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Sample records for adjuvant hormone therapy

  1. Improving Adjuvant Hormone Therapy Use in Medicaid Managed Care–Insured Women, New York State, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Wei; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Roohan, Patrick J.; Gesten, Foster C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 2010, national guidelines recommended that women with nonmetastatic, hormone receptor–positive breast cancer take adjuvant hormone therapy for 5 years. As results from randomized clinical trials became available, guidelines were revised in 2014 to recommend 10 years of therapy. Despite evidence of its efficacy, low initiation rates have been documented among women insured by New York State Medicaid. This article describes a coordinated quality improvement pilot conducted by a state department of health and Medicaid managed care plans to engage women in guideline-concordant adjuvant hormone therapy. Methods Women enrolled in Medicaid managed care with nonmetastatic, hormone receptor–positive breast cancer and who had surgery from May 1, 2012, through November 30, 2012, were identified using linked Medicaid and Cancer Registry data. Adjuvant hormone therapy status was determined from Medicaid pharmacy data. Contact information for nonadherent women was supplied to health plan care managers who conducted outreach activities. Adjuvant hormone therapy status in the 6 months following outreach was evaluated. Results In the 6 months postoutreach, 61% of women in the contacted group filled at least 1 prescription, compared with 52% in the noncontacted group. Among those with at least 1 filled prescription, 50% of the contacted group were adherent, compared with 25% in the noncontacted group. Conclusion This pilot suggests outreach conducted by health plan care managers, facilitated by linked Medicaid and Cancer Registry data, is an effective method to improve adjuvant hormone therapy initiation and adherence rates in Medicaid managed care–insured women. PMID:27584876

  2. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  3. Frailty and Adherence to Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy in Older Women With Breast Cancer: CALGB Protocol 369901

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Faul, Leigh Anne; Luta, George; Clapp, Jonathan D.; Yung, Rachel L.; Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Kimmick, Gretchen; Isaacs, Claudine; Tallarico, Michelle; Barry, William T.; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric P.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Hurria, Arti; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most patients with breast cancer age ≥ 65 years (ie, older patients) are eligible for adjuvant hormonal therapy, but use is not universal. We examined the influence of frailty on hormonal therapy noninitiation and discontinuation. Patients and Methods A prospective cohort of 1,288 older women diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic breast cancer recruited from 78 sites from 2004 to 2011 were included (1,062 had estrogen receptor–positive tumors). Interviews were conducted at baseline, 6 months, and annually for up to 7 years to collect sociodemographic, health care, and psychosocial data. Hormonal initiation was defined from records and discontinuation from self-report. Baseline frailty was measured using a previously validated 35-item scale and grouped as prefrail or frail versus robust. Logistic regression and proportional hazards models were used to assess factors associated with noninitiation and discontinuation, respectively. Results Most women (76.4%) were robust. Noninitiation of hormonal therapy was low (14%), but in prefrail or frail (v robust) women the odds of noninitiation were 1.63 times as high (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.40; P = .013) after covariate adjustment. Nonwhites (v whites) had higher odds of noninitiation (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.80; P = .033) after covariate adjustment. Among initiators, the 5-year continuation probability was 48.5%. After adjustment, the risk of discontinuation was higher with increasing age (P = .005) and lower for stage ≥ IIB (v stage I) disease (P = .003). Conclusion Frailty is associated with noninitiation of hormonal therapy, but it does not seem to be a major predictor of early discontinuation in older patients. PMID:24934786

  4. Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

    2014-11-01

    Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24575835

  5. The St. Gallen Prize Lecture 2011: evolution of long-term adjuvant anti-hormone therapy: consequences and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jordan, V Craig; Obiorah, Ifeyinwa; Fan, Ping; Kim, Helen R; Ariazi, Eric; Cunliffe, Heather; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2011-10-01

    The successful translation of the scientific principles of targeting the breast tumour oestrogen receptor (ER) with the nonsteroidal anti-oestrogen tamoxifen and using extended durations (at least 5 years) of adjuvant therapy, dramatically increased patient survivorship and significantly enhanced a drop in national mortality rates from breast cancer. The principles are the same for the validation of aromatase inhibitors to treat post-menopausal patients but tamoxifen remains a cheap, life-saving medicine for the pre-menopausal patient. Results from the Oxford Overview Analysis illustrate the scientific principle of "longer is better" for adjuvant therapy in pre-menopausal patients. One year of adjuvant therapy is ineffective at preventing disease recurrence or reducing mortality, whereas five years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduces recurrence by 50% which is maintained for a further ten years after treatment stops. Mortality is reduced but the magnitude continues to increase to 30% over a 15-year period. With this clinical database, it is now possible to implement simple solutions to enhance survivorship. Compliance with long-term anti-hormone adjuvant therapy is critical. In this regard, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to reduce severe menopausal side effects may be inappropriate. It is known that SSRIs block the CYP2D6 enzyme that metabolically activates tamoxifen to its potent anti-oestrogenic metabolite, endoxifen. The selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, does not block CYP2D6, and may be a better choice. Nevertheless, even with perfect compliance, the relentless drive of the breast cancer cell to acquire resistance to therapy persists. The clinical application of long-term anti-hormonal therapy for the early treatment and prevention of breast cancer, focused laboratory research on the discovery of mechanisms involved in acquired anti-hormone resistance. Decades of laboratory study to reproduce clinical experience

  6. Evolution of Long-Term Adjuvant Anti-hormone Therapy: Consequences and Opportunities. The St. Gallen Prize Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig; Obiorah, Ifeyinwa; Fan, Ping; Kim, Helen R.; Ariazi, Eric; Cunliffe, Heather; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2012-01-01

    The successful translation of the scientific principles of targeting the breast tumour oestrogen receptor (ER) with the nonsteroidal anti-oestrogen tamoxifen and using extended durations (at least 5-years) of adjuvant therapy, dramatically increased patient survivorship and significantly enhanced a drop in national mortality rates from breast cancer. The principles are the same for the validation of aromatase inhibitors to treat post-menopausal patients but tamoxifen remains a cheap, life-saving medicine for the pre-menopausal patient. Results from the Oxford Overview Analysis illustrate the scientific principle of “longer is better” for adjuvant therapy in pre-menopausal patients. One-year of adjuvant therapy is ineffective at preventing disease recurrence or reducing mortality, whereas five-years of adjuvant tamoxifen reduces recurrence by 50% which is maintained for a further ten-years after treatment stops. Mortality is reduced but the magnitude continues to increase to 30% over a 15-year period. With this clinical database, it is now possible to implement simple solutions to enhance survivorship. Compliance with long-term anti-hormone adjuvant therapy is critical. In this regard, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to reduce severe menopausal side effects may be inappropriate. It is known that SSRIs block the CYP2D6 enzyme that metabolically activates tamoxifen to its potent anti-oestrogenic metabolite, endoxifen. The selective nor-epinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, does not block CYP2D6, and may be a better choice. Nevertheless, even with perfect compliance, the relentless drive of the breast cancer cell to acquire resistance to therapy persists. The clinical application of long-term anti-hormonal therapy for the early treatment and prevention of breast cancer, focused laboratory research on the discovery of mechanisms involved in acquired anti-hormone resistance. Decades of laboratory study to reproduce clinical

  7. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  8. Racial differences in receipt of adjuvant hormonal therapy among Medicaid enrollees in South Carolina diagnosed with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Felder, Tisha M; Do, D Phuong; Lu, Z Kevin; Lal, Lincy S; Heiney, Sue P; Bennett, Charles L

    2016-05-01

    Several factors contribute to the pervasive Black-White disparity in breast cancer mortality in the U.S., such as tumor biology, access to care, and treatments received including adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT), which significantly improves survival for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers (HR+). We analyzed South Carolina Central Cancer Registry-Medicaid linked data to determine if, in an equal access health care system, racial differences in the receipt of AHT exist. We evaluated 494 study-eligible, Black (n = 255) and White women (n = 269) who were under 65 years old and diagnosed with stages I-III, HR+ breast cancers between 2004 and 2007. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess receipt of ≥1 AHT prescriptions at any point in time following (ever-use) or within 12 months of (early-use) breast cancer diagnosis. Seventy-two percent of the participants were ever-users (70 % Black, 74 % White) and 68 % were early-users (65 % Black, 71 % White) of AHT. Neither ever-use (adjusted OR (AOR) = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.48-1.17) nor early-use (AOR = 0.70, 95 % CI 0.46-1.06) of AHT differed by race. However, receipt of other breast cancer-specific treatments was independently associated with ever-use and early-use of AHT [ever-use: receipt of surgery (AOR = 2.15, 95 % CI 1.35-3.44); chemotherapy (AOR = 1.97, 95 % CI 1.22-3.20); radiation (AOR = 2.33, 95 % CI 1.50-3.63); early-use: receipt of surgery (AOR = 2.03, 95 % CI 1.30-3.17); chemotherapy (AOR = 1.90, 95 % CI 1.20-3.03); radiation (AOR = 1.73, 95 % CI 1.14-2.63)]. No racial variations in use of AHT among women with HR+ breast cancers insured by Medicaid in South Carolina were identified, but overall rates of AHT use by these women is low. Strategies to improve overall use of AHT should include targeting breast cancer patients who do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation. PMID:27120468

  9. Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women With Hormone Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Focused Update

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Harold J.; Temin, Sarah; Anderson, Holly; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Gelmon, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Rowden, Diana; Solky, Alexander J.; Stearns, Vered; Winer, Eric P.; Griggs, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO clinical practice guideline on adjuvant endocrine therapy on the basis of emerging data on the optimal duration of treatment, particularly adjuvant tamoxifen. Methods ASCO convened the Update Committee and conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials from January 2009 to June 2013 and analyzed three historical trials. Guideline recommendations were based on the Update Committee's review of the evidence. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease recurrence, and adverse events. Results This guideline update reflects emerging data on duration of tamoxifen treatment. There have been five studies of tamoxifen treatment beyond 5 years of therapy. The two largest studies with longest reported follow-up show a breast cancer survival advantage with 10-year durations of tamoxifen use. In addition to modest gains in survival, extended therapy with tamoxifen for 10 years compared with 5 years was associated with lower risks of breast cancer recurrence and contralateral breast cancer. Recommendations Previous ASCO guidelines recommended treatment of women who have hormone receptor–positive breast cancer and are premenopausal with 5 years of tamoxifen, and those who are postmenopausal a minimum of 5 years of adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor (in sequence). If women are pre- or perimenopausal and have received 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, they should be offered 10 years total duration of tamoxifen. If women are postmenopausal and have received 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, they should be offered the choice of continuing tamoxifen or switching to an aromatase inhibitor for 10 years total adjuvant endocrine therapy. PMID:24868023

  10. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  11. Adjuvant Therapy: Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad; Kirkwood, John M.

    2011-01-01

    With an incidence that is increasing at 2–5% per year, cutaneous melanoma is an international scourge that disproportionately targets young individuals. Despite much research, the treatment of advanced disease is still quite challenging. Immunotherapy with high-dose interferon-α2b or interleukin-2 benefits a select group of patients in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, respectively, with significant attendant toxicity. Advances in the biology of malignant melanoma and the role of immunomodulatory therapy have produced advances that have stunned the field. In this paper, we review the data for the use of interferon-α2b in various dosing ranges, vaccine therapy, and the role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma. Recent trials in the metastatic setting using anticytoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti-CTLA-4) monoclonal antibody therapy and BRAF inhibitor therapy have demonstrated clear benefit with prolongation of survival. Trials investigating combinations of these novel agents with existing immunomodulators are at present underway. PMID:22220281

  12. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  13. [Adjuvant drug therapies for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Riikka; Auvinen, Päivi; Mattson, Johanna; Joensuu, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Most breast cancers are hormone receptor positive and exhibit a slow growth pattern. Based on biological properties, breast cancers are divided into four different biological subtypes. Furthermore, these subtypes are indicative of the risk of recurrence, which is also influenced by the size of the tumor and extension to lymph nodes. Postoperative adjuvant drug therapy is chosen on the basis of the biological type. Chemotherapy can be used in all subtypes. Hormonal therapies are used exclusively for the treatment of hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab antibody belongs to the treatment of the HER2 positive subtype. PMID:26245052

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  15. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  16. Ethnic differences in initiation and timing of adjuvant endocrine therapy among older women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xianglin L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in initiation and timing of adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) after Medicare Part D drug coverage. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked data to assess ethnic, socio-demographic, and tumor characteristic variations in the initiation of AET among patients ≥65 with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in 2007–2009 enrolled in Medicare Part D through 2010. Logistic regression models were performed to assess the association between race/ethnicity and the initiation of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors (AIs), and overall AET (tamoxifen or AIs) within the first 12 months of diagnosis. Of the 12,198 women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, 74.8 % received AET within 12 months of diagnosis, of which 17.3 % received tamoxifen and 82.8 % received AIs. After controlling for all variables, only Asian women were found to have a greater odds of initiation of overall AET compared to non-Hispanic white women (odds ratio (OR): 1.28, 95 % CI: 1.03–1.58). Hispanic Mexicans and non-Hispanic black patients had a significantly lower odds of tamoxifen initiation (0.70, 0.54–0.91; 0.25, 0.10–0.62). For AI initiation, Hispanic Mexicans and Asians had a higher odds compared to non-Hispanic white women (2.06, 1.34–3.10; 1.33, 1.11–1.61). A suboptimal proportion of women (25.2 %) did not initiate AET within 12 months of diagnosis and therefore did not receive the full benefits of treatment to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence and mortality. Racial/ethnic differences in the initiation of tamoxifen and AIs have important implications that require further investigation. PMID:26786154

  17. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  18. Hormonal therapies in acne.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James C

    2002-07-01

    Hormones, in particular androgen hormones, are the main cause of acne in men, women, children and adults, in both normal states and endocrine disorders. Therefore, the use of hormonal therapies in acne is rational in concept and gratifying in practice. Although non-hormonal therapies enjoy wide usage and continue to be developed, there is a solid place for hormonal approaches in women with acne, especially adult women with persistent acne. This review covers the physiological basis for hormonal influence in acne, the treatments that are in use today and those that show promise for the future. The main treatments to be discussed are oral contraceptives androgen receptor blockers like spironolactone and flutamide, inhibitors of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase and topical hormonal treatments. PMID:12083987

  19. Hormonal therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    George, Rosalyn; Clarke, Shari; Thiboutot, Diane

    2008-09-01

    Acne affects more than 40 million people, of which more than half are women older than 25 years of age. These women frequently fail traditional therapy and have high relapse rates even after isotretinoin. Recent advances in research have helped to delineate the important role hormones play in the pathogenesis of acne. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, estrogens, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factors may all contribute to the development of acne. Hormonal therapy remains an important part of the arsenal of acne treatments available to the clinician. Women dealing with acne, even those without increased serum androgens, may benefit from hormonal treatments. The mainstays of hormonal therapy include oral contraceptives and antiandrogens such as spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, or flutamide. In this article, we discuss the effects of hormones on the pathogenesis of acne, evaluation of women with suspected endocrine abnormalities, and the myriad of treatment options available. PMID:18786497

  20. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  1. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  2. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  3. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  4. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  5. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  6. Adjuvant therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Khaja S; Kowey, Peter R; Musco, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, with increasing prevalence in the aging US population and affecting more than 2.3 million people. Current approaches for managing AF are rate- or rhythm-control strategies, both using anti-thrombotic therapy to prevent thromboembolism. While great advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of AF, few new strategies have shown promise in prevention or treatment of AF. Recent data suggest that non-antiarrhythmic medication may be useful in modifying the substrate that allows AF precipitation and perpetuation. This article reviews the data on the role of these agents in the prevention and management of AF as an adjunct to standard therapy. PMID:20014988

  7. [Recent advance in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Chikako; Watanabe, Toru

    2002-12-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to a significant improvement of disease-free and overall survival in addition to surgery and irradiation to the local disease. The adjuvant therapy to a patient is determined integrating the information on estimated risk of recurrence, benefit and harm of the therapy and the patient's value. In this review, the state of the art of adjuvant therapy is discussed from several aspects, such as interpretation and evaluation of risk, the best available evidences on adjuvant systemic therapy, the future direction of primary therapy for breast cancer, and patient-oriented decision making. PMID:12506467

  8. [Hormone therapy through changing times].

    PubMed

    Reuter, Miriam; Fassnacht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Despite several studies in the last years, only women with menopausal symptoms who desire therapy are treated. There is still no recommendation for menopausale hormone therapy for primary prevention of diseases such as coronary artery disease, osteoporosis or depression. The risk of thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and stroke is elevated especially for elderly women with oral hormone therapy. Benefits may exceed risks in younger, early-menopausal women, for whom hormone therapy may be prescribed more liberally. Systemic hormone therapy is for vasomotor symptoms, local therapy for the genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Choice of formulation depends on the individual risk due to symptoms and favours of the patients. With moderate to high cardiovascular risk profile, a transdermal route of estrogen application - in women with an intact uterus in combination with micronized progesterone - seems to be the best option. PMID:26841174

  9. Utility of adjuvant systemic therapy in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, A. M. M.; Testori, A.; Marsden, J.; Hersey, P.; Quirt, I.; Petrella, T.; Gogas, H.; MacKie, R. M.; Hauschild, A.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of effective drugs in stage IV melanoma has impacted the effectiveness of adjuvant therapies in stage II/III disease. To date, chemotherapy, immunostimulants and vaccines have been used with minimal success. Interferon (IFN) has shown an effect on relapse-free survival (RFS) in several clinical trials; however, without a clinically significant effect on overall survival (OS). A recently conducted meta-analysis demonstrated prolongation of disease-free survival (DFS) in 7% and OS benefit in 3% of IFN-treated patients when compared with observation-only patients. There were no clear differences for the dose and duration of treatment observed. Observation is still an appropriate control arm in adjuvant clinical trials. Regional differences exist in Europe in the adjuvant use of IFN. In Northwest Europe, IFN is infrequently prescribed. In Central and Mediterranean Europe, dermatologists commonly prescribe low-dose IFN therapy for AJCC stage II and III disease. High-dose IFN regimens are not commonly used. The population of patients that may benefit from IFN needs to be further characterised, potentially by finding biomarkers that can predict response. Such studies are ongoing. PMID:19617295

  10. Melanoma and IFN alpha: potential adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, U; Clerico, R; Paolino, G; Corsetti, P; Ambrifi, M; Brachini, A; Richetta, A; Nisticò, S; Pranteda, G; Calvieri, S

    2014-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is the most used adjuvant treatment in clinical practice for melanoma (MEL) high-medium risk patients; however, the use of IFNalpha has yielded conflicting data on Overall Survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) rates. Starting from these considerations, we carried out an analysis on our MEL patients who received adjuvant IFNalpha therapy, in order to identify possible predictors for their outcome. A total of 140 patients were included in our analysis. Patients with Breslow thickness ≤2.00 mm presented a significantly longer mean DFS than patients with Breslow ≥2.01 mm (p = 0.01). Using non- parametric Spearman’s Coefficient test we found association between DFS and Breslow thickness (p < 0.001) and between DFS and ulceration (p = 0.03). Performing Multiple Regression test, Breslow thickness (p < 0.001) remained the only statistically significant predictor. From the OS analysis we found that patients with lower Breslow values ≤ 2.00 mm (p < 0.0001), and absence of ulceration (p <0.004) showed a significantly better long-term survival. From the current analysis we found that the use of low dose IFNalpha is justified only for cutaneous melanoma ≤ 4.01 mm that was not ulcerated; patients with Breslow ≥ 4.01 mm, in our opinion, should not carry out adjuvant treatment with low dose IFNalpha, because its side effects could be higher than the its benefits. PMID:25001659

  11. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  12. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Tepper, J E; Skates, S J; Wood, W C; Orlow, E C; Duttenhaver, J R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three patients with Stage B2, B3, and C colonic carcinoma had resection for curative intent followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates for these 133 patients were 82% and 61%, respectively. Stage for stage, the development of local regional failure was reduced for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy compared with a historic control series. Local recurrence occurred in 8%, 21%, and 31% of patients with Stage B3, C2, and C3 tumors who had radiation therapy, respectively, whereas the local failure rates were 31%, 36%, and 53% in patients treated with surgery alone. There was a 13% and 12% improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate in the patients with Stage B3 and C3 lesions who had radiotherapy compared with the historic controls. For patients with Stage C disease, local control and disease-free survival rates decreased progressively with increasing nodal involvement; however, local control and disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients who had radiotherapy than in those who had surgery alone. Failure patterns in the patients who had radiotherapy did not show any notable changes compared with those for patients who had surgery alone. Postoperative radiation therapy for Stage B3, C2, and C3 colonic carcinoma is a promising treatment approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:3689006

  13. The Promher Study: An Observational Italian Study on Adjuvant Therapy for HER2-Positive, pT1a-b pN0 Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Stefania; Inno, Alessandro; Fiorio, Elena; Foglietta, Jennifer; Ferro, Antonella; Gulisano, Marcella; Pinotti, Graziella; Gubiotti, Marta; Cavazzini, Maria Giovanna; Turazza, Monica; Duranti, Simona; De Simone, Valeria; Iezzi, Laura; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Spazzapan, Simon; Cavanna, Luigi; Saggia, Chiara; Bria, Emilio; Cretella, Elisabetta; Vici, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Fabi, Alessandra; Garrone, Ornella; Frassoldati, Antonio; Amaducci, Laura; Saracchini, Silvana; Evangelisti, Lucia; Barni, Sandro; Gamucci, Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Laudadio, Lucio; Zoboli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Fabiana; Bogina, Giuseppe; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Boni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background The management of pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer is controversial and no data about the efficacy of trastuzumab in this setting are available from randomized clinical trials. The aims of this retrospective study were to assess how patients are managed in clinical practice in Italy, which clinical or biological characteristics influenced the choice of adjuvant systemic therapy and the outcome of patients. Methods Data of consecutive patients who underwent surgery from January 2007 to December 2012 for HER2-positive, pT1a-b pN0 M0 breast cancer were retrospectively collected from 28 Italian centres. Analysis of contingency tables and multivariate generalized logit models were used to investigate the association between the baseline clinical and biological features and the treatment strategy adopted. Results Among 303 enrolled patients, 204 received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, 65 adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and 34 did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy. At the multivariate analysis age, tumor size, proliferation index and hormone receptor status were significantly associated with the treatment choice. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) probability was 95%, 94.3% and 69.6% for patients treated with adjuvant systemic therapy and trastuzumab, with adjuvant systemic therapy without trastuzumab and for patients who did not receive adjuvant systemic therapy, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions The majority of patients (66%) with pT1a-b pN0 HER2-positive breast cancer enrolled in this retrospective study received adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab, whereas only 11% patients did not receive any adjuvant systemic therapy. The choice of treatment type seems to be mainly influenced by tumor size, proliferation index, hormone receptor status and age. The 5-year DFS probability was significantly higher for patients receiving adjuvant systemic therapy with trastuzumab compared with patients not receiving adjuvant

  14. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption phase, associated with palpitations. Liothyronine (T(3)) has the same drawback and requires twice-daily administration in view of its short half-life. Synthetic levothyroxine (L-T(4)) has many advantages: in view of its long half-life, once-daily administration suffices, the occasional missing of a tablet causes no harm, and the extrathyroidal conversion of T(4) into T(3) (normally providing 80% of the daily T(3) production rate) remains fully operative, which may have some protective value during illness. Consequently, L-T(4) is nowadays preferred, and its long-term use is not associated with excess mortality. The mean T(4) dose required to normalize serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is 1.6 microg/kg per day, giving rise to serum free T(4) (fT(4)) concentrations that are slightly elevated or in the upper half of the normal reference range. The higher fT(4) values are probably due to the need to generate from T(4) the 20% of the daily T(3) production rate that otherwise is derived from the thyroid gland itself. The daily maintenance dose of T(4) varies widely between 75 and 250 microg. Assessment of the appropriate T(4) dose is by assay of TSH and fT(4), preferably in a blood sample taken before ingestion of the subsequent T(4) tablet. Dose adjustments can be necessary in pregnancy and when medications are used that are known to interfere with the absorption or metabolism of T(4). A new equilibrium is reached after approximately 6 weeks, implying that laboratory tests should not be done earlier. With a stable maintenance dose, an annual check-up usually suffices. Accumulated experience with L-T(4) replacement has identified some areas of concern. First, the

  15. Aromatase inhibitor plus ovarian suppression as adjuvant therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Figg, William D; Cook, Katherine; Clarke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The goal of adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer is to prevent recurrence by eradicating micrometastatic disease. Recent studies have shown that the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as adjuvant therapy improves outcomes for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer compared to adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen alone. The research question has been raised whether AIs would have similar improvements in disease-free survival (DFS) in premenopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer. Combining 2 phase 3 clinical trials (n = 4,690), Pagani and colleagues randomized premenopausal women with ER-positive early breast cancer to exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 y. After a median follow-up of 68 months, DFS was 91.1% in the AI group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen group. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. PMID:25535893

  16. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  17. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woroń, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens. PMID:26327902

  18. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Jin; Lulla, Amriti; Hernandez, Liz; Gokare, Prashanth; Lim, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM) is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +), hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +), both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer. PMID:25400908

  19. Natural hormone therapy for menopause.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Khalid

    2010-02-01

    Menopausal women are deficient in estrogen, progesterone, and frequently in testosterone and DHEA. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the United States has generally consisted of one or two agents, typically equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone, with increased risk of heart attack, stroke, dementia, and breast cancer [WHI trials]. Bio-identical hormones [chemically endogenous hormones] have gained popularity and can be mixed according to physician's orders by compounding pharmacists in the United States. However, there is little published information about the use of such hormones. This paper reports a 12 plus months follow up on 189 patients who were administered natural estrogen plus progesterone with or without DHEA or testosterone according to a rationalized protocol described later. Ninety-seven percent of the patients experienced varying degrees of symptom control, whereas three had minimal or questionable benefit. Mental symptoms experienced upon presentation improved in 90% of the patients. Sixty percent of the patients, who had gained weight during menopause, lost an average of 14.8 lbs [SD 11.98 lbs]. Complications described with traditional HRT did not develop in this group of patients. These findings point out a need for larger controlled trials of similar protocols in the management of menopause. PMID:19995152

  20. Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: Current and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Marcus; Leong, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The management of gastric cancer continues to evolve. Whilst surgery alone is effective when tumours present early, a large proportion of patients are diagnosed with loco-regionally advanced disease, resulting in high loco-regional and distant relapse rates, with subsequent poor survival. Early attempts at improving outcomes following resection were disappointing; however, randomized trials have now established either post-operative chemoradiotherapy (INT0116) or peri-operative chemotherapy as standard adjuvant therapies in the Western world. There remain, however, significant differences in the approach to management between the West and East. In Asia, where there is the highest incidence of gastric cancer, extended resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy represents the standard of care. This review discusses current standard adjuvant therapy in gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as recent and ongoing trials investigating novel (neo)adjuvant approaches, which hope to build on the successes of previous studies. PMID:25320509

  1. [New options in adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Saltel-Fulero, Aurélien; Donnadieu, Anne; Leman-Detours, Solenne; Cottu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is a compulsory step in the adjuvant management of early breast cancer expressing the estrogen receptor, by reducing as much as possible serum and tissue levels of estrogens. Tamoxifen is the standard therapy for non-menopausal women. Ovarian function suppression, in addition to exemestane or tamoxifen, could be an alternative option for young women at high risk of recurrence and non menopausal after adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Recent studies show a trend for improvement of overall survival and disease-free-survival with aromatase inhibitors among postmenopausal women. However, safety of aromatase inhibitors is controversial and adverse events may lead to switch for tamoxifen with no loss of efficacy. Extension therapy by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor after five years of tamoxifen and for a total duration of ten years significantly improves overall survival. There is to date no data supporting the extension therapy after five years of aromatase inhibitor. PMID:26675809

  2. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  3. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Sumita; Miller, Robert C. . E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed.

  4. Knowns and Known Unknowns of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Marín, Virginia; Maki, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    The first 15 years of management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) have led to 3 lines of therapy for metastatic disease: imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. In the adjuvant setting, imatinib is usually given for 3 years postoperatively to patients with higher-risk primary tumors that are completely resected. In this review, issues regarding GIST adjuvant therapy are discussed. It is hoped this review will help the reader understand the present standard of care to improve upon it in years to come. PMID:27546844

  5. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: cardiovascular risks.

    PubMed

    2003-04-01

    (1) The WHI study was published in 2002: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in more than 16 000 women with an average age of 63 years at enrollment. The paper reports data on the long-term adverse effects of combined equine estrogen-progestin hormone replacement therapy, taken for 5 years. (2) On average, a yearly excess of 19 severe adverse events per 10 000 women occurred in the estrogen-progestin group. Relative to the placebo group, there were an extra 8 pulmonary embolisms, 7 coronary events, 8 strokes and 8 cases of invasive breast cancer. In contrast, there were 6 fewer colorectal cancers and 5 fewer hip fractures in the active treatment group. (3) The differences in the frequency of coronary events and venous thromboembolism emerged after the first year of treatment, while the curves for stroke and breast cancer diverged after the second and fifth years, respectively. (4) The overall mortality rate did not differ between the two groups. (5) A placebo-controlled trial of the same hormone combination (HERS trial), given for 4.1 years as secondary prophylaxis against coronary heart disease was published in 1998. The drug was ineffective during the trial, and during unblinded post-trial follow-up of 2 321 women for an average of 2.7 years (HERS II study). (6) The estrogen-progestin combination used in these trials did not reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (in primary or secondary prophylaxis) or the risk of stroke. On the contrary, both risks increased. (7) The increased incidence of deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism associated with estrogen-progestin replacement therapy was confirmed in these trials, even among women with no relevant history. (8) The WHI trial also confirmed the increased risk of breast cancer in women on hormone replacement therapy, but did not study its impact on outcome or mortality. (9) The WHI trial confirmed the beneficial impact of estrogen-progestin combination therapy on the risk of

  6. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  7. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition.

    PubMed

    McCarrey, Anna C; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Prior to the publication of findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the 'critical window hypothesis', which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as lower global cognition or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. PMID:25935728

  8. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  9. Hormone therapy, dilemmas, medical decisions.

    PubMed

    Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The decision for women to go on hormone therapy (HT) remains controversial. An historical oscillation of beliefs exists related in part to expectations of the medicinal value of HT over longer-term use beyond the initial peri-menonpausal period. Studies thought to resolve issues surrounding the efficacy of HT were perhaps overstated as confusion still permeates the decision making with regard to HT. Overzealous advertising and exaggerated understanding of the results (negative or positive) undermine patient and physician decision making. There remains no magic bullet with regard to HT. What remains is still the possibility of HT longer-term efficacy on diverse end organ systems with pockets of clinical and scientific ambiguity while working to engender reasonable expectations. PMID:18315763

  10. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D; Anderson, Roger T; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival.A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model.About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all-cause mortality.Our findings

  11. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D.; Anderson, Roger T.; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival. A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model. About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all

  12. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer and the role of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valerie M; Benson, Al B

    2013-04-01

    Both the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and improvements in surgical techniques have improved local control and overall survival for locally advanced rectal cancer patients over the past few decades. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy has likely improved outcomes as well, though the contribution has been more difficult to quantify. At present, the majority of resected locally advanced rectal cancer patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy, though there is great variability in this practice based on both patient and institution characteristics. Recently, questions have been raised regarding which sub-groups of patients benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. As pathologic complete response (pCR) is increasingly found to be a reasonable surrogate for long-term favorable outcomes, some have questioned the need for adjuvant therapy in this select group of patients. Multiple retrospective analyses have shown minimal to no benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. Indeed, the patients most consistently shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy both in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are those who achieve an intermediate pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment. Tumors that have high expression of thymidylate synthetase have also shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy. More study is needed into clinical and molecular features that predict patient benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:23381584

  13. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  14. Adjuvant Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.

    2014-01-01

    At the present time, the standard of care for patients who have received nephrectomy for localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is radiographic surveillance. With a number of novel targeted agents showing activity in the setting of metastatic RCC, there has been great interest in exploring the potential of the same agents in the adjuvant setting. Herein, we discuss the evolution of adjuvant trials in RCC, spanning from the immunotherapy era to the targeted therapy era. Pitfalls of current studies are addressed to provide a context for interpreting forthcoming results. Finally, we outline avenues to incorporate promising investigational agents, such as PD-1 (programmed death-1) inhibitors and MNNG transforming gene inhibitors, in future adjuvant trials. PMID:24969163

  15. Teriparatide Therapy as an Adjuvant for Tissue Engineering and Integration of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Robinder S.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Critically sized large bone defects commonly result from trauma, radical tumor resections or infections. Currently, massive allografting remain as the clinical standard to treat these critical defects. Unfortunately, allograft healing is limited by the lack of osteogenesis and bio-integration of the graft to the host bone. Based on its widely studied anabolic effects on the bone, we have proposed that teriparatide [recombinant parathyroid hormone (PTH1–34)] could be an effective adjuvant for massive allograft healing. In support of this theory, here we review studies that have demonstrated that intermittent PTH1–34 treatment enhances and accelerates the skeletal repair process via a number of mechanisms including: effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, bone formation and remodeling. We also review the current literature on the effects of PTH1–34 therapy on bone healing, and discuss this drug’s long term potential as an adjuvant for endogenous tissue engineering. PMID:21857768

  16. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer in the era of aromatase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, Ramia; Karat, Isabella; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women should include a third generation aromatase inhibitor (AI). On current evidence, adjuvant anstrozole or letrozole should be used upfront in such patients especially in those with high risk disease (node positive and/or tumours > 2 cm). The sequential approach of tamoxifen for 2-3 years followed by exemestane or anastrozole for 2-3 years is a reasonable alternative to 5 years of AI monotherapy in patients with low risk disease (node negative and tumour smaller than 2 cm) especially if the tumour is positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors.Node-positive patients completing 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen should be offered letrozole for up 48 months. Further research is required to establish the long-term cardiovascular safety of AIs especially that of letrozole and exmestane, the optimal AI to use, duration of AI therapy and whether monotherapy with an AI for 5 years is superior to sequencing an AI after 2-3 years of tamoxifen. The bone mineral density (BMD) should be measured at baseline and monitored during therapy in women being treated with AIs. Anti-osteoporosis agents should such as bisphosphonates should be considered in patients at high risk of bone fractures. PMID:16981992

  17. [Laparoscopic surgery and adjuvant therapy for colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kubicka, Stefan; Geissler, Michael; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Trarbach, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    At present, about 10% of all oncological procedures in the colon are carried out laparoscopically. Acceptance is increasing. After successful R0 resection, the rule for stage III patients is: adjuvant therapy is indicated regardless of age. Regimens containing oxaliplatin should be used. If there are contraindications for oxaliplatin, then fluoropyrimidine monotherapy is indicated, with oral fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine) being given precedence over infusional schemes. The use of 5-FU bolus regimens is regarded as obsolete. For stage II, the following applies: If an adjuvant chemotherapy is planned in these patients on the basis of the QUASAR data, then fluoropyrimidine monotherapy (e. g. capecitabine) can be given. Since patients whose tumours show a high frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) do not benefit from a fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, the MSI status should be determined before choosing therapy. PMID:19546595

  18. Immunoendocrine Interactions during HIV-TB Coinfection: Implications for the Design of New Adjuvant Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Guadalupe Veronica; Vecchione, Maria Belen; Angerami, Matias Tomas; Sued, Omar; Bruttomesso, Andrea Claudia; Bottasso, Oscar Adelmo

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, around 14 million individuals are coinfected with both tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In coinfected individuals, both pathogens weaken immunological system synergistically through mechanisms that are not fully understood. During both HIV and TB infections, there is a chronic state of inflammation associated to dramatic changes in immune cytokine and endocrine hormone levels. Despite this, the relevance of immunoendocrine interaction on both the orchestration of an effective immune response against both pathogens and the control of the chronic inflammation induced during HIV, TB, or both infections is still controversial. The present study reviews immunoendocrine interactions occurring during HIV and TB infections. We also expose our own findings on immunoendocrine cross talk in HIV-TB coinfection. Finally, we evaluate the use of adrenal hormones and their derivatives in immune-therapy and discuss the use of some of these compounds like the adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of TB in HIV patients. PMID:26075241

  19. Adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer patients with regular follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Renée; Latreille, Jean; Matte, Claire; Desjardins, Pierre; Bergeron, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjuvant hormonal therapy is crucial in the treatment of estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer. The nonadherence rate to hormonal treatment is reported to be as high as 60%. The goal of this study was to evaluate the factors evoked by the patients as well as the demographic and disease-related factors that could be associated with nonadherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy. Methods All consecutive patients treated for an estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer who showed up for regular follow-up with a single breast specialist between November 2008 and April 2009 were included in the study. We assessed adherence to hormonal therapy (either with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor). Reasons for adherence and nonadherence were collected. Records were also reviewed for demographic and cancer characteristics and for treatment components. Results We included 161 patients in the study; 150 (93.2%) adhered to hormonal treatment. Side effects and absence of conviction were the main reasons for nonadherence. The importance of the diagnosis of cancer, fear of recurrence and regular follow-up were reported as the main reasons for adherence. Conclusion Severity of disease and side effects are associated with nonadherence to treatment. Strict follow-up appears to be a necessary adjunct in the adherence to treatment. The association between demographic and cancer characteristics and treatment components needs further investigation. However, these factors may help identify patients at risk of nonadherence and help the oncology team. PMID:24461223

  20. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... both combination and estrogen-alone hormone use made mammography less effective for the early detection of breast ... such as a reduction in the use of mammography, may also have contributed to this decline ( 15 ). ...

  1. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  2. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  3. Adjuvant antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T Jared; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2014-04-01

    The risk of sudden cardiac death from ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia in patients with cardiomyopathy related to structural heart disease has been favorably impacted by the wide adaptation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for both primary and secondary prevention. Unfortunately, after ICD implantation both appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapies are common. ICD shocks in particular can have significant effects on quality of life and disease-related morbidity and mortality. While not indicated for primary prevention of ICD therapies, beta-blockers and antiarrhythmic drugs are a cornerstone for secondary prevention of them. This review will summarize our current understanding of adjuvant antiarrhythmic drug therapy in ICD patients. The review will also discuss the roles of nonantiarrhythmic drug approaches that are used in isolation and in combination with antiarrhythmic drugs to reduce subsequent risk of ICD shocks. PMID:24288157

  4. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  5. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: the way ahead.

    PubMed

    Pines, Amos

    2007-05-20

    This article follows the milestones in the history of postmenopausal hormone treatment, with a look into the future. In the first era, hormones were regarded as an anti-aging panacea, the fountain of eternal youth. It was recommended then that every postmenopausal woman should consider the use of hormone replacement therapy. In the second era, people realized that hormones are medications, and as such should be given for clear and scientifically proven indications. When the issue of harm as a result of hormone treatment led to professional and public debates, the concept was changed into a clinically oriented approach commonly phrased as "the expected benefits should be weighed individually against potential risks". In the third era, individualization had a further step, stressing the prognostic importance of the following parameters: women's age, age at start of hormone use, duration of therapy, dosage, route of administration, and the exact type and combination of estrogen and progestogen. The fourth era is already knocking on our door, as new molecules are sought, which will maximize the desired effects of therapy while minimizing or eliminating the risks. The fifth era is still a wishful thinking, searching for the ultimate treatment which will be based on individual gene mapping and accurate assessment of the chance to achieve treatment goals vis-à-vis the risk of having a serious adverse event. PMID:17376615

  6. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  7. Using antimicrobial adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and pre-clinical data demonstrate that adjuvant antimicrobial therapy is beneficial in cancer treatment. There could be several reasons for this effect, which include treating cancer associated bacteria and viruses, prophylaxis of post-chemotherapy infections due to immunosuppression, and antiproliferative effect of certain antimicrobials. Targeting cancer associated viruses and bacteria with antimicrobial agents is currently used for gastric, cervical, hematopoietic, liver and brain cancer. However this treatment is effective only in combination with conventional therapies. Antimicrobials can also have a direct antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect, and can cause apoptosis. Moreover, some antimicrobials are known to be helpful in overcoming side effects of drugs commonly used in cancer treatment. Chemotherapy related bacteremia and neutropenia can be overcome by the appropriately timed use of antimicrobials. This review summarizes the data on the effects of antivirals and antibiotics on cancer treatment and describes their mechanisms. PMID:23164412

  8. Evaluation of Vitamin C for Adjuvant Sepsis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Evidence is emerging that parenteral administration of high-dose vitamin C may warrant development as an adjuvant therapy for patients with sepsis. Recent Advances: Sepsis increases risk of death and disability, but its treatment consists only of supportive therapies because no specific therapy is available. The characteristics of severe sepsis include ascorbate (reduced vitamin C) depletion, excessive protein nitration in microvascular endothelial cells, and microvascular dysfunction composed of refractive vasodilation, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Parenteral administration of ascorbate prevents or even reverses these pathological changes and thereby decreases hypotension, edema, multiorgan failure, and death in animal models of sepsis. Critical Issues: Dehydroascorbic acid appears to be as effective as ascorbate for protection against microvascular dysfunction, organ failure, and death when injected in sepsis models, but information about pharmacodynamics and safety in human subjects is only available for ascorbate. Although the plasma ascorbate concentration in critically ill and septic patients is normalized by repletion protocols that use high doses of parenteral ascorbate, and such doses are tolerated well by most healthy subjects, whether such large amounts of the vitamin trigger adverse effects in patients is uncertain. Future Directions: Further study of sepsis models may determine if high concentrations of ascorbate in interstitial fluid have pro-oxidant and bacteriostatic actions that also modify disease progression. However, the ascorbate depletion observed in septic patients receiving standard care and the therapeutic mechanisms established in models are sufficient evidence to support clinical trials of parenteral ascorbate as an adjuvant therapy for sepsis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2129–2140. PMID:23682970

  9. Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159955.html Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause 5- ... important risk cognitively associated with the use of hormone therapy over at least five years," said lead ...

  10. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Survival for Pure Tubular Breast Carcinoma-Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoqing; Chen, Margaret; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pure tubular carcinoma of the breast (PTCB) represents a distinct subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) that is generally thought to be associated with better prognosis than even low-grade IDC. There has been controversy as to the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in this population. We hypothesized that adjuvant RT would demonstrate a survival improvement. Methods and Materials: We queried the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database for the years 1992-2007 to identify patients with pure tubular carcinomas of the breast. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and surgical and RT treatments were collected. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method for univariate comparisons and Cox proportional hazards modeling for multivariate comparisons, stratifying on the basis of age with a cutoff age of 65. Results: A total of 6465 patients were identified: 3624 (56.1%) patients underwent lumpectomy with RT (LUMP+RT), 1525 (23.6%) patients underwent lumpectomy alone (LUMP), 1266 (19.6%) patients received mastectomy alone (MAST), and 50 (0.8%) patients underwent mastectomy with RT (MAST+RT). When we compared the LUMP+RT and LUMP groups directly, those receiving adjuvant RT tended to be younger and were less likely to be hormone receptor-positive. Overall survival was 95% for LUMP+RT and 90% for LUMP patients at 5 years. For those 65 or younger, the absolute overall survival benefit of LUMP+RT over LUMP was 1% at 5 years and 3% at 10 years. On stratified multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor in both age groups (P=.003 in age {<=}65 and P=.04 in age >65 patients). Other significant unfavorable factors were older age and higher T stage (age >65 only). Conclusions: Since sufficiently powered large scale clinical trials are unlikely, we would recommend that adjuvant radiation be considered in PTCB patients age 65 or younger, although consideration of the small absolute survival benefit is

  11. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the superficial bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.; Russakov, I. G.; Teplov, A. A.; Filonenko, E. V.; Ul'yanov, R. V.; Bystrov, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    Superficial transitional cell carcinoma represents 50 to 80% of newly diagnosed bladder cancer in various countries. Transurethral resection of the urinary bladder is the standard procedure for biopsy and treatment superficial bladder cancer. However recurrence tumors after transurethral resection alone is high enough (50-90%). Intravesical chemotherapy for prophylaxis after complete transurethral resection is reducing recurrence rate about 1 5%. Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin (BCG) is reducing recurrence rate about 30%, but frequency side effects of this therapy is very high. Purpose of this study is appreciate efficacy adjuvant PDT with photosensitizer Photogeme (Russia) of superficial bladder cancer for prophylaxis after complete transurethral resection. The follow up was from 3 to 63 months (27 months, on average). Sixty-five patients (75.6%) showed no recurrence. For the follow up period, the recurrence was revealed in 21 (24.4%) patient, in two of them it was progressing (one case of invasive growth and one case of remote metastases). Four cases of recurrence were revealed 4 months after the surgery. In other cases, the recurrence was diagnosed from 9 to 18 months.

  12. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  13. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 2: adjuvant therapy].

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Jüttner, Björn

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. PMID:26510108

  14. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy in surgical management of cerebral tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zong-Qian; Wu, Si-En; Zhu, Shu-Gan

    1993-03-01

    We have performed high dose photoradiation therapy in patients with cerebral tumors. Twenty-seven patients had gliomas, two had metastatic cancer of the brain, one had malignant meningioma. Hematoporphyrin derivative was administered intravenously. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a radical or partial excision of the tumor. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema and other toxicity from the therapy, and all patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. On the basis of animal experiments our institute started using photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjuvant measure to the operative therapy in 30 cases of cerebral tumors. Ten of these patients were excluded from this group because of the short postoperative following time. Here, the details of our experiences are presented as follows: 106 of C6 type glioma cell strain were implanted into the frontal lobe of a Chinese hamster. Fourteen days later intracranial gliomas developed, which were larger than 4 mm in diameter, HpD in a dosage of 4 mg/kg was injected into the tail vein of the animals. The fluorescence was seen 5 minutes later. The diagnostic laser used was He-Ca (Hc-type 15A, made at Shanghai Laser Institute) with a wavelength of 441.6 nm, power of 30 mw. The fluorescence reached its peak point 24 hours later, and the normal tissue can be identified by the lack of fluorescence. Then, the tumor tissue was further radiated with an Ar laser (made in Nanjing Electronic Factory, type 360), pumped dye-laser (made in Changchun Optic Machinery Institute, type 901) with a wavelength of 630 nm, and an energy density of more than 200 Joules/cm2, which might get the tumor cells destroyed selectively. The effect of photoradiation may reach as deep as 4 - 7 mm into the brain tissue without cerebral edema or necrosis.

  15. Behavioral Interventions to Enhance Adherence to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Lobo, Tania; Dash, Chiranjeev; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant hormone therapy contributes to reductions in recurrence and mortality for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. However, adherence to hormone therapy is suboptimal. This is the first systematic literature review examining interventions aimed at improving hormone therapy adherence. Researchers followed the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Ovid-Medline, and EMBASE were searched for behavioral interventions that aimed to enhance adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors. A total of 376 articles were screened for eligibility. Five articles met the study criteria. All interventions presented adherence outcomes after 1-year follow-up. None significantly enhanced adherence compared to the usual care in the primary analysis (odds ratios ranged from 1.03 to 2.06 for adherence and from 1.11 to 1.18 for persistence). All studies targeted patients, and only 3 studies included postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Three tested the same intervention consisting of educational materials. Only one was conducted in the United States. Only one reported participants' ethnicity. Overall, it was unclear whether the studies contained bias. The use of different terminology and operationalization of adherence made comparisons challenging. Interventions to improve adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in US breast cancer populations that include survivors who are ethnically diverse, premenopausal, and receiving tamoxifen therapy are necessary to inform future interventions. Adoption of consistent adherence definitions/measurements will provide a clearer framework to consolidate aggregate findings. Given the limited efficacy of tested interventions, it is important to engage oncologists and researchers to develop approaches that target different components associated with hormone therapy adherence, such as doctor-patient communication or social support. PMID:27133733

  16. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL) and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84)) as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34)) have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy. PMID:26394728

  17. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone.

    PubMed

    Rejnmark, Lars; Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja

    2015-12-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL) and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84)) as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34)) have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy. PMID:26394728

  18. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  19. [Perspectives for the hormonal therapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Sándor

    2003-01-01

    The role of estrogens, including its sources, tissue distribution, metabolism, and mechanism of action, is discussed in this review. The ER alpha and beta are functioning separately, and there is a physiological balance between their activity. Whenever this balance is over thrown due to endogenous or exogenous carcinogenic factors, malignancy develops. Risk factors of breast cancer are listed and evaluated individually. It should be stressed however, that their carcinogenic effect sums up. The knowledge of established risk factors rises the possibility of chemoprevention, which might be highly desirable in case of gene carriers. Special emphasis is attached to the SERM molecules which act as antiestrogens. Their antitumour effect is largely used in the treatment of hormone sensitive advanced breast cancer patients, and their efficacy has been proved in adjuvant therapy as well. Their preventive use might also be justified, especially in gene carriers. Aromatase inhibitors form a special class among the SERM molecules. In Hungary, anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane are widely applied for the therapy of breast cancer patients, while raloxifene has only been introduced recently, mainly in order to prevent osteoporosis. The therapeutic value of fulvestrant is unknown yet and its antitumour effect has to be explored. The therapeutic significance of these molecules lies in the fact that they might be effective after the development of tamoxifen resistance. There are several explanations for this phenomenon offering new targets for the further development of a succesful antitumour chemotherapy. PMID:12975659

  20. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy and Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Carcaillon, Laure; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Oger, Emmanuel; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Elbaz, Alexis; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The benefit/risk analysis of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women is not straightforward and depends on cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports the safety of transdermal estrogens and the importance of progestogens for thrombotic risk. However, the differential association of oral and transdermal estrogens with stroke remains poorly investigated. Furthermore, there are no data regarding the impact of progestogens. Methods— We set up a nested case–control study of ischemic stroke (IS) within all French women aged 51 to 62 years between 2009 and 2011 without personal history of cardiovascular disease or contraindication to hormone therapy. Participants were identified using the French National Health Insurance database, which includes complete drug claims for the past 3 years and French National hospital data. We identified 3144 hospitalized IS cases who were matched for age and zip code to 12 158 controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results— Compared with nonusers, the adjusted ORs of IS were1.58 (95% CI, 1.01–2.49) in oral estrogen users and 0.83 (0.56–1.24) in transdermal estrogens users (P<0.01). There was no association of IS with use of progesterone (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49–1.26), pregnanes (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.60–1.67), and nortestosterones (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.62–2.58), whereas norpregnanes increased IS risk (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.05–4.81). Conclusions— Both route of estrogen administration and progestogens were important determinants of IS. Our findings suggest that transdermal estrogens might be the safest option for short-term hormone therapy use. PMID:27256671

  1. Aiming at the target: improved adjuvant medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Bedard, Philippe L; Dinh, Phuong; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J

    2009-10-01

    The 2007 St. Gallen Expert Panel recognized the existence of molecular tools for risk stratification, but recommended the use of high-quality standard pathological testing alone for risk allocation and treatment selection. Over the last two years, much has been learned about these novel molecular tools: they demonstrate similar prognostic power; their performance appears to be driven by improved quantification of cellular proliferation; tumour burden remains an important determinant of long-term outcome; and their prediction of responsiveness to systemic therapy is suboptimal. In the meantime, great effort has continued to be invested in evaluating individual predictive markers to guide treatment selection. A number of putative targets that showed early promise--such as HER-2 and TOP2A gene amplification for anthracyclines, Myc amplification for trastuzumab, and Tau expression for taxanes--have yielded disappointing results when subjected to subsequent validation. These failings underscore the difficulty of accurate, reproducible target measurement and the inherent complexity of early breast cancer which is unlikely to be captured by a single gene or protein alteration. Future progress in adjuvant treatment tailoring will require a fundamental shift towards multi-dimensional thinking--with the development of multi-parameter assays that integrate tumour biology, disease burden, and host-related factors. The traditional model of post hoc predictive marker validation appears unlikely to produce tangible gains in the era of targeted systemic therapy. It is hoped that coupling prospective biomarker discovery with new drug development in earlier stages of disease will yield additional targets that can be used to guide clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:19914538

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  3. Hormone replacement therapy for the adolescent patient.

