risk of short and long-term toxicity is significant. Here we provide a discussion of the key practical issues in decision making in the setting of adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly BC patients. PMID:27010772

  14. [New options in adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Saltel-Fulero, Aurélien; Donnadieu, Anne; Leman-Detours, Solenne; Cottu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is a compulsory step in the adjuvant management of early breast cancer expressing the estrogen receptor, by reducing as much as possible serum and tissue levels of estrogens. Tamoxifen is the standard therapy for non-menopausal women. Ovarian function suppression, in addition to exemestane or tamoxifen, could be an alternative option for young women at high risk of recurrence and non menopausal after adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Recent studies show a trend for improvement of overall survival and disease-free-survival with aromatase inhibitors among postmenopausal women. However, safety of aromatase inhibitors is controversial and adverse events may lead to switch for tamoxifen with no loss of efficacy. Extension therapy by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor after five years of tamoxifen and for a total duration of ten years significantly improves overall survival. There is to date no data supporting the extension therapy after five years of aromatase inhibitor. PMID:26675809

  15. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Oncotype DX Colon Cancer Assay Results on Treatment Recommendations in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Geetika; Renfro, Lindsay A.; Behrens, Robert J.; Lopatin, Margarita; Chao, Calvin; Soori, Gamini S.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Mowat, Rex B.; Kuebler, J. Philip; Kim, George; Mazurczak, Miroslaw; Lee, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The Oncotype DX colon cancer assay is a clinically validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II colon cancer patients. This prospective study evaluated the impact of recurrence score (RS) results on physician recommendations regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in T3, mismatch repair-proficient (MMR-P) stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods. Stage IIA colon cancer patients were enrolled in 17 centers. Patient tumor specimens were assessed by the RS test (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and mismatch repair (immunohistochemistry). For each patient, the physician’s recommended postoperative treatment plan of observation, fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, or combination therapy with oxaliplatin was recorded before and after the RS and mismatch repair results were provided. Results. Of 221 enrolled patients, 141 patients had T3 MMR-P tumors and were eligible for the primary analysis. Treatment recommendations changed for 63 (45%; 95% confidence interval: 36%–53%) of these 141 T3 MMR-P patients, with intensity decreasing for 47 (33%) and increasing for 16 (11%). Recommendations for chemotherapy decreased from 73 patients (52%) to 42 (30%), following review of RS results by physician and patient. Increased treatment intensity was more often observed at higher RS values, and decreased intensity was observed at lower values (p = .011). Conclusion. Compared with traditional clinicopathological assessment, incorporation of the RS result into clinical decision making was associated with treatment recommendation changes for 45% of T3 MMR-P stage II colon cancer patients in this prospective multicenter study. Use of the RS assay may lead to overall reduction in adjuvant chemotherapy use in this subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:24710310

  16. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  17. Methylation status at HYAL2 predicts overall and progression-free survival of colon cancer patients under 5-FU chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pfütze, Katrin; Benner, Axel; Hoffmeister, Michael; Jansen, Lina; Yang, Rongxi; Bläker, Hendrik; Herpel, Esther; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    DNA methylation variations in gene promoter regions are well documented tumor-specific alterations in human malignancies including colon cancer, which may influence tumor behavior and clinical outcome. As a subset of colon cancer patients does not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, predictive biomarkers are desirable. Here, we describe that DNA methylation levels at CpG loci of hyaluronoglucosaminidase 2 (HYLA2) could be used to identify stage II and III colon cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from 5-flourouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy with respect to overall survival and progression-free survival. PMID:26453961

  18. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  19. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  20. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Jin; Lulla, Amriti; Hernandez, Liz; Gokare, Prashanth; Lim, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM) is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +), hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +), both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer. PMID:25400908

  1. Metastatic male ductal breast cancer mimicking obstructing primary colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  2. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  3. Using antimicrobial adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and pre-clinical data demonstrate that adjuvant antimicrobial therapy is beneficial in cancer treatment. There could be several reasons for this effect, which include treating cancer associated bacteria and viruses, prophylaxis of post-chemotherapy infections due to immunosuppression, and antiproliferative effect of certain antimicrobials. Targeting cancer associated viruses and bacteria with antimicrobial agents is currently used for gastric, cervical, hematopoietic, liver and brain cancer. However this treatment is effective only in combination with conventional therapies. Antimicrobials can also have a direct antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect, and can cause apoptosis. Moreover, some antimicrobials are known to be helpful in overcoming side effects of drugs commonly used in cancer treatment. Chemotherapy related bacteremia and neutropenia can be overcome by the appropriately timed use of antimicrobials. This review summarizes the data on the effects of antivirals and antibiotics on cancer treatment and describes their mechanisms. PMID:23164412

  4. Chitin, Chitosan, and Glycated Chitosan Regulate Immune Responses: The Novel Adjuvants for Cancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaosong; Min, Min; Du, Nan; Gu, Ying; Hode, Tomas; Naylor, Mark; Chen, Dianjun; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of cancer immunotherapy, cancer vaccine has become a novel modality for cancer treatment, and the important role of adjuvant has been realized recently. Chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives have shown their advantages as adjuvants for cancer vaccine. In this paper, the adjuvant properties of chitin and chitosan were discussed, and some detailed information about glycated chitosan and chitosan nanoparticles was also presented to illustrate the trend for future development. PMID:23533454

  5. Adjuvant Everolimus for Resected Kidney Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with renal cell cancer who have undergone partial or complete nephrectomy will be randomly assigned to take everolimus tablets or matching placebo tablets daily for 54 weeks.

  6. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  7. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  8. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  9. Six Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Six Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Colon Cancer Diet, weight and physical activity play a significant ... March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half of the colon cancer cases in the United States could be prevented ...

  10. A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158930.html A Little Excess Weight May Boost Colon Cancer Survival Researchers saw an effect, but experts ... a surprise, a new study found that overweight colon cancer patients tended to have better survival than ...

  11. Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return DNA-based screen would aid treatment decisions for people ... News) -- A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors ...

  12. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  13. The role of IGFBP-5 in mediating the anti-proliferation effect of tetrandrine in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Zhou, Mi; Wu, Qiu-Xiang; Yuan, Shuang-Xu; Wang, Dong-Xu; Jin, Jie-Li; Huang, Jun; Yang, Jun-Qin; Sun, Wen-Juan; Wan, Li-Hua; He, Bai-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies, causes considerable morbidity and mortality. The current treatment for colon cancer is more modest than had been hoped. There is an urgent clinical need to explore new agents or adjuvants for colon cancer treatment. Natural products and their derivates act as one of the major source for anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anti-proliferation and chemoprevention effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on colon cancer cells to uncover the possible molecular basis of this effect. We found that Tet can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in LoVo cells. With dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colon cancer model, we found that Tet can prevent or inhibit DMH plus DSS induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colon cancer formation, as well as suppress tumor growth in the xenograft colon cancer model. Tet can downregulate the expression of IGFBP-5 in LoVo cells. Exogenous expression of IGFBP-5 can attenuate the anti-cancer activity of Tet, while IGFBP-5 knockdown potentiates this effect of Tet on LoVo cells. Tet can inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling transduction, which can be partly reversed by exogenous expression of IGFBP-5, but is enhanced by IGFBP-5 knockdown. Our results demonstrated that the anticancer activity of Tet in colon cancer cells may be mediated partly by downregulating the expression of IGFBP-5, thus inactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling transduction. PMID:25524807

  14. Novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer parallels human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil R; Prasad, Shilpa; Nguyen, Huy; Facista, Alexander; Lewis, Cristy; Zaitlin, Beryl; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the close parallels between our novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer and human colon cancer. METHODS: Twenty-two wild-type female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the standard control diet (AIN-93G) and an additional 22 female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the control diet supplemented with 0.2% deoxycholic acid [diet + deoxycholic acid (DOC)] for 10 mo. Tumors occurred in the colons of mice fed diet + DOC and showed progression to colon cancer [adenocarcinoma (AC)]. This progression is through the stages of tubular adenoma (TA), TA with high grade dysplasia or adenoma with sessile serrated morphology, intramucosal AC, AC stage T1, and AC stage T2. The mouse tumors were compared to human tumors at the same stages by histopathological analysis. Sections of the small and large intestines of mice and humans were evaluated for glandular architecture, cellular and nuclear morphology including cellular orientation, cellular and nuclear atypia, pleomorphism, mitotic activity, frequency of goblet cells, crypt architecture, ulceration, penetration of crypts through the muscularis mucosa and presence of malignant crypts in the muscularis propria. In addition, preserved colonic tissues from genetically similar male mice, obtained from a prior experiment, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The male mice had been fed the control diet or diet + DOC. Four molecular markers were evaluated: 8-OH-dG, DNA repair protein ERCC1, autophagy protein beclin-1 and the nuclear location of beta-catenin in the stem cell region of crypts. Also, male mice fed diet + DOC plus 0.007% chlorogenic acid (diet + DOC + CGA) were evaluated for ERCC1, beclin-1 and nuclear location of beta-catenin. RESULTS: Humans with high levels of diet-related DOC in their colons are at a substantially increased risk of developing colon cancer. The mice fed diet + DOC had levels of DOC in their colons comparable to that of humans on a high fat diet. The 22 mice without added DOC in their diet

  15. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p < 0.001). ARMc8 expression was closely related to TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p < 0.001), while ARMc8 siRNA treatment significantly reduced cell invasion and migration in LoVo cells (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARMc8 could upregulate the expression of MMP7 and snail and downregulate the expression of p120ctn and α-catenin. Therefore, ARMc8 probably enhanced invasiveness and metastatic capacity by affecting these tumor-associated factors, thereby playing a role in enhancing the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:26081621

  16. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, D; Pramateftakis, M G; Vrakas, G; Mantzoros, I; Tsachalis, T; Hatzigianni, P; Kanellos, I

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to report our experience with laparoscopic sigmoidectomy due to cancer. Between 2007 and 2009, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer was performed in 3 patients. The average operative time was 176 min. The average hospital stay was 10.2 days. There was one anastomotic leak. The patient was subjected to laparotomy and a Hartmann's procedure and drainage of the peritoneal cavity was performed. In conclusion, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer is a safe and efficient procedure. PMID:20694496

  17. Proteomic and Functional Investigation of the Colon Cancer Relapse-Associated Genes NOX4 and ITGA3

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy significantly reduces mortality in stage III colon cancer; however, it is only marginally effective in stage II patients. There is also increasing evidence that right-side colon cancer is different from left-side colon cancer. We have observed that the genes altered in expression between the poor and good prognosis tumors vary significantly depending on whether the malignancy originates on the right or left side of the colon. We have identified NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) to be highly predictive of relapse in stage II left-side colon cancer, whereas integrin alpha 3 beta 1 (ITGA3) is predictive of relapse in stage II right-side colon cancer. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we are analyzing the effect of ITGA3 and NOX4 silencing via RNA interference and pharmacological inhibition on global protein expression patterns via iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry in colon cancer cells. On the basis of bioinformatic analysis, the functions of these genes were assessed through phenotypic assays, revealing roles in cell migration and reactive oxygen species generation. These biomarkers for relapse risk are of clinical interest and lead to insight into how a tumor progresses to metastasis. PMID:25096929

  18. Optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith; Muss, Hyman B

    2005-12-01

    Mortality in breast cancer has declined in the past decade, owing to advances in diagnosis, surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic treatments. Adjuvant chemotherapy has had a major effect on increasing survival in women with locoregional breast cancer. Like all treatments, adjuvant chemotherapy is a work in progress, and it has evolved from single oral agents to complex multidrug regimens. The choice of regimens is not without controversy, however, and several have been shown to be more effective than others, especially in patients who are at high risk for recurrence. The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel (Taxotere) have been shown to be effective in the adjuvant setting, and they have also been shown to improve the outcomes in node-positive disease. Both disease-free and overall survival are greater with doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide given in a dose-dense, every-2-week schedule with growth factor support than with the same agents given in an every-3-week schedule. Disease-free and overall survival in patients with node-positive disease are greater with docetaxel, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and cyclophosphamide (TAC) than with fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC). Febrile neutropenia is common with the TAC regimen, but it can be minimized with growth factor support. Based on these findings, dose-dense therapy and TAC are the current adjuvant treatments of choice in patients with node-positive disease; other, less-intense regimens may be appropriate in patients with lower-risk disease. Ongoing trials are investigating the efficacy of commonly used regimens, new chemotherapeutic and biologic agents, and novel doses and schedules of currently available agents. PMID:16506631

  19. Right colon cancer presenting as hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tomoyuki; Konishi, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Takahisa; Kitamura, Katsuya; Katagiri, Atsushi; Muramoto, Takashi; Kubota, Yutaro; Yano, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiya; Yamochi, Toshiko; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Masahiko; Gokan, Takehiko; Yoshikawa, Nozomi; Imawari, Michio

    2011-02-15

    A 67-year-old man visited our hospital with a history of continuous hematochezia leading to hemorrhagic shock. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large mass in the ascending colon invading the duodenum and pancreatic head as well as extravasation of blood from the gastroduodenal artery (GDA) into the colon. Colonoscopy revealed an irregular ulcerative lesion and stenosis in the ascending colon. Therefore, right hemicolectomy combined with pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histologically, the tumor was classified as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Moreover, cancer cells were mainly located in the colon but had also invaded the duodenum and pancreas and involved the GDA. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (CK)20 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) but not for CK7 and carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9. The patient died 23 d after the surgery because he had another episode of arterial bleeding from the anastomosis site. Although En bloc resection of the tumor with pancreaticoduodenectomy and colectomy performed for locally advanced colon cancer can ensure long-term survival, patients undergoing these procedures should be carefully monitored, particularly when the tumor involves the main artery. PMID:21607161

  20. The Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) Trial.

    PubMed

    Bjørklund, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) was a clinical study carried out in Denmark in the 1990s with 32 typical patients with breast cancer, aged 32-81 yr and classified high risk because of tumor spread to the lymph nodes. The patients received standard therapy for their breast cancer, but got from the start additionally an adjuvant therapy in form of a cocktail consisting of vitamin C (2,850 mg/day), vitamin E (2,500 IU/day), beta-carotene (32.5 IU/day), selenium (Se; 387 micrograms/day), various other vitamins and essential trace elements, essential fatty acids (1.2 g gamma-linolenic acid/day and 3.5 g omega-3 PUFAs/day), and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 90 mg/day). The protocol was later changed, with reduction of the Se intake and more coenzyme Q10 than when the study was started. The average survival of high-risk breast patients in the study was 50% after 5 yr, whereas for low-risk breast cancer patients (without metastases in the axilla when treatment was started), the average survival was 90% after ten years. The main investigator died, and the final report from the ANICA study was therefore never written. However, the published preliminary results from the trial were very promising; it seems, therefore, important to follow-up this study. PMID:26473998

  1. Role of colonic stents in the management of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the commonly encountered cancers across the Western World. In United Kingdom, this constitutes third most common ranked cancer and second most common ranked cause of cancer related deaths. Its acute presentation as a malignant colonic obstruction imposes challenges in its management. Colonic stent has been used for many years to alleviate acute obstruction in such cases allowing optimisation of patient’s physiological status and adequate staging of cancer. In this review, current literature evidence regarding use of colonic stent in acute malignant colonic obstruction is critically appraised and recommendations on the use of colonic stent are advocated. PMID:26962401

  2. Modulation of colon cancer by nutmeg.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nichols, Robert G; Xu, Wei; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Colon cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer mortality in humans. Using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, the current study revealed the accumulation of four uremic toxins (cresol sulfate, cresol glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, and phenyl sulfate) in the serum of mice harboring adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation-induced colon cancer. These uremic toxins, likely generated from the gut microbiota, were associated with an increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Nutmeg, which exhibits antimicrobial activity, attenuated the levels of uremic toxins and decreased intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice. Nutmeg-treated Apc(min/+) mice had decreased IL-6 levels and normalized dysregulated lipid metabolism, suggesting that uremic toxins are responsible, in part, for the metabolic disorders that occur during tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate a potential biochemical link among gut microbial metabolism, inflammation, and metabolic disorders and suggest that modulation of gut microbiota and lipid metabolism using dietary intervention or drugs may be effective in colon cancer chemoprevention strategies. PMID:25712450

  3. Terahertz polarization imaging for colon cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. The terahertz reflectance measurements of fresh 3 - 5 mm thick human colonic excisions were acquired using a continuous-wave polarization imaging technique. A CO2 optically pumped Far- Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz was used to illuminate the colon tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. Both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance from the samples was collected using wire grid polarizers in the experiment. The experimental analysis of 2D images obtained from THz reflection polarization imaging techniques showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions based on increased reflection from the tumor. Also, the study demonstrates that the cross-polarized terahertz images not only correlates better with the histology, but also provide consistent relative reflectance difference values between normal and cancerous regions for all the measured specimens.

  4. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, J. Agostinho; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-05-01

    Normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results will be presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissue will be discussed.

  5. Preoperative Serum Levels of Mesothelin in Patients with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bostancı, Özgür; Kemik, Özgür; Kemik, Ahu; Battal, Muharrem; Demir, Uygar; Purisa, Sevim; Mihmanlı, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Screening for biochemical markers is important for diagnosing colon cancer. In this study, the reliability of serum mesothelin levels as a potential diagnostic and screening instrument was evaluated concerning colon cancer. Methods. Ninety-five patients who had undergone colonoscopic examination and who were diagnosed with colon cancer were included in the study. The serum mesothelin levels were measured with the ELISA kits and were evaluated in terms of significant difference when compared between colon cancer and control group. Results. Patients with colon cancer had significantly higher mesothelin serum levels (P < 0.001) than the control groups. We found significant associations between serum levels and tumor grade, perineural invasion, and vascular invasion (resp., P < 0.001). Conclusion. Evaluating the serum levels of mesothelin has a potential to detect and screen the colon cancer in affected patients. Our data suggest that mesothelin exhibits effects towards colon cancer and serves as a biomarker for this deadly disease. PMID:25477701

  6. New approach to adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, M.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Kramer, S.

    1980-02-01

    A sandwich technique of adjuvant radiotherapy was used to treat twenty-three patients with rectal cancer. In this technique, low dose preoperative irradiation (500 rad in one treatment) was given to all patients followed by immediate surgery (usually an A-P resection); on the basis of histopathological findings, patients with stage B/sub 2/ and C rectal cancer were selectively given 4500 rad post-operative irradiation in 5 weeks. Nine patients had early lesions (stage A and B/sub 1/) and did not receive postoperative irradiation. Thirteen patients had stage B/sub 2/ and C disease and hence received the full course of postoperative irradiation. One patient was found to have liver metastasis at the time of surgery, and hence received only palliative therapy. Follow-up of these twenty-three patients ranges from 10 months to 24 months with a median follow-up of 15 months. Treatment was well-tolerated with few side effects. Only two of the twenty-two patients who were treated for cure have failed to date. Both patients had stage C/sub 2/ disease; one patient developed an anterior abdominal wall recurrence in the surgical scar 3 months post-treatment and the second patient developed brain and bone metastases. No patients have failed in the pelvis. We feel this technique of adjuvant therapy is a logical approach to the treatment of rectal cancer and has potential for improving survival. The rationale for this approach to adjuvant radiotherapy is discussed together with implications for survival.

  7. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the superficial bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.; Russakov, I. G.; Teplov, A. A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Ul'yanov, R. V.; Bystrov, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    Superficial transitional cell carcinoma represents 50 to 80% of newly diagnosed bladder cancer in various countries. Transurethral resection of the urinary bladder is the standard procedure for biopsy and treatment superficial bladder cancer. However recurrence tumors after transurethral resection alone is high enough (50-90%). Intravesical chemotherapy for prophylaxis after complete transurethral resection is reducing recurrence rate about 1 5%. Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin (BCG) is reducing recurrence rate about 30%, but frequency side effects of this therapy is very high. Purpose of this study is appreciate efficacy adjuvant PDT with photosensitizer Photogeme (Russia) of superficial bladder cancer for prophylaxis after complete transurethral resection. The follow up was from 3 to 63 months (27 months, on average). Sixty-five patients (75.6%) showed no recurrence. For the follow up period, the recurrence was revealed in 21 (24.4%) patient, in two of them it was progressing (one case of invasive growth and one case of remote metastases). Four cases of recurrence were revealed 4 months after the surgery. In other cases, the recurrence was diagnosed from 9 to 18 months.

  8. IEX-1 deficiency protects against colonic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ustyugova, Irina V; Zhi, Liang; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Wu, Mei X

    2012-06-01

    The immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1) is involved in regulation of various cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis in part by controlling homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at mitochondria. The present study shows reduced inflammatory responses and colorectal cancer in IEX-1 knockout (KO) mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). However, DSS induced worse colitis in RAG(-/-)IEX-1(-/-) double KO mice than in RAG and IEX-1 single KO mice, underscoring an importance of T cells in IEX-1 deficiency-induced protection against colon inflammation. Lack of IEX-1 promoted the differentiation of interleukin (IL)-17-producing T cells, concomitant with upregulation of Gαi2 expression, a gene that is well-documented for its role in the control of inflammation in the colon. In accordance with this, T-helper 17 (T(H)17) cell differentiation was compromised in the absence of Gαi2, and deletion of Gαi2 in T cells alone aggravated colon inflammation and colorectal cancer development after azoxymethane/DSS treatment. Null mutation of IEX-1 also enhanced both proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) after injury. A potential impact of this altered IEC turnover on colon inflammation and cancer development is discussed. These observations provide a linkage of IEX-1 and Gαi2 expression in the regulation of T(H)17 cell differentiation and suggest a previously unappreciated role for IEX-1 in the control of colon epithelial homeostasis. PMID:22550081

  9. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials

  10. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family ... cannot be changed. But just because you have risk factors you cannot control does not mean you cannot take steps to ...

  11. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  12. Hereditary Colon Cancer: Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eunjeong

    2010-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common familial colorectal cancer syndrome. It is linked to germline mutations in one of four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. A comprehensive family history is one important way to identify at-risk individuals. The elucidation of the molecular genetics of this syndrome has made it possible to screen for the disorder with molecular tests. Microsatellite instability and/or immunohistochemistry followed by germline testing for mutations in MMR genes is now a standard approach for clinically suspected cases. Correctly recognizing Lynch syndrome is essential for the application of appropriate screening and surveillance measures. Close surveillance and risk-reducing operations can decrease cancer-related mortality. In addition, counseling is an important component of the management of any family with Lynch syndrome. PMID:20559516

  13. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  14. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  15. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  16. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  17. CDX2 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalerba, Piero; Sahoo, Debashis; Paik, Soonmyung; Guo, Xiangqian; Yothers, Greg; Song, Nan; Wilcox-Fogel, Nate; Forgó, Erna; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Miranda, Stephen P; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hutchison, Jacqueline; Kalisky, Tomer; Qian, Dalong; Wolmark, Norman; Fisher, George A; van de Rijn, Matt; Clarke, Michael F

    2016-01-21

    Background The identification of high-risk stage II colon cancers is key to the selection of patients who require adjuvant treatment after surgery. Microarray-based multigene-expression signatures derived from stem cells and progenitor cells hold promise, but they are difficult to use in clinical practice. Methods We used a new bioinformatics approach to search for biomarkers of colon epithelial differentiation across gene-expression arrays and then ranked candidate genes according to the availability of clinical-grade diagnostic assays. With the use of subgroup analysis involving independent and retrospective cohorts of patients with stage II or stage III colon cancer, the top candidate gene was tested for its association with disease-free survival and a benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Results The transcription factor CDX2 ranked first in our screening test. A group of 87 of 2115 tumor samples (4.1%) lacked CDX2 expression. In the discovery data set, which included 466 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 32 patients (6.9%) with CDX2-negative colon cancers than among the 434 (93.1%) with CDX2-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60 to 7.38; P=0.002). In the validation data set, which included 314 patients, the rate of 5-year disease-free survival was lower among the 38 patients (12.1%) with CDX2 protein-negative colon cancers than among the 276 (87.9%) with CDX2 protein-positive colon cancers (hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.29; P=0.003). In both these groups, these findings were independent of the patient's age, sex, and tumor stage and grade. Among patients with stage II cancer, the difference in 5-year disease-free survival was significant both in the discovery data set (49% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative tumors vs. 87% among 191 patients with CDX2-positive tumors, P=0.003) and in the validation data set (51% among 15 patients with CDX2-negative

  18. Clinical significance of HOTAIR expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Fen; Zhao, Dan; Li, Xi-Qing; Cui, Yong-Xia; Ma, Ning; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect the expression of the long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in colon cancer and analyze its relationship with clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer. METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from 80 colon cancer tissues and matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues and reverse transcribed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of HOTAIR. The relationship between the expression of HOTAIR and clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer was analyzed. RESULTS: The expression of HOTAIR was significantly higher in colon cancer tissues than in matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues (P < 0.05). HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without metastasis; in lowly differentiated and undifferentiated cases than in highly and moderately differentiated cases; and in stages III + IV cases than in stages I + II cases (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HOTAIR expression is upregulated in colon cancer, suggesting that HOTAIR plays an important role in the tumorigenesis, development and metastasis of colon cancer. HOTAIR may act as an oncogene and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27298568

  19. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. The role of adjuvant radiation in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Diavolitsis, Virginia; Boyle, John; Singh, Diljeet K; Small, William

    2009-04-15

    Endometrial cancer treatment ideally begins with a staging procedure including abdominopelvic washing, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymph node evaluation. Recommendations for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy are determined by recurrence risk. Patients who have undergone staging and have early stage I disease and an absence of high-risk features for recurrence generally are treated with surgery alone. Intermediate-risk patients--those with high-risk stage I disease and some stage II patients--may benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. Several randomized trials show that radiation therapy improves locoregional control among intermediate-risk patients. The optimal type of radiation therapy, whether vaginal brachytherapy or whole-pelvic radiation therapy, remains undetermined, though treatment decision can be guided by risk factors not encompassed by the current staging system. Patients with high-risk stage II disease and stage III disease generally receive external-beam radiotherapy, often in combination with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy alone in advanced-stage patients is a consideration, given the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-122 trial. PMID:19476264

  1. Detection of colon cancer by terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Valusis, Gintaras; Bernardo, Luis M.; Almeida, Abílio; Moreira, Joaquim A.; Lopes, Patricia C.; Macutkevic, Jan; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Adomavicius, Ramunas; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Machado

    2011-12-01

    Human normal and cancer affected samples of colon tissue have been measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy and continuous wave terahertz imaging. We show that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in the samples when they are fixed in formalin or embedded in paraffin. The still noticeable contrast in the dried paraffin-embedded tissues could indicate that there are additional contrast-contributing factors other than water, which is the main goal of the present work. Plots of the refractive index of normal and cancer affected tissues as well as 2-D transmission THz images are shown. Experimental results are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue are discussed.

  2. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D; Anderson, Roger T; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival.A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model.About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all-cause mortality.Our findings

  3. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D.; Anderson, Roger T.; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival. A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model. About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all

  4. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  5. Diet, genes, and microbes: complexities of colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Birt, Diane F; Phillips, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-rich diets and physical activity are associated with reduced rates of colon cancer, while consumption of red and processed meat, or alcoholic beverages, and overconsumption as reflected in obesity are associated with increased rates. Animal studies have probed these effects and suggested directions for further refinement of diet in colon cancer prevention. Recently a central role for the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract in colon cancer development is being probed, and it is hypothesized that the microbes may integrate diet and host genetics in the etiology of the disease. This review provides background on dietary, genetic, and microbial impacts on colon cancer and describes an ongoing project using rodent models to assess the ability of digestion-resistant starch in the integration of these factors with the goal of furthering colon cancer prevention. PMID:24129759

  6. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  7. Sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Zuiki, Toru; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan T; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We report the first case of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The patient is a 75-year-old man who presented with the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain. He had undergone laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for cancer 2 years before presentation. CT scan showed a distended sigmoid colon with a mesenteric twist, or "whirl sign." Colonoscopy showed a mucosal spiral and luminal stenosis with dilated sigmoid colon distally and ischemic mucosa. The diagnosis of ischemic colonic necrosis due to sigmoid volvulus was established. Resection of the necrotic sigmoid colon was performed and a descending colon stoma was created. A long remnant sigmoid colon and chronic constipation may contribute to the development of sigmoid volvulus after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. Prompt diagnosis is essential for adequate treatment, and colonoscopy aids in the diagnosis of ischemic changes in patients without definitive findings of a gangrenous colon. PMID:23879414

  8. [A Case of Liver Metastasis of Descending Colon Cancer with a Pathological Complete Response to mFOLFOX6].

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yusuke; Ome, Yusuke; Koda, Yusuke; Saga, Kenichi; Kawamoto, Kazuyuki; Ito, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and anorexia. She was diagnosed with descending colon cancer with lymph node and liver metastases. She was treated with preoperative chemotherapy consisting of levofolinate/5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6). After the completion of 7 courses of chemotherapy, the tumor shrunk remarkably. A left-sided colectomy with radical lymphadenectomy and an extensive posterior segment resection of the liver were performed. Postoperatively, pathological analysis revealed no cancerous cells in the primary tumor, lymph node metastases, or liver metastases. She is currently receiving mFOLFOX6 therapy as adjuvant chemotherapy. In a patient with advanced colon cancer, a complete response of not only the primary tumor but also the lymph node and liver metastases to preoperative chemotherapy is rare. This case demonstrates that mFOLFOX6 therapy is safe and effective as preoperative chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer. PMID:26809540

  9. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P; Boucher, Kenneth M; Burt, Randall W; Neklason, Deborah W; Hagedorn, Curt H; Delker, Don A

    2016-06-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20% to 30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon, and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross-validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1,422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n = 12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n = 9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability. A smaller 7-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF-mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high, and MLH1-silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 456-65. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27026680

  10. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-05-15

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  11. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  12. Field Cancerization in Sporadic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Song, Chang Seok; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Koo, Dong Hoe; Kim, Kyung Eun; Jeong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyung Ook; Kim, Hungdai; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Aberrant DNA methylation has a specific role in field cancerization. Certain molecular markers, including secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (TFPI2), N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 4 (NDRG4) and bone morphogenic protein 3 (BMP3), have previously been shown to be hypermethylated in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aim to examine field cancerization in CRC based on the presence of aberrant DNA methylation in normal-appearing tissue from CRC patients. Methods We investigated promoter methylation in 34 CRC patients and five individuals with normal colonoscopy results. CRC patients were divided into three tissue groups: tumor tissue, adjacent and nonadjacent normal-appearing tissue. The methylation status (positive: methylation level >20%) of SFRP2, TFPI2, NDRG4, and BMP3 promoters was investigated using methylation-specific PCR. Results The methylation frequencies of the SFRP2, TFPI2, NDRG4 and BMP3 promoters in tumor/adjacent/nonadjacent normal-appearing tissue were 79.4%/63.0%/70.4%, 82.4%/53.6%/60.7%, 76.5%/61.5%/69.2%, 41.2%/35.7%/50.0%, respectively. The methylation levels of the SFRP,TFPI2, NDRG4 and BMP3 promoters in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in normal-appearing tissue (SFRP2, p=0.013; TFPI2, p<0.001; NDRG4, p=0.003; BMP3, p=0.001). No significant correlation was observed between the methylation levels of the promoters and the clinicopathological variables. Conclusions The field effect is present in CRC and affects both the adjacent and nonadjacent normal-appearing mucosa. PMID:27114416

  13. Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... never be used as a substitute for the "gold standard" colon cancer test, colonoscopy. Cologuard is a ... a welcome addition to screening, colonoscopy "remains the gold standard in the prevention of colorectal cancer." Dr. ...

  14. Solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence after curative resection of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Yano, Masahiko; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Noura, Shingo; Ohue, Masayuki; Sugimura, Keijiro; Motoori, Masaaki; Kishi, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Gotoh, Kunihito; Marubashi, Shigeru; Akita, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sakon, Masato

    2014-08-27

    We report two cases of solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence after colon cancer resection. Both cases had para-aortic lymph node metastasis at the time of initial surgery and received adjuvant chemotherapy for 4 years in case 1 and 18 mo in case 2. The time to recurrence was more than 8 years in both cases. After resection of the recurrent tumor, the patient is doing well with no recurrence for 6 years in case 1 and 4 mo in case 2. Patients should be followed up after colon cancer surgery considering the possibility of solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence if they had para-aortic node metastasis at the time of initial surgery. PMID:25161766

  15. Emerging Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer: Propolis and its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a bee-metabolized resinous substance (bee glue) from plant sap and gums. It has been in usage as a healing agent since antiquity, yet has not garnered global popularity as a health promoter. Its biological effects, which range from antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, dermatoprotective, anti-allergic, laxative and immunomodulatory to anticancer, have been validated. Propolis has shown efficacy against brain, head and neck, skin, breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, bladder, prostate, colon and blood cancers. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, anti-angiogenesis, prevention of metastasis, cell-cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and moderation of the chemotherapy-induced deleterious side effects have been deduced as the key mechanisms of cancer manipulation. The components conferring antitumor potentials have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester, chrysin, artepillin C, nemorosone, galangin, cardanol, etc. These compounds target various genetic and biochemical pathways of cancer progression. Depending on the botanical sources and the geographical origin, biological activities of propolis vary. Despite phenomenal development in cancer research, conventional therapy falls short in complete malignancy management. The findings obtained so far build hope that propolis as a complementary medicine may address the lacunae. This review documents the recent advances and scope of amendement in cancer remediation with adequate emphasis on the mechanistic aspect of propolis. PMID:25723108

  16. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient’s functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:24616568

  17. Large-field, external beam irradiation as a surgical adjuvant for node-positive colon carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Pilot Study (PA285).

    PubMed

    Merrick, H W; Turner, S S; Dobelbower, R R; Bennett, J M; Haller, D

    2000-08-01

    The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PA-285 study was designed as a pilot study to evaluate the effect of large-field, external beam abdominal irradiation as an adjuvant treatment for resectable stage C1 to C2 colon cancer. Eligible patients received 45 Gy directed to the tumor bed and periaortic lymph nodes, as well as 30 Gy to the liver. Patients were followed up for time to recurrence and for survival. Fourteen patients were enrolled. One elected not to have radiation after surgery; one died of acute hepatic radiation toxicity after a major deviation from protocol. Of the 12 remaining patients, seven survived longer than 10 years for a survival rate of 58%. Other than the fatal hepatic toxicity, side effects from radiation were moderate and of short duration. One patient failed to complete therapy because of ascites, had two episodes of partial bowel obstruction (successfully treated conservatively), and subsequently survived more than 10 years. Two of three patients with stage C1 tumors, four of eight with C2 tumors, and one with a C3 tumor were long-term survivors. This study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptable toxicity of this adjuvant regimen. The numbers are too limited to evaluate survival, but all seven survivors have lived more than 10 years. PMID:10955858

  18. [Individualized therapy of synchronous ovarian and colon cancers with lymph].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Bishr, Abdulfatah M; Nizar, Jamool; Telekes, András

    2015-06-01

    A 71-year-old female patient underwent urgent laparotomy due to severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain and fever. Macroscopically duplex coecal and transverse colon cancer as well as a sigmoid or left ovarian cancer were suspected. Pathological findings revealed synchronous left ovarian and transverse colonic neoplasms. Both primaries metastatized to their regional lymph nodes. Furthermore, the ovarian cancer infiltrating the sigmoid colon gave distant metastasis in the coecum, too. Ovarian cancer histology showed papillary adenocarcinoma, and transverse colon cancer was a tubular adenocarcinoma. The affected lymph nodes were clearly distinguished by immunohistochemistry staining: ovarian metastases were CK7 positive, and colonic metastases were CK20 and CEA positive. The patient was treated with combinated chemotherapy: FOLFOX-4 two weekly and paclitaxel monotherapy every other week. The patient tolerated this combined treatment well. The authors conclude that multiple synchronous neoplasms can be treated with individualized chemotherapeutic protocol with good efficacy and few adverse reactions. PMID:26027602

  19. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines. PMID:25483674

  20. Role of dietary factors in cell replication and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R

    1988-09-01

    Human studies and experimental data from animals suggest that high rates of colonic epithelial cell replication enhance the development of colon cancer. Vegetarians and individuals following a prudent diet have lower rates of colorectal cell proliferation than subjects at high risk for colon cancer. Animal studies show that colonic cell proliferation is stimulated by feeding in general and specifically by a number of dietary fibers, fats, bile acids, and short-chain fatty acids. Many of these growth factors also increase the induction of experimental tumorigenesis. On the other hand factors that reduce cell growth, including ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxyanisole, inhibit colon carcinogenesis. These results support the concept that dietary chemoprevention is feasible and could significantly reduce the rate of colon cancer development in high risk populations. PMID:3046307

  1. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Ana R.; Hernandez, Rosa; Perazzoli, Gloria; Burgos, Miguel; Melguizo, Consolación; Vélez, Celia; Prados, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA) to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E) towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells. PMID:26053394

  2. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer and the role of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valerie M; Benson, Al B

    2013-04-01

    Both the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and improvements in surgical techniques have improved local control and overall survival for locally advanced rectal cancer patients over the past few decades. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy has likely improved outcomes as well, though the contribution has been more difficult to quantify. At present, the majority of resected locally advanced rectal cancer patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy, though there is great variability in this practice based on both patient and institution characteristics. Recently, questions have been raised regarding which sub-groups of patients benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. As pathologic complete response (pCR) is increasingly found to be a reasonable surrogate for long-term favorable outcomes, some have questioned the need for adjuvant therapy in this select group of patients. Multiple retrospective analyses have shown minimal to no benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. Indeed, the patients most consistently shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy both in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are those who achieve an intermediate pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment. Tumors that have high expression of thymidylate synthetase have also shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy. More study is needed into clinical and molecular features that predict patient benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:23381584

  3. Microbial dysbiosis and colon carcinogenesis: could colon cancer be considered a bacteria-related disease?

    PubMed Central

    Amiot, Aurelien; Le Baleur, Yann; Levy, Michael; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Van Nhieu, Jeanne Tran; Delchier, Jean Charles

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is posing an increasingly important burden on the health care system, with western countries seeing a growing incidence of the disease. Except for germline DNA mutations which have been attributed to less than 5% of patients, little is known about the main causes of CRC. However, environment factors such as food, lifestyle and medication are now suspected to have a major influence on inducing cancers. Today, exhaustive quantitative and qualitative evaluation of all environmental factors is not possible. Various environment-induced diseases have been characterized based on colon microflora, also called microbiota, analyses. Growing data have shown specific changes in microflora (i.e. dysbiosis) in the stools of patients with colon cancer or those adherent to the colonic mucosa. Thus, it appears that microbiota may be considered a platform offering host and environment interactions for studying CRCs. The hypothesis that colon cancer might be a bacteria-related disease is suggested and perspectives are discussed. PMID:23634186

  4. Cancers of the colon and rectum: identical or fraternal twins?

    PubMed

    Hong, Theodore S; Clark, Jeffrey W; Haigis, Kevin M

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer represents a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality, with approximately 1.2 million cases and 600,000 deaths worldwide each year. Because of the anatomic continuity of the colon into the rectum, cancers affecting these organs have historically been considered equivalent. In this Prospective, we discuss the clinical and experimental data suggesting that colon cancer and rectal cancer are highly related, but distinct, diseases. Reconsidering the relationship between these cancers has implications for the development of new therapeutic paradigms. PMID:22585856

  5. A case report of surgical resections with local and systemic chemotherapy for three recurrences of colon cancer occurring ten years after colectomy.

