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Sample records for adjuvant induced arthritic

  1. Triphala exhibits anti-arthritic effect by ameliorating bone and cartilage degradation in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of triphala and its underlying mechanism on adjuvant-induced rat model. For comparison purpose, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was used. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Triphala (100 mg/kg body weight [bwt]) was administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after the arthritis induction. Arthritis induction increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory marker enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) in the paw tissues of rats. The levels of bone collagen were found to decrease with increased urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and total glycosaminoglycans) in arthritic rats. In addition, the immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased expression of NF-kBp65 and COX-2 in the paw tissues of arthritic rats. However, administration of triphala significantly inhibited the biochemical and molecular alterations in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats compared to indomethacin (3 mg/kg bwt) as evidenced by the radiological and histopathological analysis. In conclusion, our results suggest that triphala administration ameliorate bone and cartilage degradation during rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25942351

  2. Triphala exhibits anti-arthritic effect by ameliorating bone and cartilage degradation in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of triphala and its underlying mechanism on adjuvant-induced rat model. For comparison purpose, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin was used. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Triphala (100 mg/kg body weight [bwt]) was administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after the arthritis induction. Arthritis induction increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory marker enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) in the paw tissues of rats. The levels of bone collagen were found to decrease with increased urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and total glycosaminoglycans) in arthritic rats. In addition, the immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased expression of NF-kBp65 and COX-2 in the paw tissues of arthritic rats. However, administration of triphala significantly inhibited the biochemical and molecular alterations in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats compared to indomethacin (3 mg/kg bwt) as evidenced by the radiological and histopathological analysis. In conclusion, our results suggest that triphala administration ameliorate bone and cartilage degradation during rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Nociceptive sensitivity and opioid antinociception and antihyperalgesia in Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles D; Nickerson, Michael D

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to examine sex differences in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and sex differences in opioid antinociception and anti-hyperalgesia. Female rats developed inflammation and hyperalgesia faster and exhibited greater peak hyperalgesia than male rats. In arthritic (CFA-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during estrus and proestrus, and in nonarthritic (vehicle-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during proestrus. Morphine and oxycodone were more potent in male than female arthritic rats, and butorphanol was more potent and effective in male than female arthritic rats. The potency of morphine was increased in arthritic rats, although to a greater magnitude in males. The potency of oxycodone was increased in male but not female arthritic rats. The potency of butorphanol was increased in arthritic male rats and the maximal antinociceptive effect of butorphanol was increased in arthritic female rats, but it did not result in greater than 20% antinociception. Morphine, oxycodone, and butorphanol all produced antihyperalgesic effects (returning thresholds of arthritic rats to the thresholds of nonarthritic rats) with greater potency in males than females. The peripherally acting opioid agonist loperamide produced intermediate levels of antinociception in male and female arthritic rats and no antinociception in nonarthritic rats. Loperamide was more potent in male than female arthritic rats at producing antihyperalgesia. These data demonstrate sex differences in arthritis-induced hyperalgesia and responsiveness to opioid analgesics. In arthritic rats, the antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are most probably mediated by both central and peripheral opioid receptors, whereas their antihyperalgesic effects are mediated primarily by actions at peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15608071

  4. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  5. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats.

    PubMed

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-06-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity.

  6. Effects of Apium graveolens Extract on the Oxidative Stress in the Liver of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukketsiri, Wanida; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa; Tanasawet, Supita; Choosri, Nutjanat; Wongtawatchai, Tulaporn

    2016-01-01

    Apium graveolens Linn. (Apiaceae) is an indigenous plant of the North and South Americas, Southern Europe, and Asia and has been widely used as a food or a traditional medicine for treatment of inflammation and arthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of a methanolic extract of A. graveolens (AGE) against liver oxidative stress in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model. The AGE (250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally for 24 consecutive days after induction by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant. Liver and spleen weights were recorded. The superoxide anion level, total peroxide (TP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also measured. AGE treatment significantly decreased the levels of the superoxide anion, TP, and OSI whereas the GPx and SOD activities significantly increased in the liver of the arthritic rats. These results indicated that AGE showed an ameliorative effect against liver oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats by reducing the generation of liver free radicals and increasing the liver antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:27390722