    PubMed

    DiVasta, Amy D; Gordon, Catherine M

    2008-01-01

    Pubertal induction and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during adolescence are conducted with the aim of closely mirroring the pubertal changes that occur in children with a normal hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. The challenge for the clinician is to determine the most appropriate form, dosing, and duration of replacement therapy to achieve that goal in an individual patient. While the optimal regimen remains unclear and data in adolescents are limited, this review presents the evidence available to clinicians as they care for adolescent girls and young women. Both the goals and phases of HRT are reviewed, and commonly used medication regimens are presented. Both the benefits and risks associated with various methods of HRT are also discussed, as are special issues of concern regarding adolescent HRT, including eating disorders and bone health. PMID:18574226

  4. Hormonal therapy for stage D cancer of the prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Gudziak, M R; Smith, A Y

    1994-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common malignant neoplasm occurring in men. About half of patients present with metastatic disease. The mainstay of the treatment of stage D cancer of the prostate is hormonal therapy. Bilateral simple orchiectomy remains the gold standard with which other therapies must be compared. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues and antiandrogens are now most commonly used but are costly. Initiating hormonal therapy immediately on diagnosing metastatic disease appears to have some advantage over delaying therapy until a patient is symptomatic. Total androgen blockade also appears to be beneficial in terms of survival but at high cost. PMID:8023485

  5. Hormone replacement therapy: determinants of women's decisions.

    PubMed

    Marmoreo, J; Brown, J B; Batty, H R; Cummings, S; Powell, M

    1998-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapy: determinants of women's decisions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the decision-making process used by menopausal women initiating or remaining on hormone replacement therapy (HRT), stopping HRT, or never starting HRT. Eight focus groups, composed of women reflecting these categories, were conducted. Four major themes or spheres of influence emerged as important in the women's decision-making process: the woman's internal influence--the interface between her perceptions and feelings including the symptoms of menopause, the benefits realized by HRT usage, and the experiences of negative side effects; interpersonal relationships, including the patient-physician relationship, family, friends and information networks; external influences, such as ageism and sexism; and consequences resulting from whichever treatment decision was chosen. A new concept was elucidated called "weighted influence" to underscore the dynamic interplay among the spheres. As information about HRT continues to grow and change, an understanding and application of these spheres of influence can assist physicians in engaging in a dialogue with their patients that allows individual evaluation and application of this new information. PMID:9731166

  6. A Single Institution Consensus on the Use of Sequential or Concurrent Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian P; Boldt, R Gabriel; Potvin, Kylea; Sexton, Tracy; D'Souza, David; Brackstone, Muriel; Lock, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: For hormone-sensitive breast cancers, treatment with breast-conserving surgery, tamoxifen, or aromatase inhibitors, along with adjuvant radiation, is the mainstay of therapy. The ideal timing of hormonal and radiation treatment is not well defined, and there is a significant degree of practice variability between concurrent and sequential treatment regimes. This variability can cause confusion amongst the clinical team resulting in contradictory recommendations, loss of patient trust, and the potential for missed initiation of hormonal therapy. Methods: To address this question, a systematic review of the literature was conducted and presented to the breast cancer multidisciplinary team at the London Regional Cancer Center. A three-round modified Delphi method was used to obtain a consensus on a series of a priori determined statements. Results: With the currently available evidence, the consensus was that hormonal therapy should be given sequentially after radiation. This will limit potential overlapping adverse effects between hormonal therapy and radiation that may decrease completion of treatment. The sequential approach has not been associated with any harm in clinical outcomes, and there is some suggestion of increased toxicity with concurrent use. However, in patients at high risk of distant recurrence, they felt it would be reasonable to consider concurrent treatment to avoid any delay in therapy. Conclusion: The consensus of our institution to utilize a sequential approach will standardize the treatment decisions and reduce the risk of failing to initiate hormonal therapy. Despite the lack of level 1 evidence, the Delphi methodology did provide a high level of confidence for our group to choose the sequential approach. The consensus was developed after a review of the literature revealed that there was no clear superiority of one schedule over the other and evidence that concurrent treatment may increase adverse events. PMID

  7. Hormone therapy and radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: A utility-adjusted number needed to treat (NNT) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Ashesh B.; Kao, Johnny; Heimann, Ruth; Hellman, Samuel . E-mail: s-hellman@uchicago.edu

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify, using the number needed to treat (NNT) methodology, the benefit of short-term ({<=}6 months) hormone therapy adjuvant to radiotherapy in the group of patients with early (clinical stage T1-T2c) prostate cancer. Methods and materials: The absolute biochemical control benefit for the use of hormones adjuvant to radiotherapy in early-stage disease was determined by literature review. A model was developed to estimate the utility-adjusted survival detriment due to the side effects of hormone therapy. The NNTs before and after the incorporation of hormone sequelae were computed; the sign and magnitude of the NNTs were used to gauge the effect of the hormones. Results: The absolute NNT analysis, based on summarizing the results of 8 reports including a total of 3652 patients, demonstrated an advantage to the addition of hormones for the general early-stage prostate cancer population as well as for all prognostic groups. After adjustment for hormone-induced functional loss, the advantage of hormones remained considerable in the high- and intermediate-risk groups, with the utility-adjusted NNT becoming weakened in the low-risk group when the utility compromise from complications of hormones was assumed to be considerable. Conclusions: Short-term hormone therapy seems to be beneficial for selected early-stage prostate cancer patients. The advantage seems to be greatest in the intermediate- and high-risk groups; with current follow-up, the side effects of hormones may outweigh their benefit in certain clinical situations in the favorable group. The present investigation demonstrates the significant role of the NNT technique for oncologic and radiotherapeutic management decisions when treatment complications need to be considered and balanced with the beneficial effects of the treatment.

  8. Hormones and acne: pathophysiology, clinical evaluation, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, D

    2001-09-01

    Hormonal aspects of acne are of particular interest in treating adult women. A review of the role of hormones in the pathogenesis of acne, guidelines for the workup of a suspected endocrine disorder, and an overview of the use of hormonal therapy in women with endocrine problems and in normal women is presented. PMID:11594669

  9. Hormonal therapies in young breast cancer patients: when, what and for how long?

    PubMed

    Christinat, Alexandre; Di Lascio, Simona; Pagani, Olivia

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer in young women (<40 years) is a rare and complex clinical and psychosocial condition, which deserves multidisciplinary and personalized approaches. In young women with hormone-receptor positive disease, 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, with or without ovarian suppression/ablation, is considered the standard endocrine therapy. The definitive role of adjuvant aromatase inhibitors has still to be elucidated: the upcoming results of the Tamoxifen and EXemestane Trial (TEXT) and Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial (SOFT) trials will help understanding if we can widen our current endocrine therapeutic options. The optimal duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy in young women also remains an unresolved issue. The recently reported results of the ATLAS and aTToM trials represent the first evidence of a beneficial effect of extended endocrine therapy in premenopausal women and provide an important opportunity in high-risk young patients. In the metastatic setting, endocrine therapy should be the preferred choice for endocrine responsive disease, unless there is evidence of endocrine resistance or need for rapid disease and/or symptom control. Tamoxifen in combination with ovarian suppression/ablation remains the 1st-line endocrine therapy of choice. Aromatase inhibitors in combination with ovarian suppression/ablation can be considered after progression on tamoxifen and ovarian suppression/ablation. Fulvestrant has not yet been studied in pre-menopausal women. Specific age-related treatment side effects (i.e., menopausal symptoms, change in body image and weight gain, cognitive function impairment, fertility damage/preservation, long-term organ dysfunction, sexuality) and the social impact of diagnosis and treatment (i.e., job discrimination, family management) should be carefully addressed when planning long-lasting endocrine therapies in young women with hormone-receptor positive early and advanced breast cancer. PMID:23819026

  10. The role of hormonal therapy in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Wawrzyniak, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In developed societies, the post-menopausal period covers approximately one third of a woman's life. The deficit of oestrogens observed during the post-menopausal period significantly affects the course of many metabolic processes, causing a number of diseases and in consequence diminishing quality of life. Among others, bones belong to oestrogen-dependent tissues. The deficit of the protective influence of oestrogens compromises the dynamic balance of the bone transformation process towards resorption, thus reducing bone mass and quality, while increasing the risk of low-energy fractures. In recent years, differing views on the application of oestrogen/gestagen therapy have reached the level of controversy. The results of numerous clinical studies are far from unequivocal, with the whole subject one of heated debate. It has been confirmed that hormonal therapy prevents bone quality deterioration, while opening a protective umbrella around the bone, reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. A rational approach to weighing possible advantages against possible risks and a thorough evaluation of a patient's health condition allows for optimal therapy selection. PMID:21365581

  11. [The role of hormonal therapy in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Wawrzyniak, Anna

    2011-01-01

    In developed societies, the post-menopausal period covers approximately one third of a woman's life. The deficit of oestrogens observed during the post-menopausal period significantly affects the course of many metabolic processes, causing a number of diseases and in consequence diminishing quality of life. Among others, bones belong to oestrogen-dependent tissues. The deficit of the protective influence of oestrogens compromises the dynamic balance of the bone transformation process towards resorption, thus reducing bone mass and quality, while increasing the risk of low-energy fractures. In recent years, differing views on the application of oestrogen/gestagen therapy have reached the level of controversy. The results of numerous clinical studies are far from unequivocal, with the whole subject one of heated debate. It has been confirmed that hormonal therapy prevents bone quality deterioration, while opening a protective umbrella around the bone, reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. A rational approach to weighing possible advantages against possible risks and a thorough evaluation of a patient's health condition allows for optimal therapy selection. PMID:22125018

  12. Menopausal hormone therapy and venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is the most effective method of treating vasomotor symptoms and other climacteric symptoms related to estrogen deficiency in peri- and postmenopausal period. In addition to estrogen replacement, women with preserved uterus require the addition of progestagen in order to ensure endometrial safety. One of rare but severe complications of MHT is venous thromboembolism (VTE). The incidence of VTE rises in parallel to women's age and body weight. The condition is also linked to hereditary and acquired risk factors. Oral estrogens increase the risk of venous thromboembolic complications to varying extents, probably depending on their type and dose used. Observational studies have not found an association between an increased risk of VTE and transdermal estrogen treatment regardless of women's age and body mass index (BMI). Micronized progesterone and pregnanes, including dydrogesterone, have no effect on the risk of VTE, whereas norpregnane progestagens cause an additional increase in risk. Among hormonal preparations which are commercially available in Poland, the combination of transdermal estradiol with oral dydrogesterone appears to be the optimum choice, as it does not elevate the risk of VTE (compared to patients not using MHT), and dydrogesterone seems to be the progestagen of choice. PMID:26327865

  13. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy: dilemmas in 2002.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anne

    2003-01-01

    About 6 million women in the United States are prescribed a combined estrogen-progestin regimen during and after the menopause. The immediate benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are relief of menopausal symptoms. Doctors and their patients have long presumed that the benefits on cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis outweigh the possible increased risk of breast cancer or venous thrombosis. The Women's Health Initiative, a National Institutes of Health program, is the first study to compare HRT to placebo in healthy women. The July 2002 report of increased cardiovascular events as well as increased breast cancer diagnosis in women on the HRT arm of the study brought widespread media coverage and has led to distress and confusion among women taking HRT. Women with a personal or family history of breast cancer pose a particular challenge to their physicians when they ask for advice about HRT. PMID:12813923

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and the endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Feeley, K; Wells, M

    2001-01-01

    Modern hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimens contain oestrogen and progestogen, given either in a cyclical or continuous combined manner. Most endometrial biopsies from women on sequential HRT show weak secretory features. Approximately 15% show proliferative activity, although this figure may be less if more than nine days of progestogen is given in each cycle. A small proportion will show an inactive or atrophic endometrium. Up to 50% of biopsies from women on continuous combined HRT contain minimal endometrial tissue for histopathological analysis: this correlates well with an atrophic endometrium with no appreciable pathology. Of the 50% with more substantial material, approximately one half will show endometrial atrophy, and one half will show weak secretory features. Proliferative, menstrual, and pseudodecidual changes are rare. Approximately 20% of women given unopposed oestrogen for one year develop endometrial hyperplasia. The relative risk of endometrial carcinoma is two to three. This is dramatically reduced by the addition of progestogen to the regimen, but cyclical progestogen as part of a sequential HRT regimen does not completely eliminate the risk of carcinoma. The prevalence of endometrial hyperplasia associated with sequential HRT is 5.4%, and that of atypical hyperplasia (endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia) is 0.7%. Continuous combined HRT is not associated with the development of hyperplasia or carcinoma, and may normalise the endometrium of women who have developed complex hyperplasia on sequential HRT. The probability of a histopathologist finding clinically relevant pathology in an endometrial biopsy specimen of a patient on HRT is low and is more likely to be a manifestation of pre-existing disease. Key Words: endometrium • hormone replacement therapy • endometrial hyperplasia • endometrial carcinoma PMID:11376015

  16. [Adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Management of early-risk relapse].

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges; Howayek, Mireille; Atallah, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of adjuvant endocrine therapy for early breast cancer is to prolong overall survival and improve the quality of life of patients. Studies on breast cancer show an early peak of recurrence at two years after surgery and distant recurrences that are responsible for a significant reduction in overall survival. Tamoxifen has been the standard of adjuvant endocrine therapy in breast cancer for years, however only about half of relapses are prevented and there is an early occurrence of serious adverse events due to agonistic estrogenic activity of tamoxifen, such as an increase in the risk of endometrial hyperplasia and venous thromboembolism. The use of aromatase inhibitors is changing this standard with studies covering various clinical settings. They have shown a benefit in many situations, such as an extension of endocrine therapy by tamoxifen, sequential hormonotherapy or up-front adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors. PMID:19623889

  17. [Our experience with hormonal therapy in transsexual patients].

    PubMed

    Weiss, Vladimír; Weiss, Petr; Fifková, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal therapy in transsexual patients (TS) includes sexagens administration: androgens in female-to-male transsexual patients (FtM) and oestrogens and antiandrogens in male-to-female transsexual patients (MtF). Duration of hormonal therapy should continue at least 1 year before gender reassignment surgery. Hormonal therapy supresses former gender and induces partially new gender changes. Hormonal therapy continues subsequently after surgery during life. Hormonal therapy in MtF TS includes oestrogens and antiandrogens application. In very young persons in both groups blocking gonadoliberin analogues can be used. In FtM TS testosterone oneself is given (orally and/or parenterally). Authors describe their own experiences with hormonal treatment in 282 TS (163 FtM and 119 MtF). During hormonal therapy statistically significant weight increasing was found in both groups. Total cholesterol increased in FtM. In MtF during hormonal therapy average prolactin level increased from 350.1 to 570.5 mU/l without clinical significance. Total average hormonal therapy duration was 6.73 years in FtM and 4.64 years in MtF and so overall therapy safety assessment is not possible. Any endocrinopathy occurence in the beginning of surveillance was found in 35 persons (12.4 %): simple goiter, autoimmune thyreoiditis, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, gynecomastia, DM type 1, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Klinefelter syndrome and nonfunctional pituitary adenoma. It is appropriate as well as in other rare medicine conditions to manage diagnosing and therapy in centers with experience with these issues. PMID:25873114

  18. Update and future of hormonal therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, Diane; Chen, WenChieh

    2003-01-01

    Hormonal therapy is an important component in the treatment of women with acne who may or may not have elevated serum androgens. The mainstays of hormonal therapy include oral contraceptives and antiandrogens such as cyproterone acetate, flutamide or spironolactone. Recent research over the past several years has unraveled some of the details regarding the way that the skin and sebaceous glands synthesize and metabolize hormones. The knowledge gained from this work may provide an impetus for future drug discovery in the hormonal treatment of acne and lead to improvements in the care of our patients with acne. PMID:12566806

  19. Hormone therapy for inmates: a metonym for transgender rights.

    PubMed

    Maruri, Silpa

    2011-01-01

    The issue of hormone therapy for transgender inmates, while seemingly limited in importance, is one that involves issues of greater importance for the transgender community. The greatest issue at the heart of the matter is the legal argument that is traditionally used to gain access to hormone therapy: the Eighth Amendment. The Eighth Amendment prohibits deliberate indifference to the medical needs of inmates. Traditionally, transgender inmates have gained access to hormone therapy by appealing to the DSM-IV's classification of Gender Identity Disorder (GID) as a mental illness, and by establishing that prison officials' failure to provide hormone therapy constitutes deliberate indifference to a serious medical need. However, appeal to GID is a double-edged sword: while it allows access to hormone therapy, it does so by describing transgender individuals as somehow sick or infirm. This description is at odds with the transgender community's conceptualization of itself. This Note seeks to square the legal arguments for provision of hormone therapy to transgender inmates with the philosophical backdrop that shapes the transgender rights movement by using Plyler v. Doe as a model. This Note argues that access to hormone therapy by transgender inmates involves the intersection of a quasi-fundamental right with a quasi-suspect class. By utilizing such an argument, the transgender community is not bound by the negative expressive effect that the law may have in describing it as infirm or deficient. PMID:25330561

  20. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in Elderly Patients With Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, David P.; Hsu, Charles C.; Wang Jingya; Makary, Martin A.; Winter, Jordan M.; Robinson, Ray; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients {>=}75 years of age. Methods: The study group of 655 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 12-year period (8/30/1993 to 2/28/2005). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, intraoperative data, pathology data, and patient outcomes were collected and analyzed by adjuvant treatment status and age {>=}75 years. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined clinical predictors of mortality and morbidity. Results: We identified 166 of 655 (25.3%) patients were {>=}75 years of age and 489 of 655 patients (74.7%) were <75 years of age. Forty-nine patients in the elderly group (29.5%) received adjuvant CRT. For elderly patients, node-positive metastases (p = 0.008), poor/anaplastic differentiation (p = 0.012), and undergoing a total pancreatectomy (p = 0.010) predicted poor survival. The 2-year survival for elderly patients receiving adjuvant therapy was improved compared with surgery alone (49.0% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.013); however, 5-year survival was similar (11.7% vs. 19.8%, respectively, p = 0.310). After adjusting for major confounders, adjuvant therapy in elderly patients had a protective effect with respect to 2-year survival (relative risk [RR] 0.58, p = 0.044), but not 5-year survival (RR 0.80, p = 0.258). Among the nonelderly, CRT was significantly associated with 2-year survival (RR 0.60, p < 0.001) and 5-year survival (RR 0.69, p < 0.001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: Adjuvant therapy after PD is significantly associated with increased 2-year but not 5-year survival in elderly patients. Additional studies are needed to select which elderly patients are likely to benefit from adjuvant CRT.

  1. Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in the Adjuvant and Definitive Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T. Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHC) are rare tumors for which large randomized studies regarding the use of radiation are not available. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of IHC in a large group of patients. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,839 patients with IHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results: Patients received either surgery alone (25%), radiation therapy alone (10%), surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (7%) or no treatment (58%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 22-102 years); 52% of patients were male and 81% were Caucasian. Median OS was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-13), 6 (95% CI, 5-6), 7 (95% CI, 6-8), and 3 months for surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy, sugery alone, radiation therapy alone, and no treatment, respectively. The OS was significantly different between surgery alone and surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.014) and radiation therapy alone and no treatment (p < 0.0001). Use of surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy conferred the greatest benefit on OS (HR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.34-0.47), followed by surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.44-0.54) and radiation therapy alone (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59-0.77) compared with no treatment, on multivariate analysis. Propensity score adjusted hazard ratios (controlling for age, race/ethnicity, stage, and year of diagnosis) were also significant (surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy vs. surgery alone (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96); radiation therapy alone vs. no treatment (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76)). Conclusions: The study results suggest that adjuvant and definitive radiation treatment prolong survival, although cure rates remain low. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologics to the treatment of

  2. Profiling and Hormonal Therapy for Acne in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Chaudhuri, Soumik; Jain, Vijay Kumar; Aggarwal, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common condition treated by physicians worldwide. Though most acne patients remit spontaneously, for the ones that do not or are unresponsive to conventional therapy or have obvious cutaneous signs of hyperandrogenism, hormonal therapy is the next option in the therapeutic ladder. It is not strictly indicated for only those patients who have cutaneous or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism, but can be used even without any evidence of hyperandrogenism, for therapy-resistant acne. It can be prescribed as monotherapy, but when used in combination with other conventional therapies, it may prove to be more beneficial. Hormonal evaluation is a prerequisite for hormonal therapy, to identify the cause behind hyperandrogenism, which may be ovarian or adrenal. This article reviews guidelines for patient selection and the various available hormonal therapeutic options, their side-effect profile, indications and contraindications, and various other practical aspects, to encourage dermatologists to become comfortable prescribing them. PMID:24700926

  3. Advances in adjuvant systemic therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Leong, David; Rai, Rajat; Nguyen, Brandon; Lee, Andrew; Yip, Desmond

    2014-10-10

    Non-small-cell lung cancer remains a leading cause of death around the world. For most cases, the only chance of cure comes from resection for localised disease, however relapse rates remain high following surgery. Data has emerged over recent years regarding the utility of adjuvant chemotherapy for improving disease-free and overall survival of patients following curative resection. This paper reviews the clinical trials that have been conducted in this area along with the studies integrating radiation therapy in the adjuvant setting. The role of prognostic gene signatures are reviewed as well as ongoing clinical trials including those incorporating biological or targeted therapies. PMID:25302167

  4. Examples of adjuvant treatment enhancing the antitumor effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Cecic, Ivana; Sun, Jinghai; Chaplin, David J.

    1999-07-01

    Strategies for improving the clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treatment of solid cancers include applications of different types of adjuvant treatments in addition to this modality that may result in superior therapeutic outcome. Examples of such an approach investigated using mouse tumor models are presented in this report. It is shown that the cures of PDT treated subcutaneous tumors can be substantially improved by adjuvant therapy with: metoclopramide (enhancement of cancer cell apoptosis), combretastatin A-4 (selective destruction of tumor neovasculature), Roussin's Black Salt (light activated tumor localized release of nitric oxide), or dendritic cell-based adoptive immunotherapy (immune rejection of treated tumor).

  5. Effectiveness of electrochemotherapy after IFN-α adjuvant therapy of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hribernik, Andrejc; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Bosnjak, Maša

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of electrochemotherapy with immuno-modulatory treatments has already been explored and proven effective. However, the role of interferon alpha (IFN-α) adjuvant therapy of melanoma patients and implication on electrochemotherapy effectiveness has not been explored yet. Therefore, the aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of electrochemotherapy after the previous adjuvant treatment with IFN-α in melanoma patients. Patients and methods The study was a retrospective single-center observational analysis of the patients with advanced melanoma, treated with electrochemotherapy after previous IFN-α adjuvant therapy. Five patients, treated between January 2008 and December 2014, were included into the study, regardless of the time point of IFN-α adjuvant therapy. Results Electrochemotherapy of recurrent melanoma after the IFN-α adjuvant therapy proved to be a safe and effective treatment. Patients with one or two metastases responded completely. Among patients with multiple metastases, there was a variable response rate. In one patient all 23 metastases responded completely, in second patient more than 85% of all together 80 metastases responded completely and in third patient all 5 metastases had partial response. Taking into account all metastases from all patients together there was an 85% complete response rate. Conclusions The study showed that electrochemotherapy of recurrent melanoma after the IFN-α adjuvant therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality, which results in a high complete response rate, not only in single metastasis, but also in multiple metastases. The high complete response rate might be due to an IFN-α immune-editing effect, however, further studies with a larger number of patients are needed to support this presumption. PMID:27069446

  6. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Cancer.gov

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  7. Improved adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with endocrine responsive disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldhirsch, Aron; Colleoni, Marco; Regan, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Results from two randomised global trials (SOFT & TEXT) designed to newly define the most effective components of adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with endocrine responsive disease, showed that for some, those with high risk of relapse, the use of the aromatase inhibitor exemestane together with ovarian function suppression with GnRH analogue (triptorelin) yielded the most favourable treatment outcome compared with tamoxifen. For women with low risk of relapse, treatment with tamoxifen was similar to ovarian function suppression together with either exemestane or tamoxifen. For women with intermediate risk of relapse, ovarian function suppression added to tamoxifen was not inferior to exemestane, while it resulted in superior outcomes compared to tamoxifen alone. Now, these trials provide critical information for the adjuvant treatment of premenopausal women with endocrine responsive breast cancer and are important for the development of future trials for further improvement of adjuvant endocrine therapies for the younger population. PMID:26082801

  8. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  9. Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... recommendations summarize what the Task Force learned: The harms of hormone therapy, when used to prevent chronic ... Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions Potential Benefits and Harms The Task Force found that taking both estrogen ...

  10. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Tied to Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Tied to Depression Study found a 23 percent increased risk compared ... cancer may be at increased risk of developing depression, a new, large study suggests. The findings are ...

  11. Is there a time limit for systemic menopausal hormone therapy?

    PubMed

    Lipold, Laura Dorr; Batur, Pelin; Kagan, Risa

    2016-08-01

    In deciding whether it is time to stop hormone therapy, in addition to the patient's age we need to consider her preferences, symptoms, quality of life, time since menopause, hysterectomy status, and personal risks of osteoporosis, breast cancer, heart disease, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. This article presents the evidence for and against extending hormone therapy and a guide for making this highly individualized and shared decision. PMID:27505882

  12. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  13. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  14. Adverse Events Associated with Hormonal Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi J; Barqawi, Al; Crawford, E. David

    2005-01-01

    With expanding indications for androgen deprivation therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, it is imperative that health care providers be cognizant of the possible adverse effects of therapy, as well as their prevention and treatment. Neurologic and psychiatric effects include depression and declines in cognitive function. Musculoskeletal effects of hormonal therapy include osteoporosis, decrease in muscle mass, and fatigue. Gynecomastia, weight gain, and erectile dysfunction are also seen, as are hematologic effects. Further research is needed to evaluate alternative forms of therapy, such as intermittent hormonal deprivation and antiandrogen monotherapy. PMID:16985883

  15. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Adenocarcinomas of the Ampulla of Vater

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil Rana, Vishal; Evans, Douglas B.; Varadhachary, Gauri; Das, Prajnan; Bhatia, Sumita; Delclos, Marc E.; Janjan, Nora A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Pisters, Peter W.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of ampullary cancers remains undefined. We retrospectively compared treatment outcomes in patients treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy alone versus those who received additional adjuvant CRT. Methods and Materials: Between May 1990 and January 2006, 54 of 96 patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma who underwent potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy also received adjuvant CRT. The median preoperative radiation dose was 45 Gy (range, 30-50.4 Gy) and median postoperative dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included primarily 5-fluorouracil (52%) and capecitabine (43%). Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariate and multivariate statistical methodologies were used to determine significant prognostic factors for local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS). Results: Actuarial 5-year LC, DC, and OS were 77%, 69%, and 64%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, gender, race/ethnicity, tumor grade, use of adjuvant treatment, and sequencing of adjuvant therapy were not significantly associated with LC, DC, or OS. However, on univariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was prognostic for poorer LC and OS (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively); node-positive disease was prognostic for poorer LC (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was independently prognostic for decreased OS (p = 0.002). Among these patients (n = 34), those who received adjuvant CRT had a trend toward improved OS (median, 35.2 vs. 16.5 months; p = 0.06). Conclusions: Ampullary cancers have a distinctly better treatment outcome than pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Higher primary tumor stage (T3/T4), an independent adverse risk factor for poorer treatment outcomes, may warrant the addition of adjuvant CRT to pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  16. Neo-adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma before liver transplantation: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Masato; Aucejo, Federico; Choi, Minsig; Kim, Richard

    2014-05-14

    Liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria is a widely accepted optimal therapy. Neo-adjuvant therapy before transplantation has been used as a bridging therapy to prevent dropout during the waiting period and as a down-staging method for the patient with intermediate HCC to qualify for liver transplantation. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation are the most commonly used method for locoregional therapy. The data associated with newer modalities including drug-eluting beads, radioembolization with Y90, stereotactic radiation therapy and sorafenib will be discussed as a tool for converting advanced HCC to LT candidates. The concept "ablate and wait" has gained the popularity where mandated observation period after neo-adjuvant therapy allows for tumor biology to become apparent, thus has been recommended after down-staging. The role of neo-adjuvant therapy with conjunction of "ablate and wait" in living donor liver transplantation for intermediate stage HCC is also discussed in the paper. PMID:24833861

  17. Hormone therapy and Alzheimer disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huibo; Breitner, John C.S.; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Wang, Junmin; Hayden, Kathleen; Wengreen, Heidi; Corcoran, Chris; Tschanz, JoAnn; Norton, Maria; Munger, Ron; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Observational studies suggest reduced risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) in users of hormone therapy (HT), but trials show higher risk. We examined whether the association of HT with AD varies with timing or type of HT use. Methods: Between 1995 and 2006, the population-based Cache County Study followed 1,768 women who had provided a detailed history on age at menopause and use of HT. During this interval, 176 women developed incident AD. Cox proportional hazard models evaluated the association of HT use with AD, overall and in relation to timing, duration of use, and type (opposed vs unopposed) of HT. Results: Women who used any type of HT within 5 years of menopause had 30% less risk of AD (95% confidence interval 0.49–0.99), especially if use was for 10 or more years. By contrast, AD risk was not reduced among those who had initiated HT 5 or more years after menopause. Instead, rates were increased among those who began “opposed” estrogen-progestin compounds within the 3 years preceding the Cache County Study baseline (adjusted hazard ratio 1.93; 95% confidence interval 0.94–3.96). This last hazard ratio was similar to the ratio of 2.05 reported in randomized trial participants assigned to opposed HT. Conclusions: Association of HT use and risk of AD may depend on timing of use. Although possibly beneficial if taken during a critical window near menopause, HT (especially opposed compounds) initiated in later life may be associated with increased risk. The relation of AD risk to timing and type of HT deserves further study. PMID:23100399

  18. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25311296

  19. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Secondary Hormone Therapy in the Management of Hormone-sensitive and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saad, Fred; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC). However, nearly all patients with mPC progress to castration-resistant PC (CRPC). Arrays of treatments, including secondary hormonal therapies, are available for the treatment of mPC and CRPC, which show efficacy when administered with ADT. Continuation of ADT is recommended for CRPC treatment as therapies are added. New secondary hormonal therapies include abiraterone, targeting the CYP17 enzyme family, and enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor with heightened binding specificity. The optimal decision-making process for CRPC treatment option remains unclear, pending further research and experience. PMID:26282624

  20. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  1. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valerie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  2. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  3. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  4. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Daniel H; Williams, Terence M; Goldstein, Daniel A; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true "net health benefit" from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  5. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2016-02-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  6. [Hormonal therapy of advanced or relapsed ovarian granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Bai, P

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumor is a rare gynecologic malignancy with hormonal activity. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this disease. Most patients present excellent short term prognosis, however, late relapse often occurs, even after many years. Viable treatments of advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor are still limited, and the optimal therapy method has not been established. Compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal therapy is a well-tolerated treatment which can be administrated over a long period of time without serious side effects, and the combined application of hormones may achieve a better outcome. Therefore, hormonal therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment option for patients with advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor, and to extend the tumor-free interval and attenuate the disease progression. Future researches should be focused on the identification of the hormonal therapy which may provide the greatest clinical benefit, comparing and analyzing the effects of different combined therapeutic regimens of hormone drugs, and on the synthesis of drugs highly activating estrogen receptor β expressed in the granulosa cell tumor cells. PMID:27531259

  7. Surgeons’ Volume of Colorectal Cancer Procedures and Collaborative Decision-making about Adjuvant Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Selwyn O.; Ayanian, John Z.; Ko, Clifford Y.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Sandler, Robert S.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed associations of surgeons’ practice volume with processes of care that lead to better outcomes. Objective We surveyed surgeons treating colorectal cancer to determine whether high-volume surgeons were more likely to collaborate with other physicians in decisions about adjuvant therapies. Subjects and methods Surgeons caring for patients with colorectal cancer in multiple regions and health-care organizations were surveyed to assess their volume of colorectal cancer resections and participation in decisions about adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We used logistic regression to assess physician and practice characteristics associated with surgical volume and the relation of surgical volume and these other characteristics to collaborative decision-making regarding adjuvant therapies. Results Of 635 responding surgeons, those who identified themselves as surgical oncologists or colorectal surgeons were more likely than others to report high volume of colorectal cancer resections (p<.001), as were those who practiced at a comprehensive cancer center (P=.06) and attended tumor board meetings weekly (vs. quarterly or less, P=.09). Most surgeons reported a collaborative role in decisions about chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, in adjusted analyses, higher-volume surgeons more often reported a collaborative role with other physicians in decisions about chemotherapy (P<0.001) and radiation therapy (P<0.001). Conclusions Higher-volume surgeons are more likely to report collaborating with other physicians in decisions about adjuvant therapies for patients following colorectal cancer surgery. This collaborative decision-making of higher-volume surgeons may contribute to outcome differences by surgeon volume. PMID:19855265

  8. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  9. Hormonal Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Current Perspectives and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Manish; Singh, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Manoj; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer, various controversial aspects of hormonal therapy have come to light. There has been tremendous progress in this area, marked by several important developments in the availability of various new androgen-suppressing agents and refinements to the existing therapies. Parallel to these developments, various more debatable aspects have arisen in the use of these therapies with regards to their negative impact on quality of life parameters. Various modifications in these hormonal agents, their doses, and protocols have been tried in different scenarios in order to improve ADT tolerability. As a result, these controversies continue to evolve even with optimal use of the androgen ablation therapy. This review assesses the present status of hormonal therapy in metastatic prostate cancer and specifically deals with those aspects of androgen ablation therapy that are still a subject of debate. In spite of the fact that various trials have been conducted, some of which are still ongoing, the multitude of questions related to the best possible use of these hormonal agents have still not been answered. Treatment guidelines concerning these issues are continuing to evolve as progress continues to be made in this field. PMID:25992227

  10. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin; Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked. PMID:25473228

  11. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-01-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked. PMID:25473228

  12. Surgical Management and Adjuvant Therapy for High-Risk and Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    van Akkooi, Alexander C J; Atkins, Michael B; Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lorigan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Wide local excision is considered routine therapy after initial diagnosis of primary melanoma to reduce local recurrences, but it does not impact survival. Sentinel node staging is recommended for melanomas of intermediate thickness, but it has also not demonstrated any indisputable therapeutic effect on survival. The prognostic value of sentinel node staging has been long established and is therefore considered routine, especially in light of the eligibility criteria for adjuvant therapy (trials). Whether completion lymph node dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy improves survival is the question of current trials. The MSLT-2 study is best powered to show a potential benefit, but it has not yet reported any data. Another study, the German DECOG study, presented at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting did not show any benefit but is criticized for the underpowered design and insufficient follow-up. There is no consensus on the use of adjuvant interferon in melanoma. This topic has been the focus of many studies with different regimens (low-, intermediate-, or high-dose and/or short- or long-term treatment). Adjuvant interferon has been shown to improve relapse-free survival but failed to improve overall survival. More recently, adjuvant ipilimumab has also demonstrated an improved relapse-free survival. Overall survival data have not yet been reported due to insufficient follow-up. Currently, studies are ongoing to analyze the use of adjuvant anti-PD-1 and molecular targeted therapies (vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib). In the absence of unambiguously positive approved agents, clinical trial participation remains a priority. This could change in the near future. PMID:27249760

  13. Transoral Laser Microsurgery (TLM) ± Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer: Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jason T.; Milov, Simon; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Document survival, prognostic variables, and functional outcomes of patients with AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer, treated with transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) ± adjuvant therapy. Study Design Analysis of prospectively assembled data pertaining to the above-described patient cohort. Methods Patients treated with TLM for AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer at Washington University School of Medicine from 1996 to 2006 were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Recurrence, survival, functional, and human papilloma virus data were analyzed. Results Eighty-four patients met inclusion criteria. Mean follow-up was 52.6 months. Overall AJCC stages were: III 15% and IV 85%. T stages were T1–2, 74%; T3–4, 26%. Eighty-three patients underwent neck dissection, 50 received adjuvant radiotherapy, and 28 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 94% and 88%, respectively. Disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 96% and 92%, respectively. Six patients recurred (7%): locally (one), regionally (four), and distant (five). T stage, positive margins, and p16 status significantly impacted survival. The addition of adjuvant chemo-therapy in high-risk patients did not significantly impact survival. Five patients (6%) had major surgical complications, but without mortality. Eighty-one percent of patients had acceptable swallowing function at last follow-up. Immediately postoperatively, 17% required G-tubes, which dropped to 3.4% of living patients at 3 years. Conclusions In this population, our findings validate TLM ± adjuvant therapy as a highly effective strategy for survival, locoregional control, and swallowing recovery in AJCC stage III and IV oropharyngeal cancer. Our finding also show that p16 positivity improves survival. PMID:19572271

  14. Adjuvant Therapy for Thymic Carcinoma – A Decade of Experience in a Taiwan National Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Lee, Yu-Chin; Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Yen, Sang-Hue; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Thymic carcinomas are rare tumors for which surgical resection is the first treatment of choice. The role of adjuvant treatment after surgery is unknown because of limited available data. The present study evaluated the efficacy of post-surgery adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Methods To evaluate the role of adjuvant therapy in patients with thymic carcinoma, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with thymic carcinoma who were diagnosed and treated between 2004 and 2014. Results Among 78 patients with thymic carcinoma, 30 patients received surgical resection. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly longer among these patients than among patients who received other treatments (PFS: 88.4 months vs 9.1 months, p<0.001; OS: 134.9 months vs 60.9 months; p = 0.003). Patients with stage III thymic carcinoma who received surgery had a longer OS than patients who did not receive surgery (70.1 months vs 23.9 months; p = 0.017, n = 11). Among 47 patients with stage IV carcinoma, 12 patients who received an extended thymothymectomy had a longer PFS than 35 patients who did not receive surgery (18.9 months vs 8.7 months; p = 0.029). Among 30 patients (with stage I- IV carcinoma) who received primary lesion surgery, 19 patients received an R0 resection and 9 patients of the 19 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. These patients had longer PFS (50.3 months) than 2 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy (5.9 months) or 4 patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (7.5 months) after surgery (p = 0.003). Conclusions Surgical resection should be considered for patients with thymic carcinoma, even for patients with locally advanced or stage IV carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in a better PFS after R0 resection. PMID:26757052

  15. Combination of phytochemicals as adjuvants for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ho, John W S; Cheung, Matt W M

    2014-01-01

    Newer treatments of advanced human cancer are based on combination of cancer drugs that have different mechanism of actions yet the combination strategy may potentiate the anti-cancer effects and cytotoxicity. Recent studies suggest that cancer growth can be inhibited more effectively by combination of phytochemicals that affect different pathways. The apoptotic activity can be modulated by intrinsic and extrinsic molecules. The combination of anti-tumor phytochemicals can be more effective in modulating different signaling pathways associated with tumor cell growth which is the common target for anti-tumor action. Combinations of cytotoxic anti-tumor agents and inhibitors from phytochemicals are believed to act together producing inhibitory mechanisms on cancer growth. This combination strategy shows promise on cancer therapy. However, the combination of phytochemicals in cancer therapy needs to be further investigated to develop a better treatment strategy. Recent patents on anti-tumor phytochemicals are reviewed in this article. PMID:24942759

  16. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Comasco, Erika; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women's brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in several cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  17. What You Should Know about Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... HAT Y OU S HOULD K NOW A BOUT Hormone Therapy Health Risks and Benefits V aginal dryness ... Women _ s Health Ini- tiative in 1993 to study hormone effects. Researchers were expecting to find that hormones ...

  18. Exogenous Hormone Use: Oral Contraceptives, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, and Health Outcomes in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodstein, Francine; Stampfer, Meir J.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II from 1976 to 2016. Results. Oral contraceptive and postmenopausal hormone use were studied in relation to major health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Current or recent oral contraceptive use is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (mainly among smokers), melanoma, and breast cancer, and a lower risk of colorectal and ovarian cancer. Although hormone therapy is not indicated primarily for chronic disease prevention, findings from the NHS and a recent analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative indicate that younger women who are closer to menopause onset have a more favorable risk–benefit profile than do older women from use of hormone therapy for relief of vasomotor symptoms. Conclusions. With updated information on hormone use, lifestyle factors, and other variables, the NHS and NHS II continue to contribute to our understanding of the complex relationship between exogenous hormones and health outcomes in women. PMID:27459451

  19. Evaluation of Senna singueana leaf extract as an alternative or adjuvant therapy for malaria

    PubMed Central

    Hiben, Mebrahtom Gebrelibanos; Sibhat, Gereziher Gebremedhin; Fanta, Biruk Sintayehu; Gebrezgi, Haile Desta; Tesema, Shewaye Belay

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malarial resistance to most antimalarial drugs is the main factor driving the continued effort to identify/discover new agents for combating the disease. Moreover, the unacceptably high mortality rate in severe malaria has led to the consideration of adjuvant therapies. Senna singueana leaves are traditionally used against malaria and fever. Extracts from the leaves of this plant demonstrated in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities, which in turn could reduce the severity of malaria. Extracts from the root bark of this plant exhibited antiplasmodial activity; however, the leaves are the more sustainable resource. Thus, S. singueana leaf was selected for in vivo evaluation as a potential alternative or adjuvant therapy for malaria. Using malaria [Plasmodium berghei ANKA, chloroquine (CQ) sensitive]-infected Swiss albino mice of both sexes, 70% ethanol extract of S. singueana leaves (alone and in combination with CQ) was tested for antimalarial activity and adjuvancy potential. The 4-day suppressive test was used to evaluate antimalarial activity. The dose of S. singueana extract administered was safe to mice and exhibited some parasite suppression effect: extract doses of 200 mg/kg/d, 400 mg/kg/d, and 800 mg/kg/d caused 34.54%, 44.52%, and 47.32% parasite suppression, respectively. Concurrent administration of the extract with CQ phosphate at varied dose levels indicated that the percentage of parasite suppression of this combination was higher than administering CQ alone, but less than the sum of the effects of the extract and CQ acting separately. In conclusion, the study indicated that 70% ethanol extract of S. singueana leaf was safe to mice and possessed some parasite suppression effect. Coadministration of the extract with CQ appeared to boost the overall antimalarial effect, indicating that the combination may have a net health benefit if used as an adjuvant therapy. PMID:26870688

  20. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, Mark B.; Foote, Matthew C.; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Thomas, Janine; Meakin, Janelle; Smithers, B. Mark; Burmeister, Bryan H.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  1. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  2. Potential Role of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Cervical Thymic Neoplasm Involving Thyroid Gland or Neck

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Ha, Sang Yun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul; Seol, Seung Won; Oh, Young Lyun; Han, Joungho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the clinicopathologic features, treatment outcomes, and role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in cervical thymic neoplasm involving the thyroid gland or neck. Materials and Methods The medical and pathologic records of eight patients with cervical thymic neoplasm were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent surgical resection, including thyroidectomy or mass excision. Adjuvant RT was added in five patients with adverse clinicopathologic features. The radiation doses ranged from 54 Gy/27 fractions to 66 Gy/30 fractions delivered to the primary tumor bed and pathologically involved regional lymphatics using a 3-dimensional conformal technique. Results Eight cases of cervical thymic neoplasm included three patients with carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE) and five with ectopic cervical thymoma. The histologic subtypes of ectopic cervical thymoma patients were World Health Organization (WHO) type B3 thymoma in one, WHO type B1 thymoma in two, WHO type AB thymoma in one, and metaplastic thymoma in one, respectively. The median age was 57 years (range, 40 to 76 years). Five patients received adjuvant RT: three with CASTLE; one with WHO type B3; and one with WHO type AB with local invasiveness. After a median follow-up period of 49 months (range, 11 to 203 months), no recurrence had been observed, regardless of adjuvant RT. Conclusion Adjuvant RT after surgical resection might be worthwhile in patients with CASTLE and ectopic cervical thymoma with WHO type B2-C and/or extraparenchymal extension, as similarly indicated for primary thymic epithelial tumors. A longer follow-up period may be needed in order to validate this strategy. PMID:25648096

  3. Early MRI changes in glioblastoma in the period between surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Amelio, Dante; Ricciardi, Giuseppe K; Zoccatelli, Giada; Magon, Stefano; Pizzini, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Beltramello, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the increase in MRI contrast enhancement (CE) occurring in glioblastoma during the period between surgery and initiation of chemo-radiotherapy, thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were analyzed by early post-operative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging within three days of surgery and by pre-adjuvant magnetic resonance (PAMR) examination before adjuvant therapy. Areas of new CE were investigated by use of EPMR diffusion-weighted imaging and PAMR perfusion imaging (by arterial spin-labeling). PAMR was acquired, on average, 29.9 days later than EPMR (range 20-37 days). During this period an increased area of CE was observed for 17/37 patients. For 3/17 patients these regions were confined to areas of reduced EPMR diffusion, suggesting postsurgical infarct. For the other 14/17 patients, these areas suggested progression. For 11/17 patients the co-occurrence of hyperperfusion in PAMR perfusion suggested progression. PAMR perfusion and EPMR diffusion did not give consistent results for 3/17 patients for whom small new areas of CE were observed, presumably because of the poor spatial resolution of perfusion imaging. Before initiation of adjuvant therapy, areas of new CE of resected glioblastomas are frequently observed. Most of these suggest tumor progression, according to EPMR diffusion and PAMR perfusion criteria. PMID:23264191

  4. Cytokines as Adjuvants for Vaccine and Cellular Therapies for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Capitini, Christian M.; Fry, Terry J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement The development of a potent vaccine that can help treat tumors resistant to conventional cytotoxic therapies remains elusive. While part of the problem may be that trials have focused on patients with bulky residual disease, the desire to maximize responses to the vaccine remains. Approach The gamma(c) family of cytokines offer a unique opportunity to support the expansion and effector potential of vaccine-responding T-cells, as well as stimulate other effectors, such as natural killer (NK) cells, to become activated. Results Combining vaccines with cytokines seems logical but can bring unwanted toxicity, as has been observed with interleukin (IL)-2. In addition, the nonspecific activation or expansion of unwanted cell subsets, such as regulatory T-cells, can contribute to global immunosuppression and limit vaccine responses. The development of IL-7 and IL-21 for the clinic offers the promise of enhancing anti-tumor responses but with far less systemic toxicity and no expansion of regulatory T cells. Preclinical studies demonstrate that IL-15 could also improve T-cell, and especially NK-cell, responses as well. Conclusions/Recommendations Future work should expand the use of vaccines with IL-7, IL-21 and hopefully IL-15 in high-risk patients, and consider treatment while in a state of minimal residual disease to maximize benefit. Identifying tumors that can signal through gamma(c) cytokines will also be essential so that induction of relapse will be avoided. PMID:20182648

  5. Emerging Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer: Propolis and its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a bee-metabolized resinous substance (bee glue) from plant sap and gums. It has been in usage as a healing agent since antiquity, yet has not garnered global popularity as a health promoter. Its biological effects, which range from antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, dermatoprotective, anti-allergic, laxative and immunomodulatory to anticancer, have been validated. Propolis has shown efficacy against brain, head and neck, skin, breast, liver, pancreas, kidney, bladder, prostate, colon and blood cancers. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, anti-angiogenesis, prevention of metastasis, cell-cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and moderation of the chemotherapy-induced deleterious side effects have been deduced as the key mechanisms of cancer manipulation. The components conferring antitumor potentials have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester, chrysin, artepillin C, nemorosone, galangin, cardanol, etc. These compounds target various genetic and biochemical pathways of cancer progression. Depending on the botanical sources and the geographical origin, biological activities of propolis vary. Despite phenomenal development in cancer research, conventional therapy falls short in complete malignancy management. The findings obtained so far build hope that propolis as a complementary medicine may address the lacunae. This review documents the recent advances and scope of amendement in cancer remediation with adequate emphasis on the mechanistic aspect of propolis. PMID:25723108

  6. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, Gérald E.; Humbert, Philippe; Berardesca, Enzo; Gaspard, Ulysse; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral) and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin. PMID:24455744

  7. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  8. Omission of adjuvant therapy after gastric cancer resection: development of a validated risk model.