    PubMed

    Miki, Hisanori; Tsunemi, Kozo; Toyoda, Masao; Senzaki, Hideto; Yonemura, Yutaka; Tsubura, Airo

    2012-05-01

    A 56-year-old Japanese woman who underwent a curative resection of ascending colon cancer at 43 years of age was found to have a tumor in her lower left abdominal cavity by computed tomography at 53 years of age. The tumor in the omentum was resected and identified as an adenocarcinoma compatible with metastasis from the primary ascending colon cancer. Although the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur uracil and calcium folinate, liver metastasis was detected 9 months after the first recurrence. A segmentectomy and hepatectomy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. A third recurrence was detected in the right abdominal cavity 7 months after the second surgery. The patient received 5 cycles of combination chemotherapy consisting of folinic acid, fluorouracil and irinotecan before the third operation. The metastatic tumor resection together with intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. After the third surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5 cycles of folinic acid, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. The patient is well with no evidence of recurrence 12 months after the third recurrence. This case suggests that colon cancer can be dormant for over 10 years and that long-term follow-up is required after curative resection. Aggressive local as well as systemic chemotherapy may be required for the management of colon cancer recurrence. PMID:23525503

  6. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer. PMID:25493015

  7. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  8. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Daniel H; Williams, Terence M; Goldstein, Daniel A; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true "net health benefit" from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  9. [Recent Status of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Completely Resected Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Naito, Masahito; Tsuboi, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Several landmark study elucidated that adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy for stage II-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)patients after appropriate surgical resection can significantly improve 5-year survival rate. Meta-analysis of modern cisplatin based adjuvant chemotherapy trial confirmed this benefit. Furthermore, in Japan, large randomized trial and metaanalysis assessing the efficacy of uracil-tegafur(UFT)for stage I patients with completely resected NSCLC reported that UFT can significantly improve 5-year survival rate. Meta-analysis of subgroup assessed that effectiveness of UFT for stage I NSCLC patients with a tumor lager than 2 cm. According to these evidence, cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II-III A NSCLC and UFT for stage I NSCLC patients with a tumor lager than 2 cm are used standard postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in Japan. In recent year, it is presumed that personalized care will be necessary to re-evaluate strategies for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy of lung cancer. Considering histological subtype of lung cancer, several randomize trial for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with non-squamous NSCLC or high neuroendocrine tumor of lung are ongoing. In addition, recent studies of biological research indicate that some tumor marker such as ERCC1 may had a predictive value for selecting patients who will derive the benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27067681

  10. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  11. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5-101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71-1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88-1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  12. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5–101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71–1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88–1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  13. Endoscopic management of polypoid early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Saunders, B P; Talbot, I C

    2000-09-01

    Endoscopic management of polypoid early colonic cancer (malignant polyps and polypoid carcinomas) is no longer controversial. When the endoscopist is satisfied that excision is complete and histology is "favorable" (a resection margin of 2 mm and well or moderately well differentiated tumor), surgery is unnecessary. When histology show "unfavorable" characteristics (which a few histologists still take to include invasion into lymphatics), surgical or laparoscopic resection may be indicated, providing the patient is considered at suitable risk. Surgery kills some patients without finding residual cancer and cannot save others with metastases, so it should be recommended only with due clinical consideration. Sessile or broad-based polyps, especially those in the rectum, are more likely to be "high risk" and merit specialist management if local removal is to be attempted and to allow proper histologic assessment. Endoscopic approaches such as saline injection polypectomy, india-ink tattooing, and use of the argon beam coagulator are applicable in some cases. New approaches that still require trials include ultrasonographic probes, which occasionally clarify the degree of invasion, and prototype stapling devices to allow full-thickness histologic specimens to be obtained. PMID:11036280

  14. Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: What have we learned since INT0116?

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Alexandre A; Sankarankutty, Ajith K; dos Santos, José Sebastião

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the main cancer-related causes of death worldwide. The curative treatment of gastric cancer consists of tumor resection and lymphadenectomy. However, surgical treatment alone is associated with high recurrence rates. Adjuvant treatment strategies have been studied over the last decades, but there have been controversial results from the initial studies. The pivotal INT0116 study demonstrated that the use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil increases relapse-free and overall survival, and it has been adopted across the Western world. The high toxicity of radiochemotherapy and suboptimal surgical treatment employed, with fewer than 10% of the patients submitted to D2 lymphadenectomy, were the main study limitations. Since its publication, other adjuvant treatment modalities have been studied, and radiochemotherapy is being refined to improve its efficacy and safety. A multimodal approach has been demonstrated to significantly increase relapse-free and overall survival, and it can be offered in the form of perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy, regardless of the extent of lymphadenectomy. The objective of the present review is to report the major advances obtained in the last decades in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer as well as the perspectives of treatment based on recent knowledge of the molecular biology of the disease. PMID:25852269

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  16. Devil's Wake: Early-stage bone colonization by breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Yu, Cuijuan; Zhang, Xiang H. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently discovered that bone micrometastases of breast cancer predominantly reside in the microenvironment termed the “osteogenic niche”. The heterotypic adherens junctions between cancer cells and osteogenic cells promote early-stage bone colonization by activating the mTOR pathway in cancer cells. Here, we discuss a few questions raised by these findings.

  17. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  18. Low-Dose Aspirin Tied to Longer Colon Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... used aspirin were 15 percent less likely to die of the disease over the next several years. ... diagnosis: They were 23 percent less likely to die of colon cancer -- and 14 percent less likely ...

  19. Feedback - Colon Cancer Conference and Workshop 2010 —

    Cancer.gov

    This document contains feedback given by the participants of the Colon Cancer Conference and the Histopathology workshop. The meetings took place in October 2010 at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine.

  20. Statins Might Not Lower Colon Cancer Risk: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158506.html Statins Might Not Lower Colon Cancer Risk: Study But ... HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of cholesterol-lowering statins does not appear to reduce the risk of ...

  1. Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158388.html Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test Cologuard may help ... 2016 TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new, but small, study finds more evidence that a ...

  2. Adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy in bitches with mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Karayannopoulou, M; Kaldrymidou, E; Constantinidis, T C; Dessiris, A

    2001-03-01

    The survival time in a group of eight bitches with malignant mammary tumours given adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy was compared with survival in another group of eight bitches with mammary cancer which were treated by surgical excision alone. The same surgical procedure was used in both groups. All bitches had stage III disease according to the World Health Organization clinical staging system. Histologically, 10 of the bitches had complex carcinomas (carcinomatous mixed tumours), the remaining six bitches had carcinosarcomas. The chemotherapeutic protocol used was a combination of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/m2 of body surface area) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/m2) given on the same day, intravenously, every week for four consecutive weeks. Chemotherapy was started one week post-surgery. Selected haematological parameters (packed cell volume, white blood cell count, platelet count and differential white blood cell count) and serum biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) were measured before and during chemotherapy. Survival analysis indicated that the chemotherapeutic regimen had a positive influence on the disease-free interval and the survival time of the eight bitches (P < 0.05). Although leucocyte numbers were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) during chemotherapy, the mean leucocyte counts remained within normal limits. Temporary leukopenia was noted only in one bitch. Packed cell volume and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly (P < 0.05) but within normal limits. Creatinine was also increased significantly (P < 0.01) but the mean creatinine concentrations were within normal limits, although in half of the bitches the concentrations occasionally rose above normal. PMID:11315572

  3. Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Survival after Pancreatic Cancer Resection: An Appraisal of Data from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Kooby, David A.; Gillespie, Theresa W.; Liu, Yuan; Byrd-Sellers, Johnita; Landry, Jerome; Bian, John; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of adjuvant radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) remains controversial. We examined effects of adjuvant therapy on overall survival (OS) in PAC, using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Methods Patients with resected PAC from 1998 to 2002 were queried from the NCDB. Factors associated with receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy (ChemoOnly) versus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (ChemoRad) versus no adjuvant treatment (NoAdjuvant) were assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to examine effect of adjuvant therapy type on OS. Propensity scores (PS) were developed for each treatment arm and used to produce matched samples for analysis to minimize selection bias. Results From 1998 to 2002, a total of 11,526 patients underwent resection of PAC. Of these, 1,029 (8.9 %) received ChemoOnly, 5,292 (45.9 %) received ChemoRad, and 5,205 (45.2 %) received NoAdjuvant. On univariate analysis, factors associated with improved OS included: younger age, higher income, higher facility volume, lower tumor stage and grade, negative margins and nodes, and absence of adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis with matched PS, factors independently associated with improved OS included: younger age, higher income, higher facility volume, later year of diagnosis, smaller tumor size, lower tumor stage, and negative tumor margins and nodes. ChemoRad had the best OS (hazard ratio 0.70, 95 % confidence interval 0.61–0.80) in a PS matched comparison with ChemoOnly (hazard ratio 1.04, 95 % confidence interval 0.93–1.18) and NoAdjuvant (index). Conclusions Adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy is associated with improved OS after PAC resection in a large population from the NCDB. On the basis of these analyses, radiotherapy should be a part of adjuvant therapy for PAC. PMID:23771249

  4. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  5. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  6. Prognostic and Predictive Model for Stage II Colon Cancer Patients With Nonemergent Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Dong; Wang, Ji-Nan; Sui, Bai-Qiang; Zeng, Yong-Ji; Chen, Jun-Qing; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No ideal prognostic model has been applied to clearly identify which suitable high-risk stage II colon cancer patients with negative margins undergoing nonemergent surgery should receive adjuvant chemotherapy routinely. Clinicopathologic and prognostic data of 333 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent D2 or D3 lymphadenectomy during nonemergent surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Four pathologically determined factors, including adjacent organ involvement (RR 2.831, P = 0.001), histologic differentiation (RR 2.151, P = 0.009), lymphovascular invasion (RR 4.043, P < 0.001), and number of lymph nodes retrieved (RR 2.161, P = 0.011), were identified as independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Importantly, a simple cumulative scoring system clearly categorizing prognostic risk groups was generated: risk score = ∑ coefficient’ × status (AOI + histological differentiated + lymphovascular invasion + LNs retrieved). Our new prognostic model may provide valuable information on the impact of lymphovascular invasion, as well as powerfully and reliably predicting prognosis and recurrence for this particular cohort of patients. This model may identify suitable patients with an R0 resection who should receive routine postoperative adjuvant therapy and may help clinicians to facilitate individualized treatment. In this study, we aim to provide an ideal and quantifiable method for clinical decision making in the nonemergent surgical treatment of stage II colon cancer. Our prognostic and predictive model should be applied in multicenter, prospective studies with large sample sizes, in order to obtain a more reliable clinical recommendation. PMID:26735527

  7. EGFR and colon cancer: a clinical view.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Carpeño, J; Belda-Iniesta, C; Casado Sáenz, E; Hernández Agudo, E; Feliu Batlle, J; González Barón, M

    2008-01-01

    Signalling pathways that emerge from EGFR activation are critical in colon cancer (CC) biology. Its targeting with specific drugs has opened a new window in the treatment of this disease. In this regard, monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have evidenced a high degree of efficiency opposed to the uselessness of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. Cetuximab is the mAb that has evidenced most activity in CC. After its initial approval as an irinotecan-resistance reversal agent, cetuximab has demonstrated its efficiency from the first line to heavily pretreated patients. In the first line, its addition may increase response rate to chemotherapy, improving liver metastases resection rate. Another promising approach has been suggested from combination schedules with bevacizumab. Panitumumab has been recently approved for CC. Although there is limited clinical experience, the latest data have confirmed its activity in heavily pretreated patients resulting in a clinical benefit vs. best support care. In spite of the clinical benefits, adverse events and the high sanitary cost derived from these drugs force the selection of patients with the highest probability of benefit. At the moment, when EGFR expression evidenced by immunohistochemistry has no value, skin toxicity and, fundamentally, K-Ras mutations may hint at critical information for confirmatory prospective studies. PMID:18208787

  8. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  9. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  10. [Adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Management of early-risk relapse].

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges; Howayek, Mireille; Atallah, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of adjuvant endocrine therapy for early breast cancer is to prolong overall survival and improve the quality of life of patients. Studies on breast cancer show an early peak of recurrence at two years after surgery and distant recurrences that are responsible for a significant reduction in overall survival. Tamoxifen has been the standard of adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer for years, however only about half of relapses are prevented and there is an early occurrence of serious adverse events due to agonistic estrogenic activity of tamoxifen, such as an increase in the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and venous thromboembolism. The use of aromatase inhibitors is changing this standard with studies covering various clinical settings. They have shown a benefit in many situations, such as an extension of endocrine therapy by tamoxifen, sequential hormonotherapy or up-front adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors. PMID:19623889

  11. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  12. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  13. E2F1/TS Immunophenotype and Survival of Patients with Colorectal Cancer Treated with 5FU-Based Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulzyc-Bielicka, Violetta; Domagala, Pawel; Bielicki, Dariusz; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rogowski, Wojciech; Domagala, Wenancjusz

    2016-07-01

    The predictive value of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression alone for 5FU-based treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been clinically confirmed. Little is known on the association of expression of E2F1, which controls the transcription of genes encoding proteins engaged in DNA synthesis including TS, and survival of patients with CRC. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between expression of both E2F1 and TS in CRCs and survival of patients administered adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy, in order to find a better predictor of treatment outcome than expression of TS or E2F1 alone. Nuclear TS and E2F1 were detected by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays from 190 CRCs (Astler-Coller stage B2 or C). Multivariate analysis identified significant association of the combined E2F1+TS+ immunophenotype with worse OS (HR = 3,78, P = 0,009) and DFS (HR = 2,30, P = 0,03) of patients with colon cancer. There were significant differences between E2F1+TS+ and E2F1-TS- Kaplan-Meier survival curves in relation to DFS (P = 0.008) and OS (P = 0.01). About 37 and 31 % difference in 3-year DFS and OS respectively were seen between patients with E2F1+TS+ vs. E2F1-TS- colon cancer immunophenotype. The E2F1+TS+ immunophenotype may be a marker of poor prognosis (the worst DFS and OS) of patients with colon cancer treated with 5FU-based adjuvant therapy. A subgroup of patients with this immunophenotype may require different and perhaps more aggressive treatment than 5FU-based chemotherapy. Thus, the combined E2F1/TS immunophenotype could be a potential indicator of colon cancer sensitivity to 5FU. PMID:26831819

  14. Long-term outcome of adjuvant chemotherapy cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone, and fluorouracil in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, Eero J; Hirvikoski, Pasi P; Johansson, Risto T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to report the long-term outcome and secondary tumours of early breast cancer patients of adjuvant CNF (cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. One hundred and ninety four patients, 185 primary early breast cancer and nine locoregionally recurrent breast cancer patients, were entered onto the trial between May 1986 and November 1993. The therapies included surgery, radiation therapy, adjuvant CNF chemotherapy, and tamoxifen according to hormonal status. Some of patients were treated twice with CMF (methotrexate). The median follow-up time was 12.9 years. Eighty nine (48%) primary breast cancers relapsed, and six locoregional breast cancers relapsed. After 5-10 years the relapse incidence decreased notably. Eighty three patients died of breast cancer, and nine of other causes. Two cases of leukemia, six cases of skin cancer, two cases of Hodgkin's disease, two cases of meningioma, and two cases of endometrial cancer were observed. This article confirms the feasibility of adjuvant CNF for early breast cancer patients. Questions of possible causability of secondary cancer have yet to be explored. PMID:18097780

  15. Short chain fatty acids and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Augenlicht, Leonard H; Mariadason, John M; Wilson, Andrew; Arango, Diego; Yang, WanCai; Heerdt, Barbara G; Velcich, Anna

    2002-12-01

    The development of intestinal cancer involves complex genetic and epigenetic alterations in the intestinal mucosa. The principal signaling pathway responsible for the initiation of tumor formation, the APC-beta-catenin-TCF4 pathway, regulates both cell proliferation and colonic cell differentiation, but many other intrinsic and extrinsic signals also modulate these cell maturation pathways. The challenge is to understand how signaling and cell maturation are also modulated by nutritional agents. Through gene expression profiling, we have gained insight into the mechanisms by which short chain fatty acids regulate these pathways and the differences in response of gene programs, and of the specific regulation of the c-myc gene, to physiological regulators of intestinal cell maturation, such as butyrate, compared with pharmacological regulators such as the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug sulindac. Moreover, we used a combination of gene expression profiling of the response of cells in culture to sulindac and the response of the human mucosa in subjects treated with sulindac for 1 month, coupled with a mouse genetic model approach, to identify the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1) as an important suppressor of Apc-initiated intestinal tumor formation and a necessary component for tumor inhibition by sulindac. Finally, the mucous barrier, secreted by intestinal goblet cells, is the interface between the luminal contents and the intestinal mucosa. We generated a mouse genetic model with a targeted inactivation of the Muc2 gene that encodes the major intestinal mucin. These mice have no recognizable goblet cells due to the failure of cells to synthesize and store mucin. This leads to perturbations in intestinal crypt architecture, increased cellular proliferation and rates of cell migration, decreased apoptosis and development of adenomas and adenocarcinomas in the small and large intestine and the rectum. PMID:12468628

  16. What make differences in the outcome of adjuvant treatments for resected gastric cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Toshifusa; Fujii, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    After a long history of Dark Age of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer, definite evidences of survival benefit from adjuvant treatment have been reported since 2000s. These survival benefits are likely attributed to something new approach different from pervious studies. In 2001, South West Oncology Group INT0116 trial yielded survival benefit in curatively resected gastric cancer patients with postoperative chemoradiotherapy [5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + Leucovorin + radiotherapy], followed by positive result by MAGIC Trial, employing peri-operative(pre- and postoperative chemotherapy with Epirubicin, cisplatin (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (ECF) regimen in patients with curative resection. A novel drug [S1: ACTS-GC (Adjuvant chemotherapy trial of TS-1 for gastric cancer) in 2007], or new drug combination chemotherapys [CDDP + 5-FU: FNCLCC/FFCD (Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte contre le cancer/Federation Francophone de Cancerologie Digestive) in 2011, Capecitabine + Oxaliplatin: CLASSIC in 2012] also produced positive results in terms of improved prognosis. Neoadjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy, novel anti-cancer drugs, and chemoradiotherapy might be the key words to develop further improvement in the adjuvant treatment of resectable gastric cancer. Moreover, it is not new but still true to stress the importance of D2 surgery as the baseline treatment in order to minimize the amount of residual tumor after surgery. PMID:25206264

  17. Intestinal protozoa are hypothesized to stimulate immunosurveillance against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Juckett, David A; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quensen, Janet Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer in humans results in considerable morbidity and mortality throughout most of the world. During the twentieth century, there was a rapid rise in colon cancer within modernizing countries that has not been adequately explained, although the role of diet has been widely explored. Previously, we showed that the presence of the endemic Eimeria spp. protozoan in intestinal tissues is associated with regions of low tumorigenesis in the large and small bovine intestine and that an Eimeria surface protein is a potent activator of dendritic cells and a useful immunomodulator, with anti-cancer and anti-viral properties. Therefore, we hypothesize that the persistent presence of such an intestinal protozoan enhances immunosurveillance by elevating the intestinal alert status and that the loss of these organisms could lead to a higher incidence of colon cancer. Preliminary support of this hypothesis derives from the observations that domestic animals, known to maintain this protozoan, have very low colon cancer incidence. We propose that this also may occur in human populations that use human excrement (night soil) as a fertilizer, a practice that serves to complete the life cycle of this type of microbe. We examine some evidence for this hypothesis in Japan's mortality patterns, where we show that colon cancer increased after the cessation of night soil use, but before the change to a western diet. We conclude that this hypothesis, a variation of the hygiene hypothesis, is worth further consideration and continued elaboration. PMID:18343044

  18. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  19. Circulating tumor DNA analysis detects minimal residual disease and predicts recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tie, Jeanne; Wang, Yuxuan; Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Springer, Simeon; Kinde, Isaac; Silliman, Natalie; Tacey, Mark; Wong, Hui-Li; Christie, Michael; Kosmider, Suzanne; Skinner, Iain; Wong, Rachel; Steel, Malcolm; Tran, Ben; Desai, Jayesh; Jones, Ian; Haydon, Andrew; Hayes, Theresa; Price, Tim J; Strausberg, Robert L; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Gibbs, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) after resection of stage II colon cancer may identify patients at the highest risk of recurrence and help inform adjuvant treatment decisions. We used massively parallel sequencing-based assays to evaluate the ability of ctDNA to detect minimal residual disease in 1046 plasma samples from a prospective cohort of 230 patients with resected stage II colon cancer. In patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, ctDNA was detected postoperatively in 14 of 178 (7.9%) patients, 11 (79%) of whom had recurred at a median follow-up of 27 months; recurrence occurred in only 16 (9.8 %) of 164 patients with negative ctDNA [hazard ratio (HR), 18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.9 to 40; P < 0.001]. In patients treated with chemotherapy, the presence of ctDNA after completion of chemotherapy was also associated with an inferior recurrence-free survival (HR, 11; 95% CI, 1.8 to 68; P = 0.001). ctDNA detection after stage II colon cancer resection provides direct evidence of residual disease and identifies patients at very high risk of recurrence. PMID:27384348

  20. Induction of pyroptosis in colon cancer cells by LXRβ

    PubMed Central

    Rébé, Cédric; Derangère, Valentin; Ghiringhelli, François

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) have been proposed to have some anticancer properties. We recently identified a new non-genomic role of LXRβ in colon cancer cells. Under LXR agonist treatment, LXRβ induces pyroptosis of these cells in vitro and in vivo, raising the possibility of targeting this isoform in cancer treatment. PMID:27308405

  1. Antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil is enhanced by rosemary extract in both drug sensitive and resistant colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Molina, Susana; Vicente, Gonzalo; de la Cueva, Ana; Vargas, Teodoro; Santoyo, Susana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Fornari, Tiziana; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2013-06-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most used chemotherapeutic agent in colorectal cancer. However, resistance to this drug is relatively frequent, and new strategies to overcome it are urgently needed. The aim of this work was to determine the antitumor properties of a supercritical fluid rosemary extract (SFRE), alone and in combination with 5-FU, as a potential adjuvant therapy useful for colon cancer patients. This extract has been recognized as a healthy component by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The effects of SFRE both alone and in combination with 5-FU were evaluated in different human colon cancer cells in terms of cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation. Additionally, colon cancer cells resistant to 5-FU were used to assay the effects of SFRE on drug resistance. Finally, qRT-PCR was performed to ascertain the mechanism by which SFRE potentiates the effect of 5-FU. Our results show that SFRE displays dose-dependent antitumor activities and exerts a synergistic effect in combination with 5-FU on colon cancer cells. Furthermore, SFRE sensitizes 5-FU-resistant cells to the therapeutic activity of this drug, constituting a beneficial agent against both 5-FU sensitive and resistant tumor cells. Gene expression analysis indicates that the enhancement of the effect of 5-FU by SFRE might be explained by the downregulation of TYMS and TK1, enzymes related to 5-FU resistance. PMID:23557932

  2. Generation of "virtual" control groups for single arm prostate cancer adjuvant trials.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenyu; Lilly, Michael B; Koziol, James A; Chen, Xin; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Yipeng; Skarecky, Douglas; Sutton, Manuel; Sawyers, Anne; Ruckle, Herbert; Carpenter, Philip M; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Mingsen; Pan, Cong; Zhu, Jian-Guo; McLaren, Christine E; Gurley, Michael J; Lee, Chung; McClelland, Michael; Ahlering, Thomas; Kattan, Michael W; Mercola, Dan

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to construct a control group for trials of adjuvant therapy (Rx) of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RP) due to ethical issues and patient acceptance. We utilized 8 curve-fitting models to estimate the time to 60%, 65%, … 95% chance of progression free survival (PFS) based on the data derived from Kattan post-RP nomogram. The 8 models were systematically applied to a training set of 153 post-RP cases without adjuvant Rx to develop 8 subsets of cases (reference case sets) whose observed PFS times were most accurately predicted by each model. To prepare a virtual control group for a single-arm adjuvant Rx trial, we first select the optimal model for the trial cases based on the minimum weighted Euclidean distance between the trial case set and the reference case set in terms of clinical features, and then compare the virtual PFS times calculated by the optimum model with the observed PFSs of the trial cases by the logrank test. The method was validated using an independent dataset of 155 post-RP patients without adjuvant Rx. We then applied the method to patients on a Phase II trial of adjuvant chemo-hormonal Rx post RP, which indicated that the adjuvant Rx is highly effective in prolonging PFS after RP in patients at high risk for prostate cancer recurrence. The method can accurately generate control groups for single-arm, post-RP adjuvant Rx trials for prostate cancer, facilitating development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24465467

  3. The Efficacy of Adjuvant FOLFOX6 for Patients With Gastric Cancer after D2 Lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Xian; Yang, Xu-Long; He, Ming-Ming; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Li, Yu-Hong; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhan, You-Qing; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) are widely used for treating resected gastric cancer in clinics in China, but only few clinical trials have investigated its efficacy. Using propensity score matching, we evaluated the efficacy of adjuvant FOLFOX6 following D2 lymphadenectomy. Patients who received adjuvant FOLFOX6 following D2 lymphadenectomy (FOLFOX6, n = 113) or D2 lymphadenectomy only (surgery-only, n = 512) between 1998 and 2007 at our center were propensity score-matched; we identified a balanced 1:2 cohort, with 96 patients in the FOLFOX6 group and 192 patients in the surgery-only group. The overall survival (OS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method; factors affecting survival were identified by Cox regression models. A nomogram incorporating independent prognosticators was constructed for predicting the 3-, 5-, and 7-year OS, and bootstrap validation was performed. The median follow-up was 9.3 years, and the 7-year OS was 52.1% in the FOLFOX6 group and 43.8% in the surgery-only group (P = 0.04), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.69 (95% confidence interval = 0.49–0.98). A prognostic nomogram was generated with the identified significant prognosticators (adjuvant FOLFOX6, number of total harvested nodes, the interaction effect between these two variables, tumor size, T and N stage). Internal validation of the nomogram revealed good predictive abilities, with a bootstrap-corrected concordance index of 0.70. Adjuvant FOLFOX6 following D2 lymphadenectomy is associated with survival benefit in resected gastric cancer. Receiving adjuvant FOLFOX6 can be developed into a nomogram with other independent prognosticators to refine OS prediction and estimation of benefit from adjuvant FOLFOX6 for resected gastric cancer. PMID:27100411

  4. Risk of Marrow Neoplasms After Adjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Visvanathan, Kala; Rugo, Hope S.; Moy, Beverly; Goldstein, Lori J.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Neumayer, Leigh; Langbaum, Terry S.; Theriault, Richard L.; Hughes, Melissa E.; Weeks, Jane C.; Karp, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Outcomes for early-stage breast cancer have improved. First-generation adjuvant chemotherapy trials reported a 0.27% 8-year cumulative incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Incomplete ascertainment and follow-up may have underestimated subsequent risk of treatment-associated marrow neoplasm (MN). Patients and Methods We examined the MN frequency in 20,063 patients with stage I to III breast cancer treated at US academic centers between 1998 and 2007. Time-to-event analyses were censored at first date of new cancer event, last contact date, or death and considered competing risks. Cumulative incidence, hazard ratios (HRs), and comparisons with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results estimates were obtained. Marrow cytogenetics data were reviewed. Results Fifty patients developed MN (myeloid, n = 42; lymphoid, n = 8) after breast cancer (median follow-up, 5.1 years). Patients who developed MN had similar breast cancer stage distribution, race, and chemotherapy exposure but were older compared with patients who did not develop MN (median age, 59.1 v 53.9 years, respectively; P = .03). Two thirds of patients had complex MN cytogenetics. Risk of MN was significantly increased after surgery plus chemotherapy (HR, 6.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 36.1) or after all modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation; HR, 7.6; 95% CI, 1.6 to 35.8), compared with no treatment with chemotherapy. MN rates per 1,000 person-years were 0.16 (surgery), 0.43 (plus radiation), 0.46 (plus chemotherapy), and 0.54 (all three modalities). Cumulative incidence of MN doubled between years 5 and 10 (0.24% to 0.48%); 9% of patients were alive at 10 years. Conclusion In this large early-stage breast cancer cohort, MN risk after radiation and/or adjuvant chemotherapy was low but higher than previously described. Risk continued to increase beyond 5 years. Individual risk of MN must be balanced against the absolute survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID

  5. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:27041240

  6. Clitocine potentiates TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells by promoting Mcl-1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Ruan, Feng; Zeng, Xue-Li; Xiang, Jun; Li, Xia; Wu, Ping; Fung, Kwok Pui; Liu, Fei-Yan

    2016-10-01

    Among anti-cancer candidate drugs, TRAIL might be the most specific agent against cancer cells due to its low toxicity to normal cells. Unfortunately, cancer cells usually develop drug resistance to TRAIL, which is a major obstacle for its clinical application. One promising strategy is co-administrating with sensitizer to overcome cancer cells resistance to TRAIL. Clitocine, a natural amino nucleoside purified from wild mushroom, is recently demonstrated that can induce apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human cancer cells by targeting Mcl-1. In the present study,we found that pretreatment with clitocine dramatically enhances TRAIL lethality in its resistant human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. More importantly, combination of clitocine and TRAIL also effectively inhibits xenograft growth and induces tumor cells apoptosis in athymic mice. The disruption of the binding between Mcl-1 and Bak as well as mitochondrial translocation of Bax mediated by clitocine are identified as the key underlying mechanisms, which leading to mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Enforced exogenous Mcl-1 can effectively attenuate clitocine/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by suppressing the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, clitocine regulates Mcl-1 expression at the posttranslational level as no obvious change is observed on mRNA level and proteasome inhibitor MG132 almost blocks the Mcl-1 suppression by clitocine. In fact, more ubiquitinated Mcl-1 was detected under clitocine treatment. Our findings indicate that clitocine is potentially an effective adjuvant agent in TRAIL-based cancer therapy. PMID:27421828

  7. Near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for colonic cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic cancer detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (<5s) Muller matrix imaging system with dual-rotating waveplates was developed. 16 (4 by 4) full Mueller matrices of the colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and cancerous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  8. Aromatase inhibitor plus ovarian suppression as adjuvant therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Figg, William D; Cook, Katherine; Clarke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The goal of adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer is to prevent recurrence by eradicating micrometastatic disease. Recent studies have shown that the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as adjuvant therapy improves outcomes for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer compared to adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen alone. The research question has been raised whether AIs would have similar improvements in disease-free survival (DFS) in premenopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer. Combining 2 phase 3 clinical trials (n = 4,690), Pagani and colleagues randomized premenopausal women with ER-positive early breast cancer to exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 y. After a median follow-up of 68 months, DFS was 91.1% in the AI group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen group. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. PMID:25535893

  9. MYST3/CREBBP Rearranged Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Mrinal M.; Naina, Harris V.

    2014-01-01

    Although rare, clinicians and patients must be aware that therapy related malignancies, specifically acute myeloid leukemia (AML), can occur as a complication of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Vigilance for signs and symptoms is appropriate. AML with t (8;16) is a specific translocation leading to formation of a fusion protein (MYST3/CREBBP). The MYST3/CREBBP AML tends to develop within 2 years of adjuvant chemotherapy, especially for breast cancer, without preceding myelodysplasia. It usually presents with disseminated intravascular coagulation and osteolytic lesions and has a poor prognosis despite aggressive resuscitation and therapy. With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, we are seeing a definite increase in the incidence of therapy related myelodysplastic syndromes and AML. One must keep this complication in mind while counseling and following up breast cancer patients who have received adjuvant chemotherapy. New osteolytic bone lesions in a patient with history of breast cancer do not necessarily mean metastatic disease and should be fully evaluated. PMID:25548695

  10. [Cases of Obstructive Colon Cancer for Which Elective Surgery Was Performed after Colonic Stent Placement].