  7. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  8. Anti-arthritic Effects of Total Flavonoids from Juniperus sabina on Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Tao; Xu, Fang; You, Shuping; Xu, Fang; Li, Chenyang; Gu, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of many ailments including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aims: To confirm the therapeutic effect of total flavonoids from J. sabina (JSTF) on RA-induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in rats. Settings and Design: Wistar rats (200 ± 20 g) were immunized by intradermal injection of 0.1 mL of CFA into the right hind metatarsal footpad. JSTF was administered orally at the dose of 125,250 and 500 mg/kg on 14 days after the induction of adjuvant arthritis. Tripterygium glycoside (20 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. Paw swelling, arthritic score, body weight loss, serum cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and histological change were measured. Results: We found that JSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic score (P < 0.05). The overproduction of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1beta were remarkably suppressed in the serum of JSTF (125,500 mg/kg) treated rats (P < 0.05). Histopathological studies also showed a marked decrease of synovial inflammatory infiltration and synovial lining hyperplasia in the joints of JSTF-treated animals. Six flavonoids were isolated and from JSTF by various chromatographic methods and identified as follows: Catechin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-β-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 3)-α-L-rhamnoside, and rutin. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential therapeutically effect of JSTF as an anti-arthritis agent toward CFA-induced arthritis in rats, and verified therapeutic applications of J. sabina on RA in folk medicine. SUMMARY Twigs and leaves of Juniperus sabina L. have been traditionally used as the medicinal herb in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritisJSTF could ameliorate paw swelling of CFA rats, and significantly inhibit arthritic scoreHistopathological studies showed a marked decrease

  9. Anti-arthritic activity of root bark of Oroxylum indicum (L.) vent against adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karnati, Mamatha; Chandra, Rodda H; Veeresham, Ciddi; Kishan, Bookya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oroxylum indicum (Bignoniaceae) also known as Sonapatha is an indigenous medicinal plant widely used in Ayurvedic medicine for over thousands of years. It is an active ingredient of well-known Ayurvedic formulations such as Chyawanprash and Dasamula. Root bark of this plant has tonic and astringent properties and it is also used in rheumatism. Objective: The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the anti-arthritic activity of different extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum against adjuvant - induced arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used in this study. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally into the left hind paw of the rats. The paw volume, hematological, biochemical, radiographic and histopathological aspects were evaluated. Results: The relative percentage inhibition potential of paw volume in rats treated with various extracts of Oroxylum indicum was found to be ethyl acetate extract (67.69%) >chloroform extract (64.61%) >n-butanol extract (58.46%) respectively. The hematological parameters like RBC count, hemoglobin content showed significant increase while there was a significant decrease in total WBC count and ESR in all the groups of animals pretreated with root bark extracts. The biochemical parameters such as catalase, glutathione contents showed a significant increase while the lipid peroxide and Cathepsin-D content decreased significantly only in case of ethyl acetate pretreated rats when compared to others. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol extracts of root bark of Oroxylum indicum exhibit anti-arthritic activity. The order of activity of extracts was found to be ethyl acetate >chloroform >n-butanol respectively. PMID:23798888

  10. Anti-bone resorption activity of deer antler aqua-acupunture, the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong) in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Kap-Sung; Choi, Byeong-Joon; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Seung-Duk; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-01-15

    Effect of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, a traditional immunosuppressive acupuncture, was evaluated to assess the reductions in bone mass, strength, and turnover in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. For measuring the above parameters, a 20-day dosing experiment was performed using 6-week-old female Lewis rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting the adjuvant into the hind paw of the Lewis rats. The age-dependent increases in the body weight, lumbar bone mineral content and density (BMC and BMD) and compressive strength were disturbed in the arthritic rats. At 10 days, the histomorphometric parameters of bone formation (BFR/BS and BFR/BV) and the serum osteocalcin levels were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls of Lewis rats. However, the BMC values corrected for body weight did not differ significantly between the arthritic and normal rats, and the bone minerals were not reduced when they were compared with the baseline controls. At 20 days, the parameters of bone minerals and strength of the lumbar body in the arthritic rats, both with and without correction for body weight, were significantly reduced compared with the baseline controls. The trabecular mineralizing surface remained significantly reduced and the osteoclast numbers were increased. DAA at the doses of 10, 20, 50 and 100 microg/kg, administered by Shinsu (B23) acupuncture daily from the start of the experiment, significantly prevented the development of the chronic paw edema at 20 days. The reductions in the parameters such as bone minerals, strength, and trabecular bone formation, and the increase in osteoclast number were alleviated by this DAA. Age-dependent increases in the lumbar height, disturbed by the adjuvant injection, were also maintained. These results indicated that a 20-day-period is necessary to obtain sufficient reductions in the bone mass and strength of the lumbar body

  11. Quantitative gait analysis as a method to assess mechanical hyperalgesia modulated by disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rat