    PubMed

    Datta, Jashodeep; McMillan, Matthew T; Shang, Eric K; Mamtani, Ronac; Lewis, Russell S; Kelz, Rachel R; Teitelbaum, Ursina; Plastaras, John P; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Fraker, Douglas L; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Roses, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Gastric Cancer recommend adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy following after resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) for patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Despite frequent noncompliance with NCCN Guidelines nationally, risk factors underlying adjuvant therapy omission (ATom) have not been well characterized. We developed an internally validated preoperative instrument stratifying patients by incremental risk of ATom. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage IB-III GA undergoing gastrectomy; those receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Multivariable models identified factors associated with ATom between 2006 and 2011. Internal validation was performed using bootstrap analysis; model discrimination and calibration were assessed using k-fold cross-validation and Hosmer-Lemeshow procedures, respectively. Using weighted β-coefficients, a simplified Omission Risk Score (ORS) was created to stratify ATom risk. The impact of ATom on overall survival (OS) was examined in ORS risk-stratified cohorts. In 4,728 patients (median age, 70 years; 64.8% male), 53.7% had ATom. The bootstrap-validated model identified advancing age, comorbidity, underinsured/uninsured status, proximal tumor location, and clinical T1/2 and N0 tumors as independent ATom predictors, demonstrating good discrimination. The simplified ORS, stratifying patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories, predicted incremental risk of ATom (30% vs 53% vs 80%, respectively) and progressive delay to adjuvant therapy initiation (median time, 51 vs 55 vs 61 days, respectively). Patients at moderate/high-risk of ATom demonstrated worsening risk-adjusted mortality compared with low-risk patients (median OS, 26.4 vs 29.2 months). This ORS may aid in rational selection of multimodality treatment sequence in GA. PMID:25964639

  9. Adjuvant sorafenib therapy in patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma: evaluation of predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Gang; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Qingxiang; Ma, Weiwei; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Ti; Kong, Dalu; Li, Qiang; Song, Tianqiang

    2015-04-01

    Currently there is no predictor for survival after adjuvant sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have undergone curative resection. Thirty-eight patients who underwent curative resection of HCC received adjuvant sorafenib therapy between August 2009 and March 2012. Clinicopathological parameters including patient factors, tumor factors, liver background, and inflammatory factors (before surgery and dynamic changes after sorafenib therapy) were evaluated to identify predictors for overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The recurrence rate, mortality rate, and clinicopathological data were also compared. Increased NLR after sorafenib (HR = 3.199, 95 % CI 1.365-7.545, P = 0.008), increased GGT after sorafenib (HR = 3.204, 95 % CI 1.333-7.700, P = 0.009), and the presence of portal vein thrombosis (HR = 2.381, 95 % CI 1.064-5.328, P = 0.035) were risk factors related to RFS. By contrast, increased NLR after sorafenib was the only independent risk factor related to OS (HR = 4.647, 95 % CI 1.266-17.053, P = 0.021). Patients with increased NLR or increased GGT after sorafenib had a higher incidence of recurrence and death. Patients who had increased NLR tended to have higher preoperative levels of NLR and GGT. There were no differences in clinicopathological factors in patients with increased GGT and decreased GGT. In conclusion, increased NLR predicted a worse OS and RFS in patients with HCC who underwent curative resection with adjuvant sorafenib therapy. Increased GGT predicted a worse OS. NLR and GGT can be monitored dynamically before and after sorafenib therapy. PMID:25750040

  10. Antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy to prevent or ameliorate vasodilatory shock.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2002-09-01

    Vasodilatory shock is a syndrome with high mortality. It is becoming evident that depletion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) after cardiac surgery or during sepsis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. Established vasodilatory shock responds well to exogenous ADH infusion. It is possible that preventing ADH depletion at an earlier stage may abrogate the onset of vasodilatory shock, or at least reduce its severity. This paper examines the evidence supporting this concept, and the potential areas of concern in considering this particular type of hormone replacement therapy. PMID:12208165

  11. Standard of Care and Controversies in the Adjuvant Endocrine Treatment of Hormone-Responsive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschlag, Dirk O.; Maass, Nicolai; Schem, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hormone-responsive early breast cancer is a highly curable disease. In premenopausal women, tamoxifen (TAM) is still the standard treatment. Nowadays, up to 10 years of TAM can be safely administered, especially in women who remain premenopausal. Patients who are considered to be perimenopausal should be initially treated like premenopausal patients. Depending on their serum hormone levels, these patients can be safely switched to an aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy once the estradiol (E2) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels prove the established postmenopausal status. In postmenopausal women, several sequences of endocrine treatment are available. The AI therapy can be induced upfront or sequentially by switching from Tam to AI and vice versa. Extended endocrine therapy, by adding up to 5 years of letrozole after 5 years of TAM, has also been proven to be beneficial in certain patient subgroups. Genotyping of cytochromes such as CYP2D6 did not have any added value in identifying patients who are at higher risk of recurrence. Nevertheless, in all patients the side effects need to be given high consideration. New strategies developed to overcome endocrine resistance are tested in clinical studies. New co-administered drugs such as specific inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Src, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) do improve endocrine responsiveness in metastatic disease and will eventually be introduced in the treatment of early breast cancer. PMID:25404889

  12. Impact of Adjuvant Therapy on Survival in Curatively Resected Gallbladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, Anupam Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) has the propensity to fail at loco-regional (LR) and distant sites despite aggressive radical surgery. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiotherapy (RT), systemic chemotherapy (CT) and chemoradiation (CRT) is the usual practice. Due to rarity of this disease, there is limited evidence to suggest the type of adjuvant treatment which should be offered to the patients. Aim The study was conducted to evaluate the impact of adjuvant treatment on curatively resected GBC patients. Settings and Design Histological proven patients of GBC registered between June, 2008 and July, 2014 were identified from our hospital database and retrospective analysis was done. Materials and Methods Patients of GBC who had curative resection followed by adjuvant treatment as RT alone, CT alone or CRT were included in the study. Statistical Analysis Adverse prognostic factors and the effect of adjuvant treatment on overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were evaluated using Cox Regression Method and Kaplan Meier plot. Results We identified 33 patients of which 23 were Stage I or II disease (Early disease) and the remaining 10 were Stage III or IV disease (Advanced disease). All except one patient had adenocarcinoma. A total of 5 patients were treated with RT alone while 16 patients received CT alone. The remaining 12 patients were treated with CRT. Median follow-up period was 8.5 months. At analysis 4 were alive while the remaining 29 were dead due to disease. With regard to “Early disease” patients who had RT alone, CT alone and CRT, the median OS was 22.3, 10.3 and 15.2 months respectively (p = .440). Cohort of patients with “Advanced disease” who were treated with CT alone and CRT the median OS was 7.5 and 7.0 months respectively (p = .643). On multivariate analysis none of the prognostic factors had an adverse impact on survival. Conclusion The impact of adjuvant treatment in the form of RT, CT or CRT after curative resection

  13. The association of adjuvant therapy with survival at the population level following pancreatic adenocarcinoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, Daniel J.; Raju, Ravish S.; Dixon, Matthew E.; Shin, Elizabeth; Li, Qing; Liu, Ning; Elmi, Maryam; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Paszat, Lawrence; Kiss, Alexander; Earle, Craig C.; Mittmann, Nicole; Coburn, Natalie G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Using a retrospective observational cohort approach, the overall survival (OS) following curative-intent resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) was defined at the population level according to adjuvant treatment, and predictors of OS were identified. Methods Patients undergoing resection of PC in the province of Ontario between 2005 and 2010 were identified using the provincial cancer registry, and linked to databases that include all treatments received and outcomes experienced in the province. Pathology reports were abstracted for staging and margin status. Patients were identified as having received chemotherapy (CT), chemoradiation therapy (CRT), or no adjuvant treatment (NAT). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of patients surviving ≥6 months was performed, and predictors of OS identified by log-rank test. Cox multivariable analysis was used to define independent predictors of OS. Results Among the 473 patients undergoing PC resection, the median survival was 17.8 months; for the 397 who survived ≥6 months following surgery, the 5-year OS for the CT, CRT, and NAT groups was 21%, 16%, and 17%, respectively (p = 0.584). Lymph node-negative patients demonstrated improved OS associated with chemotherapy on multivariable analysis (HR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.25–3.83 for NAT vs. CT). Conclusions Following PC resection, only patients with negative lymph nodes demonstrated improved OS associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27037203

  14. Tailoring Adjuvant Radiation Therapy by Intraoperative Imaging to Detect Residual Cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Melodi J; Weissleder, Ralph; Kirsch, David G

    2015-10-01

    For many solid cancers, radiation therapy is offered as an adjuvant to surgical resection to lower rates of local recurrence and improve survival. However, a subset of patients treated with surgery alone will not have a local recurrence. Currently, there is no way to accurately determine which patients have microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed after surgery and therefore are most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. To address this problem, a number of technologies have been developed to try to improve margin assessment of resected tissue and to detect residual cancer in the tumor bed. Moreover, some of these approaches have been translated from the preclinical arena into clinical trials. Here, we review different types of intraoperative molecular imaging systems for cancer. Optical imaging techniques like epi-illumination, fluorescence molecular tomography and optoacoustic imaging can be coupled with exogenous fluorescent imaging probes that accumulate in tumors passively via the enhanced permeability and retention effect or are targeted to tumor tissues based on affinity or enzyme activity. In these approaches, detection of fluorescence in the tumor bed may indicate residual disease. Protease activated probes have generated great interest because of their potential for leading to high tumor to normal contrast. Recently, the first Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and activation of a protease activated probe was conducted. Spectroscopic methods like radiofrequency spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are based on energy absorption and scattering, respectively, have also been tested in humans and are able to distinguish between normal and tumors tissues intraoperatively. Most recently, multimodal contrast agents have been developed that target tumors and contain both fluorescent dyes and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, allowing for preoperative planning and intraoperative margin assessment with a single contrast

  15. Adjuvant therapy of melanoma with interferon: lessons of the past decade

    PubMed Central

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Kirkwood, John M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of interferon alpha (IFNα2) given alone or in combination has been widely explored in clinical trials over the past 30 years. Despite the number of adjuvant studies that have been conducted, controversy remains in the oncology community regarding the role of this treatment. Recently an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis at longer follow-up was reported, showing a statistically significant benefit for IFN in relation to relapse-free survival, without any difference according to dosage (p = 0.2) or duration of IFN therapy (p = 0.5). Most interestingly, there was a statistically significant benefit of IFN upon overall survival (OS) that translates into an absolute benefit of at least 3% (CI 1–5%) at 5 years. Thus, both the individual trials and this meta-analysis provide evidence that adjuvant IFNα2 significantly reduces the risk of relapse and mortality of high-risk melanoma, albeit with a relatively small absolute improvement in survival in the overall population. We have surveyed the international literature from the meta-analysis (2006) to summarize and assimilate current biological evidence that indicates a potent impact of this molecule upon the tumor microenvironment and STAT signaling, as well as the immunological polarization of the tumor tissue in vivo. In conclusion, we argue that there is a compelling rationale for new research upon IFN, especially in the adjuvant setting where the most pronounced effects of this agent have been discovered. These efforts have already shed light upon the immunological and proinflammatory predictors of therapeutic benefit from this agent – that may allow practitioners to determine which patients may benefit from IFN therapy, and approaches that may enable us to overcome resistance or enhance the efficacy of IFN. Future efforts may well build toward patient-oriented therapy based upon the knowledge of the unique molecular features of this disease and the immune system of each melanoma patient. PMID

  16. Hormonal therapy for acne: why not as first line therapy? facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Katsambas, Andreas D; Dessinioti, Clio

    2010-01-01

    Standard systemic therapeutic agents used in acne include oral antimicrobials, isotretinoin, and hormonal agents. Appropriate patient selection is the key to decide when to use hormonal agents as first-line therapy as well as to achieve optimal results. Indications of hormonal therapy in acne in girls and women include proven ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, recalcitrant acne, acne not responding to repeated courses of oral isotretinoin, acne tarda, polycystic ovary syndrome, or the presence of clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as androgenic alopecia or the presence of the seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, alopecia syndrome. We describe the hormonal agents currently available for acne treatment, discuss their indications and contraindications, and address the question of whether they may be used as a first-line therapy in acne. PMID:20082945

  17. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours. PMID:9010027

  18. Celecoxib plus hormone therapy versus hormone therapy alone for hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: first results from the STAMPEDE multiarm, multistage, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas D; Sydes, Matthew R; Mason, Malcolm D; Clarke, Noel W; Anderson, John; Dearnaley, David P; Dwyer, John; Jovic, Gordana; Ritchie, Alastair WS; Russell, J Martin; Sanders, Karen; Thalmann, George N; Bertelli, Gianfilippo; Birtle, Alison J; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Protheroe, Andrew; Sheehan, Denise; Srihari, Narayanan; Parmar, Mahesh KB

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Long-term hormone therapy alone is standard care for metastatic or high-risk, non-metastatic prostate cancer. STAMPEDE—an international, open-label, randomised controlled trial—uses a novel multiarm, multistage design to assess whether the early additional use of one or two drugs (docetaxel, zoledronic acid, celecoxib, zoledronic acid and docetaxel, or zoledronic acid and celecoxib) improves survival in men starting first-line, long-term hormone therapy. Here, we report the preplanned, second intermediate analysis comparing hormone therapy plus celecoxib (arm D) with hormone therapy alone (control arm A). Methods Eligible patients were men with newly diagnosed or rapidly relapsing prostate cancer who were starting long-term hormone therapy for the first time. Hormone therapy was given as standard care in all trial arms, with local radiotherapy encouraged for newly diagnosed patients without distant metastasis. Randomisation was done using minimisation with a random element across seven stratification factors. Patients randomly allocated to arm D received celecoxib 400 mg twice daily, given orally, until 1 year or disease progression (including prostate-specific antigen [PSA] failure). The intermediate outcome was failure-free survival (FFS) in three activity stages; the primary outcome was overall survival in a subsequent efficacy stage. Research arms were compared pairwise against the control arm on an intention-to-treat basis. Accrual of further patients was discontinued in any research arm showing safety concerns or insufficient evidence of activity (lack of benefit) compared with the control arm. The minimum targeted activity at the second intermediate activity stage was a hazard ratio (HR) of 0·92. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00268476, and with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN78818544. Findings 2043 patients were enrolled in the trial from Oct 17, 2005, to Jan 31, 2011, of whom 584 were randomly

  19. Predicting Response to Hormonal Therapy and Survival in Men with Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Petros D.; Robins, Diane M.; Hussain, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the cornerstone of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. Despite several decades of clinical experience with this therapy there are no standard predictive biomarkers for response. Although several candidate genetic, hormonal, inflammatory, biochemical, metabolic biomarkers have been suggested as potential predictors of response and outcome, none has been prospectively validated nor has proven clinical utility to date. There is significant heterogeneity in the depth and duration of hormonal response and in the natural history of advanced disease; therefore to better optimize/individualize therapy and for future development, identification of biomarkers is critical. This review summarizes the current data on the role of several candidate biomarkers that have been evaluated in the advanced/metastatic disease setting. PMID:22705096

  20. Parathyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-X; Zhu, X-Y; Mei, G-H

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of human parathyroid hormone replacement therapy on specific disease-related outcomes in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until January 13, 2015 for randomized trials using the following search terms: hypoparathyroidism, parathyroid hormone/PTH, and hormone replacement therapy. Five randomized controlled trials (n=245) that investigated effect of either PTH (1-34) (3 trials) or PTH (1-84) (2 trials) on serum calcium, phosphate, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels, and urine level of calcium were included in the meta-analysis. Both PTH (1-34) and PTH (1-84) therapies were not associated with change in serum calcium level compared with calcitriol/placebo. The level of 24-h urine calcium excretion had a significant decrease in PTH (1-34)-treated group compared placebo/calcitriol (control) group (p≤0.012). PTH (1-34) did not change serum phosphate (p=0.053). PTH (1-84) did not change level of 24-h urine calcium excretion compared with control (p≥0.214) but it did decrease the levels of serum phosphorous (p=0.000). Both PTH-replacement therapies were not associated with change in serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level compared with control (p≥0.606), but were associated with a significant decrease in serum 25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels (p≤0.04). In conclusion, although the number of randomized trial is limited, our meta-analysis suggests that PTH (1-34) replacement therapy may maintain the serum calcium levels in the normal range by reducing the levels of urine calcium excretion, and both replacement therapies may maintain 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D serum levels by reducing serum level of 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. PMID:27254756

  1. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy from holistic and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herrick, C A; Douglas, V; Carlson, J H

    1996-01-01

    Myths and other issues surrounding menopause are examined on the basis of historical and current literature from medicine, psychiatry, and psychiatric nursing, and on current research. Changes in the psychiatric view of menopause and mental illness reflect a more holistic view of menopause. Some effects of menopause during this normal transitional phase of a woman's life are explored with respect to the developmental, physiological, and cognitive/psychosocial domains. Concepts of menopause as disease or as normal development are discussed as well as issues related to "care or cure" interventions for menopausal women. Evidence supports the need for systematic longitudinal research studies on the use of hormone therapies to provide information on their long-term effects on the menopausal woman. The use of hormone therapies alone or in conjunction with other holistic interventions is discussed. Nurses have a professional responsibility to come to terms with the continuing conflict related to hormone therapies so that they may provide appropriate nursing interventions to celebrate this passage rather than deny it. PMID:8707535

  2. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Indications and Controversies for Neoadjuvant Therapy, Adjuvant Therapy, Intraoperative Radiation Therapy, and Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Larrier, Nicole A; Czito, Brian G; Kirsch, David G

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare mesenchymal cancers that pose a treatment challenge. Although small superficial soft tissue sarcomas can be managed by surgery alone, adjuvant radiotherapy in addition to limb-sparing surgery substantially increases local control of extremity sarcomas. Compared with postoperative radiotherapy, preoperative radiotherapy doubles the risk of a wound complication, but decreases the risk for late effects, which are generally irreversible. For retroperitoneal sarcomas, intraoperative radiotherapy can be used to safely escalate the radiation dose to the tumor bed. Patients with newly diagnosed sarcoma should be evaluated before surgery by a multidisciplinary team that includes a radiation oncologist. PMID:27591502

  3. Adherence to hormone therapy among women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the excellent results obtained with hormone therapy, the long treatment period and the side effects associated with its use make patient adherence difficult. Moreover, certain aspects of health care can mitigate or exacerbate non-adherence. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with adherence to hormone therapy for breast cancer, with the goal of contributing to the reformulation of the care process and to improvements in outcomes. Method This was a retrospective longitudinal study based on secondary data. The study integrated and analyzed data from a cohort of 5,861 women with breast cancer who were identified in the databases of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute [Instituto Nacional de Câncer - INCA] and the Unified Health System [Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS]. All of the patients were treated at INCA, which dispenses free medication, and the follow-up period lasted from 01/01/2004 to 10/29/2010. The outcome of interest was hormone treatment adherence, which was defined as the possession of medication, and a logistic regression model was employed to identify the socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical, and health care variables that were independently associated with the variations in this outcome. Results The proportion of women who adhered to hormone therapy was 76.3%. The likelihood of adherence to hormone therapy increased with each additional year of age, as well as among women with a secondary or higher level education, those with a partner, those who underwent surgery, those who had more consultations with a breast specialist and clinical oncologist, and those who underwent psychotherapy; the effect for the latter increased with each additional consultation. Conversely, the likelihood of adherence was lower among patients at a non-curable stage, those who were alcohol drinkers, those who received chemotherapy, those who had undergone more tests and had more hospitalizations, and those who used tamoxifen and combined

  4. Tamoxifen as the First Targeted Long Term Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an unlikely pioneering medicine in medical oncology. Nevertheless, the medicine has continued to surprise us, perform and save lives for the past 40 years. Unlike any other medicine in oncology, it is used to treat all stages of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, male breast cancer, pioneered the use of chemoprevention by reducing the incidence of breast cancer in women at high risk and induces ovulation in subfertile women! The impact of tamoxifen is ubiquitous. However, the power to save lives from this unlikely success story came from the first laboratory studies which defined that “longer was going to be better” when tamoxifen was being considered as an adjuvant therapy (Jordan 1978 Use of the DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinoma system for the evaluation of tamoxifen as a potential adjuvant therapy Reviews in Endocrine Related Cancer. October Supplement: 49–55.). This is that success story, with a focus on the interdependent components of: excellence in drug discovery, investment in self-selecting young investigators, a conversation with Nature, a conversation between the laboratory and the clinic, and the creation of the Oxford Overview Analysis. Each of these factors was essential to propel the progress of tamoxifen to evolve as an essential part of the fabric of society. “Science is adventure, discovery, new horizons, insight into our world, a means of predicting the future and enormous power to help others”(Hoagland 1990).- Mahlon Hoagland, MD. Director, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology (1970–85) PMID:24659478

  5. A review of hormonal therapy for female pattern (androgenic) alopecia.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2008-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (female androgenetic alopecia) is a common, but puzzling, condition in women. Approximately 10 percent of pre-menopausal women show evidence of androgenetic alopecia. Age increases the incidence and 50-75 percent of women 65 years or older suffer from this condition. Only 2 percent topical mindoxidil is approved for treating female androgenetic alopecia. Reviews suggest that anti-hormonal therapy (e.g. cyproterone acetate, spironolactone) is helpful in treating female pattern alopecia in some women who have normal hormone levels. The use of hormonal therapies is most extensively studied in post-menopausal women. Several studies have suggested that cyproterone acetate with or without ethinyl estradiol and spironolactone can ameliorate female androgenetic alopecia in women with normal hormone levels, but larger controlled studies need to be done. Flutamide was found to be more effective than spironolactone or cyproterone in one study. Testosterone conversion inhibitors have been tried in post-menopausual women with normal hormone levels to treat alopecia. No study has shown that 1 mg of finasteride effectively treats female androgenetic alopecia but doses of 2.5 and 5 mg finasteride have helped some women in a few open studies. One case report notes the utility of dutasteride after finasteride failed. The role and place of anti-androgentic agents in female androgenetic alopecia in both pre and post-menopausal women remains to be fully defined. The need for effective agents is highlighted by the paucity of effective treatments and the substantial psychosocial impact of alopecia on women. PMID:18627703

  6. Adjuvant Therapy with High-Dose Medroxyprogesterone Acetate for Operable Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koyama

    1999-04-25

    BACKGROUND: Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) produces a comparable or higherresponse rate in metastatic breast cancer compared with tamoxifen which is alsocommonly used for adjuvant endocrine therapy. Several studies in the West have indicated the efficacy of MPA when used as an adjuvant to surgery in certain subsets of patients. The present study was undertaken as a multicenter open study in Japan to investigate the safety and efficacy of MPA in adjuvant endocrine therapy. Method and Patients: A combination of 800 mg/day MPA and a fluorouracil compound for 6 months was given postoperatively to 119 patients with stage II or IIIabreast cancer in 32 participating hospitals between June 1987 and June 1989. RESULTS: Among the 119 patients, 59 patients (49.6%) experienced some kind ofadverse reaction. The major adverse reaction was abnormal menstruation, seen in 13 (25.0%) of the 52 premenopausal patients. Vaginal bleeding was a major adverse reaction in the 67 postmenopausal patients (8/67 or 11.9%). An increase in body weight and moon face were observed in 23 (19.3%) and 9 (7.6%) of the 119 patients, respectively. Administration of drugs was discontinued because of adversereaction in 17 patients (14.3%), and dose reduction or temporary suspension wasnecessary in 7 patients (5.9%). Increase in body weight was the main reason fordiscontinuation of the treatment. No severe adverse reactions were observed. After a median follow-up of 74.5 months (range, 2.2-90.0 months), 84 of the 119 patients are alive with no evidence of disease. The 3-year and 5-year disease-freesurvival rates were 88.2% and 82.6% in stage II patients, and 64.7% and 52.9% in stage IIIa patients, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year disease-free survivalrates according to age were 87.8% and 79.3% in patients aged 50 years or more, and 78.6% and 71.4% in patients aged under 50 years. CONCLUSION: These results show that 800 mg/day MPA plus a fluorouracil compound can be administered with acceptable

  7. Bicalutamide-activated oncolytic adenovirus for the adjuvant therapy of high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T J; Höti, N; Liu, C; Chowdhury, W H; Li, Y; Zhang, Y; Lupold, S E; Deweese, T; Rodriguez, R

    2013-07-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue-specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer (PCa) gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate-specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen-suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate-specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A and AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and nonsteroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR-responsive genes and E1A-responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of high-risk PCas. PMID:23764901

  8. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  9. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Thompson, Ian; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Wolf, J. Stuart; Sartor, Oliver; Klein, Eric; Hahn, Carol; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Faraday, Martha M.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  10. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable gastric cancer? A practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Craig C.; Maroun, Jean; Zuraw, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Objective To make recommendations on the use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy in addition to surgery in patients with resectable gastric cancer (T1–4, N1–2, M0). Options Neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments compared with “curative” surgery alone. Outcomes Overall survival, disease-free survival, and adverse effects. Evidence The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify randomized trials. Values Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative (CCOPGI) Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and methodologists. A systematic review of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice, to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. This report has been reviewed and approved by the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group, comprising medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, a pathologist and 2 community representatives. Benefits, harms and costs When compared with surgery alone, at 3 years adjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been shown to increase overall survival by 9% (50% v. 41%, p = 0.005) and to improve relapse-free survival from 31% to 48% (p = 0.001). At 5 years, it has been shown to increase overall survival by 11.6% (40% v. 28.4%) and to improve relapse-free survival from 25% to 38% (p < 0.001). Treatment has been associated with toxic deaths in 1% of patients. The most frequent adverse effects (> grade 3 [Southwest Oncology Group toxicity scale] are hematologic (54%), gastrointestinal (33%), influenza-like (9%), infectious (6%) and neurologic (4%). The radiation fields used can possibly damage the left kidney, resulting in hypertension and other renal problems. Furthermore, this therapy could increase the demand on radiation resources. Physicians and patients should understand the tradeoffs between survival benefit

  11. Influence of Patient and Treatment Factors on Adherence to Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Catherine M.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Casillo, Frances E.; Cohen, Susan M.; Dailey, Meredith M.; Donovan, Heidi S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.; Sherwood, Paula R.; Sereika, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To comprehensively assess the patient and illness or treatment factors that may predict nonadherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy and to explore whether an interaction occurs between these factors in women with breast cancer. Design Repeated-measures design. Setting The Outpatient Services of the Women's Cancer Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and participants' homes. Sample 91 women with early-stage breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Methods Adherence was assessed continuously for the first 18 months of endocrine therapy. Patient and illness or treatment factors were assessed at four time points (Time 1 to Time 4). Time 1 (baseline) was within two weeks prior to the initiation of endocrine therapy. Times 2–4 occurred at six-month intervals, as many as 18 months after Time 1. Main Research Variables Adherence, patient factors, and illness or treatment factors. Findings Adherence to endocrine therapy declined significantly during the first 18 months of treatment in women with breast cancer. The presence of negative mood and symptoms before starting treatment predicted nonadherence to endocrine therapy over time. Perceptions of financial hardship, symptoms, disease stage, and more complex medication regimens intensified the effect of negative mood on adherence over time. Conclusions Women with breast cancer may be at risk for nonadherence to prescribed endocrine therapy if they experience depression or anxiety and symptoms prior to initiating therapy. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses should be alert to women with breast cancer who are depressed or anxious or who are experiencing symptoms. Management of negative mood and symptoms may result in better adherence. PMID:24769592

  12. Genomic Classifier Identifies Men With Adverse Pathology After Radical Prostatectomy Who Benefit From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Den, Robert B.; Yousefi, Kasra; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Abdollah, Firas; Choeurng, Voleak; Feng, Felix Y.; Dicker, Adam P.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Davicioni, Elai; Karnes, R. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal timing of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) is unclear. We hypothesized that a genomic classifier (GC) would provide prognostic and predictive insight into the development of clinical metastases in men receiving post-RP RT and inform decision making. Patients and Methods GC scores were calculated from 188 patients with pT3 or margin-positive prostate cancer, who received post-RP RT at Thomas Jefferson University and Mayo Clinic between 1990 and 2009. The primary end point was clinical metastasis. Prognostic accuracy of the models was tested using the concordance index for censored data and decision curve analysis. Cox regression analysis tested the relationship between GC and metastasis. Results The cumulative incidence of metastasis at 5 years after RT was 0%, 9%, and 29% for low, average, and high GC scores, respectively (P = .002). In multivariable analysis, GC and pre-RP prostate-specific antigen were independent predictors of metastasis (both P < .01). Within the low GC score (< 0.4), there were no differences in the cumulative incidence of metastasis comparing patients who received adjuvant or salvage RT (P = .79). However, for patients with higher GC scores (≥ 0.4), cumulative incidence of metastasis at 5 years was 6% for patients treated with adjuvant RT compared with 23% for patients treated with salvage RT (P < .01). Conclusion In patients treated with post-RP RT, GC is prognostic for the development of clinical metastasis beyond routine clinical and pathologic features. Although preliminary, patients with low GC scores are best treated with salvage RT, whereas those with high GC scores benefit from adjuvant therapy. These findings provide the first rational selection of timing for post-RP RT. PMID:25667284

  13. Withdrawal of hormone therapy and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-06-01

    Many menopause specialists follow the principle of prescribing postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) for the shortest duration needed, in order to decrease the risk of some related serious adverse effects, such as breast cancer. Based on several large studies, it seems, however, that withdrawal of HT may be associated with immediate, though small increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Cessation of HT correlates with increased risk of fractures as well. This information should be relayed to hormone users while discussing the continuation of HT with their health-care provider, but, since the potential cardiovascular harm is actually very small, it should not deter symptomatic women from using HT when needed. PMID:27075839

  14. A Prospective Cohort Study on Cardiotoxicity of Adjuvant Trastuzumab Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Erika; Jug, Borut; Blagus, Rok; Zakotnik, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiotoxicity is an important side effect of trastuzumab therapy and cardiac surveillance is recommended. Objectives The aim of our study was to prospectively assess baseline patients' characteristics, level of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and echocardiographic parameters as possible predictors of trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction. Methods In a prospective cohort study, clinical, echocardiographic and neurohumoral assessment was performed at baseline, after 4, 8 and 12 months in breast cancer patients undergoing post-anthracycline (3-4 cycles) adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction was defined as a decline of ≥ 10% in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Results 92 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 9.0 years) were included. Patients who developed trastuzumab-related LVEF decline ≥ 10% (20.6%) during treatment had significantly higher baseline LVEF (70.7 ± 4.4%) than those without (64.8 ± 5.5%) (p = 0.0035). All other measured baseline parameters (age, body mass index, arterial hypertension, level of NT-proBNP and other echocardiographic parameters) were not identified as significant. Conclusions Our findings suggest that baseline patient' characteristics, level of NT-proBNP and echocardiographic parameters, as long as they are within normal range, are not a reliable tool to predict early trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction in patients undergoing post-low dose anthracycline adjuvant trastuzumab therapy. A LVEF decline in patients with high-normal baseline level although statistically significant is not clinically relevant. PMID:27305108

  15. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-12-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  16. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  17. Adjuvant role of radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer without pathological lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Lee, Yoon Se; Kwon, Minsu; Kim, Ji Won; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Nam, Soon Yuhl

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion The application of adjuvant RT to reduce recurrence should be tailored in cases of pathologically negative node metastasis. Objectives The treatment modality following surgical resection of advanced laryngeal cancer is determined by adverse factors. Aside from lymph node metastasis (LNM) or positive margins, definite risk factors supporting adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) have not been clearly suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for advanced laryngeal cancer without LNM and the role of RT. Materials and methods Pathologically T3 and T4-staged laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma without LNM were reviewed. The patients were classified into RT (+) (n = 22) and RT (-) (n = 38) groups. Results Five-year overall survival (OS) of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 84.4% and 83.8%, respectively. Five-year disease-specific survival of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 88.4% and 93.9%. Five-year local control rate of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 94.7% and 91.3%. The factors affecting OS were smoking history and recurrence history (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis, smoking history and recurrence history were determining factors for 5-year OS (p = 0.024 and p = 0.047, respectively). PMID:26924463

  18. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the safety, efficacy and anti-tumor effects of a surgery adjuvant treatment on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This approach combined suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by formolized tumor cells and irradiated xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The post-surgical margin of the cavity was infiltrated with lipid-complexed thymidine kinase suicide gene coadministrated with ganciclovir. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. With respect to surgery-treated controls (SC), this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of patients local disease-free from 6 to 58% and distant metastases-free from 43 to 78% (Fisher's Exact test). In addition, CT significantly improved both SC overall 78 (23-540) and metastasis-free survival 112 (0-467) days to more than 1312 days (respective ranges: 43-1312 and 0-1312) (Kaplan-Meier analysis). In those patients subjected to partial surgery or presenting local recurrence, the efficacy of CT was verified by a 49% of objective responses that averaged 85% of tumor mass loss, while 22% displayed tumor progression as 94% of SC did. Therefore, surgery adjuvant CT controlled tumor growth, delaying or preventing post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life. PMID:18033308

  19. Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Breast Cancer Palliative Care and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a life-threatening disease among women worldwide with annual rates of reported incidence and death increasing alarmingly. Chemotherapy is a recommended and effective treatment option for breast cancer; however, the narrow therapeutic indices and varied side effects of currently approved drugs present major hurdles in increasing its effectiveness. An increasing number of literature evidence indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in treatment-related symptom control and alleviation of side effects plays an important role in increasing survival rate and quality of life in breast cancer patients. This review focuses on the use of herbal medicines and acupuncture in palliative care and as adjuvants in the treatment of breast cancer. Herbal medicinal treatments, the correlation of clinical use with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action, and the use of certain acupoints in acupuncture are summarized. The aim of this review is to facilitate an understanding of the current practice and usefulness of herbal medicine and acupuncture as adjuvants in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23840256

  20. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  1. Prostate changes related to therapy: with special reference to hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Galosi, Andrea B; Zizzi, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Bracarda, Sergio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2014-08-01

    Hormone and radiation therapy have traditionally been used in prostate cancer (PCa). Morphological effects are often identified in needle biopsies and surgical specimens. A range of histological changes are seen in the non-neoplastic prostate and in the pre-neoplastic and neoplastic areas. Other ablative therapies, including cryotherapy, and emerging focal therapies, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy and interstitial laser thermotherapy, may induce changes on the prostate. As new compounds are developed for prostate cancer treatment, it is important to document their effects on benign and neoplastic prostate tissue. PMID:25325826

  2. Use of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil and Radiation Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection Among the Elderly and Impact on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Joshua; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; McBride, Russell; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In randomized trials patients with resected nonmetastatic gastric cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoRT) had better survival than those who did not. We investigated the effectiveness of adjuvant chemoRT after gastric cancer resection in an elderly general population and its effects by stage. Methods and Materials: We identified individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database aged 65 years or older with Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) gastric cancer, from 1991 to 2002, who underwent gastric resection, using multivariate modeling to analyze predictors of chemoRT use and survival. Results: Among 1,993 patients who received combined chemoRT or no adjuvant therapy after resection, having a later year of diagnosis, having a more advanced stage, being younger, being white, being married, and having fewer comorbidities were associated with combined treatment. Among 1,476 patients aged less than 85 years who survived more than 4 months, the 313 who received combined treatment had a lower mortality rate (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.98) than the 1,163 who received surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy significantly reduced the mortality rate for Stages III and IV (M0), trended toward improved survival for Stage II, and showed no benefit for Stage IB. We observed trends toward improved survival in all age categories except 80 to 85 years. Conclusions: The association of combined adjuvant chemoRT with improved survival in an overall analysis of Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) resected gastric cancer is consistent with clinical trial results and suggests that, in an elderly population, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is effective. However, our observational data suggest that adjuvant treatment may not be effective for Stage IB cancer, is possibly appropriate for Stage II, and shows significant survival benefits for Stages III and IV (M0) for those aged less than 80 years.

  3. Household Net Worth, Racial Disparities, and Hormonal Therapy Adherence Among Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Tsui, Jennifer; Wright, Jason D.; Coromilas, Ellie J.; Tsai, Wei Yann; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nonadherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased prescription copayment amount and black race. Studies suggest that household wealth may partly explain racial disparities. We investigated the impact of net worth on disparities in adherence and discontinuation. Patients and Methods We used the OptumInsight insurance claims database to identify women older than age 50 years diagnosed with early breast cancer, from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011, who were using hormonal therapy. Nonadherence was defined as a medication possession ratio of ≤ 80% of eligible days over a 2-year period. We evaluated the association of demographic and clinical characteristics, annual household income, household net worth (< $250,000, $250,000 to $750,000, or > $750,000), insurance type, and copayments (< $10, $10 to $20, or > $20) with adherence to hormonal therapy. Logistic regression analyses were conducted by sequentially adding sociodemographic and financial variables to race. Results We identified 10,302 patients; 2,473 (24%) were nonadherent. In the unadjusted analyses, adherence was negatively associated with black race (odds ratio [OR], 0.76; P < .001), advanced age, comorbidity, and Medicare insurance. Adherence was positively associated with medium (OR, 1.33; P < .001) and high (OR, 1.66; P < .001) compared with low net worth. The negative association of black race with adherence (OR, 0.76) was reduced by adding net worth to the model (OR, 0.84; P < .05). Correcting for other variables had a minimal impact on the association between race and adherence (OR, 0.87; P = .08). The interaction between net worth and race was significant (P < .01). Conclusion We found that net worth partially explains racial disparities in hormonal therapy adherence. These results suggest that economic factors may contribute to disparities in the quality of care. PMID:25691670

  4. Doxorubicin and deracoxib adjuvant therapy for canine splenic hemangiosarcoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S Anthony; Mullin, Christine M; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Burgess, Kristine E; Risbon, Rebecca E; Fred, Rogers M; Drobatz, Kenneth; Clifford, Craig A

    2013-03-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a highly malignant tumor for which standard chemotherapy has done little to substantially improve survival. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) plays a role in the formation, growth, and metastasis of tumors and inhibitors have demonstrated therapeutic benefit with certain canine cancers. In this prospective study, 21 dogs received adjuvant therapy combining the selective Cox-2 inhibitor deracoxib with doxorubicin, following splenectomy for HSA. The combination was well-tolerated with only low-grade gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities noted. An overall median survival of 150 days (range; 21 to 1506 days) was noted. Although there was no significant difference in survival based upon stage of disease, dogs with stage III HSA (n = 11) had a median survival of 149 days, which appears to be longer than previously reported. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the potential benefit of Cox-2 inhibitors in the treatment of canine HSA. PMID:23997259

  5. Selective Thrombolysis in Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis: Evaluation of Adjuvant Therapy In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit; Brosstad, Frank; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate in a porcine model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) the efficacy of dalteparin and antithrombin with respect to heparin for local adjuvant therapy during selective thrombolysis, and the utility of nitroglycerin and iloprost as heparin supplements. Methods: DVT was induced in both hind limbs using a previously described technique (n = 20). Thirty minutes later, the animal was heparinized (2500 IU IV), and bilateral sequestrated thrombolysis was performed using 8 mg alteplase: both external iliac veins were endoluminally occluded with Swan-Ganz catheters, and a multi-sideport infusion wire coaxially introduced through each catheter and advanced into the ipsilateral popliteal vein. In the control limbs, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) 8 mg was injected as 0.8-ml boluses at 3-min intervals for 2 hr as a 0.25-mg/ml solution containing heparin 50 IU/ml (n 20). On the contralateral side, heparin was substituted with either dalteparin 50 IU/ml (n = 5) or antithrombin 12.5 IU/ml (n = 5), or supplemented with either nitroglycerin 0.075 mg/ml (n = 5) or iloprost (150 ng/ml) (n = 5). Blood samples were taken at predetermined intervals to measure the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and fibrinogen concentration. At autopsy, the thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins was measured, and the extent of residual thrombosis in the venous tributaries graded at four sites. Results: Bilateral thrombolysis was successfully completed in all animals. The median thrombus mass in the iliofemoral veins after thrombolysis was 0.48 g (range 0.06-1.58 g), 0.95 g (0.59-1.29 g), 0.74 g (0.52-0.96 g), and 0.29 g (0.0-0.77 g) for dalteparin, antithrombin, iloprost, and nitroglycerin respectively, as compared with 0.53 g (0.18-0.88 g) (p = 0.69), 0.97 g (0.46-1.15 g) (p = 0.69), 0.53 g (0.48-1.10 g) (p = 0.69), and 0.18 g (0.13-1.04 g) (p = 0.5) for the respective controls. Likewise, the severity of residual thrombosis in the venous

  6. Doxorubicin and deracoxib adjuvant therapy for canine splenic hemangiosarcoma: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, S. Anthony; Mullin, Christine M.; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Burgess, Kristine E.; Risbon, Rebecca E.; Fred, Rogers M.; Drobatz, Kenneth; Clifford, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a highly malignant tumor for which standard chemotherapy has done little to substantially improve survival. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) plays a role in the formation, growth, and metastasis of tumors and inhibitors have demonstrated therapeutic benefit with certain canine cancers. In this prospective study, 21 dogs received adjuvant therapy combining the selective Cox-2 inhibitor deracoxib with doxorubicin, following splenectomy for HSA. The combination was well-tolerated with only low-grade gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities noted. An overall median survival of 150 days (range; 21 to 1506 days) was noted. Although there was no significant difference in survival based upon stage of disease, dogs with stage III HSA (n = 11) had a median survival of 149 days, which appears to be longer than previously reported. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the potential benefit of Cox-2 inhibitors in the treatment of canine HSA. PMID:23997259

  7. Prognosis of invasive breast cancer after adjuvant therapy evaluated with VEGF microvessel density and microvascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ultrasonographic microvascular imaging in the evaluation of prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. A total of 121 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent ultrasonographic contrast-enhanced imaging, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining, and microvessel density (MVD) counts. The parameters of microvascular imaging and the expression of VEGF and MVD in primary breast cancer were calculated. The correlation between these factors and the overall and progression-free survival rate were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among 121 cases, the positive VEGF cases were 75 and negative ones were 46. The cut point of 52.3 was calculated by the regressive curve for MVD counts. The data showed the mean intensity (MI) was positively associated with both the MVD counts (r = .51, p < .001) and VEGF expression (r = .35, p < .001). For the prognosis of patients, high VEGF expression and MVD counts were associated with reduced progressive and survival times (PFS, p = .032 and p = .034; OS, p = .041 and p = .038, respectively). The correlation between parameters of microvascular imaging, VEGF expressive status, and the MVD counts were established. The cut point of mean intensity (MI = 40) was used to investigate as an independent predictor for PFS (p = .021) and OS (p = .025), respectively, due to a strong correlation between MVD counts and VEGF expression in patients with invasive breast cancer. The microvascular imaging could be a visual and helpful tool to predict the prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. PMID:26052072

  8. Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon H.; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Guenther

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {<=}20 weeks was found. The adjusted hazard ratio for RT within 77 days vs. after 77 days was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.87) for the interval to local recurrence, 1.05 (95% CI, 0.82-1.34) for disease-free survival, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.77-1.49) for overall survival. For the interval to local recurrence the adjusted hazard ratio for {<=}48, 49-77, and 78-112 days was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.34-2.37), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.33-2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33-2.41), respectively, relative to {>=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  9. Gender and sex hormones in multiple sclerosis pathology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Arnaud B.

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that gender affects the susceptibility and course of multiple sclerosis (MS) with a higher disease prevalence and overall better prognosis in women than men. This sex dimorphism may be explained by sex chromosome effects and effects of sex steroid hormones on the immune system, blood brain barrier or parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) cells. The well known improvement in disease during late pregnancy has also been linked to hormonal changes and has stimulated recent clinical studies to determine the efficacy of and tolerance to sex steroid therapeutic approaches. Both clinical and experimental studies indicate that sex steroid supplementation may be beneficial for MS. This could be related to anti-inflammatory actions on the immune system or CNS and to direct neuroprotective properties. Here, clinical and experimental data are reviewed with respect to the effects of sex hormones or gender in the pathology or therapy of MS or its rodent disease models. The different cellular targets as well as some molecular mechanisms likely involved are discussed. PMID:19273365

  10. Hormone Therapy and Ovarian Cancer: Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Karen J.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hampton, John; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between hormone therapy (HT) and ovarian cancer incidence, and followed all these cancer cases to determine the association of HT use with ovarian cancer mortality. Methods Seven hundred fifty-one incident cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer aged 40–79 years were diagnosed in Wisconsin and Massachusetts between 1993–1995 and 1998–2001 and matched to similarly-aged controls (n=5808). Study subjects were interviewed by telephone, which ascertained information on HT use and specific preparation, estrogen alone (E-alone) or estrogen plus progestin (EP). Ovarian cancer cases were followed-up for mortality through December 2005. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ovarian cancer incidence, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals for ovarian cancer mortality. Results Ever use of HT was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.31–1.87). The excess risk was confined to women who used E-alone preparations (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.85–2.95). No significant associations were detected between pre-diagnosis HT use and ovarian cancer survival. Conclusions Hormone therapy increases risk of ovarian cancer among E-alone users, but there is no substantial impact on survival after diagnosis. PMID:18264784

  11. Effective and clinically meaningful non-hormonal hot flash therapies.

    PubMed

    Guttuso, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Although many non-hormonal compounds have shown statistically significant benefit over placebo in hot flash randomized controlled trials (RCTs), these studies have varied considerably in basic methodology making it challenging to deduce which compounds have the greatest potential to provide clinically meaningful benefit. This review used evidence-based methodology closely mirroring the FDA and EMEA guidelines as a template to identify "well-designed" RCTs from which effective and clinically meaningful non-hormonal hot flash therapies could be identified. In addition, pertinent safety information was reviewed. Out of 3548 MEDLINE citations and abstracts, 51 well-designed hot flash RCTs were identified. From these trials, gabapentin, oxybutynin ER, desvenlafaxine, soy-derived isoflavones and black cohosh each showed a clinically meaningful treatment effect in at least 1 RCT. Among these 5 compounds, only gabapentin demonstrated consistent and statistically significant benefit over placebo in all of its well-designed RCTs. Desvenlafaxine, soy-derived isoflavones, and black cohosh demonstrated statistically significant benefit over placebo in 75%, 21%, and 17% of the well-designed RCTs for each compound, respectively. There was only 1 well-designed RCT using oxybutynin ER, which showed it to have a robust and clinically meaningful benefit. In terms of safety, there have been cardiovascular risks associated with desvenlafaxine use in postmenopausal women with hot flashes. The use of anticonvulsants, in general, has been associated with an absolute 0.21% increase in suicidal thoughts and behavior. Further research is needed with several of these nonhormonal compounds to replicate these findings and to also directly compare their efficacy and tolerability with those of hormone replacement therapy. PMID:22377187

  12. Evaluation of monophosphoryl lipid A as an immune adjuvant for photodynamic therapy in a rat sarcoma model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Edwards, Benjamin F.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Madewell, Bruce R.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment option for several forms of human cancer, and like traditional chemotherapy and ionizing radiation therapy, PDT alone is not curative for some cases. Recent efforts have aimed at developing strategies for adjuvant therapy for PDT. Given the nature of PDT-mediated cell damage, immunotherapy is a promising adjuvant for long-term control of solid tumors. A candidate immune stimulant for use with PDT is monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA), a non-toxic fraction of the endotoxin molecule. The hypothesis is that adjuvant MLA immunotherapy with PDT will improve local tumor control and prevent growth of subsequently implanted tumor cells when compared to PDT alone. To date, no significant differences in circulating leukocyte populations or tumor infiltrating lymphocyte populations have been identified in 9L tumor-bearing F344 rats after systemic administrations of MLA. Likewise, no significant difference has been identified in local tumor control following PDT of 9L tumors with or without adjuvant MLA. Further results are pending.

  13. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: identifying use trends and knowledge gaps among US women

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Santoro, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two surveys (Harris and Rose surveys) were conducted to quantify the use of compounded hormone therapy (CHT; or bioidentical hormone therapy) among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in the United States, to assess women's knowledge of CHT versus Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved hormone therapy, and to gather information on menopausal experience. Methods: The Harris survey was administered to 801 women aged 45 to 60 years who had experienced at least one menopausal symptom. The Rose survey was administered to 2,044 women aged 40 years or older who were ever users of hormone therapy. Women were queried about menopausal symptoms, hormone therapy use, and knowledge of CHT. Findings from the Rose survey were extrapolated using US Census Bureau data and prescription claims for FDA-approved hormone therapy to estimate the prevalence of CHT use. Results: According to extrapolations using Rose data, up to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older may use CHT annually, accounting for 28% to 68% of hormone therapy prescriptions. Harris data showed that 86% of women surveyed were unaware that CHT products are not FDA-approved. The Rose survey asked a subset of 1,771 women whether their hormone therapy had been personalized based on hormone levels; 21% (378) answered “yes” whereas 27% (476) did not know. In both surveys, most hormone therapy users stated that their physician had recommended the treatment. Conclusions: We estimate that 1 million to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older use CHT. The data suggest that many women are unaware that compounded hormones have not been evaluated or approved by the FDA. Providers have an educational opportunity to ensure that women considering hormone therapy understand the risks and benefits of inadequately regulated CHT. PMID:25692877

  14. Breast cancer risk during hormone therapy: experimental versus clinical data.

    PubMed

    Ruan, X; Seeger, H; Mueck, A O

    2012-03-01

    Evidence is increasing suggesting that adding progestogens to estrogens can increase the risk of breast cancer. However, our experimental data as a result of scientific collaboration between university of Tuebingen, Germany, and university of Beijing, China, comparing all available progestogens used in hormone therapy and hormonal contraception present high evidence that there may be differences regarding breast cancer risk. Especially of concern may be to differentiate between primary and secondary risk i.e. between the effect of on benign and malignant breast epithelial cells suggesting differences in primary risk and risk in patients after breast cancer. Of importance also is that in contrast to natural progesterone the apocrine impact of stromal growth factors and also certain cell components of breast epithelial cells can strongly increase proliferation rates of some (but not all. synthetic progestogens which can lead to clinical cancer before (in contrast to estrogen-only therapy. carcinoprotective mechanisms can work. Regarding clinical data, epidemiological studies and especially the Women's Health Initiative, so far the only prospective placebo-controlled study, demonstrate an increased risk under combined estrogen/progestogen-, but not under estrogen-only therapy. However, up to now the clinical studies cannot discriminate between the various progestogens mostly due to too small patient numbers in the subgroups, and in most studies either medroxyprogesterone acetate or norethisterone have been used. However, there is evidence that the natural progesterone and dydrogesterone, possibly also the transdermal usage of synthetic progestogens, may have less risks, but this must be proven in further clinical trials. PMID:22382615

  15. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy and Obesity in Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shiasi Arani, Kobra; Heidari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depot preparations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are the gold standard drugs for the treatment of central precocious puberty. A concern about these drugs is obesity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) therapy on body mass index (BMI) in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods: The girls with onset of puberty before eight years of age or menarche before nine years of age were studied. The weight, height, BMI, and pubertal stage were determined before and at sixth and 12th months of treatment. The GnRHa (Triptorelin) was administered intramuscularly for patients with rapidly progressive forms of CPP. Patients with slowly progressive forms of CPP were considered as control group. Results: From 110 subjects with CPP, 46 girls (41.8%) were considered as intervention and 64 (58.2%) as control groups. The mean age at initial visit was 7.46 ± 1.03 years. The BMI standard deviation scores in both groups was not significantly different at sixth and 12th months of treatment compared with baseline (P = 0.257 and P = 0.839, respectively). The prevalence of obesity was not significantly different between study groups at baseline and at and sixth and 12th months of therapy (P = 0.11, P = 0.068, and P = 0.052, respectively). Conclusions: The GnRHa therapy has no effect on BMI and the prevalence of obesity. PMID:26401141

  16. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ederer, Austin K; Didier, Kaylin D; Reiter, Landon K; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D; Larson, Rebecca D; Ade, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V̇O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V̇O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV̇O2) relative to ΔV̇O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V̇O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  17. Triacetin-based acetate supplementation as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant therapy in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsen, Andrew R.; Long, Patrick M.; Driscoll, Heather E.; Davies, Matthew T.; Teasdale, Benjamin A.; Penar, Paul L.; Pendlebury, William W.; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Lawler, Sean E.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with epigenetic (i.e., histone hypoacetylation) and metabolic (i.e., aerobic glycolysis) alterations. Levels of N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate, are reduced in glioma; yet, few studies have investigated acetate as a potential therapeutic agent. This preclinical study sought to test the efficacy of the food additive Triacetin (glyceryl triacetate, GTA) as a novel therapy to increase acetate bioavailability in glioma cells. The growth-inhibitory effects of GTA, compared to the histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat (SAHA), were assessed in established human glioma cell lines (HOG and Hs683 oligodendroglioma, U87 and U251 glioblastoma) and primary tumor-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu), normal astrocytes, and neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro. GTA was also tested as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant with temozolomide (TMZ) in orthotopically grafted GSCs. GTA induced cytostatic growth arrest in vitro comparable to Vorinostat, but, unlike Vorinostat, GTA did not alter astrocyte growth and promoted NSC expansion. GTA alone increased survival of mice engrafted with glioblastoma GSCs and potentiated TMZ to extend survival longer than TMZ alone. GTA was most effective on GSCs with a mesenchymal cell phenotype. Given that GTA has been chronically administered safely to infants with Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a novel, safe chemotherapeutic adjuvant to reduce the growth of glioma tumors, most notably the more rapidly proliferating, glycolytic, and hypoacetylated mesenchymal glioma tumors. PMID:23996800

  18. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  19. mTOR inhibition as an adjuvant therapy in a metastatic model of HPV+ HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Coppock, Joseph D; Vermeer, Paola D; Vermeer, Daniel W; Lee, Kimberly M; Miskimins, W Keith; Spanos, William C; Lee, John H

    2016-04-26

    Effective treatments for recurrent/metastatic human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) are limited. To aid treatment development, we characterized a novel murine model of recurrent/metastatic HPV+ HNSCC. Further analysis of the parental tumor cell line and its four recurrent/metastatic derivatives led to preclinical testing of an effective treatment option for this otherwise fatal disease. Reverse phase protein arrays identified key signaling cascades in the parental and recurrent/metastatic cell lines. While protein expression profiles differed among the recurrent/metastatic cell lines, activated proteins associated with the mTOR signaling cascade were a commonality. Based on these data, mTOR inhibition was evaluated as an adjuvant treatment for recurrent/metastatic disease. mTOR activity and treatment response were assessed in vitro by western blot, Seahorse, proliferation, clonogenic, and migration assays. Standard-of-care cisplatin/radiation therapy (CRT) versus CRT/rapamycin were compared in vivo. Low-dose rapamycin inhibited mTOR signaling, decreasing proliferation (43%) and migration (62%) while it enhanced CRT-induced cytotoxicity (3.3 fold) in clonogenic assays. Furthermore, rapamycin re-sensitized CRT-resistant, metastatic tumors to treatment in vivo, improving long-term cures (0-30% improved to 78-100%, depending on the recurrent/metastatic cell line) and limiting lymph node metastasis (32%) and lung metastatic burden (30 fold). Studies using immune compromised mice suggested rapamycin's effect on metastasis is independent of the adaptive immune response. These data suggest a role of mTOR activation in HPV+ HNSCC recurrent/metastatic disease and that adjuvant mTOR inhibition may enhance treatment of resistant, metastatic cell populations at the primary site and limit distant metastasis. PMID:27015118

  20. Efficacy and Interaction of Antioxidant Supplements as Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Asuka; Urushima, Hayato; Ito, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is a key component in carcinogenesis. Although radiation produces reactive oxygen species, some anticancer agents such as alkylating agents, platinum and antitumor antibiotics exert cytotoxicity by generating free radicals. Nonenzymatic exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols can quench ROS activity. However, whether antioxidants alter antitumor effects during radiotherapy and some types of chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we reviewed antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients during chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Electronic literature searches were performed to select all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in which antioxidants were administered to cancer patients along with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Articles or abstracts written in English were included. In total, 399 reports received primary screening. Duplicated articles and those meeting the exclusion criteria (not RCT, not human, and no oral administration) were excluded. Finally, 49 reports matching the inclusion criteria were included. It was difficult to determine whether antioxidants affect treatment outcomes or whether antioxidants ameliorate adverse effects induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It is desirable to use an evidence-based method to select supplements best suited to cancer patients. Although there are many opinions about risks or benefits of antioxidant supplementation, we could mostly conclude that the harm caused by antioxidant supplementation remains unclear for patients during cancer therapy, except for smokers undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26503419

  1. Hormone replacement therapy in a risk-benefit perspective.

    PubMed

    Daly, E; Vessey, M P; Barlow, D; Gray, A; McPherson, K; Roche, M

    1996-03-01

    The relative cost-effectiveness of different treatment strategies for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was assessed within the framework of a computer model. Where data were lacking, it was necessary to make assumptions about the effects of HRT, particularly in relation to combined oestrogen-progestogen therapy and cardiovascular disease; however, sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the impact of changing these assumptions on the cost-effectiveness equation. It appears that net expenditure by the NHS will depend critically on the direct costs of treatment, rather than on any indirect costs incurred or saved as a result of side-effects. In terms of mortality, a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk would have greatest impact and would overshadow any small increase in breast cancer risk which may be associated with long-term use. If the cardioprotective effect of oestrogen is real, our results suggest that long-term prophylactic treatment of hysterectomised women would be relatively cost-effective. Treatment of symptomatic menopausal women for any period of time appears to offer very good value for money. The lack of data relating to combined oestrogen-progestogen therapy and cardioprotection, and the major importance of the latter in the equation of benefits and risks, make it more difficult to draw conclusions about the cost-effectiveness of treating non-hysterectomised asymptomatic women for prophylactic reasons. PMID:8735363

  2. Adjuvant therapy for highly malignant canine mammary tumours: Cox-2 inhibitor versus chemotherapy: a case-control prospective study.