    PubMed

    Maruo, Hirotoshi; Nakamura, Koichi; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Nishiyama, Raisuke; Koike, Kota; Kubota, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the short-term outcomes of 20 patients with obstructive colon cancer who underwent colonic stent placement as a bridge to surgery (BTS) during the 3-year period between April 2012 and March 2015. Subjects comprised 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 68.3 years. Placement and decompression were successfully achieved in all of the patients. Oral ingestion became possible from a mean of 2.7 days after placement. No serious complications associated with placement were encountered. Total colonoscopy was performed after placement in 17 patients (85%), and independent advanced cancer was seen in the proximal portion of the colon in 1 patient. Elective surgery was performed for all of the patients after placement. Excluding the 2 patients for whom preoperative chemotherapy or treatment of another disease was prioritized, the mean interval to surgery for the remaining 18 patients was 23.2 days. The operative procedure performed was laparoscopic surgery in 8 patients (40%). Although minor leakage (n=1) and abdominal wall abscess (n=1) were observed as postoperative complications, the patients generally had an uneventful course. Colonic stent placement for obstructive colon cancer is relatively easy and safe, and may be considered as an effective treatment method that enables favorable intestinal decompression preoperatively and one-stage resection. PMID:26805323

  11. Effects of commercial anthocyanin-rich extracts on colonic cancer and nontumorigenic colonic cell growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cuiwei; Giusti, M Monica; Malik, Minnie; Moyer, Mary P; Magnuson, Bernadene A

    2004-10-01

    Commercially prepared grape (Vitis vinifera), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), and chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa E.) anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) were investigated for their potential chemopreventive activity against colon cancer. The growth of colon-cancer-derived HT-29 and nontumorigenic colonic NCM460 cells exposed to semipurified AREs (10-75 microg of monomeric anthocyanin/mL) was monitored for up to 72 h using a sulforhodamine B assay. All extracts inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells, with chokeberry ARE being the most potent inhibitor. HT-29 cell growth was inhibited approximately 50% after 48 h of exposure to 25 microg/mL chokeberry ARE. Most importantly, the growth of NCM460 cells was not inhibited at lower concentrations of all three AREs, illustrating greater growth inhibition of colon cancer, as compared to nontumorigenic colon cells. Extracts were semipurified and characterized by high-pressure liquid chromatography, spectrophotometry, and colorimetry. Grape anthocyanins were the glucosylated derivatives of five different anthocyanidin molecules, with or without p-coumaric acid acylation. Bilberry contained five different anthocyanidins glycosylated with galactose, glucose, and arabinose. Chokeberry anthocyanins were cyanidin derivatives, monoglycosylated mostly with galactose and arabinose. The varying compositions and degrees of growth inhibition suggest that the anthocyanin chemical structure may play an important role in the growth inhibitory activity of commercially available AREs. PMID:15453676

  12. Wnt signaling in cancer stem cells and colon cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2016-01-01

    Overactivation of Wnt signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). The Wnt pathway is a key regulator of both the early and the later, more invasive, stages of CRC development. In the normal intestine and colon, Wnt signaling controls the homeostasis of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that fuel, via proliferation, upward movement of progeny cells from the crypt bottom toward the villus and differentiation into all cell types that constitute the intestine. Studies in recent years suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs), similar to ISCs of the crypts, consist of a small subpopulation of the tumor and are responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease. Although various ISC signature genes were also identified as CRC markers and some of these genes were even demonstrated to have a direct functional role in CRC development, the origin of CSCs and their contribution to cancer progression is still debated. Here, we describe studies supporting a relationship between Wnt-regulated CSCs and the progression of CRC. PMID:27134739

  13. Two or Three Year Disease Free Survival (DFS) as a Primary Endpoint in Stage III Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trials with fluoropyrimidines with or without Oxaliplatin or Irinotecan: Data from 12,676 patients from MOSAIC, X-ACT, PETACC-3, C-06, C-07, and C89803

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, D; Shi, Q; Yothers, G; Van Cutsem, E; Cassidy, J; Saltz, L; Wolmark, N; Bot, B; Grothey, A; Buyse, M; de Gramont, A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The ACCENT group previously established disease-free survival (DFS) with 2 or 3 years median follow-up to predict 5 year overall survival (5yr OS) in stage II and III colon cancer. ACCENT further proposed (1) a stronger association between DFS and OS in stage III than II, and (2) 6 or 7 years necessary to demonstrate DFS/OS surrogacy in recent trials. The relationship between endpoints in trials with oral fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan is unknown. Methods Associations between the treatment effect hazard ratios (HRs) on 2 and 3yr DFS, and 5 and 6yr OS were examined in 6 phase III trials not included in prior analyses from 1997-2002. Individual data for 12,676 patients were analyzed; two trials each tested oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and oral treatment vs 5-FU/LV. Findings Overall association between 2/3 yr DFS and 5/6 yr OS HRs was modest to poor (simple R2 measures: 0.58 to 0.76, model-based R2: 0.17 to 0.49). In stage III patients, the association increased (model-based R2≥0.79). Observed treatment effects on 2 yr DFS accurately 5/6 yr OS effects overall and in stage III patients. Interpretation In recent trials of cytotoxic chemotherapy, 2 or 3yr DFS HRs are highly predictive of 5 and 6yr OS HRs in stage III but not stage II patients. In all patients the DFS/OS association is stronger for 6yr OS, thus at least 6 year follow-up is recommended to assess OS benefit. These data support DFS as the primary endpoint for stage III colon cancer trials testing cytotoxic agents. Funding Funded by NCI Grant CA-25224 to the Mayo Clinic to support the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. PMID:21257306

  14. Rural-Urban Differences in Colon Cancer Risk in Blacks and Whites: The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeomans Kinney, Anita; Harrell, Janna; Slattery, Marty; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Geographic and racial variations in cancer incidence have been observed. Studies of colorectal carcinoma indicate a higher incidence and mortality rate for blacks than for whites in the United States. Purpose: We evaluated the effect of rural versus urban residence on colon cancer risk and stage of disease at diagnosis in blacks and…

  15. The Prognostic Value of Microsatellite Instability, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutations in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vogelaar, F Jeroen; N van Erning, Felice; Reimers, Marlies S; van der Linden, Hans; Pruijt, Hans; C van den Brule, Adriaan J; Bosscha, Koop

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized cancer medicine, identifying mutations within patient tumors plays an important role in defining high-risk stage II colon cancer patients. The prognostic role of BRAF V600E mutation, microsatellite instability (MSI) status, KRAS mutation and PIK3CA mutation in stage II colon cancer patients is not settled. We retrospectively analyzed 186 patients with stage II colon cancer who underwent an oncological resection but were not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. KRAS mutations, PIK3CA mutation, V600E BRAF mutation and MSI status were determined. Survival analyses were performed. Mutations were found in the patients with each mutation in the following percentages: 23% (MSI), 35% (KRAS), 19% (BRAF) and 11% (PIK3CA). A trend toward worse overall survival (OS) was seen in patients with an MSI (5-year OS 74% versus 82%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6–4.9) and a KRAS-mutated tumor (5-year OS 77% versus 82%, adjusted HR 1.7, 95% CI 0.8–3.5). MSI and BRAF-mutated tumors tended to correlate with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (5-year DFS 60% versus 78%, adjusted HR 1.6, 95% CI 0.5–2.1 and 5-year DFS 57% versus 77%, adjusted HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.4–2.6 respectively). In stage II colon cancer patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, BRAF mutation and MSI status both tended to have a negative prognostic effect on disease-free survival. KRAS and MSI status also tended to be correlated with worse overall survival. PMID:26716438

  16. Oncostatic effects of fluoxetine in experimental colon cancer models.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Silva, Wilson A; Gasser, Martin; Mönch, Romana; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Heinsen, Helmut; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Friedrich, Mike; Heinze, Katrin Gertrud; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Stopper, Helga

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors in the human population. Recent studies have shown a reduced risk for colon cancer in patients given the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX). The exact mechanism by which FLX might protect from colon cancer remains however controversial. Here, FLX reduced the development of different colon tumor xenografts, as well as proliferation in hypoxic tumor areas within them. FLX treatment also decreased microvessel numbers in tumors. Although FLX did not increase serum and tumor glucose levels as much as the colon chemotherapy gold standard Fluorouracil did, lactate levels were significantly augmented within tumors by FLX treatment. The gene expression of the MCT4 lactate transporter was significantly downregulated. Total protein amounts from the third and fifth mitochondrial complexes were significantly decreased by FLX in tumors. Cell culture experiments revealed that FLX reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential significantly and disabled the reactive oxygen species production of the third mitochondrial complex. Furthermore, FLX arrested hypoxic colon tumor cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell-cycle. The expression of key cell-cycle-related checkpoint proteins was enhanced in cell culture and in vivo experiments. Therefore, we suggest FLX impairs energy generation, cell cycle progression and proliferation in tumor cells, especially under condition of hypoxia. This then leads to reduced microvessel formation and tumor shrinkage in xenograft models. PMID:26004136

  17. CpG Oligonucleotides as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Shirota, Hidekazu; Tross, Debra; Klinman, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants improve host responsiveness to co-delivered vaccines through a variety of mechanisms. Agents that trigger cells expressing Toll-like receptors (TLR) activate an innate immune response that enhances the induction of vaccine-specific immunity. When administered in combination with vaccines designed to prevent or slow tumor growth, TLR agonists have significantly improved the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Unfortunately, vaccines containing TLR agonists have rarely been able to eliminate large established tumors when administered systemically. To improve efficacy, attention has focused on delivering TLR agonists intra-tumorally with the intent of altering the tumor microenvironment. Agonists targeting TLRs 7/8 or 9 can reduce the frequency of Tregs while causing immunosuppressive MDSC in the tumor bed to differentiate into tumoricidal macrophages thereby enhancing tumor elimination. This work reviews pre-clinical and clinical studies concerning the utility of TLR 7/8/9 agonists as adjuvants for tumor vaccines. PMID:26343193

  18. Predictive and Prognostic Analysis of PIK3CA Mutation in Stage III Colon Cancer Intergroup Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoyun; Imamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Mai; McCleary, Nadine J.; Ng, Kimmie; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al B.; Mowat, Rex B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase [PI3K], catalytic subunit alpha gene) activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and contribute to pathogenesis of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Methods We examined associations of PIK3CA oncogene mutation with relapse, survival, and treatment efficacy in 627 stage III colon carcinoma case subjects within a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (5-fluorouracil and leucovorin [FU/LV] vs irinotecan [CPT11], fluorouracil and leucovorin [IFL]; Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 [Alliance]). We detected PIK3CA mutation in exons 9 and 20 by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess prognostic and predictive role of PIK3CA mutation, adjusting for clinical features and status of routine standard molecular pathology features, including KRAS and BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability (mismatch repair deficiency). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with PIK3CA wild-type cases, overall status of PIK3CA mutation positivity or the presence of PIK3CA mutation in either exon 9 or 20 alone was not statistically significantly associated with recurrence-free, disease-free, or overall survival (log-rank P > .70; P > .40 in multivariable regression models). There was no statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA and KRAS (or BRAF) mutation status in survival analysis (P interaction > .18). PIK3CA mutation status did not appear to predict better or worse response to IFL therapy compared with FU/LV therapy (P interaction > .16). Conclusions Overall tumor PIK3CA mutation status is not associated with stage III colon cancer prognosis. PIK3CA mutation does not appear to serve as a predictive tumor molecular biomarker for response to irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24231454

  19. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Stefan Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m{sup 2}), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h). A dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m{sup 2} in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m{sup 2} administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy.

  20. Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Emma M; Popa, Gina; Gill, Chris IR; McCann, Mark J; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Rowland, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a probable association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the digestive tract. This anti-cancer activity has been attributed in part to anti-oxidants present in these foods. Raspberries in particular are a rich source of the anti-oxidant compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Methods A "colon-available" raspberry extract (CARE) was prepared that contained phytochemicals surviving a digestion procedure that mimicked the physiochemical conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The polyphenolic-rich extract was assessed for anti-cancer properties in a series of in vitro systems that model important stages of colon carcinogenesis, initiation, promotion and invasion. Results The phytochemical composition of CARE was monitored using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The colon-available raspberry extract was reduced in anthocyanins and ellagitannins compared to the original raspberry juice but enriched in other polyphenols and polyphenol breakdown products that were more stable to gastrointestinal digestion. Initiation – CARE caused significant protective effects against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in HT29 colon cancer cells measured using single cell microgelelectrophoresis. Promotion – CARE significantly decreased the population of HT29 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, effectively reducing the number of cells entering the cell cycle. However, CARE had no effect on epithelial integrity (barrier function) assessed by recording the trans-epithelial resistance (TER) of CACO-2 cell monolayers. Invasion – CARE caused significant inhibition of HT115 colon cancer cell invasion using the matrigel invasion assay. Conclusion The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro. PMID:17442116

  1. The Vitamin D Receptor, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rong; Wu, Shaoping; Xia, Yinglin; Sun, Jun

    2012-03-01

    The nuclear receptor is an emerging therapeutic target in various human diseases. Vitamin D receptor (VDR), a nuclear receptor, mediates the biological functions of vitamin D. Classically, vitamin D is recognized as an essential contributor to mineral and bone homeostasis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that vitamin D is involved in inflammatory responses. Persistent intestinal inflammation is associated with colon cancer. This review focuses on vitamin D and VDR in inflammatory bowel diseases and colon cancer. We place emphasis on the regulatory roles of vitamin D/VDR on in inflammation, enteric bacteria, and tumorigenesis. We summarize the signaling pathways regulated by VDR in intestinal homeostasis. Finally, we discuss the potential application of the insights gleaned from these findings to personalized therapies in chronic inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:23814529

  2. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  3. Thioredoxin reductase 1 ablation sensitizes colon cancer cells to methylseleninate-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Honeggar, Matthew; Beck, Robert; Moos, Philip J.

    2009-12-15

    The relationship between selenium and cancer is complex because individuals with low serum selenium levels benefit from selenium supplementation, but those with high serum selenium levels are at increased risk for other diseases. This suggests that the use of selenocompounds might be limited to particular circumstances, such as adjuvant therapy. A contributor to this dichotomy may be the activity of certain selenium containing enzymes like the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (TR1). We evaluated the cellular response to select selenocompounds that have anticancer activity when TR1 was attenuated by siRNA in RKO colon cancer cells. Methylseleninic acid (MSA), which is a substrate for TR1, enhanced cytotoxicity to colon cancer cells when TR1 was attenuated. MSA induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, as measured by GRP78 protein levels. However, this pathway did not appear to account for the change in cytotoxicity when TR1 was attenuated. Instead, knockdown of the cytosolic TR plus incubation with MSA increased autophagy, as measured by LC3B cleavage, and apoptosis, as measured by Annexin V and mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the use of selenocompounds with anticancer activity, like MSA, might be utilized most effectively with agents that targets TR1 in chemotherapeutic applications.

  4. Racial variation in adjuvant chemotherapy initiation among breast cancer patients receiving oncotype DX testing.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Megan C; Weinberger, Morris; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Dinan, Michaela A; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Troester, Melissa A; Carey, Lisa A; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown whether racial differences exist in adjuvant chemotherapy initiation among women with similar oncotype DX (ODX) risk scores. We examined whether adjuvant chemotherapy initiation varied by race. Data come from the Phase III, Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a longitudinal, population-based study of North Carolina women diagnosed with breast cancer between 2008 and 2014. We used modified Poisson regression and report adjusted relative risk (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) to estimate the association between race and adjuvant chemotherapy initiation across ODX risk groups among women who received the test (n = 541). Among women who underwent ODX testing, 54.2, 37.5, and 8.3% of women had tumors classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. We observed no racial variation in adjuvant chemotherapy initiation. Increasing ODX risk score (aRR = 1.39, 95%CI = 1.22, 1.58) and being married (aRR = 2.92, 95%CI = 1.12, 7.60) were independently associated with an increased likelihood of adjuvant chemotherapy in the low-risk group. Among women in the intermediate-risk group, ODX risk score (aRR = 1.15, 95%CI = 1.11, 1.20), younger age (aRR = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.35, 2.81), larger tumor size (aRR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.22, 2.35), and higher income were independently associated with increased likelihood of adjuvant chemotherapy initiation. No racial differences were found in adjuvant chemotherapy initiation among women receiving ODX testing. As treatment decision-making becomes increasingly targeted with the use of genetic technologies, these results provide evidence that test results may drive treatment in a similar way across racial subgroups. PMID:26216535

  5. Transcriptional recapitulation and subversion of embryonic colon development by mouse colon tumor models and human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Sergio; Park, Young-Kyu; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Halberg, Richard B; Yu, Ming; Jessen, Walter J; Freudenberg, Johannes; Chen, Xiaodi; Haigis, Kevin; Jegga, Anil G; Kong, Sue; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Xu, Huan; Reichling, Timothy; Azhar, Mohammad; Boivin, Gregory P; Roberts, Reade B; Bissahoyo, Anika C; Gonzales, Fausto; Bloom, Greg C; Eschrich, Steven; Carter, Scott L; Aronow, Jeremy E; Kleimeyer, John; Kleimeyer, Michael; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Settle, Stephen H; Boone, Braden; Levy, Shawn; Graff, Jonathan M; Doetschman, Thomas; Groden, Joanna; Dove, William F; Threadgill, David W; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coffey, Robert J; Aronow, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of carcino-embryonic antigen by colorectal cancer is an example of oncogenic activation of embryonic gene expression. Hypothesizing that oncogenesis-recapitulating-ontogenesis may represent a broad programmatic commitment, we compared gene expression patterns of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and mouse colon tumor models to those of mouse colon development embryonic days 13.5-18.5. Results We report here that 39 colon tumors from four independent mouse models and 100 human CRCs encompassing all clinical stages shared a striking recapitulation of embryonic colon gene expression. Compared to normal adult colon, all mouse and human tumors over-expressed a large cluster of genes highly enriched for functional association to the control of cell cycle progression, proliferation, and migration, including those encoding MYC, AKT2, PLK1 and SPARC. Mouse tumors positive for nuclear β-catenin shifted the shared embryonic pattern to that of early development. Human and mouse tumors differed from normal embryonic colon by their loss of expression modules enriched for tumor suppressors (EDNRB, HSPE, KIT and LSP1). Human CRC adenocarcinomas lost an additional suppressor module (IGFBP4, MAP4K1, PDGFRA, STAB1 and WNT4). Many human tumor samples also gained expression of a coordinately regulated module associated with advanced malignancy (ABCC1, FOXO3A, LIF, PIK3R1, PRNP, TNC, TIMP3 and VEGF). Conclusion Cross-species, developmental, and multi-model gene expression patterning comparisons provide an integrated and versatile framework for definition of transcriptional programs associated with oncogenesis. This approach also provides a general method for identifying pattern-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This delineation and categorization of developmental and non-developmental activator and suppressor gene modules can thus facilitate the formulation of sophisticated hypotheses to evaluate potential synergistic effects of targeting within- and

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy for older adults with breast cancer: making the standard a standard.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Mortimer, Joanne

    2009-09-01

    Muss HB, Berry DA, Cirrincione CT et al.: Adjuvant chemotherapy in older women with early-stage breast cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 360, 2055-2065 (2009). To date, only two prospective trials evaluating adjuvant therapy for breast cancer in older adults have been published. The second and more recent trial, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 49907, provides substantial evidence supporting the use of standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimens (doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide or cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-5-fluorouracil) as opposed to simplified oral regimens (capecitabine). In this trial, both the risk of relapse (hazard ratio: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.38-3.17; p < 0.001) and the risk of death (hazard ratio: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.11-3.08; p = 0.02) were significantly higher with capecitabine compared with standard chemotherapy. The current review explores both the implications and potential caveats of this innovative trial. CALGB 49907 represents a paradigm for further studies of adjuvant cancer therapy in older adults. PMID:19702447

  7. NDC80 promotes proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, X K; Wu, H Y; Chen, H L; Feng, H G

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome instability is a common feature of tumor cells, and may be an important mechanism in tumor formation. Nuclear division cycle 80 (NDC80) is closely associated with the stability of chromosomes. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between NDC80 and development of colon cancer using a range of methods. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were employed to determine the expression of this protein in different colon cells and tissues, cell proliferation was measured with an MTT assay, levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen were examined by immunofluorescence, and cell migration was observed using wound healing tests. Our results showed that the expression of NDC80 in colon cancer cells (CACO2, HCT8, HCT116, and SW480) and tissues (from 20 patients) was higher than that in controls. Moreover, cell proliferation and migration rates were elevated in cells transfected with NDC80 compared to control groups. In summary, NDC80 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer cells, and may constitute a new target for gene therapy in treating this disease. Combined with clinicopathological grading, measurement of positive NDC80 expression may be helpful in diagnosing and estimating the prognosis of colon cancer patients. PMID:27173328

  8. [Multidisciplinary tailoring of therapy of metastatic colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Österlund, Pia; Isoniemi, Helena; Scheinin, Tom; Ristimäki, Ari; Lantto, Eila

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of colon cancer requires multidisciplinary team work. The multitude of therapies in metastatic colon cancer have led to longer overall survival with fewer symptoms. Median survival has increased from 5 months with the best supportive care to 30-40 months in randomized studies, even with curative treatment in some patients. Tailoring of the treatment is best done by a multidisciplinary team considering radiotherapy and operation of the primary tumor, resection of liver, lung and peritoneal metastases, medical treatment alternatives, palliative care, ablative methods etc. Without skillful surgeons, oncologists, pathologists, geneticists, radiologists etc. the best treatment opportunities may be missed. PMID:27483635

  9. The c-MYC-ABCB5 axis plays a pivotal role in 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kugimiya, Naruji; Nishimoto, Arata; Hosoyama, Tohru; Ueno, Koji; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-07-01

    c-MYC overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including colon cancer and regulates many biological activities such as aberrant cell proliferation, apoptosis, genomic instability, immortalization and drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which c-MYC confers drug resistance remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the c-MYC expression level in primary colorectal cancer tissues correlated with the recurrence rate following 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Supporting this finding, overexpression of exogenous c-MYC increased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment in human colon cancer cells, and knockdown of endogenous c-MYC decreased it. Furthermore, c-MYC knockdown decreased the expression level of ABCB5, which is involved in 5-FU resistance. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that c-MYC bound to the ABCB5 promoter region. c-MYC inhibitor (10058-F4) treatment inhibited c-MYC binding to the ABCB5 promoter, leading to a decrease in ABCB5 expression level. ABCB5 knockdown decreased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment as expected, and the ABCB5 expression level was increased in 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer cells. Finally, using a human colon cancer xenograft murine model, we found that the combined 5-FU and 10058-F4 treatment significantly decreased tumorigenicity in nude mice compared with 5-FU or 10058-F4 treatment alone. 10058-F4 treatment decreased the ABCB5 expression level in the presence or absence of 5-FU. In contrast, 5-FU treatment alone increased the ABCB5 expression level. Taken together, these results suggest that c-MYC confers resistance to 5-FU through regulating ABCB5 expression in human colon cancer cells. PMID:25689483

  10. Is It Possible to Shorten the Duration of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    You, Kai-Yun; Huang, Rong; Yu, Xin; Liu, Yi-Min; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The long duration of 4 months of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is currently recommended for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery. Whether a short duration could be applied in these patients is unknown. So, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects on prognosis based on different durations of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer. We performed a retrospective study of 200 rectal cancer patients who were treated with preoperative chemoradiation and were pathologically graded as ypII and ypIII stages between March 2003 and May 2012. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median duration of adjuvant chemotherapy of 2 months. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between patients with duration shorter and longer than 2 months in the whole group and subgroups of ypII and ypIII. Recurrence patterns were also analyzed in all subgroups. Multivariate analysis was performed to explore clinical factors that were significantly associated with DFS, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival. In subgroup of ypII stage, the 5-year OS and DFS were similar between patients in long and short durations of adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients of ypIII stage, although no significant difference was found in OS between patients in short and long durations, DFS was showed to be higher in the group of long duration. Further analysis showed that longer duration of adjuvant chemotherapy could lead to improved control of distant metastasis and no impact on local control. Multivariable analysis indicated that long duration of adjuvant chemotherapy is significantly associated with longer distant metastasis-free survival in patients with ypIII stage, but not in those with ypII stage. A long duration of at least 2 months of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for patients with ypIII stage, whereas it may not be absolutely appropriate for those

  11. Advances in adjuvant systemic therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Leong, David; Rai, Rajat; Nguyen, Brandon; Lee, Andrew; Yip, Desmond

    2014-10-10

    Non-small-cell lung cancer remains a leading cause of death around the world. For most cases, the only chance of cure comes from resection for localised disease, however relapse rates remain high following surgery. Data has emerged over recent years regarding the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy for improving disease-free and overall survival of patients following curative resection. This paper reviews the clinical trials that have been conducted in this area along with the studies integrating radiation therapy in the adjuvant setting. The role of prognostic gene signatures are reviewed as well as ongoing clinical trials including those incorporating biological or targeted therapies. PMID:25302167

  12. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  13. Docetaxel as adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Heys, Steven D; Sarkar, Tarun; Hutcheon, Andrew W

    2004-10-01

    Developments in the role of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with breast cancer have focused on the taxes, in particular, docetaxel. This paper discusses the rationale for the introduction of docetaxel into the management of patients following surgery and also its role in those patients with locally-advanced disease, focussing on key clinical trials. The addition of docetaxel to standard adjuvant chemotherapeutic regimens does seem to result in an increased survival in some patients with early-stage disease. In the neoadjuvant setting, the addition of docetaxel to standard regimens does increase pathological response rates, which is a surrogate marker of eventual outcome. PMID:15461550

  14. miR-126: A novel regulator in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WEINA; LIN, JIE; ZHANG, HONGXUAN

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common, lethal diseases worldwide. Tumor metastasis and chemotherapy resistance are the main reasons for its poor prognosis and high fatality rate. Tumor development is thought of as one of the most complex cellular events as it is a multi-step cascading process involving infinite proliferation, invasion and immigration. Recently, increasing studies have demonstrated that microRNA-126 (miR-126) has an important role in colon cancer. The expression of miR-126 decreased significantly in colon cancer, particularly in highly metastatic cell lines. miR-126 controls tumor cell growth, metastasis and survival via inactivation of the oncogene signaling pathway, indicating that miR-126 may serve as a therapeutic target for anticancer therapy. Potentially, miR-126 was also reported to be an ideal molecular target as a novel biomarker for liver metastasis from colorectal cancer due to its changeable expression level. In the present review, the current knowledge regarding regulatory function of miR-126 is summarized along with its underlying mechanisms in colon cancer. PMID:26893826

  15. [A case of hyperammonemia with encephalopathy related to FOLFIRI chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Akihiro; Nakajima, Takayoshi; Inui, Kyoko; Yamashita, Hironari; Gon, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Hamabe, Yutaka; Ishida, Takeshi

    2009-07-01

    A 50-year-old man undergoing operations for sigmoid colon cancer, small intestine invasion, and liver metastasis was given adjuvant chemotherapy postoperatively. During the course, lung, brain and bone metastasis were found, FOLFIRI therapy was started. Fifth FOLFIRI therapy was performed, but on the night of the next day, he was transported on an emergency basis to our hospital because of a coma. Laboratory examination revealed hyperammonemia, so aminoleban was started for its treatment. After 3 days in the hospital, consciousness and serum ammonia were improved. Cases of hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU have been reported in the literature, and this case was diagnosed with the same. Hyperammonemia should be taken into account as a differential diagnosis in the disturbance of consciousness in chemotherapy. PMID:19620810

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer-why does level 1 evidence not support it?

    PubMed

    Raghavan, D; Bawtinhimer, A; Mahoney, J; Eckrich, S; Riggs, S

    2014-10-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy provides a 5% increase in cure rate, an increase in median survival of about 3 years, and statistically significant and clinically relevant increments in overall survival for patients with invasive bladder cancer. Despite compelling level 1 data, it has become quite clear that facts that are similar to those that changed the paradigm of treatment of breast cancer in the 1970s have not had a similar influence on patterns of practice in bladder cancer care. Instead of using this proven approach, cystectomy alone or surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy is often used as a functional alternative for patients with deeply invasive and/or node-metastatic disease discovered at radical cystectomy. However, there is no well-powered level 1 evidence to support routine adjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, and some randomized trials have shown inferior outcomes. There is a clear need for a well-designed, randomized trial that tests the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, but until that has been completed, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by definitive local treatment should be the standard of care for invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24569916

  17. Inhibition of azoxymethane-induced colon cancer by orange juice.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Y; Om, A S; Chee, K M; Bennink, M R

    2000-01-01

    Previous research has shown that hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside in orange juice, inhibits colon carcinogenesis and that feeding double-strength orange juice delays the onset of chemically induced mammary cancer in rats. This study determined whether feeding single-strength, pasteurized orange juice would inhibit azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in male Fischer 344 rats. Colon cancer was initiated by injecting AOM (15 mg/kg body wt) at 22 and 29 days of age. One week after the second AOM injection, orange juice replaced drinking water for the experimental group (n = 30). The rats were killed 28 weeks later, and tumors were removed for histological analysis. Feeding orange juice reduced tumor incidence by 22% (p < 0.05). Tumor reduction was associated with a decreased labeling index and proliferation zone in the colonic mucosa. Hesperidin, other flavonoids, limonin 17-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and other limonoid glucosides are potential chemopreventive agents in orange juice that could account for the decreased colon tumorigenesis associated with feeding orange juice. PMID:10890034

  18. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  19. SA-4-1BBL as a Novel Adjuvant for the Development of Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajesh K.; Yolcu, Esma S.; Shirwan, Haval

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated antigen (TAA)-based therapeutic vaccines have great potential as a safe, practical, and cost-efficient alternative to standard treatments for cancer. Clinical efficacy of TAA-based vaccines, however, has yet to be realized and will require adjuvants with pleiotropic functions on immune cells. Such adjuvants need not only to generate/boost T cell responses, but also reverse intrinsic/extrinsic tumor immune evasion mechanisms for therapeutic efficacy. This review focuses on a novel agonistic ligand, SA-4-1BBL, for 4-1BB costimulatory receptor as an adjuvant of choice because of its ability to: i) serve as a vehicle to deliver TAAs to dendritic cells (DCs) for antigen uptake and cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells; ii) augment adaptive Th1 and innate immune responses; and iii) overcome various immune evasion mechanisms, cumulatively translating into therapeutic efficacy in preclinical tumor models. PMID:24521311

  20. Dietary fibre and colon cancer: epidemiologic and experimental evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B S

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified two dietary factors, a relatively high intake of fat and a relatively low intake of fibre, that are associated with colon cancer in humans. However, a recent study has shown a low risk of large bowel cancer in a rural Finnish population with a high dietary intake of fat, but also a high intake of fibre. Observations in humans and studies in animals have indicated that dietary fibre may protect against colon carcinogenesis by binding bile acids in the intestinal tract, by a direct effect on the colonic mucosa and by an indirect effect on the metabolism of carcinogens. The strength of protection varies with the type of fibre. PMID:6254626

  1. Alcohol consumption and colon cancer prognosis among participants in north central cancer treatment group phase III trial N0147.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Shi, Qian; Limburg, Paul J; Nelson, Garth D; Sargent, Daniel J; Sinicrope, Frank A; Chan, Emily; Gill, Sharlene; Goldberg, Richard M; Kahlenberg, Morton; Nair, Suresh; Shields, Anthony F; Newcomb, Polly A; Alberts, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a modest increased risk of colon cancer, but its relationship with colon cancer survival has not been elucidated. Using data from a phase III randomized adjuvant trial, we assessed the association of alcohol consumption with colon cancer outcomes. Patients completed a risk factor questionnaire before randomization to FOLFOX or FOLFOX + cetuximab (N = 1984). Information was collected on lifestyle factors, including smoking, physical activity and consumption of different types of alcohol. Cox models assessed the association between alcohol consumption and outcomes of disease-free survival (DFS), time-to-recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), adjusting for age, sex, study arm, body mass, smoking, physical activity and performance status. No statistically significant difference in outcomes between ever and never drinkers were noted [hazard ratio (HR)DFS  = 0.86, HRTTR  = 0.87, HROS  = 0.86, p-values = 0.11-0.17]. However, when considering alcohol type, ever consumers of red wine (n = 628) had significantly better outcomes than never consumers (HRDFS  = 0.80, HRTTR  = 0.81, HROS  = 0.78, p-values = 0.01-0.02). Favorable outcomes were confirmed in patients who consumed 1-30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 601, HR = 0.80-0.83, p-values = 0.03-0.049); there was a suggestion of more favorable outcomes in patients who consumed >30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 27, HR = 0.33-0.38, p-values = 0.05-0.06). Beer and liquor consumption were not associated with outcomes. Although alcohol consumption was not associated with colon cancer outcomes overall, mild to moderate red wine consumption was suggestively associated with longer OS, DFS and TTR in stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:27060850

  2. Signaling in colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sanchita; Majumdar, Adhip Pn

    2012-01-01

    : Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common form of cancer worldwide and ranks third among the cancer-related deaths in the US and other Western countries. It occurs with equal frequency in men and women, constituting 10% of new cancer cases in men and 11% in women. Despite recent advancement in therapeutics, the survival rates from metastatic are less than 5%. Growing evidence supports the contention that epithelial cancers including colorectal cancer, the incidence of which increases with aging, are diseases driven by the pluripotent, self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). Dysregulation of Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog and/or TGF-β signaling pathways that are involved in proliferation and maintenance of CSCs leads to the development of CRC. This review focuses on the signaling pathways relevant for CRC to understand the mechanisms leading to tumor progression and therapy resistance, which may help in the development of therapeutic strategies for CRC. PMID:22866952

  3. EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant treatment of lung cancer: to give or not to give?

    PubMed Central

    Milovancev, Aleksandar; Stojsic, Vladimir; Zaric, Bojan; Kovacevic, Tomi; Sarcev, Tatjana; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Freitag, Lutz; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsavlis, Drosos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Stratakos, Grigoris; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) brought a significant revolution in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a short period of time, EGFR-TKIs became the standard of treatment for mutation-positive, advanced stage non-squamous NSCLC. In recent years, second- and third-generation EGFR-TKIs are emerging, further widening the clinical use. However, the question of EGFR-TKIs efficiency in the treatment of early stage NSCLC still remains open. Early clinical trials failed to approve the use of EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant setting. The majority of these early trials were performed in unselected NSCLC populations and without standardized biomarker identification. One should certainly not rely solely on these results and dismiss the use of EGFR-TKIs as adjuvant therapy. Many important questions are still unanswered. Most important issues such as stage heterogeneity (IA–IIIA), timing (after or concomitantly with chemotherapy), and type of administration (monotherapy or combination) need to be answered in near future. Adjuvant TKIs in the treatment of lung cancer might offer significant number of advancements. Having in mind the significant duration of response observed in advance disease setting, there could be place for prolongation of response in adjuvant setting potentially, leading to improvement in survival. TKIs could offer less-toxic adjuvant treatment with better efficiency than chemotherapy. However, there is a chronic lack of randomized controlled trials in this field, leading to inability to draw any scientifically sound conclusion with regard to the adjuvant treatment. For now, the use of EGFR-TKIs outside clinical trial setting is not recommended. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current and available data. PMID:26508876

  4. Endometrial cancer - reduce to the minimum. A new paradigm for adjuvant treatments?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Up to now, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and the extent of lymph node dissection for early stage endometrial cancer are controversial. In order to clarify the current position of the given adjuvant treatment options, a systematic review was performed. Materials and methods Both, Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge database were searched using the following keywords and MESH headings: "Endometrial cancer", "Endometrial Neoplasms", "Endometrial Neoplasms/radiotherapy", "External beam radiation therapy", "Brachytherapy" and adequate combinations. Conclusion Recent data from randomized trials indicate that external beam radiation therapy - particularly in combination with extended lymph node dissection - or radical lymph node dissection increases toxicity without any improvement of overall survival rates. Thus, reduced surgical aggressiveness and limitation of radiotherapy to vaginal-vault-brachytherapy only is sufficient for most cases of early stage endometrial cancer. PMID:22118369

  5. Tolfenamic acid downregulates β-catenin in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Taekyu; Lou, Zhiyuan; Baek, Seung Joon; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Tolfenamic acid is one of the fenamic acid-derived non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and has been shown to exhibit anti-cancer activities in several types of cancer. Both mutations and aberrant expression of β-catenin are highly associated with progression of cancer. Therefore, β-catenin is considered to be a promising molecular target for cancer prevention and treatment. The current study investigates the role of tolfenamic acid on β-catenin expression in colon cancer. Treatment with tolfenamic acid led to inhibition of cell growth and down-regulation of β-catenin expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human colon cancer cell lines. Reduction of β-catenin upon tolfenamic acid treatment was associated with ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, without affecting mRNA level and promoter activity of β-catenin. In addition, treatment with tolfenamic acid downregulated Smad2 and Smad3 expression, while overexpression of Smad2, but not Smad3, blocked tolfenamic acid-induced suppression of β-catenin expression. Tolfenamic acid also decreased expression of β-catenin target genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Compared to adjacent normal tissue, intestinal tumor tissues of Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased expression of β-catenin, Smad2, Smad3, and VEGF, which were down-regulated with tolfenamic acid treatment at a dose of 50mg/kg body weight. In conclusion, our findings suggest that tolfenamic acid inhibits growth of colon cancer cells through downregulation of Smad2 and, subsequently, facilitating ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated β-catenin degradation in colon cancer. PMID:27089389

  6. Combination of phytochemicals as adjuvants for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ho, John W S; Cheung, Matt W M

    2014-01-01

    Newer treatments of advanced human cancer are based on combination of cancer drugs that have different mechanism of actions yet the combination strategy may potentiate the anti-cancer effects and cytotoxicity. Recent studies suggest that cancer growth can be inhibited more effectively by combination of phytochemicals that affect different pathways. The apoptotic activity can be modulated by intrinsic and extrinsic molecules. The combination of anti-tumor phytochemicals can be more effective in modulating different signaling pathways associated with tumor cell growth which is the common target for anti-tumor action. Combinations of cytotoxic anti-tumor agents and inhibitors from phytochemicals are believed to act together producing inhibitory mechanisms on cancer growth. This combination strategy shows promise on cancer therapy. However, the combination of phytochemicals in cancer therapy needs to be further investigated to develop a better treatment strategy. Recent patents on anti-tumor phytochemicals are reviewed in this article. PMID:24942759

  7. Adjuvant Cancer Biotherapy by Viscum Album Extract Isorel: Overview of Evidence Based Medicine Findings.

    PubMed

    Sunjic, Suzana Borovic; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Vukovic, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Weiss, Elisabeth Sussman; Soldo, Ivo; Djakovic, Nikola; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-09-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidence based findings describing effects of the Viscum album extract Isorel in cancer therapy with respect to the type of therapy, stage and type of illness. This study presents cumulated data for 74 patients with different types and stages of cancer treated by Viscum album extract as adjuvant treatment to different conventional therapies, mostly combined surgery and radiotherapy. The biotherapy effectiveness was evaluated according to the outcome as (1) no major therapeutic improvement (15% of patients), (2) prevention of tumor recurrence (47% of patients) and (3) regression of cancer (38% of patients). Notably, there was no obvious health worsening during the follow up period at all. Thus, the results obtained for conventional anticancer therapies combined with adjuvant biotherapy based on Viscum album extract seem to be beneficial for the majority of cancer patients (85%) without serious side effects. PMID:26898069

  8. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  9. Surgeons’ Volume of Colorectal Cancer Procedures and Collaborative Decision-making about Adjuvant Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Selwyn O.; Ayanian, John Z.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Sandler, Robert S.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed associations of surgeons’ practice volume with processes of care that lead to better outcomes. Objective We surveyed surgeons treating colorectal cancer to determine whether high-volume surgeons were more likely to collaborate with other physicians in decisions about adjuvant therapies. Subjects and methods Surgeons caring for patients with colorectal cancer in multiple regions and health-care organizations were surveyed to assess their volume of colorectal cancer resections and participation in decisions about adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We used logistic regression to assess physician and practice characteristics associated with surgical volume and the relation of surgical volume and these other characteristics to collaborative decision-making regarding adjuvant therapies. Results Of 635 responding surgeons, those who identified themselves as surgical oncologists or colorectal surgeons were more likely than others to report high volume of colorectal cancer resections (p<.001), as were those who practiced at a comprehensive cancer center (P=.06) and attended tumor board meetings weekly (vs. quarterly or less, P=.09). Most surgeons reported a collaborative role in decisions about chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, in adjusted analyses, higher-volume surgeons more often reported a collaborative role with other physicians in decisions about chemotherapy (P<0.001) and radiation therapy (P<0.001). Conclusions Higher-volume surgeons are more likely to report collaborating with other physicians in decisions about adjuvant therapies for patients following colorectal cancer surgery. This collaborative decision-making of higher-volume surgeons may contribute to outcome differences by surgeon volume. PMID:19855265