    PubMed Central

    Simjee, Shabana Usman; Jawed, Huma; Quadri, Javeria; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, azothioprine, chloroquine, D-penicillamine, methotrexate and sodium aurothiomalate (gold salt) were evaluated for possible disease-modifying effects in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Gait analysis was used to examine the role of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the development of pain. Body weights were also measured to monitor the progression of disease and the systemic antiarthritic effects of the test compounds used in this study, as well as their systemic toxicity. Our results showed that azothioprine (5 mg/kg/day), chloroquine (12.5 mg/kg/day), sodium aurothiomalate (2.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/week) not only inhibited the macroscopic changes such as erythema and swelling of limbs, but also exhibited significant reversal of gait deficits seen in the untreated or saline-treated arthritic rats. No reduction in the body weights were observed in the arthritic rats treated with azothioprine, chloroquine, sodium aurothiomalate and methotrexate. D-Penicillamine (12.5 mg/kg/day), however, showed a significant reduction (P < 0.03) in the body weights of the arthritic rats over a period of 22 days; furthermore, it was unable to show any reduction in arthritic score (P < 0.1). In earlier experiments, chloroquine and methotrexate failed to suppress carageenan-induced edema, suggesting that the mode of antiarthritic action may be different from those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Since these disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are reported to have an immunomodulatory role, especially the gold salt, which influences the monocyte–macrophage system, it is suggested that the observed antiarthritic effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs may be partly attributed to their immunomodulatory activity. PMID:17848187

  12. Modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokines and inflammatory mediators by hydroxychavicol in adjuvant induced arthritic tissues.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjali; Bani, Sarang; Dutt, Prabhu; Suri, Krishna Avtar

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-arthritic activity of hydroxychavicol (HC) a major phenolic compound isolated from the aqueous extract leaves of plant Piper betle (Piperaceae). The compound showed significant lowering of pro-inflammatory (Th1) cytokine levels in arthritic paw tissue homogenate supernatant viz. IL-2, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha with maximum inhibition at higher dose levels of 2 and 4 mg/kg p.o. and enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 estimated by cytometric bead array immunoassay. Cytometric bead array uses the sensitivity of amplified fluorescence detection by flowcytometer to measure soluble analytes in a particle based immune assay. This assay can accurately quantitate five cytokines in a 50-microl sample volume. The T-helper (Th1) deviated cells produce detectable level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), while the Th2 deviated cells produce significant amount of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-5 (IL-5). HC at graded doses also significantly decreased the expression of IL-1beta, PGE(2), LTB(4), and nitric oxide levels showing significant inhibition of these parameters. Elevated levels of CD4(+) T cell specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in splenocytes of arthritic animals was also inhibited in treated animals. The oral LD(0) in both mice and rats was more than 1000 mg/kg.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Sida rhombifolia stems and roots in adjuvant induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Limmy, T P

    2012-04-01

    Free radical stress leads to tissue injury and progression of disease conditions such as arthritis, hemorrhagic shock, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hepatic injury, aging and ischemia, reperfusion injury of many tissues, gastritis, tumor promotion, neurodegenerative diseases and carcinogenesis. Safer anti-oxidants suitable for long term use are needed to prevent or stop the progression of free radical mediated disorders. Herbal medicine provides a foundation for various traditional medicine systems worldwide. The Sida species is one of the most important families of medicinal plants in India. Hence, the present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Sida rhombifolia extracts for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. The altered levels of hematological parameters were reverted to near normal levels, especially the elevated rate of erythrocyte sedimentation was significantly reduced by S. rhombifolia extracts in experimental rats. Oral administration of root and stem of S. rhombifolia extracts significantly increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological and transmission electron microscopy observations made on the hind limb tissue.

  14. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors reduce anti-Mycobacterium antibodies in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Turull, A; Queralt, J

    2000-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis, induced by Mycobacterium butyricum, is an experimental immunopathy that shares many features of human rheumatoid arthritis and, as such, is one of the most widely used models for studying the anti-inflammatory activity of compounds. In rats with adjuvant induced arthritis, IgG antibodies to M. butyricum have been detected and autoantigens that cross react with mycobacteria may be involved in the pathogenesis of adjuvant arthritis. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities of two cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, flosulide and L-745,337, at doses of 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day, were examined in adjuvant arthritic rats. After 14 days of treatment, a clear dose-dependent inhibition of plantar edema was seen for both flosulide (ID50 lower than 0.1 mg/kg) and L-745,337 (ID50 = 0.4 mg/kg). Plasma levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum antibodies were also decreased by both drugs. In each case the maximal immunosuppressive effect was observed at doses lower than 5 mg/kg. The non-selective COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin (1 mg/kg) decreased paw edema by 65% and the levels of IgG anti-M. butyricum by 45%. Neither cyclooxygenase selective inhibitors nor indomethacin decreased the delayed hypersensitivity reaction induced by M. butyricum. Thus, in vivo inhibition of COX-2 inhibited articular swelling and also the humoral immune response to Mycobacterium.