    PubMed

    Arenas, C; Peña, L; Granados-Soler, J L; Pérez-Alenza, M D

    2016-07-30

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) enzyme participates in different steps of the carcinogenetic process and in canine mammary tumours (CMTs), a high expression of Cox-2 is associated with malignancy and tumour angiogenesis. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of a Cox-2 inhibitor as adjuvant therapy in dogs with highly malignant (HM)-CMTs and compare it with that of dogs treated with chemotherapy and with control dogs. Twenty-eight dogs were prospectively included. After surgery, dogs were alternatively allocated into two treatment groups (chemotherapy with mitoxantrone n=8; Cox-2 inhibitor, firocoxib n=7). Control group (n=13) included dogs whose owners rejected adjuvant therapy. All dogs were followed up for two years or until death. The DFS was significantly higher in dogs that received adjuvant treatment (mitoxantrone or firocoxib) (P=0.030) than in control dogs. Dogs on firocoxib treatment had significantly higher DFS (P=0.015) and OS (P=0.048) than control dogs. The DFS and OS of dogs on mitoxantrone treatment were not statistically different from controls. In conclusion, this study supports the use of firocoxib for the treatment of HM-CMTs. Further studies are needed to compare the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs versus Cox-2 inhibitors as adjuvant treatment in these cases. PMID:27377395

  3. Growth hormone receptor polymorphism and growth hormone therapy response in children: a Bayesian meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Renehan, Andrew G; Solomon, Mattea; Zwahlen, Marcel; Morjaria, Reena; Whatmore, Andrew; Audí, Laura; Binder, Gerhard; Blum, Werner; Bougnères, Pierre; Santos, Christine Dos; Carrascosa, Antonio; Hokken-Koelega, Anita; Jorge, Alexander; Mullis, Primus E; Tauber, Maïthé; Patel, Leena; Clayton, Peter E

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy is used in the long-term treatment of children with growth disorders, but there is considerable treatment response variability. The exon 3-deleted growth hormone receptor polymorphism (GHR(d3)) may account for some of this variability. The authors performed a systematic review (to April 2011), including investigator-only data, to quantify the effects of the GHR(fl-d3) and GHR(d3-d3) genotypes on rhGH therapy response and used a recently established Bayesian inheritance model-free approach to meta-analyze the data. The primary outcome was the 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score for the 2 genotypes. Eighteen data sets from 12 studies (1,527 children) were included. After several prior assumptions were tested, the most appropriate inheritance model was codominant (posterior probability = 0.93). Compared with noncarriers, carriers had median differences in 1-year change-in-height standard-deviation score of 0.09 (95% credible interval (CrI): 0.01, 0.17) for GHR(fl-d3) and of 0.14 (95% CrI: 0.02, 0.26) for GHR(d3-d3). However, the between-study standard deviation of 0.18 (95% CrI: 0.10, 0.33) was considerable. The authors tested by meta-regression for potential modifiers and found no substantial influence. They conclude that 1) the GHR(d3) polymorphism inheritance is codominant, contrasting with previous reports; 2) GHR(d3) genotypes account for modest increases in rhGH effects in children; and 3) considerable unexplained variability in responsiveness remains. PMID:22494952

  4. Hormone replacement therapy benefits meibomian gland dysfunction in perimenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiuming; Lin, Zhenyun; Liu, Yufang; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Binbin

    2016-08-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is believed to be the leading cause of dry eye (DE) disease worldwide. The connection between aging and MGD has long been recognized. However, few studies have addressed the relationship between MGD and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in perimenopausal women, and not have examined the prevalence of MGD in perimenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to address and evaluate the possible relationship between MGD and HRT in perimenopausal women.The results suggest that perimenopausal women have a high prevalence of DE related to perimenopausal symptoms. The study also shows that perimenopausal women who use HRT can gain benefits for DE as well as for perimenopausal symptoms. Physicians caring for women who are experiencing DE related to perimenopausal symptoms should consider HRT. PMID:27495030

  5. The "newer" progestogens and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HRT).

    PubMed

    Schindler, Adolf E

    2014-07-01

    After a worldwide breakdown of hormone therapy [HT] following the publications of the Women's Health Initiative trial and Million Women's Study in 2002-2003, there is now a trend to turn attention again to HT and to explore particular progestogens, which have been discredited with respect to their side effects. The progestogens to be considered should control undue proliferation of the endometrium and should not interfere negatively with the positive effects of estradiol, regarding carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as well as hemostasis. In the present review, three "newer progestogens" are scrutinized regarding their various actions, in combination with estradiol; the progestogens include dienogest, drospirenone and nomegestrol acetate. This article is part of a special issue entitled Menopause. PMID:24333799

  6. Hormone replacement therapy benefits meibomian gland dysfunction in perimenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiuming; Lin, Zhenyun; Liu, Yufang; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is believed to be the leading cause of dry eye (DE) disease worldwide. The connection between aging and MGD has long been recognized. However, few studies have addressed the relationship between MGD and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in perimenopausal women, and not have examined the prevalence of MGD in perimenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to address and evaluate the possible relationship between MGD and HRT in perimenopausal women. The results suggest that perimenopausal women have a high prevalence of DE related to perimenopausal symptoms. The study also shows that perimenopausal women who use HRT can gain benefits for DE as well as for perimenopausal symptoms. Physicians caring for women who are experiencing DE related to perimenopausal symptoms should consider HRT. PMID:27495030

  7. Impact of Sex Hormone Metabolism on the Vascular Effects of Menopausal Hormone Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Durr-e-Nayab; Roach, Emir C.; Beauregard, Katie G.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in pre-menopausal women (Pre-MW) compared to men of the same age or post-menopausal women (Post-MW), suggesting cardiovascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen receptors (ERs) have been identified in the vasculature, and experimental studies have demonstrated vasodilator effects of estrogen/ER on the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix. Several natural and synthetic estrogenic preparations have been developed for relief of menopausal vasomotor symptoms. However, whether menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is beneficial in postmenopausal CVD remains controversial. Despite reports of vascular benefits of MHT from observational and experimental studies, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), have suggested that, contrary to expectations, MHT may increase the risk of CVD. These discrepancies could be due to age-related changes in sex hormone synthesis and metabolism, which would influence the effective dose of MHT and the sex hormone environment in Post-MW. Age-related changes in the vascular ER subtype, structure, expression, distribution, and post-ER signaling pathways in the endothelium and VSM, along with factors related to the design of RCTs, preexisting CVD condition, and structural changes in the blood vessels architecture have also been suggested as possible causes of MHT failure in CVD. Careful examination of these factors should help in identifying the causes of the changes in the vascular effects of estrogen with age. The sex hormone metabolic pathways, the active versus inactive estrogen metabolites, and their effects on vascular function, the mitochondria, the inflammatory process and angiogenesis should be further examined. Also, the genomic and non-genomic effects of estrogenic compounds should be viewed as integrated rather than discrete

  8. Adrenal Function Testing Following Hormone Therapy for Infantile Spasms: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mytinger, John R.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.

    2015-01-01

    Prednisolone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) are “hormone” therapies for infantile spasms. There is limited data on the occurrence of decreased adrenal reserve or signs of clinical adrenal insufficiency after hormone therapy. This is a retrospective medical record review of patients referred to our Infantile Spasms Program. Our standardized infantile spasms management guideline began in September 2012 and initially included a post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function. Medical records were assessed for hormone treatments, adrenal function testing, and signs of adrenal insufficiency. Forty-two patients who received one or both hormone therapies met inclusion criteria. A post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function was done in 14 patients. Of these 14 patients, 2 had an abnormal laboratory assessment of adrenal function, both by adrenal stimulation testing – one after ACTH and one after prednisolone. One patient received hydrocortisone replacement and the other received stress dose hydrocortisone as needed; neither patient developed signs of adrenal insufficiency. Another patient treated with both types of hormone therapy in tandem, who did not have a post-hormone laboratory assessment, developed signs of mild adrenal insufficiency and required replacement hydrocortisone. Our study suggests that adrenal suppression can occur after modern hormone therapy regimens. We found two patients with abnormal adrenal function testing after hormone therapy and another patient with signs adrenal insufficiency. Given the seriousness of adrenal crisis, caregiver education on the signs of adrenal insufficiency is critical. Greater vigilance may be indicated in patients receiving both types of hormone therapy in tandem. Although a routine post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function may not be feasible in all patients, replacement or stress dose hydrocortisone is necessary for all patients with suspected adrenal insufficiency. PMID

  9. Impact of Adjuvant External-Beam Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Uterine Papillary Serous and Clear Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Anne; Schreiber, David; Rineer, Justin; Choi, Kwang; Rotman, Marvin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in early-stage high- to intermediate-risk endometrioid adenocarcinoma is well established and has been shown to improve locoregional control. Its role in the management of early-stage clear cell carcinoma and uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) remains controversial. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, we identified women with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage Sixth Edition. Stage IA-IIB clear cell carcinoma or UPSC who underwent hysterectomy with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2003. We used Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis to compare overall survival (OS) for all patients. Results: We identified 1,333 women of whom 451 had clear cell carcinoma and 882 had UPSC. Of those patients, 775 underwent surgery alone and 558 received adjuvant RT as well. For Stages I-IIB disease, the median OS with surgery alone was 106 months, vs. 151 months with adjuvant RT (p = 0.006). On subgroup analysis, we saw the benefit from adjuvant RT only in Stage IB-C patients. For Stage IB disease, patients undergoing surgery alone had a median OS of 117 months, vs. median survival not reached with the addition of RT (p = 0.006). For Stage IC disease, surgery alone had a median OS of 35 months vs. 120 months with RT (p = 0.001). Although the apparent benefit of RT diminished when measured via multivariate analysis, the impact of RT on survival did show a trend toward significance (hazard ration 0.808, confidence interval 95% 0.651-1.002, p = 0.052) Conclusion: In FIGO Stage IB-C papillary serous and clear cell uterine carcinoma, adjuvant RT seems to play an important role in improving survival.

  10. Music as an adjuvant therapy in control of pain and symptoms in hospitalized adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Linda C; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of music as an adjuvant therapy for pain control in hospitalized adults. The search terms music, music therapy, pain, adults, inpatient, and hospitalized were used to search the Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Medline, Natural Standard, and Scopus databases from January 2005 to March 2011. (A systematic review conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration has extensively covered the time frame from 1966 to 2004.) Seventeen randomized controlled trials met criteria for review and inclusion. Seven of the research studies were conducted with surgical patients, three with medical patients, one with medical-surgical patients, four with intensive care patients, and two with pregnant patients. The combined findings of these studies provide support for the use of music as an adjuvant approach to pain control in hospitalized adults. The use of music is safe, inexpensive, and an independent nursing function that can be easily incorporated into the routine care of patients. PMID:23107431

  11. A hard pill to swallow: a qualitative study of women's experiences of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Alison; Dryden, Ruth; McCowan, Colin; Radley, Andrew; Parsons, Mark; Thompson, Alastair M; Wells, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore women's experiences of taking adjuvant endocrine therapy as a treatment for breast cancer and how their beliefs about the purpose of the medication, side effects experienced and interactions with health professionals might influence adherence. Design Qualitative study using semistructured, one-to-one interviews. Setting 2 hospitals from a single health board in Scotland. Participants 30 women who had been prescribed tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole or letrozole) and had been taking this medication for 1–5 years. Results Women clearly wished to take their adjuvant endocrine therapy medication as prescribed, believing that it offered them protection against breast cancer recurrence. However, some women missed tablets and did not recognise that this could reduce the efficacy of the treatment. Women did not perceive that healthcare professionals were routinely or systematically monitoring their adherence. Side effects were common and impacted greatly on the women’s quality of life but did not always cause women to stop taking their medication, or to seek advice about reducing the side effects they experienced. Few were offered the opportunity to discuss the impact of side effects or the potential options available. Conclusions Although most women in this study took adjuvant endocrine therapy as prescribed, many endured a range of side effects, often without seeking help. Advice, support and monitoring for adherence are not routinely offered in conventional follow-up settings. Women deserve more opportunity to discuss the pros, cons and impact of long-term adjuvant endocrine therapy. New service models are needed to support adherence, enhance quality of life and ultimately improve survival. These should ideally be community based, in order to promote self-management in the longer term. PMID:24928595

  12. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Schoenfeld, Joshua D.; Buatti, John M.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. PMID:25460731

  13. Wound complications of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, M.V.; Hilaris, B.S.; Nori, D.; Brennan, M.F.

    1989-07-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy by the brachytherapy technique has been suggested by us to diminish local recurrence following resection of extremity and superficial truncal soft-tissue sarcoma. However, loading of the catheters with radioactive sources on the first through the fifth postoperative days results in a 48% significant wound-complication rate. Our previous animal experiments would suggest that delay of application of radiation to one week after wounding is accompanied by significant improvement in wound-breaking strength, new H3 hydroxyproline accumulation, and improved force-tension curves. As part of our ongoing prospective randomized trial of the effects of brachytherapy on local control, one change was made: the catheters were loaded five or more days after operation. Wound complications were then reviewed in 50 patients following this single change in brachytherapy delivery. Of the 21 patients receiving brachytherapy, 14% had significant wound complications; 10% of the 29 patients who did not receive radiation had wound complications of similar severity. This decrease in wound complications represents a major improvement over our prior experience and suggests that the timing of radioactive source loading in the postoperative period is a major factor in radiation-induced wound-healing delay.

  14. Radiation Therapy Field Extent for Adjuvant Treatment of Axillary Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Ballo, Matthew T.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Ross, Merrick I.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment-related outcomes and toxicity for patients with axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to either the axilla only or both the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (extended field [EF]). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 200 consecutive patients treated with postoperative RT for axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received postoperative hypofractionated RT for high-risk features; 95 patients (48%) received RT to the axilla only and 105 patients (52%) to the EF. Results: At a median follow-up of 59 months, 111 patients (56%) had sustained relapse, and 99 patients (50%) had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 51%, 43%, and 46%, respectively. The 5-year axillary control rate was 88%. There was no difference in axillary control rates on the basis of the treated field (89% for axilla only vs. 86% for EF; p = 0.4). Forty-seven patients (24%) developed treatment-related complications. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, only treatment with EF irradiation was significantly associated with increased treatment-related complications. Conclusions: Adjuvant hypofractionated RT to the axilla only for metastatic malignant melanoma with high-risk features is an effective method to control axillary disease. Limiting the radiation field to the axilla only produced equivalent axillary control rates to EF and resulted in lower treatment-related complication rates.

  15. Effect of a randomized controlled exercise trial on bone outcomes: influence of adjuvant endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Knobf, M Tish; Jeon, Sangchoon; Smith, Barbara; Harris, Lyndsay; Kerstetter, Jane; Thompson, A Siobhan; Insogna, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N = 154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200 mg) and Vitamin D (400 IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12 months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20 ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29 ng/mL range at the LS (p = 0.01), hip (p = 0.03), and GT (p = 0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy. PMID:26850265

  16. Pharmacokinetic Study of Adjuvant Gemcitabine Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer following Major Hepatectomy (KHBO1101)

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Shogo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Kanai, Masashi; Hatano, Etsuo; Toyoda, Masanori; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Takashima, Yuki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Hamada, Akinobu; Minami, Hironobu; Ioka, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients who have undergone surgical resection with major hepatectomy cannot tolerate the standard gemcitabine regimen (1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks) due to severe toxicities such as myelosuppression. Our dose-finding study of adjuvant gemcitabine therapy for biliary tract cancer following major hepatectomy determined that the recommended dose is 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 15 every 4 weeks. Here, we evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gemcitabine in these subjects. Methods We evaluated BTC patients scheduled to undergo surgical resection with major hepatectomy followed by gemcitabine therapy. A pharmacokinetic evaluation of gemcitabine and its main metabolite, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU), was conducted at the initial administration of gemcitabine, which was given by intravenous infusion over 30 min at a dose of 800–1,000 mg/m2. Physical examination and adverse events were monitored for 12 weeks. Results Thirteen patients were enrolled from August 2011 to January 2013, with 12 ultimately completing the pharmacokinetic study. Eight patients had hilar cholangiocarcinoma, three had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and one had superficial spreading type cholangiocarcinoma. The median interval from surgery to first administration of gemcitabine was 65.5 days (range, 43–83 days). We observed the following toxicities: neutropenia (n = 11, 91.7%), leukopenia (n = 10, 83.3%), thrombocytopenia (n = 6, 50.0%), and infection (n = 5, 41.7%). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in 25% (n = 3) of patients. There were differences in clearance of gemcitabine and dFdU between our subjects and the subjects who had not undergone hepatectomy. Conclusion Major hepatectomy did not affect the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine or dFdU. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR in (JPRN) UMIN000005109 PMID:26633034

  17. Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Richa; Faubion, Stephanie S; Kuhle, Carol L; Thielen, Jacqueline M; Shuster, Lynne T

    2014-01-01

    The constantly changing landscape regarding menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has been challenging for providers caring for menopausal women. After a decade of fear and uncertainty regarding MHT, reanalysis of the Women’s Health Initiative data and the results of recent studies have provided some clarity regarding the balance of risks and benefits of systemic MHT. Age and years since menopause are now known to be important variables affecting the benefit-risk profile. For symptomatic menopausal women who are under 60 years of age or within 10 years of menopause, the benefits of MHT generally outweigh the risks. Systemic MHT initiated early in menopause appears to slow the progression of atherosclerotic disease, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. During this window of opportunity, MHT might also provide protection against cognitive decline. In older women and women more than 10 years past menopause, the risk-benefit balance of MHT is less favorable, particularly with regard to cardiovascular risk and cognitive impairment. For women entering menopause prematurely (<40 years), MHT ameliorates the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cognitive decline. Nonoral administration of estrogen offers advantages due to the lack of first-pass hepatic metabolism, which in turn avoids the increased hepatic synthesis of clotting proteins, C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and sex hormone-binding globulin. The duration of combined MHT use is ideally limited to less than 5 years because of the known increase in breast cancer risk after 3–5 years of use. Limitations to use of estrogen only MHT are less clear, since breast cancer risk does not appear to increase with use of estrogen alone. For women under the age of 60 years, or within 10 years of onset of natural menopause, MHT for the treatment of bothersome menopausal symptoms poses low risk and is an acceptable option, particularly when nonhormonal management approaches fail. PMID

  18. Enhanced Neuroactivation during Verbal Memory Processing in Postmenopausal Women Receiving Short Term Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Carol C.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Love, Tiffany; Wang, Heng; Tkaczyk, Anne; Smith, Yolanda R.

    2012-01-01

    Capsule Using a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, we showed that short-term hormone replacement therapy increases brain activation in parietal and prefrontal areas during verbal memory tasks in postmenopausal women. Objective To study the effects of hormone therapy on brain activation patterns during verbal memory in postmenopausal women. Design A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study was performed. Setting A tertiary care university medical center. Participants Ten healthy postmenopausal women (age range 50-60 years) were recruited from the local community. Interventions Women were randomized to the order they received combined hormone therapy, 5 ug ethinyl estradiol and 1 mg norethindrone acetate, and placebo. Volunteers received hormone therapy or placebo for 4 weeks, followed by a one month washout period, and then received the other treatment for 4 weeks. An fMRI was performed at the end of each 4 week treatment utilizing a verbal memory task. Main Outcome Measure Brain activation patterns were compared between hormone therapy and placebo. Results Hormone therapy was associated with increased activation in left middle/superior frontal cortex (BA 6,9), medial frontal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate (BA 24,32), posterior cingulate (BA 6), and left inferior parietal (BA 40) during memory encoding. All regions were significant at p ≤ 0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Hormone therapy increased neural activation in frontal and parietal areas in postmenopausal women during a verbal memory task. PMID:18692790

  19. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  20. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the squamous part of temporal bone in a young girl treated with adjuvant volumetric arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Goswami, Suchanda; Goswami, Chanchal

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors usually arise in the long bones of children and young adults. Primary ES of the cranium is unusual. Treatment involves multi-modality therapy incorporating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; outcomes are similar to those arising from long bones. We report a case of Primary ES of the squamous part of temporal bone with intracranial extension in a 9-year-old girl who was treated with surgery, chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy by volumetric arc therapy. Post 1-year of treatment the girl is performing well in her classes. PMID:26881573

  1. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Else, Tobias; Griffith, Kent A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Williams, Andrew; Miller, Barbra S.; Worden, Francis; Jolly, Shruti

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed.

  2. Adjuvant Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer by Age and Hormone Receptor Status: A Cost-Utility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, William; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Blakely, Tony

    2016-01-01

    the same result. A key limitation was a lack of treatment-effect data by hormone receptor subtype. Heterogeneity was restricted to age and hormone receptor status; tumour size/grade heterogeneity could be explored in future work. Conclusions This study highlights how cost-effectiveness can vary greatly by heterogeneity in age and hormone receptor subtype. Resource allocation and licensing of subsidised therapies such as trastuzumab should consider demographic and clinical heterogeneity; there is currently a profound disconnect between how funding decisions are made (largely agnostic to heterogeneity) and the principles of personalised medicine. PMID:27504960

  3. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Analogs as Osteoporosis Therapies.

    PubMed

    Esbrit, Pedro; Herrera, Sabina; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Nogués, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2016-04-01

    The only bone anabolic agent currently available for osteoporosis treatment is parathyroid hormone (PTH)-either its N-terminal 1-34 fragment or the whole molecule of 1-84 aminoacids-whose intermittent administration stimulates new bone formation by targeting osteoblastogenesis and osteoblast survival. PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is an abundant factor in bone which shows N-terminal homology with PTH and thus exhibits high affinity for the same PTH type 1 receptor in osteoblasts. Therefore, it is not surprising that intermittently administered N-terminal PTHrP peptides induce bone anabolism in animals and humans. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of PTHrP also elicits osteogenic features in vitro in osteoblastic cells and in various animal models of osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the current concepts about the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby PTHrP may induce anabolic actions in bone. Pre-clinical studies and clinical data using N-terminal PTHrP analogs are also summarized, pointing to PTHrP as a promising alternative to current bone anabolic therapies. PMID:26259869

  4. Plant derived alternatives for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

    PubMed

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has undisputable positive effects on climacteric complaints, in the bone and on body weight but also several undesired side effects. Therefore, plant-derived alternatives are currently promoted. Phytoestrogens - primarily the isoflavones genistein, daidzein and coumestrol, stemming from soy (Glycine max) or red clover (Trifolium pratense) - were suggested to have the desired but not the undesired effects of estrogens. Most recently published placebo-controlled studies question the beneficial effects. When taken at the time of puberty however, phytoestrogens appear to protect against mammary cancer later in life. Extracts from the rhizome of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) have no estrogenic effects. In a narrow dose range they have beneficial effects on climacteric complaints, which are due to several compounds with dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and GABAergic actions that act together in the hypothalamus. Ecdysone is produced by several plants, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and was very early on shown to increase muscle mass. Later it became apparent that spinach extracts containing ecdysone decreased body fat load, thereby reducing secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by visceral adipocytes and oxidative stress. This had beneficial effects on body weight and serum lipids not only in obese postmenopausal but also in premenopausal women and in men. For the above-described plant extracts, solid placebo-controlled clinical trials are available. For other plant extracts claiming beneficial effects on climacteric complaints or postmenopausal diseases, no solid data are available. PMID:25436745

  5. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Levancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR), is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence. PMID:26327857

  6. Hormone Therapy and Skeletal Muscle Strength: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Greising, Sarah M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Warren, Gordon L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Our objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the research literature that compared muscle strength in postmenopausal women who were and were not on estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT). Methods Twenty-three relevant studies were found. Effect sizes (ESs) were calculated as the standardized mean difference, and meta-analyses were completed using a random effects model. Results HT was found to result in a small beneficial effect on muscle strength in postmenopausal women (overall ES = 0.23; p = .003) that equated to an ∼5% greater strength for women on HT. Among the 23 studies, various muscle groups were assessed for strength, and those that benefitted the most were the thumb adductors (ES = 1.14; p < .001). Ten studies that compared muscle strength in rodents that were and were not estradiol deficient were also analyzed. The ES for absolute strength was moderate but not statistically significant (ES = 0.44; p = .12), whereas estradiol had a large effect on strength normalized to muscle size (ES = 0.66; p = .03). Conclusion Overall, estrogen-based treatments were found to beneficially affect strength. PMID:19561145

  7. Screening mammography intervals among postmenopausal hormone therapy users and nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Onega, Tracy; MacKenzie, Todd; Weiss, Julia; Goodrich, Martha; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent decline in US breast cancer incidence rates has been attributed to the marked reduction in use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT). An alternative explanation is that women who are not routinely seeking medical care to renew HT prescriptions may be less adherent to recommendations for mammographic screening. To investigate the latter possibility, we compared mammographic intervals according to HT use. Methods Using data (1995–2007) from the New Hampshire Mammography Network (NHMN), a state-based mammography registry, we assessed mammographic intervals corresponding to HT use or nonuse among postmenopausal women. We used linear mixed effects models to assess whether the length of screening mammogram intervals differed according to HT use. Results A total of 310,185 mammograms, representing 76,192 postmenopausal women and 319,353 person-years of screening, were included in the analysis. The median screening interval corresponding to HT use overall was 13.0 months (interquartile range: 12.4–15.1) and for nonuse was 13.1 (interquartile range: 12.4–15.8). Virtually, all screening mammograms occurred within a 2-year interval regardless of HT use or nonuse (98.5 and 98.1%, respectively). Conclusions Our findings indicate that screening mammography intervals are similar whether or not women are using HT. Thus, reduced utilization of screening mammography is unlikely to account for the decrease in breast cancer incidence seen soon after the WHI report. PMID:19844798

  8. Local Failure in Resected N1 Lung Cancer: Implications for Adjuvant Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Kristin A.; Chino, Junzo P.; Berry, Mark; Ready, Neal; Boyd, Jessamy; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate actuarial rates of local failure in patients with pathologic N1 non-small-cell lung cancer and to identify clinical and pathologic factors associated with an increased risk of local failure after resection. Methods and Materials: All patients who underwent surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with pathologically confirmed N1 disease at Duke University Medical Center from 1995-2008 were identified. Patients receiving any preoperative therapy or postoperative radiotherapy or with positive surgical margins were excluded. Local failure was defined as disease recurrence within the ipsilateral hilum, mediastinum, or bronchial stump/staple line. Actuarial rates of local failure were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox multivariate analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. Results: Among 1,559 patients who underwent surgery during the time interval, 198 met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 50 (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Actuarial (5-year) rates of local failure, distant failure, and overall survival were 40%, 55%, and 33%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of local failure included a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; p = 0.01), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04), and increasing number of positive N1 lymph nodes (HR, 1.3 per involved lymph node; p = 0.02). Chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward decreased risk of local failure that was not statistically significant (HR, 0.61; p = 0.2). Conclusions: Actuarial rates of local failure in pN1 disease are high. Further investigation of conformal postoperative radiotherapy may be warranted.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Aspirin Adjuvant Therapy in Early Stage Colorectal Cancer in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soon, Swee Sung; Chia, Whay-Kuang; Chan, Mun-ling Sarah; Ho, Gwo Fuang; Jian, Xiao; Deng, Yan Hong; Tan, Chuen-Seng; Sharma, Atul; Segelov, Eva; Mehta, Shaesta; Ali, Raghib; Toh, Han-Chong; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Recent observational studies showed that post-operative aspirin use reduces cancer relapse and death in the earliest stages of colorectal cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of aspirin as an adjuvant therapy in Stage I and II colorectal cancer patients aged 65 years and older. Methods Two five-state Markov models were constructed separately for Stage I and II colorectal cancer using TreeAge Pro 2014. Two hypothetical cohorts of 10,000 individuals at a starting age of 65 years and with colorectal cancer in remission were put through the models separately. Cost-effectiveness of aspirin was evaluated against no treatment (Stage I and II) and capecitabine (Stage II) over a 20-year period from the United States societal perspective. Extensive one-way sensitivity analyses and multivariable Probabilistic Sensitivity Analyses (PSA) were performed. Results In the base case analyses, aspirin was cheaper and more effective compared to other comparators in both stages. Sensitivity analyses showed that no treatment and capecitabine (Stage II only) can be cost-effective alternatives if the utility of taking aspirin is below 0.909, aspirin’s annual fatal adverse event probability exceeds 0.57%, aspirin’s relative risk of disease progression is 0.997 or more, or when capecitabine’s relative risk of disease progression is less than 0.228. Probabilistic Sensitivity Analyses (PSA) further showed that aspirin could be cost-effective 50% to 80% of the time when the willingness-to-pay threshold was varied from USD20,000 to USD100,000. Conclusion Even with a modest treatment benefit, aspirin is likely to be cost-effective in Stage I and II colorectal cancer, thus suggesting a potential unique role in secondary prevention in this group of patients. PMID:25250815

  10. Adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: What have we learned since INT0116?

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Alexandre A; Sankarankutty, Ajith K; dos Santos, José Sebastião

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the main cancer-related causes of death worldwide. The curative treatment of gastric cancer consists of tumor resection and lymphadenectomy. However, surgical treatment alone is associated with high recurrence rates. Adjuvant treatment strategies have been studied over the last decades, but there have been controversial results from the initial studies. The pivotal INT0116 study demonstrated that the use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil increases relapse-free and overall survival, and it has been adopted across the Western world. The high toxicity of radiochemotherapy and suboptimal surgical treatment employed, with fewer than 10% of the patients submitted to D2 lymphadenectomy, were the main study limitations. Since its publication, other adjuvant treatment modalities have been studied, and radiochemotherapy is being refined to improve its efficacy and safety. A multimodal approach has been demonstrated to significantly increase relapse-free and overall survival, and it can be offered in the form of perioperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy, regardless of the extent of lymphadenectomy. The objective of the present review is to report the major advances obtained in the last decades in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer as well as the perspectives of treatment based on recent knowledge of the molecular biology of the disease. PMID:25852269

  11. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances. PMID:26602222

  12. Chemohormonal Therapy in Metastatic Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Christopher J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Carducci, Michael; Liu, Glenn; Jarrard, David F.; Eisenberger, Mario; Wong, Yu-Ning; Hahn, Noah; Kohli, Manish; Cooney, Matthew M.; Dreicer, Robert; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Picus, Joel; Shevrin, Daniel; Hussain, Maha; Garcia, Jorge A.; DiPaola, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the backbone of treatment for metastatic prostate cancer since the 1940s. We assessed whether concomitant treatment with ADT plus docetaxel would result in longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. METHODS We assigned men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to receive either ADT plus docetaxel (at a dose of 75 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks for six cycles) or ADT alone. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that the median overall survival would be 33.3% longer among patients receiving docetaxel added to ADT early during therapy than among patients receiving ADT alone. RESULTS A total of 790 patients (median age, 63 years) underwent randomization. After a median follow-up of 28.9 months, the median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with ADT plus docetaxel (combination therapy) than with ADT alone (57.6 months vs. 44.0 months; hazard ratio for death in the combination group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.80; P<0.001). The median time to biochemical, symptomatic, or radiographic progression was 20.2 months in the combination group, as compared with 11.7 months in the ADT-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.72; P<0.001). The rate of a prostate-specific antigen level of less than 0.2 ng per milliliter at 12 months was 27.7% in the combination group versus 16.8% in the ADT-alone group (P<0.001). In the combination group, the rate of grade 3 or 4 febrile neutropenia was 6.2%, the rate of grade 3 or 4 infection with neutropenia was 2.3%, and the rate of grade 3 sensory neuropathy and of grade 3 motor neuropathy was 0.5%. CONCLUSIONS Six cycles of docetaxel at the beginning of ADT for metastatic prostate cancer resulted in significantly longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00309985.) PMID:26244877

  13. Thyroid hormone therapy and procurement of livers from brain-dead donors.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Videla, Luis A; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2016-08-01

    Hormonal therapy to brain-dead potential organ donors remains controversial. A retrospective study was carried out of hormonal therapy on procurement of organs in 63,593 donors in whom information on T3/T4 therapy was available. In 40,124 donors, T3/T4 and all other hormonal therapy was recorded. The percentages of all organs procured, except livers, were greater in T3/T4-treated donors. Nevertheless, if T3/T4 therapy had been administered to the donor, liver transplantation was associated with significantly increased graft and recipient survival at 1 month and 12 months. The potential reasons for the lack of effect of T3/T4 therapy on the number of livers procured are discussed. PMID:26853445

  14. High Risk Stage 2 and Stage 3 Colon Cancer, Predictors of Recurrence and Effect of Adjuvant Therapy in a Nonselected Population

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart; Loffeld, Ruud J. L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer often are treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. However, patients seen in daily practice have more comorbidity than those enrolled in clinical trials. This study aims to evaluate prognostic factors for recurrence and to ascertain the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy on recurrence-free survival (RFS) of patients in a nonselected population. Furthermore, the impact of relative dose intensity (RDI) of adjuvant therapy on RFS is examined. Chart review was performed for 243 consecutive patients diagnosed and treated at a single center for stage 2 and stage 3 colon cancer from 2002 to 2008. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 66 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 5.84 years and median RFS was 5.37 years. For stage 2 disease, patients treated with or without adjuvant therapy had a median RFS of 5.49 and 5.73, respectively (p = ns). For stage 3 disease, median RFS rates were 5.08 and 1.19, respectively (p = 0.084). Overall RDI of oxaliplatin based chemotherapy higher than median was associated with increased RFS (p = 0.045). In conclusion, adjuvant therapy did not significantly increase recurrence-free survival. This could be the result of comorbidity in patients. Relative dose intensity of oxaliplatin based therapy is associated with RFS.

  15. Role of chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in first-line treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ceresoli, G L; De Vincenzo, F; Sauta, M G; Bonomi, M; Zucali, P A

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a heterogeneous disease, whose growth is driven by androgens and androgen receptors. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment of hormone-naïve metastatic disease. The majority of patients are treated with medical castration with GnRH agonists or antagonists, which usually determines a profound PSA decline and a radiological and clinical benefit. However, essentially all patients experience progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and overall prognosis remains disappointing. Early targeting of cells that survive hormonal therapy may potentially prevent the development of CRPC. Several trials have explored the use of combination therapy with ADT and chemotherapy, targeting both the androgen dependent and independent cells simultaneously. Docetaxel was administered in combination with ADT to men with hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, in the attempt to improve the duration and quality of patient survival. Three large randomized trials (the GETUG-15, CHAARTED and more recently the STAMPEDE study) have assessed these endpoints, with partially conflicting results. Overall, the results from these trials seem to support the use of early docetaxel combined with ADT in selected hormone-naïve metastatic PC patients. Full publication of the results of all studies, with longer follow-up, and the results of other ongoing trials in this setting will hopefully further define the role and the indications of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26222275

  16. Role of Axillary Clearance After a Tumor-Positive Sentinel Node in the Administration of Adjuvant Therapy in Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Straver, Marieke E.; Meijnen, Philip; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Mansel, Robert E.; Bogaerts, Jan; Demonty, Gaston; Duez, Nicole; Cataliotti, Luigi; Klinkenbijl, Jean; Westenberg, Helen A.; van der Mijle, Huub; Hurkmans, Coen; Rutgers, Emiel J.T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The After Mapping of the Axilla: Radiotherapy or Surgery? (AMAROS) phase III study compares axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and axillary radiation therapy (ART) in early breast cancer patients with tumor-positive sentinel nodes. In the ART arm, the extent of nodal involvement remains unknown, which could have implications on the administration of adjuvant therapy. In this preliminary analysis, we studied the influence of random assignment to ALND or ART on the choice for adjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods In the first 2,000 patients enrolled in the AMAROS trial, we analyzed the administration of adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariate analysis was used to assess variables affecting the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy was applied according to institutional guidelines. Results Of 2,000 patients, 566 patients had a positive sentinel node and were treated per random assignment. There was no significant difference in the administration of adjuvant systemic therapy. In the ALND and ART arms, 58% (175 of 300) and 61% (162 of 266) of the patients, respectively, received chemotherapy. Endocrine therapy was administered in 78% (235 of 300) of the patients in the ALND arm and in 76% (203 of 266) of the patients in the ART arm. Treatment arm was not a significant factor in the decision, and no interactions between treatment arm and other factors were observed. Multivariate analysis showed that age, tumor grade, multifocality, and size of the sentinel node metastasis significantly affected the administration of chemotherapy. Within the ALND arm, the extent of nodal involvement remained not significant in a sensitivity multivariate analysis. Conclusion Absence of knowledge regarding the extent of nodal involvement in the ART arm appears to have no major impact on the administration of adjuvant therapy. PMID:20038733

  17. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  18. Hormone therapy in menopause: An update on cardiovascular disease considerations.

    PubMed

    Hale, Georgina E; Shufelt, Chrisandra L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number one cause of death and morbidity worldwide, and while overall CVD incidence rates declined in both genders between 1999 and 2007, age-specific data suggest that coronary risk factors in women are on the rise. While early observational data favored menopausal hormone therapy's (MHT's) role in primary CVD prevention, the initial interventional study data from the WHI did not. Further detailed analyses of both observational and interventional data have pointed to the possibility that MHT may play a role in primary CVD prevention if initiated within 10 years of menopause and less than 60 years of age (the timing hypothesis). Unanswered questions remain regarding the optimal route and dosage of estrogen in MHT. Data so far, favor transdermal estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to CVD risk and oral estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to stroke risk. Low-dose oral CEE may similarly have benefit over conventional-dose oral CEE for some CVD events. In addition, the transdermal route of delivery may avoid the excess risk of certain CVD events associated with MHT and lower doses of estrogen may have fewer adverse effects than the doses previously tested in WHI. Because questions regarding benefits versus risks remain, MHT is yet to be recommended for CVD prevention. However, it is indicated for menopausal symptom management in women within 10 years of menopause and under the age of 60 years, in whom it does not appear to carry increased cardiovascular risk. Additional research is ongoing and needed to confirm or refute the comparative safety of the various MHT options. PMID:26270318

  19. Formulations of hormone therapy and risk of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Jessica I.; Ton, Thanh G.N.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Longstreth, W.T.; Franklin, Gary M.; Swanson, Phillip D.; Smith-Weller, Terri; Racette, Brad A.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy (HT) is a class of medications widely prescribed to women in the Western world. Evidence from animal models and in vitro studies suggests that estrogen may protect against nigrostriatal system injury and increase dopamine synthesis, metabolism, and transport. Existing epidemiologic research indicates a possible reduced risk of Parkinson disease (PD) associated with HT use. The objective of this study was to evaluate PD risk associated with specific HT formulations. Methods Neurologist confirmed cases and age-matched controls were identified from Group Health Cooperative (GHC) of Washington state. Final analysis included 137 female cases and 227 controls. HT use was ascertained from the GHC pharmacy database, further classified as conjugated estrogens, esterified estrogens, and progestin. Results Ever use of HT formulation demonstrated a suggested elevated risk with esterified estrogen use (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0–9.8), and no risk associated with conjugated estrogen use (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.6–1.3). Restricting this analysis to prescriptions that included progestin further elevated the risk associated with esterified estrogen use (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.1–22.9); again, no risk was associated with conjugated estrogen use (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.6–5.0). Conclusions The findings from this study suggest an increase in PD risk associated with esterified estrogen use combined with progestin, and no risk associated with conjugated estrogen with progestin. These findings could have important implications for choice of HT in clinical practice. PMID:25255692

  20. Factors Associated with Successful Discontinuation of Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan D.; Nekhyludov, Larissa; Grothaus, Louis C.; Ludman, Evette J.; Ehrlich, Kelly; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Careful management of symptoms, particularly sleep and mood disturbances, may assist women in discontinuing hormone therapy (HT). We sought to describe characteristics associated with successful HT cessation in women who attempted to discontinue estrogen pills/patches with or without progestin. Methods: We invited 2,328 women, aged 45–70, enrolled January 1, 2005, to May 31, 2006, at Group Health in Washington State and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates in Massachusetts, to participate in a telephone survey about HT practices. For the sample, we selected 2,090 women with estrogen dispensings (pharmacy data) during the study period, 200 women without HT dispensing after January 2005, and 240 women with no estrogen dispensings; 1,358 (58.3%) completed the survey. These analyses are based on survey responses. Results: Among 802 women who attempted HT discontinuation, the mean age was 50 years, 93% were postmenopausal, 90% were white, 30% had had a hysterectomy, and 75% experienced hot flashes after discontinuation. Those who did not succeed had greater trouble sleeping (74% vs. 57%) and mood disturbances (51% vs. 34%) than those who succeeded. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with successful discontinuation included doctor advice (odds ratio [OR] 2.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.68–4.08), lack of symptom improvement (OR 4.21, CI 1.50–12.17), vaginal bleeding (OR 5.96, CI 1.44–24.6), and learning to cope with symptoms (OR 3.36, CI 2.21–5.11). Factors associated with unsuccessful HT discontinuation included trouble sleeping (OR 0.40, CI 0.26–0.61) and mood swings or depression (OR 0.63, CI 0.42–0.92). Conclusions: Doctor advice is strongly associated with successful HT discontinuation. Symptom management, particularly sleep and mood disturbances, may help women discontinue HT. PMID:24443881

  1. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m{sup 2} intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m{sup 2} orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of >=180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  2. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  3. [Decrease of labor absenteeism associated with hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Blümel, J E; Sáez, L; Roncagliolo, M E; Tacla, X; Brandt, A

    1995-08-01

    Absenteeism affects efficiency and costs of health care. Most of health workers are middle age women, whose climacteric symptoms may reduce their work capacity working at a public hospital in Santiago during 1992. Fifty-eight percent were postmenopausal and 34.8% of these were receiving hormone replacement therapy. Global absenteeism rate was 17.1 days/year. These figures were 14.8 days/year for premenopausal and 17.8 days/year for postmenopausal women (NS). Among the latter, those women receiving hormone replacement therapy had a significantly lower absenteeism rate (9.4 days/year compared to 20.4 days/year among those not receiving hormones). Osteoarticular diseases were responsible for 44.3% and psychiatric diseases for 18.1% of sick leaves. No differences in absenteeism were observed between different professional levels. We conclude that hormone replacement therapy is associated with a better working capacity in postmenopausal women. PMID:8657962

  4. The role of hormonal factors and endocrine therapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sinacki, Marcin; Jassem, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of the second-line chemotherapy commonly used in both relapsed ovarian cancer patients and those with primary treatment failure remains unsatisfactory. This therapy has a small effect on survival, whereas associated toxicity may diminish the patient's quality of life. Hormonal factors play a role in ovarian tumorigenesis, and inhibition of the stimulating effects of estrogens may exert a clinical benefit. The role of hormonal therapy as a palliative therapeutic alternative for ovarian cancer remains undetermined. This modality may result in long-term stabilization of disease in individual patients and less frequently in tumor remission. In this article the role of hormonal factors and recent literature of various forms of hormonal therapy for ovarian cancer are presented. PMID:23788955

  5. Effects of hypophysectomy and subsequent hormonal replacement therapy on hormonal and osmoregulatory status of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, B T; Yamauchi, K; Nishioka, R S; Deftos, L J; Bern, H A

    1987-12-01

    This study investigates the effects of hypophysectomy and subsequent hormone replacement therapy upon the hormonal and osmoregulatory status of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in 7% seawater (SW) and SW. Following hypophysectomy, coho salmon were injected every 2 days for 8 days with thyroxine, growth hormone, and cortisol, alone or in combinations, and sampled 2 days after the final injection. Increased environmental salinity raises plasma sodium, calcium, and magnesium levels, as well as plasma osmolality. Cortisol is hypercalcemic and thyroxine is hypocalcemic in hypophysectomized salmon, but it is unclear whether these effects are due directly to calcium regulation or are the consequence of general effects on the plasma osmotic/ionic balance. Growth hormone and thyroxine together, but not separately, decrease and increase magnesium levels, at low and high environmental salinities, respectively, indicating a complex endocrine control of plasma magnesium. Gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity in hypophysectomized salmon is stimulated by growth hormone and cortisol, but inhibited by thyroxine and raised environmental salinity. This implies a complex endocrine control and indicates that hormonal support is needed to sustain or raise gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity in seawater. Increased environmental salinity induces elevation of plasma cortisol levels in apparent absence of pituitary control, indicating that the interrenals may respond to changes in external and/or internal environment, either directly or indirectly through extrapituitary hormonal or nervous control. Cortisol is a potent inhibitor of calcitonin secretion, as seen by the large decrease in plasma calcitonin levels in cortisol-treated hypophysectomized fish. The study was carried out at a time when thyroxine plasma levels were low. These basal levels were not affected by hypophysectomy, possibly indicating a basal release of thyroxine from the thyroid without stimulatory support of the pituitary gland. PMID

  6. Cardiovascular Risk in Growth Hormone Deficiency: Beneficial Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lanes, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adulthood is associated with an increased risk of developing adverse cardiovascular events and with reduced life expectancy. Cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities have so far been evaluated only in a small number of children with GHD and adolescents. In this article we review these abnormalities and their underlying mechanisms and discuss the beneficial effect of growth hormone treatment in subjects with GHD. PMID:27241971

  7. Adjuvant Surgical Oophorectomy Plus Tamoxifen in Premenopausal Women With Operable Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: A Global Treatment Option.

    PubMed

    Love, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    One third of annual new cases of breast cancer globally are now hormone receptor-positive tumors in premenopausal women from low- and middle-income countries. For this subgroup of women with breast cancer, high-income country guidelines suggest impractical and unaffordable adjuvant treatments. The balance of clinical trial evidence now suggests that surgical oophorectomy plus tamoxifen is a safe and practical treatment for these women in low- and middle-income countries. Additionally, new randomized trial data suggest that women in the second half of an anovulatory cycle benefit minimally from surgical oophorectomy done at this time, which implies that regularly cycling women will benefit more than has been shown from this procedure. Allred scoring of levels of hormone receptors is a practical and inexpensive approach to the assessment of magnitudes of response to oophorectomy plus tamoxifen. These circumstances suggest that more detailed consideration of this option should characterize clinical practice guidelines in high-income countries because of their global impact. PMID:27117241

  8. Selecting a specific pre- or postoperative adjuvant therapy for individual patients with operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Evangelos; Liakakos, Theodore; Dova, Lefkothea; Fatouros, Michael; Tsekeris, Pericles; Roukos, Dimitrios H; Kappas, Angelos M

    2006-06-01

    Although the very high locoregional recurrence rates reported with limited D0/D1 surgery can be reduced with extended D2 gastrectomy for operable gastric cancer, overall relapse and survival rates remain poor and can only be improved with adequate perioperative adjuvant treatment. However, despite intensive research, no regimen has been established as standard. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a marginal survival benefit with adjuvant chemotherapy. Two recent large randomized trials for operable gastric cancer, the MAGIC trial and the INT-0116 trial, provide evidence that some patients may benefit from perioperative chemotherapy and chemoradiation, respectively. However, while both trials suggest an overall survival benefit with adjuvant treatment, they don't provide the harm-benefit ratio for specific subsets of patients wih different extent of surgery (D1 or D2) and tumor stage (early [T1,2]/advanced [T3,4]). This lack of evidence complicates current therapeutic adjuvant decisions. Estimating the risk of local and distant recurrence (high, moderate or low) after D1 or D2 surgery in various tumor stages and the expected harm-benefit ratio, the authors provide useful information for decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy with or withour radiotherapy in individual patients. Research on newer cytotoxic and targeted agents may improve treatment efficacy. Simultaneously, advances with microarray-based gene-expression profiling signatures may improve individualized treatment decisions. However, the validation and translation of these genomic classifiers as biomarkers into a completed 'bench-to-bedside' cycle for tailoring treatment to individuals is a major challenge and limits inflated expectations. PMID:16761937

  9. [Results of radical removal of malignant cerebral gliomas, by using computer-assisted navigation, followed by adjuvant therapy].

    PubMed

    Krivoshapkin, A L; Kanygin, V V; Semin, P A; Melidi, E G

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective cohort analysis of the results of treatment of patients with malignant gliomas was made in 2 groups, each comprising 43 patients. In Group 1, the tumors were radically removed under neuronavigation guidance ("Voyager SX"). In Group 2 where the patients were operated on by the same team of surgeons who did not employ computer-assisted navigation technologies. The results of different adjuvant therapy regimens were analyzed in patients after radical tumor removal under navigation guidance (Group 1). In its first subgroup, 24 patients with anaplastic astrocytes were postoperatively irradiated (60 Gy), followed by treatment with temodal (200 mg/m2 (mean 6 courses). In the second subgroup, 12 patients received chemoradiotherapy (temodal, 75 mg/m2 daily + irradiation), followed by courses (n=6) of temodal, 200 mg/m2). In the third subgroup, 7 patients were treated with fotemustin (200 mg/m2 (induction) + 5 cycles). The computer-assisted technologies substantially improve a postoperative outcome in patients with malignant glionas. Current chemoradiotherapy is relatively safe and prolongs a relapse-free interval with a high quality of life. Further studies call for the efficiency of different adjuvant therapy regimens after radical surgery. PMID:17195370

  10. CYP19A1 Genetic Polymorphisms rs4646 and Osteoporosis in Patients Treated with Aromatase Inhibitor-Based Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Federica; Botticelli, Andrea; Mazzotti, Eva; La Torre, Marco; Borro, Marina; Marchetti, Luca; Maddalena, Chiara; Gentile, Giovanna; Simmaco, Maurizio; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AI) are potent suppressors of aromatase activity. The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of adverse effects in breast cancer patients treated with AI-based adjuvant therapy and the relationship with the CYP19A1 genotypes. Materials and Methods: Forty-five postmenopausal breast cancer patients (46–85 yrs) in AI adjuvant treatment were genotyped for the rs4646 polymorphisms of CYP19A1 gene and three variations were identified. Toxicities were registered at each follow-up medical examination, and classified in accord with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: Twenty-four (53.3%) patients presented the GG genotype; 19 (42.2%) the GT, and 2 (4.4%) the TT. The AI treatment was Anastrazole for 35 patients (77.8%) and Letrozole for the others (n=10; 22.2%). Osteoporosis was significantly associated with the GG genotype (p=0.001). Treatment discontinuation (TD) was observed in 6 cases (13.3%). The only parameter able to predict TD was the appearance of severe arthralgia/myalgia (Odds Ratio, OR=23.75; p=0.009), when adjusted for age and AI treatment. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CYP19A1 polymorphic variants may influence susceptibility to develop AI-related side effects. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the role of the aromatase gene (CYP19A1) polymorphisms in predicting adverse effects to AI-based therapy. PMID:27026757

  11. The Impact of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for High-Grade Gliomas by Histology in the United States Population

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Chad G.; Carlson, Julie A.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Dally, Miranda J.; Barón, Anna E.; Yeh, Norman; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Liu, Arthur K.; Ney, Douglas E.; Damek, Denise M.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the survival impact of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (RT) for malignant gliomas of glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), and mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) histology. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried from 1998 to 2007 for patients aged ≥18 years with high-grade gliomas managed with upfront surgical resection, treated with and without adjuvant RT. Results: The primary analysis totaled 14,461 patients, with 12,115 cases of GBM (83.8%), 1312 AA (9.1%), 718 AO (4.9%), and 316 AOA (2.2%). On univariate analyses, adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved overall survival (OS) for GBMs (2-year OS, 17% vs 7%, p<.001), AAs (5-year OS, 38% vs 24%, p<.001), and AOAs (5-year OS, 55% vs 44%, p=.026). No significant differences in OS were observed for AOs (5-year OS, with RT 50% vs 56% without RT, p=.277). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models accounting for extent of resection, age, sex, race, year, marital status, and tumor registry, RT was associated with significantly improved OS for both GBMs (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.50-0.55; P<.001) and AAs (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.48-0.68; P<.001) but only a trend toward improved OS for AOAs (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.45-1.09; P=.110). Due to the observation of nonproportional hazards, Cox regressions were not performed for AOs. A significant interaction was observed between the survival impact of RT and histology overall (interaction P<.001) and in a model limited to the anaplastic (WHO grade 3) histologies. (interaction P=.024), characterizing histology as a significant predictive factor for the impact of RT. Subgroup analyses demonstrated greater hazard reductions with RT among patients older than median age for both GBMs and AAs (all interaction P≤.001). No significant interactions were observed between RT and extent of resection. Identical patterns of significance were

  12. Impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy on cardiovascular events and cancer: pooled data from clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, E.; McPherson, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer from published clinical trials that studied other outcomes of postmenopausal hormone therapy as some surveys have suggested that it may decrease the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and increase the incidence of hormone dependent cancers. DESIGN: Trials that compared hormone therapy with placebo, no therapy, or vitamins and minerals in comparable groups of postmenopausal women and reported cardiovascular or cancer outcomes were searched from the literature. SUBJECTS: 22 trials with 4124 women were identified. In each group, the numbers of women with cardiovascular and cancer events were summed and divided by the numbers of women originally allocated to the groups. RESULTS: Data on cardiovascular events and cancer were usually given incidentally, either as a reason for dropping out of a study or in a list of adverse effects. The calculated odds ratios for women taking hormones versus those not taking hormones was 1.39 (95% confidence interval 0.48 to 3.95) for cardiovascular events without pulmonary embolus and deep vein thrombosis and 1.64 (0.55 to 4.18) with them. It is unlikely that such results would have occurred if the true odds ratio were 0.7 or less. For cancers, the numbers of reported events were too low for a useful conclusion. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these pooled data do not support the notion that postmenopausal hormone therapy prevents cardiovascular events. PMID:9251544

  13. The Development of a Mindfulness-Based Music Therapy (MBMT) Program for Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesiuk, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Problems with attention and symptom distress are common clinical features reported by women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Mindfulness practice significantly improves attention and mindfulness programs significantly reduce symptom distress in patients with cancer, and, more specifically, in women with breast cancer. Recently, a pilot investigation of a music therapy program, built on core attitudes of mindfulness practice, reported significant benefits of enhanced attention and decreased negative mood and fatigue in women with breast cancer. This paper delineates the design and development of the mindfulness-based music therapy (MBMT) program implemented in that pilot study and includes clients' narrative journal responses. Conclusions and recommendations, including recommendation for further exploration of the function of music in mindfulness practice are provided. PMID:27517966

  14. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    PubMed Central

    Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an “unacceptable health risk” during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. PMID:26696010

  15. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. PMID:26696010

  16. Systemic therapy for the treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer: from intermittent androgen deprivation therapy to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Bobby C; Shevach, Jeffrey; Oh, William K

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of advanced prostate cancer has changed considerably in recent years, but the vast majority of advances have been made in patients with metastatic castration-resistant disease. There have been relatively fewer advances in the earlier, hormonally responsive stage of metastatic disease. Since the empiric establishment of androgen deprivation therapy as first-line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer decades ago, there have been multiple studies looking at variations of suppressing testosterone, but the overall paradigm has not been strongly challenged until more recently. In particular, the dramatic results reported by the CHAARTED trial not only bring chemotherapy to an arena historically dominated solely by hormonal therapy but also stimulate renewed efforts into improving upon our management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25677235

  17. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  18. Phase 1 study on S-1 and oxaliplatin therapy as an adjuvant after hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Oba, Masaru; Saiura, Akio; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    of Background Data The effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer has been confirmed in various studies. However, no adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) classified to stage IV has been established. Objectives We conducted a phase 1 study of S-1 and oxaliplatin to determine the recommended dose (RD) in patients with CLM as adjuvant therapy in two institutes. Methods S-1 and oxaliplatin were administered from day 1 to day 14 of a 3-week cycle as a 2-h infusion every 3 weeks, respectively. The initial doses of S-1 and oxaliplatin were fixed to 80 mg/m(2) and 100 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1). We scheduled in the protocol a dose change of S-1 and oxaliplatin to level 2 (S-1: 80 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 130 mg/m(2)) or level 0 (S-1: 65 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 100 mg/m(2)) depending on the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at level 1 in six patients. Results Because DLT occurred in one among the initial six patients at level 1, the doses were increased to level 2 in the next six patients. At level 2, grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in one (16.7 %) and two (33.3 %) patients, respectively, in the absence of non-hematological event. Because no DLT occurred at level 2, we suggest that the RD can be set to the level 2 dose. The median number of cycles delivered at RD was 8. The mean relative dose intensity of S-1 and oxaliplatin at RD was 0.90 and 0.63, respectively. Conclusion In a patient undergoing hepatectomy for CLM, 80 mg/m(2) of S-1 and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin are recommended as adjuvant therapy. A further study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of this regimen on a larger scale. PMID:27155613

  19. Hormone resuscitation therapy for brain-dead donors - is insulin beneficial or detrimental?

    PubMed

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Videla, Luis A; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2016-07-01

    Hormonal replacement therapy to brain-dead potential organ donors remains controversial. A retrospective study was carried out of hormonal therapy on procurement of organs in 63 593 donors in whom information on thyroid hormone therapy (triiodothyronine or levothyroxine [T3 /T4 ]) was available. In 40 124 donors, T3 /T4 and all other hormonal therapy were recorded. The percentage of all organs procured, except livers, was greater when T3 /T4 had been administered. An independent beneficial effect of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) was also clear. Corticosteroids were less consistently beneficial (most frequently when T3 /T4 had not been administered), although never detrimental. Insulin was almost never beneficial and at times was associated with a reduced yield of organs, particularly of the pancreas and intestine, an observation that does not appear to have been reported previously. In addition, there was reduced survival at 12 months of recipients of pancreases from T3 /T4 -treated donors, but not of pancreas grafts. The possibly detrimental effect observed following insulin therapy is discussed. PMID:27037748

  20. [News options and preparations in growth hormone therapy].