  10. Childhood colon cancer in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Kyeong Min; Park, Jong Ha; Kim, Tae Oh; Jeong, Heui Jeong; Heo, Chang Min; Jang, Ji Hoon; Hur, So Chong; Jeong, Na Ri; Jeong, Su Jin; Seol, Sang Hoon; Nam, Kyung Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic impairment and cerebellar ataxia. In addition, patients with this disease are known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, predominantly hematologic malignancies. Methods We report the case of a young boy with AT from Russia, who had abdominal pain. Laboratory tests and radiologic examinations were performed to him. Results After abdominal computed tomography (CT), colonoscopy and surgical interventions, the young boy was diagnosed with colon cancer that had signet ring cell features. Conclusions It is known that the patient with AT appeared to be predisposed to various tumors, including leukemia or lymphoma, which are more common in childhood. Even if the patient with AT could have solid tumor such as stomach cancer or breast cancer, it is less likely to have colon cancer, especially signet ring cell type. Actually, no case of colon cancer has ever been reported, especially in young patient and hence, we have focused on this point and are hereby reporting this unique case. PMID:26855947

  11. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  12. Transoral Laser Microsurgery (TLM) ± Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer: Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jason T.; Milov, Simon; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Document survival, prognostic variables, and functional outcomes of patients with AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer, treated with transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) ± adjuvant therapy. Study Design Analysis of prospectively assembled data pertaining to the above-described patient cohort. Methods Patients treated with TLM for AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer at Washington University School of Medicine from 1996 to 2006 were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Recurrence, survival, functional, and human papilloma virus data were analyzed. Results Eighty-four patients met inclusion criteria. Mean follow-up was 52.6 months. Overall AJCC stages were: III 15% and IV 85%. T stages were T1–2, 74%; T3–4, 26%. Eighty-three patients underwent neck dissection, 50 received adjuvant radiotherapy, and 28 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 94% and 88%, respectively. Disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 96% and 92%, respectively. Six patients recurred (7%): locally (one), regionally (four), and distant (five). T stage, positive margins, and p16 status significantly impacted survival. The addition of adjuvant chemo-therapy in high-risk patients did not significantly impact survival. Five patients (6%) had major surgical complications, but without mortality. Eighty-one percent of patients had acceptable swallowing function at last follow-up. Immediately postoperatively, 17% required G-tubes, which dropped to 3.4% of living patients at 3 years. Conclusions In this population, our findings validate TLM ± adjuvant therapy as a highly effective strategy for survival, locoregional control, and swallowing recovery in AJCC stage III and IV oropharyngeal cancer. Our finding also show that p16 positivity improves survival. PMID:19572271

  13. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  14. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert; Robertson, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  15. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  16. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K. P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  17. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs. PMID:27455311

  18. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133⁺CD44⁺ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133⁺CD44⁺ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs. PMID:27455311

  19. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  20. Carbohydrate-based vaccines with a glycolipid adjuvant for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Lin; Hung, Jung-Tung; Cheung, Sarah K. C.; Lee, Hsin-Yu; Chu, Kuo-Ching; Li, Shiou-Ting; Lin, Yu-Chen; Ren, Chien-Tai; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Yu, Alice L.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-01-01

    Globo H (GH) is a hexasaccharide specifically overexpressed on a variety of cancer cells and therefore, a good candidate for cancer vaccine development. To identify the optimal carrier and adjuvant combination, we chemically synthesized and linked GH to a carrier protein, including keyhole limpet hemocyanion, diphtheria toxoid cross-reactive material (CRM) 197 (DT), tetanus toxoid, and BSA, and combined with an adjuvant, and it was administered to mice for the study of immune response. Glycan microarray analysis of the antiserum obtained indicated that the combination of GH-DT adjuvanted with the α-galactosylceramide C34 has the highest enhancement of anti-GH IgG. Compared with the phase III clinical trial vaccine, GH–keyhole limpet hemocyanion/QS21, the GH-DT/C34 vaccine elicited more IgG antibodies, which are more selective for GH and the GH-related epitopes, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) and SSEA4, all of which were specifically overexpressed on breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells with SSEA4 at the highest level (>90%). We, therefore, further developed SSEA4-DT/C34 as a vaccine candidate, and after immunization, it was found that the elicited antibodies are also IgG-dominant and very specific for SSEA4. PMID:23355685

  1. Antihormonal treatment associated musculoskeletal pain in women with breast cancer in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Seber, Selcuk; Solmaz, Dilek; Yetisyigit, Tarkan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antihormonal treatment is an effective therapy in the adjuvant setting. However, musculoskeletal pain is a common adverse effect encountered in patients receiving this treatment. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for the development of antihormonal treatment-associated musculoskeletal pain (AHAMP) and its impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey of 78 consecutive breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment for early-stage breast cancer in an academic medical oncology clinic was conducted. AHAMP was assessed by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQOL was assessed by self-administered short form 36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast subscale surveys. Results AHAMP was found to be present in 37 (47.7%) patients. In multivariate regression analysis, having a normal body mass index (<30 kg/m2), cigarette smoking, and low serum vitamin D level (20 ng/mL) were found to be independent risk factors. In HRQOL assessment, physical and mental scores were found to be significantly lower in patients with joint arthralgia. Conclusion AHAMP has an adverse effect on the quality of life of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment, and assessment of predictive factors is important for identification of patient groups at risk of developing this condition. PMID:27563249

  2. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays common and different roles in cancerous colon HCT116 cell and noncancerous NCM460 colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. To determine differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on colon cancer cells versus colon noncancerous cells, colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colonic NCM460 ...

  3. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  4. Correlation of trace elements in hair with colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Cholewa, M.; Kajfosz, J.; Jones, K.W.; Shore, R.E.; Redrick, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The trace element content of 116 hair samples from patients with colon cancer and from referent series of patients who had a variety of other diseases were measured using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE). The patients had been on largely uncontrolled diets, and the interest was whether there were differences in trace element concentrations attributable to the effects of colon cancer. The concentrations of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, and Rb were determined using a beam of 2.5-MeV protons. Minimum detectable limits (MDL) of 0.3 ppM were obtained for Zn and Se. Cluster analysis of the data set did not reveal any significant differences between the cancer and control groups. Mean values and ranges obtained for the elemental concentrations show good agreement with other published determinations. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network. PMID:25079297

  6. Functional and genetic analysis of the colon cancer network.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Glazko, Galina; McDade, Simon; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Holzinger, Andreas; Dehmer, Matthias; Campbell, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that has proven to be difficult to understand on the single-gene level. For this reason a functional elucidation needs to take interactions among genes on a systems-level into account. In this study, we infer a colon cancer network from a large-scale gene expression data set by using the method BC3Net. We provide a structural and a functional analysis of this network and also connect its molecular interaction structure with the chromosomal locations of the genes enabling the definition of cis- and trans-interactions. Furthermore, we investigate the interaction of genes that can be found in close neighborhoods on the chromosomes to gain insight into regulatory mechanisms. To our knowledge this is the first study analyzing the genome-scale colon cancer network. PMID:25079297

  7. Recurrent R-spondin fusions in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Somasekar; Stawiski, Eric W; Durinck, Steffen; Modrusan, Zora; Storm, Elaine E; Conboy, Caitlin B; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Guan, Yinghui; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Guillory, Joseph; Ha, Connie; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J P; Stinson, Jeremy; Gnad, Florian; Huntley, Melanie A; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Haverty, Peter M; Bourgon, Richard; Wang, Weiru; Koeppen, Hartmut; Gentleman, Robert; Starr, Timothy K; Zhang, Zemin; Largaespada, David A; Wu, Thomas D; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2012-08-30

    Identifying and understanding changes in cancer genomes is essential for the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we analyse systematically more than 70 pairs of primary human colon tumours by applying next-generation sequencing to characterize their exomes, transcriptomes and copy-number alterations. We have identified 36,303 protein-altering somatic changes that include several new recurrent mutations in the Wnt pathway gene TCF7L2, chromatin-remodelling genes such as TET2 and TET3 and receptor tyrosine kinases including ERBB3. Our analysis for significantly mutated cancer genes identified 23 candidates, including the cell cycle checkpoint kinase ATM. Copy-number and RNA-seq data analysis identified amplifications and corresponding overexpression of IGF2 in a subset of colon tumours. Furthermore, using RNA-seq data we identified multiple fusion transcripts including recurrent gene fusions involving R-spondin family members RSPO2 and RSPO3 that together occur in 10% of colon tumours. The RSPO fusions were mutually exclusive with APC mutations, indicating that they probably have a role in the activation of Wnt signalling and tumorigenesis. Consistent with this we show that the RSPO fusion proteins were capable of potentiating Wnt signalling. The R-spondin gene fusions and several other gene mutations identified in this study provide new potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. PMID:22895193

  8. Validation of the 12-Gene Colon Cancer Recurrence Score in NSABP C-07 As a Predictor of Recurrence in Patients With Stage II and III Colon Cancer Treated With Fluorouracil and Leucovorin (FU/LV) and FU/LV Plus Oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Yothers, Greg; O'Connell, Michael J.; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Millward, Carl; Paik, Soonmyung; Sharif, Saima; Shak, Steven; Wolmark, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Accurate assessments of recurrence risk and absolute treatment benefit are needed to inform colon cancer adjuvant therapy. The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay has been validated in patients with stage II colon cancer from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9581 and Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) trials. We conducted an independent, prospectively designed clinical validation study of Recurrence Score, with prespecified end points and analysis plan, in archival specimens from patients with stage II and III colon cancer randomly assigned to fluorouracil (FU) or FU plus oxaliplatin in National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C-07. Methods Recurrence Score was assessed in 892 fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens (randomly selected 50% of patients with tissue). Data were analyzed by Cox regression adjusting for stage and treatment. Results Continuous Recurrence Score predicted recurrence (hazard ratio for a 25-unit increase in score, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.55; P < .001), as well as disease-free and overall survival (both P < .001). Recurrence Score predicted recurrence risk (P = .001) after adjustment for stage, mismatch repair, nodes examined, grade, and treatment. Recurrence Score did not have significant interaction with stage (P = .90) or age (P = .76). Relative benefit of oxaliplatin was similar across the range of Recurrence Score (interaction P = .48); accordingly, absolute benefit of oxaliplatin increased with higher scores, most notably in patients with stage II and IIIA/B disease. Conclusion The 12-gene Recurrence Score predicts recurrence risk in stage II and stage III colon cancer and provides additional information beyond conventional clinical and pathologic factors. Incorporating Recurrence Score into the clinical context may better inform adjuvant therapy decisions in stage III as well as stage II colon cancer. PMID:24220557

  9. Enhanced endoscopic detection of early colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Gowra; Trowers, Eugene A.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced endoscopic detection of small flat adenomas is becoming increasingly important as they have a reported 14 percent incidence of dysplasia when compared with 5% incidence in polypod adenomas of the same size. These lesions even when invasive do not show up against the translucent surrounding mucosa making endoscopic detection difficult. Dye spraying with indigo carmine makes their morphology clear, with well-circumscribed borders. Dye spraying and magnifying endoscopes can be used to observe pit patterns on the surface of the bowel. Combining dye spraying and high-resolution video endoscopy demonstrates well the colorectal epithelial surface. Scanning immersion video endoscopy visualizes the epithelial surface of the colorectal mucosa by high-resolution endoscopy after filling the lumen with water. Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to see if the lesion is intramucosal or not and assess the depth of invasion if malignancy is presented. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to detect colonic dysplasia in vivo. Combining such technologies with conventional colonoscopy can help in the surveillance of large areas of colonic mucosa for the presence of dysplasia. Guided biopsy can replace random biopsy based on information provided at the time of colonoscopic examination.

  10. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  11. Thrombin drives tumorigenesis in colitis-associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeldt, Leah; Kombrinck, Keith; Flick, Matthew J.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Harmel-Laws, Eleana; Mullins, Eric S.; Shaw, Maureen; Witte, David P.; Revenko, Alexey; Monia, Brett; Palumbo, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    The established association between inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer underscores the importance of inflammation in colon cancer development. Based on evidence that hemostatic proteases are powerful modifiers of both inflammatory pathologies and tumor biology, gene-targeted mice carrying low levels of prothrombin were used to directly test the hypothesis that prothrombin contributes to tumor development in colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). Remarkably, imposing a modest 50% reduction in circulating prothrombin in fII+/− mice, a level that carries no significant bleeding risk, dramatically decreased adenoma formation following an azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate challenge. Similar results were obtained with pharmacological inhibition of prothrombin expression or inhibition of thrombin proteolytic activity. Detailed longitudinal analyses showed that the role of thrombin in tumor development in CAC was temporally associated with the antecedent inflammatory colitis. However, direct studies of the antecedent colitis showed that mice carrying half-normal prothrombin levels were comparable to control mice in mucosal damage, inflammatory cell infiltration and associated local cytokine levels. These results suggest that thrombin supports early events coupled to inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis in CAC that are distinct from overall inflammation-induced tissue damage and inflammatory cell trafficking. That prothrombin is linked to early events in CAC was strongly inferred by the observation that prothrombin deficiency dramatically reduced the formation of very early, pre-cancerous aberrant crypt foci. Given the importance of inflammation in the development of colon cancer, these studies suggest that therapeutic interventions at the level of hemostatic factors may be an effective means to prevent and/or impede colitis-associated colon cancer progression. PMID:24710407

  12. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  13. Mucin production by human colonic carcinoma cells correlates with their metastatic potential in animal models of colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Bresalier, R S; Niv, Y; Byrd, J C; Duh, Q Y; Toribara, N W; Rockwell, R W; Dahiya, R; Kim, Y S

    1991-01-01

    Patients with mucinous colorectal cancers characteristically present with advanced disease, however, the relationship between mucin production by colon cancer cells and their metastatic potential remains unclear. We therefore sought to define the relationship between mucin production by human colon cancer cells and metastatic ability by employing animal models of colon cancer metastasis. LS LiM 6, a colon carcinoma cell line with high liver metastasizing ability during cecal growth in nude mice produced twofold more metabolically labeled intracellular mucin and secreted four- to fivefold more mucin into the culture medium compared to poorly metastatic parental line LS174T. This was accompanied by a similar elevation in poly(A)+ RNA detected by blot hybridization with a human intestinal mucin cDNA probe, and increases in mucin core carbohydrate antigens determined immunohistochemically. Variants of LS174T selected for high (HM 7) or low (LM 12) mucin synthesizing capacity also yielded metastases after cecal growth and colonized the liver after splenic-portal injection in proportion to their ability to produce mucin. Inhibition of mucin glycosylation by the arylglycoside benzyl-alpha-N-acetyl-galactosamine greatly reduced liver colonization after splenic-portal injection of the tumor cells. These data suggest that mucin production by human colon cancer cells correlates with their metastatic potential and affects their ability to colonize the liver in experimental model systems. Images PMID:1999484

  14. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  15. Selecting a specific pre- or postoperative adjuvant therapy for individual patients with operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Evangelos; Liakakos, Theodore; Dova, Lefkothea; Fatouros, Michael; Tsekeris, Pericles; Roukos, Dimitrios H; Kappas, Angelos M

    2006-06-01

    Although the very high locoregional recurrence rates reported with limited D0/D1 surgery can be reduced with extended D2 gastrectomy for operable gastric cancer, overall relapse and survival rates remain poor and can only be improved with adequate perioperative adjuvant treatment. However, despite intensive research, no regimen has been established as standard. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a marginal survival benefit with adjuvant chemotherapy. Two recent large randomized trials for operable gastric cancer, the MAGIC trial and the INT-0116 trial, provide evidence that some patients may benefit from perioperative chemotherapy and chemoradiation, respectively. However, while both trials suggest an overall survival benefit with adjuvant treatment, they don't provide the harm-benefit ratio for specific subsets of patients wih different extent of surgery (D1 or D2) and tumor stage (early [T1,2]/advanced [T3,4]). This lack of evidence complicates current therapeutic adjuvant decisions. Estimating the risk of local and distant recurrence (high, moderate or low) after D1 or D2 surgery in various tumor stages and the expected harm-benefit ratio, the authors provide useful information for decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy with or withour radiotherapy in individual patients. Research on newer cytotoxic and targeted agents may improve treatment efficacy. Simultaneously, advances with microarray-based gene-expression profiling signatures may improve individualized treatment decisions. However, the validation and translation of these genomic classifiers as biomarkers into a completed 'bench-to-bedside' cycle for tailoring treatment to individuals is a major challenge and limits inflated expectations. PMID:16761937

  16. A case of leptospirosis simulating colon cancer with liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Granito, Alessandro; Ballardini, Giorgio; Fusconi, Marco; Volta, Umberto; Muratori, Paolo; Sambri, Vittorio; Battista, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Francesco B.

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man who presented with fatigue, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed hepatomegaly and multiple hepatic lesions highly suggestive of metastatic diseases. Due to the endoscopic finding of colon ulcer, colon cancer with liver metastases was suspected. Biochemically a slight increase of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and gammaglutamyl transpeptidase were present; α - fetoprotein, carcinoembryogenic antigen and carbohydrate 19-9 antigen serum levels were normal. Laboratory and instrumental investigations, including colon and liver biopsies revealed no signs of malignancy. In the light of spontaneous improvement of symptoms and CT findings, his personal history was revaluated revealing direct contact with pigs and their tissues. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was considered and confirmed by detection of an elevated titer of antibodies to leptospira. After two mo, biochemical data, CT and colonoscopy were totally normal. PMID:15285043

  17. The combination of FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab may enable salvage surgery of unresectable liver metastases in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sereno Moyano, María; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal

    2009-04-01

    Colorectal cancer treatment has experienced important advances in the last 5 years. New targeted therapies have been included in the classical regimens based on 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, or irinotecan. This new approach has brought great revolution in the treatment of this type of cancer. Bevacizumab (Avastin), a new antivascular endothelial growth factor drug, has been shown to improve overall survival in combination with chemotherapy in first-line and second-line settings as compared with standard chemotherapy regimens alone. This case report demonstrates our experience with bevacizumab in a colon cancer patient with liver, lung, and regional lymph node metastases who had a relapse in the liver after adjuvant treatment with capecitabine (Xeloda). The addition of bevacizumab to the FOLFOX4 regimen resulted in a partial response that provided an opportunity for salvage hepatic surgery. PMID:19352109

  18. Stenting for Obstructing Colon Cancer: Fewer Complications and Colostomies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Peter; Goldstein, Rachel; Coury, Joseph; Hackford, Alan; Dao, Haisar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Colonic stenting has been used in the setting of malignant obstruction to avoid an emergent colectomy. We sought to determine whether preoperative placement of a colonic stent decreases morbidity and the rate of colostomy formation. Methods: Cases of obstructing sigmoid, rectosigmoid, and rectal cancer from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2011, were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. All patients were treated at hospitals in the United States, and the database generated national estimates. Postoperative complications, mortality, and the rate of colostomy formation were analyzed. Results: Of the estimated 7891 patients who presented with obstructing sigmoid, rectosigmoid, or rectal cancer necessitating intervention, 12.1% (n = 956) underwent placement of a colonic stent, and the remainder underwent surgery without stent placement. Of the patients who underwent stenting, 19.9% went on to have colon resection or stoma creation during the same admission. Patients who underwent preoperative colonic stent placement had a lower rate of total postoperative complications (10.5% vs 21.7%; P < .01). There was no significant difference in mortality (4.7% vs 4.2%; P = .69). The rate of colostomy formation was more than 2-fold higher in patients who did not undergo preoperative stenting (42.5% vs 19.5%; P < .01). Preoperative stenting was associated with increased use of laparoscopy (32.6% vs 9.7%; P < .01). Conclusions: Our study characterizes the national incidence of preoperative placement of a colonic stent in the setting of malignant obstruction. Preoperative stent placement is associated with lower postoperative complications and a lower rate of colostomy formation. The results support the hypothesis that stenting as a bridge to surgery may benefit patients by converting an emergent surgery into an elective one. PMID:25848200

  19. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  20. Identifying Molecular Targets of Lifestyle Modifications in Colon Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Molly M.; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    One in four deaths in the United States is cancer-related, and colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. Screening strategies are utilized but have not reduced disease incidence or mortality. In this regard, there is an interest in cancer preventive strategies focusing on lifestyle intervention, where specific etiologic factors involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression could be targeted. For example, exposure to dietary carcinogens, such as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons influences colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, dietary deficiencies could alter sensitivity to genetic damage and influence carcinogen metabolism contributing to CRC. High alcohol consumption increases the risk of mutations including the fact that acetaldehyde, an ethanol metabolite, is classified as a group 1 carcinogen. Tobacco smoke exposure is also a risk factor for cancer development; approximately 20% of CRCs are associated with smoking. Additionally, obese patients have a higher risk of cancer development, which is further supported by the fact that physical activity decreases CRC risk by 55%. Similarly, chronic inflammatory conditions also increase the risk of CRC development. Moreover, the circadian clock alters digestion and regulates other biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes that could influence CRC. Taken together, colon carcinogenesis involves a number of etiological factors, and therefore, to create effective preventive strategies, molecular targets need to be identified and beleaguered prior to disease progression. With this in mind, the following is a comprehensive review identifying downstream target proteins of the above lifestyle risk factors, which are modulated during colon carcinogenesis and could be targeted for CRC prevention by novel agents including phytochemicals. PMID:23675573

  1. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  2. Chemoprevention of colon cancer: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Gustin, David M; Brenner, Dean E

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem in the western world. Although some progress has been made in the prevention and management of this disease, colon cancer still remains one of the most common types of epithelial malignancies in both genders and is essentially incurable when it reaches the most advanced stages. Given the substantial morbidity and mortality associated with colorectal malignancies and their treatment, cancer prevention in its many forms emerges as a very attractive approach. Colorectal cancer chemoprevention refers to the administration of natural or synthetic compounds to block, reverse, delay or prevent the development of invasive large bowel neoplasms. The ultimate goal of implementing a chemopreventive intervention in the general, or alternatively, in an at-risk population is to decrease the incidence rate of the specific cancer being targeted. This article reviews the present status of colorectal cancer chemoprevention. Current insights into the molecular and genetic models of human colorectal carcinogenesis, preclinical models for efficacy testing as well as into promising biomarkers for colorectal chemoprevention are provided. The developmental status of many promising agents is also discussed emphasizing the epidemiological evidence, preclinical information substantiating an anticarcinogenic effect, their postulated mechanism of action and the status of human clinical development. Our perspective of the future prospects in this scientific area is also provided and has been predicated primarily on the firm belief that the proper integration of advances in the biology of colon carcinogenesis, experimental therapeutics and clinical trial methodology will be critical for the success of this promising field. PMID:12549770

  3. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host’s metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer. PMID:24567795

  4. Exosome removal as a therapeutic adjuvant in cancer.

    PubMed

    Marleau, Annette M; Chen, Chien-Shing; Joyce, James A; Tullis, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    Exosome secretion is a notable feature of malignancy owing to the roles of these nanoparticles in cancer growth, immune suppression, tumor angiogenesis and therapeutic resistance. Exosomes are 30-100 nm membrane vesicles released by many cells types during normal physiological processes. Tumors aberrantly secrete large quantities of exosomes that transport oncoproteins and immune suppressive molecules to support tumor growth and metastasis. The role of exosomes in intercellular signaling is exemplified by human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) over-expressing breast cancer, where exosomes with the HER2 oncoprotein stimulate tumor growth and interfere with the activity of the therapeutic antibody Herceptin®. Since numerous observations from experimental model systems point toward an important clinical impact of exosomes in cancer, several pharmacological strategies have been proposed for targeting their malignant activities. We also propose a novel device strategy involving extracorporeal hemofiltration of exosomes from the entire circulatory system using an affinity plasmapheresis platform known as the Aethlon ADAPT™ (adaptive dialysis-like affinity platform technology) system, which would overcome the risks of toxicity and drug interactions posed by pharmacological approaches. This technology allows affinity agents, including exosome-binding lectins and antibodies, to be immobilized in the outer-capillary space of plasma filtration membranes that integrate into existing kidney dialysis systems. Device therapies that evolve from this platform allow rapid extracorporeal capture and selective retention of target particles < 200 nm from the entire circulatory system. This strategy is supported by clinical experience in hepatitis C virus-infected patients using an ADAPT™ device, the Hemopurifier®, to reduce the systemic load of virions having similar sizes and glycosylated surfaces as cancer exosomes. This review discusses the possible

  5. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  6. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the Hippo pathway as recurrence biomarkers in stages II/III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebio, A; Matsusaka, S; Zhang, W; Yang, D; Ning, Y; Stremitzer, S; Stintzing, S; Sunakawa, Y; Yamauchi, S; Fujimoto, Y; Ueno, M; Lenz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates tissue growth and cell fate. In colon cancer, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes cellular quiescence and resistance to 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu). In this study, 14 polymorphisms in 8 genes involved in the Hippo pathway (MST1, MST2, LATS1, LATS2, YAP, TAZ, FAT4 and RASSF1A) were evaluated as recurrence predictors in 194 patients with stages II/III colon cancer treated with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a RASSF1A rs2236947 AA genotype had higher 3-year recurrence rate than patients with CA/CC genotypes (56 vs 33%, hazard ratio (HR): 1.87; P=0.017). Patients with TAZ rs3811715 CT or TT genotypes had lower 3-year recurrence rate than patients with a CC genotype (28 vs 40%; HR: 0.66; P=0.07). In left-sided tumors, this association was stronger (HR: 0.29; P=0.011) and a similar trend was found in an independent Japanese cohort. These promising results reveal polymorphisms in the Hippo pathway as biomarkers for stages II and III colon cancer.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 15 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.64. PMID:26370619

  7. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the Hippo pathway as recurrence biomarkers in stage II/III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebio, Ana; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Stremitzer, Stefan; Stintzing, Sebastian; Sunakawa, Yu; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Ueno, Masashi; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates tissue growth and cell fate. In colon cancer, Hippo pathway deregulation promotes cellular quiescence and resistance to 5-Fluorouracil. In this study 14 polymorphisms in 8 genes involved in the Hippo pathway (MST1, MST2, LATS1, LATS2, YAP, TAZ, FAT4 and RASSF1A) were evaluated as recurrence predictors in 194 patients with stages II/III colon cancer treated with 5-Fu-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a RASSF1A rs2236947 AA genotype had higher 3-year recurrence rate than patients with CA/CC genotypes (56% vs 33%, HR: 1.87; p=0.017). Patients with TAZ rs3811715 CT or TT genotypes had lower 3-year recurrence rate than patients with a CC genotype (28% vs 40%; HR: 0.66; p=0.07). In left-sided tumors, this association was stronger (HR: 0.29; p=0.011) and a similar trend was found in an independent Japanese cohort. These promising results reveal polymorphisms in the Hippo pathway as biomarkers for stage II and III colon cancer. PMID:26370619

  8. Modeling survival in colon cancer: a methodological review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Farid E; Vos, Paul W; Holbert, Don

    2007-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model is the most widely used model for survival analysis because of its simplicity. The fundamental assumption in this model is the proportionality of the hazard function. When this condition is not met, other modifications or other models must be used for analysis of survival data. We illustrate in this review several methodological approaches to deal with the violation of the proportionality assumption, using survival in colon cancer as an illustrative example. PMID:17295918

  9. Potential Therapy for Refractory Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The drug MM-1151 may overcome resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab caused by some mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR. The drug slowed disease progression in a colorectal cancer cell line that carried some of the mutations and curbed growth of cells derived from a cetuximab-resistant patient tumor. In a phase I trial, tumors shrank or stabilized in patients who carried the mutations and received the drug. PMID:26928314

  10. Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines: clinical results.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Christopher W

    2010-01-01

    As technological advances allow for the identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) against which adaptive immune responses can be raised, efforts to develop vaccines for the treatment of cancer continue to gain momentum. Some of these vaccines target differentiation antigens that are expressed by tumors derived from one particular tissue (e. g., Melan-A/ MART-1, tyrosinase, gp 100). Some target antigens are specifically expressed in tumors of different types but not in normal tissues (e. g., MAGE-3), while other possible targets are antigens that are expressed at low level in normal tissues and are over-expressed in tumors of different types (e. g., HER2, Muc 1). Oncogenes (HER2/neu, Ras, E7 HPV 16), tumor suppressor genes (pS3) or tumor-specific post-translational modified proteins (under glycosylated Muc 1) can also be used as cancer vaccine candidates. In either case, these antigens tend to be poorly inmmunogenic by themselves and vaccines containing them generally require the inclusion of potent immunological adjuvants in order to generate robust anti-tumor immune responses in humans. Many adjuvants currently under evaluation for use in cancer vaccines activate relevant antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages, via toll-like receptors (TLRs) and promote effective uptake, processing and presentation of antigen to T-cells in draining lymph nodes.Lipid A, the biologically active portion of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is known to possess strong immunostimulatory properties and has been evaluated for more than two decades as an adjuvant for promoting immune responses to minimally immunogenic antigens, including TAAs. The relatively recent discovery of TLRs and the identification of TLR4 as the signaling receptor for lipid A have allowed for a better understanding of how this immunostimulant functions with regard to induction of innate and adaptive immune responses.Although several lipid

  11. Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Breast Cancer Palliative Care and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a life-threatening disease among women worldwide with annual rates of reported incidence and death increasing alarmingly. Chemotherapy is a recommended and effective treatment option for breast cancer; however, the narrow therapeutic indices and varied side effects of currently approved drugs present major hurdles in increasing its effectiveness. An increasing number of literature evidence indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in treatment-related symptom control and alleviation of side effects plays an important role in increasing survival rate and quality of life in breast cancer patients. This review focuses on the use of herbal medicines and acupuncture in palliative care and as adjuvants in the treatment of breast cancer. Herbal medicinal treatments, the correlation of clinical use with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action, and the use of certain acupoints in acupuncture are summarized. The aim of this review is to facilitate an understanding of the current practice and usefulness of herbal medicine and acupuncture as adjuvants in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23840256

  12. Isolated splenic metastasis from colon cancer: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Jiddou; Omor, Youssef; Boutayeb, Saber; Elkhannoussi, Basma; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Isolated splenic metastases from colorectal cancer are very rare clinical entities and when they are present, they usually manifest widely disseminated disease. In this paper we report a case of metachronous solitary isolated splenic metastasis from colon cancer in a 64-year-old woman who was successfully treated by laparoscopic splenectomy. We discuss the pathological and clinical aspects of this condition. We furthermore comment on the diagnostic and therapeutic options of this rare entity through our observation of the case and consideration of the 31 case reports published in the literature. PMID:27182171

  13. Isolated splenic metastasis from colon cancer: Case report.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Jiddou; Omor, Youssef; Boutayeb, Saber; Elkhannoussi, Basma; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-05-14

    Isolated splenic metastases from colorectal cancer are very rare clinical entities and when they are present, they usually manifest widely disseminated disease. In this paper we report a case of metachronous solitary isolated splenic metastasis from colon cancer in a 64-year-old woman who was successfully treated by laparoscopic splenectomy. We discuss the pathological and clinical aspects of this condition. We furthermore comment on the diagnostic and therapeutic options of this rare entity through our observation of the case and consideration of the 31 case reports published in the literature. PMID:27182171

  14. Unusual elevation of CEA in a patient with history of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chi

    2006-12-01

    A 35-year-old female received right hemicolectomy for a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon with lymph node metastasis (1/28) in February 1997. CEA was 1.68 ng/microl prior to colectomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy with weekly 5-FU and leucovorin intravenously was started following surgery and discontinued after 17 doses in May 1997. She received bilateral salpingo-ophorecctomy for metastatic cancer in August 1999. Intravenous chemotherapy was resumed with weekly 5-FU and leucovorin intravenously in August 1999. CEA was 93.8 ng/microl in November 1999. Intravenous chemotherapy was discontinued after 20 doses and oral chemotherapy with futraful and leucovorin was started in January 2000. CEA was found to be 240.3 ng/microl in December 1999 and then elevated to 1521.3 ng/microl in June 2001, which was 10 months after resection of metastatic ovarian cancer. No metastatic lesions could be detected, however, with image studies. The CEA decreased to 396.6 ng/microl three months later. Futraful was switched to uracil-tegafur (UFUR) in September 2001. The CEA for the patient ranged from 68.5 to 298.9 ng/microl for the following 5 years without aggressive chemotherapy. No evidence of recurrence could be demonstrated by imaging studies. The patient is not a smoker and denied exposure to a smoking environment. She was also not known to have persistent infections, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, or any benign tumors. The current case suggested that: (i) elevation of CEA is not necessarily well correlated with presence of metastatic colon cancer; (ii) some patients may live with elevated CEA for years without evidence of recurrence or metastasis; (iii) aggressive chemotherapy may not be necessary in patients with only elevated CEA. PMID:17060406

  15. Flagellin is a strong vaginal adjuvant of a therapeutic vaccine for genital cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shee Eun; Hong, Seol Hee; Verma, Vivek; Lee, Youn Suhk; Duong, Tra-My Nu; Jeong, Kwangjoon; Uthaman, Saji; Sung, Young Chul; Lee, Jae-Tae; Park, In-Kyu; Min, Jung-Joon; Rhee, Joon Haeng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cervical cancer is a high-incidence female cancer most commonly caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the genital mucosa. Immunotherapy targeting HPV-derived tumor antigens (TAs) has been widely studied in animal models and in patients. Because the female genital tract is a portal for the entry of HPV and a highly compartmentalized system, the development of topical vaginal immunotherapy in an orthotopic cancer model would provide an ideal therapeutic. Thus, we examined whether flagellin, a potent mucosal immunomodulator, could be used as an adjuvant for a topical therapeutic vaccine for female genital cancer. Intravaginal (IVAG) co-administration of the E6/E7 peptides with flagellin resulted in tumor suppression and long-term survival of tumor-bearing mice. In contrast to IVAG vaccination, intranasal (IN) or subcutaneous (SC) immunization did not induce significant tumor suppression in the same model. The vaginal adjuvant effect of the flagellin was completely abolished in Toll-like receptor-5 (TLR5) knock-out mice. IVAG immunization with the E6/E7 peptides plus flagellin induced the accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells and the expression of T cell activation-related genes in the draining genital lymph nodes (gLNs). The co-administered flagellin elicited antigen-specific IFNγ production in the gLNs and spleen. The intravaginally administered flagellin was found in association with CD11c+ cells in the gLNs. Moreover, after immunization with a flagellin and the E6/E7 peptides, the TLR5 expression in gLN cells was significantly upregulated. These results suggest that flagellin serves as a potent vaginal adjuvant for a therapeutic peptide cancer vaccine through the activation of TLR5 signaling. PMID:27057462

  16. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  17. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ederer, Austin K; Didier, Kaylin D; Reiter, Landon K; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D; Larson, Rebecca D; Ade, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V̇O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V̇O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV̇O2) relative to ΔV̇O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V̇O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  18. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  19. Gastrointestinal microflora, food components and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Cindy D.; Milner, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that the intestinal microbiota is intrinsically linked with overall health, including cancer risk. Moreover, its composition is not fixed, but can be influenced by several dietary components. Dietary modifiers, including the consumption of live bacteria (probiotics), nondigestible or limited digestible food constituents such as oligosaccharides (prebiotics) and polyphenols, or both (synbiotics), are recognized modifiers of the numbers and types of microbes and have been reported to reduce colon cancer risk experimentally. Microorganisms also have the ability to generate bioactive compounds from food components. Examples include equol from isoflavones, enterodiol and enterolactone from lignans, and urolithins from ellagic acid, which have also been demonstrated to retard experimentally induced cancers. The gastrointestinal microbiota can also influence both sides of the energy balance equation; namely, as a factor influencing energy utilization from the diet and as a factor that influences host genes that regulate energy expenditure and storage. Because of the link between obesity and cancer incidence and mortality, this complex relationship deserves greater attention. Thus, a complex interrelationship exists between the intestinal microbiota and colon cancer risk which can be modified by dietary components and eating behaviors. PMID:19716282

  20. Linking Nucleoporins, Mitosis, and Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Richard W; D'Angelo, Maximiliano

    2016-05-19

    Suppression of a nuclear pore protein Nup358/RanBP2 is linked to mitotic cell death, but the clinical relevance of this link is unknown. In a recent issue of Cell, Vecchione et al. (2016) show that in approximately 10% of BRAF-like colorectal cancer (CC) patients, Nup358/RanBP2 is critical for survival. Treatment with vinorelbine, a microtubule-depolymerizing drug that inhibits mitosis, might be a potential treatment for these CCs. PMID:27203373