  15. Distinct alterations in ATP-binding cassette transporter expression in liver, kidney, small intestine, and brain in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Norikane, Sari; Okada, Ayaka; Adachi, Mamiko; Kato, Yukio; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathophysiological changes of infection or inflammation are associated with alterations in the production of numerous absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion-related proteins. However, little information is available on the effects of inflammation on the expression levels and activities of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We examined the effect of acute (on day 7) and chronic (on day 21) inflammation on the expression of ABC transporters in some major tissues in rat. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats was used as an animal model for inflammation. The mRNA levels of mdr1a and mdr1b encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decreased significantly in livers of AA rats on day 21. Hepatic protein levels of P-gp, Mrp2, and Bcrp decreased significantly in membranes but not homogenates of AA rats after 7 days and after 21 days of treatment with adjuvant. Contrary to liver, protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2, but not Bcrp in kidney, increased significantly in membranes. The biliary excretion of rhodamine 123 was decreased in rats with chronic inflammation owing to decreases in efflux activities of P-gp. Our results showed that the expression of transporters in response to inflammation was organ dependent. In particular, hepatic and renal P-gp and Mrp2 exhibited opposite changes in membrane protein levels.

  16. Triphala herbal extract suppresses inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and adjuvant-induced arthritic rats via inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sowmiya; Rasool, Mahaboob Khan

    2016-07-01

    This study sought to explore the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of triphala in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. In stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, triphala (100-300 μg/ml) significantly suppressed production of inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VEGF, NO, PGE2), intracellular free radicals and release of lysosomal enzymes (e.g. acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosamindase and cathepsin D) in a dose-related manner. With triphala, mRNA levels of genes for pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1, inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 enzymes and NF-κBp65 were down-regulated in the stimulated cells; in contrast, there was up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Western blot analyses revealed that triphala suppressed the protein expression of NF-κB p65 and p-NF-κB p65 in the stimulated cells, which subsequently reduced over-expression of TNFα, IL-17, iNOS and COX-2 in a manner similar to that observed with BAY 11-7082, an IκB kinase inhibitor. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed inhibition of p-NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and COX-2 protein expression caused by triphala. Consistent with these findings, the animal studies presented confirmed that triphala exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model by reducing of inflammatory mediator (e.g. IL-17, COX-2 and RANKL) expression via inhibition of NF-κB activation. Taken together, the results here demonstrated that triphala has potential anti-inflammatory applications that could be used for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27438966

  17. UP1304, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba, Mitigates Pain and Inflammation in Adjuvant-induced Arthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Though, the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share pain as the prime complaints. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side effects. Hence, the need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is an overdue. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP1304, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the botanical composition were demonstrated in adjuvant-induced arthritis models in rats with oral dose ranges of 50–200 mg/kg. Ibuprofen at a dose of 100 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. Ex vivo sulfated glycosaminoglycan inhibition assays were performed. Results: Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance, suppression of paw edema and ankle thickness were observed in animals treated with UP1304 compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats. These results were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment. Inhibitions of proteoglycan degradation were observed in a range of 37.5–61.7% for concentration of UP1304 at 50–200 μg/mL when compared to interleukin-1α-exposed untreated explants. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1304, for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, could potentially be considered agent of botanical origin for the improvement of arthritis associated symptoms. SUMMARY Pain is one of the cardinal signs of arthritis.Long term applications of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief are associated with cardiovascular

  18. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound, suppresses pro-inflammatory mediators and RANKL expression via modulating NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways in fibroblast-like synoviocytes from adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are inhabitant mesenchymal cells of synovial joints and have been recognized to play an imperative role in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blocking these pathological roles of FLS provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment for RA. A recent study had confirmed that majoon ushba (MU), a polyherbal unani compound, possesses anti-arthritic effects in in vivo. Toward this direction, an effort has been made to understand the effect of MU on FLS derived from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Here, we observed that MU administration (100-300 µg/ml) significantly inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of NFкB-p65 protein similar to that of the Bay 11-7082 (NFкB inhibitor) in NFкB signaling pathway and suppressed the protein expression of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 in MAPKs signaling pathway in AIA-FLS. In addition, the protein expression of TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and iNOS was also found reduced. MU treatment significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-17, iNOS, and COX-2), transcription factors (NFкB-p65 and AP-1), and RANKL and attenuated the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 (ELISA) in AIA-FLS. Furthermore, MU treatment significantly inhibited the level of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes release, and glycoproteins and increased antioxidant status (superoxide dismutase and catalase) in AIA-FLS. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that MU possesses anti-inflammatory effect against AIA-FLS through the decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators expression by suppressing NFкB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:27067226

  19. Rioprostil prevents gastric bleeding induced by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in dogs and arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Katz, L B; Capetola, R J; Argentieri, D C; Moore, L E; Genna, T; Porter, M C; Jasty, V; Hartnagel, R E; Abrutyn, D; Shriver, D A