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; Meneguz-Moreno, Rafael A; Nascimento-Junior, Adão C

    2008-07-01

    In the last twenty years, recombinant human Growth hormone (hrGH) has been available for the treatment of Growth Hormone Deficiency (GHD) in children and more recently in adults. However, the necessity of daily injections compromises the patient's compliance. Attempts to improve this compliance includes the use of pens and needle free devices, once the infusion pumps, not always physiologic, are of restricted use. When growth is the purpose of treatment, daily subcutaneous hrGH is still the most indicated. Nevertheless the expansion of GH replacement to new uses and especially in adults will need new preparations. Nowadays, the oral secretagogues have not proved efficacy to be used in clinical practice and the slow- release preparations of GH and GH releasing hormone that could improve the patient's compliance will need to be studied considering long term efficacy and safety. PMID:18797599

  1. Phase I study of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT) using helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent low dose temozolomide (TMZ) followed by adjuvant TMZ in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and materials Adult patients with GBM and KPS > 70 were prospectively enrolled between 2005 and 2007 in this phase I study. The Fibonacci dose escalation protocol was implemented to establish a safe radiation fractionation regimen. The protocol defined radiation therapy (RT) dose level I as 54.4 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks and dose level II as 60 Gy in 22 fractions over 4.5 weeks. Concurrent TMZ followed by adjuvant TMZ was given according to the Stupp regimen. The primary endpoints were feasibility and safety of Hypo-IMRT with concurrent TMZ. Secondary endpoints included progression free survival (PFS), pattern of failure, overall survival (OS) and incidence of pseudoprogression. The latter was defined as clinical or radiological suggestion of tumour progression within three months of radiation completion followed by spontaneous recovery of the patient. Results A total of 25 patients were prospectively enrolled with a median follow-up of 12.4 months. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years. Based on recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) criteria, 16%, 52% and 32% of the patients were RPA class III, class IV and class V, respectively. All patients completed concurrent RT and TMZ, and 19 patients (76.0%) received adjuvant TMZ. The median OS was 15.67 months (95% CI 11.56 - 20.04) and the median PFS was 6.7 months (95% CI 4.0 – 14.0). The median time between surgery and start of RT was 44 days (range of 28 to 77 days). Delaying radiation therapy by more than 6 weeks after surgery was an independent prognostic factor associated with a worse OS (4.0 vs. 16.1 months, P = 0.027). All recurrences occurred within 2 cm of the original gross tumour volume (GTV). No cases of pseudoprogression were

  2. Linking Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis With Decreases in Mortality Following Long-term Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The impressive first results of the Adjuvant Tamoxifen: Longer Against Shorter (ATLAS) and the adjuvant Tamoxifen To offer more (aTTom) trials both demonstrate that 10 years of tamoxifen is superior to five years of treatment. Tamoxifen is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that blocks estrogen-stimulated tumor growth. Paradoxically, mortality decreases dramatically only in the decade after long-term tamoxifen is stopped. It is proposed that the evolution and clonal selection of micrometastases that acquire tamoxifen resistance now become increasingly vulnerable to endogenous estrogen-induced apoptosis. Laboratory and clinical studies confirm the concept, and supporting clinical evidence from the estrogen-alone trial in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), demonstrate that long-term estrogen-deprived women given exogenous physiologic estrogen have a decreased incidence of breast cancer and decreased mortality. It is proposed that a natural process of apoptosis is recruited to execute the long-term survival benefit of stopping ten years of adjuvant tamoxifen, but only after clonal selection of vulnerable breast cancer cells in an estrogen-deprived environment. PMID:25269699

  3. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haoran; Zhong, Wenzhao; Yang, Xuening

    2015-01-01

    The Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis and the meta-analysis of individual participant data reported by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Meta-analysis Collaborative Group in neo-adjuvant setting validated respectively that adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy would significantly improve overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival for resectable NSCLC. However, chemotherapy has reached a therapeutic plateau. It has been confirmed that epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) targeting therapy provides a dramatic response to patients with advanced EGFR-mutation positive NSCLC. Researchers have paid more attention to exploring applications of TKIs to early resectable NSCLCs. Several studies on adjuvant TKI treatment concluded its safety and feasibility. But there existed certain limitations of these studies as inference factors to interpret data accurately: the BR19 study recruited patients among which almost 52% had stage IB and only 15 (3.0%, 15/503) had been confirmed with EGFR-mutant type; retrospective studies performed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) selected EGFR mutant-type NSCLC patients but couldn’t avoid inherent defects inside retrospective researches; the RADIANT study revised endpoints from targeting at EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC)+ and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)+ mutation to only EGFR IHC+ mutation, leading to selective bias; despite that the SELECT study validated efficacy of adjuvant TKI and second round of TKI after resistance occurred, a single-arm clinical trial is not that persuasive in the absence of comparison with chemotherapy. Taking all these limitations into account, CTONG1104 in China and IMPACT in Japan have been conducted and recruiting patients to offer higher level of evidences to explore efficacy of preoperative TKI therapy for early resectable EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients (confirmed by pathological results of tumor tissue or

  4. Relevance of breast cancer hormone receptors and other factors to the efficacy of adjuvant tamoxifen: patient-level meta-analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG)

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background As trials of 5 years of tamoxifen in early breast cancer mature, the relevance of hormone receptor measurements (and other patient characteristics) to long-term outcome can be assessed increasingly reliably. We report updated meta-analyses of the trials of 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. Methods We undertook a collaborative meta-analysis of individual patient data from 20 trials (n=21 457) in early breast cancer of about 5 years of tamoxifen versus no adjuvant tamoxifen, with about 80% compliance. Recurrence and death rate ratios (RRs) were from log-rank analyses by allocated treatment. Findings In oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease (n=10 645), allocation to about 5 years of tamoxifen substantially reduced recurrence rates throughout the first 10 years (RR 0·53 [SE 0·03] during years 0–4 and RR 0·68 [0·06] during years 5–9 [both 2p<0·00001]; but RR 0·97 [0·10] during years 10–14, suggesting no further gain or loss after year 10). Even in marginally ER-positive disease (10–19 fmol/mg cytosol protein) the recurrence reduction was substantial (RR 0·67 [0·08]). In ER-positive disease, the RR was approximately independent of progesterone receptor status (or level), age, nodal status, or use of chemotherapy. Breast cancer mortality was reduced by about a third throughout the first 15 years (RR 0·71 [0·05] during years 0–4, 0·66 [0·05] during years 5–9, and 0·68 [0·08] during years 10–14; p<0·0001 for extra mortality reduction during each separate time period). Overall non-breast-cancer mortality was little affected, despite small absolute increases in thromboembolic and uterine cancer mortality (both only in women older than 55 years), so all-cause mortality was substantially reduced. In ER-negative disease, tamoxifen had little or no effect on breast cancer recurrence or mortality. Interpretation 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen safely reduces 15-year risks of breast cancer recurrence and death. ER status was the

  5. End points for adjuvant therapy trials: has the time come to accept disease-free survival as a surrogate end point for overall survival?

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharlene; Sargent, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    The intent of adjuvant therapy is to eradicate micro-metastatic residual disease following curative resection with the goal of preventing or delaying recurrence. The time-honored standard for demonstrating efficacy of new adjuvant therapies is an improvement in overall survival (OS). This typically requires phase III trials of large sample size with lengthy follow-up. With the intent of reducing the cost and time of completing such trials, there is considerable interest in developing alternative or surrogate end points. A surrogate end point may be employed as a substitute to directly assess the effects of an intervention on an already accepted clinical end point such as mortality. When used judiciously, surrogate end points can accelerate the evaluation of new therapies, resulting in the more timely dissemination of effective therapies to patients. The current review provides a perspective on the suitability and validity of disease-free survival (DFS) as an alternative end point for OS. Criteria for establishing surrogacy and the advantages and limitations associated with the use of DFS as a primary end point in adjuvant clinical trials and as the basis for approval of new adjuvant therapies are discussed. PMID:16794241

  6. Phase II study of the GPC3-derived peptide vaccine as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Ofuji, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Mayuko; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Mari; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Gotohda, Naoto; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Kato, Yuichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira; Ikeda, Masafumi; Nakachi, Kohei; Yamazaki, Naoya; Mizuno, Shoichi; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Yamao, Kenji; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Furuse, Junji; Endo, Itaru; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recurrence rates of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are high, necessitating novel and effective adjuvant therapies. Therefore, we conducted a phase II study of glypican-3 (GPC3) peptide vaccine as an adjuvant therapy for HCC patients. Forty-one patients with initial HCC who had undergone surgery or radiofrequency ablation (RFA) were analyzed in this phase II, open-label, single-arm trial. Ten vaccinations were performed for 1 y after curative treatment. We also investigated case-control subjects, where selected patients treated surgically during the same period were analyzed. The expression of GPC3 in the available primary tumors was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Six patients received RFA therapy while 35 received surgery. The recurrence rate tended to be lower in the 35 patients treated with surgery plus vaccination compared to 33 patients who underwent surgery alone (28.6% vs. 54.3% and 39.4% vs. 54.5% at 1 and 2 y, respectively; p = 0.346, 0.983). Twenty-five patients treated with surgery and vaccination had GPC3-positive tumors; the recurrence rate in this group was significantly lower compared to that in 21 GPC3-positive patients who received surgery only (24% vs. 48% and 52.4% vs. 61.9% at 1 and 2 y, respectively; p = 0.047, 0.387). The GPC3 peptide vaccine improved the 1-y recurrence rate in patients with GPC3-positive tumors. This study demonstrated that GPC3 expression by the primary tumor may be used as a biomarker in a putative larger randomized clinical trial to determine the efficacy of the GPC3-derived peptide vaccine. PMID:27467945

  7. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  8. Hormonal therapy is associated with better self-esteem, mood, and quality of life in transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Gorin-Lazard, Audrey; Baumstarck, Karine; Boyer, Laurent; Maquigneau, Aurélie; Penochet, Jean-Claude; Pringuey, Dominique; Albarel, Frédérique; Morange, Isabelle; Bonierbale, Mireille; Lançon, Christophe; Auquier, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Few studies have assessed the role of cross-sex hormones on psychological outcomes during the period of hormonal therapy preceding sex reassignment surgery in transsexuals. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between hormonal therapy, self-esteem, depression, quality of life (QoL), and global functioning. This study incorporated a cross-sectional design. The inclusion criteria were diagnosis of gender identity disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision) and inclusion in a standardized sex reassignment procedure. The outcome measures were self-esteem (Social Self-Esteem Inventory), mood (Beck Depression Inventory), QoL (Subjective Quality of Life Analysis), and global functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning). Sixty-seven consecutive individuals agreed to participate. Seventy-three percent received hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was an independent factor in greater self-esteem, less severe depression symptoms, and greater "psychological-like" dimensions of QoL. These findings should provide pertinent information for health care providers who consider this period as a crucial part of the global sex reassignment procedure. PMID:24177489

  9. Efficacy and Safety Assessment of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Adjuvant Therapy Agents in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadizar, Fariba; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; de Boer, Anthonius; Liu, Geoffrey; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in the adjuvant cancer therapy setting within different subset of patients. Methods & Design/ Results PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane and Clinical trials.gov databases were searched for English language studies of randomized controlled trials comparing bevacizumab and adjuvant therapy with adjuvant therapy alone published from January 1966 to 7th of May 2014. Progression free survival, overall survival, overall response rate, safety and quality of life were analyzed using random- or fixed-effects models according to the PRISMA guidelines. We obtained data from 44 randomized controlled trials (30,828 patients). Combining bevacizumab with different adjuvant therapies resulted in significant improvement of progression free survival (log hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84–0.89), overall survival (log hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94–0.98) and overall response rate (relative risk, 1.46; 95% CI: 1.33–1.59) compared to adjuvant therapy alone in all studied tumor types. In subgroup analyses, there were no interactions of bevacizumab with baseline characteristics on progression free survival and overall survival, while overall response rate was influenced by tumor type and bevacizumab dose (p-value: 0.02). Although bevacizumab use resulted in additional expected adverse drug reactions except anemia and fatigue, it was not associated with a significant decline in quality of life. There was a trend towards a higher risk of several side effects in patients treated by high-dose bevacizumab compared to the low-dose e.g. all grade proteinuria (9.24; 95% CI: 6.60–12.94 vs. 2.64; 95% CI: 1.29–5.40). Conclusions Combining bevacizumab with different adjuvant therapies provides a survival benefit across all major subsets of patients, including by tumor type, type of adjuvant therapy, and duration and dose of bevacizumab therapy. Though bevacizumab was associated with increased risks of some adverse drug

  10. A Hybrid Systems Approach to Hormonal Therapy of Prostate Cancer and its Nonlinear Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Gouhei; Suzuki, Taiji; Hirata, Yoshito

    2007-07-01

    This talk is to review our recent work on mathematical modeling of prostate cancer and its application to hormonal therapy of intermittent androgen suppression. First, we model the tumor growth of prostate cancer composed of a mixed dynamical assembly of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent cancer cells. Then, we introduce the intermittent androgen suppression to the model as feedback control with monitoring the serum prostate-specific antigen, where the controlled model is described as a hybrid system with continuous and discrete variables. Next, we analyze nonlinear dynamics and bifurcations of the hybrid system. Finally, we discuss a possibility to improve the hormonal therapy.

  11. The prognosis factor of adjuvant radiation therapy after surgery in uterine sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hai-Ling; Meng, Mao-Bin; Chen, Xiu-Li; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Bai-Lin; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study evaluated the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (AR) after surgery in patients with uterine sarcoma and analyzed the prognostic factors of local-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients and methods A study of a total of 182 patients with uterine sarcoma was conducted between June 1994 and October 2014. Adjuvant radiotherapy was defined as postoperative external beam radiation to the pelvis (30–50 Gray/10–25 fractions at five fractions/week). The primary end point was LRFFS, and the secondary end point was OS. Kaplan–Meier curves were compared using the log-rank test. Cox regression analyses were used to determine prognosticators for LRFFS and OS. Results The median follow-up time of all patients was 75 months, with a 5-year LRFFS of 62.1%. The 2-year and 5-year LRFFS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (83.4% vs 70.3%; 78% vs 55.3%; P=0.013). The 5-year OS of all patients was 56.2%, and no significant differences were observed in the 2-year and 5-year OS rates between these two groups (82.7% vs 71.4%; 64.1% vs 51.7%; P=0.067). Importantly, in patients with leiomyosarcoma, the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS and OS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (P=0.04 and P=0.02 for the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS, respectively). Conclusion Patients with uterine sarcoma who were treated with AR after surgery demonstrated an improved LRFFS compared with those who were treated with surgery alone, especially those patients with leiomyosarcoma. Therefore, the role of personalized adjuvant radiation for patients with uterine sarcoma still requires further discussion. PMID:26357482

  12. Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) Program: Baseline Data and Patient Characteristics from a Population-Based, Randomized Study Evaluating Compliance to Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy in Postmenopausal Women with Hormone-Sensitive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Nadia; Blettner, Maria; Hadji, Peyman; Jackisch, Christian; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Zaun, Silke; Haidinger, Renate; Schmitt, Doris; Schulte, Hilde; Nitz, Ulrike; Kreienberg, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) program is a large randomized study designed to assess whether the provision of educational materials (EM) could improve compliance with aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with early, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Patients and Methods The PACT study presented a large, homogeneous dataset. The baseline analysis included patient demographics and initial treatments and patient perceptions about treatment and quality of life. Results Overall, 4,923 patients were enrolled at 109 German breast cancer centers/clinics in cooperation with 1,361 office-based gynecologists/oncologists. 4,844 women were randomized 1:1 to standard therapy (n = 2,402) or standard therapy plus EM (n = 2,442). Prior breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy had been received by 76% and 24% of the patients, respectively. Radiotherapy was scheduled for 85% of the patients, adjuvant chemotherapy for 38%. Reflecting the postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive nature of this population, only 285 patients (7%) had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions A comparison with epidemiological data from the West German Breast Center suggests that the patients in the PACT study are representative of a general postmenopausal early breast cancer population and that the findings may be applicable to ‘real-world’ Germany and beyond. Compliance data from PACT are eagerly anticipated. PMID:24419247

  13. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  14. Hormone Therapy Plus Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A trial of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus six cycles of docetaxel versus ADT alone found that after a median follow-up of nearly 29 months, median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with the combination therapy than with ADT alone (57.6vs44

  15. [Adjuvant therapy with WT1 peptide-pulsed dendritic cell therapy in combination with TS-1 for pancreatic cancer with positive peritoneal cytology after curative operation].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Tono, Takeshi; Abe, Hirofumi; Nishida, Kentaro; Yanagawa, Takehiro; Fujie, Yujiro; Fujita, Shoichiro; Fujita, Junya; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Imaoka, Shingi; Monden, Takushi

    2014-10-01

    A 66-year-old woman was diagnosed with pancreatic tail cancer, and she was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed a tumor(2.5 cm in diameter)in the pancreatic tail, with invasion to the spleen and splenic vein. In February 2013, we performed distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, left adrenal gland resection, and D2 lymph node dissection. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage cytology during surgery was positive; however, we performed curative resection because there were no signs of peritoneal dissemination and distant metastasis. The patient was discharged from the hospital 23 days after the operation, with good postoperative course. Histological diagnosis was pancreatic tail cancer, pT4N0H0P0M(-) fStage IVa. Subsequently, the patient received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy(TS-1: 100mg/day, 4 courses)combined with Wilms'tumor 1(WT1)peptide-pulsed dendritic cell therapy. No serious adverse events occurred during the postoperative adjuvant therapy. The patient remains alive without recurrence 16 months after the operation. PMID:25335723

  16. Rapid enlargement of an intracranial germ cell tumor after gonadotropin hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakagawa, Athushi; Nakada, Satoko; Nojima, Takayuki; Koya, Daisuke; Iizuka, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of an intracranial germ cell tumor (iGCT) that showed rapid enlargement after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone therapy for pituitary hypogonadism. A 16-year-old boy presented with headache and was diagnosed with a suprasellar tumor. He was initially observed without surgery. Intranasal desmopressin therapy was started for central diabetes insipidus, but there was no change in the tumor size on MRI. The diagnosis of the tumor remained unknown for 4years. Levels of serum gonadotropin hormones (follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone) and testosterone progressively decreased, and the patient developed pituitary hypogonadism and complained about his undeveloped beard, lack of underarm hair, and erectile dysfunction. Intramuscular gonadotropin injection (hCG 5000U×2/week) was started at age 20. Eight months after the first gonadotropin injection, the MRI showed tumor growth with vivid enhancement. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was partially resected. The histological diagnosis was immature teratoma. After surgery, the patient was treated with 5 cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide. He also received radiation therapy of 50Gy (20Gy tumor bed and 30Gy whole ventricles) to the residual tumor, after which the tumor decreased in size. We postulate that iGCT may be at risk of progression during hCG hormone therapy. Thus, careful monitoring is required for a patient with iGCT who receives this therapy. PMID:27050912

  17. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  18. Functional Alteration of Tumor-infiltrating Myeloid Cells in RNA Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages, as well as dendritic cells (DCs), are derived from myeloid progenitor cells. Recent evidence suggests that tumor-infiltrating macrophages differ in many aspects from conventional tissue macrophages, including nature, function and markers. Tumors usually contain various myeloid lineage cells in their non-parenchymal environment. In immunotherapy for cancer, tumor cells and non-parenchymal cells are exposed to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and tumor-cell-derived nucleic acids. In addition, a dsRNA mimic, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), exhibits strong adjuvant activity, which acts both on the immune system and tumor constituents. Herein we discuss the RNA recognition system and unique cellular output in tumor-associated myeloid cells in response to immunotherapy. We especially focus on the mechanism by which RNA adjuvant alters the tumor-supportive nature of tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells to those with tumoricidal activity. We discuss how RNA administration makes tumor cells collapse and its significance of evoking cell death signals in tumor cells and macrophages. This knowledge will be applicable to the development of an alternative immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:26168476

  19. Feasibility of combining adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization with nucleos(t)ide analog therapy for patients with HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    GONG, WEN-FENG; ZHONG, JIAN-HONG; XIANG, BANG-DE; LI, LE-QUN

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortalities, and its prevalence is expected to increase in future decades. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of HCC. Although hepatectomy is the preferred curative treatment for HCC, tumor recurrence is common, which is the most frequent cause of mortality in patients with HCC. HCC recurrence may originate from the primary tumor or be associated with remnant liver tissue, and include high viral load and hepatic inflammatory activity. Adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and postoperative nucleos(t)ide analogs therapy are the two corresponding therapies. Following systematic searching of the PubMed database, the indications for adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization and nucleos(t)ide analog therapies for HBV-related HCC after hepatectomy were acquired. Additionally, the feasibility of combining these two therapies were also reviewed. PMID:27330754

  20. Pyogenic granuloma occurring in a postmenopausal woman on hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas M; Demsar, Williamr J; Herold, Robert W; Bisch, Frederick C; Gerlach, Robert C; Swiec, Gary D

    2011-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is a benign nodular lesion occurring most commonly on the gingiva of females during periods of elevated sex hormones such as puberty and pregnancy. Possible molecular mechanisms responsible for the appearance of pyogenic granuloma in this demographic have been suggested. Increased incidence of pyogenic granuloma in post menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy has not been reported. A 49-year-old woman with preexisting titanium implant placement in the left posterior mandible presented with complaint of food impaction and slight discomfort associated with the implant. Clinical examination revealed slight soft tissue erythema and edema, but no foreign body could be identified. Subsequently, a nodular gingival lesion associated with the implant developed and was treated by conservative surgical excision. Histologic characteristics of the lesion were consistent with pyogenic granuloma. The patient was informed of the diagnosis. No evidence of recurrence could be identified after 6 months. Like peripubertal and pregnant women, postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy may be at increased risk for pyogenic granuloma. Observational studies designed to establish an association between hormone replacement therapy and pyogenic granuloma have not been conducted. Dentists should be aware of putative pathophysiologic mechanisms for pyogenic granuloma formation and the possibility that hormone replacement may trigger these mechanisms. PMID:21409768

  1. Risk of Marrow Neoplasms After Adjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Visvanathan, Kala; Rugo, Hope S.; Moy, Beverly; Goldstein, Lori J.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Neumayer, Leigh; Langbaum, Terry S.; Theriault, Richard L.; Hughes, Melissa E.; Weeks, Jane C.; Karp, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Outcomes for early-stage breast cancer have improved. First-generation adjuvant chemotherapy trials reported a 0.27% 8-year cumulative incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Incomplete ascertainment and follow-up may have underestimated subsequent risk of treatment-associated marrow neoplasm (MN). Patients and Methods We examined the MN frequency in 20,063 patients with stage I to III breast cancer treated at US academic centers between 1998 and 2007. Time-to-event analyses were censored at first date of new cancer event, last contact date, or death and considered competing risks. Cumulative incidence, hazard ratios (HRs), and comparisons with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results estimates were obtained. Marrow cytogenetics data were reviewed. Results Fifty patients developed MN (myeloid, n = 42; lymphoid, n = 8) after breast cancer (median follow-up, 5.1 years). Patients who developed MN had similar breast cancer stage distribution, race, and chemotherapy exposure but were older compared with patients who did not develop MN (median age, 59.1 v 53.9 years, respectively; P = .03). Two thirds of patients had complex MN cytogenetics. Risk of MN was significantly increased after surgery plus chemotherapy (HR, 6.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 36.1) or after all modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation; HR, 7.6; 95% CI, 1.6 to 35.8), compared with no treatment with chemotherapy. MN rates per 1,000 person-years were 0.16 (surgery), 0.43 (plus radiation), 0.46 (plus chemotherapy), and 0.54 (all three modalities). Cumulative incidence of MN doubled between years 5 and 10 (0.24% to 0.48%); 9% of patients were alive at 10 years. Conclusion In this large early-stage breast cancer cohort, MN risk after radiation and/or adjuvant chemotherapy was low but higher than previously described. Risk continued to increase beyond 5 years. Individual risk of MN must be balanced against the absolute survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID

  2. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  3. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  4. Adjuvant oestrogen therapy does not improve disease activity in postmenopausal patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink, H R; van Everdingen, A A; van Wijk, M J; Jacobs, J W; Bijlsma, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether oestrogens can be used as treatment to diminish disease activity in women with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Forty postmenopausal female patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind study on the possible beneficial effect of adjuvant treatment of oestradiol on disease activity. RESULTS--Thirty three patients completed 52 weeks of treatment with 2 mg oestradiol-valerate or placebo. No statistically significant difference was found in and between both treatment groups with regard to articular indices, pain score by visual analogue scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and health questionnaire on daily activities before, during and at the end of the study. CONCLUSION--This first randomised prospective placebo-controlled study shows no beneficial effect of oestrogens on disease activity in postmenopausal female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8311536

  5. Combination therapies in adjuvant with topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has becomes the fastest growth male cancer disease due to the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people. In order to eliminate the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when ALA reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of ALA gel. We found that ALA reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 150 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that adjuvant topical ALA -mediated PDT group has shown better therapeutic results in compared to those of non-adjuvant topical ALA-mediated PDT group for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  6. Eradication of breast cancer with bone metastasis by autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV) combined with palliative radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuranishi, Fumito; Ohno, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis of breast carcinoma is refractory to intensive chemo-radiation therapy and therefore is assumed impossible to cure. Here, we report an advanced case of breast cancer with vertebra-Th7 metastasis that showed complete response to combined treatments with formalin-fixed autologous tumor vaccine (AFTV), palliative radiation therapy with 36 Gy, and adjuvant chemotherapy with standardized CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and 5FU), zoledronic acid, and aromatase inhibitors following mastectomy for the breast tumor. The patient has been disease-free for more than 4 years after the mammary surgery and remains well with no evidence of metastasis or local recurrence. Thus, a combination of AFTV, palliative radiation therapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for this devastating disease. PMID:23734861

  7. Quantitative detection of HER2 protein concentration in breast cancer tissue does not increase the number of patients eligible for adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Bechmann, Troels; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Jakobsen, Erik Hugger; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Brandslund, Ivan; Jylling, Anne Marie Bak; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 15-20% of breast cancer patients and is associated with an aggressive tumor and a poor prognosis. Currently, patients are selected for adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy based on HER2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this study, we assessed the clinical significance of tissue HER2 status determined by a quantitative immunoassay using ADVIA Centaur. We investigated the hypothesis that the clinical outcome is worse in a group of patients defined as tissue HER2-positive only by Centaur, but not treated with adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy, compared to patients defined as HER2-positive by IHC/FISH and therefore treated with adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy. Tumor tissue was obtained at primary surgery from 415 breast cancer patients between 2004 and 2010. HER2 status was determined by quantitative immunoassay of fresh-frozen tissue and by IHC/FISH of corresponding paraffin-embedded tissue. We compared the clinical outcome in four groups of patients defined by tissue HER2 status and adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy. The final analysis included 379 patients after a median follow-up of 3.9 years for invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) and 4.2 years for overall survival (OS). The quantitative Centaur assay defined a greater number of patients (100 patients, 26.4%) as HER2-positive than IHC/FISH (63 patients, 16.6%) (P<0.0001). No significant difference in IDFS (P=0.159) and OS (P=0.150) was observed among the four groups of patients. However, in the IHC/FISH-positive group without adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy (group 2), a significantly greater number of events was found compared to the Centaur-positive group without adjuvant HER2-targeted therapy (group 3) for both IDFS (P=0.025) and OS (P=0.020). Quantitative HER2 determination by Centaur did not define a new group of patients eligible for HER2-targeted therapy. Currently, tissue HER2 status defined

  8. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  9. The influence of hormone therapies on type I and II endometrial cancer: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina S; Kjaer, Susanne K; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2016-03-15

    The influence of hormone therapy (HT) on risk for endometrial cancer is still casting which type of HT the clinicians recommend. It is unrevealed if HT has a differential influence on Type I versus Type II endometrial tumors, and little is known about the influence of, e.g., different routes of administration and about the influence of tibolone. We followed all Danish women aged 50-79 years without previous cancer or hysterectomy (n = 914,595) during 1995-2009. From the National Prescription Register, we computed HT exposures as time-dependent covariates. Incident endometrial cancers (n = 6,202) were identified from the National Cancer Registry: 4,972 Type I tumors and 500 Type II tumors. Incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cls) were estimated by Poisson regression. Compared with women never on HT, the RR of endometrial cancer was increased with conjugated estrogen: 4.27 (1.92-9.52), nonconjugated estrogen: 2.00 (1.87-2.13), long cycle combined therapy: 2.89 (2.27-3.67), cyclic combined therapy: 2.06 (1.88-2.27), tibolone 3.56 (2.94-4.32), transdermal estrogen: 2.77 (2.12-3.62) and vaginal estrogen: 1.96 (1.77-2.17), but not with continuous combined therapy: 1.02 (0.87-1.20). In contrast, the risk of Type II tumors appeared decreased with continuous combined therapy: 0.45 (0.20-1.01), and estrogen therapy implied a nonsignificantly altered risk of 1.43 (0.85-2.41). Our findings support that continuous combined therapy is risk free for Type I tumors, while all other hormone therapies increase risk. In contrast, Type II endometrial cancer was less convincingly associated with hormone use, and continuous combined therapy appeared to decrease the risk. PMID:26421912

  10. Indocyanine green (ICG) as a new adjuvant for the antimicrobial photo-dynamic therapy (aPDT) in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Joerg; Hopp, Michael; Schäfers, Johannes; Verbeek, Jonas; Kraus, Dominik; Frentzen, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    Clinical surveys show a continuous increase of antimicrobial resistance related to the frequency of the administrated medication. The antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is an effective adjuvant to reduce the need of antibiotics in dentistry, especially in periodontics. The antimicrobial effect of lightactivated photosensitizers in periodontics is demonstrated in clinical studies and case reports. Indocyanine green (ICG) as a new adjuvant shows the high potential of antiphlogistic and antimicrobial effects in combination with laser-light activation. In trying to answer the question of just how far the influence of temperature is acting on bacteria, this study was carried out. The influences of ICG at different concentrations (0.01 up to 1 mg/ml) in combination with a culture medium (brain-heart-infusion) and a bacteria culture (Streptococcus salivarius) at different optical densities (OD600 0.5 and 0.1) were investigated under laser-light activation. Laser activation was carried out with diode laser at 810 nm and two different power settings (100 mW/300 mW). The pulse repetition rate was 2 kHz. Taking account of the fiber diameter, distance and spot size on the sample surface, the applicated intensities were 6.2 and 18.7 W/cm2. Total irradiation time was 20 s for all meaurements. Transmitted laser power and temperature increase in the culture medium as well as in the bacteria culture were determined. Additionally the influence of ICG regarding bacterial growth and bactericidal effect was investigated in the bacteria culture without laser irradiation. Without laser, no bactericidal effect of ICG was observed. Only a bacteriostatic effect could be proved. In dependence of the ICG concentration and the applied intensities a temperature increase of ΔT up to 80°C was measured.

  11. Oral 2.01: Proton beam radiation therapy for adjuvant and definitive treatment of thymoma and thymic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jennifer H.; Berman, Abigail T.; Pechet, Taine T.; William, Levin P.; Gabriel, Peter E.; Khella, Sami; Singhal, Sunil; Kucharczuk, John C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is a critical component of treatment for thymic tumors. However, radiation-induced toxicity may reduce benefit, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Proton beam therapy (PBT), due to its characteristic Bragg peak, is ideally suited to treat the anterior mediastinum while sparing organs at risk. To date, PBT to treat thymic tumors has only been reported in three single-patient case studies. In this study, we evaluated patterns of failure and toxicity in patients treated for thymoma and thymic carcinoma using PBT and hypothesized that PBT can achieve excellent local control with limited high grade toxicity. Methods All patients with thymoma or thymic carcinoma treated with PBT between 2011–2015 were analyzed. Either double scattered proton therapy (DS-PT) or pencil beam scanning (PBS) were used. Toxicity was assessed using CTCAE v 4.2. Local control, distant control, and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of PBT completion. Results Twenty-seven patients were included. Patients were a median age of 56 years, predominantly female (56%), and had thymoma (85%) or thymic carcinoma (15%). They were treated with definitive (22%) or salvage (15%) PBT or adjuvant (63%) PBT following resection with predominantly close (23%) or positive (50%) margins. Forty-one percent also received chemotherapy. Patients were treated to a median of 61.2 Gy (range 50.4–70.2 Gy) using DS-PT (85%) or PBS (15%). Median mean lung dose, volume of lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V20), and V5 were 98 cGy (1–2,050 cGy), 18% (0–38%), and 26.2% (0–55%). Median mean heart and esophagus doses were 1,065 cGy (105–3,356cGy) and 1,072cGy (0–4,655 cGy). No patient experienced grade ≥3 acute or chronic toxicity. Acute grade ≥2 toxicities included fatigue (11%), esophagitis (7%), dermatitis (37%), and pneumonitis in one patient (4%) who received 2 prior thoracic radiotherapy courses. Late grade ≥2 toxicity was limited to a single

  12. The efficacy of Curcuma Longa L. extract as an adjuvant therapy in primary knee osteoarthritis: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Pinsornsak, Piya; Niempoog, Sunyarn

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is one of the most commonly use medication for treatment of knee osteoarthritis which has the analgesic and anti-inflammation by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis via COX-1 and COX-2 isoenzyme. The problem of prolong using NSAIDs has side effect on kidney, liver and GI system. Curcumin longa extract Curcumin) is the Asian herbal medicine that has the anti-inflammatory effect by down regulate activation of NF-kappaB and proinflammatory cytokines such as Tumor Necrotic Factor-alpha, Interleukin-1, Interleukin-8, and Nitric Oxide Syntase. Many research data had advocate for the combination therapy which can increase safety and efficacy with less side effect compare with monotherapy regimen especially when the medicine has the different mechanism of action. The present study is the double blind prospective randomized control trial to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin as an adjuvant therapy of diclofenac in primary knee osteoarthritis. 44 patients were randomized to take NSAIDs (diclofenac) 75 mg/d with placebo and the other 44 took NSAIDs (diclofenac) 75 mg/d with curcumin 1,000 mg/d for 3 months. The authors evaluated the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) every month for 3 months. At the end of study 36 patients were completed for the first group and 37 for the study group. There was no difference in VAS [p-value = 0.923 (F = 0.009)]. The KOOS was analyzed in 5 categories symptom, pain, function in daily living, function in sport and recreation and knee related quality of life. The curcumin with diclofenac group had tendency to be better in Pain and Function in daily living, but there were no statistic different in all group [p-value = 0.412 (F = 0.683), p-value = 0.814 (F = 0.056), p-value = 0.446 (F = 0.589), p-value = 0.224 (F = 1.511) and p-value = 0.938 (F = 0.006)]. In conclusion, the adjuvant therapy ofcurcumin with diclofenac has the potential beneficial

  13. Refractory asthma - beyond step 5, the role of new and emerging adjuvant therapies.

    PubMed

    Kane, Binita; Fowler, Stephen J; Niven, Rob

    2015-02-01

    A small percentage of asthmatics have 'severe refractory asthma', where there is suboptimal response to currently available therapies. A number of novel therapies targeting key biological targets are becoming available. Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, and systematic evaluation of patients is important to target therapies to the underlying inflammatory subtype and clinical features. This review article outlines new and emerging treatments for severe asthma, including monoclonal antibodies targeting eosinophilic disease, anti-neutrophil strategies, novel bronchodilators and bronchial thermoplasty. We highlight the importance of individualized investigation, treatment and management of severe asthmatics. PMID:25492977

  14. Endocrine therapy for hormone treatment-naïve advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Miguel; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Gilarranz, Yolanda Jerez

    2016-08-01

    A proportion of patients with hormone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer will not have received prior endocrine therapy. However, there are limited clinical data specifically in these patients. We conducted a review of randomized phase II and III clinical studies of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, palbociclib, and fulvestrant to determine the evidence base supporting use of specific endocrine therapies in this patient population. From our findings, there is a paucity of clinical studies in patients with endocrine therapy-naïve disease; however, it appears that first-line treatment effects are consistent between patients who have and have not received prior endocrine treatment. PMID:27326977

  15. Endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive her2-negative advanced breast cancer after progression or recurrence on nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy: a Canadian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, K I; Gelmon, K A; Rayson, D; Provencher, L; Webster, M; McLeod, D; Verma, S

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 22,700 Canadian women were expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. Despite improvements in screening and adjuvant treatment options, a substantial number of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive (hr+) breast cancer will continue to develop metastatic disease during or after adjuvant endocrine therapy. Guidance on the selection of endocrine therapy for patients with hr+ disease that is negative for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (her2-) and that has relapsed or progressed on earlier nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (nsai) therapy is of increasing clinical importance. Exemestane, fulvestrant, and tamoxifen are approved therapeutic options in this context. Four phase iii trials involving 2876 patients-efect, sofea, confirm, and bolero-2-have assessed the efficacy of various treatment options in this clinical setting. Data from those trials suggest that standard-dose fulvestrant (250 mg monthly) and exemestane are of comparable efficacy, that doubling the dose of fulvestrant from 250 mg to 500 mg monthly results in a 15% reduction in the risk of progression, and that adding everolimus to exemestane (compared with exemestane alone) results in a 57% reduction in the risk of progression, albeit with increased toxicity. Multiple treatment options are now available to women with hr+ her2- advanced breast cancer recurring or progressing on earlier nsai therapy, although current clinical trial data suggest more robust clinical efficacy with everolimus plus exemestane. Consideration should be given to the patient's age, functional status, and comorbidities during selection of an endocrine therapy, and use of a proactive everolimus safety management strategy is encouraged. PMID:23443928

  16. Growth hormone therapy in children with CKD after more than two decades of practice.

    PubMed

    Rees, Lesley

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on the evidence for the efficacy and safety of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in children with all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and at all ages. It describes the improving height prognosis for our patients both with and without rhGH; explains the underlying hormonal abnormalities that provide the rationale for rhGH use in CKD and the endocrine changes that accompany treatment; and views on who warrants treatment, with what dose, and how long for. PMID:26369925

  17. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy: three 'simple' questions, complex answers.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Antonio C; Casula, Sabina

    2012-07-01

    Current guidelines recommend that hypothyroid patients should be treated with levothyroxine, which in the vast majority of the cases leads to resolution of the symptoms and normalization of serum free T4 (FT4), T3 and TSH levels. However, a small group of hypothyroid patients remain symptomatic for neurocognitive dysfunction despite normal serum FT4 and TSH, which could be explained by localized brain hypothyroidism. More than half of the T3 in the brain is produced locally via the action of the type II deiodinase (D2) and variability/defects in this pathway could explain the residual symptoms. If this rationale is correct, adding liothyronine to the replacement therapy could prove beneficial. However, with a few exceptions, several clinical trials failed to identify any beneficial effects of combined therapy. More recently, the results of a large clinical trial revealed a better neurocognitive outcome with combined therapy only in hypothyroid patients carrying a polymorphism in the DIO2 gene. This obviously needs to be confirmed by other groups but it is tempting to speculate that combined levothyroxine and liothyronine has a place in the treatment of hypothyroidism, for some. PMID:24783002

  18. New Natural Pigment Fraction Isolated from Saw Palmetto: Potential for Adjuvant Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Takahashi, Masao; Feng, Yigang; Li, Hongyun; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we discovered a small proportion of aqueous fraction from Saw Palmetto apart from the fatty acid-rich fraction exhibited pharmacological activity. Therefore, this study aims to explore the anti-tumor potential of red pigmented aqueous fraction of Saw Palmetto, NYG on human hepatocellular carcinoma and its possible targets. Subcutaneous xenograft and orthotopic implantation models of HCC were used to evaluate the tumor inhibitory effect of NYG. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as in vitro model. The mRNA expression was conducted by qPCR. Protein expression was monitored by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Cell migration and blood vessel formation were determined by chamber assay and tube formation assay, respectively. Significant tumor inhibition of NYG in dose-dependent manner was observed on subcutaneous xenograft and orthotopic HCC model. NYG has no direct action on cell viability or VEGF secretion of HCC cells. However, NYG reduced in vitro migration and vessel formation activities of HUVEC cells, as well as in vivo intratumoral neovascularization. NYG attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activation in endothelial cells, which may be associated with the suppression of migration and tube formation of HUVEC. NYG suppressed tumor expansion of HCC via inhibiting neovascularization, and may be potential adjuvant treatment for HCC. PMID:27527161

  19. New Natural Pigment Fraction Isolated from Saw Palmetto: Potential for Adjuvant Therapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Takahashi, Masao; Feng, Yigang; Li, Hongyun; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, we discovered a small proportion of aqueous fraction from Saw Palmetto apart from the fatty acid-rich fraction exhibited pharmacological activity. Therefore, this study aims to explore the anti-tumor potential of red pigmented aqueous fraction of Saw Palmetto, NYG on human hepatocellular carcinoma and its possible targets. Subcutaneous xenograft and orthotopic implantation models of HCC were used to evaluate the tumor inhibitory effect of NYG. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as in vitro model. The mRNA expression was conducted by qPCR. Protein expression was monitored by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Cell migration and blood vessel formation were determined by chamber assay and tube formation assay, respectively. Significant tumor inhibition of NYG in dose-dependent manner was observed on subcutaneous xenograft and orthotopic HCC model. NYG has no direct action on cell viability or VEGF secretion of HCC cells. However, NYG reduced in vitro migration and vessel formation activities of HUVEC cells, as well as in vivo intratumoral neovascularization. NYG attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activation in endothelial cells, which may be associated with the suppression of migration and tube formation of HUVEC. NYG suppressed tumor expansion of HCC via inhibiting neovascularization, and may be potential adjuvant treatment for HCC. PMID:27527161

  20. Effect of a low-tryptophan diet as an adjuvant to conventional neuroleptic therapy in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rosse, R B; Schwartz, B L; Zlotolow, S; Banay-Schwartz, M; Trinidad, A C; Peace, T D; Deutsch, S I

    1992-04-01

    Eleven patients with DSM-III-R schizophrenia were entered into a 4-day tryptophan (TRP)-deficient diet. The diet lowered total plasma TRP levels in all patients; during the diet phase, there was a greater than 50% reduction in mean total plasma TRP levels from the pre-diet phase. The low-TRP diet improved performance on the Stroop Color and Word Test. These data are especially intriguing in view of the suggestion that a deficit in color-word naming is related to frontal lobe dysfunction and the possible occurrence of frontal lobe abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia. Interestingly, depressive symptomatology did not emerge on the TRP-deficient diet, despite the lowering of total plasma TRP levels. There were statistically significant improvements noted on objective ratings of the severity of psychotic symptomatology; however, these statistical improvements were without obvious clinical significance, as the magnitude of the changes on the behavioral ratings were minimal. The results of this study suggest that there might be some adjuvant potential for a low-TRP diet in the treatment of schizophrenia, and that schizophrenia or antipsychotic medications might offer some protection against the depressive effects of a TRP-deficient diet. PMID:1350512

  1. Adjuvant therapy of Dukes' C colon cancer by intra-arterial P-32 colloid for internal radiation therapy of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, E.D.

    1984-09-01

    To prevent probable occult metastatic liver cancer from progressing to clinical disease, the author used internal radiation therapy as an effective adjuvant to surgical excision of primary Dukes' C colonic cancer. A calculated radiation dose of 5000 rads was delivered to the liver by injecting radioactive 32-P chromic phosphate colloid through the superior mesenteric and celiac arteries. When this was done, the colloid passed through the intestines and was mixed thoroughly with the blood and delivered to the liver by the portal vein. The Kupffer cells in the liver trapped the colloid, and a minimum amount passed through the liver and got into the general circulation. This kept the amount of colloid deposited in the bone marrow to a minimum. In a phase-I pilot study in which nine patients were treated, no serious side effects were noted. In eight patients, the liver has remained free of cancer for more than 1 year.

  2. Factors associated to persistence with hormonal therapy in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Cláudia; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze factors associated with persistence to breast cancer hormone therapy in order to contribute to the quality of care improvement. METHODS Retrospective longitudinal study, based on secondary data. A cohort of 5,861 women with breast cancer registered in different datasets of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute and the Brazilian Unified Health System were analyzed. All women were treated at this hospital, which provides free medication, and the follow-up period was from January 2004 to October 2010. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical variables, as well as aspects of lifestyle and health care, were considered in the explanation of variations in the persistence to hormone therapy, applying the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS Overall persistence to hormone therapy was 79.0% at the end of the first year, and 31.0% in five years of treatment. The risk of discontinuing hormone therapy was higher among women under 35 years old, with more advanced disease (stages III and IV), alcohol drinkers, those undergoing chemotherapy, and for each additional hospitalization, exam performed, and month between diagnosis and beginning of treatment. In the opposite direction, the risk of discontinuity was lower among women who had at least finished high school, those with partner, with a family history of cancer, those who had undergone breast surgery, and who had outpatient visits to a Mastologist, and a Clinical Oncologist. CONCLUSIONS The majority of the women with breast cancer (69.0%) do not persist with hormone treatment for the five years recommended, increasing the risk of inadequate clinical results. The results show aspects of care that can provide better results. PMID:24897050

  3. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  4. Survival Benefits and Trends in Use of Adjuvant Therapy Among Elderly Stage II and III Rectal Cancer Patients in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, Sharon A.; Warren, Joan L.; Matthews, Barbara; Schwartz, David; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Billingsley, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study examined elderly stage II and III rectal cancer patients’ adjuvant chemoradiation therapy adherence, trends in adherence over time, and the relation of levels of adherence to mortality. METHODS The authors studied 2886 stage II and III rectal cancer patients who had surgical resection and who appeared in 1992–1999 linked SEER-Medicare claims data. The authors compared measures of adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy receipt and completion between stage II and III patients. Adjusted risk of cancer-related 5-year mortality was calculated by multivariate logistic regression for different levels of chemoradiation adherence among stage II and III patients. RESULTS Of the 2886 patients, 45.4% received both adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Stage III patients were more likely to receive chemoradiation than stage II patients. The receipt of chemoradiation by stage II patients increased significantly from 1992 to 1999. Stage III patients were more likely to complete radiation therapy (96.6%), chemotherapy (68.2%), and both modalities (67.5%) than stage II patients (91.5%, 49.8%, 47.6%, respectively). Only a complete course of both radiation and chemotherapy for both stage II (relative risk [RR] 0.74; 95% CI, 0.54, 0.97) and III (RR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65, 0.96) decreased the adjusted 5-year cancer mortality risk compared with counterparts with no adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS Even though stage II rectal cancer patients were less likely than stage III patients to receive and complete adjuvant chemoradiation, both patient groups in the general population had lower cancer-related mortality if they completed chemoradiation. These patients deserve support and encouragement to complete treatment. PMID:18189291

  5. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status: a large prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. Methods Within the European EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationship of BMI, waist and hip circumferences with risk of estrogen-receptor (ER) negative and progesterone-receptor (PR) negative (n = 1,021) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,586) breast tumors within five-year age bands. Among postmenopausal women, the joint effects of BMI and HRT use were analyzed. Results For risk of ER-PR- tumors, there was no association of BMI across the age bands. However, when analyses were restricted to postmenopausal HRT never users, a positive risk association with BMI (third versus first tertile HR = 1.47 (1.01 to 2.15)) was observed. BMI was inversely associated with ER+PR+ tumors among women aged ≤49 years (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.79 (95%CI 0.68 to 0.91)), and positively associated with risk among women ≥65 years (HR = 1.25 (1.16 to 1.34)). Adjusting for BMI, waist and hip circumferences showed no further associations with risks of breast cancer subtypes. Current use of HRT was significantly associated with an increased risk of receptor-negative (HRT current use compared to HRT never use HR: 1.30 (1.05 to 1.62)) and positive tumors (HR: 1.74 (1.56 to 1.95)), although this risk increase was weaker for ER-PR- disease (Phet = 0.035). The association of HRT was significantly stronger in the leaner women (BMI ≤22.5 kg/m2) than for more overweight women (BMI ≥25.9 kg/m2) for, both, ER-PR- (HR: 1.74 (1.15 to 2.63)) and ER+PR+ (HR: 2.33 (1.84 to 2.92)) breast cancer and was not restricted to any particular HRT regime. Conclusions An elevated BMI may be positively associated with risk of ER-PR- tumors among postmenopausal women

  6. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Emanuel R.; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50–60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn’t significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids. PMID:26792091

  7. Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Gastric Cancer-Rapid, Yet Incomplete Adoption Following Results of Intergroup 0116 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, Natalie G. Guller, Ulrich; Baxter, Nancy N.; Kiss, Alex; Ringash, Jolie; Swallow, Carol J.; Law, Calvin H.L.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The Southwest Oncology Group/Intergroup 0116 (INT-0116) trial showed that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves survival in high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma patients. This study examined the adoption of adjuvant treatment following the trial results and the factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, patients aged 18-85 years with resected gastric adenocarcinoma were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and classified as diagnosed before (January 1996 to April 2000) or after (May 2000 to December 2003) presentation of the INT-0116 trial findings. Univariate and multivariable models were used to determine the factors associated with use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Results: Of 10,230 patients studied, 14.6% were given adjuvant RT before the INT-0116 trial, increasing to 30.4% afterward (p < 0.001). Significant increases in adjuvant RT from before to after INT-0116 were seen in all demographic categories. Younger patients were significantly more likely to receive adjuvant RT (44.5%, 18-59 years; 31.0%, 60-74 years; and 12.6%, 75-85 years, p < 0.0001). Married patients were significantly more likely to receive adjuvant RT (30.9%) than were unmarried patients (23.6%, p < 0.001). A greater depth of tumor invasion, worse nodal status, and more lymph nodes assessed were associated with adjuvant RT (p < 0.0001). The rate of adjuvant RT varied from 22.9-44.2% across SEER regions. On multiple logistic regression analysis, age, SEER region, marital status, assessed lymph nodes, tumor depth, and nodal status were all significant independent predictors of the use of adjuvant RT. Conclusion: Use of adjuvant RT doubled after the INT-0116 trial results became public; however, the fraction of patients receiving adjuvant RT is still low. Additional examination of the statistically significant and clinically relevant variability between different SEER regions, tumor characteristics, and patient

  8. Evaluation of MR markers that predict survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM prior to adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Saraswathy, Suja; Crawford, Forrest W; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Pirzkall, Andrea; Chang, Susan; Cha, Soonmee; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. The goal of this study was to test the predictive value of MR parameters in relation to the survival of patients with newly diagnosed GBM who were scanned prior to receiving adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Methods The study population comprised 68 patients who had surgical resection and were to be treated with fractionated external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging scans included anatomical MRI, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging and (1)H MRSI. The MR data were acquired 3-5 weeks after surgery and approximately 1 week before treatment with radiation therapy. The diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic parameter values were quantified and subjected to proportional hazards analysis that was adjusted for age and scanner field strength. Results The patients with larger lesion burden based upon volumes of anatomic lesions, volume of CNI2 (number of voxels within the T2 lesion having choline to NAA index >2), volume of CBV3 (number of pixels within the T2 lesion having relative cerebral blood volume >3), and volume of nADC1.5 (number of pixels within the T2 lesion having normalized apparent diffusion coefficient <1.5) had a higher risk for poor outcome. High intensities of combined measures of lactate and lipid in the T2 and CNI2 regions were also associated with poor survival. Conclusions Our study indicated that several pre-treatment anatomic, physiological and metabolic MR parameters are predictive of survival. This information may be important for stratifying patients to specific treatment protocols and for planning focal therapy. PMID:18810326

  9. Evaluation of MR markers that predict survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM prior to adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathy, Suja; Crawford, Forrest W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Pirzkal, Andrea; Chang, Susan; Cha, Soonmee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor in adults. The goal of this study was to test the predictive value of MR parameters in relation to the survival of patients with newly diagnosed GBM who were scanned prior to receiving adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Methods The study population comprised 68 patients who had surgical resection and were to be treated with fractionated external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging scans included anatomical MRI, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging and 1H MRSI. The MR data were acquired 3–5 weeks after surgery and approximately 1 week before treatment with radiation therapy. The diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic parameter values were quantified and subjected to proportional hazards analysis that was adjusted for age and scanner field strength. Results The patients with larger lesion burden based upon volumes of anatomic lesions, volume of CNI2 (number of voxels within the T2 lesion having choline to NAA index >2), volume of CBV3 (number of pixels within the T2 lesion having relative cerebral blood volume >3), and volume of nADC1.5 (number of pixels within the T2 lesion having normalized apparent diffusion coefficient <1.5) had a higher risk for poor outcome. High intensities of combined measures of lactate and lipid in the T2 and CNI2 regions were also associated with poor survival. Conclusions Our study indicated that several pre-treatment anatomic, physiological and metabolic MR parameters are predictive of survival. This information may be important for stratifying patients to specific treatment protocols and for planning focal therapy. PMID:18810326

  10. Pak1, adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, and breast cancer recurrence risk in a Danish population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Lash, Timothy L; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Ording, Anne Gulbech; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Hellberg, Ylva

    2016-06-01

    Background Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy approximately halves the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer recurrence, but many women do not respond to therapy. Observational studies nested in clinical trial populations suggest that overexpression or nuclear localization of p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) in primary tumors predicts tamoxifen failure. Material and methods We measured the association between Pak1 expression and breast cancer recurrence in a Danish population-based case-control study. Pak1 cytoplasmic expression level and nuclear positivity were determined by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tumors from recurrence cases and matched controls from two breast cancer populations; women diagnosed with ER-positive tumors who received at least one year of tamoxifen therapy (ER+/TAM+), and women diagnosed with ER-negative tumors who survived for at least one year (ER-/TAM-). Pak1 staining was assessed by a single, blinded pathologist, and associations were estimated with conditional logistic regression models. Results We included 541 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER+/TAM + group and 300 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER-/TAM - group. Pak1 cytoplasmic intensity was not associated with breast cancer recurrence in either group (ER+/TAM + ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.91, 95% CI 0.57, 1.5; ER-/TAM - ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.74, 95% CI 0.39, 1.4). Associations between Pak1 nuclear positivity and breast cancer recurrence were similarly near null in both groups. Conclusion Pak1 positivity in primary breast tumors was neither predictive nor prognostic in this prospective, population-based study. PMID:27056567

  11. Impact of Postoperative Radiation Therapy on Survival in Patients With Complete Resection and Stage I, II, or IIIA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: The Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Douillard, Jean-Yves Rosell, Rafael; De Lena, Mario; Riggi, Marcello; Hurteloup, Patrick; Mahe, Marc-Andre

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) on survival in the Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) randomized study of adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: ANITA is a randomized trial of adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy vs. observation in completely resected non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) Stages IB to IIIA. Use of PORT was recommended for pN+ disease but was not randomized or mandatory. Each center decided whether to use PORT before initiation of the study. We describe here the survival of patients with and without PORT within each treatment group of ANITA. No statistical comparison of survival was performed because this was an unplanned subgroup analysis. Results: Overall, 232 of 840 patients received PORT (33.3% in the observation arm and 21.6% in the chemotherapy arm). In univariate analysis, PORT had a deleterious effect on the overall population survival. Patients with pN1 disease had an improved survival from PORT in the observation arm (median survival [MS] 25.9 vs. 50.2 months), whereas PORT had a detrimental effect in the chemotherapy group (MS 93.6 months and 46.6 months). In contrast, survival was improved in patients with pN2 disease who received PORT, both in the chemotherapy (MS 23.8 vs. 47.4 months) and observation arm (median 12.7 vs. 22.7 months). Conclusion: This retrospective evaluation suggests a positive effect of PORT in pN2 disease and a negative effect on pN1 disease when patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The results support further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC.