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected colorectal cancer metastases: Literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Giovanni; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Nannini, Margherita; Curti, Stefania; Ottone, Marta; Dall’Olio, Filippo Gustavo; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Biasco, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only option of cure for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the risk of recurrence within 18 mo after metastasectomy is around 75% and the liver is the most frequent site of relapse. The current international guidelines recommend an adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of CRC metastases despite the lower level of evidence (based on the quality of studies in this setting). However, there is still no standard treatment and the effective role of an adjuvant therapy remains controversial. The aim of this review is to report the state-of-art of systemic chemotherapy and regional chemotherapy with hepatic arterial infusion in the management of patients after resection of metastases from CRC, with a literature review and meta-analysis of the relevant randomized controlled trials. PMID:26811604

  2. Functional annotation of colon cancer risk SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijing; Tak, Yu Gyoung; Berman, Benjamin P.; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk for CRC. A molecular understanding of the functional consequences of this genetic variation has been complicated because each GWAS SNP is a surrogate for hundreds of other SNPs, most of which are located in non-coding regions. Here we use genomic and epigenomic information to test the hypothesis that the GWAS SNPs and/or correlated SNPs are in elements that regulate gene expression, and identify 23 promoters and 28 enhancers. Using gene expression data from normal and tumour cells, we identify 66 putative target genes of the risk-associated enhancers (10 of which were also identified by promoter SNPs). Employing CRISPR nucleases, we delete one risk-associated enhancer and identify genes showing altered expression. We suggest that similar studies be performed to characterize all CRC risk-associated enhancers. PMID:25268989

  3. Treatment of colon cancer with oncolytic herpes simplex virus in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Peng, T; Li, J; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Zhang, P; Peng, S; Du, T; Li, Y; Yan, Q; Liu, B

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are a rare population in any type of cancer, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic and responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a number of different solid tumors recently, although the isolation of CSCs in colon cancer is still challenging. We cultured colon cancer cells in stem cell medium to obtain colonosphere cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with a high capacity of tumorigenicity, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. The isolation and identification of CSCs have provided new targets for the therapeutics. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSV) are an effective strategy for killing colon cancer cells in preclinical models. Here, we examined the efficacy of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 (oHSV2) in killing colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs). oHSV2 was found to be highly cytotoxic to the adherent and sphere cells in vitro, and oHSV2 treatment in vivo significantly inhibited tumor growth. This study demonstrates that oHSV2 is effective against colon cancer cells and colon CSLCs and could be a promising strategy for treating colon cancer patients. PMID:26871935

  4. Red meat and colon cancer: dietary haem, but not fat, has cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects on rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sesink, A L; Termont, D S; Kleibeuker, J H; Van Der Meer, R

    2000-10-01

    High intake of red meat is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. It has been suggested that fat from red meat is responsible, because high fat intake increases the concentration of cytotoxic lipids in the colon. Experimental studies have not unequivocally supported such a role for fat, however. Recently, we showed that dietary haem, which is abundant in red meat, increased colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial proliferation. In this study, we wanted to clarify whether dietary fat affects colon cancer risk by itself or by modulating the detrimental effects of haem on the colonic epithelium. Rats were fed control or haem-supplemented diets with 10%, 25% or 40% of the energy derived from fat for 14 days. Faeces were collected for biochemical analyses. Colonic cytotoxicity was determined from the degree of lysis of erythrocytes by faecal water. Colonic epithelial proliferation was measured in vivo using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Increasing the fat content of the control diets stimulated faecal disposal of both fatty acids and bile acids. It also increased the concentration of fatty acids, but not that of bile acids, in faecal water in control rats. The cytolytic activity of faecal water and colonic epithelial proliferation were unaffected. Dietary haem increased faecal cation content and cytolytic activity of faecal water at all fat levels, suggesting that the colonic mucosa was exposed to high amounts of luminal irritants. This effect was smaller in rats on the low-fat diet. Dietary haem also increased colonic epithelial proliferation at all fat levels. The haem-induced effects were independent of fatty acids or bile acids in the faecal water. In western societies, 30-40% of ingested energy is supplied by dietary fat, so our results suggest that the association between consumption of red meat and risk of colon cancer is mainly due to its haem content, and is largely independent of dietary fat content. PMID:11023550

  5. Toxicity of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy for BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan C; Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Bernadette A M; Smallenbroek, Nyrée; Epskamp, Cynthia; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Jager, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, as currently given, causes cell damage by induction of double-strand DNA breaks. Because BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins play a role in the repair of DNA damage, the efficacy of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy may be increased in BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer patients. As a downside, acute chemotherapy-related toxicity may also be increased. We selected all female patients who were treated at the Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, with (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy for primary or locoregional recurrence of breast cancer (PBC/LR) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2014. The primary outcome was the relative total dose intensity (RTDI), calculated for anthracyclines and taxanes separately. Secondary outcomes were the occurrence of febrile neutropenia, delay in chemotherapy administration, and switch to another chemotherapy regimen due to toxicity. In total, 701 patients treated for PBC/LR were eligible for data analyses, among which 85 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (n = 67 BRCA1 and n = 18 BRCA2). The mean RTDI for anthracyclines was not significantly different between both groups (98.7 % in the BRCA1/2, 96.6 % in the sporadic group, p = 0.27). Also the mean RTDI for taxanes was not significantly different between the groups (93.6 % in the BRCA1/2-associated, 90.0 % in the sporadic group, p = 0.12). Linear regression analysis revealed no significant effect of BRCA1/2 mutation carriership on the RTDIs. No significant differences were found in the percentages of patients presenting with febrile neutropenia, having a delay in chemotherapy administration or switching to an altered chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, the odds ratios showed no significant effect of BRCA1/2 mutation carriership on the secondary outcome variables. (Neo)adjuvant chemotherapy-related toxicity was not different between BRCA1/2-associated and sporadic breast cancer patients suggesting that the DNA damage repair mechanism of non-cancer cells

  6. Oral bisphosphonates and colon cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used as the main treatment for osteoporosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest that use of BPs may have a potential for colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. Safety and efficacy in terms of osteoporosis prevention have only been evaluated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of relatively short duration (3–5 years), with smaller extension studies. The evidence for a benefit beyond 5 years is limited and intake of BPs has not shown any relationship with CRC in intervention studies. Observational studies and meta-analysis have shown unchanged or decreased risk of CRC. BPs used for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis should not be applied for prevention of CRC in clinical practice. PMID:26288666

  7. Pro-growth role of the JMJD2C histone demethylase in HCT-116 colon cancer cells and identification of curcuminoids as JMJD2 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Fuchs, James R; Schwartz, Eric; Abdelhamid, Dalia; Etter, Jonathan; Berry, William L; Li, Chenglong; Ihnat, Michael A; Li, Pui-Kai; Janknecht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Colon tumors are a major cause of cancer death, yet their molecular intricacies are not fully understood. We demonstrate that the histone demethylases JMJD2A, JMJD2B and JMJD2C are overexpressed in colon cancer cell lines, whereas another related protein, JMJD2D, is not. Interestingly, despite their high homology, the intracellular localization of JMJD2A-C is different in colon and other cancer cells, with JMJD2A being present comparably in the cytoplasm and nucleus, JMJD2B more prevalent in the nucleus and JMJD2C strongly associated with chromatin. This suggests that each of these three proteins performs different, non-redundant functions. Moreover, we show that JMJD2C (also called KDM4C) forms complexes with β-catenin, an oncoprotein whose overexpression is crucial for the development of most colonic tumors. In addition, JMJD2C downregulation reduced both growth and clonogenic capacity of HCT-116 colon cancer cells. Further, JMJD2C was required for efficient expression of the growth stimulatory proteins FRA1 and cyclin D1 as well as the survival factor BCL2. Lastly, we identified derivatives of curcumin as in vitro inhibitors of JMJD2 enzymes, suggesting that these curcuminoids could be useful for decreasing JMJD2 activity in vivo. In conclusion, our data highlight that overexpression of JMJD2C confers a pro-growth effect on colon cancer cells and, therefore, its inhibition by curcuminoids or other small molecules could be beneficial as an adjuvant therapy for colon cancer patients. PMID:24936217

  8. Body mass index and colon cancer screening: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Imam, Mohamad; Ismail, Bahaa Eldeen Senousy; Castro, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) has been associated with a decreased incidence and mortality from CRC. However, patient adherence to screening is less than desirable and resources are limited even in developed countries. Better identification of individuals at a higher risk could result in improved screening efforts. Over the past few years, formulas have been developed to predict the likelihood of developing advanced colonic neoplasia in susceptible individuals but have yet to be utilized in mass screening practices. These models use a number of clinical factors that have been associated with colonic neoplasia including the body mass index (BMI). Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which obesity contributes to colonic neoplasia as well as clinical studies on this subject have proven the association between BMI and colonic neoplasia. However, there are still controversies on this subject as some studies have arrived at different conclusions on the influence of BMI by gender. Future studies should aim at resolving these discrepancies in order to improve the efficiency of screening strategies. PMID:25663756

  9. Carbohydrate-Monophosphoryl Lipid A Conjugates Are Fully Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Cancer Vaccines Eliciting Robust Immune Responses in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianli; Zhou, Zhifang; Tang, Shouchu; Guo, Zhongwu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are useful targets in the development of therapeutic cancer vaccines. However, a serious problem with them is the poor immunogenicity. To overcome the problem, a monophosphorylated derivative of Neisseria meningitidis lipid A was explored as a potential carrier molecule and built-in adjuvant for the construction of structurally defined fully synthetic glycoconjugate vaccines. Some paradigm-shifting discoveries about the monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-TACA conjugates were that they elicited robust IgG antibody responses, indicating T cell-mediated immunity, without an external adjuvant and that an external adjuvant, e.g., Titermax Gold, actually reduced, instead of promoting, the immunological activity of the conjugates. The induced antibodies were proved to bind selectively to target tumor cells. MPLA was therefore demonstrated to be a powerful built-in immunostimulant and adjuvant for an all new design of fully synthetic glycoconjugate cancer vaccines. PMID:22013921

  10. Approaches that ascertain the role of dietary compounds in colonic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Venema, Koen; Putri, Adeline K; Lazarova, Darina

    2014-01-01

    Preventive approaches against cancer have not been fully developed and applied. For example, the incidence of some types of cancer, including colon cancer, is highly dependent upon lifestyle, and therefore, amenable to prevention. Among the lifestyle factors, diet strongly affects the incidence of colon cancer; however, there are no definitive dietary recommendations that protect against this malignancy. The association between diet-derived bioactives and development of colonic neoplasms will remain ill defined if we do not take into account: (1) the identity of the metabolites present in the colonic lumen; (2) their concentrations in the colon; and (3) the effect of the colonic contents on the function of individual bioactives. We review two approaches that address these questions: the use of fecal water and in vitro models of the human colon. Compared to treatment with individual diet-derived compounds, the exposure of colon cancer cells to samples from fecal water or human colon simulators mimics closer the in vitro conditions and allows for more reliable studies on the effects of diet on colon cancer development. The rationale and the advantages of these strategies are discussed from the perspective of a specific question on how to analyze the combined effect of two types of bioactives, butyrate and polyphenol metabolites, on colon cancer cells. PMID:24578783

  11. Vesicocutaneous fistula following adjuvant radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, Derek Barry; Bolton, Eva; Thomas, Arun Z; Lynch, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Vesicocutaneous fistulas (VCF) are a rare complication of radical radiotherapy to the pelvis. Timely diagnosis and management are often difficult and complex. We report the unusual case of a 64-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department with worsening sepsis and profuse discharge from a cutaneous opening in the left groin. This presentation was 6 weeks following the completion of external beam radiotherapy for apical margin-positive prostate cancer (pT3a). A diagnosis of a VCF was confirmed after CT scanning of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast. Urinary diversion was achieved by a temporary urethral catheter insertion. Full resolution of this gentleman's symptoms was accomplished. In this article, we present a non-invasive approach to the management of VCF. This case raises intricate management issues in the atypical development of an early urinary tract fistula postradiotherapy. PMID:23625668

  12. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  13. Tamoxifen as the First Targeted Long Term Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an unlikely pioneering medicine in medical oncology. Nevertheless, the medicine has continued to surprise us, perform and save lives for the past 40 years. Unlike any other medicine in oncology, it is used to treat all stages of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, male breast cancer, pioneered the use of chemoprevention by reducing the incidence of breast cancer in women at high risk and induces ovulation in subfertile women! The impact of tamoxifen is ubiquitous. However, the power to save lives from this unlikely success story came from the first laboratory studies which defined that “longer was going to be better” when tamoxifen was being considered as an adjuvant therapy (Jordan 1978 Use of the DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinoma system for the evaluation of tamoxifen as a potential adjuvant therapy Reviews in Endocrine Related Cancer. October Supplement: 49–55.). This is that success story, with a focus on the interdependent components of: excellence in drug discovery, investment in self-selecting young investigators, a conversation with Nature, a conversation between the laboratory and the clinic, and the creation of the Oxford Overview Analysis. Each of these factors was essential to propel the progress of tamoxifen to evolve as an essential part of the fabric of society. “Science is adventure, discovery, new horizons, insight into our world, a means of predicting the future and enormous power to help others”(Hoagland 1990).- Mahlon Hoagland, MD. Director, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology (1970–85) PMID:24659478

  14. A recellularized human colon model identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Wei, Zhubo; Sun, Jian; Bhattacharya, Asmita; Savage, David J; Serda, Rita; Mackeyev, Yuri; Curley, Steven A; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Chen, Shuibing; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Huang, Emina; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A; Shuler, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    Refined cancer models are needed to bridge the gaps between cell line, animal and clinical research. Here we describe the engineering of an organotypic colon cancer model by recellularization of a native human matrix that contains cell-populated mucosa and an intact muscularis mucosa layer. This ex vivo system recapitulates the pathophysiological progression from APC-mutant neoplasia to submucosal invasive tumor. We used it to perform a Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes that cooperate with mutant APC in driving invasive neoplasia. We identified 38 candidate invasion-driver genes, 17 of which, including TCF7L2, TWIST2, MSH2, DCC, EPHB1 and EPHB2 have been previously implicated in colorectal cancer progression. Six invasion-driver genes that have not, to our knowledge, been previously described were validated in vitro using cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays and ex vivo using recellularized human colon. These results demonstrate the utility of our organoid model for studying cancer biology. PMID:27398792

  15. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K.; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer. PMID:26744320

  16. Biological/Chemopreventive Activity of Stilbenes and Their Effect on Colon Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men and women in Western countries. Epidemiological studies have linked consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduced risk of colon cancer, and small fruits are particularly rich sources of many active phytochemical stilbenes, such as ...

  17. Adjuvant bisphosphonates in early breast cancer: consensus guidance for clinical practice from a European Panel.

    PubMed

    Hadji, P; Coleman, R E; Wilson, C; Powles, T J; Clézardin, P; Aapro, M; Costa, L; Body, J-J; Markopoulos, C; Santini, D; Diel, I; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Dodwell, D; Smith, I; Gnant, M; Gray, R; Harbeck, N; Thurlimann, B; Untch, M; Cortes, J; Martin, M; Albert, U-S; Conte, P-F; Ejlertsen, B; Bergh, J; Kaufmann, M; Holen, I

    2016-03-01

    Bisphosphonates have been studied in randomised trials in early breast cancer to investigate their ability to prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL) and reduce the risk of disease recurrence and metastasis. Treatment benefits have been reported but bisphosphonates do not currently have regulatory approval for either of these potential indications. This consensus paper provides a review of the evidence and offers guidance to breast cancer clinicians on the use of bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Using the nominal group methodology for consensus, a systematic review of the literature was augmented by a workshop held in October 2014 for breast cancer and bone specialists to present and debate the available pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates. This was followed by a questionnaire to all members of the writing committee to identify areas of consensus. The panel recommended that bisphosphonates should be considered as part of routine clinical practice for the prevention of CTIBL in all patients with a T score of <-2.0 or ≥2 clinical risk factors for fracture. Compelling evidence from a meta-analysis of trial data of >18,000 patients supports clinically significant benefits of bisphosphonates on the development of bone metastases and breast cancer mortality in post-menopausal women or those receiving ovarian suppression therapy. Therefore, the panel recommends that bisphosphonates (either intravenous zoledronic acid or oral clodronate) are considered as part of the adjuvant breast cancer treatment in this population and the potential benefits and risks discussed with relevant patients. PMID:26681681

  18. Stage migration vs immunology: The lymph node count story in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Märkl, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node staging is of crucial importance for the therapy stratification and prognosis estimation in colon cancer. Beside the detection of metastases, the number of harvested lymph nodes itself has prognostic relevance in stage II/III cancers. A stage migration effect caused by missed lymph node metastases has been postulated as most likely explanation for that. In order to avoid false negative node staging reporting of at least 12 lymph nodes is recommended. However, this threshold is met only in a minority of cases in daily practice. Due to quality initiatives the situation has improved in the past. This, however, had no influence on staging in several studies. While the numbers of evaluated lymph nodes increased continuously during the last decades the rate of node positive cases remained relatively constant. This fact together with other indications raised doubts that understaging is indeed the correct explanation for the prognostic impact of lymph node harvest. Several authors assume that immune response could play a major role in this context influencing both the lymph node detectability and the tumor’s behavior. Further studies addressing this issue are need. Based on the findings the recommendations concerning minimal lymph node numbers and adjuvant chemotherapy should be reconsidered. PMID:26604632

  19. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding mechanisms underlying muscarinic receptor agonist-induced promotion of colon cancer and, more importantly, indicates that blocking MMP1 expression and activation has therapeutic promise to stop or retard colon cancer invasion and dissemination. PMID:22027145

  20. An Apta-Biosensor for Colon Cancer Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Raji, Mojgan Ahmadzadeh; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Tajik, Parviz; Hosseini, Morteza; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design and implementation of an aptasensor using a modified KCHA10a aptamer. This aptasensor consists of a functionalized electrodes using various materials including 11-mercaptoandecanoic acid (11-MUA) and modified KCHA10a aptamer. The HCT 116, HT 29 and HEp-2 cell lines are used in this study to demonstrate the functionality of aptasensor for colon cancer detection purposes. Flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry are used to verify the binding between the target cells and aptamer. The limit of detection (LOD) of this aptasensor is equal to seven cancer cells. Based on the experimental results, the proposed sensor can be employed for point-of-care cancer disease diagnostics. PMID:26404293

  1. An Apta-Biosensor for Colon Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh Raji, Mojgan; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Tajik, Parviz; Hosseini, Morteza; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design and implementation of an aptasensor using a modified KCHA10a aptamer. This aptasensor consists of a functionalized electrodes using various materials including 11-mercaptoandecanoic acid (11-MUA) and modified KCHA10a aptamer. The HCT 116, HT 29 and HEp-2 cell lines are used in this study to demonstrate the functionality of aptasensor for colon cancer detection purposes. Flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry are used to verify the binding between the target cells and aptamer. The limit of detection (LOD) of this aptasensor is equal to seven cancer cells. Based on the experimental results, the proposed sensor can be employed for point-of-care cancer disease diagnostics. PMID:26404293

  2. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer in the era of aromatase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, Ramia; Karat, Isabella; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women should include a third generation aromatase inhibitor (AI). On current evidence, adjuvant anstrozole or letrozole should be used upfront in such patients especially in those with high risk disease (node positive and/or tumours > 2 cm). The sequential approach of tamoxifen for 2-3 years followed by exemestane or anastrozole for 2-3 years is a reasonable alternative to 5 years of AI monotherapy in patients with low risk disease (node negative and tumour smaller than 2 cm) especially if the tumour is positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors.Node-positive patients completing 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen should be offered letrozole for up 48 months. Further research is required to establish the long-term cardiovascular safety of AIs especially that of letrozole and exmestane, the optimal AI to use, duration of AI therapy and whether monotherapy with an AI for 5 years is superior to sequencing an AI after 2-3 years of tamoxifen. The bone mineral density (BMD) should be measured at baseline and monitored during therapy in women being treated with AIs. Anti-osteoporosis agents should such as bisphosphonates should be considered in patients at high risk of bone fractures. PMID:16981992

  3. Anthocyanin-containing purple-fleshed potatoes suppress colon tumorigenesis via elimination of colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Agarwal, Rajesh; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2015-12-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are shown to be responsible for initiation and progression of tumors in a variety of cancers. We previously showed that anthocyanin-containing baked purple-fleshed potato (PP) extracts (PA) suppressed early and advanced human colon cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, but their effect on colon CSCs is not known. Considering the evidence of bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins, against cancers, there is a critical need to study anticancer activity of PP, a global food crop, against colon CSCs. Thus, isolated colon CSCs (positive for CD44, CD133 and ALDH1b1 markers) with functioning p53 and shRNA-attenuated p53 were treated with PA at 5.0 μg/ml. Effects of baked PP (20% wt/wt) against colon CSCs were also tested in vivo in mice with azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis. Effects of PA/PP were compared to positive control sulindac. In vitro, PA suppressed proliferation and elevated apoptosis in a p53-independent manner in colon CSCs. PA, but not sulindac, suppressed levels of Wnt pathway effector β-catenin (a critical regulator of CSC proliferation) and its downstream proteins (c-Myc and cyclin D1) and elevated Bax and cytochrome c, proteins-mediating mitochondrial apoptosis. In vivo, PP reduced the number of crypts containing cells with nuclear β-catenin (an indicator of colon CSCs) via induction of apoptosis and suppressed tumor incidence similar to that of sulindac. Combined, our data suggest that PP may contribute to reduced colon CSCs number and tumor incidence in vivo via suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and elevation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26383537

  4. TPX2 is a novel prognostic marker for the growth and metastasis of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated an aberrant overexpression of the microtubule-associated protein TPX2 in colon cancer using a genome-wide gene expression profiling analysis. Here, we aim to investigate its expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function in colon cancer. Methods TPX2 expression was analyzed in human colon cancer cell lines and tumor samples. The effect of TPX2 on cell proliferation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis was examined in vitro and in vivo. Results TPX2 was overexpressed in 129 of the 203 (60.8%) colon cancer metastatic lesions, with the expression being significantly higher than that in primary cancerous tissue and normal colon mucosa. Overexpression of TPX2 was significantly associated with clinical staging, vessel invasion, and metastasis. In survival analyses, patients with TPX2 overexpression had worse overall survival and metastasis free survival, suggesting that deregulation of TPX2 may contribute to the metastasis of colon cancer. Consistent with this, suppression of TPX2 expression inhibited proliferation and tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, we found that TPX2 knockdown significantly attenuated the migration and invasion ability of colon cancer cells, which was further shown to be mechanistically associated with AKT-mediated MMP2 activity. Conclusions These findings suggest that TPX2 plays an important role in promoting tumorigenesis and metastasis of human colon cancer, and may represent a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:24341487

  5. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice . E-mail: Janice.kwon@lhsc.on.ca; D'Souza, David; Gawlik, Christine; Stitt, Larry; Whiston, Frances; Nascu, Patricia; Wong, Eugene; Carey, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age, 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.

  6. Tailoring Adjuvant Radiation Therapy by Intraoperative Imaging to Detect Residual Cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi J; Weissleder, Ralph; Kirsch, David G

    2015-10-01

    For many solid cancers, radiation therapy is offered as an adjuvant to surgical resection to lower rates of local recurrence and improve survival. However, a subset of patients treated with surgery alone will not have a local recurrence. Currently, there is no way to accurately determine which patients have microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed after surgery and therefore are most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. To address this problem, a number of technologies have been developed to try to improve margin assessment of resected tissue and to detect residual cancer in the tumor bed. Moreover, some of these approaches have been translated from the preclinical arena into clinical trials. Here, we review different types of intraoperative molecular imaging systems for cancer. Optical imaging techniques like epi-illumination, fluorescence molecular tomography and optoacoustic imaging can be coupled with exogenous fluorescent imaging probes that accumulate in tumors passively via the enhanced permeability and retention effect or are targeted to tumor tissues based on affinity or enzyme activity. In these approaches, detection of fluorescence in the tumor bed may indicate residual disease. Protease activated probes have generated great interest because of their potential for leading to high tumor to normal contrast. Recently, the first Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and activation of a protease activated probe was conducted. Spectroscopic methods like radiofrequency spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are based on energy absorption and scattering, respectively, have also been tested in humans and are able to distinguish between normal and tumors tissues intraoperatively. Most recently, multimodal contrast agents have been developed that target tumors and contain both fluorescent dyes and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, allowing for preoperative planning and intraoperative margin assessment with a single contrast

  7. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  8. Use of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil and Radiation Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection Among the Elderly and Impact on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Joshua; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; McBride, Russell; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In randomized trials patients with resected nonmetastatic gastric cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoRT) had better survival than those who did not. We investigated the effectiveness of adjuvant chemoRT after gastric cancer resection in an elderly general population and its effects by stage. Methods and Materials: We identified individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database aged 65 years or older with Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) gastric cancer, from 1991 to 2002, who underwent gastric resection, using multivariate modeling to analyze predictors of chemoRT use and survival. Results: Among 1,993 patients who received combined chemoRT or no adjuvant therapy after resection, having a later year of diagnosis, having a more advanced stage, being younger, being white, being married, and having fewer comorbidities were associated with combined treatment. Among 1,476 patients aged less than 85 years who survived more than 4 months, the 313 who received combined treatment had a lower mortality rate (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.98) than the 1,163 who received surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy significantly reduced the mortality rate for Stages III and IV (M0), trended toward improved survival for Stage II, and showed no benefit for Stage IB. We observed trends toward improved survival in all age categories except 80 to 85 years. Conclusions: The association of combined adjuvant chemoRT with improved survival in an overall analysis of Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) resected gastric cancer is consistent with clinical trial results and suggests that, in an elderly population, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is effective. However, our observational data suggest that adjuvant treatment may not be effective for Stage IB cancer, is possibly appropriate for Stage II, and shows significant survival benefits for Stages III and IV (M0) for those aged less than 80 years.

  9. Radioimmunotoxin Therapy of Experimental Colon and Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2006-02-09

    To pursue the development of radiolabeled immunotoxins (RIT) for colon cancer, it was first necessary to identify an immunotoxin (IT) that could selectively kill colon cancer cell lines. Recently, our collaborators in the Vallera laboratory have observed that potent recombinant IT can be synthesized using recombinant single chain antibodies (sFv) spliced to truncated diphtheria toxin (DT) consisting of the first 390 amino acids of native DT. DT was chosen as a toxin because it is a catalytic bacterial toxin that is easily manipulated in genetic engineering studies. Also, the Vallera lab has developed new procedures for preparing the sFv fusion toxins from bacterial inclusion bodies such as DT and another good genetic engineering toxin pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) based on detergent refolding. This allows for enhanced yields and higher purity that is essential for generating the protein that will be needed for preparation of larger amounts of RIT for therapy. Many potential sFvs were considered for targeting colon cancer. The best results have been obtained with an sFv recognizing EpCam. EpCam, also known as ESA or EGP40, is a 40 kDa epithelial transmembrane glycoprotein found on the basolateral surface of simple, pseudostratified, and transitional epithelia. It has been found overexpressed on 81% of adenocarcinomas of the colon (Went et al. Human pathology 35:122, 2004). EpCam sliced to DT (DTEpCam) was highly potent in studies in which we measured its ability to inhibit the proliferation of the HT-29 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines since we measured its IC50 at 1-2 x 10-2 nM. Potency is important, but is also critical that DTEpCam is selective in its cytotoxicity against EpCam-expressing target colon cancer cells. The activity of DTEpCam was highly selective since irrelevant control IT that did not recognize any markers on cancer cells, did not show any activity against the same colon cancer cell lines. Also, blocking studies were performed in which DTEpCam was

  10. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  11. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Fabien J; Jouan-Lanhouet, Sandrine; Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Jan, Gwénaël

    2016-02-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  12. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  13. Dual HER2 blockade in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Cornell, Lauren; Chumsri, Saranya; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that is overexpressed on the surface of 15%–20% of breast tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Consistently improved pathologic response and survival rates have been demonstrated with use of trastuzumab in combination with standard chemotherapy in both early and advanced breast cancer. However, resistance to trastuzumab may pose a major problem in the effective treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 blockade, using agents that work in a complimentary fashion to trastuzumab, has more recently been explored to evade resistance in both the preoperative (neoadjuvant) and adjuvant settings. Increased effectiveness of dual anti-HER2 agents over single blockade has been recently reported in clinical studies. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and taxane is currently approved in the metastatic and neoadjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Various biomarkers have also been investigated to identify subsets of patients with HER2-positive tumors who would likely respond best to these targeted therapy combinations. In this article, available trial data regarding efficacy and toxicity of treatment with combination HER2 agents in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting have been reviewed, and relevant correlative biomarker data from these trials have been discussed. PMID:26451122

  14. Vaginal brachytherapy alone is sufficient adjuvant treatment of surgical stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Solhjem, Matthew C. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy and complications of adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for patients with Stage I endometrial cancer in whom complete surgical staging had been performed. Methods and Materials Between April 1998 and March 2004, 100 patients with Stage I endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic {+-} paraaortic nodal sampling) and postoperative vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy at our institution. The total dose was 2100 cGy in three fractions. Results With a median follow-up of 23 months (range 2-62), no pelvic or vaginal recurrences developed. All patients underwent pelvic dissection, and 42% underwent paraaortic nodal dissection. A median of 29.5 pelvic nodes (range 1-67) was removed (84% had >10 pelvic nodes removed). Most patients (73%) had endometrioid (or unspecified) adenocarcinoma, 16% had papillary serous carcinoma, and 11% had other histologic types. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade was Stage IA, grade III in 5; Stage IB, grade I, II, or III in 6, 27, or 20, respectively; and Stage IC, grade I, II, or III in 13, 17, or 10, respectively. The Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0) complications were mild (Grade 1-2) and consisted primarily of vaginal mucosal changes, temporary urinary irritation, and temporary diarrhea. Conclusion Adjuvant vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone may be a safe and effective alternative to pelvic external beam radiotherapy for surgical Stage I endometrial cancer.

  15. Up-regulation of CNDP2 facilitates the proliferation of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytosolic nonspecific dipetidase (CN2) belongs to the family of M20 metallopeptidases. It was stated in previous articles that higher expression levels of CN2 were observed in renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer. Our study explored the correlation between CN2 and colon carcinogenesis. Methods We analysed the relationship between 183 patients clinicopathological characteristics and its CN2 expression. To detect the levels of CN2 in colon cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues by western blot. To verify cell proliferation in colon cancer cells with knockdown of CNDP2 and explore the causes of these phenomena. Results The expression levels of CN2 in clinical colon tumors and colon cancer cell lines were significantly higher than that in normal colon mucosa and colon cell lines. The difference in CN2 levels was associated with tumor location (right- and left-sided colon cancer), but there was no significant association with age, gender, tumor size, tumor grade, tumor stage or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Knockdown of CNDP2 inhibited cell proliferation, blocked cell cycle progression and retarded carcinogenesis in an animal model. The signaling pathway through which knockdown of CNDP2 inhibited cell proliferation and tumorigenesis involved in EGFR, cyclin B1 and cyclin E. Conclusions Knockdown of CNDP2 can inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer in vitro and retarded carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:24885395

  16. Tuberculosis axillary lymph node coexistent breast cancer in adjuvant treatment: case report

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Silvio Eduardo; do Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of breast cancer and tuberculosis is rare. In most cases, involvement by tuberculosis occurs in axillary lymph nodes. We report a case of a 43-years-old patient who had undergone adenomastectomy and left sentinel lymph node biopsy due to a triple negative ductal carcinoma. At the end of adjuvant treatment, the patient had an atypical lymph node in the left axilla. Lymph node was excised, and after laboratory analysis, the diagnosis was ganglion tuberculosis. The patient underwent treatment for primary tuberculosis. The development of these two pathologies can lead to problems in diagnosis and treatment. An accurate diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:26018148

  17. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable gastric cancer? A practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Craig C.; Maroun, Jean; Zuraw, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Objective To make recommendations on the use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy in addition to surgery in patients with resectable gastric cancer (T1–4, N1–2, M0). Options Neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments compared with “curative” surgery alone. Outcomes Overall survival, disease-free survival, and adverse effects. Evidence The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify randomized trials. Values Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative (CCOPGI) Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and methodologists. A systematic review of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice, to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. This report has been reviewed and approved by the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group, comprising medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, a pathologist and 2 community representatives. Benefits, harms and costs When compared with surgery alone, at 3 years adjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been shown to increase overall survival by 9% (50% v. 41%, p = 0.005) and to improve relapse-free survival from 31% to 48% (p = 0.001). At 5 years, it has been shown to increase overall survival by 11.6% (40% v. 28.4%) and to improve relapse-free survival from 25% to 38% (p < 0.001). Treatment has been associated with toxic deaths in 1% of patients. The most frequent adverse effects (> grade 3 [Southwest Oncology Group toxicity scale] are hematologic (54%), gastrointestinal (33%), influenza-like (9%), infectious (6%) and neurologic (4%). The radiation fields used can possibly damage the left kidney, resulting in hypertension and other renal problems. Furthermore, this therapy could increase the demand on radiation resources. Physicians and patients should understand the tradeoffs between survival benefit

  18. The multihit model of carcinogenesis: etiologic implications for colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.V.; Bailar, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A new multihit model of carcinogenesis is developed for use in evaluating age-specific cancer incidence rates in human populations. The model allows for some heterogeneity in both risk (perhaps genetic) and pathway (number of hits). Fitting the model yields estimates of (1) levels of effect of background exposure to environmental agents, (2) tumor growth times after initiation of a malignant cell, and (3) relative sizes of high-risk groups in a human population. Maximum likelihood procedures are used to fit the model to the polyposis coli data of Veale and the colon cancer incidence data from the Third National Cancer Survey. Model estimates may be verified in some cases by review of independent data in the literature and results have both theoretical and practical implications. Findings are generally consistent with the adenoma-carcinoma etiologic sequence postulated by Hill, Morson and Bussey with one exception. A large proportion of the population may be at risk of four-hit colon tumors following a non-adenoma etiologic sequence.

  19. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  20. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Schoenfeld, Joshua D.; Buatti, John M.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. PMID:25460731

  1. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1st 2005 to June 1st 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference between OS and DFS in stage I patients with low or high fibrinogen levels. Cox regression analysis indicated preoperative fibrinogen levels, TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and

  2. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, diet, and risk of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Potter, J D; Samowitz, W; Schaffer, D; Leppert, M

    1999-06-01

    Individuals with different forms of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, carriers of the C677T mutation versus wild type, show differences in enzyme levels; these differences have been hypothesized to be related to DNA methylation and, perhaps, to the nucleotide pool size. Using data from an incident case-control study, we evaluated the combined effect of dietary intake of folate, methionine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and alcohol and various forms of the MTHFR gene on risk of colon cancer. Individuals homozygous for the variant form of the MTHFR gene (TT) had a slightly lower risk of colon cancer than did individuals who were wild type [CC, odds ratio (OR) = 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-1.1 for men; and OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6-1.2 for women]. High levels of intake of folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 were associated with a 30-40% reduction in risk of colon cancer among those with the TT relative to those with low levels of intake who were CC genotype. Associations were stronger for proximal tumors, in which high levels of intake of these nutrients were associated with a halving of risk among those with the TT genotype. The inverse association with high levels of these nutrients in those with the TT genotype was stronger among those diagnosed at an older age. Although imprecise, the inverse association with the low-risk diet that was high in folate and methionine and without alcohol was observed for both the TT genotype (OR = 0.4 95% CI = 0.1-0.9) and the CC/CT genotype (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-1.0), but this association was not seen with the high-risk diet for either the TT or CC/CT genotype. Although associations were generally weak, these findings suggest that those with differing MTHFR genotypes may have different susceptibilities to colon cancer, based on dietary consumption of folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. PMID:10385141

  3. [Adjuvants--essential components of new generation vaccines].

    PubMed

    Dzierzbicka, Krystyna; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksander M

    2006-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of vaccines that augment an immunological reaction of organism. New vaccines based on recombinant proteins and DNA, are more save than traditional vaccines but they are less immunogenic. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of new, improved vaccine adjuvants. There are two classes of adjuvants: vaccine delivery systems (e.g. emulsions, microparticles, immune-stimulating complexes ISCOMs, liposomes) and immunostimulatory adjuvants (e.g. lipopolysaccharide, monophosphoryl lipid A, CpG DNA, or muramylpeptides). The discovery of more potent and safer adjuvants may allow to development better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against chronic infectious (e.g., HSV, HIV, HCV, HBV, HPV, or Helicobacter pylori) and noninfectious diseases as multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, allergy and tumors (e.g., melanoma, breast, or colon cancer). PMID:17078510

  4. Cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy with uracil–tegafur for curatively resected stage III rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hisashige, A; Yoshida, S; Kodaira, S

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the National Surgical Adjuvant Study of Colorectal Cancer in Japan, a randomised controlled trial of oral uracil–tegafur (UFT) adjuvant therapy for stage III rectal cancer, showed remarkable survival gains, compared with surgery alone. To evaluate value for money of adjuvant UFT therapy, cost-effective analysis was carried out. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adjuvant UFT therapy was carried out from a payer's perspective, compared with surgery alone. Overall survival and relapse-free survival were estimated by Kaplan–Meier method, up to 5.6 years from randomisation. Costs were estimated from trial data during observation. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were calculated using utility score from literature. Beyond observation period, they were simulated by the Boag model combined with the competing risk model. For 5.6-year observation, 10-year follow-up and over lifetime, adjuvant UFT therapy gained 0.50, 0.96 and 2.28 QALYs, and reduced costs by $2457, $1771 and $1843 per person compared with surgery alone, respectively (3% discount rate for both effect and costs). Cost-effectiveness acceptability and net monetary benefit analyses showed the robustness of these results. Economic evaluation of adjuvant UFT therapy showed that this therapy is cost saving and can be considered as a cost-effective treatment universally accepted for wide use in Japan. PMID:18797469

  5. [Treatment outcomes of colon cancer surgery combined with radical lymphadenectomy].