    1986-10-01

    Gastrointestinal irritation is the most significant side effect in patients chronically taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) for treatment of arthritic conditions. Rioprostil, a primary alcohol prostaglandin E1 analog, prevents gastric bleeding induced by several NSAID in a rat model of arthritis that is similar in many aspects to human rheumatoid arthritis. Daily oral dosing of rioprostil (50 micrograms/kg BID for 15 days) did not influence the course of the adjuvant disease in rats or alter the antiinflammatory or analgesic effect of the NSAID. In a 13 week efficacy study in dogs, rioprostil (40-60 micrograms/kg, PO) completely prevented gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by daily administration of aspirin. PMID:3102726

  20. Anti-Arthritic Potential of the Plant Justicia Gendarussa Burm F

    PubMed Central

    Paval, Jaijesh; Kaitheri, Srinivasan Keloth; Potu, Bhagath Kumar; Govindan, Sreejith; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Moorkoth, Sudheer

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the anti-arthritic potential of the plant Justicia gendarussa using two different rat models. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The anti-arthritic potential of the alcoholic extract of the plant Justicia gendarussa was evaluated using the Freund’s adjuvant-induced and collagen-induced arthritic rat models. The rats were treated with the ethanolic extract of Justicia gendarussa and with standard aspirin. RESULTS: The ethanolic extract of Justicia gendarussa showed significant anti-arthritic activity that was statistically similar to that of aspirin. Our results suggest that the alcoholic extract of Justicia gendarussa exhibits significant anti-arthritic potential. PMID:19488595

  1. Lymphoid abnormalities in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. I. Mitogen responsiveness and lymphokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, S C; Daniels, J F; Wilson, R E; Carlson, R P; Lewis, A J

    1984-01-01

    Lewis rats injected in the hind paw with Mycobacterium butyricum develop a severe polyarthritis which shares certain features in common with rheumatoid arthritis in man. Spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rats with this form of arthritic disease proliferate poorly in vitro in response to concanavalin A (con A), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The splenic hyporesponsiveness appears within four days of M. butyricum injection (three to five days prior to the development of detectable arthritis), reaches a peak 16-22 days following injection, and persists for at least 40 days. Buffalo strain rats injected with M. butyricum do not develop arthritis, and their spleen cells respond normally to con A, PHA, and PWM. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) the synthesis of interleukin 1 (IL-1) by spleen or peritoneal macrophages from arthritic Lewis rats equalled or exceeded that of macrophages from normal rats. In contrast splenic T cells from arthritic rats produced reduced amounts of interleukin 2 (IL-2; T cell growth factor) in response to stimulation with PHA or con A. Moreover, con-A-activated spleen cells from arthritic rats failed to bind IL-2 and to respond to this growth factor with increased 3H-TdR uptake as did normal spleen cells. In-vitro treatment of 'arthritic' cells with 10(-5) M indomethacin did not restore to normal their reduced mitogen responsiveness, and spleen cells from normal and arthritic rats were equally sensitive to the inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on con-A-induced proliferative responses. These results indicate that peripheral lymphoid function is compromised in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis and that this functional deficit is mediated by aberrant synthesis of and response to IL-2 by T cells of arthritic animals. PMID:6335388

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect and low ulcerogenic activity of etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Yoshida, Eri; Matsui, Masami; Ukai, Yojiro; Yano, Junichi

    2003-06-01

    Adjuvant arthritic rats are known to be more susceptible to gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) than are normal rats. We compared the relative gastric safety profile of etodolac with those of meloxicam, diclofenac sodium and indometacin in adjuvant arthritic rats and normal rats or mice. As a measure of the safety profiles of NSAIDs, we used the safety index, the ratio of the dose that elicits gastric mucosal lesions to the effective dose as an anti-inflammatory or analgesic compound. The anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects of NSAIDs were assessed by paw swelling in adjuvant arthritic rats, and either carrageenin-induced paw edema or brewer's yeast-induced hyperalgesia, as well as acetic acid-induced writhing, in normal rats or mice. In addition, we also investigated the effects of these NSAIDs on human COX-1 and COX-2 activity. Etodolac and other NSAIDs inhibited paw swelling and caused gastric mucosal lesions in adjuvant arthritic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Etodolac showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index among these NSAIDs in arthritic rats. In normal rats, etodolac also showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index, except when its effects were assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing. Etodolac and meloxicam showed selectivity for human COX-2 over COX-1. In contrast, diclofenac sodium and indometacin were selective for COX-1. These results suggest that etodolac, a COX-2 selective NSAID, has anti-inflammatory effects with a better safety profile for the stomach than do non-selective NSAIDs, including diclofenac sodium and indometacin, in adjuvant arthritic as well as normal rats.