  12. Bifurcation analysis on a hybrid systems model of intermittent hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Tsumoto, Kunichika; Tsuji, Shigeki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Hybrid systems are widely used to model dynamical phenomena that are characterized by interplay between continuous dynamics and discrete events. An example of biomedical application is modeling of disease progression of prostate cancer under intermittent hormonal therapy, where continuous tumor dynamics is switched by interruption and reinstitution of medication. In the present paper, we study a hybrid systems model representing intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Intermittent medication with switching between on-treatment and off-treatment periods is intended to possibly prevent a prostatic tumor from developing into a hormone-refractory state and is anticipated as a possible strategy for delaying or hopefully averting a cancer relapse which most patients undergo as a result of long-term hormonal suppression. Clinical efficacy of IAS therapy for prostate cancer is still under investigation but at least worth considering in terms of reduction of side effects and economic costs during off-treatment periods. In the model of IAS therapy, it depends on some clinically controllable parameters whether a relapse of prostate cancer occurs or not. Therefore, we examine nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation structure of the model by exploiting a numerical method to clarify bifurcation sets in the hybrid system. Our results suggest that adjustment of the normal androgen level in combination with appropriate medication scheduling could enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Moreover, a two-dimensional piecewise-linear system reduced from the original model highlights the origin of nonlinear phenomena specific to the hybrid system.

  13. Moral assessment of growth hormone therapy for children with idiopathic short stature.

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, M; Kortmann, F

    1997-01-01

    The prescription of growth hormone therapy for children who are not growth hormone deficient is one of the controversies in contemporary paediatric endocrinology. Is it morally appropriate to enhance the growth, by means of medical treatment, of a child wish idiopathic short stature? The medical, moral, and philosophical questions in this area are many. Data on the effects of human growth hormone (hGH) treatment will not on their own provide us with answers, as these effects have to be evaluated from a normative perspective. In this article we consider hGH treatment for children of idiopathic short stature from three normative perspectives: the goals of medicine, the good of the patient, and the public good. We argue that the prevention of psychological and social problems due to short stature (and not merely the enhancement of growth) should be the ultimate goal of medical treatment and research. PMID:9358351

  14. Promotional Tone in Reviews of Menopausal Hormone Therapy After the Women's Health Initiative: An Analysis of Published Articles

    PubMed Central

    Fugh-Berman, Adriane; McDonald, Christina Pike; Bell, Alicia M.; Bethards, Emily Catherine; Scialli, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Even after the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) found that the risks of menopausal hormone therapy (hormone therapy) outweighed benefit for asymptomatic women, about half of gynecologists in the United States continued to believe that hormones benefited women's health. The pharmaceutical industry has supported publication of articles in medical journals for marketing purposes. It is unknown whether author relationships with industry affect promotional tone in articles on hormone therapy. The goal of this study was to determine whether promotional tone could be identified in narrative review articles regarding menopausal hormone therapy and whether articles identified as promotional were more likely to have been authored by those with conflicts of interest with manufacturers of menopausal hormone therapy. Methods and Findings We analyzed tone in opinion pieces on hormone therapy published in the four years after the estrogen-progestin arm of the WHI was stopped. First, we identified the ten authors with four or more MEDLINE-indexed reviews, editorials, comments, or letters on hormone replacement therapy or menopausal hormone therapy published between July 2002 and June 2006. Next, we conducted an additional search using the names of these authors to identify other relevant articles. Finally, after author names and affiliations were removed, 50 articles were evaluated by three readers for scientific accuracy and for tone. Scientific accuracy was assessed based on whether or not the findings of the WHI were accurately reported using two criteria: (1) Acknowledgment or lack of denial of the risk of breast cancer diagnosis associated with hormone therapy, and (2) acknowledgment that hormone therapy did not benefit cardiovascular disease endpoints. Determination of promotional tone was based on the assessment by each reader of whether the article appeared to promote hormone therapy. Analysis of inter-rater consistency found moderate agreement for scientific

  15. Impact of short course hormonal therapy on overall and cancer specific survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, David C. . E-mail: dbeyer@azoncology.com; McKeough, Timothy; Thomas, Theresa

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of prior hormonal therapy on 10-year overall and prostate cancer specific survival after primary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the Arizona Oncology Services tumor registry for 2,378 consecutive permanent prostate brachytherapy cases from 1988 through 2001. Hormonal therapy was administered before the implant in 464 patients for downsizing of the prostate or at the discretion of the referring physician. All deceased patients with known clinical recurrence were considered to have died of prostate cancer, irrespective of the immediate cause of death. Risk groups were defined, with 1,135 favorable (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] < 10, Gleason < 7, Stage T1-T2a), 787 intermediate (single adverse feature), and 456 unfavorable (two or more adverse features) patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were generated for both overall and cause-specific survival from the time of treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the impact of hormonal intervention in comparison with known risk factors of grade, PSA, and age. Results: With follow-up ranging up to 12.6 years and a median of 4.1 year, a total of 474 patients died, with 67 recorded as due to prostate cancer. Overall and cause-specific 10-year survival rates are 43% and 88%, respectively. Overall survival is 44% for the hormone naive patients, compared with 20% for the hormone-treated cohort (p = 0.02). The cancer-specific survival is 89% vs. 81% for the same groups (p = 0.133). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of age > 70 years (p = 0.0013), Gleason score {>=} 7 (p = 0.0005), and prior hormone use (p = 0.0065) on overall survival. Conclusions: At 10 years, in prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, overall survival is worse in men receiving neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, compared with hormone naive patients. This does not appear to be due to other known risk factors for survival (i.e., stage, grade

  16. Hormone replacement therapy in children: The use of growth hormone and IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been available since 1985. This article gives an overview, what has been achieved over the past 30 years in respect to optimization of rhGH treatment for the individual child with GH deficiency and what are the safety issues concerned with this treatment. In the last twenty years significant scientific progress has been made in the diagnosis of GH deficiency, the genetic disorders that are associated with pituitary GH deficiency and the genetics that influence growth in general. On the other hand rhGH is not only used in states of GH deficiency but also various conditions without a proven GH deficiency by classical standards. Clinical studies that investigated both the genetics of growth and the individual responses to rhGH therapy in these patient populations were able to refine our concept about the physiology of normal growth. In most patients under rhGH treatment there is a considerable short-term effect, however the overall gain in growth obtained by a long-term treatment until final height still remains a matter of debate in some of the conditions treated. Also first studies on the long-term safety risks of rhGH treatment have raised the question whether this treatment is similarly safe for all the patient groups eligible for such a treatment. Therefore even in the face of a longstanding safety record of this drug replacement therapy the discussion about the right cost and risk to benefit ratio is continuing. Consequently there is still a need for carefully conducted long-term studies that use modern anthropometric, genetic, and laboratory techniques in order to provide the necessary information for clinicians to select the patients that will benefit best from this valuable treatment without any long term risk. PMID:26051295

  17. Use of different postmenopausal hormone therapies and risk of histology- and hormone receptor-defined invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Agnès; Fabre, Alban; Mesrine, Sylvie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Berrino, Franco; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We previously found that the risk of invasive breast cancer varied according to the progestagen component of combined postmenopausal hormone therapy (CHT): progesterone, dydrogesterone, or other progestagens. We conducted the present study to assess how these CHTs were associated with histology- and hormone receptor-defined breast cancer. Patients and Methods We used data from the French E3N cohort study, with 80,391 postmenopausal women followed for a mean duration of 8.1 years; 2,265 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers were identified through biennial self-administered questionnaires completed from 1990 to 2002. The relative risks (RRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Compared with postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) never-use, ever-use of estrogen+progesterone was not significantly associated with the risk of any breast cancer subtype, but increasing duration of estrogen+progesterone was associated with increasing risks of lobular (P=.06) and estrogen receptor–positive/progesterone receptor–negative (ER+/PR−; P=.02). Estrogen+dydrogesterone was associated with a significant increase in risk of lobular carcinoma (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.6). Estrogen+other progestagens was associated with significant increases in risk of ductal and lobular carcinomas (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 1.8; and 2.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.7, respectively), of ER+/PR+ and ER+/PR− carcinomas (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.1; and 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9 to 3.5, respectively), but not of ER−/PR+ or ER−/PR− carcinomas (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5 to 2.1; and 1.4; 95% CI, 0.9 to 2.0, respectively). Conclusion The increase in risk of breast cancer observed with the use of CHTs other than estrogen+progesterone and estrogen+dydrogesterone seems to apply preferentially to ER+ carcinomas, especially those ER+/PR−, and to affect both ductal and lobular carcinomas. PMID:18323549

  18. Cardiovascular effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Jason F; Mason, Malcolm D

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay of treatment for advanced prostate cancer for decades, and has been shown to control disease and improve symptoms. In addition, for men with high-risk localized or locally advanced prostate cancer, short-course ADT in combination with radiotherapy improves survival. There is evidence that ADT increases cardiovascular risk, particularly in men with preexisting cardiovascular disease. This increased risk may apply even with short-course ADT. In an individual patient, the benefits of ADT should be balanced against the risk, and patients who require ADT should have risk factors for cardiovascular disease optimized. There is some evidence to suggest that more contemporary methods of delivering ADT may reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:26229507

  19. Outcome of T1N0M0 breast cancer in relation to St. Gallen risk assignment criteria for adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Garassino, I; Gullo, G; Orefice, S; Tondulli, L; Masci, G; Salvini, P; Eboli, M; Di Tommaso, L; Giordano, L; Alloisio, M; Roncalli, M; Santoro, A

    2009-08-01

    T1N0M0 (stage I) breast cancer (BC) has been increasing in recent decades but the optimal adjuvant approach remains controversial. To assess the outcome of BC patients stratified and treated with multimodal therapies according to St. Gallen consensus meeting recommendations, we retrospectively evaluated an unselected cohort of T1N0M0 BC patients, with respect to the St. Gallen criteria. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the recurrence rate, recurrence-free survival and overall survival were 7%, 94% and 96% respectively, and 60% of relapses were locoregional. No statistically significant difference was observed between T1a,b/T1c groups, or among risk categories (high/intermediate/low). The very low rate of distant recurrences even in patients with unfavorable prognostic factors seems to support the use of adjuvant systemic therapies but better prognostic and predictive factors are strongly needed for this subset of patients. PMID:19682903

  20. Hormone replacement therapy may reduce the return of endogenous lead from bone to the circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, C E; Chettle, D R; Bowins, R J; Beaumont, L F; Gordon, C L; Song, X; Blake, J M; McNutt, R H

    1995-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women suppresses the increase in bone resorption expected as circulating levels of endogenous estrogen decline. We tested the hypothesis that bone lead content might remain elevated in women on HRT. Fifty six women who at recruitment were on average 35 years postmenopausal were placed on calcium supplementation. Six months later 33 of these women were prescribed either low dose or moderate dose hormone replacement in addition to the calcium supplementation. After approximately 4 years of hormone replacement, lead content was measured at the tibia and calcaneus by in vivo fluorescence excitation, and lead concentrations were measured in serum, whole blood, and urine. Women not taking hormones had significantly lower lead concentrations in cortical bone compared to all women on HRT (p = 0.007). Tibia lead content (mean +/- SD) for women on calcium only was 11.13 +/- 6.22 microgram/g bone mineral. For women on HRT, tibia bone lead was 19.37 +/- 8.62 micrograms/g bone mineral on low-dose HRT and 16.87 +/- 11.68 micrograms/g bone mineral on moderate-dose HRT. There were no differences between groups for lead concentrations measured in trabecular bone, whole blood, serum or urine. Hormone replacement maintains cortical bone lead content. In women not on HRT, there will be a perimenopausal release of lead from bone. Images Figure 1. PMID:8747022

  1. The role of menopausal hormone therapy in the management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, T J

    2015-01-01

    It is now 75 years since Fuller Albright published his observations on the causal relationship between menopausal estrogen deficiency and osteoporosis. He introduced the concept of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the prevention of osteoporosis. Most of his remarkable observations have stood the test of time and scientific scrutiny. Unfortunately, the uptake of MHT for the prevention of osteoporosis and related fractures remains very low. This can be ascribed to several factors. The availability of new drugs, supported by randomized clinical trials, has increased therapeutic options and created the impression that all new drugs are better compared to MHT. Confusion exists as to the benefit/risk profile of menopausal hormone therapy, limitations on the age of initiation of treatment, limitations on the length of treatment, and the need for treatment in the young menopausal woman with low bone density. PMID:26474003

  2. Risks and effectiveness of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ruth; Batur, Pelin; Thacker, Holly L

    2014-08-01

    After the publication of the Women's Health Initiative, attitudes towards management of menopausal symptoms changed dramatically. One alternative that has received much media attention is the use of bioidentical hormone therapy (BHT). The media and celebrity endorsements have promoted a number of misconceptions about the risks and benefits associated with the various forms of BHT. This article will review the available evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of BHT in comparison to conventional hormone therapy. We will also review several cases seen in our midlife women's referral clinics, which demonstrate concerns for the safety and efficacy of BHT, including unexplained endometrial cancer in otherwise healthy BHT users. Due to the lack of sufficient data to support the efficacy or safety of BHT, we recommend the use of United States Food and Drug Administration-approved regimens in the management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:25111856

  3. [Current surgical and adjuvant therapy concepts of malignant tumors of the facial skin and the pinna].

    PubMed

    Kolk, A; Wermker, K; Bier, H; Götz, C; Eckert, A W

    2015-02-01

    Malignant tumors of the skin had been a rare entity 2 decades ago. Today they are spread rapidly worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the skin, the largest human organ, may occur from all structures and layers. While previously skin cancer -occurred mainly after the age of 60, the incidence increases now in younger ages. Strong sunburns in the childhood and before the age of 20 are important risk factors for the development of malignancies of the skin. An increased exposure to UV rays is found especially in the facial skin, where basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma and Merkel cell carcinomas are the most common malignancies. Early diagnosis of malignancies and therapy-oriented mostly surgical approaches are crucial for the prognosis of all skin cancers. Therefore under the aspect of the increasing incidence these topics will be pointed out according to the latest findings including current multimodal therapy concepts and future treatment options. PMID:25658862

  4. Modeling patient-centered communication: Oncologist relational communication and patient communication involvement in breast cancer adjuvant therapy decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Step, Mary M.; Rose, Julia Hannum; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Cheruvu, Vinay K.; Siminoff, Laura A

    2009-01-01

    Objective Relational communication refers to those messages communicators naturally express that carry meaning about the type and quality of relationship they share. It is expected that patients of oncologists who express positive relational communication will be more communicatively involved in their office visits, and regret their decision for adjuvant therapy following surgery less. Methods One hundred eighty (180) audio-recorded discussions between oncologists (n = 40) and early stage (I–III) breast cancer patients were coded with the Siminoff Communication Content and Affect Program (SCCAP). The data were used to test the relationships between patient demographics, oncologist relational communication, patient communication involvement and self-reported patient decision regret. Results After controlling for clinician clusters, oncologists’ verbal (i.e., confirming messages) and nonverbal (i.e., direct and inclusive speech) relational communication is indirectly associated with lower patient decision regret via the mediating effect of greater patient communication involvement. Conclusion Clinician relational communication provides an influential affective climate for decision-making that appears to have important effects on patients’ decision confidence. Practice Implications Clinicians should recognize the potential of their own relational messages to facilitate patients’ communication involvement in decision-making during cancer care. PMID:19811883

  5. (Neo)-adjuvant chemo(-radio) therapy for adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and the stomach in the West.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Hansjochen; Lordick, Florian; Meyer, Hans-Joachim; Stahl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, the treatment of adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and stomach has changed over the past decades. It is no longer surgery alone. Nowadays, most patients undergo surgery plus pre- and/or postoperative therapies. However, there are still marked differences in surgical procedures between the East and the West which might influence the surgical prognosis and thereby also the choice of perioperative treatment strategies. In the East, with its more extended surgical procedures, including standard D2 dissections, the current treatment philosophy is primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant approaches are restricted to really advanced tumors, and perioperative chemoradiation is not routinely used (at least to date). This clearly differs from treatment strategies currently recommended in Western countries. In Europe and North America, pre- plus postoperative chemotherapy has become the recommended treatment for locally more advanced tumors, and preoperative chemoradiation is increasingly administered to patients with adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction (Siewert type I/II). However, the role of postoperative chemotherapy (despite its increasing use) is still under discussion in the West (especially Europe) and not generally recommended/accepted as a standard treatment. Postoperative chemoradiation, which is one standard treatment in North America, is only regarded as a treatment option for patients after 'inadequate surgery' (i.e.

  6. How plausible is the use of dietary n-3 PUFA in the adjuvant therapy of cancer?

    PubMed

    Serini, Simona; Ottes Vasconcelos, Renata; Fasano, Elena; Calviello, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Considerable debate exists regarding the potential antineoplastic effect of dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA contained in fatty fishes. Since the majority of published data has proven that their intake does not induce toxic or carcinogenic effects in humans, their possible preventive use against cancer has been suggested. On the other hand, it is unlikely that they could be effective in cancer patients as a single therapy. Nevertheless, a considerable effort has been put forth in recent years to evaluate the hypothesis that n-3 PUFA might improve the antineoplastic efficiency of currently used anticancer agents. The rationale for this therapeutic combinatory strategy is trying to increase cancer sensitivity to conventional therapies. This could allow the use of lower drug/radiation doses and, thereby, a reduction in the detrimental health effects associated with these treatments. We will here critically examine the studies that have investigated this possibility, by focusing particularly on the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the antineoplastic effect of these combined treatments. A possible use of n-3 PUFA in combination with the innovative single-targeted anti-cancer therapies, that often are not completely devoid of dangerous side-effects, is also suggested. PMID:27172872

  7. Novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D

    2001-11-01

    Vaccination remains the single most valuable tool in the prevention of infectious disease. Nevertheless, there exists a need to improve the performance of existing vaccines such that fewer boosts are needed or to develop novel vaccines. For the development of effective vaccines for humans, a great need exists for safe and effective adjuvants. A number of novel adjuvants have been reported in recent years including: i) bacterial toxins such as cholera toxin, CT, and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT; ii) less toxic derivatives of CT and LT; iii) endogenous human immunomodulators, such as IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF; iv) hormones; v) lipopeptides; vi) saponins, such as QS-21; vii) synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN); viii) lipid 'A derivatives, such as monophosphoryl lipid A, MPL, and ix) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivatives. Herein, we will review recent findings using these novel adjuvant systems. PMID:12455400

  8. Distinctive Tooth-Extraction Socket Healing: Bisphosphonate Versus Parathyroid Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Mecano, Rodan B.; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Koi, Kiyono; Yamashita, Junro

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with osteoporosis who receive tooth extractions are typically on either oral bisphosphonate or parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy. Currently, the consequence of these therapies on hard- and soft-tissue healing in the oral cavity is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to determine the differences in the therapeutic effect on tooth-extraction wound healing between bisphosphonate and PTH therapies. Methods Maxillary second molars were extracted in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 30), and either bisphosphonate (zoledronate [Zol]), PTH, or saline (vehicle control [VC]) was administered for 10 days (n = 10 per group). Hard-tissue healing was evaluated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analyses. Collagen, blood vessels, inflammatory cell infiltration, and cathepsin K expression were assessed in soft tissue using immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Results Both therapies significantly increased bone fill and suppressed vertical bone loss. However, considerably more devital bone was observed in the sockets of rats on Zol versus VC. Although Zol increased the numbers of blood vessels, the total blood vessel area in soft tissue was significantly smaller than in VC. PTH therapy increased osteoblastic bone formation and suppressed osteoclasts. PTH therapy promoted soft-tissue maturation by suppressing inflammation and stimulating collagen deposition. Conclusion Zoledronate therapy deters whereas PTH therapy promotes hard- and soft-tissue healing in the oral cavity, and both therapies prevent vertical bone loss. PMID:23688101

  9. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  10. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  11. Adjuvant Therapy in Early-Stage Endometrial Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Evidence, Guidelines, and Clinical Practice in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nawar A.; Haggerty, Ashley; Jean, Stephanie; Lin, Lilie

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the U.S., with an increasing incidence likely secondary to the obesity epidemic. Surgery is usually the primary treatment for early stage endometrial cancer, followed by adjuvant therapy in selected cases. This includes radiation therapy [RT] with or without chemotherapy, based on stratification of patients into categories dependent on their future recurrence risk. Several prospective trials (PORTEC-1, GOG#99, and PORTEC-2) have shown that the use of adjuvant RT in the intermediate risk (IR) and the high-intermediate risk (HIR) groups decreases locoregional recurrence (LRR) but has no effect on overall survival. The ad hoc analyses from these studies have shown that an even larger LRR risk reduction was seen within the HIR group compared with the IR group. Vaginal brachytherapy is as good as external beam radiotherapy in controlling vaginal relapse where the majority of recurrence occur, and with less toxicity. In the high-risk group, multimodality therapy (chemotherapy and RT) may play a significant role. Although adjuvant RT has been evaluated in many cost-effectiveness studies, high-quality data in this area are still lacking. The uptake of the above prospective trial results in the U.S. has not been promising. Factors that are driving current practices and defining quality-of-care measures for patients with early-stage disease are what future studies need to address. PMID:24821823

  12. Results of NCCTG N0275 (Alliance) - a phase II trial evaluating resection followed by adjuvant radiation therapy for patients with desmoplastic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rule, William G; Allred, Jacob B; Pockaj, Barbara A; Markovic, Svetomir N; DiCaudo, David J; Erickson, Lori A; Deming, Richard L; Schild, Steven E

    2016-08-01

    To examine, in a prospective fashion, the utilization and efficacy of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in patients with resected desmoplastic melanoma (DM). Adult patients with resected, margin-negative, and nonmetastatic DM were eligible for this single-arm prospective phase II study. Patients were to receive postoperative RT, 30 Gy in five fractions, to the operative bed with 2- to 3-cm margins (depending on the tumor location). Nodal basin RT was not allowed. The primary study endpoint was the 2-year local recurrence rate (LRR). Secondary endpoints included the incidence of regional and distant metastatic disease, progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related toxicity. Twenty patients with a single de novo DM lesion meeting trial eligibility criteria were enrolled and treated. The 2-year LRR was 10%, with two patients demonstrating a LR within 2 years of completion of protocol therapy. No regional or distant failures occurred. OS at 2 and 5 years was 95 and 77%, respectively. There were no grade 3 or higher acute or late adverse events that were related to the protocol therapy. Adjuvant RT after wide local excision (WLE) for DM is efficacious and well tolerated. It should be considered for DM patients after margin-negative WLE. Additional study is needed to further refine low-risk patient populations that can potentially have adjuvant RT omitted as part of the treatment plan. PMID:27368067

  13. Thyroid hormone replacement one day before 131I therapy in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kayano, Daiki; Taki, Junichi; Inaki, Anri; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ayane; Fukuoka, Makoto; Kinuya, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study aimed to determine the efficacy of radioiodine-131 (131I) ablation therapy with thyroid hormone replacement one day before 131I administration in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Methods: This retrospective study included 29 patients who underwent 131I therapies twice for DTC during 6-12 months. Since all the patients obviously had residual lesions by their serum thyroglobulin levels or their scintigrams at the first therapies, they underwent the second 131I therapies without diagnostic scintigraphy after the first therapies. After confirming the sufficient elevation of TSH concentration, thyroid hormone replacement was resumed one day before 131I administration (3.7-7.4GBq). The ablation rate of thyroid remnant at the first 131I therapy was evaluated by comparing 131I post-therapeutic images of the two treatments. Results: Three patients were administrated thyroid hormone after 131I therapy because of insufficient TSH concentration under thyroid hormone withdrawal. In the remaining 26 patients, 41 thyroid remnant accumulations were detected in all 26 patients at the first 131I therapy. Based on the second 131I post-therapeutic images, successful ablation was confirmed in 24 of 26 patients (92.3%) and 38 of 41 sites (92.7%), which was comparable with historically reported ablation rates. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone replacement one day before 131I therapy could provide a sufficiently high ablation rate in patients with DTC.

  14. The Role of Sex Hormone Replacement Therapy on Self-Perceived Competence in Adolescents with Delayed Puberty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Jacqueline; Kulin, Howard E.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Finkelstein, Jordan W.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Kunselman, Susan J.; Liben, Lyye S.; D'Arcangelo, M. Rose; Demers, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined role of sex steroids in development of self-perceived competence among adolescents receiving hormone therapy for delayed puberty. Found that hormone treatments had a significant positive effect for both males and females in perceived job competence. Significant positive effects were also obtained for perceptions of romantic appeal and…

  15. Book review of "The estrogen elixir: A history of hormone replacement therapy in America" by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    "The Estrogen elixir: A history of hormone replacement therapy in America" by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins is a thoroughly documented cautionary tale of the information and advice offered to women in the perimenopausal period of their life, and the consequences of exposure to sexual hormones on their health and wellbeing.

  16. A Novel CXCL10-Based GPI-Anchored Fusion Protein as Adjuvant in NK-Based Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muenchmeier, Niklas; Boecker, Sophia; Bankel, Lorenz; Hinz, Laura; Rieth, Nicole; Lapa, Constantin; Mendler, Anna N.; Noessner, Elfriede

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellular therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for malignant diseases. The efficacy of this therapy can be limited by poor infiltration of the tumor by immune effector cells. In particular, NK cell infiltration is often reduced relative to T cells. A novel class of fusion proteins was designed to enhance the recruitment of specific leukocyte subsets based on their expression of a given chemokine receptor. The proteins are composed of an N-terminal chemokine head, the mucin domain taken from the membrane-anchored chemokine CX3CL1, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor replacing the normal transmembrane domain allowing integration of the proteins into cell membranes when injected into a solid tumor. The mucin domain in conjunction with the chemokine head acts to specifically recruit leukocytes expressing the corresponding chemokine receptor. Methodology/Principal Findings A fusion protein comprising a CXCL10 chemokine head (CXCL10-mucin-GPI) was used for proof of concept for this approach and expressed constitutively in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. FPLC was used to purify proteins. The recombinant proteins efficiently integrated into cell membranes in a process dependent upon the GPI anchor and were able to activate the CXCR3 receptor on lymphocytes. Endothelial cells incubated with CXCL10-mucin-GPI efficiently recruited NK cells in vitro under conditions of physiologic flow, which was shown to be dependent on the presence of the mucin domain. Experiments conducted in vivo using established tumors in mice suggested a positive effect of CXCL10-mucin-GPI on the recruitment of NK cells. Conclusions The results suggest enhanced recruitment of NK cells by CXCL10-mucin-GPI. This class of fusion proteins represents a novel adjuvant in cellular immunotherapy. The underlying concept of a chemokine head fused to the mucin domain and a GPI anchor signal sequence may be expanded into a broader family of reagents that will allow

  17. Introducing a new section to Breast Cancer Research: endocrinology and hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, V Craig; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2003-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is increasingly understood as the conceptual basis for the future treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Endocrine agents have considerably changed the approach to targeted treatment during the past two decades, and select endocrine agents have advanced the goal of preventing breast cancer. Progress has occurred because of a vigorous interaction between laboratory scientists and the clinical trials community. Breast Cancer Research is launching a new section on endocrinology and hormone therapy in order to invigorate this exchange and challenge our readers with novel concepts that might result in enhanced survival in breast cancer. PMID:14580241

  18. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resistance, which is a major clinical problem. In clinical practice, hormonal therapy agents are commonly used in combination or sequence with radiation therapy. Tamoxifen treatment and radiotherapy improve both local tumor control and patient survival. However, tamoxifen treatment may render cancer cells less responsive to radiation therapy. Only a handful of data exist on the effects of radiation on cells resistant to hormonal therapy agents. These scarce data show that cells that were resistant to tamoxifen were also resistant to radiation. Yet, the existence and mechanisms of cross-resistance to endocrine therapy and radiation therapy need to be established. Here, we for the first time examined and compared radiation responses of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7/S0.5) and two antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from MCF-7/S0.5: the tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/TAMR-1 and ICI 182,780 resistant MCF-7/182R-6 cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the expression of genes involved in DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. We found that the tamoxifen-resistant cell line in contrast to the parental and ICI 182,780-resistant cell lines displayed a significantly less radiation-induced decrease in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we show that MCF-7/TAMR-1 and MCF-7/182R-6 cells were less susceptible to radiation-induced apoptosis as compared to the parental line. These data indicate that tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells have a reduced sensitivity to radiation treatment. The current study may therefore serve as a

  19. Menopausal hormone therapy in cancer survivors: A narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kuhle, Carol L; Kapoor, Ekta; Sood, Richa; Thielen, Jacqueline M; Jatoi, Aminah; Faubion, Stephanie S

    2016-10-01

    Decision making regarding the use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) for the treatment of bothersome menopausal symptoms in a cancer survivor can be complex, and includes assessment of its impact on disease-free or overall survival. Estrogen receptors are present in several cancer types, but this does not always result in estrogen-mediated tumor proliferation and adverse cancer-related outcomes. Estrogen may even be protective against certain cancers. Menopausal hormone therapy is associated with an increased risk of recurrence and mortality after diagnosis of some cancer types, but not others. We provide a narrative review of the medical literature regarding the risk of cancer recurrence and associated mortality with initiation of MHT after the diagnosis of breast, gynecologic, lung, colorectal, hematologic cancers, and melanoma. Menopausal hormone therapy may be considered for management of bothersome menopausal symptoms in women with some cancer types (e.g., colorectal and hematologic cancer, localized melanoma, and most cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers), while nonhormonal treatment options may be preferred for others (e.g., breast cancer). In women with other cancer types, recommendations are less straightforward, and the use of MHT must be individualized. PMID:27621244

  20. An alternative regimen of hormone replacement therapy to improve patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Kemp, J F; Fryer, J A; Baber, R J

    1989-02-01

    In order to achieve the long-term benefits from hormone replacement therapy of a markedly reduced incidence of heart disease and osteoporosis, a high degree of compliance is essential. In an effort to obtain high compliance, it was decided to introduce a cyclic therapy of 6 months duration using conjugated oestrogens supported by a 10-day course of progestogens. A total of 85 patients were treated prospectively. Compliance was assessed by the number of patients continuing treatment, and endometrial response was assessed by office biopsy and cytological or histological examination. Five patients withdrew, giving an overall compliance rate of 94%. Two have subsequently resumed therapy, thus 98% of those enrolled are currently receiving hormone replacement therapy. No cases of endometrial carcinoma were detected during the trial period of 4 years. Two cases of mild atypical endometrial hyperplasia were detected but both were mild and reverted to secretory or inactive endometrium following progestogen therapy. This regimen provides a viable alternative for those women who are troubled by progestogenic side-effects and monthly withdrawal bleeding. PMID:2562774

  1. Adjuvant Therapy for Stage I and II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Evan C

    2016-07-01

    Patients with stage I and stage II non-small cell lung cancer undergoing complete resection have a 40% to 70% 5-year overall survival despite optimal local therapy. Chemotherapy administered after complete resection has been shown to improve overall survival at 5 years by approximately 5%. This improvement in survival may be confined to patients with stage IB disease 4 cm or greater, and to those with hilar or mediastinal lymph node involvement. The optimal chemotherapy regimen appears to be cisplatin-based doublet or triplet chemotherapy for 3 to 4 cycles. The addition of biologic agents has failed to improve outcomes. PMID:27261917

  2. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatero, Almudena; Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano; Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  3. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  4. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  5. Delay in initiation of adjuvant trastuzumab therapy leads to decreased overall survival and relapse-free survival in patients with HER2-positive non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Christopher M; More, Kenneth; Kamath, Tripthi; Masaquel, Anthony; Guerin, Annie; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Gauthier-Loiselle, Marjolaine; Nitulescu, Roy; Sicignano, Nicholas; Butts, Elizabeth; Wu, Eric Q; Barnett, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Trastuzumab reduces the risk of relapse in women with HER2-positive non-metastatic breast cancer, but little information exists on the timing of trastuzumab initiation. The study investigated the impact of delaying the initiation of adjuvant trastuzumab therapy for >6 months after the breast cancer diagnosis on time to relapse, overall survival (OS), and relapse-free survival (RFS) among patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. Adult women with non-metastatic breast cancer who initiated trastuzumab adjuvant therapy without receiving any neoadjuvant therapy were selected from the US Department of Defense health claims database from 01/2003 to 12/2012. Two study cohorts were defined based on the time from breast cancer diagnosis to trastuzumab initiation: >6 months and ≤6 months. The impact of delaying trastuzumab initiation on time to relapse, OS, and RFS was estimated using Cox regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Of 2749 women in the study sample, 79.9 % initiated adjuvant trastuzumab within ≤6 months of diagnosis and 20.1 % initiated adjuvant trastuzumab >6 months after diagnosis. After adjusting for confounders, patients who initiated trastuzumab >6 months after the breast cancer diagnosis had a higher risk of relapse, death, or relapse/death than those who initiated trastuzumab within ≤6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratios [95 % CIs]: 1.51 [1.22-1.87], 1.54 [1.12-2.12], and 1.43 [1.16-1.75]; respectively). The results of this population-based study suggest that delays of >6 months in the initiation of trastuzumab among HER2-positive non-metastatic breast cancer patients are associated with a higher risk of relapse and shorter OS and RFS. PMID:27107569

  6. Slightly focused high-energy shockwave therapy: a potential adjuvant treatment for osteoporotic fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Hai-Ming; Li, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Ge-Jun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Slightly focused high-energy shockwave (HESW) therapy is characterized by a wide focal area, a large therapy zone, easy positioning and less pain during treatment. The objective of this study was to perform for the first time an in vivo test of the slightly focused HESWs for osteoporotic fractures. Bilateral proximal tibial osteotomies were made in 30 ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague-Dawley rats and secured with internal fixation. The osteotomy site in the left tibia was subsequently treated with slightly focused HESWs with the energy flux density of 0.26 mj/mm2, shock repetition frequency of 1 Hz and 2000 shocks (OVX + HESW group). The contralateral right tibia was not treated and served as the control (OVX group). Roentgenographic examination 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after osteotomy showed that HESW treatment accelerated tibia fracture healing in osteoporotic rats. Histological examination 2, 4, and 8 weeks after HESW treatment showed a greater inflammatory reaction in the OVX + HESW group, with more mature collagen and trabeculae than in the OVX group. Micro computer tomography (Micro-CT) scanning after 4 and 8 weeks showed that bone volume (BV), bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), mean trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and mean trabecular number (Tb.N) were about 45.0% and 33.1%, 18.4% and 20.1%, 38.2% and 20.9%, 26.7% and 28.4%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05); and the mean trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) was about 16.7% and 27.3% lower in the treatment group (P < 0.05). Four and eight weeks after HESW treatment, the maximum compressive callus endurance was about 72.3% and 25.5%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05). These results show that slightly focused HESW therapy has a beneficial effect on osteoporotic tibial fracture healing. Slightly focused HESWs could increase callus endurance, induce bone formation, and improve trabecular bone microarchitecture and biomechanical

  7. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oestrogen and progestogen have the potential to influence gastro-intestinal motility; both are key components of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Results of observational studies in women taking HRT rely on self-reporting of gastro-oesophageal symptoms and the aetiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) remains unclear. This study investigated the association between HRT and GORD in menopausal women using validated general practice records. Methods 51,182 menopausal women were identified using the UK General Practice Research Database between 1995–2004. Of these, 8,831 were matched with and without hormone use. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for GORD and proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use in hormone and non-hormone users, adjusting for age, co-morbidities, and co-pharmacy. Results In unadjusted analysis, all forms of hormone use (oestrogen-only, tibolone, combined HRT and progestogen) were statistically significantly associated with GORD. In adjusted models, this association remained statistically significant for oestrogen-only treatment (OR 1.49; 1.18–1.89). Unadjusted analysis showed a statistically significant association between PPI use and oestrogen-only and combined HRT treatment. When adjusted for covariates, oestrogen-only treatment was significant (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.03–1.74). Findings from the adjusted model demonstrated the greater use of PPI by progestogen users (OR 1.50; 1.01–2.22). Conclusions This first large cohort study of the association between GORD and HRT found a statistically significant association between oestrogen-only hormone and GORD and PPI use. This should be further investigated using prospective follow-up to validate the strength of association and describe its clinical significance. PMID:22642788

  8. Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement during Pregnancy: An Adjuvant Option When Medical Therapy Fails

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Fátima; Torres, Rita; Borges, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 27-year-old multiparous woman, with multiple thrombophilia, whose pregnancy was complicated with deep venous thrombosis requiring placement of a vena cava filter. At 15th week of gestation, following an acute deep venous thrombosis of the right inferior limb, anticoagulant therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was instituted without improvement in her clinical status. Subsequently, at 18 weeks of pregnancy, LMWH was switched to warfarin. At 30th week of gestation, the maintenance of high thrombotic risk was the premise for placement of an inferior vena cava filter for prophylaxis of pulmonary embolism during childbirth and postpartum. There were no complications and a vaginal delivery was accomplished at 37 weeks of gestation. Venal placement of inferior vena cava filters is an attractive option as prophylaxis for pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. PMID:23781361

  9. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D'Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando Cm; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  10. The effect of adjuvant remifentanil with propofol or thiopentone on seizure quality during electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, R; Marroquin-Harris, M; Gálvez, V; Tor, P; Loo, C

    2016-03-01

    In order to optimise outcome to Electro Convulsive therapy (ECT), there has been a trend to utilise remifentanil as an adjunct to standard intravenous induction agents. This has allowed a reduction in the dose of anaesthetic agent, and usually an improved response to stimulation. However there have been no previous studies to ascertain whether this improvement is simply as a result of the reduced dose of anaesthetic agent or whether remifentanil itself might possess epileptogenic properties. This retrospective case-controlled study examined ECT outcomes, determined by EEG quality analysis, in patients who received ECT with or without remifentanil, where there was no dose reduction in the anaesthetic agent. There were no improvements seen in the measurements of any EEG parameter, including seizure duration. These observations suggest that remifentanil does not possess any intrinsic pro-convulsant activity and that any improvement in outcome seen with its use is as a result of dose reduction in the IV anaesthetic agent. PMID:27029661

  11. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  12. Adjuvant Therapy in the Treatment of Complications Following Surgery for Hepatic Echinococcal Cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Maurice C.; Huwaijah, Said H.; Mourad, Fadi H.; Sharara, Alaa I.; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad O.

    2000-09-15

    Thirty-two patients had surgery for hepatic echinococcal cysts (HEC). Serious complications were observed in 16 patients (50%): cyst recurrence (n = 4), infected residual cyst cavity (n = 7), infected residual cyst cavity with biliary and duodenal fistulae (n = 2), recurrent biliary obstruction following open surgery for a ruptured HEC into the biliary tree (n = 2), delayed rupture of an HEC into the biliary tree following laparoscopic surgery with secondary biliary obstruction (n = 1). These major complications were successfully managed by percutaneous methods in 8 of 16 patients while antihelmintic therapy was sufficient in two patients with a small recurrent cyst and ERCP was used in one patient to relieve biliary obstruction. Surgery was required in two patients only. With a success rate of 87.5%, the nonsurgical approach is the preferred method for treating a post-surgical complication.

  13. The role of hormone replacement therapy in the intensive care management of deceased organ donors: a primer for nurses.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Keaton S; Kimmons, Lauren A; Jones, G Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Donation after brain death remains the primary contributor to the supply of organs available for transplantation in the United States. After brain death, both a surge of catecholamines and a dysregulation of the neurohormonal axis may result in hypotension, decreased organ perfusion, and reduced viability of organs to be transplanted. Hormone replacement therapy is widely used to maintain organ perfusion and has been shown to increase the number of organs procured. This article reviews the literature and mechanisms supporting the use of hormone replacement therapy in brain-dead organ donors and provides clinicians with information regarding the administration, monitoring, and preparation of thyroid hormone, arginine vasopressin, and corticosteroids. PMID:26335215

  14. The pharmacological and hormonal therapy of hot flushes in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Iwona; Jochymek, Bożena; Lenart-Lipińska, Monika; Chabowski, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    The side effects of oncological treatment, which appear during or after therapy, are sometimes very annoying for patients and are not adequately treated by physicians. Among the symptoms experienced by breast cancer patients are hot flushes, which result from a natural or cancer therapy-induced menopause. The intensity of hot flushes in breast cancer patients may be more severe than those experienced by women undergoing a natural menopause. Taking into account the incidence of breast cancer and long-lasting hormone-suppression therapies, the problem of hot flushes will affect many women. Hormonal replacement therapy, the most effective therapeutic means for alleviating hot flushes, is usually contraindicated for breast cancer patients. For intense and severe hot flushes, pharmacological treatment using agents from a group of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors such as venlafaxine or citalopram may be introduced. Other agents from different pharmacological groups, such as clonidine, gabapentin, or pregabalin, have also proved to be effective in treating hot flushes. The efficacy of phytoestrogens has not been proven in randomized clinical trials. The importance of the placebo effect in decreasing vasomotor symptoms has also been reported in many research papers. Educating breast cancer patients in lifestyle changes which decrease the frequency and intensity of vasomotor symptoms can offer significant help too. This paper reviews the current state of research in order to assess the options for the treatment of hot flushes in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26498637

  15. Prospective evaluation of concurrent paclitaxel and radiation therapy after adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for Stage II or III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, Harold J. . E-mail: hburstein@partners.org; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Galper, Sharon; Lu, H.-M.; Kuter, Irene; Wong, Julia; Gelman, Rebecca; Bunnell, Craig A.; Parker, Leroy M.; Garber, Judy E.; Winer, Eric P.; Harris, Jay R.; Powell, Simon N.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of concurrent radiation therapy and paclitaxel-based adjuvant chemotherapy, given either weekly or every 3 weeks, after adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC). Methods and Materials: After definitive breast surgery and AC chemotherapy, 40 patients with operable Stage II or III breast cancer received protocol-based treatment with concurrent paclitaxel and radiation therapy. Paclitaxel was evaluated on 2 schedules, with treatment given either weekly x 12 weeks (60 mg/m{sup 2}), or every 3 weeks x 4 cycles (135-175 mg/m{sup 2}). Radiation fields and schedules were determined by the patient's surgery and pathology. The tolerability of concurrent therapy was evaluated in cohorts of 8 patients as a phase I study. Results: Weekly paclitaxel treatment at 60 mg/m{sup 2} per week with concurrent radiation led to dose-limiting toxicity in 4 of 16 patients (25%), including 3 who developed pneumonitis (either Grade 2 [1 patient] or Grade 3 [2 patients]) requiring steroids. Efforts to eliminate this toxicity in combination with weekly paclitaxel through treatment scheduling and CT-based radiotherapy simulation were not successful. By contrast, dose-limiting toxicity was not encountered among patients receiving concurrent radiation with paclitaxel given every 3 weeks at 135-175 mg/m{sup 2}. However, Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis not requiring steroid therapy was seen in 2 of 24 patients (8%) treated in such a fashion. Excessive radiation dermatitis was not observed with either paclitaxel schedule. Conclusions: Concurrent treatment with weekly paclitaxel and radiation therapy is not feasible after adjuvant AC chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Concurrent treatment using a less frequent paclitaxel dosing schedule may be possible, but caution is warranted in light of the apparent possibility of pulmonary injury.