    PubMed

    Lipská, L; Visokai, V; Mrácek, M; Levý, M

    2008-05-01

    The authors analyzed a group of 1281 subjects with colorectal cancer operated and followed up in a single institution from I/1992 to VIII/2007. Colon carcinoma patients were assessed separately (C18). Patients with rectal and rectosigmoid tumors are not included in the presentation. A total of 846 patients were operated for colon carcinomas. In 546 subjects, radical R0 resections were achieved. In the R0 group, the male/female ratio is 315/231, age 29-94 years, the mean age of 69 years. The R0 group stratification by TNM classification was: I 17.8%, II 49.6%, III 24.0%, IV 8.1%, TNMx 0.5%. Irrespective of the TNM staging, three-year, five-year and ten-year survival rates were 80%, 71%, and 51%, resp. The median survival time was 9.85 years. Postoperative morality was 5.5%, morbidity 29.8%, anastomic leak occured in 5.7%. Systematic lymph node dissection up to the apical level, had been gradually introduced as an integral part of the R0 surgery. The aim of the study is to analyze outcomes of the colon carcinoma surgical management, combined with radical lymphadenectomy. Furthermore, effects of the extensive procedure on the postoperative morbidity and moratility rates are analyzed as well. PMID:18595540

  6. Prognosis of invasive breast cancer after adjuvant therapy evaluated with VEGF microvessel density and microvascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ultrasonographic microvascular imaging in the evaluation of prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. A total of 121 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent ultrasonographic contrast-enhanced imaging, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining, and microvessel density (MVD) counts. The parameters of microvascular imaging and the expression of VEGF and MVD in primary breast cancer were calculated. The correlation between these factors and the overall and progression-free survival rate were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among 121 cases, the positive VEGF cases were 75 and negative ones were 46. The cut point of 52.3 was calculated by the regressive curve for MVD counts. The data showed the mean intensity (MI) was positively associated with both the MVD counts (r = .51, p < .001) and VEGF expression (r = .35, p < .001). For the prognosis of patients, high VEGF expression and MVD counts were associated with reduced progressive and survival times (PFS, p = .032 and p = .034; OS, p = .041 and p = .038, respectively). The correlation between parameters of microvascular imaging, VEGF expressive status, and the MVD counts were established. The cut point of mean intensity (MI = 40) was used to investigate as an independent predictor for PFS (p = .021) and OS (p = .025), respectively, due to a strong correlation between MVD counts and VEGF expression in patients with invasive breast cancer. The microvascular imaging could be a visual and helpful tool to predict the prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. PMID:26052072

  7. Adjuvant Therapy with High-Dose Medroxyprogesterone Acetate for Operable Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koyama

    1999-04-25

    BACKGROUND: Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) produces a comparable or higherresponse rate in metastatic breast cancer compared with tamoxifen which is alsocommonly used for adjuvant endocrine therapy. Several studies in the West have indicated the efficacy of MPA when used as an adjuvant to surgery in certain subsets of patients. The present study was undertaken as a multicenter open study in Japan to investigate the safety and efficacy of MPA in adjuvant endocrine therapy. Method and Patients: A combination of 800 mg/day MPA and a fluorouracil compound for 6 months was given postoperatively to 119 patients with stage II or IIIabreast cancer in 32 participating hospitals between June 1987 and June 1989. RESULTS: Among the 119 patients, 59 patients (49.6%) experienced some kind ofadverse reaction. The major adverse reaction was abnormal menstruation, seen in 13 (25.0%) of the 52 premenopausal patients. Vaginal bleeding was a major adverse reaction in the 67 postmenopausal patients (8/67 or 11.9%). An increase in body weight and moon face were observed in 23 (19.3%) and 9 (7.6%) of the 119 patients, respectively. Administration of drugs was discontinued because of adversereaction in 17 patients (14.3%), and dose reduction or temporary suspension wasnecessary in 7 patients (5.9%). Increase in body weight was the main reason fordiscontinuation of the treatment. No severe adverse reactions were observed. After a median follow-up of 74.5 months (range, 2.2-90.0 months), 84 of the 119 patients are alive with no evidence of disease. The 3-year and 5-year disease-freesurvival rates were 88.2% and 82.6% in stage II patients, and 64.7% and 52.9% in stage IIIa patients, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year disease-free survivalrates according to age were 87.8% and 79.3% in patients aged 50 years or more, and 78.6% and 71.4% in patients aged under 50 years. CONCLUSION: These results show that 800 mg/day MPA plus a fluorouracil compound can be administered with acceptable

  8. Omission of adjuvant therapy after gastric cancer resection: development of a validated risk model.

    PubMed

    Datta, Jashodeep; McMillan, Matthew T; Shang, Eric K; Mamtani, Ronac; Lewis, Russell S; Kelz, Rachel R; Teitelbaum, Ursina; Plastaras, John P; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Fraker, Douglas L; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Roses, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Gastric Cancer recommend adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy following after resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) for patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Despite frequent noncompliance with NCCN Guidelines nationally, risk factors underlying adjuvant therapy omission (ATom) have not been well characterized. We developed an internally validated preoperative instrument stratifying patients by incremental risk of ATom. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage IB-III GA undergoing gastrectomy; those receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Multivariable models identified factors associated with ATom between 2006 and 2011. Internal validation was performed using bootstrap analysis; model discrimination and calibration were assessed using k-fold cross-validation and Hosmer-Lemeshow procedures, respectively. Using weighted β-coefficients, a simplified Omission Risk Score (ORS) was created to stratify ATom risk. The impact of ATom on overall survival (OS) was examined in ORS risk-stratified cohorts. In 4,728 patients (median age, 70 years; 64.8% male), 53.7% had ATom. The bootstrap-validated model identified advancing age, comorbidity, underinsured/uninsured status, proximal tumor location, and clinical T1/2 and N0 tumors as independent ATom predictors, demonstrating good discrimination. The simplified ORS, stratifying patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories, predicted incremental risk of ATom (30% vs 53% vs 80%, respectively) and progressive delay to adjuvant therapy initiation (median time, 51 vs 55 vs 61 days, respectively). Patients at moderate/high-risk of ATom demonstrated worsening risk-adjusted mortality compared with low-risk patients (median OS, 26.4 vs 29.2 months). This ORS may aid in rational selection of multimodality treatment sequence in GA. PMID:25964639

  9. Are dietary fiber-induced alterations in colonic epithelial cell proliferation predictive of fiber's effect on colon cancer?

    PubMed

    Whiteley, L O; Klurfeld, D M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cell proliferation of the colon have been observed as a result of changes in amount and type of dietary fiber and in relation to risk of developing colon cancer. Although some human observational and intervention studies contribute to the database, most information results from experiments on rodents. Because of numerous contradictory reports linking dietary fiber, cell proliferation, and colon cancer, we undertook a critical review of existing methods in an attempt to explain the inconsistencies. Although there may be some individual types of dietary fiber that protect against chemically induced colon cancer, dietary fiber as a single entity does not appear to afford any consistent protection. Because of significant differences in experimental protocols among laboratories, it is not yet possible to state with certainty that increases in cell proliferation, induced by fiber consumption, are predictive of increased tumorigenesis. Much of what has been observed and interpreted as elevation of risk may simply be normal homeostatic changes in cell proliferation. Even though fermentation to short-chain fatty acids is a mechanistically attractive hypothesis to explain why fiber modulates cytokinetics, data do not consistently support short-chain fatty acids as biological intermediates in risk of colon cancer. The state of the art in this field has not yet progressed to the point where a clear effect of dietary fiber on cytokinetics and colon carcinogenesis can be assessed with any degree of certainty. Additional markers of apoptosis, differentiation, and cell-cell communication may be required for a more accurate analysis of the relation among fiber, cytokinetics, and colon cancer. PMID:10890023

  10. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  11. PAK6 increase chemoresistance and is a prognostic marker for stage II and III colon cancer patients undergoing 5-FU based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongwang; Cui, Feifei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Fudong; Xue, Yingming; Feng, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Senlin; Yu, Yang; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) has been implicated in radiotherapy and docetaxel resistance. We have further evaluated PAK6 as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment response in colon cancer. Here we report that in colon cancer PAK6 promotes tumor progression and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. In the clinical analysis, PAK6 was overexpressed in 104 of 147 (70.75%) stage II and III patients who received 5-FU based chemotherapy after surgery. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that PAK6 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001). Colon cancer cell lines showed increased PAK6 expression upon 5-FU treatment. In PAK6-knockdown cells treated with 5-FU, cell viability and phosphorylation of BAD decreased, and the number of apoptotic cells, levels of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP increased compared to control cells. The opposite was observed in PAK6 overexpressing cells. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of PAK6 blocked cells in G2-M phase. Furthermore, Animal experiments results in vivo are consistent with outcomes in vitro. This study demonstrates that PAK6 is an independent prognostic factor for adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer. PMID:25426562

  12. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) as an adjuvant in cancer treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M M; Haniadka, R; Chacko, P P; Palatty, P L; Baliga, M S

    2011-01-01

    Despite acquiring a strong understanding of the molecular basis and advances in treatment, cancer is the second major cause of death in the world. In clinics, the stagedependent treatment strategies may include surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments like hormonotherapy and chemotherapy, which are associated with side effects. The use of traditional herbal medicine in cancer patients is on a rise, as it is believed that these medications are non toxic and alleviate the symptoms of cancer, boost the immune system, or may tackle the cancer itself. Since antiquity the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe commonly known as ginger (family Zingiberaceae) have widely been used as a spice and condiment in different societies. Additionally, ginger also has a long history of medicinal use in various cultures for treating common colds, fever, to aid digestion, treat stomach upset, diarrhoea, nausea, rheumatic disorders, gastrointestinal complications and dizziness. Preclinical studies have also shown that ginger possesses chemopreventive and antineoplastic properties. It is also reported to be effective in ameliorating the side effects of γ-radiation and of doxorubicin and cisplatin; to inhibit the efflux of anticancer drugs by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to possess chemosensitizing effects in certain neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo. The objective of this review is to address observations on the role of ginger as adjuvant to treatment modalities of cancer. Emphasis is also placed on the drawbacks and on future directions for research that will have a consequential effect on cancer treatment and cure. PMID:22006742

  13. Pilot study of bone mineral density in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headley, J. A.; Theriault, R. L.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.; Hortobagyi, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in breast cancer patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Chemotherapy drugs and dosages along with a history of risk factors for reduced bone density including activity level, tobacco and/or alcohol use, metabolic bone disease, family history, and hormone exposure were identified. Results showed that women who became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy had BMD 14% lower than women who maintained menses after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-treated women who maintained ovarian function had normal BMD. This study suggests that women who have premature menopause as a result of chemotherapy for breast cancer are at increased risk of bone loss and may be at risk for early development of osteoporosis. Women who maintain menses do not appear to be at risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss.

  14. Adjuvant role of radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer without pathological lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Lee, Yoon Se; Kwon, Minsu; Kim, Ji Won; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Nam, Soon Yuhl

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion The application of adjuvant RT to reduce recurrence should be tailored in cases of pathologically negative node metastasis. Objectives The treatment modality following surgical resection of advanced laryngeal cancer is determined by adverse factors. Aside from lymph node metastasis (LNM) or positive margins, definite risk factors supporting adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) have not been clearly suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for advanced laryngeal cancer without LNM and the role of RT. Materials and methods Pathologically T3 and T4-staged laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma without LNM were reviewed. The patients were classified into RT (+) (n = 22) and RT (-) (n = 38) groups. Results Five-year overall survival (OS) of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 84.4% and 83.8%, respectively. Five-year disease-specific survival of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 88.4% and 93.9%. Five-year local control rate of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 94.7% and 91.3%. The factors affecting OS were smoking history and recurrence history (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis, smoking history and recurrence history were determining factors for 5-year OS (p = 0.024 and p = 0.047, respectively). PMID:26924463

  15. Impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms in tamoxifen adjuvant breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ramón y Cajal, T; Altés, A; Paré, L; del Rio, E; Alonso, C; Barnadas, A; Baiget, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of CYP2D6 genotyping in predicting disease-free survival and toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. DNA from 91 patients was genotyped using the AmpliChip CYP450 GeneChip, Roche that facilitates the classification of individuals by testing 27 alleles. When patients were grouped into group 1 (*4/*4, *4/*41, *1/*5 and *2/*5) and group 2 (the remaining genotypes), a significant difference in disease-free survival (DFS) was observed between groups (P = 0.016). The mean DFS in group 1 was 95 months in contrast with 119 months in group 2. No significant relationship was found between the CYP2D6 genotype classification and severe, mild or no toxicity (P = 0.2). Nevertheless, severe, and mild toxicity was more frequent among poor metabolizer patients than in patients with a normal metabolizer pattern (18.8 and 43.8% vs. 10.7 and 36%, respectively). In breast cancer, patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen, non-functional and severely impaired CYP2D6 variants are associated with a worse DFS and with a higher frequency of severe and mild toxicities. Larger studies of the CYP2D6 genotype-clinical outcomes association are needed to complement initial results. PMID:19189210

  16. Differential clonal evolution in oesophageal cancers in response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John M.; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Makino, Seiko; Rayner, Emily; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Cross, William; Kovac, Michal; Ulahannan, Danny; Palles, Claire; Gillies, Richard S.; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Church, David; Maynard, Nicholas D.; Buffa, Francesca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Lai-Mun; Sharma, Ricky A.; Middleton, Mark; Tomlinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    How chemotherapy affects carcinoma genomes is largely unknown. Here we report whole-exome and deep sequencing of 30 paired oesophageal adenocarcinomas sampled before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Most, but not all, good responders pass through genetic bottlenecks, a feature associated with higher mutation burden pre-treatment. Some poor responders pass through bottlenecks, but re-grow by the time of surgical resection, suggesting a missed therapeutic opportunity. Cancers often show major changes in driver mutation presence or frequency after treatment, owing to outgrowth persistence or loss of sub-clones, copy number changes, polyclonality and/or spatial genetic heterogeneity. Post-therapy mutation spectrum shifts are also common, particularly C>A and TT>CT changes in good responders or bottleneckers. Post-treatment samples may also acquire mutations in known cancer driver genes (for example, SF3B1, TAF1 and CCND2) that are absent from the paired pre-treatment sample. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can rapidly and profoundly affect the oesophageal adenocarcinoma genome. Monitoring molecular changes during treatment may be clinically useful. PMID:27045317

  17. Antitumor and Adjuvant Activity of λ-carrageenan by Stimulating Immune Response in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Shao, Bin; Nie, Wen; Wei, Xia-Wei; Li, Yu-Li; Wang, Bi-Lan; He, Zhi-Yao; Liang, Xiao; Ye, Ting-Hong

    2015-01-01

    λ-Carrageenan is a seaweed polysaccharide which has been generally used as proinflammatory agent in the basic research, however, how the immunomodulating activity of λ-carrageenan affects tumor microenvironment remains unknown. In this study, we found that intratumoral injection of λ-carrageenan could inhibit tumor growth in B16-F10 and 4T1 bearing mice and enhance tumor immune response by increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating M1 macrophages, DCs and more activated CD4+CD8+ T lymphocytes in spleen. In addition, λ-carrageenan could enhance the secretion of IL17A in spleen and significantly increase the level of TNF-α in tumor, most of which was secreted by infiltrating macrophages. Moreover, λ-carrageenan exhibited an efficient adjuvant effect in OVA-based preventative and therapeutic vaccine for cancer treatment, which significantly enhanced the production of anti-OVA antibody. The toxicity analysis suggested that λ-carrageenan was with a good safety profile. Thus, λ-carrageenan might be used both as a potent antitumor agent and an efficient adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26098663

  18. Antitumor and Adjuvant Activity of λ-carrageenan by Stimulating Immune Response in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Min; Shao, Bin; Nie, Wen; Wei, Xia-Wei; Li, Yu-Li; Wang, Bi-Lan; He, Zhi-Yao; Liang, Xiao; Ye, Ting-Hong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2015-01-01

    λ-Carrageenan is a seaweed polysaccharide which has been generally used as proinflammatory agent in the basic research, however, how the immunomodulating activity of λ-carrageenan affects tumor microenvironment remains unknown. In this study, we found that intratumoral injection of λ-carrageenan could inhibit tumor growth in B16-F10 and 4T1 bearing mice and enhance tumor immune response by increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating M1 macrophages, DCs and more activated CD4(+)CD8(+) T lymphocytes in spleen. In addition, λ-carrageenan could enhance the secretion of IL17A in spleen and significantly increase the level of TNF-α in tumor, most of which was secreted by infiltrating macrophages. Moreover, λ-carrageenan exhibited an efficient adjuvant effect in OVA-based preventative and therapeutic vaccine for cancer treatment, which significantly enhanced the production of anti-OVA antibody. The toxicity analysis suggested that λ-carrageenan was with a good safety profile. Thus, λ-carrageenan might be used both as a potent antitumor agent and an efficient adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26098663

  19. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  20. Ascending Colon Cancer Associated with Dermatomyositis Which Was Cured after Colon Resection.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Higashihara, Yoshie; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman with muscle ache, weakness of the extremities, and skin rash was diagnosed with dermatomyositis (DM). Upon the diagnosis of DM, a systemic survey of malignancy revealed an advanced carcinoma of the ascending colon. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy approximately 2 months after the onset of DM. The symptoms and signs of DM disappeared after the surgery without additional therapy. DM is an idiopathic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by muscle ache, muscle weakness, and skin rash. In some cases, DM develops as paraneoplastic syndrome, and it is assumed that 30% of DM patients have cancer. Symptoms and signs of DM can be attenuated by treatment of the malignancy, and they reappear if the malignancy recurs. It is essential to perform a systemic survey of malignancy in DM patients, and treatment of the malignancy has to precede treatment of DM. PMID:27482193

  1. Ascending Colon Cancer Associated with Dermatomyositis Which Was Cured after Colon Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Higashihara, Yoshie; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman with muscle ache, weakness of the extremities, and skin rash was diagnosed with dermatomyositis (DM). Upon the diagnosis of DM, a systemic survey of malignancy revealed an advanced carcinoma of the ascending colon. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy approximately 2 months after the onset of DM. The symptoms and signs of DM disappeared after the surgery without additional therapy. DM is an idiopathic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by muscle ache, muscle weakness, and skin rash. In some cases, DM develops as paraneoplastic syndrome, and it is assumed that 30% of DM patients have cancer. Symptoms and signs of DM can be attenuated by treatment of the malignancy, and they reappear if the malignancy recurs. It is essential to perform a systemic survey of malignancy in DM patients, and treatment of the malignancy has to precede treatment of DM. PMID:27482193

  2. Colon cancer prediction with genetic profiles using intelligent techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alladi, Subha Mahadevi; P, Shinde Santosh; Ravi, Vadlamani; Murthy, Upadhyayula Suryanarayana

    2008-01-01

    Micro array data provides information of expression levels of thousands of genes in a cell in a single experiment. Numerous efforts have been made to use gene expression profiles to improve precision of tumor classification. In our present study we have used the benchmark colon cancer data set for analysis. Feature selection is done using t‐statistic. Comparative study of class prediction accuracy of 3 different classifiers viz., support vector machine (SVM), neural nets and logistic regression was performed using the top 10 genes ranked by the t‐statistic. SVM turned out to be the best classifier for this dataset based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and total accuracy. Logistic Regression ranks as the next best classifier followed by Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP). The top 10 genes selected by us for classification are all well documented for their variable expression in colon cancer. We conclude that SVM together with t-statistic based feature selection is an efficient and viable alternative to popular techniques. PMID:19238250

  3. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  4. Ovarian hyperstimulation in premenopausal women during adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for endocrine-dependent breast cancer: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    MADEDDU, CLELIA; GRAMIGNANO, GIULIA; KOTSONIS, PARASKEVAS; PARIBELLO, FRANCESCO; MACCIÒ, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy is an integral component of care for endocrine-dependent breast cancer. The aim of this type of therapy is to counteract the production and the action of estrogens. The ovary is the primary site of estrogen production in premenopausal women, whereas, in postmenopausal women, the main source of estrogens is adipose tissue. Therefore, ovarian function suppression is an effective adjuvant strategy in premenopausal estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Similarly, the inhibition of estrogen action at the receptor site by tamoxifen has proven to be effective. To date, international consensus statements recommend tamoxifen (20 mg/day) for five years as the standard adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women. It should be noted that tamoxifen is a potent inducer of ovarian function and consequent hyperestrogenism in premenopausal women. In the present study, we report two cases of ovarian cyst formation with very high estrogen levels and endometrial hyperplasia during the administration of tamoxifen alone as adjuvant treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in premenopausal women. These cases suggest that in young premenopausal patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, ovarian suppression is an essential prerequisite for an adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen. In this context, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist treatment by suppressing effective ovarian function may lead to a hypoestrogenic status that may positively impact breast cancer prognosis and prevent the effects of tamoxifen at the gynecological level. It is important to reconsider the action of tamoxifen on ovarian function and include these specific effects of tamoxifen in the informed consent of premenopausal patients who are candidates for tamoxifen alone as adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25120706

  5. Curative effect of the recent photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO; LI, WEI; LIU, NING

    2016-01-01

    Advanced colorectal cancer has a high mortality rate and conventional treatments have poor therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to analyze the recent curative effect and adverse reaction of photofrin photodynamic adjuvant treatment on young patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had accepted semiconductor laser photodynamic adjuvant treatment were selected as the observation group. In addition, 30 patients who had accepted concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy during the same period served as the control group. The observation group received photofrin (2 mg/kg) intravenously in 100 ml of 5% glucose, followed by the introduction of the endoscopic optical fiber to deliver laser radiation with an intensity of 630 nm wavelength pulse power. After 2 days, necrotic tissues were removed and irradiation of the original or new tumor lesions was performed and necrotic tissues were removed. The total effective rate and survival time was higher and the length of hospital stay was shorter in the observation group in comparison with the control group. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The number of patients in the control and observation groups with symptoms of hematochezia, change in bowel habit, intestinal stimulation and incomplete intestinal obstruction were reduced. Additionally, the reduced ratio of the observation group was significantly increased in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). The adverse reaction rate of the observation group was lower than that of the control group and this difference was also statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of photodynamic treatment for young patients with advanced colorectal cancer can effectively improve the clinical symptoms and reduce complications. PMID:26998124

  6. The c-MYC-ABCB5 axis plays a pivotal role in 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kugimiya, Naruji; Nishimoto, Arata; Hosoyama, Tohru; Ueno, Koji; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    c-MYC overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including colon cancer and regulates many biological activities such as aberrant cell proliferation, apoptosis, genomic instability, immortalization and drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which c-MYC confers drug resistance remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the c-MYC expression level in primary colorectal cancer tissues correlated with the recurrence rate following 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Supporting this finding, overexpression of exogenous c-MYC increased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment in human colon cancer cells, and knockdown of endogenous c-MYC decreased it. Furthermore, c-MYC knockdown decreased the expression level of ABCB5, which is involved in 5-FU resistance. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that c-MYC bound to the ABCB5 promoter region. c-MYC inhibitor (10058-F4) treatment inhibited c-MYC binding to the ABCB5 promoter, leading to a decrease in ABCB5 expression level. ABCB5 knockdown decreased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment as expected, and the ABCB5 expression level was increased in 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer cells. Finally, using a human colon cancer xenograft murine model, we found that the combined 5-FU and 10058-F4 treatment significantly decreased tumorigenicity in nude mice compared with 5-FU or 10058-F4 treatment alone. 10058-F4 treatment decreased the ABCB5 expression level in the presence or absence of 5-FU. In contrast, 5-FU treatment alone increased the ABCB5 expression level. Taken together, these results suggest that c-MYC confers resistance to 5-FU through regulating ABCB5 expression in human colon cancer cells. PMID:25689483

  7. Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene cou...

  8. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  9. SOY ISOFLAVONES AND SAPONINS PROVIDE MODEST PROTECTION FROM COLON CANCER IN A MOUSE MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colon cancer risk is highly correlated with dietary factors. We have systematically investigated soy protein and bioactive compounds found in soy, isoflavones (IF) and saponins (SAP) using a mouse model of colon cancer. In previous studies, we found soy IF were protective of azoxymethane (AOM)-ind...

  10. The Evaluation of More Lymph Nodes in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Improved Survival in Patients of All Ages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in survival of patients with colon cancer is reduced in elderly patients compared to younger patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the removal of ≥ 12 lymph nodes can explain differences in survival rates between elderly and younger patients diagnosed with colon cancer. Methods In a population-based cohort study, all patients (N = 41,074) diagnosed with colon cancer stage I to III from 2003 through 2010 from the Netherlands Cancer Registry were included. Age groups were defined as < 66, 66–75 and > 75 years of age. Main outcome measures were overall and relative survival, the latter as a proxy for disease specific survival. Results Over an eight years time period there was a 41.2% increase in patients with ≥ 12 lymph nodes removed, whereas the percentage of patients with the presence of lymph node metastases remained stable (35.7% to 37.5%). After adjustment for patient and tumour characteristics and adjuvant chemotherapy, it was found that for patients in which ≥ 12 lymph nodes were removed compared to patients with < 12 lymph nodes removed, there was a statistically significant higher overall survival (< 66: HR: 0.858 (95% CI, 0.789–0.933); 66–75: HR: 0.763 (95% CI, 0.714–0.814); > 75: HR: 0.734 (95% CI, 0.700–0.771)) and relative survival (< 66: RER: 0.783 (95% CI, 0.708–0.865); 66–75: RER: 0.672 (95% CI, 0.611–0.739); > 75: RER: 0.621 (95% CI, 0.567–0.681)) in all three age groups. Conclusions The removal of ≥ 12 lymph nodes is associated with an improvement in both overall and relative survival in all patients. This association was stronger in the elderly patient. The biology of this association needs further clarification. PMID:27196666

  11. Is adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for patients with microinvasive breast cancer after surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Hai-Fei; Wei, Li-Juan; Yu, Jin-Pu; Lian, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Zi-Zheng; Liu, Jun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Survival and treatment of patients with microinvasive breast cancer (MIBC) remain controversial. In this paper, we evaluated whether adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for patients with MIBC to identify risk factors influencing its prognosis and decide the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, 108 patients with MIBC were recruited according to seventh edition of the staging manual of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). The subjects were divided into chemotherapy and non-chemotherapy groups. We compared the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates between groups. Furthermore, we analyzed the factors related to prognosis for patients with MIBC using univariate and multivariate analyses. We also evaluated the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on the prognostic factors by subgroup analysis after median follow-up time of 33 months (13-104 months). Results: The 5-year DFS and OS rates for the chemotherapy group were 93.7% and 97.5%, whereas those for the non-chemotherapy group were 89.7% and 100%. Results indicate that 5-year DFS was superior, but OS was inferior, in the former group compared with the latter group. However, no statistical significance was observed in the 5-year DFS (P=0.223) or OS (P=0.530) rate of the two groups. Most relevant poor-prognostic factors were Ki-67 overexpression and negative hormonal receptors. Cumulative survival was 98.2% vs. 86.5% between low Ki-67 (≤20%) and high Ki-67 (>20%). The hazard ratio of patients with high Ki-67 was 16.585 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.969-139.724; P=0.010]. Meanwhile, ER(-)/PR(-) patients with MIBC had cumulative survival of 79.3% compared with 97.5% for ER(+) or PR(+) patients with MIBC. The hazard ratio for ER(-)/PR(-) patients with MIBC was 19.149 (95% CI, 3.702-99.057; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that chemotherapy could improve the outcomes of ER(-)/PR(-) patients (P=0.014), but not those who overexpress Ki-67

  12. Associations Between Cigarette Smoking Status and Colon Cancer Prognosis Among Participants in North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Shi, Qian; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nelson, Garth D.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose By using data from North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase III Trial N0147, a randomized adjuvant trial of patients with stage III colon cancer, we assessed the relationship between smoking and cancer outcomes, disease-free survival (DFS), and time to recurrence (TTR), accounting for heterogeneity by patient and tumor characteristics. Patients and Methods Before random assignment to infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or FOLFOX plus cetuximab, 1,968 participants completed a questionnaire on smoking history and other risk factors. Cox models assessed the association between smoking history and the primary trial outcome of DFS (ie, time to recurrence or death), as well as TTR, adjusting for other clinical and patient factors. The median follow-up was 3.5 years among patients who did not experience events. Results Compared with never-smokers, ever smokers experienced significantly shorter DFS (3-year DFS proportion: 70% v 74%; hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.42). This association persisted after multivariate adjustment (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.49). There was significant interaction in this association by BRAF mutation status (P = .03): smoking was associated with shorter DFS in patients with BRAF wild-type (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66) but not BRAF mutated (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.29) colon cancer. Smoking was more strongly associated with poorer DFS in those with KRAS mutated versus KRAS wild-type colon cancer (HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.12 to 2.00] v HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 0.85 to 1.39]), although interaction by KRAS mutation status was not statistically significant (P = .07). Associations were comparable in analyses of TTR. Conclusion Overall, smoking was significantly associated with shorter DFS and TTR in patients with colon cancer. These adverse relationships were most evident in patients with BRAF wild-type or KRAS mutated colon cancer. PMID:23547084

  13. Intestinal floras of populations that have a high risk of colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, W E; Moore, L H

    1995-01-01

    The fecal floras of polyp patients, Japanese-Hawaiians, North American Caucasians, rural native Japanese, and rural native Africans were compared. The polyp patients and Japanese-Hawaiians were considered to be groups at high risk of colon cancer, and the rural native Japanese and rural native Africans were considered to be groups at low risk. The North American Caucasians were found to have a flora composition intermediate between these two groups. Fifteen bacterial taxa from the human fecal flora were significantly associated with high risk of colon cancer, and five were significantly associated with low risk of colon cancer. Total concentrations of Bacteroides species and, surprisingly, Bifidobacterium species were generally positively associated with increased risk of colon cancer. Some Lactobacillus species and Eubacterium aerofaciens, which also produces major amounts of lactic acid, showed closest associations with low risk of colon cancer. PMID:7574628

  14. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  15. Classification of Colon Cancer Patients Based on the Methylation Patterns of Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonyoung; Lee, Jungwoo; Lee, Jin-Young; Lee, Sun-Min; Kim, Da-Won

    2016-01-01

    Diverse somatic mutations have been reported to serve as cancer drivers. Recently, it has also been reported that epigenetic regulation is closely related to cancer development. However, the effect of epigenetic changes on cancer is still elusive. In this study, we analyzed DNA methylation data on colon cancer taken from The Caner Genome Atlas. We found that several promoters were significantly hypermethylated in colon cancer patients. Through clustering analysis of differentially methylated DNA regions, we were able to define subgroups of patients and observed clinical features associated with each subgroup. In addition, we analyzed the functional ontology of aberrantly methylated genes and identified the G-protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway as one of the major pathways affected epigenetically. In conclusion, our analysis shows the possibility of characterizing the clinical features of colon cancer subgroups based on DNA methylation patterns and provides lists of important genes and pathways possibly involved in colon cancer development. PMID:27445647

  16. Adjuvant sorafenib after heptectomy for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Wu, Li-Li; Lau, Wan-Yee; Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Ma, Kuan-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Wu; Bie, Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant sorafenib after curative resection for patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC)-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Thirty-four HCC patients, classified as BCLC-stage C, received adjuvant sorafenib for high-risk of tumor recurrence after curative hepatectomy at a tertiary care university hospital. The study group was compared with a case-matched control group of 68 patients who received curative hepatectomy for HCC during the study period in a 1:2 ratio. RESULTS: The tumor recurrence rate was markedly lower in the sorafenib group (15/34, 44.1%) than in the control group (51/68, 75%, P = 0.002). The median disease-free survival was 12 mo in the study group and 10 mo in the control group. Tumor number more than 3, macrovascular invasion, hilar lymph nodes metastasis, and treatment with sorafenib were significant factors of disease-free survival by univariate analysis. Tumor number more than 3 and treatment with sorafenib were significant risk factors of disease-free survival by multivariate analysis in the Cox proportional hazards model. The disease-free survival and cumulative overall survival in the study group were significantly better than in the control group (P = 0.034 and 0.016, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study verifies the potential benefit and safety of adjuvant sorafenib for both decreasing HCC recurrence and extending disease-free and overall survival rates for patients with BCLC-stage C HCC after curative resection. PMID:27340354

  17. Review of Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer and Results From Mayo Clinic for the 5th JUCTS Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C. Iott, Matthew J.; Corsini, Michele M.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To present an overview of Phase III trials in adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer and review outcomes at the Mayo Clinic after adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RT/CT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A literature review and a retrospective review of 472 patients who underwent an R0 resection for T1-3N0-1M0 invasive carcinoma of the pancreas from 1975 to 2005 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Patients with metastatic or unresectable disease at the time of surgery, positive surgical margins, or indolent tumors and those treated with intraoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the analysis. Median radiotherapy dose was 50.4Gy in 28 fractions, with 98% of patients receiving concurrent 5-fluorouracil- based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. Median overall survival (OS) was 1.8 years. Median OS after adjuvant RT/CT was 2.1 vs. 1.6 years for surgery alone (p = 0.001). The 2-y OS was 50% vs. 39%, and 5-y was 28% vs. 17% for patients receiving RT/CT vs. surgery alone. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that adverse prognostic factors were positive lymph nodes (risk ratio [RR] 1.3, p < 0.001) and high histologic grade (RR 1.2, p < 0.001). T3 tumor status was found significant on univariate analysis only (RR 1.1, p = 0.07). Conclusions: Results from recent clinical trials support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer. The role of radiochemotherapy in adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer remains a topic of debate. Results from the Mayo Clinic suggest improved outcomes after the administration of adjuvant radiochemotherapy after a complete resection of invasive pancreatic malignancies.