  3. Margaritaria discoidea (Euphorbiaceae) stem bark extract attenuates allergy and Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Obiri, David D.; Osafo, Newman; Oppong-Sarfo, Joshua; Prah, Jude K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various parts of Margaritaria discoidea find use in traditional medicine in the treatment of pain and oedema. This study evaluated the anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of a 70% (v/v) aqueous ethanol extract of the stem bark of Margaritaria discoidea, MDE in rodents. Materials and Methods: Systemic anaphylaxis was induced by the injection of compound 48/80 into mice and their survival rate was monitored to evaluate the anti-allergic action of the extract. The effect of MDE assessed on the maximal and total oedema responses in the mouse carrageenan-induced paw oedema was used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of the extract while the Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis model was employed to study the anti-arthritic effects of MDE. Results: MDE dose-dependently increased the time for compound 48/80-induced mortality in mice. MDE suppressed the mean maximal swelling and the total paw swellings induced over 6 h in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. MDE caused a reduction in serum levels of TNFα and IL-6 and significantly suppressed Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis. Conclusion: Margaritaria discoidea suppresses allergy and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in mice. In addition it attenuates Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis through a reduction in serum levels of TNFα and IL-6 in rats. PMID:24761122

  4. Protective role of theophylline and their interaction with nitric oxide (NO) in adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rishi; Chaudhary, Manju J; Tiwari, Prafulla C; Babu, Suresh; Pant, K K

    2015-12-01

    Theophylline (non-specific PDE inhibitor) and their interactions with nitric oxide modulators were evaluated in adjuvant-induced arthritic model of rats. Wistar rats (200-300g), 8 animals per group were used in the study. The animals were injected with 0.1mL of squalene and 0.2mL of complete Freund's adjuvant on day (0) in sub-planter region of right hind paw controls received only saline. The treatment with theophylline and nitric oxide modulators were done from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis indexes, ankle diameter, paw volume, and body weight were determined to assess RA progression from day (0) to day 28. On day 28 animals were sacrificed and their blood collected for IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine levels and hind paw for pathological analysis. Synovial fluid from joint spaces of CFA inoculated rats was collected to estimate TNF-α level in synovial fluid. The data obtained was analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by the Newman-Keuls post-hoc test. Theophylline (10 and 20mg/kg) significantly decreased adjuvant induced increased arthritis-index, paw volume and ankle diameter (p<0.05 in all parameters) compared to only adjuvant control group. It also reversed adjuvant induced slight decrease in body weight to normalcy. l-Arginine 100mg/kg+theophylline 20mg/kg suppressed TNF-α and elevates IL-10 level as well as reversed adjuvant-induced elevated arthritic parameters as compared to only adjuvant and prednisone group (p<0.001). Synovial TNF-α level of adjuvant only group was several fold higher than its serum level. Treatment with theophylline 20mg/kg significantly reduces synovial TNF-α level as compared to adjuvant only group. Theophylline 20mg/kg+L-NAME 10mg/kg significantly reversed these adjuvant-induced changes in immunological, histopathological and arthritis parameters (p<0.05).

  5. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  6. Inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} activity by BP-1 ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, J.; Thippegowda, P.B.; Kanum, S.A.

    2009-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory, angiogenic disease. Inflamed synovitis is a hallmark of RA which is hypoxic in nature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the key regulators of angiogenesis, is overexpressed in the pathogenesis of RA. VEGF expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), a master regulator of homeostasis which plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. In this study we show that synthetic benzophenone analogue, 2-benzoyl-phenoxy acetamide (BP-1) can act as a novel anti-arthritic agent in an experimental adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rat model by targeting VEGF and HIF-1{alpha}. BP-1 administered hypoxic endothelial cells and arthritic animals clearly showed down regulation of VEGF expression. Further, BP-1 inhibits nuclear translocation of HIF-1{alpha}, which in turn suppresses transcription of the VEGF gene. These results suggest a further possible clinical application of the BP-1 derivative as an anti-arthritic agent in association with conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinglan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Dan; Dai, Qing; Liu, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA. PMID:26402786

  8. Polyphenolics isolated from virgin coconut oil inhibits adjuvant induced arthritis in rats through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Vysakh, A; Ratheesh, M; Rajmohanan, T P; Pramod, C; Premlal, S; Girish kumar, B; Sibi, P I

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of the polyphenolic fraction from virgin coconut oil (PV) against adjuvant induced arthritic rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The activities of inflammatory, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation were estimated. PV showed high percentage of edema inhibition at a dose of 80mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis and is non toxic. The expression of inflammatory genes such as COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6 and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were decreased by treatment with PV. Antioxidant enzymes were increased and on treatment with PV. The increased level of total WBC count and C-reactive protein in the arthritic animals was reduced in PV treated rats. Synovial cytology showed that inflammatory cells and reactive mesothelial cells were suppressed by PV. Histopathology of paw tissue showed less edema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with PV. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of PV on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats and the mechanism behind this action is due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  9. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  10. Anti-arthritic activity of various extracts of Sida rhombifolia aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S R; Nirmal, S A; Patil, R Y; Asane, G S

    2009-01-01

    Aerial parts of the plant Sida rhombifolia Linn. (Malvaceae) were extracted successively to produce various extracts. These extracts were screened for various parameters of anti-arthritic activity, such as adjuvant-induced arthritis, motor performance, mean distance travelled, and histopathological study. Results showed that the polar constituents (ethanol and aqueous extracts) of the plant S. rhombifolia were useful in the treatment of arthritis.