  16. A double blind, randomised controlled trial of glycerol adjuvant therapy in adult bacterial meningitis in a high HIV seroprevalence setting in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M.B.; Cartwright, Katharine E.; Scarborough, Matthew; Mwambene, James B.; Goodson, Patrick; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Zijlstra, Eduard E.; French, Neil; Whitty, Christopher J.M.; Lalloo, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Southern Africa has a high incidence of bacterial meningitis in adults, often associated with HIV co-infection. Even with appropriate antibiotic therapy, mortality exceeds 50% and is not improved with corticosteroids. Glycerol adjuvant therapy reduced mortality and long-term morbidity (deafness) in bacterial meningitis in children and is being promoted. If similarly effective in adults, glycerol would provide a cheap, available adjuvant therapy in Africa. Methods Following a dose-finding study, we conducted a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial of oral glycerol in adults with bacterial meningitis. Patients with clinical and CSF findings suggestive of bacterial meningitis were randomised either to glycerol or an equivalent volume of sugar solution. The primary outcome was mortality at 40 days with secondary outcomes including disability and mortality restricted to pneumococcal disease. Findings 75ml glycerol QDS was best tolerated and was used for the main study. 265 patients were randomised to receive glycerol or placebo. The trial was stopped early on the advice of the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) following a planned interim analysis. Mortality by day 40 was 61/125 (49%) in the placebo and 86/136 (69%) in the glycerol arms, Adjusted Odds Ratio 2·4 (95% CI 1·3-4·2 p0·003). There was no benefit from glycerol for death and disability by day 40 by intention to treat or in predefined subgroups. Two serious adverse events occurred possibly due to study drug. Interpretation Oral glycerol therapy did not improve mortality in adults with bacterial meningitis and cannot be recommended as a suitable adjuvant therapy in resource-poor settings with a high HIV prevalence. PMID:21334262

  17. Durable response of glioblastoma to adjuvant therapy consisting of temozolomide and a weekly dose of AMD3100 (plerixafor), a CXCR4 inhibitor, together with lapatinib, metformin and niacinamide

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Adan; Hsu, Sigmund H.; Blanco, Angel; Buryanek, Jamie; Day, Arthur L.; McGuire, Mary F.; Brown, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a CNS (central nervous system) malignancy with a low cure rate. Median time to progression after standard treatment is 7 months and median overall survival is 15 months [1]. Post-treatment vasculogenesis promoted by recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs, CD11b+ myelomonocytes) is one of main mechanisms of GBM resistance to initial chemoradiotherapy treatment [2]. Local secretion of SDF-1, cognate ligand of BMDCs CXCR4 receptors attracts BMDCs to the post-radiation tumor site.[3]. This SDF-1 hypoxia-dependent effect can be blocked by AMD3100 (plerixafor) [4]. We report a GBM case treated after chemo- radiotherapy with plerixafor and a combination of an mTOR, a Sirt1 and an EGFRvIII inhibitor. After one year temozolomide and the EGFRvIII inhibitor were stopped. Plerixafor, and the MTOR and Sirt-1 inhibitors were continued. He is in clinical and radiologic remission 30 months from the initiation of his adjuvant treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient treated for over two years with a CXCR4 inhibitor (plerixafor), as part of his adjuvant treatment. We believe there is sufficient experimental evidence to consider AMD3100 (plerixafor) part of the adjuvant treatment of GBM. Significance The adjuvant inhibition of GBM vasculogenesis(a process different from local angiogenesis) by specifically blocking the migration of BMDCs to the primary tumor site with inhibitors of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis represents a potential novel therapeutic approach to GBM. There is significant pre-clinical evidence and validation for its use as demonstrated in a patient derived tumor xenograft model of GBM. Together with other specific anti-tumoral therapies, the active inhibition of vasculogenesis in the adjuvant treatment of GBM is deserving of further exploration. PMID:27489862

  18. What is the influence of hormone therapy on homocysteine and crp levels in postmenopausal women?

    PubMed Central

    Lakryc, Eli Marcelo; Machado, Rogério Bonassi; Soares, José Maria; Fernandes, César Eduardo; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of estrogen therapy and estrogen-progestin therapy on homocysteine and C-reactive protein levels in postmenopausal women. METHODS: In total, 99 postmenopausal women were included in this double-blind, randomized clinical trial and divided into three groups: Group A used estrogen therapy alone (2.0 mg of 17β-estradiol), Group B received estrogen-progestin therapy (2.0 mg of 17 β-estradiol +1.0 mg of norethisterone acetate) and Group C received a placebo (control). The length of treatment was six months. Serum measurements of homocysteine and C-reactive protein were carried out prior to the onset of treatment and following six months of therapy. RESULTS: After six months of treatment, there was a 20.7% reduction in homocysteine levels and a 100.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels in the group of women who used estrogen therapy. With respect to the estrogen-progestin group, there was a 12.2% decrease in homocysteine levels and a 93.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that hormone therapy (unopposed estrogen or estrogen associated with progestin) may have a positive influence on decreasing cardiovascular risk due to a significant reduction in homocysteine levels. PMID:25789519

  19. Effect of solid nanoparticle of indomethacin on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We designed new oral formulations containing indomethacin (IMC) solid nanoparticles, and investigate their usefulness by evaluating bioavailability and gastrointestinal lesions. The IMC solid nanoparticles were prepared using methylcellulose (MC), 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), and the bead mill method, and high quality dispersions containing 1.0% IMC nanoparticles were prepared (IMC(nano), particle size: 76 ± 58 nm, means ± S.D.). The fate of serum IMC and the induction of paw edema in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats receiving low-doses IMC(nano) (0.4 mg/kg) were similar to those following the administration of a therapeutic dose of conventional IMC prepared with MC and HPβCD (conventional IMC, 2 mg/kg), and the bioavailability in 0.4 mg/kg IMC(nano) was 5.3-fold higher in comparison with that in 2 mg/kg conventional IMC. IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions in AA rats administered IMC(nano) (8 mg/kg), in consideration of bioavailability, were significantly less than for conventional IMC (40 mg/kg). On the other hand, the toxicity caused by conventional IMC and IMC(nano) was similar in Caco-2 cells. It is possible that the oral administration of IMC solid nanoparticles will show increased effectiveness in treating RA without causing IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions, since the bioavailability is higher than that of conventional IMC. An oral drug delivery system using drug nanoparticles may expand the usage of NSAIDs for therapy in the inflammatory field. PMID:24989003

  20. Adjuvant treatment of node-positive breast cancer with adriamycin-cyclophosphamide with or without radiation therapy: interim results of an ongoing clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, S E; Salmon, S E; Allen, H; Giordano, G F; Davis, S; Chase, E; Moon, T E; Heusinkveld, R S

    1982-01-01

    During 1974-1980, 138 women with node-positive stage II breast cancer were treated with either eight courses of adriamycin-cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy (82 patients) or AC chemotherapy plus comprehensive regional radiotherapy (56 patients). The overall relapse-free survival of the treated patients was significantly superior (P less than 0.001) to a comparable group of women who underwent surgery alone. This effect of adjuvant therapy was clearly manifest in all groups of patients irrespective of nodal involvement or menopausal status. To date, relapse-free survival for patients receiving AC compared to AC plus radiotherapy is not different (P = 0.7). In summary, wer have demonstrated that a brief 6-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy with AC can significantly reduce the recurrence rate in women with stage II breast cancer. PMID:7036279

  1. Second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer: A report from the International Breast Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Lorenzo; Gelber, Shari; Ravaioli, Alberto; Price, Karen N.; Panzini, Ilaria; Fantini, Manuela; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Pagani, Olivia; Simoncini, Edda; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of second non-breast primary cancer following adjuvant treatment was evaluated using data from patients enrolled from 1978 to 1999 in four International Breast Cancer Study Group (IBCSG) trials. The occurrence of these tumours as sites of first failure was assessed separately for two treatment comparisons: toremifene versus tamoxifen for five years in 1035 patients in IBCSG Trials 12-93 and 14-93 with a median follow-up of eight years and endocrine therapy (toremifene or tamoxifen) versus chemoendocrine therapy (CMF or AC plus toremifene or tamoxifen) in 1731 patients from IBCSG Trials III, VII and 12-93, with a combined median follow-up of 14 years. No significant differences in second non-breast primary tumours were observed in either comparison. In particular the incidences of second primary uterine tumours with toremifene and tamoxifen were similar and no significant increase of secondary leukaemias was observed with chemoendocrine therapy compared with endocrine therapy. PMID:19062268

  2. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  3. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Fabien J; Jouan-Lanhouet, Sandrine; Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Jan, Gwénaël

    2016-02-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  4. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  5. Recombinant growth hormone therapy for cystic fibrosis in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Vidhu; Haagensen, Alexandra L; Carter, Ben; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Houston, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition causing disease most noticeably in the lungs, digestive tract and pancreas. People with cystic fibrosis often have malnutrition and growth delay. Adequate nutritional supplementation does not improve growth optimally and hence an anabolic agent, recombinant growth hormone, has been proposed as a potential intervention. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of recombinant human growth hormone therapy in improving lung function, quality of life and clinical status of children and young adults with cystic fibrosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group’s Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of latest search: 11 February 2015. We conducted a search of relevant endocrine journals and proceedings of the Endocrinology Society meetings using Scopus and Proceedings First. Date of latest search: 04 March 2015. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of recombinant growth hormone compared to either no treatment, or placebo, or each other at any dose (high-dose and low-dose) or route and for any duration, in children or young adults aged up to 25 years diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Main results Four controlled trials were included in this review (with 161 participants in total), each with an unclear risk of bias. Analysis of data obtained from these trials shows improvement in height for all comparisons, but improvements in weight and lean tissue mass were only reported in the comparison of standard dose recombinant growth hormone versus no treatment. One study showed moderate improvement at one time point

  6. Prevention of cardiac dysfunction during adjuvant breast cancer therapy (PRADA): a 2 × 2 factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of candesartan and metoprolol

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Geeta; Heck, Siri Lagethon; Ree, Anne Hansen; Hoffmann, Pavel; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Fagerland, Morten W.; Gravdehaug, Berit; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Bratland, Åse; Storås, Tryggve H.; Hagve, Tor-Arne; Røsjø, Helge; Steine, Kjetil; Geisler, Jürgen; Omland, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Aims Contemporary adjuvant treatment for early breast cancer is associated with improved survival but at the cost of increased risk of cardiotoxicity and cardiac dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that concomitant therapy with the angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan or the β-blocker metoprolol will alleviate the decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) associated with adjuvant, anthracycline-containing regimens with or without trastuzumab and radiation. Methods and results In a 2 × 2 factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial, we assigned 130 adult women with early breast cancer and no serious co-morbidity to the angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan cilexetil, the β-blocker metoprolol succinate, or matching placebos in parallel with adjuvant anticancer therapy. The primary outcome measure was change in LVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. A priori, a change of 5 percentage points was considered clinically important. There was no interaction between candesartan and metoprolol treatments (P = 0.530). The overall decline in LVEF was 2.6 (95% CI 1.5, 3.8) percentage points in the placebo group and 0.8 (95% CI −0.4, 1.9) in the candesartan group in the intention-to-treat analysis (P-value for between-group difference: 0.026). No effect of metoprolol on the overall decline in LVEF was observed. Conclusion In patients treated for early breast cancer with adjuvant anthracycline-containing regimens with or without trastuzumab and radiation, concomitant treatment with candesartan provides protection against early decline in global left ventricular function. PMID:26903532

  7. Combination Therapy with Zoledronic Acid and Parathyroid Hormone Improves Bone Architecture and Strength following a Clinically-Relevant Dose of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Local Treatment of Canine Osteosarcoma in Athymic Rats.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ryan C; Custis, James T; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Ehrhart, E J; Condon, Keith W; Gookin, Sara E; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies using definitive-intent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for the local treatment of canine osteosarcoma (OSA) have shown canine patients achieving similar median survival times as the current standard of care (amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy). Despite this, there remains an unacceptable high risk of pathologic fracture following radiation treatment. Zoledronic acid (ZA) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are therapeutic candidates for decreasing this fracture risk post-irradiation. Due to differing mechanisms, we hypothesized that the combined treatment with ZA and PTH would significantly improve bone healing more than ZA or PTH treatment alone. Using an orthotopic model of canine osteosarcoma in athymic rats, we evaluated bone healing following clinically-relevant doses of radiation therapy (12 Gy x 3 fractions, 36 Gy total). Groups included 36 Gy SRT only, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA and PTH, 36 Gy SRT plus PTH, and 36 Gy SRT plus localized PTH treatment. Our study showed significant increases in bone volume and increased polar moments of inertia (in the distal femoral metaphysis) 8 weeks after radiation in the combined (ZA/PTH) treatment group as compared to radiation treatment alone. Histomorphometric analysis revealed evidence of active mineralization at the study endpoint as well as successful tumor-cell kill across all treatment groups. This work provides further evidence for the expanding potential indications for ZA and PTH therapy, including post-irradiated bone disease due to osteosarcoma. PMID:27332712

  8. Combination Therapy with Zoledronic Acid and Parathyroid Hormone Improves Bone Architecture and Strength following a Clinically-Relevant Dose of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Local Treatment of Canine Osteosarcoma in Athymic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Ryan C.; Custis, James T.; Ehrhart, Nicole P.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Condon, Keith W.; Gookin, Sara E.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies using definitive-intent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for the local treatment of canine osteosarcoma (OSA) have shown canine patients achieving similar median survival times as the current standard of care (amputation and adjuvant chemotherapy). Despite this, there remains an unacceptable high risk of pathologic fracture following radiation treatment. Zoledronic acid (ZA) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are therapeutic candidates for decreasing this fracture risk post-irradiation. Due to differing mechanisms, we hypothesized that the combined treatment with ZA and PTH would significantly improve bone healing more than ZA or PTH treatment alone. Using an orthotopic model of canine osteosarcoma in athymic rats, we evaluated bone healing following clinically-relevant doses of radiation therapy (12 Gy x 3 fractions, 36 Gy total). Groups included 36 Gy SRT only, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA, 36 Gy SRT plus ZA and PTH, 36 Gy SRT plus PTH, and 36 Gy SRT plus localized PTH treatment. Our study showed significant increases in bone volume and increased polar moments of inertia (in the distal femoral metaphysis) 8 weeks after radiation in the combined (ZA/PTH) treatment group as compared to radiation treatment alone. Histomorphometric analysis revealed evidence of active mineralization at the study endpoint as well as successful tumor-cell kill across all treatment groups. This work provides further evidence for the expanding potential indications for ZA and PTH therapy, including post-irradiated bone disease due to osteosarcoma. PMID:27332712

  9. Skeletal effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I therapy.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Richard C; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-09-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis is critically important for the regulation of bone formation, and deficiencies in this system have been shown to contribute to the development of osteoporosis and other diseases of low bone mass. The GH/IGF axis is regulated by a complex set of hormonal and local factors which can act to regulate this system at the level of the ligands, receptors, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), or IGFBP proteases. A combination of in vitro studies, transgenic animal models, and clinical human investigations has provided ample evidence of the importance of the endocrine and local actions of both GH and IGF-I, the two major components of the GH/IGF axis, in skeletal growth and maintenance. GH- and IGF-based therapies provide a useful avenue of approach for the prevention and treatment of diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26408965

  10. The immune system in menopause: pros and cons of hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mimi; Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Wira, Charles R

    2014-07-01

    With aging, a general decline in immune function is observed leading to immune-senescence. Several of these changes are gender specific affecting postmenopausal women. Menopause is a normal part of a woman's lifecycle and consists of a series of body changes that can last from one to ten years. It is known that loss of sex hormones due to aging results in a reduction of immune functions. However, there remains a major gap in our understanding regarding the loss of immune functions particularly in the female reproductive tract (FRT) following menopause and the role of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) in protecting against immune senescence. The current review presents an overview of changes in the immune system due to aging, focusing on genital tract immunity in menopausal women and the risks and benefits of using MHT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Menopause'. PMID:24041719

  11. Effects of external radiation therapy for cancer of the prostate on the serum concentrations of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, R.; Bergman, B.; Damber, J.E.; Littbrand, B.; Loefroth, P.O.

    1983-08-01

    Testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin were analyzed in serum from 31 patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated primarily with megavoltage radiation therapy. The total tumor dose varied between 58 and 71 gray (mean 63.5 gray). Absorbed doses to the testes were measured at approximately 1 to more than 10 gray. We investigated retrospectively 17 patients 3 to 60 months (mean 20 months) after therapy and found significantly lower serum testosterone concentrations and significantly higher luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations than in age-matched controls. Of the patients, 14 were followed before and after radiation treatment. Testosterone concentrations were reduced significantly 1 week as well as 3 months after treatment but pre-treatment values were found on analysis 6 and 12 months after treatment. The values for luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones were significantly higher 3, 6 and 12 months after radiation treatment compared to pre-treatment values. The follicle-stimulating hormone value already increased after 1 week. The greatest observed testosterone alteration occurred 1 week after treatment in patients who received more than 10 gray over the gonads. The use of lead shields protecting the testes reduced the dose absorbed to the gonads by approximately 50 percent.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  13. Issues and trends in pediatric growth hormone therapy--an update from the GHMonitor observational registry.

    PubMed

    Pitukcheewanont, Pisit; Desrosiers, Paul; Steelman, Joel; Rapaport, Robert; Fuqua, John S; Kreher, Nerissa C; Hamlett, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    The GHMonitor observational registry collates data on pediatric subjects receiving Saizen (recombinant human growth hormone (GH)) therapy. From January 2003 through August 2006, 1335 subjects were enrolled in the registry, approximately two-thirds of whom are male. The most common diagnosis in the registry is idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (58%). Most subjects in GHMonitor are receiving Saizen doses using a needle-free delivery device, the cool.click (73%). Mean height standard deviation scores show an improvement from -2.1 at screening to -1.1 following 3 years of Saizen therapy. To date, adverse events have been reported in 4% of subjects. Three serious adverse events were identified to be related to Saizen by the primary investigator: cellulitis at the injection site, behavioral problems/suicidal ideation, and enlargement of a craniopharyngioma. This article provides an update on data from the registry and briefly discusses topical and controversial issues in the treatment of pediatric patients requiring GH therapy. PMID:18317441

  14. Effects of substitution and high-dose thyroid hormone therapy on deiodination, sulfoconjugation, and tissue thyroid hormone levels in prolonged critically ill rabbits.

    PubMed

    Debaveye, Yves; Ellger, Björn; Mebis, Liese; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2008-08-01

    To delineate the metabolic fate of thyroid hormone in prolonged critically ill rabbits, we investigated the impact of two dose regimes of thyroid hormone on plasma 3,3'-diiodothyronine (T(2)) and T(4)S, deiodinase type 1 (D1) and D3 activity, and tissue iodothyronine levels in liver and kidney, as compared with saline and TRH. D2-expressing tissues were ignored. The regimens comprised either substitution dose or a 3- to 5- fold higher dose of T(4) and T(3), either alone or combined, targeted to achieve plasma thyroid hormone levels obtained by TRH. Compared with healthy animals, saline-treated ill rabbits revealed lower plasma T(3) (P=0.006), hepatic T(3) (P=0.02), and hepatic D1 activity (P=0.01). Substitution-dosed thyroid hormone therapy did not affect these changes except a further decline in plasma (P=0.0006) and tissue T(4) (P=0.04). High-dosed thyroid hormone therapy elevated plasma and tissue iodothyronine levels and hepatic D1 activity, as did TRH. Changes in iodothyronine tissue levels mimicked changes in plasma. Tissue T(3) and tissue T(3)/reverse T(3) ratio correlated with deiodinase activities. Neither substitution- nor high-dose treatment altered plasma T(2). Plasma T(4)S was increased only by T(4) in high dose. We conclude that in prolonged critically ill rabbits, low plasma T(3) levels were associated with low liver and kidney T(3) levels. Restoration of plasma and liver and kidney tissue iodothyronine levels was not achieved by thyroid hormone in substitution dose but instead required severalfold this dose. This indicates thyroid hormone hypermetabolism, which in this model of critical illness is not entirely explained by deiodination or by sulfoconjugation. PMID:18450965

  15. A nationwide cohort study on the incidence of meningioma in women using postmenopausal hormone therapy in Finland.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Katariina; Auvinen, Anssi; Lyytinen, Heli; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Pukkala, Eero

    2012-02-15

    The authors conducted a nationwide cohort study to evaluate the association between postmenopausal hormone therapy and meningioma incidence in Finland. All women who had used hormone therapy at least for 6 months at the age of 50 years or older during 1994-2009 were included. Women who had used postmenopausal hormone therapy were identified from the medical reimbursement register of the Social Insurance Institution (131,480 estradiol users and 131,248 estradiol-progestin users), and meningioma cases were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. During the average 9 years of follow-up, 289 estradiol users and 196 estradiol-progestin users were diagnosed with meningioma. Ever use of estradiol-only therapy was associated with an increased risk of meningioma (standardized incidence ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.44). Among women who had been using estradiol-only therapy for at least 3 years, the incidence of meningioma was 1.40-fold higher (95% confidence interval: 1.18, 1.64; P < 0.001) than in the background population. In contrast, this risk was not increased in users of combination therapy (standardized incidence ratio = 0.93, 95% confidence interval: 0.80, 1.06). There was no difference in risk between continuous and sequential use of hormone therapy. Estradiol-only therapy was accompanied with a slightly increased risk of meningioma. PMID:22287638

  16. Combined Hypofractionated Radiation and Hormone Therapy for the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yassa, Michael; Fortin, Bernard; Fortin, Marie-Andree; Lambert, Carole; Van Nguyen, Thu; Bahary, Jean-Paul

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Because of the low alpha/beta value of prostate cancer, a therapeutic gain may be possible with a hypofractionated radiation scheme, and this gain may be further increased with the adjunct of hormone therapy. A Phase II study was undertaken to study the toxicity of such a treatment. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were recruited for this study. Neoadjuvant and concomitant hormone therapy consisted of one injection of leuprolide acetate (4-month preparation) and 1 month of oral nonsteroidal, anti-androgen medication starting on the day of the injection. Radiation treatment was started 8 weeks after the injection and patients received 57 Gy in 19 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 46 months. The treatment was well tolerated and no interruptions occurred. The majority (59%) had Grade 0 or 1 acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity, whereas 36% had Grade 2 and 5% had Grade 3 acute GU toxicity. Only Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. All chronic toxicity was of Grade 1 or 2 except for 3 patients (8%) with Grade 3 toxicity. Sixty-eight percent (68%) of patients had no long-term side effects from the treatment. At time of analysis, 79% showed no sign of treatment failure. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiation with neoadjuvant and concomitant hormone therapy is well tolerated with no significant short- or long-term morbidity. Control for this risk group is good, and comparative Phase III studies should be undertaken to determine whether this treatment is superior to new evolving treatments.

  17. Incremental value of hormonal therapy for deep vein thrombosis prediction: an adjusted Wells score for women.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Márcio Vinícius Lins; Arancibia, Ana Elisa Loyola; Costa, Ana Paula; Bueno, Fernando Brito; Martins, Marcela Aparecida Corrêa; Magalhães, Maria Cláudia; Silva, José Luiz Padilha; de Bastos, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) management includes prediction rule evaluation to define standard pretest DVT probabilities in symptomatic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental usefulness of hormonal therapy to the Wells prediction rules for DVT in women. We studied women undertaking compressive ultrasound scanning for suspected DVT. We adjusted the Wells score for DVT, taking into account the β-coefficients of the logistic regression model. Data discrimination was evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The adjusted score calibration was assessed graphically and by the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Reclassification tables and the net reclassification index were used for the adjusted score comparison with the Wells score for DVT. We observed 461 women including 103 DVT events. The mean age was 56 years (±21 years). The adjusted logistic regression model included hormonal therapy and six Wells prediction rules for DVT. The adjusted score weights ranged from -4 to 4. Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed a nonsignificant P value (0.69) and the calibration graph showed no differences between the expected and the observed values. The area under the ROC curve was 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90-0.95] for the adjusted model and 0.87 (95% CI 0.84-0.91) for the Wells score for DVT (Delong test, P value < 0.01). Net reclassification index for the adjusted score was 0.22 (95% CI 0.11-0.33, P value < 0.01). Our results suggest an incremental usefulness of hormonal therapy as an independent DVT prediction rule in women compared with the Wells score for DVT. The adjusted score must be evaluated in different populations before clinical use. PMID:26757018

  18. Increases in Serum Estrone Sulfate Level Are Associated with Increased Mammographic Density during Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Carolyn J.; Guan, Min; Laughlin, Gail A.; Ursin, Giske A.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Ingles, Sue A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Greendale, Gail A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. We determined whether increases in serum estrone sulfate (E1S) levels during menopausal hormone therapy predict increased mammographic density. Methods We measured percent mammographic density and serum E1S levels in 428 participants of the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions study who were randomly assigned to daily conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) 0.625 mg alone, CEE + daily medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) 2.5 mg, CEE + cyclical MPA (10 mg days 1-12 per 28-day cycle), or CEE + cyclical micronized progesterone (10 mg days 1-12). Serum E1S levels were determined by RIA. Information about covariates was determined by annual questionnaire. Using linear regression, we determined the association between change in E1S level from baseline to 12 months and change in percent mammographic density (by semiquantitative interactive threshold method). Results After controlling for baseline mammographic density, age, body mass index, alcohol intake, parity, smoking, ethnicity, physical activity, and age at first pregnancy, mammographic density increased by 1.3% for every 1 ng/mL increase in E1S level (P < 0.0001). The association between change in E1S level and change in mammographic density differed by treatment group (greater effect in CEE + cyclical MPA group versus CEE group; P = 0.05). After controlling for treatment group, change in the ratio of E1S to E1 was also positively associated with change in mammographic density. Conclusions Increases in serum E1S levels during menopausal hormone therapy are associated with increases in mammographic density. The relative contribution of E1S and E1 to stimulation of breast tissue awaits further elucidation. PMID:18628419

  19. Compounded non-FDA–approved menopausal hormone therapy prescriptions have increased: results of a pharmacy survey

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Constantine, Ginger D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: From a survey of compounding pharmacists, specific questions regarding compounded menopausal hormone therapy were used to estimate compounded hormone therapy (CHT) prescribing in the United States. Methods: A national online survey was conducted by Rose Research—a market research company consisting of 12,250 US pharmacists from independent community pharmacies (ICPs) and compounding pharmacies (CPs). Pharmacists who completed the survey and met the prespecified criteria were eligible. Data from the survey were extrapolated to estimate overall CHT prescription volume and annual costs of CHT prescriptions for the United States based upon industry data from the National Community Pharmacists Association and IBISWorld. Results: Surveys were completed by 483 pharmacies, including 365 ICPs and 118 CPs. On the basis of the survey responses and extrapolated industry data, an estimated 26 to 33 million CHT prescriptions were filled annually, with total sales estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. CPs (vs ICPs) accounted for a higher proportion of CHT prescriptions. More than half of the ICPs (52%) and CPs (75%) expected continued compounding business growth, with most predicting 5% to 25% growth within 2 years, despite the potential effect of restrictive legislation regarding compounding. Conclusions: On the basis of extrapolated data from numbers of prescriptions reported by pharmacists participating in the survey, the volume of CHT seems to approach that of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved menopausal hormone therapy, and growth in the CHT market is expected. Thus, physicians should educate themselves and the women consulting them about the differences between the FDA-approved and the less-tested CHT formulations. More research on the efficacy, safety, and consistency of non-FDA–approved CHT is needed. PMID:26645819

  20. Testosterone hormone replacement therapy: state-of-the-art and emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Leichtnam, Marie-Laure; Rolland, Hervé; Wüthrich, Patrick; Guy, Richard H

    2006-06-01

    In the human male, testosterone is the major circulating androgen. The clinical effects of androgen are numerous, and testosterone deficiency is associated with a number of clinical abnormalities. At present, a variety of preparations containing testosterone is available for the treatment of androgen deficiency. Ideally, those treatments have to produce and maintain physiologic serum concentrations of the hormone. This article reviews the current existing testosterone dosage forms on the market with their advantages and drawbacks and examines new and emerging technology developments concerning this therapy. In particular, the latest innovations in transdermal delivery are explored. PMID:16755346

  1. An individual patient data meta-analysis of adjuvant therapy with uracil–tegafur (UFT) in patients with curatively resected rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, J; Hamada, C; Yoshida, S; Kodaira, S; Yasutomi, M; Kato, T; Oba, K; Nakazato, H; Saji, S; Ohashi, Y

    2007-01-01

    Uracil–Tegafur (UFT), an oral fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapeutic agent, has been used for adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected colorectal cancer patients. Past trials and meta-analyses indicate that it is somewhat effective in extending survival of patients with rectal cancer. The objective of this study was to perform a reappraisal of randomised clinical trials conducted in this field. We designed an individual patient-based meta-analysis of relevant clinical trials to examine the benefit of UFT for curatively resected rectal cancer in terms of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local relapse-free survival (LRFS). We analysed individual patient data of five adjuvant therapy randomised clinical trials for rectal cancer, which met the predetermined inclusion criteria. These five trials had a combined total of 2091 patients, UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy compared to surgery-alone, 5-year follow-up, intention-to-treat-based analytic strategy, and similar endpoints (OS and DFS). In a pooled analysis, UFT had significant advantage over surgery-alone in terms of both OS (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.70–0.97; P=0.02) and DFS (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95%CI, 0.63–0.84; P<0.0001). This individual patient-based meta-analysis demonstrated that oral UFT significantly improves both OS and DFS in patients with curatively resected rectal cancer. PMID:17375049

  2. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Hunt, Daniel; Sartor, A. Oliver; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Jones, Christopher U.; Dobelbower, Michael; Shipley, William U.; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Donavanik, Viroon; Rotman, Marvin; Hartford, Alan C.; Michalski, Jeffrey; Seider, Michael; Kim, Harold; and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  3. TOMOGRAFIC AND TENSIOMETRIC ASSESSMENT ON FEMURS FROM OOPHORECTOMIZED RATS SUBJECTED TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Martynetz, Fábio Alexandre; Pessole Biondo-Simões, Maria de Lourdes; Martynetz, Juliano Rodrigo; Martynetz, Tatiana Daher; Zimerman, Elise; Neto, Heraldo Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the biomechanical and tomographic effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on femurs from rats subjected to induced menopause. Methods: Forty-five adult Wistar rats were divided equally into three groups. The first and second groups consisted of rats subjected to oophorectomy, and the third was the control group, consisting of nonoophorectomized rates. After verifying that hormone failure had occurred (exfoliative cytological test), only the first group received HRT, over a two-month period. After this period, the femurs were disarticulated and subjected to biomechanical tests in a universal testing machine to evaluate their strength, and were subjected to tomographic evaluation to determine the bone mineral density. Results: The exfoliative cytological test showed that hormone failure was induced in all the oophorectomized animals. A significant difference (p = 0.030) in maximum strength measurements was observed between the groups (higher in the group with HRT). Greater bone fragility was observed in the oophorectomized animals without HRT than in those with HRT (p = 0.010), in relation to the control group (p = 0.0107). There was greater bone strength in the oophorectomized rats with HRT than in those without HRT, and these values were similar to those of the control group (p = 0.179). In the tomographic evaluation, no significant differences were found between the groups (p = 0.625). Conclusion: A significant increase in bone strength was observed with the use of HRT. However, treatment with HRT did not show any significant change in bone mineral density. PMID:27019837

  4. Large-scale hormone replacement therapy and life expectancy: results from an international comparison among European and North American populations.

    PubMed Central

    Panico, S; Galasso, R; Celentano, E; Ciardullo, A V; Frova, L; Capocaccia, R; Trevisan, M; Berrino, F

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An analysis was performed to determine the risks and benefits of a 10-year hormone replacement therapy regimen that had been applied to all women at 50 years of age in 8 countries. METHODS: Cumulative mortality with and without hormone replacement therapy over 20 years was estimated, with both current and predicted total and disease-specific secular mortality trends and the influence of a generational cohort effect taken into account. RESULTS: In countries with high ischemic heart disease frequency and predictable relative predominance of ischemic heart disease rates over breast cancer rates for the next 20 years, hormone replacement therapy could result in benefits with regard to overall mortality; this advantage decreases in younger-generation cohorts. In countries in which breast cancer mortality predominates over ischemic heart disease in early postmenopause and in which the predictable trends for both diseases reinforce this condition, a negative effect on overall mortality would be observed. In the United States, the effect of large-scale hormone replacement therapy would change over time. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term effect of hormone replacement therapy on life expectancy of postmenopausal women may vary among countries. PMID:10983196

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis comparing degarelix with leuprolide in hormonal therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Hind T; Crawford, E David; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Lin, Swu-Jane; Marshall, Dennis C

    2013-04-01

    Degarelix, approved in the USA in 2008, is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, representing one of the latest additions to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT is used as first-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer with the aim to reduce testosterone to castrate levels. Like other gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonists, degarelix treatment results in rapid decrease in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone levels without the associated risk of flare. Using one registration trial for degarelix with leuprolide as the active control, a cost-effectiveness analysis with a Markov model and a 20-year time horizon found the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for degarelix to be US$245/quality-adjusted life years. Degarelix provides a cost-effective treatment for ADT among patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23570437

  6. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Engellau, Jacob; Engström, Katarina; Bauer, Henrik C.; Monge, Odd R.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Eide, Geir E.; Trovik, Clement S.; Bruland, Øyvind S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  7. Use of Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Bioidentical Hormone Therapy in Australian Women 50 to 69 Years of Age: Results from a National, Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Velentzis, Louiza S; Banks, Emily; Sitas, Freddy; Salagame, Usha; Tan, Eng Hooi; Canfell, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Menopausal Hormone Therapy (MHT) use in Australia fell by 55% from 2001 to 2005, following the release of large-scale findings on its risks and benefits. Comprehensive national data, including information on overall prevalence of MHT use as well as information on duration of use in Australia have not been reported since the 2004-5 National Health Survey, when 11% of women aged 45+ years were estimated to be current MHT users. No national data are available on prevalence of use of "bioidentical" hormone therapy (BHT). The objective of this study was to determine recent prevalence of MHT and BHT use. A cross-sectional, national, age-stratified, population survey was conducted in 2013. Eligible women, aged 50-69 years, resident in Australia were randomly sampled in 5-year age groups from the Medicare enrolment database (Australia's universal health scheme). The response rate was 22% based on return of completed questionnaires, and analyses were restricted to 4,389 women within the specified age range. The estimated population-weighted prevalence of current use of MHT was 13% (95%CI 12-14), which was broadly similar to the previously reported national figures in 2004-5, suggesting that the use of MHT in Australia has largely stabilised over the past decade. A total of 39% and 20% of current-users with an intact uterus reported use of oestrogen-progestagen MHT and oestrogen-only MHT, respectively, whereas 77% of hysterectomised current-users used oestrogen-only MHT. Almost three-quarters of current-users [population-weighted prevalence 9% (95%CI 8-10)] had used MHT for ≥5 years. In regard to BHT, estimated population-weighted prevalence of ever use was 6% (95%CI 6-7) and 2% (95%CI 2-3) for current use. The population-weighted prevalence of MHT and BHT combined, in current users in their fifties and sixties was 15% (95%CI 14-16). These data provide a recent national "snapshot" of Australian women's use of both conventional MHT and of BHT. PMID:27008039

  8. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  9. The Na+ /H+ exchanger (NHE1) as a novel co-adjuvant target in paclitaxel therapy of triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amith, Schammim Ray; Wilkinson, Jodi Marie; Baksh, Shairaz; Fliegel, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of Na+ /H+ exchanger isoform one (NHE1) activity is a hallmark of cells undergoing tumorigenesis and metastasis, the leading cause of patient mortality. The acidic tumor microenvironment is thought to facilitate the development of resistance to chemotherapy drugs and to promote extracellular matrix remodeling leading to metastasis. Here, we investigated NHE1 as a co-adjuvant target in paclitaxel chemotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. We generated a stable NHE1-knockout of the highly invasive, triple-negative, MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The NHE1-knockout cells proliferated comparably to parental cells, but had markedly lower rates of migration and invasion in vitro. In vivo xenograft tumor growth in athymic nude mice was also dramatically decreased compared to parental MDA-MB-231 cells. Loss of NHE1 expression also increased the susceptibility of knockout cells to paclitaxel-mediated cell death. NHE1 inhibition, in combination with paclitaxel, resulted in a dramatic decrease in viability, and migratory and invasive potential of triple-negative breast cancer cells, but not in hormone receptor-positive, luminal MCF7 cells. Our data suggest that NHE1 is critical in triple-negative breast cancer metastasis, and its chemical inhibition boosts the efficacy of paclitaxel in vitro, highlighting NHE1 as a novel, potential co-adjuvant target in breast cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25514463

  10. Effects of oophorectomy and hormone replacement therapy on pituitary-gonadal function.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Branco, C; Martínez de Osaba, M J; Vanrezc, J A; Fortuny, A; González-Merlo, J

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how oophorectomy and different hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimens using low doses of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg/day) influence the pituitary-gonadal axis function. Ninety (90) women, who had had regular menses prior to surgery, completed a 1-year follow-up period. Patients were assigned to 5 groups. The first (n = 16) received 0.625 mg/day conjugated equine oestrogens (CEE) cyclically, the second (n = 20) 50 micrograms day transdermal oestradiol (E2) cyclically and the third (n = 15) 0.625 mg/day CEE continuously. These 3 groups also received 2.5 mg MPA sequentially for the last 12 days of HRT administration. The fourth group (n = 20) received 0.625 mg/day CEE and 2.5 mg/day of MPA continuously, while the fifth (n = 19) constituted a control group. After oophorectomy all patients showed increases in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, and decreases in those of E2, oestrone (E1), prolactin (PRL), sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), androstenedione (delta A4) and testosterone (T). No changes were detected in dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) levels. After HRT, decreases in FSH, LH and PRL levels and increases in those of E2, E1 and SHBG were observed, but no changes were seen in T, delta A4 or DHEA-S plasma levels. As the differences that were found cannot be attributed to the presence of ovaries, it is reasonable to assume that they were perhaps due to the treatment. All these changes, with the exception of a decrease in PRL levels, are therefore to be expected after HRT. PMID:8231902

  11. Menopausal hormone therapy use and risk of primary liver cancer in the clinical practice research datalink.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Katherine A; Hagberg, Katrina; Chen, Jie; Braunlin, Megan; Graubard, Barry I; Suneja, Neha; Jick, Susan; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V

    2016-05-01

    Primary liver cancer occurs less commonly among women than men in almost all countries. This discrepancy has suggested that hormone levels and/or exogenous hormone use could have an effect on risk, although prior studies have reached inconsistent conclusions. Thus, the current study was conducted to examine the relationship between menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use and development of liver cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted within the United Kingdom's Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Controls were matched, at a 4-to-1 ratio, to women diagnosed with primary liver cancer between 1988 and 2011. A second match, based on whether the cases and controls had diabetes, was also conducted. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations of MHT with liver cancer were estimated using conditional logistic regression adjusted for known risk factors. In the overall match, 339 women with liver cancer were matched to 1318 controls. MHT use was associated with a significantly lower risk of liver cancer (ORadj  = 0.58, 95%CI = 0.37-0.90) especially among users of estrogen-only MHT (ORadj = 0.44, 95%CI = 0.22-0.88) and among past users (ORadj  = 0.53, 95%CI = 0.32-0.88). Among the matched cases (n = 58) and controls (n = 232) with diabetes, the odds ratios were similar to the overall analysis (ORadj  = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.09-3.53), but did not attain statistical significance. In the current study, MHT use, especially estrogen-only MHT use, was associated with a significantly lower risk of liver cancer. These results support the need of further investigation into whether hormonal etiologies can explain the variation in liver cancer incidence between men and women. PMID:26662112

  12. [Assessment of serum estrogen levels by RIA with HPLC during hormone replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Uemura, H; Yoneda, N; Irahara, M; Aono, T; Sunahara, S; Hata, K

    1995-07-01

    We studied the serum estradiol and estrone levels in 146 peri and postmenopausal women, and in 38 women who had complained of various climacteric disturbance symptoms during daily hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) 0.625 mg and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) 2.5 mg. Serum estradiol and estrone were measured before treatment, and at 6 months, and after one year of the HRT therapy by HPLC-radioimmunoassay. In 146 peri and postmenopausal women, the serum level of estradiol was from 3 to 6pg/ml. The serum level of estradiol in 38 women after HRT significantly increased (p < 0.01) from 3.34 to 23.6 pg/ml at 6 months, and 21.5 pg/ml at 12 months. The serum level of estrone significantly increased (p < 0.01) from 26.6pg/ml to 156.7pg/ml at 6 months, and 137.2pg/ml at 12 month. These results are very useful for deciding on the doses of hormones and the expected serum estradiol level in HRT for Japanese women. PMID:7636337

  13. Acceleration of puberty during growth hormone therapy in a child with septo-optic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Catlı, Gönül; Altıncık, Ayça; Anık, Ahmet; Demir, Korcan; Güleryüz, Handan; Abacı, Ayhan; Böber, Ece

    2014-01-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a heterogeneous disorder of the central nervous system characterized by various endocrinological and neurological findings. It is a complex disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we report the case of a 5.5-year-old girl who presented with short stature and strabismus. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Ectopic posterior pituitary and bilateral optic hypoplasia were detected on brain magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia and hypopituitarism led to the diagnosis of SOD. An abated growth hormone (GH) response was found in the GH stimulation test and GH replacement therapy was initiated. At the end of the first year of clinical follow-up, secondary hypothyroidism was detected and L-thyroxine was added to the treatment. At the age of 8.25 years, thelarche was noted and 6 months later, the patient presented with menarche. At this time, the bone age was 12 years and the basal luteinizing hormone level was 7 mIU/mL. These findings indicated acceleration in the process of pubertal development. We report this case (i) to emphasize the need to investigate hypopituitarism in cases with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia and (ii) to draw attention to the fact that during the follow-up of SOD cases receiving GH therapy, inappropriate acceleration of growth velocity and rapid improvement in bone age may be predictive of central precocious puberty development. PMID:24932606

  14. Fatal Breast Cancer Risk in Relation to Use of Unopposed Estrogen and Combined Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pocobelli, Gaia; Newcomb, Polly A.; Li, Christopher I.; Cook, Linda S.; Barlow, William E.; Weiss, Noel S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of combined hormone therapy (CHT) is associated with increased breast cancer incidence, but it is unclear whether this translates into increased breast cancer mortality. Methods We conducted a population-based nested case-control study in Saskatchewan, Canada, where a population-based prescription drug database has existed since 1975. We evaluated fatal breast cancer risk in relation to recency and duration of use of CHT and unopposed estrogen hormone therapy (EHT). Results A total of 1,288 cases and 12,535 controls were included in the analyses. Exclusive use of EHT was not associated with fatal breast cancer risk, either overall or within categories of recency or duration (odds ratio (OR) for current versus never use=1.1; 95% CI (confidence interval), 0.8–1.3). Use of CHT (includes women who had also used EHT) was also not associated with fatal breast cancer risk (OR for current versus never use=0.9; 95% CI, 0.7–1.3), except for a suggestion of an increased risk with current long-term use. Conclusion Consistent with prior studies, we observed no increased risk of fatal breast cancer associated with use of EHT. To date only a few studies have evaluated fatal breast cancer risk in relation to use of CHT, and collectively the results are inconsistent. PMID:24671356

  15. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    PubMed

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne. PMID:25845307

  16. Insights from the Women's Health Initiative: individualizing risk assessment for hormone therapy decisions.

    PubMed

    Wild, Robert A; Manson, JoAnn E

    2014-11-01

    Identifying appropriate candidates for menopausal hormone therapy (HT) is challenging given the complex profile of risks and benefits associated with treatment. Most professional societies agree that HT should not be used for chronic disease prevention. Recent findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other randomized trials suggest that a woman's age, proximity to menopause, underlying cardiovascular risk factor status, and various biological characteristics may modify health outcomes with HT. An emerging body of evidence suggests that it may be possible to assess individual risk and therefore better predict who is more likely to have favorable outcomes versus adverse effects when taking HT. Thus, once a woman is identified as a potential candidate for HT due to moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms or other indications, risk stratification may be an important tool for minimizing patient risk. This individualized approach holds great promise for improving the safety of HT. We review here the evidence for this approach, focusing on vascular health because of limited data on other outcomes. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a personalized risk/benefit prediction model to be used when a woman seeks therapy for symptom management. Patient centered outcomes including quality of life and sense of well-being should also be incorporated and will directly impact the benefit: risk ratio and compliance. Additional research on hormone dose, formulation, and route of delivery will be important for improving this model. PMID:25321420

  17. The association of polymorphisms in hormone metabolism pathway genes, menopausal hormone therapy, and breast cancer risk: a nested case-control study in the California Teachers Study cohort

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The female sex steroids estrogen and progesterone are important in breast cancer etiology. It therefore seems plausible that variation in genes involved in metabolism of these hormones may affect breast cancer risk, and that these associations may vary depending on menopausal status and use of hormone therapy. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of breast cancer in the California Teachers Study cohort. We analyzed 317 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 24 hormone pathway genes in 2746 non-Hispanic white women: 1351 cases and 1395 controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by fitting conditional logistic regression models using all women or subgroups of women defined by menopausal status and hormone therapy use. P values were adjusted for multiple correlated tests (PACT). Results The strongest associations were observed for SNPs in SLCO1B1, a solute carrier organic anion transporter gene, which transports estradiol-17β-glucuronide and estrone-3-sulfate from the blood into hepatocytes. Ten of 38 tagging SNPs of SLCO1B1 showed significant associations with postmenopausal breast cancer risk; 5 SNPs (rs11045777, rs11045773, rs16923519, rs4149057, rs11045884) remained statistically significant after adjusting for multiple testing within this gene (PACT = 0.019-0.046). In postmenopausal women who were using combined estrogen-progestin therapy (EPT) at cohort enrollment, the OR of breast cancer was 2.31 (95% CI = 1.47-3.62) per minor allele of rs4149013 in SLCO1B1 (P = 0.0003; within-gene PACT = 0.002; overall PACT = 0.023). SNPs in other hormone pathway genes evaluated in this study were not associated with breast cancer risk in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. Conclusions We found evidence that genetic variation in SLCO1B1 is associated with breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, particularly among those using EPT. PMID:21457551

  18. [The level of pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein and the hormonal background during different options of hormonal replacement therapy in the menopausal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zorina, V N; Predeina, E M; Zorina, R M; Levchenko, V G; Bazhenova, L G; Zorin, N A

    2007-07-01

    The authors studied the concentration of pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein (PA alpha2GP), a sensitive marker of estrogen-dependent tumors, and the association of its level with the serum content of a number of hormones: follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol (E-2), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DEAS-S), and testosterone in females receiving the groups of drugs containing: 1) estradiol valerate; 2) 17beta-estradiol, and 3) tibolone. The type of the active ingredient of a drug and the duration of its administration were shown to differently affect both the concentration of hypothalamopituitary hormones and steroid sex hormones and the level of PA alpha2GP). The latter increased significantly in Group 1 and insignificantly in Group 2 and did not differ from the normal values in Group 3, at the same time the concentration of E-2 elevated in Groups 1 and 2, rather than in Group 3; the level of DEAS-S increased in Groups 2 and 3 irrespective of the duration of use. Moreover, there were elevated levels of testosterone in Group 3 and those of DEAS-S in Group 1 only when the drugs were administered for 3-6 months. A number of correlations were found in the levels of PA alpha2GP with those of steroid hormones. The authors consider that individual monitoring of the level of PA alpha2GP in the females who need hormonal therapy in menopause provides a useful guide to choosing a drug, monitoring its use efficiency, and preventing malignant proliferation in proper time. PMID:17802803

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early female breast cancer: a systematic review of the evidence for the 2014 Cancer Care Ontario systemic therapy guideline

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, S.; Fletcher, G.G.; Eisen, A.; Mates, M.; Freedman, O.C.; Dent, S.F.; Trudeau, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) of Cancer Care Ontario recently created an evidence-based consensus guideline on the systemic treatment of early breast cancer. The evidence for the guideline was compiled using a systematic review to answer the question “What is the optimal systemic therapy for patients with early-stage, operable breast cancer, when patient and disease factors are considered?” The question was addressed in three parts: cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine treatment, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (her2)–directed therapy. Methods For the systematic review, the medline and embase databases were searched for the period January 2008 to May 2014. The Standards and Guidelines Evidence directory of cancer guidelines and the Web sites of major oncology guideline organizations were also searched. The basic search terms were “breast cancer” and “systemic therapy” (chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, targeted agents, ovarian suppression), and results were limited to randomized controlled trials (rcts), guidelines, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Results Several hundred documents that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved. The Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group meta-analyses encompassed many of the rcts found. Several additional studies that met the inclusion criteria were retained, as were other guidelines and systematic reviews. Chemotherapy was reviewed mainly in three classes: anti-metabolite–based regimens (for example, cyclophosphamide–methotrexate–5-fluorouracil), anthracyclines, and taxane-based regimens. In general, single-agent chemotherapy is not recommended for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer in any patient population. Anthracycline–taxane-based polychemotherapy regimens are, overall, considered superior to earlier-generation regimens and have the most significant impact on patient survival outcomes. Regimens with varying anthracycline and taxane doses and

  20. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on hemodynamic responses of postmenopausal women to passive heating.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, S L; Kenney, W L

    2000-07-01

    To examine the influence of chronic hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the central and peripheral cardiovascular responses of postmenopausal women to direct passive heating, seven women taking estrogen replacement therapy, seven women taking estrogen and progesterone therapy, and seven women not taking HRT were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output, blood pressure, skin blood flow, splanchnic blood flow, renal blood flow, esophageal temperature, and mean skin temperature. Cardiac output was higher in women taking estrogen and progesterone therapy than in women not taking HRT (7.12 +/- 0.70 vs. 5.02 +/- 0. 57 l/min at the limit of thermal tolerance, respectively; P < 0.05) because of a higher HR. However, when the HR data were plotted as a percentage of the maximum HR or percentage of HR reserve, there were no differences among the three groups of women. Neither splanchnic nor renal blood flow differed among the groups of women. These data suggest that HRT has little effect on the cardiovascular responses to direct passive heating. PMID:10904040

  1. Retrospective analysis of drug utilization, health care resource use, and costs associated with IFN therapy for adjuvant treatment of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Le, Trong Kim; Shaw, James W; Kotapati, Srividya

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines real-world drug utilization patterns, health care resource use, and costs among patients receiving adjuvant treatment with IFN versus patients receiving no treatment (“observation”) for malignant melanoma following surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims from Truven Health Analytics (MarketScan®) to identify all adjuvant melanoma patients (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed between June 2007 and June 2011 who had a lymph node dissection (ie, index surgery) and were treated with IFN or subsequently observed. Health care resource use and costs of services were converted to 2012 US dollars and were evaluated and compared using multivariable regression. Results Of 1,999 eligible subjects with melanoma surgery claims, 179 (9.0%) were treated with IFN and 1,820 (91.0%) were observed. The median duration (days) and number of doses of IFN therapy were 73 and 36, respectively. Among IFN-treated patients, only 10.6% completed ≥80% of maintenance therapy. The total average cost for patients treated with IFN was US$60,755±$3,972 (n=179); significantly higher than for patients undergoing observation ($31,641±$2,471; P<0.0001). Similar trends were observed when evaluating total cost components, including melanoma-related and non-melanoma–related medical costs. Among the melanoma-related medical costs, outpatient services, including office visits and laboratory testing, represented between 33% and 53% of total costs and demonstrated the largest difference between IFN-treated and observation patients. Outpatient service costs for IFN-treated patients were $32,414±$2,498, over three times greater than those for observation patients ($10,556±$1,128; P<0.0001). Conclusion The majority of adjuvant melanoma patients in this study was treated with observation versus IFN treatment. Among those who attempted IFN treatment, most could not complete the recommended course of therapy. Health care costs were

  2. Alzheimer’s disease: review of hormone therapy trials and implications for treatment and prevention after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Victor W.

    2013-01-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the menopausal transition and postmenopause have the potential to influence processes linked to Alzheimer’s disease symptoms and pathogenesis, but effects of menopause on Alzheimer risk can be addressed only indirectly. Nine randomized clinical trials of estrogen-containing hormone therapy in Alzheimer’s disease patients were identified by a systematic literature search. Findings suggest that hormone therapy does not improve cognitive symptoms of women with Alzheimer’s disease. No clinical trials of hormone therapy address Alzheimer prevention, but one clinical trial provides moderate evidence that continuous, combined estrogen plus progestogen initiated at age 65 years or older increases the risk of dementia. The timing, or critical window, hypothesis suggests that hormone therapy initiated at a younger age in closer temporal proximity to menopause may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. This hypothesis is supported by observational research but is not addressed by clinical trial data. Unrecognized confounding is of concern in interpreting observational results, and research that helps resolve this issue will have important public health implications. Well-designed cohort studies, convergent evidence from appropriate laboratory models, and long-term clinical trials using surrogate biomarkers of brain function and neural pathology could provide relevant answers. Other estrogenic compounds are of theoretical interest with respect to Alzheimer treatment and risk. Effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as raloxifene may differ from those of estrogens; potential effects of phytoestrogens are not well studied. PMID:23727128

  3. Growth hormone therapy for Prader–willi syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS’ clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype–phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  4. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-willi syndrome: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS' clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype-phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  5. Progestogens Used in Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Differences in Their Pharmacological Properties, Intracellular Actions, and Clinical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hapgood, Janet P.; Winer, Sharon; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of progestogens as a class has come under increased scrutiny after the publication of data from the Women's Health Initiative trial, particularly with respect to breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, despite the fact that only one progestogen, medroxyprogesterone acetate, was used in this study. Inconsistency in nomenclature has also caused confusion between synthetic progestogens, defined here by the term progestin, and natural progesterone. Although all progestogens by definition have progestational activity, they also have a divergent range of other properties that can translate to very different clinical effects. Endometrial protection is the primary reason for prescribing a progestogen concomitantly with postmenopausal estrogen therapy in women with a uterus, but several progestogens are known to have a range of other potentially beneficial effects, for example on the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Because women remain suspicious of the progestogen component of postmenopausal hormone therapy in the light of the Women's Health Initiative trial, practitioners should not ignore the potential benefits to their patients of some progestogens by considering them to be a single pharmacological class. There is a lack of understanding of the differences between progestins and progesterone and between individual progestins differing in their effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, the breast, and bone. This review elucidates the differences between the substantial number of individual progestogens employed in postmenopausal hormone therapy, including both progestins and progesterone. We conclude that these differences in chemical structure, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, affinity, potency, and efficacy via steroid receptors, intracellular action, and biological and clinical effects confirm the absence of a class effect of progestogens. PMID:23238854

  6. Chinese Medicines as an Adjuvant Therapy for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma during Transarterial Chemoembolization: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanbin; Yuen, Man-Fung; Ziea, Tat-chi; Tong, Yao; Wong, Vivian Taam; Feng, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To conduct a comprehensive PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Chinese medicines (CMs) as an adjuvant therapy for unresectable HCC during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Methods. Main databases were searched up to October 2012 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of CMs plus TACE on unresectable HCC compared with TACE alone. References of relevant reviews and eligible studies were also assessed. Risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals and mean difference were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were examined. Results. Sixty-seven trials (N = 5,211) were included in the meta-analysis. Sensitivity analysis and random-effects model were performed for assessing significant heterogeneity. CMs plus TACE showed beneficial effects on tumor response, survival at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months, quality of life, and TACE toxicity reduction compared with TACE alone. Conclusion. The results show that the use of CMs may increase the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of TACE in treating patients with unresectable HCC. These findings suggest that CMs could be considered as an adjuvant therapy for unresectable HCC patients during TACE. Larger-scale RCTs using standard methods and long-term follow-up are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:23956773

  7. Autologous tunica vaginalis and subcapsular orchiectomy: a hormonal therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Martyn A; Lamontagne, Donald P; Guru, Khurshid A; Satyanarayana, Ramgopal K; Vickers, Kristin E; Menon, Mani

    2004-01-01

    Two novel surgical procedures that combine an autologous tunica vaginalis pedicle graft (TVG) with a subcapsular orchiectomy (SCOT) were evaluated in asymptomatic patients with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values following radiation therapy, a radical retropubic prostatectomy, or a newly diagnosed prostatic cancer with bony metastasis. In the SCOT I procedure, the TVG was secured to the inner wall of the tunica albuginea. In the SCOT II procedure, the TVG was folded and secured to the external wall of the tunica albuginea. Between December 1, 1999, and July 1, 2000, 26 patients were offered hormonal therapy. Twelve patients selected the SCOT I procedure, 12 selected a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, and 2 selected a bilateral total orchiectomy (BTO). Because the cosmetic outcome of the SCOT I procedure was less than ideal, this procedure was modified in December 2001. Between December 1, 2001, and July 1, 2002, 28 hormonal candidates were evaluated. Twelve patients selected the SCOT II procedure, 11 selected an LHRH agonist, and 5 selected a BTO. Preoperative measurements of the testicular area and PSA were obtained. During postoperative visits, the total testosterone, PSA, and testicular area were determined, and the Fugl-Meyer questionnaire (FMQ) and SCOT-specific questionnaire (SSQ) were completed. Between March 1, 2000, and December 1, 2002, 10 patients underwent a BTO. This group was the control for the postoperative SCOT total testosterone values. Sixty-three percent of the mean preoperative testicular area was preserved in the SCOT II group vs 43% in the SCOT I group at the 9- to 12-month visit (P <.01). The mean postoperative total testosterone values for the SCOT I, SCOT II, and BTO groups were in the castrate range. No statistically significant difference was noted between the preoperative and postoperative FMQ scores among the SCOT I and SCOT II groups. Eighty-three percent of the SCOT II patients experienced no change in

  8. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR{sup +}CD4{sup +} T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer.

  9. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colorectal carcinoma above the peritoneal reflection. II. Antimesenteric wall ascending and descending colon and cecum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelson, G.