  18. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26437221

  19. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Myeroff, Lois L.; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K. V.; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2015-01-01

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26437221

  20. In-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in pancreatic and colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; Borgoño, Carla A; Popalis, Cynthia; Yacoub, George M; Polymeris, Mary-Ellen; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    Human kallikreins are a cluster of 15 serine protease genes located in the chromosomal band 19q13.4, a non-randomly rearranged region in many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer. We utilized the SAGE and EST databases of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project to perform in-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in normal and cancerous pancreatic and colon tissues and cell lines using virtual Northern blotting (VNB), digital differential display (DDD) and X-profiler. At least two kallikreins, KLK6 and KLK10, are significantly up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. We probed 2 normal and 6 pancreatic cancer SAGE libraries with gene-specific tags for each of these kallikreins. KLK6 was found to be expressed in 5/6 cancer libraries and showed the most marked (5-fold) increase in average expression levels in cancer vs. normal. These data were verified by screening the EST databases, where all mRNA clones isolated were from cancerous libraries, with no clones detected in normal pancreatic tissues or cell lines. X-profiler comparison of two pools of normal and cancerous pancreatic libraries further verified the significant increase of KLK6 expression levels in pancreatic cancer. DDD data showed a 13-fold increase in KLK10 expression in pancreatic cancer. Three kallikrein genes, KLK6, 8 and 10 are overexpressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon, while one kallikrein, KLK1, is down-regulated. While no expression of KLK6 was detected in normal colon, KLK6-specific tags were detectable in 2 cancer libraries. Similar results were obtained by EST screening; no KLK6 clones were detected in any of the 28 normal libraries examined, while 10 KLK6 EST clones were found in colon adenocarcinoma. KLK10 was not detectable in normal colon. Gene-specific tags were, however, detectable with high density in colon cancer and 7 EST clones were found to be expressed in colon Adenocarcinoma. PMID:15015574

  1. Activation of TIM1 induces colon cancer cell apoptosis via modulating Fas ligand expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xueyan; Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaolin; Fu, Songbin; Liu, Chen

    2016-04-29

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is unclear. It is proposed that TIM1 has an association with human cancer. The present study aims to investigate the role of TIM1 activation in the inhibition of human colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell line, HT29 and T84 cells were cultured. The expression of TIM1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The TIM1 on the cancer cells was activated in the culture by adding recombinant TIM4. The chromatin structure at the FasL promoter locus was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The apoptosis of the cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 cells and T84 cells, expressed TIM1. Activation of TIM1 by exposing the cells to TIM4 significantly increased the frequency of apoptotic colon cancer cells. The expression of FasL was increased in the cancer cells after treating by TIM4. Blocking Fas or FasL abolished the exposure to TIM4-induced T84 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, HT29 cells and T84 cells express TIM1; activation TIM1 can induce the cancer cell apoptosis. TIM1 may be a novel therapeutic target of colon cancer. PMID:26921445

  2. Cardiac Monitoring During Adjuvant Trastuzumab-Based Chemotherapy Among Older Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Niu, Jiangong; Zhang, Ning; Elting, Linda S.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Banchs, Jose; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Giordano, Sharon H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab require adequate cardiac monitoring. We describe the patterns of cardiac monitoring and evaluate factors associated with adequate monitoring in a large population-based study of older patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients age 66 years or older with full Medicare coverage, diagnosed with stage I to III breast cancer between 2005 and 2009, and treated with adjuvant trastuzumab-based chemotherapy were identified in the SEER-Medicare and the Texas Cancer Registry-Medicare databases. The adequacy of cardiac monitoring was determined. Chemotherapy, trastuzumab use, cardiac monitoring, and comorbidities were identified by using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes. Prescribing physician characteristics were also evaluated. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression models. Results In all, 2,203 patients were identified; median age was 72 years. Adequate monitoring was identified in only 36.0% of the patients (n = 793). In the multivariable model, factors associated with optimal cardiac monitoring included a more recent year of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54), anthracycline use (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.71), female prescribing physician (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.70), and physician graduating after 1990 (HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.12). The presence of cardiac comorbidities was not a determinant for cardiac monitoring. Of the variance in the adequacy of cardiac monitoring, 15.3% was attributable to physician factors and 5.2% to measured patient factors. Conclusion A large proportion of patients had suboptimal cardiac monitoring. Physician characteristics had more influence than measured patient-level factors in the adequacy of cardiac monitoring. Because trastuzumab-related cardiotoxicity is reversible, efforts to improve the adequacy of cardiac monitoring are needed

  3. Economic Evaluation of First-Line Adjuvant Chemotherapies for Resectable Gastric Cancer Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chongqing; Peng, Liubao; Zeng, Xiaohui; Li, Jianhe; Wan, Xiaomin; Chen, Gannong; Yi, Lidan; Luo, Xia; Zhao, Ziying

    2013-01-01

    Background First-line postoperative adjuvant chemotherapies with S-1 and capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) were first recommended for resectable gastric cancer patients in the 2010 and 2011 Chinese NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Gastric Cancer; however, their economic impact in China is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy with XELOX, with S-1 and no treatment after a gastrectomy with extended (D2) lymph-node dissection among patients with stage II-IIIB gastric cancer. Methods A Markov model, based on data from two clinical phase III trials, was developed to analyse the cost-effectiveness of patients in the XELOX group, S-1 group and surgery only (SO) group. The costs were estimated from the perspective of Chinese healthcare system. The utilities were assumed on the basis of previously published reports. Costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were calculated with a lifetime horizon. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results For the base case, XELOX had the lowest total cost ($44,568) and cost-effectiveness ratio ($7,360/QALY). The relative scenario analyses showed that SO was dominated by XELOX and the ICERs of S-1 was $58,843/QALY compared with XELOX. The one-way sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential parameter was the utility of disease-free survival. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis predicted a 75.8% likelihood that the ICER for XELOX would be less than $13,527 compared with S-1. When ICER was more than $38,000, the likelihood of cost-effectiveness achieved by S-1 group was greater than 50%. Conclusions Our results suggest that for patients in China with resectable disease, first-line adjuvant chemotherapy with XELOX after a D2 gastrectomy is a best option comparing with S-1 and SO in view of our current study. In addition, S-1 might be a better choice, especially with a

  4. Controlled trial of RSV, herbs or placebo as adjuvants to complete resection of squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Osterlind, K; Hansen, M; Hansen, H H; Dombernowsky, P

    1985-12-01

    152 completely resected patients with high or intermediate differentiated squamous cell lung cancer were randomized to receive 6 months adjuvant therapy with RSV (1, 2-diphenyl-alpha beta-diketone) herbs or placebo. No significant differences were observed in duration of survival or relapse rates between the three groups. PMID:3905440

  5. Zn- and Mg- Containing Tricalcium Phosphates-Based Adjuvants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Onuma, Kazuo; Sogo, Yu; Ohno, Tadao; Ito, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Zn-, and Mg-containing tricalcium phosphates (TCPs) loaded with a hydrothermal extract of a human tubercle bacillus (HTB) were prepared by immersing Zn-TCP and Mg-TCP in HTB-containing supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions. The in vitro and in vivo immunogenic activities of the HTB-loaded Zn-, and Mg-TCPs (Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB, respectively) were evaluated as potential immunopotentiating adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. The Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB adjuvants showed no obvious cytotoxicity and more effectively stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion by macrophage-like cells than unprocessed HTB or HTB-loaded TCP (T-Ap-HTB) in vitro. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB mixed with liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue markedly inhibited the in vivo development of rechallenged Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells compared with T-Ap-HTB and the unprocessed HTB mixed liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB contributed to eliciting potent systemic antitumor immunity in vivo. PMID:23857555

  6. Helicobacter pylori and gastrointestinal symptoms in diagnostics and adjuvant chemotherapy of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Soveri, Leena-Maija; Osterlund, Pia; Ruotsalainen, Tarja; Poussa, Tuija; Rautelin, Hilpi; Bono, Petri

    2014-02-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy is the mainstay of adjuvant treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC). Few studies have explored Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastrointestinal symptoms in the diagnosis of CRC, and the association between H. pylori infection and gastrointestinal toxicity during adjuvant chemotherapy in CRC. Seventy-nine CRC patients were randomised in a prospective clinical trial to receive 5-FU and leucovorin administered as bolus injection (Mayo regimen) or continuous infusion (simplified de Gramont regimen). H. pylori antibodies were analysed at baseline, twice monthly during treatment and after treatment up to 12 months. Thirty-seven patients (47%) were H. pylori-seronegative at baseline. There was no significant association between baseline H. pylori seropositivity (n=42; 53%) and oro-gastrointestinal toxicity during chemotherapy. The median time from symptom onset of CRC to surgery was significantly longer in patients with H. pylori infection (median time, 6 vs. 5 months; P=0.012). Functional dyspeptic symptoms at presentation significantly delayed diagnosis (median time, 7.5 vs. 5 months; P=0.035), whereas anaemia, bowel symptoms, occlusion, blood in the stool, infection and hypolactasia did not. We conclude that there is no association between H. pylori status and gastrointestinal toxicity in CRC patients during chemotherapy. Dyspeptic symptoms and presence of H. pylori may delay the diagnosis of CRC. (www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN98405441). PMID:24396486

  7. [A Case of Nasopharyngeal Cancer with Febrile Neutropenia Followed by Death during Adjuvant Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Susumu; Kitamura, Koji; Honma, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Takenaka, Yukinori; Yasui, Toshimichi; Hanamoto, Atsushi; Morii, Eiichi; Inohara, Hidenori

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-related death can occur, but is rarely experienced in the case of head and neck cancer. In this report, we present the case of a 55-year-old male who died of a severe febrile neutropenia during adjuvant chemotherapy. He was initially diagnosed as having nasopharyngeal carcinoma (cT2N0M0), and concurrent chemoradiotherapy was used as a primary treatment. He did not show any critical side effects during that therapy. After residual disease was proven by biopsy, docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) therapy was introduced as adjuvant chemotherapy. The patient developed a high fever with a decreased neutrophil count on day 8, and went into a state of shock on day 9. He underwent immediate systemic management, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia and enteritis were uncontrolled, resulting in death on day 43. The autopsy findings suggested that the main cause of death was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was also noted in multiple organs. . Since it is assumed from literature that the mortality rate in TPF therapy is about 2-4%, it was considered that prior sufficient explanations and informed consent should be required before this therapy. PMID:26336750

  8. Zn- and Mg- Containing Tricalcium Phosphates-Based Adjuvants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Onuma, Kazuo; Sogo, Yu; Ohno, Tadao; Ito, Atsuo

    2013-07-01

    Zn-, and Mg-containing tricalcium phosphates (TCPs) loaded with a hydrothermal extract of a human tubercle bacillus (HTB) were prepared by immersing Zn-TCP and Mg-TCP in HTB-containing supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions. The in vitro and in vivo immunogenic activities of the HTB-loaded Zn-, and Mg-TCPs (Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB, respectively) were evaluated as potential immunopotentiating adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. The Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB adjuvants showed no obvious cytotoxicity and more effectively stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion by macrophage-like cells than unprocessed HTB or HTB-loaded TCP (T-Ap-HTB) in vitro. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB mixed with liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue markedly inhibited the in vivo development of rechallenged Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells compared with T-Ap-HTB and the unprocessed HTB mixed liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB contributed to eliciting potent systemic antitumor immunity in vivo.

  9. Up-regulation of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis of patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Encheng; Huang, Qing; Wang, Ji; Fang, Chengfeng; Yang, Leilei; Zhu, Min; Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Lihua; Dong, Milian

    2015-01-01

    Tim-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3), belonging to the member of the novel Tim family, has been confirmed that it plays a critical negative role in regulating the immune responses against viral infection and carcinoma. Recently, it has also been reported that the over-expression of Tim-3 is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. However, the role of Tim-3 in colorectal cancer remains largely unknown. In the current study, we aim to investigate the expression of Tim-3 in colorectal carcinoma and discuss the relationship between Tim-3 expression and colon cancer prognosis, thus speculating the possible role of Tim-3 in colon cancer progression. Colon cancer tissues and paired normal tissue were obtained from 201 patients with colon cancer for preparation of tissue microarray. Tim-3 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The Tim-3 expression level was evaluated by q-RT-PCR, western blot and immunocytochemistry in four colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT116, LoVo, SW620). Tim-3 was expressed in 92.5% tumor tissue samples and 86.5% corresponding normal tissue samples. Expression of Tim-3 was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues (P < 0.0001). Tim-3 expression in colon cancer tissues is in correlation with colon cancer lymphatic metastasis and TNM (P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that Tim-3 expression could be a potential independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients (P < 0.0001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis result showed that patients with higher Tim-3 expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those with lower Tim-3 expression patients. Our results indicated that Tim-3 might participate in the tumorgenesis of colon cancer and Tim-3 expression might be a potential independent prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:26339368

  10. Influence of Patient and Treatment Factors on Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Catherine M.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Casillo, Frances E.; Cohen, Susan M.; Dailey, Meredith M.; Donovan, Heidi S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Sherwood, Paula R.; Sereika, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To comprehensively assess the patient and illness or treatment factors that may predict nonadherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and to explore whether an interaction occurs between these factors in women with breast cancer. Design Repeated-measures design. Setting The Outpatient Services of the Women's Cancer Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and participants' homes. Sample 91 women with early-stage breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Methods Adherence was assessed continuously for the first 18 months of endocrine therapy. Patient and illness or treatment factors were assessed at four time points (Time 1 to Time 4). Time 1 (baseline) was within two weeks prior to the initiation of endocrine therapy. Times 2–4 occurred at six-month intervals, as many as 18 months after Time 1. Main Research Variables Adherence, patient factors, and illness or treatment factors. Findings Adherence to endocrine therapy declined significantly during the first 18 months of treatment in women with breast cancer. The presence of negative mood and symptoms before starting treatment predicted nonadherence to endocrine therapy over time. Perceptions of financial hardship, symptoms, disease stage, and more complex medication regimens intensified the effect of negative mood on adherence over time. Conclusions Women with breast cancer may be at risk for nonadherence to prescribed endocrine therapy if they experience depression or anxiety and symptoms prior to initiating therapy. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses should be alert to women with breast cancer who are depressed or anxious or who are experiencing symptoms. Management of negative mood and symptoms may result in better adherence. PMID:24769592

  11. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-10

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  12. Impact of CYP2D*6 in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients with tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Markopoulos, Christos; Kykalos, Stylianos; Mantas, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Biotransformation of tamoxifen to the potent antiestrogen endoxifen is performed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, in particular the CYP2D6 isoform. CYP2D6*4 is one of the most frequent alleles associated with loss of enzymatic activity. The incidence of CYP2D6*4 among Caucasians is estimated up to 27%, while it is present in up to 90% of all poor metabolizers within the Caucasian population. The hypothesis under question is whether the presence of one or two non-functioning (null) alleles predicts an inferior outcome in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen. The numerous existing studies investigating the association of CYP2D6 with treatment failure in breast cancer are inconsistent and give rather conflicting results. Currently, routine CYP2D6 testing among women with breast cancer is not recommended and the significance of CYP2D6 phenotype in decision making regarding the administration of tamoxifen is unclear. The present study summarizes current literature regarding clinical studies on CYP2D6*4, particularly in terms of response to tamoxifen therapy and breast cancer outcome. PMID:25114852

  13. Efficacy and Interaction of Antioxidant Supplements as Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Asuka; Urushima, Hayato; Ito, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is a key component in carcinogenesis. Although radiation produces reactive oxygen species, some anticancer agents such as alkylating agents, platinum and antitumor antibiotics exert cytotoxicity by generating free radicals. Nonenzymatic exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols can quench ROS activity. However, whether antioxidants alter antitumor effects during radiotherapy and some types of chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we reviewed antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients during chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Electronic literature searches were performed to select all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in which antioxidants were administered to cancer patients along with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Articles or abstracts written in English were included. In total, 399 reports received primary screening. Duplicated articles and those meeting the exclusion criteria (not RCT, not human, and no oral administration) were excluded. Finally, 49 reports matching the inclusion criteria were included. It was difficult to determine whether antioxidants affect treatment outcomes or whether antioxidants ameliorate adverse effects induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It is desirable to use an evidence-based method to select supplements best suited to cancer patients. Although there are many opinions about risks or benefits of antioxidant supplementation, we could mostly conclude that the harm caused by antioxidant supplementation remains unclear for patients during cancer therapy, except for smokers undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26503419

  14. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Li, Linmei; Shi, Renren; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Junyan; Zou, Zehong; Hao, Zhuofang; Tao, Ailin

    2016-01-01

    The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26978404

  15. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer. PMID:23603476

  16. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, MP; Reindl, KM

    2013-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 minutes) and prolonged (24 hours) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer. PMID:23603476

  17. Imperatorin exhibits anticancer activities in human colon cancer cells via the caspase cascade.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi Mei; Lu, Amy Xiaoxu; Shen, James Zheng; Kwok, Amy Ho Yan; Ho, Wing Shing

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in medical treatments for colon cancer, it remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among men. Thus, more efficacious treatment strategies for colon cancer are needed. Imperatorin is one of the major ingredients present in the root of Angelica dahurica, and has been used in herbal formulations for the treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. However, the medical properties of imperatorin remain unclear. In the present study, the anti‑proliferative activities of imperatorin were investigated in the HT‑29 colon cancer cell line. The results showed that imperatorin significantly inhibited HT‑29 colon cancer cell growth with an IC50 value of 78 µM. Imperatorin induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells through upregulation of p53 and the caspase cascade. Our findings revealed that imperatorin induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. The apoptotic index showed a steady increment when the imperatorin concentration was increased. The results suggest that imperatorin exerts considerable anti‑proliferative activities in HT‑29 colon cancer cells and highlight the potential of imperatorin as an anticancer agent for colon cancer. PMID:26794238

  18. Epithelial impedance analysis in experimentally induced colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R J; Joseph, R; Kaplan, D; Juncosa, R D; Pempinello, C; Asbun, H; Sedwitz, M M

    1987-01-01

    Epithelial impedance analysis was used to measure the alterations in resistance of the large bowel in a murine model of large bowel cancer. The technique was able to resolve the epithelial resistance from the total resistance of the bowel wall. A progressive decrease in resistance of the bowel epithelium occurs during carcinogenesis induced with dimethyhydrazine. About a 21% decrease in epithelial resistance from 22.0 +/- 1.3 omega.cm-2 to 17.5 +/- 1.1 omega cm-2 (p less than 0.025) was observed after 20 wk of carcinogen administration. The sensitivity of the technique in detecting altered epithelial resistance in premalignant bowel mucosa was improved by examining the impedance profile in a sodium-free Ringer's solution where the epithelium of control colons had a resistance of 24.4 +/- 1.8 omega.cm-2 compared with 19.0 +/- 1.1 omega.cm-2 (p less than 0.02) in colons from animals treated for only 4 wk with the carcinogen. Epithelial impedance analysis would seem to be a sensitive technique capable of identifying changes in the electrical properties or the large bowel early in disease states. PMID:3427187

  19. Incidentally Solitary, Synchronous, Metastatic Left Adrenal Mass From Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Khalvati, Mehdi; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 63-year-old man who underwent an open adrenalectomy for a synchronous, malignant, metastatic left adrenal tumor and a total colectomy for T3N0M1 (stage 4) primary, malignant colon cancer. Two polypoid lesions, one measuring 40 mm × 30 mm × 30 mm and the other measuring 20 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm, were found in the ascending colon and rectosigmoid (RS) junction, respectively, and a synchronous, malignant, left adrenal gland lesion measuring 70 mm × 50 mm × 30 mm was incidentally found on abdominal computed tomography scan. Histological examination revealed a metastatic, necrotic adenocarcinoma of the left adrenal mass, an adenocarcinoma of the cecal mass, and an adenomatous polyp (tubulovillous type) of the smallest polypoid lesion in RS junction that had invaded deeply into the submucosal layer. The patient recovered uneventfully, and his condition is now stable, with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic disease, 2 years after the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, only 25 cases of an adrenalectomy for treating metastatic adrenal gland tumors have been reported to date; physicians should be aware of the possibility of this event. PMID:27218099

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy after primary treatments for cervical cancer: a critical point of view and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Aloisi, Alessia; Capriglione, Stella; Gennari, Paolo; Linciano, Francesca; Li Destri, Marta; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Montera, Roberto; Plotti, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy represents the standard of care for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer, while radical surgery (RS) and radiotherapy is widely used for treating early stage cervical cancer. However, the poor control of micrometastasis, declining operability, the lack of radiotherapy departments and the high incidence of long-term complications due to radiotherapy have brought about the development of different therapeutic approaches such as neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS. Unfortunately, treatment results are still unsatisfactory due to a high recurrence rate and several authors have studied the possibility to add an adjuvant treatment to primary therapy. We reviewed the literature concerning the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS and after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24483847

  1. Expression of Nucleophosmin/NPM1 correlates with migration and invasiveness of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the expression level of Nucleophosmin (NPM1) protein in colon cancer tissues and to investigate the potential role of NPM1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasiveness. Methods Immunohistochemical assay was performed to examine the expression pattern of NPM1 in 31 groups of colonic carcinoma samples, including colon tumors, adjacent normal tissues, and matched metastatic lymph nodes from the same patients. Small interfering RNA technique and exogenous expression of wild type NPM1 methods were used to further verify the function of NPM1. Results High-expression of NPM1 correlates with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0003) and poor survival rate of human colon cancer patients (P = 0.017). SiRNA-mediated reduction of NPM1 was also shown to inhibit the migration and invasiveness of metastatic colon cancer HCT116 cell line. In addition, the exogenous expression of NPM1 in HT29 cells, a NPM1 low expression and low invasive colon cancer cell line, enhanced cell migration and invasiveness along with increased cell proliferation. Conclusions The current study uncovered the critical role of NPM1 in the regulation of colon cancer cells migration and invasion, and NPM1 may serve as a potential marker for the prognosis of colon cancer patients. PMID:22631075

  2. Host Immune Defense Peptide LL-37 Activates Caspase-Independent Apoptosis and Suppresses Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shun X.; Cheng, Alfred S.L.; To, Ka F.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Li, May S.; Shen, Jin; Wong, Clover C.M.; Zhang, Lin; Chan, Ruby L.Y.; Wang, Xiao J.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Chiu, Lawrence C.M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Gallo, Richard L.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J.Y.; Wu, William K.K.; Cho, Chi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of bacteriocidal polypeptides secreted by macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). LL-37, the only human cathelicidin, has been implicated in tumorigenesis, but there has been limited investigation of its expression and function in cancer. Here, we report that LL-37 activates a p53-mediated, caspase-independent apoptotic cascade that contributes to suppression of colon cancer. LL-37 was expressed strongly in normal colon mucosa but downregulated in colon cancer tissues, where in both settings its expression correlated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive apoptotic cells. Exposure of colon cancer cells to LL-37 induced phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation in a manner independent of caspase activation. Apoptogenic function was mediated by nuclear translocation of the proapoptotic factors, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG), through p53-dependent upregulation of Bax and Bak and downregulation of Bcl-2 via a pertussis toxin–sensitive G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway. Correspondingly, colonic mucosa of cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited reduced expression of p53, Bax, and Bak and increased expression of Bcl-2 together with a lower basal level of apoptosis. Cathelicidin-deficient mice exhibited an increased susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, establishing pathophysiologic relevance in colon cancer. Collectively, our findings show that LL-37 activates a GPCR-p53-Bax/Bak/Bcl-2 signaling cascade that triggers AIF/EndoG–mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells. PMID:23100468

  3. microRNAs in colon cancer: a roadmap for discovery.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Simona; Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Mestdagh, Pieter; Jacobs, Bart; Bosman, Fredrik T; Gustavsson, Bengt; Majoie, Bernard; Roth, Arnaud; Vandesompele, Jo; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Delorenzi, Mauro; Tejpar, Sabine

    2012-09-21

    Cancer omics data are exponentially created and associated with clinical variables, and important findings can be extracted based on bioinformatics approaches which can then be experimentally validated. Many of these findings are related to a specific class of non-coding RNA molecules called microRNAs (miRNAs) (post-transcriptional regulators of mRNA expression). The related research field is quite heterogeneous and bioinformaticians, clinicians, statisticians and biologists, as well as data miners and engineers collaborate to cure stored data and on new impulses coming from the output of the latest Next Generation Sequencing technologies. Here we review the main research findings on miRNA of the first 10 years in colon cancer research with an emphasis on possible uses in clinical practice. This review intends to provide a road map in the jungle of publications of miRNA in colorectal cancer, focusing on data availability and new ways to generate biologically relevant information out of these huge amounts of data. PMID:23166923

  4. Targeting Iron in Colon Cancer via Glycoconjugation of Thiosemicarbazone Prochelators.

    PubMed

    Akam, Eman A; Tomat, Elisa

    2016-08-17

    The implication of iron in the pathophysiology of colorectal cancer is documented at both the biochemical and epidemiological levels. Iron chelators are therefore useful molecular tools for the study and potential treatment of this type of cancer characterized by high incidence and mortality rates. We report a novel prochelation strategy that utilizes a disulfide redox switch to connect a thiosemicarbazone iron-binding unit with carbohydrate moieties targeting the increased expression of glucose transporters in colorectal cancer cells. We synthesized three glycoconjugates (GA2TC4, G6TC4, and M6TC4) with different connectivity and/or carbohydrate moieties, as well as an aglycone analog (ATC4). The sugar conjugates present increased solubility in neutral aqueous solutions, and the ester-linked conjugates M6TC4 and G6TC4 compete as effectively as d-glucose for transporter-mediated cellular uptake. The glycoconjugates show improved selectivity compared to the aglycone analog and are 6-11 times more toxic in Caco-2 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells than in normal CCD18-co colon fibroblasts. PMID:27471913

  5. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  6. Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and colon cancer: myth or reality? A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Galdy, Salvatore; Nastasi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A relationship between infective endocarditis and colon cancer was established in 1950, and Streptococcus bovis was successfully isolated in 1970. However, this association and its pathogenesis still remain unclear. In this paper, we describe the clinical case of a patient with a history of colon cancer and infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis. The role of S bovis as an aetiological agent in the development of colon cancer is intriguing but uncertain. S bovis infection should be considered a silent sign of gastrointestinal malignancy or hepatic disease. We believe that in order to demonstrate the presence of colon cancer, all patients with S bovis infection require an endoscopic investigation of the colon. PMID:23220436

  7. Participants' perceptions of a phase I colon cancer chemoprevention trial.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, K S; Stoltzfus, C; Chamberlain, R M; Lorimor, R J; Steinbach, G; Winn, R J

    1996-12-01

    To assess participants' perceptions of a phase I colon cancer chemoprevention trial using a calcium intervention, questionnaires were mailed to trial participants at the conclusion of the study. Responses to questionnaire items reported here include (1) perceived benefits and barriers of participation, (2) interest in participating in future trials, (3) willingness to pay trial expenses out of pocket, and (4) posttrial continuation of the calcium regimen. The study found that the most highly rated trial benefit was the perception of potential colon cancer prevention; the trial barrier reported to be the most troublesome was inappropriate or mistaken billing for study visits. Three fourths of the subjects expressed an interest in future trials of the same duration. For trials of longer duration, this percentage decreased to 66%. Approximately half did not object to participation in future trials involving placebos, and just over one third indicated that they would either definitely (8%) or probably (27%) have joined the calcium trial even if they had to pay some study expenses out of pocket. Over 90% indicated they would continue taking the calcium pills if calcium is shown to be effective. The level of perceived benefits was positively associated with reported interest in participating in future trials of the same and longer durations, and the level of reported difficulty with trial pills and procedures was inversely related to interest in future placebo-controlled trials. The results of this study, in conjunction with results of prospective studies of trial participation, may be applied in future chemoprevention trials to facilitate recruitment, reduce attrition, and promote positive trial experiences for participants by emphasizing frequently reported benefits and minimizing frequently reported barriers. PMID:8974209

  8. Adjuvant systemic treatment for individual patients with triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakman, Catherine; Moretti, Erica; Galardi, Francesca; Biagioni, Chiara; Santarpia, Libero; Biganzoli, Laura; Di Leo, Angelo

    2011-10-01

    Chemotherapy is the only evidence based adjuvant systemic treatment option in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Despite emerging results for targeted biological therapies for this subpopulation, lack of robust results does not currently support their use beyond the confines of a clinical trial. Conventional systemic chemotherapy remains the standard of care and is curative in a minority of patients. There is no defined standard chemotherapy and there is currently no robust, prospective, randomized data to advise different use of specific chemotherapy agents in TNBC as compared to non-TNBC. Data suggest high sensitivity to chemotherapy, however it is yet to be determined whether this increased sensitivity is agent/regimen specific or whether it reflects general chemosensitivity. This review will focus on systemic chemotherapy in early TNBC, particularly anthracyclines and platinums, and potential predictive tools to guide chemotherapy use. PMID:22015281

  9. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Aspirin Adjuvant Therapy in Early Stage Colorectal Cancer in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Swee Sung; Chia, Whay-Kuang; Chan, Mun-ling Sarah; Ho, Gwo Fuang; Jian, Xiao; Deng, Yan Hong; Tan, Chuen-Seng; Sharma, Atul; Segelov, Eva; Mehta, Shaesta; Ali, Raghib; Toh, Han-Chong; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Recent observational studies showed that post-operative aspirin use reduces cancer relapse and death in the earliest stages of colorectal cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of aspirin as an adjuvant therapy in Stage I and II colorectal cancer patients aged 65 years and older. Methods Two five-state Markov models were constructed separately for Stage I and II colorectal cancer using TreeAge Pro 2014. Two hypothetical cohorts of 10,000 individuals at a starting age of 65 years and with colorectal cancer in remission were put through the models separately. Cost-effectiveness of aspirin was evaluated against no treatment (Stage I and II) and capecitabine (Stage II) over a 20-year period from the United States societal perspective. Extensive one-way sensitivity analyses and multivariable Probabilistic Sensitivity Analyses (PSA) were performed. Results In the base case analyses, aspirin was cheaper and more effective compared to other comparators in both stages. Sensitivity analyses showed that no treatment and capecitabine (Stage II only) can be cost-effective alternatives if the utility of taking aspirin is below 0.909, aspirin’s annual fatal adverse event probability exceeds 0.57%, aspirin’s relative risk of disease progression is 0.997 or more, or when capecitabine’s relative risk of disease progression is less than 0.228. Probabilistic Sensitivity Analyses (PSA) further showed that aspirin could be cost-effective 50% to 80% of the time when the willingness-to-pay threshold was varied from USD20,000 to USD100,000. Conclusion Even with a modest treatment benefit, aspirin is likely to be cost-effective in Stage I and II colorectal cancer, thus suggesting a potential unique role in secondary prevention in this group of patients. PMID:25250815

  11. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy for high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eastwick, Gary; Anne, Pramila Rani; Rosenblum, Norman G.; Schilder, Russell J.; Chalian, Raffi; Zibelli, Allison M.; Kim, Christine H.; Den, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes following adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with or without chemotherapy for high-intermediate risk (HIR) and high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer as defined in Gynecologic Oncology Group trial 0249. Material and methods From May 2000 to January 2014, 68 women with HIR and high-risk endometrial cancer underwent surgical staging followed by VBT. Median VBT dose was 21 Gy delivered in three fractions prescribed to 0.5 cm depth. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the curve 6 was administered every 21 days in sequence with VBT. Actuarial survival estimates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Patient demographics included a median age of 66 years (range: 36-91) and stages IA (49%), IB (38%), and II (13%), respectively. Thirty-one (46%) patients had HIR disease with endometrioid histology, and 33 (48%) patients had serous or clear cell histology. Thirty-seven (54%) patients received a median 3 cycles (range: 3-6) of chemotherapy in addition to VBT, and 65 patients (96%) completed all prescribed therapy. During a median follow up of 33.1 months (range: 4.0-161.7), four patients have recurred, including one vaginal recurrence. The 3-year estimates of vaginal, pelvic, and distant recurrences were 1.9%, 2.4%, and 9.1%, respectively. The 3-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 87.7% and 93.9%, respectively. Conclusions Early outcomes with adjuvant VBT with or without chemotherapy demonstrate high rates of vaginal and pelvic control for women with HIR disease. Early vaginal and pelvic relapses in high-risk patients suggest that pelvic external beam radiotherapy is warranted in this subgroup, but additional data from large phase III trials is warranted. PMID:25337127

  12. Effect of miR27a on proliferation and invasion in colonic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Li, Bao-Dong; Liu, Yong-Gang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the expression of miR196a, miR146a, miR27a and miR200a in patients with colon cancer, and investigate the effect of miR27a expression on proliferation and invasion in colonic cancer cells. RT-PCR was employed to detect the expression levels in colon cancers. Then, colon cancer cells were cultured and transfected with 100 nM of miR27a mimics (80 nmol/L) or 80 nM miR27a inhibitors (80 nmol/L) in 24-well plates. Proliferation and invasion of colonic cancer cells were then determined by CCK-8 and Transwell assays, respectively. Our data showed miR27a to be high-expressed in patients with colon cancer. In addition, proliferation and invasion in the miR27a mimic group were significantly higher than in the control group and negative group (P<0.05), while, proliferation and invasion in the miR27a inhibitor group were obviously lowered (P<0.05). In conclusion, high expression of miR27a may play an important role in enhancing proliferation and invasion of colon cancer cells. PMID:24083724

  13. NTRK1 fusions for the therapeutic intervention of Korean patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eunji; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Jo, Hong-Jae; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kim, Hyun Sung; Oh, Nahmgun; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Ok Ku; Park, Eok; Park, Jonghoon; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Il; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Park, Hee Dong; Park, Joonghoon

    2016-01-01

    The identification and clinical validation of cancer driver genes are essential to accelerate the translational transition of cancer genomics, as well as to find clinically confident targets for the therapeutic intervention of cancers. Here we identified recurrent LMNA-NTRK1 and TPM3-NTRK1 fusions in Korean patients with colon cancer (3 out of 147, 2%) through next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). NTRK1 fusions were mutually exclusive oncogenic drivers of colon cancer that were accompanied with in vitro potential of colony formation and in vivo tumorigenicity comparable to KM12, a human colon cancer cell line harboring TPM3-NTRK1 fusion. NTRK1-encoded TrkA protein was prevalent in 11 out of 216 Korean (5.1%) and 28 out of 472 Chinese patients (5.9%) from independent cohorts, respectively. The expression level of TrkA was significantly correlated with NTRK1 fusion (p = 0.0192), which was verified by a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Korean patients with TrkA-positive colon cancer had a marginal but significant shorter overall survival time than TrkA-negative colon cancer [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.5346, 95% confidential interval (CI) = 0.2548-0.9722, p = 0.0411]. In addition, KM12 cell line was sensitive to selective TrkA inhibitors. These results demonstrate that NTRK1 fusion is granted as a clinically relevant target for therapeutic intervention of colon cancer. PMID:26716414

  14. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  15. Impact of Pattern Recognition Receptors on the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Pattern recognition receptors allow the innate immune system to perceive the presence of microbial products and to launch the first steps of the defense response. Some pattern recognition receptors also sense endogenous ligands that are released from uninfected dying cells, thereby activating immune responses against dead-cell antigens. This applies to toll-like receptors 3 and 4 (TLR3, TLR4), which sense double-stranded RNA and high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), respectively, as well as to formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1), which interacts with Annexin A1 (ANXA1) from dead cells. Breast cancer patients who bear loss-of-function alleles in TLR3, TLR4, and FPR1 exhibit a reduced metastasis-free and overall survival after treatment with anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. These genetic defects are epistatic with respect to each other, suggesting that they act on the same pathway, linking chemotherapy to a therapeutically relevant anticancer immune response. Loss-of-function alleles in TLR4 and FPR1 also affect the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Altogether, these results support the idea that conventional anticancer treatments rely on stimulation of anticancer immune responses to become fully efficient. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3122-6. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197163

  16. MicroRNA Profiles Discriminate among Colon Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Zanesi, Nicola; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Pichiorri, Flavia; Volinia, Stefano; Fernandez, Cecilia; Antenucci, Anna; Costinean, Stefan; Bottoni, Arianna; Rosito, Immacolata A.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Burch, Aaron; Acunzo, Mario; Pekarsky, Yuri; Alder, Hansjuerg; Ciardi, Antonio; Croce, Carlo M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are being exploited for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of cancer and other diseases. Their high tissue specificity and critical role in oncogenesis provide new biomarkers for the diagnosis and classification of cancer as well as predicting patients' outcomes. MicroRNAs signatures have been identified for many human tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). In most cases, metastatic disease is difficult to predict and to prevent with adequate therapies. The aim of our study was to identify a microRNA signature for metastatic CRC that could predict and differentiate metastatic target organ localization. Normal and cancer tissues of three different groups of CRC patients were analyzed. RNA microarray and TaqMan Array analysis were performed on 66 Italian patients with or without lymph nodes and/or liver recurrences. Data obtained with the two assays were analyzed separately and then intersected to identify a primary CRC metastatic signature. Five differentially expressed microRNAs (hsa-miR-21, -103, -93, -31 and -566) were validated by qRT-PCR on a second group of 16 American metastatic patients. In situ hybridization was performed on the 16 American patients as well as on three distinct commercial tissues microarray (TMA) containing normal adjacent colon, the primary adenocarcinoma, normal and metastatic lymph nodes and liver. Hsa-miRNA-21, -93, and -103 upregulation together with hsa-miR-566 downregulation defined the CRC metastatic signature, while in situ hybridization data identified a lymphonodal invasion profile. We provided the first microRNAs signature that could discriminate between colorectal recurrences to lymph nodes and liver and between colorectal liver metastasis and primary hepatic tumor. PMID:24921248

  17. Role of pomegranate and citrus fruit juices in colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Recent studies prove that though chemotherapeutic agents are being used for the treatment of colon cancer, they become non-effective when the cancer progresses to an invasive stage. Since consumption of certain dietary agents has been linked with various cancers, fruit juices have been investigated for their consistently protective effect against colon cancer. The unique biochemical composition of fruit juices is responsible for their anticancer properties. In this review, the chemo-preventive effect of fruit juices such as pomegranate and citrus juices against colon cancer are discussed. For this purpose, the bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of these fruit juices on colorectal cancer are highlighted. Moreover, there is a scarcity of studies involving human trials to estimate the preventive nature of these juices against colon cancer. This review will support the need for more preclinical tests with these crude juices and their constituents in different colorectal cancer cell lines and also some epidemiological studies in order to have a better understanding and promote pomegranate and citrus juices as crusaders against colon cancer. PMID:24782614

  18. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  19. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  20. The Promher Study: An Observational Italian Study on Adjuvant Therapy for HER2-Positive, pT1a-b pN0 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Stefania; Inno, Alessandro; Fiorio, Elena; Foglietta, Jennifer; Ferro, Antonella; Gulisano, Marcella; Pinotti, Graziella; Gubiotti, Marta; Cavazzini, Maria Giovanna; Turazza, Monica; Duranti, Simona; De Simone, Valeria; Iezzi, Laura; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Spazzapan, Simon; Cavanna, Luigi; Saggia, Chiara; Bria, Emilio; Cretella, Elisabetta; Vici, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Fabi, Alessandra; Garrone, Ornella; Frassoldati, Antonio; Amaducci, Laura; Saracchini, Silvana; Evangelisti, Lucia; Barni, Sandro; Gamucci, Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Laudadio, Lucio; Zoboli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Fabiana; Bogina, Giuseppe; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Boni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer is controversial and no data about the efficacy of trastuzumab in this setting are available from randomized clinical trials. The aims of this retrospective study were to assess how patients are managed in clinical practice in Italy, which clinical or biological characteristics influenced the choice of adjuvant systemic therapy and the outcome of patients. Methods Data of consecutive patients who underwent surgery from January 2007 to December 2012 for HER2-positive, pT1a-b pN0 M0 breast cancer were retrospectively collected from 28 Italian centres. Analysis of contingency tables and multivariate generalized logit models were used to investigate the association between the baseline clinical and biological features and the treatment strategy adopted. Results Among 303 enrolled patients, 204 received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, 65 adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and 34 did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy. At the multivariate analysis age, tumor size, proliferation index and hormone receptor status were significantly associated with the treatment choice. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) probability was 95%, 94.3% and 69.6% for patients treated with adjuvant systemic therapy and trastuzumab, with adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and for patients who did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions The majority of patients (66%) with pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer enrolled in this retrospective study received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, whereas only 11% patients did not receive any adjuvant systemic therapy. The choice of treatment type seems to be mainly influenced by tumor size, proliferation index, hormone receptor status and age. The 5-year DFS probability was significantly higher for patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab compared with patients not receiving adjuvant