  11. Chrysin alleviates testicular dysfunction in adjuvant arthritic rats via suppression of inflammation and apoptosis: Comparison with celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Arab, Hany H.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.

    2014-09-01

    Long standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with testicular dysfunction and subfertility. Few studies have addressed the pathogenesis of testicular injury in RA and its modulation by effective agents. Thus, the current study aimed at evaluating the effects of two testosterone boosting agents; chrysin, a natural flavone and celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in testicular impairment in rats with adjuvant arthritis, an experimental model of RA. Chrysin (25 and 50 mg/kg) and celecoxib (5 mg/kg) were orally administered to Wistar rats once daily for 21 days starting 1 h before arthritis induction. Chrysin suppressed paw edema with comparable efficacy to celecoxib. More important, chrysin, dose-dependently and celecoxib attenuated the testicular injury via reversing lowered gonadosomatic index and histopathologic alterations with preservation of spermatogenesis. Both agents upregulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression and serum testosterone with concomitant restoration of LH and FSH. Furthermore, they suppressed inflammation via abrogation of myeloperoxidase, TNF-α and protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS besides elevation of IL-10. Alleviation of the testicular impairment was accompanied with suppression of oxidative stress via lowering testicular lipid peroxides and nitric oxide. With respect to apoptosis, both agents downregulated FasL mRNA expression and caspase-3 activity in favor of cell survival. For the first time, these findings highlight the protective effects of chrysin and celecoxib against testicular dysfunction in experimental RA which were mediated via boosting testosterone in addition to attenuation of testicular inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Generally, the 50 mg/kg dose of chrysin exerted comparable protective actions to celecoxib. - Highlights: • Chrysin and celecoxib alleviated testicular suppression in adjuvant arthritis. • They attenuated histopathological damage and preserved spermatogenesis

  12. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T; Sauld, John F; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T; Pollack, Henry J; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  13. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  14. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSNs) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What's more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and in vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating the NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis.

  15. Therapeutic effects of total steroid saponin extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright in Freund’s complete adjuvant induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Ito, Yoichiro; Liang, Jin-ru; Liu, Jian-li; He, Jiao; Sun, Wen-ji

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our present study is to explore the anti-arthritic potential effect of total steroid saponins (TSSN) extracted from the rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H.Wright (DZW) and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. This work was performed using adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats in vivo and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulated 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. In AIA-induced arthritic rats, TSSN significantly alleviated the arthritic progression through evaluating arthritic score, immune organ indexes, paw swelling, and body weight. This phenomenon was well correlated with significant suppression of the overproduction of inflammation cytokines (IL-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), oxidant stress makers (MDA and NO), eicosanoids (LTB4 and PGE2), and inflammatory enzymes (5-LOX and COX-2) versus the AIA rats without treatment. On the contrary, the release of SOD and IL-10 was profoundly increased. What’s more, TSSN could obviously ameliorate the translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus through phosphorylation of the p65 and IκBα in vivo and vitro. The current findings demonstrated that TSSN could protect the injured ankle joint from further deterioration and exert its satisfactory anti-arthritis properties through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects via inactivating NF-κB signal pathway. This research implies that DZW may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of human arthritis. PMID:25066758

  16. Therapeutic Effect of Saponin Rich Fraction of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kothavade, Pankaj S.; Bulani, Vipin D.; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M.; Deshpande, Padmini S.; Gawali, Nitin B.; Juvekar, Archana R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Achyranthes aspera Linn. (AA) is used in folklore for the treatment of various inflammatory ailments and arthritis like conditions. Anti-inflammatory activity of saponin rich (SR) fraction of AA has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess the antiarthritic effect of SR fraction of Achyranthes aspera in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Methods. Arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, paw volume, changes in tibiotarsal joint thickness, hyperalgesic parameters, and spleen and thymus index. Haematological, serum, biochemical, and inflammatory cytokine and in vivo antioxidant parameters were measured on the last day of the study. Results. SR fraction significantly suppressed paw swelling and arthritic score and improved the pain threshold in motility and stair climbing tests. There was a reversal in the levels of altered parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide. SR fraction significantly decreased plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6. Moreover, histopathology revealed a significant reduction in synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and bone destruction in the joints. Conclusion. These observations explain the therapeutic benefit of SR fraction of AA in suppressing the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. PMID:26273477

  17. Evaluation of antiarthritic activity of isoeugenol in adjuvant induced arthritis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-08-01