    1983-08-15

    From 1970 to 1981, 50 patients had curative surgery for carcinoma of the cecum, ascending, or descending colon and were Stage greater than or equal to B2. In 15 cases, the lesion originated on the antimesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall. Of seven cases (with minimum three-year follow-up) not receiving adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation, four recurred in the tumor bed/abdominal wall versus 0/3 irradiated patients. Similarly, the five-year survival was improved in the irradiated group (2/3) versus only 2/9 in the unirradiated group. Patients with transmural extension of right or left colon cancers originating on the anti mesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall may have a high incidence of postoperative regional failure which may be decreased by adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation.

  10. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26613834

  11. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamaya, Yasushi; Guarinos, Carla; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie S.; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Das, Ritabrata; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Carethers, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer) and hMutSβ (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer) MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutSα > hMutSβ alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutSβ defective) had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44%) EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41%) received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05). We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36). There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H). PMID:25996601

  12. Live birth rates after combined adjuvant therapy in IVF-ICSI cycles: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Motteram, C; Vollenhoven, B; Hope, N; Osianlis, T; Rombauts, L J

    2015-04-01

    The effectiveness of combined co-treatment with aspirin, doxycycline, prednisolone, with or without oestradiol patches, was investigated on live birth (LBR) rates after fresh and frozen embryo transfers (FET) in IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. Cases (n = 485) and controls (n = 485) were extensively matched in a one-to-one ratio on nine physical and clinical parameters: maternal age, body mass index, smoking status, stimulation cycle number, cumulative dose of FSH, stimulation protocol, insemination method, day of embryo transfer and number of embryos transferred. No significant differences were found in fresh cycles between cases and controls for the pregnancy outcomes analysed, but fewer surplus embryos were available for freezing in the combined adjuvant group. In FET cycles, LBR was lower in the treatment group (OR: 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.95). The lower LBR in FET cycles seemed to be clustered in patients receiving combined adjuvant treatment without luteal oestradiol (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.80). No difference was found in LBR between cases and controls when stratified according to the number of previous cycles (<3 or ≥3). There is no benefit of this combined adjuvant strategy in fresh IVF cycles, and possible harm when used in frozen cycles. PMID:25676168

  13. INFLUENCES OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON OLFACTORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN THE MENOPAUSE

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Richard L.; Tourbier, Isabelle; Ng, Victoria; Neff, Jessica; Armstrong, Deborah; Battistini, Michelle; Sammel, Mary D.; Gettes, David; Evans, Dwight L.; Mirza, Natasha; Moberg, Paul J.; Connolly, Tim; Sondheimer, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may protect against developing AD in postmenopausal women, the question arises as to whether it also protects against olfactory dysfunction in such women. Three olfactory and 12 neurocognitive tests were administered to 432 healthy postmenopausal women with varied HRT histories. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were obtained for all subjects; APOE-ε4 haplotype was determined for 77. National Adult Reading Test and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test (OMT) scores were positively influenced by HRT. Odor identification and OMT test scores were lower for women who scored poorly on a delayed recall test, a surrogate for mild cognitive impairment. WAIS-R NI Spatial Span Backwards Test scores were higher in women receiving estrogen plus progestin HRT and directly correlated with serum testosterone levels, the latter implying a positive effect of testosterone on spatial memory. APOE-ε4 was associated with poorer odor threshold test scores. These data suggest that HRT positively influences a limited number of olfactory and cognitive measures in the menopause. PMID:25850354

  14. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route), we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol), pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires), andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS) and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36) parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0) and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively). Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID) progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area%) remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management. PMID:21332999

  15. Pathology, Pathogenesis and Therapy of Growth Hormone (GH)-producing Pituitary Adenomas: Technical Advances in Histochemistry and Their Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Osamura, Robert Y.; Egashira, Noboru; Kajiya, Hanako; Takei, Mao; Tobita, Maya; Miyakoshi, Takashi; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Teramoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed. PMID:19759870

  16. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-Willi and Down syndromes: a post-modern medical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lantos, J D

    2000-04-01

    Post-modernism means the end of traditional certainties. In this paper, growth hormone (GH) is conceptualized as a post-modern medical therapy. It is used in the treatment of conditions that are not traditional diseases, for indications that are not precisely defined. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome represent two clinical conditions in which GH can possibly be used. It is argued that the difference between the two syndromes instructs us as to the principles that might guide appropriate use of GH in the future. In particular, for children, the more GH treatment can be shown to produce benefits other than increased height, the more justifiable its use will be. PMID:10984261

  17. Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the Diabetes Prevention Program?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Golden, Sherita H.; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Mather, Kieren J.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of postmenopausal Diabetes Prevention Program participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and at 1-year follow-up (n=324) vs. those who did not use at either time point (n=382). Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) changes were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change (ILS), metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure with changes in sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. Results Estrogen users and non-users had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs. 34%, p=0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (p=0.25) and follow-up (p=0.10). Estrogen users and non-users randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (p=0.016) and DBP (p=0.009) vs. placebo. Among non-users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (p=0.001) vs. placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (p=0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions vs. placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. Conclusions Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS was unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use. PMID:23942251

  18. [Puberty-delaying hormone therapy in adolescents with gender identity disorder].

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Mikiya

    2013-01-01

    The guideline for the treatment of people with gender identity disorder (GID) of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology was revised in January 2012. The guideline eased restrictions for the endocrine treatment of transsexual adolescents. A medical specialist can start treating transsexual adolescents at the age of 15 after the diagnosis of GID. It recommends that transsexual adolescents (Tanner stage 2 [mainly 12-13 years of age]) are treated by endocrinologists to suppress puberty with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists until the age of 15 years old, after which cross-sex hormones may be given. Female-to-male transsexuals do not necessarily want to start androgen therapy before presenting female secondary sexual characteristics because androgen can easily stop menstruation, cause beard growth, and lower the voice. On the contrary, male-to-female transsexuals want to start estrogen therapy before presenting male secondary sexual characteristics because estrogen cannot alter the beard and low voice. It is important to identify children with gender dysphoria in school and help them receive medical advice. However, approximately half of school teachers think that children with gender dysphoria are very rare and they do not know of the notification from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN, which aims to help children with gender dysphoria. The revision of the guideline for the treatment of transsexual people and endocrine treatment of transsexual adolescents by medical specialists may prevent them from attempting suicide, being depressive, and refusing to attend school. Furthermore, the treatment may help avoid mental disorders, aid being employed with the desired sexuality, and, subsequently, getting married and having children. PMID:23691819

  19. Effects of obesity and hormone therapy on surgically-confirmed fibroids in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Eva M; Balkwill, Angela; Reeves, Gillian; Green, Jane; Beral, Dame Valerie; Coffey, Kate

    2015-06-01

    To examine the association between body mass index (BMI), use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT), and incidence of uterine fibroids in postmenopausal women, 610,604 postmenopausal women without prior hysterectomy or diagnosis of fibroids were followed as part of a large United Kingdom prospective cohort study. We used Cox regression models to calculate adjusted relative risks (RRs) of surgically-confirmed fibroids (defined as a hospital admission with uterine fibroids as a primary diagnosis with a related surgical procedure), in relation to BMI and use of HT. During an average of 11.4 years of follow-up, 3561 women were admitted to hospital with surgically-confirmed fibroids. Five-year incidence rates decreased with age, from 0.50% (1 in 200 women) at age 50-54, to 0.11% (1 in 1000 women) at age 75-79. The 5-year rate in postmenopausal women aged 50-54 was about a quarter that seen in premenopausal women of the same age (1 in 200 vs. 1 in 50). Compared with normal weight women, obese women had a RR of surgically-detected fibroids of 1.46 (95% CI 1.33-1.59; p < 0.0001). HT use was associated with a RR of 2.33 (95% CI 2.18-2.49; p < 0.0001) in ever versus never users. When we analysed HT use and BMI together, obese vs. normal weight never users had a RR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.77-2.26): the highest risks were seen in women who were obese and had ever used HT, RR = 3.30 (95% CI 2.88-3.79). Uterine fibroids continue to occur in postmenopausal women; obesity and hormone therapy use are important modifiable risk factors. PMID:25784364

  20. Validation of Electronic Data on Chemotherapy and Hormone Therapy Use in HMOs

    PubMed Central

    Ritzwoller, Debra P.; Carroll, Nikki; Delate, Thomas; O’Keeffe-Rossetti, Maureen; Fishman, Paul A.; Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Hornbrook, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Most data regarding medical care for cancer patients in the United States comes from SEER-linked Medicare analyses of individuals aged 65 years or older and typically excludes Medicare Advantage enrollees. Objectives To assess the accuracy of chemo- and hormone therapy treatment data available via the Cancer Research Network’s Virtual Data Warehouse (VDW). Research Design Retrospective, longitudinal cohort study. Medical record-abstracted, tumor registry-indicated treatments (“gold standard”) were compared to VDW-indicated treatments derived from HMO pharmacy, electronic medical record, and claim-based data systems. Subjects Enrollees aged 18 years and older diagnosed with incident breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer from 2000 through 2008. Measures Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were computed at six-and 12-months post-cancer diagnosis. Results Approximately 45% of all cancer cases (total N=23,800) were aged 64 years or younger. Overall chemotherapy sensitivity/specificities across the three health plans for incident breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancer cases were 95%/90%, 95%/93%, 93%/93%, and 85%/77%, respectively. With the exception of prostate cancer cases, overall PPV ranged from 86% to 89%. Small variations in chemotherapy data accuracy existed by cancer site and data source, while greater variation existed in hormone therapy capture across sites. Conclusions Strong concordance exists between gold standard tumor registry measures of chemotherapy receipt and CRN VDW data. HMO VDW data can be used for a variety of studies addressing patterns of cancer care and comparative effectiveness research that previously could only be conducted among elderly SEER-Medicare populations. PMID:22531648

  1. Adjuvant treatment in patients at high risk of recurrence of thymoma: efficacy and safety of a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy regimen

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Francesco; Pisconti, Salvatore; Conson, Manuel; Pacelli, Roberto; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Gnoni, Antonio; D’Aniello, Carmine; Cavaliere, Carla; Licchetta, Antonella; Cella, Laura; Giuliano, Mario; Schiavone, Concetta; Falivene, Sara; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Ravo, Vincenzo; Muto, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical benefits of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with thymoma are still controversial. In the absence of defined guidelines, prognostic factors such as stage, status of surgical margins, and histology are often considered to guide the choice of adjuvant treatment (radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy). In this study, we describe our single-institution experience of three-dimensional conformal PORT administered as adjuvant treatment to patients with thymoma. Methods Twenty-two consecutive thymoma patients (eleven male and eleven female) with a median age of 52 years and treated at our institution by PORT were analyzed. The patients were considered at high risk of recurrence, having at least one of the following features: stage IIB or III, involved resection margins, or thymic carcinoma histology. Three-dimensional conformal PORT with a median total dose on clinical target volume of 50 (range 44–60) Gy was delivered to the tumor bed by 6–20 MV X-ray of the linear accelerator. Follow-up after radiotherapy was done by computed tomography scan every 6 months for 2 years and yearly thereafter. Results Two of the 22 patients developed local recurrence and four developed distant metastases. Median overall survival was 100 months, and the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 83% and 74%, respectively. Median disease-free survival was 90 months, and the 5-year recurrence rate was 32%. On univariate analysis, pathologic stage III and presence of positive surgical margins had a significant impact on patient prognosis. Radiation toxicity was mild in most patients and no severe toxicity was registered. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved good local control and showed an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with high-risk thymoma. PMID:26089683

  2. Impact of intratumoral expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes on treatment outcomes of adjuvant S-1 therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Eun; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dae-Won; Kim, Se-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Keun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes (thymidylate synthase [TS], dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [DPD], thymidine phosphorylase [TP] and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT]) to identify potential biomarkers related to treatment outcomes in gastric cancer (GC) patients receiving adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy. In this study, 184 patients who received curative gastrectomy (D2 lymph node dissection) and adjuvant S-1 were included. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to measure the protein and mRNA levels of TS, DPD, TP, and OPRT in tumor tissue. In univariate analysis, low intratumoral DPD protein expression was related to poorer 5-year disease-free survival (DFS; 78% vs. 88%; P = 0.068). Low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (1st [lowest] quartile) was also related to poorer DFS (69% vs. 90%; P < 0.001) compared to high intratumoral DPD expression (2nd to 4th quartiles). In multivariate analyses, low intratumoral DPD protein or mRNA expression was related to worse DFS (P < 0.05), irrespective of other clinical variables. TS, TP, and OPRT expression levels were not related to treatment outcomes. Severe non-hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3) had a trend towards more frequent development in patients with low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (29% vs. 16%; P = 0.068). In conclusion, GC patients with high intratumoral DPD expression did not have inferior outcome following adjuvant S-1 therapy compared with those with low DPD expression. Instead, low intratumoral DPD expression was related to poor DFS. PMID:25793299

  3. Adjuvant Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy and Survival Among Elderly Patients With Non–Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Benjamin A.; McBride, Russell B.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; Herr, Harry W.; Benson, Mitchell C.; Gupta-Mohile, Supriya; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: National guidelines recommend adjuvant intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy for higher-risk non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Although a survival benefit has not been demonstrated, randomized trials have shown reduced recurrence and delayed progression after its use. We investigated predictors of BCG receipt and its association with survival for older patients with NMIBC. Patients and Methods: We identified individuals with NMIBC registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database from 1991 to 2003. We used logistic regression to compare those treated with BCG within 6 months of initial diagnosis with those not treated, adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to analyze the association between BCG and overall survival (OS) and bladder cancer–specific survival (BCSS) for the entire cohort and within tumor grades. Results: Of 23,932 patients with NMIBC identified, 22% received adjuvant intravesical BCG. Predictors of receipt were stages Tis and T1, higher grade, and urban residence. Age > 80 years, fewer than two comorbidities, and not being married were associated with decreased use. In the survival analysis, BCG use was associated with better OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.92) in the entire cohort and BCSS among higher-grade cancers (poorly differentiated: HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.72 to 0.85; undifferentiated: HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.77). Conclusion: Despite guidelines recommending its use, BCG is administered to less than one quarter of eligible patients. This large population-based study found improved OS and BCSS were associated with use of adjuvant intravesical BCG among older patients with NMIBC. Better-designed clinical trials focusing on higher-grade cancers are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:23814517

  4. Pathologic and Molecular Features Correlate With Long-Term Outcome After Adjuvant Therapy of Resected Primary GI Stromal Tumor: The ACOSOG Z9001 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Christopher L.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Kolesnikova, Violetta; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Blackstein, Martin E.; Blanke, Charles D.; Demetri, George D.; Heinrich, Michael C.; von Mehren, Margaret; Patel, Shreyaskumar; McCarter, Martin D.; Owzar, Kouros; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ACOSOG (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group) Z9001 (Alliance) study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, demonstrated that 1 year of adjuvant imatinib prolonged recurrence-free survival (RFS) after resection of primary GI stromal tumor (GIST). We sought to determine the pathologic and molecular factors associated with patient outcome. Patients and Methods There were 328 patients assigned to the placebo arm and 317 to the imatinib arm. Median patient follow-up was 74 months. There were 645 tumor specimens available for mitotic rate or mutation analysis. Results RFS remained superior in the imatinib arm (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.75; Cox model–adjusted P < .001). On multivariable analysis of patients in the placebo arm, large tumor size, small bowel location, and high mitotic rate were associated with lower RFS, whereas tumor genotype was not significantly associated with RFS. Multivariable analysis of patients in the imatinib arm yielded similar findings. When comparing the two arms, imatinib therapy was associated with higher RFS in patients with a KIT exon 11 deletion of any type, but not a KIT exon 11 insertion or point mutation, KIT exon 9 mutation, PDGFRA mutation, or wild-type tumor, although some of these patient groups were small. Adjuvant imatinib did not seem to alter overall survival. Conclusion Our findings show that tumor size, location, and mitotic rate, but not tumor genotype, are associated with the natural history of GIST. Patients with KIT exon 11 deletions assigned to 1 year of adjuvant imatinib had a longer RFS. PMID:24638003

  5. The influence of growth hormone deficiency, growth hormone replacement therapy, and other aspects of hypopituitarism on fracture rate and bone mineral density. .

    PubMed

    Wüster, C; Abs, R; Bengtsson, B A; Bennmarker, H; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Hernberg-Ståhl, E; Monson, J P; Westberg, B; Wilton, P

    2001-02-01

    To assess the influence of factors affecting fracture risk and bone density in adult hypopituitary patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), data from a large-scale pharmacoepidemiological survey (the Pharmacia & Upjohn International Metabolic Database [KIMS]) were analyzed and compared with data from a control population (the European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study [EVOS]). The KIMS group consisted of 2084 patients (1112 men and 972 women) with various types of pituitary disease and EVOS consisted of 1176 individuals (581 men and 595 women). Fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) data were available from 2024 patients from the KIMS group and 392 patients from EVOS. The prevalence of fractures in patients with hypopituitarism was 2.66 times that in the non-GH-deficient EVOS population. Adult-onset hypopituitarism with GHD was associated with a higher fracture risk than childhood-onset disease, and patients with isolated GHD had a similar prevalence of fractures to those with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Hormonal replacement therapy with L-thyroxine, glucocorticoids, and sex steroids did not affect the risk of fracture in KIMS patients. In addition, fracture rates in KIMS were independent of body mass index (BMI) and the country of origin. However, smoking was associated with a higher fracture rate in this group. In summary, this is the first large-scale analysis to support the hypothesis of an increased fracture risk in adult patients with hypopituitarism and GHD. This increased risk appears to be attributable to GHD alone, rather than to other pituitary hormone deficiencies or to their replacement therapy. PMID:11204440

  6. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photosensitizer photosens for superficial bladder cancer: experimental investigations to treat prostate cancer by PDT with photosens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolikhin, Oleg I.; Chernishov, Igor V.; Sivkov, Andrey V.; Altunin, Denis V.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2007-07-01

    14 patients with transional-cell bladder cancer in stage T1N0M0G2 after transurethral bladder resection were offered adjuvant treatment with PDT. Adjuvant PDT was performed 1-1.5 months after transurethral bladder resection for superficial bladder cancer. Prior to PDT conventional and fluorescent cystoscopy were performed. In the absence of inflammation and after full epitalisation of postoperative wound a session of therapy was performed. 24 hours prior to PDT-session photosensitizer Photosens was injected intravenously in the dose of 0.8 mg per kg of body weight. Prior to PDT local anesthesia of urethra with lidocain-gel was performed. Cystoscopy was carried out. PDT was performed with diode laser "Biospec" (675 nm). During the session the place of standing diffuser and the volume of a bladder were controlled. After 7 months of observation no tumor recidivists were observed. Registered side effects were not life-threatened. 5 patients had pain or discomfort in suprapubic area, ceasing spontaneously or requiring administration of analgetics. No systemic side-effects or allergic reactions were observed. The method can be used in out-patient practice. Absence of early recidivists shows efficiency of PDT in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Further study is necessary to estimate optimal regimen of PDT. The further controlling of condition on the patients in this group is required. At the laboratory animals' experiment, we conducted the explorations devoted to the influence of the photodynamic effect at the prostate's tissues.

  7. Letrozole as upfront endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer: BIG 1-98

    PubMed Central

    Thuerlimann, Beat

    2007-01-01

    The BIG 1-98 trial is a large, randomized, independently conducted clinical trial designed to compare the efficacy of upfront letrozole versus tamoxifen monotherapy and to compare sequential or up-front use of letrozole and/or tamoxifen as an early adjuvant therapy for patients with early breast cancer. We report on the results from the primary core analysis of the BIG 1-98 trial of 8,010 patients, which compares monotherapy with letrozole versus tamoxifen. This pre-planned core analysis allowed the use of patient data from the monotherapy arms of letrozole and tamoxifen and from the sequential arms prior to the drug switch point. Patients randomized to letrozole had a 19% improved disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.81; P = 0.003), due especially to reduced distant metastases (HR = 0.73; P = 0.001). A 14% risk reduction of fatal events in favor of letrozole was also observed (P = NS). The results from the monotherapy arms alone confirmed the findings from the primary core analysis. Based on the results from this trial, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Femara®) is currently recommended as a part of standard adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-responsive breast cancer and has recently been approved in the early adjuvant setting in both Europe and the United States. A subsequent analysis after additional follow-up will address the question of monotherapy versus sequential therapy. PMID:17912636

  8. Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment: Women's perceptions of support provided by their male partners during hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sena; Tazumi, Keiko; Arao, Harue

    2015-01-01

    Women with breast cancer receive support from their partners to deal with the side effects of therapies over the cancer trajectory. Hormonal therapy (HT) is usually given after completing other treatments, and women receiving HT reclaim their normal life. This may lead to changes in support from their partners. Therefore, we explored women's perceptions of the support provided by their male partners in managing the side effects of adjuvant HT. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 women who received HT and recognized their partners as a main source of support. An interview guide was used to explore their experiences of treatment side effects, the contents of support received from their partners, their need for support, and their overall relationship with their partners. Interviews were analysed by content analysis. A theme on how participants perceived support from their partners was formulated as “Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment” with the following categories: “Shrinking support,” “Primacy of partner,” and “Solitary new treatment.” Participants felt lack of support from their partners because their partners did not understand their experience of the side effects induced by HT. Unlike the side effects of past treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy, side effects of HT cannot be observed and are highly subjective. Their partners often failed to notice these symptoms and provided little support. Nevertheless, participants aimed to accept the existing support without asking for more. They were left alone in the continuing trajectory of breast cancer. After starting HT, women entered a new treatment phase in which less understanding and support was provided by partners. Educational support for couples may enable sharing of subjective symptoms that are not obvious to partners and improve outcomes by facilitating partner engagement and support. PMID:26627115

  9. Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity. PMID:25175295

  10. Effects of hormone replacement therapy and aging on cognition: evidence for executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wegesin, Domonick J; Stern, Yaakov

    2007-05-01

    The present study was designed to explore whether the frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging may be extended to describe the cognitive effects associated with estrogen use in postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal estrogen-only users, estrogen + progesterone users, and non-users (60-80 years old), as well as young, regularly cycling women (18-30 years old) completed an item and source memory task. Since source memory is thought to rely more on executive processes than item memory, we hypothesized that aging and estrogen effects would be greater for source memory than for item memory. Neuropsychological tests explored whether the effects of aging and estrogen use were revealed on other tests of frontal lobe function. Results from the experimental task revealed greater aging and estrogen effects for source memory than for item memory, and neuropsychological results revealed aging and estrogen effects on a subset of tests of executive function. Women on estrogen + progesterone therapy did not outperform non-users, suggesting that the addition of progesterone to hormone therapy may mitigate the benefits induced by estrogen use alone. Overall, findings support the hypothesis that estrogen use may temper age-related cognitive decline by helping to maintain functions subserved by the frontal lobes. PMID:17453562

  11. Antibiotic Adjuvant Therapy for Multi-Drug Resistant Carbapenemases Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated Sepsis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rising resistance and spread of K. pneumoniae strains, create great concerns in treating sepsis patients due to high incidence of mortality and morbidity. The current study is a case of a 20-year-old male with sepsis and bilateral lung lesions infected with Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae (KPC) showing resistance to carbapenem and polymyxin. Based on sensitivity report, patient was put on antibiotic adjuvant: Elores (ceftriaxone, sulbactam, disodium edetate) along with fluconazole for 10 days. Elores was instituted with remarkable recovery and patient was discharged. PMID:27190808

  12. Modulation of host responses to blood-stage malaria by interleukin-12: from therapy to adjuvant activity.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M M; Su, Z; Sam, H; Mohan, K

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of interleukin (IL)-12, a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects as a potent immunoregulatory molecule and hematopoietic growth factor, in infection with Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria. IL-12 has been demonstrated to have profound effects on the immune response to blood-stage malaria, to induce protection, and to alleviate malarial anemia. In combination with an anti-malarial drug, IL-12 is effective in an established malaria infection. This cytokine also has potent immune effects as a malaria vaccine adjuvant. However, IL-12 can also mediate pathology during blood-stage malaria. PMID:11226854

  13. Antibiotic Adjuvant Therapy for Multi-Drug Resistant Carbapenemases Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Associated Sepsis: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Rising resistance and spread of K. pneumoniae strains, create great concerns in treating sepsis patients due to high incidence of mortality and morbidity. The current study is a case of a 20-year-old male with sepsis and bilateral lung lesions infected with Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) carbapenemase producing K. pneumoniae (KPC) showing resistance to carbapenem and polymyxin. Based on sensitivity report, patient was put on antibiotic adjuvant: Elores (ceftriaxone, sulbactam, disodium edetate) along with fluconazole for 10 days. Elores was instituted with remarkable recovery and patient was discharged. PMID:27190808

  14. Ovarian hyperstimulation in premenopausal women during adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for endocrine-dependent breast cancer: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    MADEDDU, CLELIA; GRAMIGNANO, GIULIA; KOTSONIS, PARASKEVAS; PARIBELLO, FRANCESCO; MACCIÒ, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy is an integral component of care for endocrine-dependent breast cancer. The aim of this type of therapy is to counteract the production and the action of estrogens. The ovary is the primary site of estrogen production in premenopausal women, whereas, in postmenopausal women, the main source of estrogens is adipose tissue. Therefore, ovarian function suppression is an effective adjuvant strategy in premenopausal estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Similarly, the inhibition of estrogen action at the receptor site by tamoxifen has proven to be effective. To date, international consensus statements recommend tamoxifen (20 mg/day) for five years as the standard adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women. It should be noted that tamoxifen is a potent inducer of ovarian function and consequent hyperestrogenism in premenopausal women. In the present study, we report two cases of ovarian cyst formation with very high estrogen levels and endometrial hyperplasia during the administration of tamoxifen alone as adjuvant treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in premenopausal women. These cases suggest that in young premenopausal patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, ovarian suppression is an essential prerequisite for an adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen. In this context, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist treatment by suppressing effective ovarian function may lead to a hypoestrogenic status that may positively impact breast cancer prognosis and prevent the effects of tamoxifen at the gynecological level. It is important to reconsider the action of tamoxifen on ovarian function and include these specific effects of tamoxifen in the informed consent of premenopausal patients who are candidates for tamoxifen alone as adjuvant endocrine treatment. PMID:25120706

  15. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  16. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension. PMID:27136634

  17. Effect of antiepileptic drug therapy on thyroid hormones among adult epileptic patients: An analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Adhimoolam, Mangaiarkkarasi; Arulmozhi, Ranjitha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of conventional and newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on thyroid hormone levels in adult epileptic patients. Methods: A hospital-based, analytical cross-sectional study was conducted among the adult epileptic patients receiving conventional AEDs (Group 2) or newer AEDs (Group 3) for more than 6 months. Serum thyroid hormone levels including free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were analyzed and the hormonal status was compared with healthy control subjects (Group 1). Findings: Sodium valproate and phenytoin were commonly used conventional AEDs; levetiracetam and topiramate were common among the newer drugs. There was a statistically significant decrease in serum fT4 and increase in serum TSH levels (P < 0.0001) in patients on long-term therapy with conventional antiepileptic agents than in the control group. No significant change in thyroid hormone levels (fT3, fT4, and TSH; P = 0.68, 0.37, and 0.90, respectively) was observed with newer antiepileptics-treated patients when compared to control group. One-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was performed using SPSS version 17.0 software package. Conclusion: The present study showed that conventional AEDs have significant alteration in the thyroid hormone levels than the newer antiepileptics in adult epileptic patients. PMID:27512707

  18. A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria.

    PubMed

    Seal, Leighton J

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the effect that cross-gender sex steroid therapy has on metabolic and hormonal parameters. There is an emphasis on those changes that result in significant clinical effects such as the positive effects of the development of secondary sexual characteristics and negative effects such as haemostatic effects and thromboembolism in transwomen or dyslipidaemia in transmen. There is also a description of the current hormonal regimens used at the largest UK gender identity clinic. The overall safety of these treatments in the context of long-term outcome data is reviewed. PMID:25933804

  19. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma: 9 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2012-12-01

    We present here the updated results after 9 years of the beginning of a trial on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This surgery adjuvant approach combined local suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by tumor cells extracts and xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Toxicity was absent or minimal in all patients (0≤VCOG-CTCAE grade≤1). With respect to surgery-treated controls (ST), the complete surgery (CS) arm of this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of local disease-free patients from 13 to 81% and distant metastases free from 32 to 84%. Even though less effective than the CS arm, the partial surgery (PS) arm of this CT was significantly better controlling the disease than only surgery (14% while PS-ST: 0%, P<0.01 and CS-ST: 5%, P<0.05). In addition, CT produced a significant sevenfold (CS) and threefold (PS) increase in overall survival. The CS-CT arm significantly improved both CS-ST metastasis-free- and melanoma overall survival from 99 days (respective ranges: 11-563 and 10-568) to >2848 days (81-2848 and 35-2848). Thus, more of 50% of our CT patients died of melanoma unrelated causes, transforming a lethal disease into a chronic one. Finally, surgery adjuvant CT delayed or prevented post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly improved disease-free and overall survival maintaining the quality of life. Long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment are supported by the high number of CT patients (283) and extensive follow-up (>9 years). The successful clinical outcome encourages the further translation of similar approaches to human gene therapy trials. PMID:23059870

  20. Climacteric medicine: European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) statements on postmenopausal hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Skouby, Sven O; Barlow, David; Samsioe, Göran; Gompel, Anne; Pines, Amos; Al-Azzawi, Farok; Graziottin, Allezzandra; Hudita, Decebal; Rozenberg, Serge

    2004-05-28

    Hormonal therapy (HT) is one of the most frequently prescribed drug regimens for women after the age of 50 years. HT has been developed progressively since the 1960s to provide estrogen to those women (a) who require relief of symptoms which have resulted from reduced circulating estrogen or (b) to act as an anti-resorptive agent to counteract the effect of the increased bone turnover which occurs with falling menopausal estrogen levels and which results in loss of bone mass leading to postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, a large number of women pass through the menopausal transition without experiencing distress as a result of the natural fall in estrogen hormone levels and since the introduction HT has been thought to be associated with a number of health benefits that have been tested in clinical trials but not substantiated. In women experiencing distressing climacteric symptoms double-blind randomised controlled clinical trials with a variety of HT regimens have shown that HT of any type provides symptom relief with no alternative treatment of similar effect. The dose and regimen of HT need to be individualised and in general the appropriate dose is dependent on the menopausal age. Women experiencing urogenital estrogen deficiency symptoms require long-term treatment which is most easily achieved with local estrogen. With the perspective provided by the most recent epidemiological findings not least from the estrogen only arm of the Women's Health Initiative Study (WHI) EMAS supports research activities generating HT with new compositions including lower doses and a wider range of progestins in order to positively affect the balance of clinical benefit and risk. Currently, however, individualized and appropriate prescription of the available HT products together with life-style management will sustain possibilities for beneficial effects on climacteric symptoms, quality of life and degenerative diseases after the menopause. PMID:15223104

  1. Growth hormone therapy and risk of recurrence/progression in intracranial tumors: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Sun, Chun Ming; Li, Xue Tao; Liu, Chuan Jin; Zhou, You Xin

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency is common in intracranial tumors, which is usually treated with surgery and radiotherapy. A number of previous studies have investigated the relationship between the growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) and risk of tumor recurrence/progression; however, the evidence remains controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies to estimate the potential relation between GHRT and intracranial tumors recurrence/progression. Three comprehensive databases, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, were researched with no limitations, covering all published studies till the end of July, 2014. Reference lists from identified studies were also screened for additional database. The summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by fixed-effects models for estimation. Fifteen eligible studies, involving more than 2232 cases and 3606 controls, were included in our meta-analysis. The results indicated that intracranial tumors recurrence/progression was not associated with GHRT (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.39-0.56), and for children, the pooled RR was 0.44 and 95% CI was 0.34-0.54. In subgroup analysis, risks of recurrence/progression were decreased for craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, glioma, but not for pituitary adenomas, and non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA), ependymoma. Results from our analysis indicate that GHRT decreases the risk of recurrence/progression in children with intracranial tumors, craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, or glioma. However, GHRT for pituitary adenomas, NFPA, and ependymoma was not associated with the recurrence/progression of the tumors. GH replacement seems safe from the aspect of risk of tumor progression. PMID:26048536

  2. Anabolic therapy with growth hormone accelerates protein gain in surgical patients requiring nutritional rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, T A; Morrissey, T B; Gatzen, C; Benfell, K; Nattakom, T V; Scheltinga, M R; LeBoff, M S; Ziegler, T R; Wilmore, D W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the effects of exogenous growth hormone (GH) on protein accretion and the composition of weight gain in a group of stable, nutritionally compromised postoperative patients receiving standard hypercaloric nutritional therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A significant loss of body protein impairs normal physiologic functions and is associated with increased postoperative complications and prolonged hospitalization. Previous studies have demonstrated that standard methods of nutritional support enhance the deposition of fat and extracellular water but are ineffective in repleting body protein. METHODS: Fourteen patients requiring long-term nutritional support for severe gastrointestinal dysfunction received standard nutritional therapy (STD) providing approximately 50 kcal/kg/day and 2 g of protein/kg/day during an initial 7-day equilibrium period. The patients then continued on STD (n = 4) or, in addition, received GH 0.14 mg/kg/day (n = 10). On day 7 of the equilibrium period and again after 3 weeks of treatment, the components of body weight were determined; these included body fat, mineral content, lean (nonfat and nonmineral-containing tissue) mass, total body water, extracellular water (ECW), and body protein. Daily and cumulative nutrient balance and substrate oxidation studies determined the distribution, efficiency, and utilization of calories for protein, fat, and carbohydrate deposition. RESULTS: The GH-treated patients gained minimal body fat but had significantly more lean mass (4.311 +/- 0.6 kg vs. 1.988 +/- 0.2 kg, p < or = 0.03) and more protein (1.417 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.086 +/- 0.1 kg, p < or = 0.03) than did the STD-treated patients. The increase in lean mass was not associated with an inappropriate expansion of ECW. In contrast, patients receiving STD therapy tended to deposit a greater proportion of body weight as ECW and significantly more fat than did GH-treated patients (1.004 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.129 +/- 0.2 kg, p < 0

  3. An update on the cognitive impact of clinically-used hormone therapies in the female rat: models, mazes, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, J.I.; Hiroi, R.; Camp, B.W.; Talboom, J.S.; Bimonte-Nelson, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    In women, ovarian hormone loss associated with menopause has been associated with cognitive decline. Hormone therapy (HT) may ameliorate some of these changes. Understanding the cognitive impact of female steroids, including estrogens, progestogens, and androgens, is key to discovering treatments that promote brain health in women. The preclinical literature has presented elegant and methodical experiments allowing a better understanding of parameters driving the cognitive consequences of ovarian hormone loss and HT. Animal models have been a valuable tool in this regard, and will be vital to future discoveries. Here, we provide an update on the literature evaluating the impact of female steroid hormones on cognition, and the putative mechanisms mediating these effects. We focus on preclinical work that was done with an eye toward clinical realities. Parameters that govern the cognitive efficacy of HT, from what we know thus far, include but are not limited to: type, dose, duration, and route of HT, age at HT initiation, timing of HT relative to ovarian hormone loss, memory type examined, menopause history, and hormone receptor status. Researchers have identified intricate relationships between some of these factors by studying their individual effects on cognition. As of late, there is increased focus on studying interactions between these variables as well as multiple hormone types when administered concomitantly. This is key to translating preclinical data to the clinic, wherein women typically have concurrent exposure to endogenous ovarian hormones as well as exogenous combination HTs, which include both estrogens and progestins. Gains in understanding the parameters of HT effects on cognition provide exciting novel avenues that can inform clinical treatments, eventually expanding the window of opportunity to optimally enhance cognition and brain health in aging women. PMID:23333453

  4. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bobanga, Iuliana D.; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y.

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24967094

  5. The effects of a novel hormonal breast cancer therapy, endoxifen, on the mouse skeleton.

    PubMed

    Gingery, Anne; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Pitel, Kevin S; Reese, Jordan M; Cicek, Muzaffer; Lindenmaier, Laurence B; Ingle, James N; Goetz, Matthew P; Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Spelsberg, Thomas C; Hawse, John R

    2014-01-01

    Endoxifen has recently been identified as the predominant active metabolite of tamoxifen and is currently being developed as a novel hormonal therapy for the treatment of endocrine sensitive breast cancer. Based on past studies in breast cancer cells and model systems, endoxifen classically functions as an anti-estrogenic compound. Since estrogen and estrogen receptors play critical roles in mediating bone homeostasis, and endoxifen is currently being implemented as a novel breast cancer therapy, we sought to comprehensively characterize the in vivo effects of endoxifen on the mouse skeleton. Two month old ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice were treated with vehicle or 50 mg/kg/day endoxifen hydrochloride via oral gavage for 45 days. Animals were analyzed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Serum from control and endoxifen treated mice was evaluated for bone resorption and bone formation markers. Gene expression changes were monitored in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and the cortical shells of long bones from endoxifen treated mice and in a human fetal osteoblast cell line. Endoxifen treatment led to significantly higher bone mineral density and bone mineral content throughout the skeleton relative to control animals. Endoxifen treatment also resulted in increased numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts per tissue area, which was corroborated by increased serum levels of bone formation and resorption markers. Finally, endoxifen induced the expression of osteoblast, osteoclast and osteocyte marker genes. These studies are the first to examine the in vivo and in vitro impacts of endoxifen on bone and our results demonstrate that endoxifen increases cancellous as well as cortical bone mass in ovariectomized mice, effects that may have implications for postmenopausal breast cancer patients. PMID:24853369

  6. Efficacy of Postoperative Hormone Replacement Therapy on Prognosis of Patients with Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Li; Chen, Jin-Hong; Lu, Wen; Li, Bi-Lan; Zhu, Qin-Yi; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynecological cancer-associated death. Iatrogenic menopause might adversely affect the quality of life and health outcomes in young female cancer survivors. We evaluated whether postoperative hormone replacement therapy (HRT) had a negative influence on the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with papillary serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with papillary SOC, treated from January 1980 to December 2009, who suffered from menopause with or without HRT. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared between the two groups (HRT and non-HRT). Blood samples were collected from all the participants to detect serum cancer antigen (CA) 125. Hazard ratios with 95% confidential intervals for each variable were calculated by univariable and multivariable conditional Logistic regression analyses. Results: Among 112 identified patients, 31 were HRT users and 81 were not. The two groups did not significantly differ in median age at diagnosis (t = 0.652, P = 0.513), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (χ2 = 0.565, P = 0.754), differentiation (χ2 = 1.728, P = 0.422), resection status (χ2 = 0.070, P = 0.791), relapse (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.741), chemotherapy course (t = −1.079, P = 0.282), follow-up interval (t = 0.878, P = 0.382), or PFS (t = 0.580, P = 0.562). Median Kupperman score at the onset of HRT was 30.81 and 12.19 after the therapy (t = 3.302, P = 0.001). According to the analysis, the strongest independent variables in predicting PFS were FIGO stage and disease that was not optimally debulked. Conclusions: Postoperative HRT is not a prognostic factor for PFS of patients with papillary SOC. However, multicenter studies are needed to verify and extend our findings. PMID:27231169

  7. The Effects of a Novel Hormonal Breast Cancer Therapy, Endoxifen, on the Mouse Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gingery, Anne; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Pitel, Kevin S.; Reese, Jordan M.; Cicek, Muzaffer; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Ingle, James N.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Hawse, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Endoxifen has recently been identified as the predominant active metabolite of tamoxifen and is currently being developed as a novel hormonal therapy for the treatment of endocrine sensitive breast cancer. Based on past studies in breast cancer cells and model systems, endoxifen classically functions as an anti-estrogenic compound. Since estrogen and estrogen receptors play critical roles in mediating bone homeostasis, and endoxifen is currently being implemented as a novel breast cancer therapy, we sought to comprehensively characterize the in vivo effects of endoxifen on the mouse skeleton. Two month old ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice were treated with vehicle or 50 mg/kg/day endoxifen hydrochloride via oral gavage for 45 days. Animals were analyzed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Serum from control and endoxifen treated mice was evaluated for bone resorption and bone formation markers. Gene expression changes were monitored in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and the cortical shells of long bones from endoxifen treated mice and in a human fetal osteoblast cell line. Endoxifen treatment led to significantly higher bone mineral density and bone mineral content throughout the skeleton relative to control animals. Endoxifen treatment also resulted in increased numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts per tissue area, which was corroborated by increased serum levels of bone formation and resorption markers. Finally, endoxifen induced the expression of osteoblast, osteoclast and osteocyte marker genes. These studies are the first to examine the in vivo and in vitro impacts of endoxifen on bone and our results demonstrate that endoxifen increases cancellous as well as cortical bone mass in ovariectomized mice, effects that may have implications for postmenopausal breast cancer patients. PMID:24853369

  8. [Primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events through hormone replacement therapy (HRT)].

    PubMed

    Pilz, Heidemarie

    2005-09-01

    A recently (2002) published, randomised, double blind placebo controlled trial of hormone replace ment therapy (HRT), the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), is not consistent with the decrease in cardiovascular disease under CEE/HPA seen in observational primary prevention studies like the Nurses' Health Study. Baseline characteristics of participants like age, body mass index, years since menopause and preexistent cardiovascular diseases may be responsible for the lack of benefit seen in this trial. Clinical outcome data of HRT from randomised trials in secondary prevention of cardiovasular diseases are limited. The first prospective, randomised placebo controlled trial, the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) in secondary prevention did not show any difference in CHD events between treatment groups and placebo during a follow up of 4.1 years. However, an increased risk of CHD was seen especially during the first year on HRT, subsequent years showed a decrease in event rate compared with never-users. One explanation for this lack of benefit may be a bi-directional effect of estrogen - early risk and late benefit - especially in an elderly study population with established atherosclerotic lesions. In postmenopausal women, estrogen replacement therapy affects LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels favorably, causes vasodilatation by activating NOS, inhibits platelet aggregation and proinflammatory cell adhesion on endothelial cells of vascular wall. Estrogen can affect the cardiovascular system adversely by increasing triglycerid levels, CPR and proinflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Alternatives to HRT like phytoestrogens act via estrogen alpha and beta receptor modulation. Phytoestrogens may lower LDL-cholesterol levels without increasing triglyceride levels, they have shown antioxidannt properties as well as favorable effects on vascular reactivity. The importance of HRT and phytoestrogens in primary and secondary

  9. Occurrence of DNET and other brain tumors in Noonan syndrome warrants caution with growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Geoffrey D; SantaCruz, Karen; Hart, Blaine; Clericuzio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway that is well known for its relationship with oncogenesis. An 8.1-fold increased risk of cancer in Noonan syndrome has been reported, including childhood leukemia and solid tumors. The same study found a patient with a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) and suggested that DNET tumors are associated with NS. Herein we report an 8-year-old boy with genetically confirmed NS and a DNET. Literature review identified eight other reports, supporting the association between NS and DNETs. The review also ascertained 13 non-DNET brain tumors in individuals with NS, bringing to 22 the total number of NS patients with brain tumors. Tumor growth while receiving growth hormone (GH) occurred in our patient and one other patient. It is unknown whether the development or progression of tumors is augmented by GH therapy, however there is concern based on epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies. This issue was addressed in a 2015 Pediatric Endocrine Society report noting there is not enough data available to assess the safety of GH therapy in children with neoplasia-predisposition syndromes. The authors recommend that GH use in children with such disorders, including NS, be undertaken with appropriate surveillance for malignancies. Our case report and literature review underscore the association of NS with CNS tumors, particularly DNET, and call attention to the recommendation that clinicians treating NS patients with GH do so with awareness of the possibility of increased neoplasia risk. PMID:26377682

  10. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy modifies skeletal muscle composition and function: a study with monozygotic twin pairs.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Paula H A; Kovanen, Vuokko; Alén, Markku; Pöllänen, Eija; Palonen, Eeva-Maija; Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina; Hämäläinen, Esa; Turpeinen, Ursula; Kujala, Urho M; Puolakka, Jukka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2009-07-01

    We investigated whether long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with mobility and lower limb muscle performance and composition in postmenopausal women. Fifteen 54- to 62-yr-old monozygotic female twin pairs discordant for HRT were recruited from the Finnish Twin Cohort. Habitual (HWS) and maximal (MWS) walking speeds over 10 m, thigh muscle composition, lower body muscle power assessed as vertical jumping height, and maximal isometric hand grip and knee extension strengths were measured. Intrapair differences (IPD%) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The mean duration of HRT use was 6.9 +/- 4.1 yr. MWS was on average 7% (0.9 to 13.1%, P = 0.019) and muscle power 16% (-0.8 to 32.8%, P = 0.023) greater in HRT users than in their cotwins. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area tended to be larger (IPD% = 6%, 95% CI: -0.07 to 12.1%, P = 0.065), relative muscle area greater (IPD% = 8%, CI: 0.8 to 15.0%, P = 0.047), and relative fat area smaller (IPD% = -5%, CI: -11.3 to 1.2%, P = 0.047) in HRT users than in their sisters. There were no significant differences in maximal isometric strengths or HWS between users and nonusers. Subgroup analyses revealed that estrogen-containing therapies (11 pairs) significantly decreased total body and thigh fat content, whereas tibolone (4 pairs) tended to increase muscle cross-sectional area. This study showed that long-term HRT was associated with better mobility, greater muscle power, and favorable body and muscle composition among 54- to 62-yr-old women. The results indicate that HRT is a potential agent in preventing muscle weakness and mobility limitation in older women. PMID:19246654

  11. The 5th Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Moore, Malcolm A; Chang, Shu-Jen; Cheng, Christopher; Choi, Han Yong; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hong, Sung-Joon; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Murai, Masaru; Naito, Seiji; Soebadi, Doddy; Song, Jae-Mann; Umbas, Rainy; Usami, Michiyuki; Xia, Shujie; Yang, Chi-Rei

    2007-01-01

    The Conference on Asian Trends in Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy is an annual forum for Asian urologists now in its 5th year. The 2006 conference, held in Bali, Indonesia, was attended by 27 leading urologic oncologists from China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and featured a packed program of presentations and discussions on a wide range of topics such as relationships among clinicians and the newly opened Asia Regional Office for Cancer Control of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), detection rates of prostate cancer by biopsy in each of the 6 Asian countries, and favored treatment modalities for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in each country. The first session of the conference kicked off with a keynote lecture entitled "Activities of the UICC ARO". UICC's new office will be the nerve center for its activities in the Asia region. Along with the Asian Pacific Organization for Cancer Prevention (APOCP), UICC aims to shift the focus of attention to cancer control. As such APOCP's long-running publication the APJCP is to be re-launched as the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Control. Although UICC is primarily concerned with cancer, several risk factors for cancer are common also to other non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and an important strategy is to implement measures to control these various pathologic conditions as a whole. Apart from contributing to an Asian prostate cancer registry the UICC-ARO will provide training courses, working groups, and assistance in collecting and processing data. The keynote lecture was followed by a roundtable discussion on possible ways in which clinicians from each Asian country can work with UICC. A number of suggestions were put forth including better registration, epidemiology research, possible implementation of UICC prostate cancer guidelines, early detection and screening, and roles of diet and phytotherapy. The underlying reasons for the large but

  12. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of atrial fibrillation in Taiwanese menopause women: A nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chung; Haung, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Tang, Wei-Hua; Hsu, Po-Chao; Su, Ho-Ming; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Jhuo, Shih-Jie; Lee, Kun-Tai; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Chen, Chung-Yu; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2016-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with risk of vascular disease. The association between atrial fibrillation (AF), vascular events, and different HRTs, including estradiol and conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), has been controversial in previous studies. Thus, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate these associations. Female patients (>45 years old) first diagnosed with menopause were enrolled from National Health Insurance Research Dataset (1998–2008). Cox regression analysis estimated risk of new-onset AF, stroke, and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after exposure to estradiol or CEE. Of 5489 females (mean age = 55 years) enrolled, 1815 treated with estradiol and 3674 treated with CEE. Incidence per 103 person-years of AF, stroke, and MACE in CEE vs estradiol patients was 2.23 vs. 0.92, 14.0 vs. 9.09, and 15.55 vs. 10.47. As compared with patients treated with estradiol, those treated with CEE had a significantly higher incidence of AF, stroke, and MACE. The adjusted hazard ratios for each category were 1.96, 1.30, and 1.26, respectively. The significant results remained similar, even after use of propensity-score-matched strategy. In conclusion, CEE was associated with a higher risk of AF, stroke, and MACE than estradiol in menopausal females. Further exploration of underlying mechanisms is necessary. PMID:27052889

  13. Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Insulin Resistance in Postmenopausal Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Bitoska, Iskra; Krstevska, Branka; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Subeska-Stratrova, Slavica; Petrovski, Goran; Mishevska, Sasha Jovanovska; Ahmeti, Irfan; Todorova, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance (IR) is closely associated with diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, increased visceral fat in menopause is also associated with IR, which makes postmenopausal diabetic women in a big risk for cardiovascular diseases. There are conflicting reports about the effects on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on IR. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of HRT on IR. METHODS: A total of 40 postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes were enrolled and followed for 12 months. Half of them were assigned to take HRT, while the other half made the control group. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and insulinemia were measured in both groups at baseline and after 12 months. IR was represented by Homeostatic model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: HRT was associated with significant decrease in HOMA-IR, FPG and insulinemia in the examined group. There was no significant reduction in FPG and no significant increase in insulinemia levels and HOMA-IR values in control group after 12 months. CONCLUSION: HRT was associated with statistically signifficant increase of insulin sensitivity. Larger clinical trials will be necessary to understand whether HRT may improve insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in women with diabetes, especially when given shortly after entering menopause.

  14. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to and prevented by the use of menopausal hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Susan J; Wilson, Louise F; Nagle, Christina M; Green, Adele C; Olsen, Catherine M; Bain, Christopher J; Pandeya, Nirmala; Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the proportion and number of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction for cancers causally associated with MHT (breast, endometrium, ovary), and the proportion of colorectal cancers prevented by MHT. We used standard formulae incorporating Australian prevalence data, relative risks of cancer associated with MHT and cancer incidence. We also estimated potential change in cancer incidence under two hypothetical scenarios whereby 25% fewer Australian women used MHT, or women exclusively used oestrogen-only MHT. Results An estimated 539 cancers in Australia in 2010 were attributable to MHT: 453 breast, 67 endometrial and 19 ovarian cancers equating to 3.4%, 3.1% and 1.6% of each cancer type, respectively. In contrast, MHT may have prevented 52 colorectal cancers. If 25% fewer women used MHT, then 141 cancers may have been avoided. If women exclusively used oestrogen-only MHT then 240 cancers may have been avoided. Conclusions MHT use caused more than 500 cancers in Australian women in 2010 and prevented ∼50 colorectal cancers. Implications MHT use continues to cause an excess of cancers. The risks, benefits, regimen and treatment duration should be carefully considered for each woman before MHT is commenced. PMID:26437728

  15. [HORMONALLY-GENETICALLY DEPENDENT THERAPY, USING VITAMIN K IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING THE ULCER HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Duzhyi, I D; Kharchenko, S V

    2016-04-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of the vitamin K impact, including those in the gut with ulcerative affection, are studied still insufficiently. Investigations of pharmacogenomics of the vitamin K gives a new approach to therapy in patients, suffering gastro-intestinal hemorrhage. Possibilities of titration of the vitamin K3 (menadione) doses, depending on level of estrogenemia and genetic constitution, concerning genes-candidates ESR1 (rs2234693) and VKORC1 (rs9923231), were studied. There were examined 36 patients, who were treated for the ulcer hemorrhage. The blood serum concentration of estradiol was investigated in accordance to method of solid phase enzyme immunoassay, the genotyping procedure was performed in accordance to indices of polymerase chain reaction with analysis of the restrictional fragments length. The initial daily dose of menadione have constituted 20 mg. After a genotype determination made (first-second day after admittance to hospital) in patients with normoestrogenemia in genotypes CC/GG, CC/GA, CT/GG, CT/GA a vitaminotherapy was prolonged in daily dose of 20 mg, and in a conditionally-pathological variant of genotype the dose of vitamin K was enhanced up to 30 mg. Determination of hormones and the patients' genetic constitution makes possible to apply a personified approach for the vitamin K3 application in the ulcerative hemorrhage. PMID:27434945

  16. Targeted Therapies Overcoming Endocrine Resistance in Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Almstedt, Katrin; Schmidt, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different molecular subtypes. Most tumours are hormone receptor positive (luminal subtype) with potential endocrine responsiveness. Endocrine therapy is commonly used in these patients. Disease progression caused by endocrine resistance represents a significant challenge in the treatment of breast cancer. To understand the mechanisms of resistance of long-term oestrogen-deprived breast cancer cells, it is important to focus on cross-talk between steroid receptor signalling and other growth factor receptors and intracellular pathways. (Pre-)clinical trials showed that co-targeting these pathways can restore endocrine sensitivity. The focus of the current review is on the intracellular PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and cyclin-dependant kinases (CDKs) in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Study results clearly show that both inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and CDK4/6 are promising ways to improve the efficacy of endocrine treatment in ER-positive breast cancer patients with comparably few side effects. Further clinical trials are needed to identify the patient population who would benefit most from a dual inhibition. PMID:26557821

  17. Progestins and progesterone in hormone replacement therapy and the risk of breast cancer