  1. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  2. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis. PMID:27064876

  3. The Nature and Severity of Cognitive Impairment Associated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of the Current Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falleti, Marina G.; Sanfilippo, Antonietta; Maruff, Paul; Weih, LeAnn; Phillips, Kelly-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have identified that adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is associated with cognitive impairment; however, the magnitude of this impairment is unclear. This study assessed the severity and nature of cognitive impairment associated with adjuvant chemotherapy by conducting a meta-analysis of the published literature to…

  4. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Li, Qingguo; Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-09-15

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3-85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45-86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  5. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3–85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45–86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  6. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E. ); Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field [sup 60]Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with [sup 99m]Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2012-07-19

    To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma, we conducted a genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analysing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation and messenger RNA and microRNA expression. A subset of these samples (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. In total, 16% of colorectal carcinomas were found to be hypermutated: three-quarters of these had the expected high microsatellite instability, usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, and one-quarter had somatic mismatch-repair gene and polymerase ε (POLE) mutations. Excluding the hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers were found to have considerably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes were significantly mutated, and in addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9 and FAM123B. Recurrent copy-number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include the fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive colorectal carcinoma and an important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression. PMID:22810696

  8. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  9. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  10. [The role of inflammation in colon cancer pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Francuz, Tomasz; Czajka-Francuz, Paulina; Cisoń-Jurek, Sylwia; Wojnar, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The results of the latest research more and more bind development of neoplasms with the chronic inflammation. Inflammatory process creates microenvironment promoting development of neoplasms; as a result, malignant process start to develop in places, where chronic inflammation proceeds or regeneration of tissues takes place. Inflammatory cells not only create suitable microenvironment for development of neoplasms, but also excrete number of cytokines and growth factors promoting survival of a neoplasmatic cell and avoiding its apoptosis, promoting neoangiogenesis and metastases formation. Moreover, cytokines and other pro-inflammatory factors modulate expression of genes important in cancerogenesis, they also activate NFκB-dependent signaling pathways, which favor neoplasmatic cells to avoid apoptosis. On the other hand, oxidative stress accompanying chronic inflammation may promote mutagenesis, enabling that way the neoplasm development. The same cells and metabolic pathways are engaged in inflammatory and neoplasmatic processes, and development of cancer may be a consequence of loss of control over tissue regeneration during resolution of chronic inflammation. The role of most important cells and metabolic pathways in inflammatory process, which may lead to colon cancer, was discussed in this paper. PMID:27117112

  11. Chemoprevention of hereditary colon cancers: time for new strategies.

    PubMed

    Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ahnen, Dennis J; Lynch, Patrick M

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is potentially preventable. Chemoprevention, a focus of research for the past three decades, aims to prevent or delay the onset of cancer through the regression or prevention of colonic adenomas. Ideal pharmacological agents for chemoprevention should be cheap and nontoxic. Although data indicate that aspirin can reduce the risk of CRC in the general population, the highest return from chemopreventive strategies would be expected in patients with the highest risk of developing the disease, particularly those with a defined hereditary predisposition. Despite compelling data showing that a large number of chemopreventive agents show promise in preclinical CRC models, clinical studies have yielded conflicting results. This Review provides a historical and methodological perspective of chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome, and summarizes the current status of CRC chemoprevention in humans. Our goal is to critically focus on important issues of trial design, with particular attention on the choice of appropriate trial end points, how such end points should be measured, and which patients are the ideal candidates to be included in a chemopreventive trial. PMID:27095653

  12. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Human Colon and Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), we conducted genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analyzing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression. A subset (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. 16% of CRC have hypermutation, three quarters of which have the expected high microsatellite instability (MSI), usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, but one quarter has somatic mismatch repair gene mutations. Excluding hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers have remarkably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes are significantly mutated. In addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9, and FAM123B/WTX. Recurrent copy number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive CRC and important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression. PMID:22810696

  13. A randomized trial comparing adjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin, and mitomycin with no treatment in operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Kosmidis, P; Mylonakis, N; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Lisaios, B; Soumilas, A; Mandrekas, D; Tsetis, A; Klonaris, C

    1996-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy (CT) has, in some groups of patients with gastric cancer (GC), who are at a high risk for relapse, resulted in a small but measurable improvement in palliation and patient survival not reaching statistical significance and therefore remaining applicable in an investigational setting. Based on the above data, we studied adjuvant CT with FEM (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), epirubicin, mitomycin C) in a randomized study of patients with completely resected stage III GC and patients with stages T1-3 with a low histologic grade. CT was started 2-3 weeks after surgery. From August 1988 until February 1994, 84 patients with completely resected tumors and lymph nodes were randomized to either group A (FEM) or group B (no treatment). Patients were eligible for randomization if they had a Karnofsky score > 60, no postoperative evidence of residual tumor, and normal cardiac, hepatic and renal functions. Forty-two patients were randomized to each group, with no significant differences regarding: age distribution, group A 53 years (41-65), group B 57 years (35-66); sex, group A 32/10, group B 25/17 (men/women); site of primary tumor, group A 22/20, group B 25/17 (pylorus/antrum); histologic grade, group A 0/19/23, group B 0/25/17 (grades I/II/III); lymph node metastases, group A 30, group B 32, and surgical procedure, group A 33/9/6, group B 35/7/9 (total gastrectomy/partial gastrectomy/splenectomy). Group A received 5-FU 600 mg/m2/day i.v. on days 1, 8, 29 and 36, epirubicin 45 mg/m2/day i.v. on days 1 and 29, and mitomycin C 10 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1. The schedule was repeated every 56 days for 3 cycles. Group B received no treatment odd was only subjected to the regular follow-up. At the last follow-up at 66 months, 27/42 patients in group A (64%) had relapsed or died, compared to 34/42 patients in group B (81%). The differences in the relapse and the disease-free and the overall survival rates were not statistically significant. Only the subgroup of patients

  14. Proliferation and Cdk4 expression in microsatellite unstable colon cancers with TGFBR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Grady, William M; Willis, Joseph E; Trobridge, Patty; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Munoz, Nina; Olechnowicz, Joseph; Ferguson, Kelly; Gautam, Shiva; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 15% of human colon cancers have microsatellite instability (MSI) and carry frameshift mutations in a polyadenine tract (BAT-RII) in the type II transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptor (TGFBR2), a required component of the TGF-beta receptor. The BAT-RII mutations in MSI colon cancers make the tumors resistant to the effects of TGF-beta. In cultured epithelial cells, TGF-beta can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, and in vitro it can regulate the expression of a variety of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) and cdk inhibitors. These effects are context- and tissue type-dependent, raising questions about which of these in vitro effects of TGF-beta signaling inactivation contribute to the formation of primary colon cancer. Thus, this study sought to determine the pathogenetically relevant effects of TGFBR2 inactivation in primary MSI colon cancers with mutant BAT-RII. Colon cancers with mutant BAT-RII were found to have increased proliferation compared to cancers with wild-type BAT-RII. Assessment of cdk4, cyclin D1 and p27(kip1) expression revealed that only cdk4 expression was increased in the cancers with mutant BAT-RII. In order to determine if TGFBR2 inactivation was the cause of these changes, TGFBR2 was reconstituted in an MSI colon cancer cell line, resulting in decreased proliferation and decreased cdk4 expression and kinase activity. These results suggest that TGFBR2 mutations in primary colon cancers may be responsible for the increased proliferation and cdk4 expression in these tumors and provide evidence that deregulation of cdk4 is a pathogenic in vivo consequence of TGFBR2 inactivation in primary colon cancer. PMID:16108056

  15. [A Successful Case of Treatment of Colonic Metastasis and Peritoneal Recurrence of Type 4 Gastric Cancer by Using Colectomy and Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yasuto; Fujii, Yoritaka; Miura, Seiko; Fujita, Jun; Morioka, Emi; Kaida, Daisuke; Ohonishi, Toshio; Ohono, Yukako; Noguchi, Miki; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Kinami, Shinichi; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo; Sakata, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    We present a successful case of treatment of colonic metastasis and peritoneal recurrence of type 4 gastric cancer by using colectomy and chemotherapy. A 70-year-old woman with a diagnosis of type 4 advanced gastric cancer underwent distal gastrectomy. The final pathological diagnosis was LM, circ, type 4, sig, pT4a (SE), ly1, v1, pN1, M0, P0, CY0, pStage Ⅲa. Adjuvant chemotherapy was conducted with oral administration of S-1, though regrettably the chemotherapy was interrupted because of diarrhea, an adverse effect of S-1. Metastatic recurrence occurred on the transverse colon, for which she underwent transverse colectomy 2.9 years after the initial surgery. Another colonic metastasis in the ascending colon along with peritoneal recurrence was diagnosed 3.11 years after the initial surgery, and the patient underwent a palliative colostomy and received chemotherapy with S-1 plus docetaxel. She was successfully treated up to a clinical CR with chemotherapy, and she died 5.10 years after the initial surgery. In this case, a good prognosis was obtained through the combination of resection of the recurrence sites, palliative surgery for avoiding obstruction, and chemotherapy using S-1 plus docetaxel for metachronous multiple metastases. PMID:26805106

  16. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances. PMID:26602222

  17. [A case of a probable "cancer family syndrome" presenting four synchronous malignancies of the colon].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, O; Harigane, M; Ohara, H; Satoh, H; Oda, M; Kojima, M; Watanabe, H

    1988-06-01

    A 72-year-old male was admitted because of right lower quadrant pain, Barium enema and total colonoscopy disclosed multiple colon cancers and sequentially, a subtotal colectomy was performed. The resected specimen demonstrated 3 advanced carcinomas and an adenomatous cancer with additional multiple polyps. Investigation of his family history revealed that his mother and his elder sister had died of uterine cancer, and that his elder brother, his nephew, and his niece had been operated on for colorectal cancer. We thus supposed a case of "Cancer Family Syndrome" presenting multiple neoplasms of the colon. PMID:3294469

  18. Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 in gastric cancer: Beyond metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Li-Shan; Zhou, Rui; Bin, Jian-Ping; Liao, Yu-Lin; Liao, Wang-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that was first identified in colon cancer. The upstream and downstream of MACC1 form a delicate regulatory network that supports its tumorigenic role in cancers. Multiple functions of MACC1 have been discovered in many cancers. In gastric cancer (GC), MACC1 has been shown to be involved in oncogenesis and tumor progression. MACC1 overexpression adversely affects the clinical outcomes of GC patients. Regarding the mechanism of action of MACC1 in GC, studies have shown that it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and accelerates cancer metastasis. MACC1 is involved in many hallmarks of GC in addition to metastasis. MACC1 promotes vasculogenic mimicry (VM) via TWIST1/2, and VM increases the tumor blood supply, which is necessary for tumor progression. MACC1 also facilitates GC lymphangiogenesis by upregulating extracellular secretion of VEGF-C/D, indicating that MACC1 may be an important player in GC lymphatic dissemination. Additionally, MACC1 supports GC growth under metabolic stress by enhancing the Warburg effect. In conclusion, MACC1 participates in multiple biological processes inside and outside of GC cells, making it an important mediator of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27547006

  19. Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 in gastric cancer: Beyond metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Li-Shan; Zhou, Rui; Bin, Jian-Ping; Liao, Yu-Lin; Liao, Wang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that was first identified in colon cancer. The upstream and downstream of MACC1 form a delicate regulatory network that supports its tumorigenic role in cancers. Multiple functions of MACC1 have been discovered in many cancers. In gastric cancer (GC), MACC1 has been shown to be involved in oncogenesis and tumor progression. MACC1 overexpression adversely affects the clinical outcomes of GC patients. Regarding the mechanism of action of MACC1 in GC, studies have shown that it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and accelerates cancer metastasis. MACC1 is involved in many hallmarks of GC in addition to metastasis. MACC1 promotes vasculogenic mimicry (VM) via TWIST1/2, and VM increases the tumor blood supply, which is necessary for tumor progression. MACC1 also facilitates GC lymphangiogenesis by upregulating extracellular secretion of VEGF-C/D, indicating that MACC1 may be an important player in GC lymphatic dissemination. Additionally, MACC1 supports GC growth under metabolic stress by enhancing the Warburg effect. In conclusion, MACC1 participates in multiple biological processes inside and outside of GC cells, making it an important mediator of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27547006

  20. Major postoperative complications and survival for colon cancer elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased life expectancy has led to elevating the mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis of colon cancer and subsequent treatment. Differences in complication rates and outcome between elderly and younger patients have been investigated. Methods We retrospectively analysed a database containing the information of patients who underwent surgery for stage I-III colorectal cancer from January 2004 to January 2012 at our institution and compared demographic, cancer-related, and outcomes data of 235 elderly patients with 211 patients ≤65 years old. Results Intraoperative complications did not differ between young and old patients whereas some differences have been found in postoperative and late complications: elderly patients suffered more by ileus (P = 0.024), peritonitis or septic shock (P = 0.017), pelvic abscess (P = 0.028), wound infection (P = 0.031), and incisional/port herniation (P = 0.012) compared with younger patients. Moreover, elderly patients suffered by systemic complications such as cardiovascular (4.7% vs. 1.4%, P = 0.049), renal (4.7% vs. 0.5%, P = 0.006), and respiratory (10.6% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.036). The multivariate analysis assessing the odds of having a complication revealed that older age (Odd Ratio [OR] 2.75, 95% Confidential Interval [CI]: 1.67-4.52) and open surgery (OR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.01-2.62) are significantly and independently associated with having a complication. Conclusions In our series, elderly patients have presented a slight higher incidence of comorbidities that may affect the incidence rates of postoperative complications. These results have implications in increasing the hospital stay as well as a higher rate of death. PMID:23173563

  1. Avenanthramides inhibit proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High intake of whole grain food is associated with reduced risk of colon cancer, but the mechanism underlying this protection has yet to be elucidated. Chronic inflammation and associated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the colon epithelium are causally related to epithelial carcinogenesis, p...

  2. A Prospective Cohort Study on Cardiotoxicity of Adjuvant Trastuzumab Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Erika; Jug, Borut; Blagus, Rok; Zakotnik, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiotoxicity is an important side effect of trastuzumab therapy and cardiac surveillance is recommended. Objectives The aim of our study was to prospectively assess baseline patients' characteristics, level of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and echocardiographic parameters as possible predictors of trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction. Methods In a prospective cohort study, clinical, echocardiographic and neurohumoral assessment was performed at baseline, after 4, 8 and 12 months in breast cancer patients undergoing post-anthracycline (3-4 cycles) adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction was defined as a decline of ≥ 10% in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Results 92 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 9.0 years) were included. Patients who developed trastuzumab-related LVEF decline ≥ 10% (20.6%) during treatment had significantly higher baseline LVEF (70.7 ± 4.4%) than those without (64.8 ± 5.5%) (p = 0.0035). All other measured baseline parameters (age, body mass index, arterial hypertension, level of NT-proBNP and other echocardiographic parameters) were not identified as significant. Conclusions Our findings suggest that baseline patient' characteristics, level of NT-proBNP and echocardiographic parameters, as long as they are within normal range, are not a reliable tool to predict early trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction in patients undergoing post-low dose anthracycline adjuvant trastuzumab therapy. A LVEF decline in patients with high-normal baseline level although statistically significant is not clinically relevant. PMID:27305108

  3. GALNT14 Genotype Predicts Postoperative Outcome of Stage III Colorectal Cancer With Oxaliplatin as Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wey-Ran; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Liang, Kung-Hao; Lim, Siew-Na; Lai, Ming-Wei; Tsou, Yung-Kuan; Hsieh, Tzu-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is widely used for stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) after curative surgery. CRC is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and our current knowledge of therapeutic response-related genetic factors remains limited. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GALNT14)-rs9679162 genotype is a prognostic predictor for chemotherapy response in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we investigated whether this genotype was related to the therapeutic outcome of stage III CRC. A cohort of 300 stage III CRC patients receiving curative resection followed by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was retrospectively recruited. GALNT14 genotypes and the clinicopathological factors were correlated with posttherapeutic prognosis. Of these patients, 18% patients had GALNT14-rs9679162 “TT” and 82% had the “GT” + “GG” genotypes. The analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS, P = 0.009) but not with recurrence-free survival (RFS, P = 0.700). The subgroup analysis showed that the “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in the following subgroups: age ≤65 years, men, left side CRC, N2 stage, carcinoembryonic antigen >5 ng/mL, and mucinous histology (P = 0.012, 0.011, 0.009, 0.025, 0.013, and 0.007, respectively). Within the latter 2 subgroups, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for OS. Finally, the “TT” genotype was associated with the T4 tumor stage (P = 0.017) and in patients with T4 tumors, the “TT” genotype was the only independent predictor for unfavorable RFS (P = 0.007). GALNT14 “TT” genotype was associated with unfavorable OS in stage III CRC patients receiving curative surgery and adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27124048

  4. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  5. EZH2 inhibition enhances the efficacy of an EGFR inhibitor in suppressing colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Katona, Bryson W; Liu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Anqi; Jin, Jian; Hua, Xianxin

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colon cancer has a 5-year survival of less than 10% despite the use of aggressive chemotherapeutic regimens. As signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often enhanced and epigenetic regulation is often altered in colon cancer, it is desirable to enhance the efficacy of EGFR-directed therapy by co-targeting an epigenetic pathway. We showed that the histone methyltransferase EZH2, which catalyzes methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27), was upregulated in colon cancers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Since co-inhibition of both EGFR and EZH2 has not been studied in colon cancer, we examined the effects of co-inhibition of EGFR and EZH2 on 2 colon cancer cell lines, HT-29 and HCT-15. Co-inhibition of EZH2 and EGFR with the small molecules UNC1999 and gefitinib, led to a significant decrease in cell number and increased apoptosis compared to inhibition of either pathway alone, and similar results were noted after EZH2 shRNA knockdown. Moreover, co-inhibition of EZH2 and EGFR also significantly induced autophagy, indicating that autophagy may play a role in the observed synergy. Together, these findings suggest that inhibition of both EZH2 and EGFR serves as an effective method to increase the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in suppressing colon cancer cells. PMID:25535899

  6. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objectiv...

  7. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}/day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}, daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles.

  8. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  9. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vabi, Benjamin W.; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated. PMID:27034804

  10. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vabi, Benjamin W; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G; Gibbs, John F

    2016-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated. PMID:27034804

  11. Affinity-based strategies to fast track development of colon cancer biomarkers — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our goal is to discover plasma and tissue-based tumor biomarkers that work well enough together to identity colon cancer at early stages, lead to accurate diagnosis and could ultimately allow for individualized treatment.

  12. Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158240.html Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer Guideline applies ... of heart disease should take a low-dose aspirin each day to reduce their risk of both ...

  13. [A Case of Resection of Para-Aortic Lymph Node Recurrence and Peritoneal Recurrence Following Sigmoid Colon Cancer Surgery].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-11-01

    In June 2010, a 73-year old man diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was tub2, pSS, n (-), stageⅡ.Vascular invasion was present; however, at the patient's request, no adjuvant chemotherapy was administered.Computed tomography (CT) performed at the outpatient follow-up 4 years and 6 months after the surgery revealed a para-aortic lymph node metastasis in the caudal aspect of the left renal artery branch point. No other definite mass shadows were detected. Positron emission (PET)-CT revealed high tracer accumulation (SUVmax) not only in the CT-identified lymph node, but also near the site of the anastomosis in the bowel. Considering that no tracer accumulation was detected at any other sites and the patient's compliance with medication and scheduled visits was poor, surgical resection rather than chemotherapy was adopted as the treatment strategy. No metastases other than at the sites identified by the diagnostic imaging were found during the surgery. Since the findings on palpation did not rule out the possibility that the nodule near the anastomotic site was present inside the intestinal tract, lymph node dissection, resection of the intestinal tract including the anastomotic site, and re-anastomosis were performed. The most likely diagnosis based on the histopathological findings was dissemination for both the adenocarcinoma and the nodule near the anastomotic site. At present, the patient is being treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. In the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum (JSCCR) Guidelines for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer, the recommended therapeutic intervention is surgical resection of hematogenous metastases; however, no treatment is specified for lymph node metastases. In general, chemotherapy is administered for distant metastases. However, we have found no reports of cases in which a complete remission has been achieved. There are reports of improvement of

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy for ypT0N0M0 rectal cancer following chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision.

    PubMed

    Kainthla, Radhika; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    The management of adenocarcinoma of the rectum is a dynamic field in oncology. The multidisciplinary approach to the management of this disease continues to evolve in each segment of its trimodality treatment. New scheduling regimens and radiosensitizing agents continue to emerge. Although total mesorectal excision continues to be the operation of choice for rectal cancers, what is done before and after surgery continues to evolve to maximize an ideal oncologic outcome with minimal morbidity. The achievement of a pathological complete response [pCR (i.e. ypT0N0)] in a fraction of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation poses an interesting management dilemma. The cohort of patients who can achieve a pCR have superior oncologic outcomes compared to nonresponders. The present review addresses the need for adjuvant therapy in patients with a pCR. We discuss the evolution of the role of adjuvant therapy in patients with rectal cancer and the studies addressing the elimination of this strategy in all patients with rectal cancer with a goal of determining the current evidence that might result in the omission of adjuvant therapy for patients with ypT0N0 rectal cancer after chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. PMID:27387144

  15. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  16. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases. PMID:25829782

  17. Educating patients with limited literacy skills: the effectiveness of printed and videotaped materials about colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, C D; McKinney, W P; Barnas, G P

    1994-01-01

    We investigated whether printed or videotaped information is more effective in enhancing colon cancer knowledge. Subjects (n = 1100) were randomized into three groups: to receive a booklet, view a videotape, or receive no intervention. Subjects receiving the intervention showed increased knowledge compared with control subjects (booklet = 23% and videotape = 26% vs no intervention = 3%). Findings suggest that personalized educational materials are effective in enhancing colon cancer knowledge. PMID:8279598

  18. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  19. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-03-29

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer. PMID:26918725

  20. External influences and priority-setting for anti-cancer agents: a case study of media coverage in adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Christopher M; Dranitsaris, George; Gainford, M Corona; Berry, Scott; Fralick, Michael; Fralick, John; Sue, Joanna; Clemons, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background Setting priorities for the funding of new anti-cancer agents is becoming increasingly complex. The funding of adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer has brought this dilemma to the fore. In this paper we review external factors that may influence decision-making bodies and present a case study of media response in Ontario, Canada to adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer. Methods A comprehensive search of the databases of Canadian national and local newspapers and television was performed. Articles pertaining to trastuzumab in adjuvant breast cancer as well as 17 other anti-cancer drugs and indications were retrieved. The search period was from the date when individual trial results were announced to the date funding was made available in Ontario. Results During the 2.6 months between the release of the trastuzumab results to funding approval in Ontario, we identified 51 episodes of media coverage. For the 17 other drugs/indications (7 breast and 10 non-breast), the median time to funding approval was 31 months (range 14–46). Other recent major advances in oncology such as adjuvant vinorelbine/cisplatin for resected NSCLC and docetaxel for advanced prostate cancer received considerably less media attention (17 media reports for each) than trastuzumab. The median number of media reports for breast cancer drugs was 4.5 compared to 2.5 for non-breast cancer drugs (p = 0.56). Conclusion Priority-setting for novel anti-cancer agents is a complex process that tries to ensure fair use of constrained resources to fund therapies with the best evidence of clinical benefit. However, this process is subject to external factors including the influence of media, patient advocates, politicians, and industry. The data in this case study serve to illustrate the significant involvement one (or all) of these external factors may play in the debate over priority-setting. PMID:17598896

  1. INPP4B is an oncogenic regulator in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S T; Chi, M N; Yang, R H; Guo, X Y; Zan, L K; Wang, C Y; Xi, Y F; Jin, L; Croft, A; Tseng, H-Y; Yan, X G; Farrelly, M; Wang, F H; Lai, F; Wang, J F; Li, Y P; Ackland, S; Scott, R; Agoulnik, I U; Hondermarck, H; Thorne, R F; Liu, T; Zhang, X D; Jiang, C C

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and is a tumor suppressor in some types of cancers. However, we have found that it is frequently upregulated in human colon cancer cells. Here we show that silencing of INPP4B blocks activation of Akt and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3), inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and retards colon cancer xenograft growth. Conversely, overexpression of INPP4B increases proliferation and triggers anchorage-independent growth of normal colon epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effect of INPP4B on Akt and SGK3 is associated with inactivation of phosphate and tensin homolog through its protein phosphatase activity and that the increase in INPP4B is due to Ets-1-mediated transcriptional upregulation in colon cancer cells. Collectively, these results suggest that INPP4B may function as an oncogenic driver in colon cancer, with potential implications for targeting INPP4B as a novel approach to treat this disease. PMID:26411369

  2. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  3. Dehydropeptidase 1 promotes metastasis through regulation of E-cadherin expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Jae Wha; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yeom, Young Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Younghee; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropeptidase 1 (DPEP1) is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that is expressed aberrantly in several cancers. The role of DPEP1 in cancer remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that DPEP1 functions as a positive regulator for colon cancer cell metastasis. The expression of DPEP1 mRNA and proteins were upregulated in colon cancer tissues compared to normal mucosa. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were used to examine the malignant phenotype of DPEP1-expressing or DPEP1-depleted cells. DPEP1 expression caused a significant increase in colon cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, DPEP1 depletion induced opposite effects. Furthermore, cilastatin, a DPEP1 inhibitor, suppressed the invasion and metastasis of DPEP1-expressing cells. DPEP1 inhibited the leukotriene D4 signaling pathway and increased the expression of E-cadherin. We also show that DPEP1 mediates TGF-β-induced EMT. TGF-β transcriptionally repressed DPEP1 expression. TGF-β treatment decreased E-cadherin expression and promoted cell invasion in DPEP1-expressing colon cancer cell lines, whereas it did not affect these parameters in DPEP1-depleted cell lines. These results suggest that DPEP1 promotes cancer metastasis by regulating E-cadherin plasticity and that it might be a potential therapeutic target for preventing the progression of colon cancer. PMID:26824987

  4. A Case of Advanced Descending Colon Cancer in an Adult Patient with Intestinal Malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Masaki; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    This report presents an operative case of advanced descending colon cancer in an adult patient with intestinal malrotation. A 63-year-old Japanese male was suffering from left side abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and constipation. An endoscopic examination revealed an advanced tumor in the descending colon. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed the thickening of the descending colon wall and superior mesenteric vein rotation. An opaque enema detected severe stenosis of the descending colon. An abdominal X-ray examination revealed the dilation of the colon and small intestine with niveau. At the insertion of an ileus tube, the C-loop of the duodenum was observed to be absent and the small intestine was located on the right side of the abdomen. After the decompression of the bowel contents, laparotomy was performed. Descending colon cancer was observed to have directly invaded the left side of the transverse colon. Left hemicolectomy, lymph node dissection, and appendectomy were performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged from the hospital on the 16th day after surgery. This report presents a rare operative case of descending colon cancer in an adult patient with intestinal malrotation. PMID:27042367

  5. ColonCancerCheck Primary Care Invitation Pilot project

    PubMed Central

    Tinmouth, Jill; Ritvo, Paul; McGregor, S. Elizabeth; Patel, Jigisha; Guglietti, Crissa; Levitt, Cheryl A.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Rabeneck, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the perceptions of those who received invitations to the ColonCancerCheck Primary Care Invitation Pilot (the Pilot) about the mailed invitation, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in general, and their specific screening experiences. Design Qualitative study with 6 focus group sessions, each 1.5 hours in length. Setting Hamilton, Ont; Ottawa, Ont; and Thunder Bay, Ont. Participants Screening-eligible adults, aged 50 years and older, who received a Pilot invitation for CRC screening. Methods The focus groups were conducted by a trained moderator and were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analyzed using grounded-theory techniques facilitated by the use of electronic software. Main findings Key themes related to the invitation letter, the role of the family physician, direct mailing of the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) kit, and alternate CRC screening promotion strategies were identified. Specifically, participants suggested the letter content should use stronger, more powerful language to capture the reader’s attention. The importance of the family physician was endorsed, although participants favoured clarification of the physician and program roles in the actual mailed invitation. Participants expressed support for directly mailing FOBT kits to individuals, particularly those with successful previous test completion, and for communication of both negative and positive screening results. Conclusion This study yielded a number of important findings including strategies to optimize letter content, support for directly mailed FOBT kits, and strategies to report results that might be highly relevant to other health programs where population-based CRC screening is being considered. PMID:24336559

  6. Colitis-associated colon cancer: Is it in your genes?

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Kraak, Lauren; Gros, Philippe; Beauchemin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CA-CRC) is the cause of death in 10%-15% of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. CA-CRC results from the accumulation of mutations in intestinal epithelial cells and progresses through a well-characterized inflammation to dysplasia to carcinoma sequence. Quantitative estimates of overall CA-CRC risks are highly variable ranging from 2% to 40% depending on IBD severity, duration and location, with IBD duration being the most significant risk factor associated with CA-CRC development. Recently, studies have identified IBD patients with similar patterns of colonic inflammation, but that differ with respect to CA-CRC development, suggesting a role for additional non-inflammatory risk factors in CA-CRC development. One suggestion is that select IBD patients carry polymorphisms in various low penetrance disease susceptibility genes, which pre-dispose them to CA-CRC development, although these loci have proven difficult to identify in human genome-wide association studies. Mouse models of CA-CRC have provided a viable alternative for the discovery, validation and study of individual genes in CA-CRC pathology. In this review, we summarize the current CA-CRC literature with a strong focus on genetic pre-disposition and highlight an emerging role for mouse models in the search for CA-CRC risk alleles. PMID:26556996

  7. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  8. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  9. Clinical importance of androgen receptor in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Honma, Naoko; Horii, Rie; Iwase, Takuji; Saji, Shigehira; Younes, Mamoun; Ito, Yoshinori; Akiyama, Futoshi

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite many studies, the clinicopathological importance of the androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer is not well established, and its significance as an independent predictor of clinical outcome is controversial. A large and systematic study is needed to address these issues. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether AR has independent clinical value, examining its importance in a large and well-predefined patient group with a long follow-up period and complete clinicopathological data. METHODS: Archival materials of 403 invasive breast cancers from women treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy (median follow-up period 11.0 years) were subjected to immunohistochemical study using anti-AR monoclonal antibody. AR expression was compared with established clinicopathological factors, estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression, and clinical outcome. RESULTS: AR positivity was correlated with ER-α positivity, progesterone receptor positivity, ER-β positivity, and a lower nuclear grade. Patients with AR-positive carcinomas exhibited a significantly better clinical outcome than those with AR-negative carcinomas (P = 0.0165 for disease-free survival, P = 0.0344 for overall survival). Multivariate analysis did not yield significant differences in clinical outcome according to the AR status, whereas the ER-β status showed significant differences in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Although, and in agreement with previous reports, AR positivity correlated with some established favorable prognostic factors and with ER-β positivity, AR was not an independent predictor of clinical outcome. Controversy regarding the value of AR as an independent predictor of clinical outcome may at least partly reflect the relatively limited power of AR in breast cancer. PMID:22302643

  10. Enhanced sensitivity to irinotecan by Cdk1 inhibition in the p53-deficient HT29 human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Abal, Miguel; Bras-Goncalves, Rui; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Fsihi, Hafida; De Cremoux, Patricia; Louvard, Daniel; Magdelenat, Henri; Robine, Sylvie; Poupon, Marie-France

    2004-03-01

    Mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene p53 have been associated with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase 1 inhibitor, has been recently incorporated to the adjuvant therapy. Since the DNA-damage checkpoint depends on p53 activation, the status of p53 might critically influence the response to CPT-11. We analysed the sensitivity to CPT-11 in the human colon cancer cell line HT29 (mut p53) and its wild-type (wt)-p53 stably transfected subclone HT29-A4. Cell-cycle analysis in synchronised cells demonstrated the activation of transfected wt-p53 and a p21(WAF1/CIP1)-dependent cell-cycle blockage in the S phase. Activated wt-p53 increased apoptosis and enhanced sensitivity to CPT-11. In p53-deficient cells, cDNA-macroarray analysis and western blotting showed an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1/cyclin B complex. Subsequent p53-independent activation of the cdk-inhibitor (cdk-I) p21(WAF1/CIP1) prevented cell-cycle progression. Cdk1 induction was exploited in vivo to improve the sensitivity to CPT-11 by additional treatment with the cdk-I CYC-202. We demonstrate a gain of sensitivity to CPT-11 in a p53-mutated colon cancer model either by restoring wild-type p53 function or by sequential treatment with cdk-Is. Considering that mutations in p53 are among the most common genetic alterations in CRC, a therapeutic approach specifically targeting p53-deficient tumors could greatly improve the treatment outcomes. PMID:15001986

  11. Vaccine against MUC1 antigen expressed in inflammatory bowel disease and cancer lessens colonic inflammation and prevents progression to colitis associated colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Pamela L.; Narayanan, Sowmya; Gariépy, Jean; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Finn, Olivera J.

    2009-01-01

    Association of chronic inflammation with an increased risk of cancer is well established but the contributions of innate versus adaptive immunity are not fully delineated. There has furthermore been little consideration of the role played by chronic inflammation-associated antigens, including cancer antigens, and the possibility to use them as vaccines to lower the cancer risk. We studied the human tumor antigen MUC1 that is abnormally expressed in colon cancers and also in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that gives rise to colitis associated colon cancer (CACC). Using our new mouse model of MUC1+ IBD that progresses to CACC, IL-10−/− mice crossed with MUC1 transgenic mice, we show that vaccination against MUC1 delays IBD and prevents progression to CAAC. One mechanism is the induction of MUC1-specific adaptive immunity (anti-MUC1 IgG, anti-MUC1 CTL) that appears to eliminate abnormal MUC1+ cells in IBD colons. The other mechanism is the change in the local and the systemic microenvironments. Compared to IBD in vaccinated mice, IBD in control mice is dominated by larger numbers of neutrophils in the colon and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the spleen, which can compromise adaptive immunity and facilitate tumor growth. This suggests that the tumor-promoting microenvironment of chronic inflammation can be converted to a tumor-inhibiting environment by increasing adaptive immunity against a disease-associated antigen. PMID:20332301

  12. FOLFIRI and regorafenib combination therapy with dose escalation of irinotecan as fourth-line treatment for patients with metastatic colon cancer according to UGT1A1 genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chien-Yu; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Yu, Fang-Jung; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a case of metastatic colon cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and escalated doses of irinotecan (FOLFIRI) combined with regorafenib in the fourth-line setting after uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 genotyping analysis. A 66-year-old male was initially diagnosed with Union Internationale Contre le Cancer stage III descending colon cancer and underwent curative surgery. He received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy; however, liver metastasis developed and a partial hepatectomy was performed thereafter. Unfortunately, pulmonary metastases and recurrent liver tumors were found despite a series of systemic treatments with multiple combinations of cytotoxic and biologic agents. Recently, a novel multikinase inhibitor, regorafenib, was approved for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to other therapeutic modalities. As further treatment, we combined regorafenib with FOLFIRI, which included dose escalations of irinotecan, after UGT1A1 genotyping analysis. The therapeutic results were promising, with the improvement in liver and pulmonary metastases being classified as stable disease and partial response, respectively. Moreover, the progression-free survival was over 6 months. FOLFIRI, with dose escalation of irinotecan according to UGT1A1 genotyping plus regorafenib appears to be a promising salvage therapy for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:25473295

  13. How much survival benefit is necessary for breast cancer patients to opt for adjuvant chemotherapy? Results from a Chilean survey

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Francisco; Sanchez, Cesar; Jans, Jaime; Rivera, Solange; Camus, Mauricio; Besa, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cause of cancer death in Chilean women. Adjuvant chemotherapy decreases recurrence and death from BC. The recommendation to indicate chemotherapy is complex. Adjuvant! Online is a valuable computational tool to predict survival benefit obtained with adjuvant systemic therapy. Previous studies in Caucasian patients with BC showed that they are willing to receive chemotherapy for a small benefit. No studies, to our knowledge, have been done in the Hispanic or Latino populations. Methods: We interviewed females with BC who had previously received adjuvant chemotherapy. Age, stage at presentation, time since last chemotherapy, type of chemotherapy, marital status, number of children, and level of education were recorded. We used the graphic representation from Adjuvant! Online to question each patient on how much survival benefit she required to accept chemotherapy. Results: There were 101 women surveyed. The average age was 55.9 (±10.2), 54.5% had involved lymph nodes, 59.4% were married, and 15.8% did not have parity; 62.3% of females accepted chemotherapy for an absolute survival benefit of 1% or less. In a multivariate analysis, younger (p = 0.02) and less-educated patients (p = 0.018) were associated with lower survival benefit required to opt for chemotherapy. Conclusion: In our study, the acceptance of chemotherapy by the Hispanic population requires minimal survival benefit and is in agreement with the Caucasian population reported elsewhere. To our knowledge, our report is the first study that evaluates the perception of Latino patients regarding the benefit of chemotherapy in early BC