    Isoeugenol, a component of clover oil, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect on experimentally induced adjuvant arthritis in rats. Induction of arthritis in adjuvant exposed rats was confirmed by appearance of several physical symptoms such as redness, swelling and stiffness of paws, radiographic analysis revealing joint damage, soft tissue swelling of the footpad, histopathologic changes and expression of proinflammatory enzymes and mediators in the joint tissue. Treatment of rats with isoeugenol, however, conferred a significant protection against almost all the investigated parameters. Isoeugenol significantly and dose dependently attenuated arthritic index, paw circumference, joint stiffness and the levels of proinflammatory mediators. Exposure to isoeugenol inhibited the release of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines the including PGE(2) and TNFα from lipopolysaccharide primed macrophages. Isoeugenol also showed a significant analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced writhing model. Further, unlike most antiarthritic drugs, isoeugenol had no damaging effect on gastric mucosa, which makes it a favorable antiarthritic drug. Thus, the results obtained in the present study indicate isoeugenol to possess a promising antiarthritic activity and further advocate the efficacy of natural products as antiarthritic therapeutics.

  18. Targeting TNF-α and NF-κB Activation by Bee Venom: Role in Suppressing Adjuvant Induced Arthritis and Methotrexate Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Samar F.; El-Bakly, Wesam M.; Arafa, Hossam M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2013-01-01

    Low dose methotrexate is the cornerstone for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine such as bee venom. The combination of natural products with modern medicine poses the possibility of potential interaction between the two groups and needs investigation. The present study was aimed to investigate the modulatory effect of bee venom acupuncture on efficacy, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics and tissue disposition of methotrexate. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritic rats were treated for 3 weeks with methotrexate and/or bee venom. Arthritic score, ankle diameter, paw volume and tissue expression of NF-κB and TNF-α were determined to assess anti-arthritic effects, while anti-nociceptive effects were assessed by gait score and thermal hyperalgesia. Methotrexate toxicity was assessed by measuring serum TNF-α, liver enzymes and expression of NF-κB in liver. Combination therapy of bee venom with methotrexate significantly improved arthritic parameters and analgesic effect as compared to methotrexate alone. Bee venom ameliorated serum TNF-α and liver enzymes elevations as well as over expression of NF-κB in liver induced by methotrexate. Histological examination supported the results. And for the first time bee venom acupuncture was approved to increase methotrexate bioavailability with a significant decrease in its elimination. Conclusion: bee venom potentiates the anti-arthritic effects of methotrexate, possibly by increasing its bioavailability. Also, it provides a potent anti-nociceptive effect. Furthermore, bee venom protects against methotrexate induced hepatotoxicity mostly due to its inhibitory effect on TNF-α and NF-κB. PMID:24278124

  19. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism of the heart from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Amanda Caroline; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Amado, Ciomar Aparecida Bersani; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate, in a more extensive way, the oxidative state and parameters related to energy metabolism of the heart tissue of rats using the model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The latter is a model for the human arthritic disease. Measurements were done in the total tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria and cytosolic fraction. The adjuvant-induced arthritis caused several modifications in the oxidative state of the heart which, in general, indicate an increased oxidative stress (+80% reactive oxygen species), protein damage (+53% protein carbonyls) and lipid damage (+63% peroxidation) in the whole tissue. The distribution of these changes over the various cell compartments was frequently unequal. For example, protein carbonyls were increased in the whole tissue and in the cytosol, but not in the mitochondria. No changes in GSH content of the whole tissue were found, but it was increased in the mitochondria (+33%) and decreased in the cytosol (-19%). The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was 77% stimulated by arthritis; the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were diminished by 31, 25 and 35.3%, respectively. In spite of these alterations, no changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity and in the efficiency of energy transduction were found. It can be concluded that the adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats causes oxidative damage to the heart with an unequal intracellular distribution. Compared to the liver and brain the modifications caused by arthritis in the heart are less pronounced on variables such as GSH levels and protein integrity. Possibly this occurs because the antioxidant system of the heart is less impaired by arthritis than that reported for the former tissues. Even so, the modifications caused by arthritis represent an imbalanced situation that probably contributes to the cardiac symptoms of the arthritis disease. PMID:27032477

  20. Quantitative evaluation of an experimental inflammation induced with Freund's complete adjuvant in dogs.

    PubMed

    Botrel, M A; Haak, T; Legrand, C; Concordet, D; Chevalier, R; Toutain, P L

    1994-10-01

    A chronic inflammation model in dogs was induced by intraarticular injection of Freund's Complete Adjuvant in the stifle. After a primary, acute response during the first 24 hr, a secondary subacute response was observed after a delay of approximately 3 weeks and persisted for several weeks. To evaluate the time course of the inflammatory process quantitatively, we tested more than 100 different parameters. Finally, only four parameters were selected based on practicability and metrological properties, namely, the body temperature, difference in skin temperature, difference in stifle diameter and vertical force exerted by arthritic hind limb measured using a force plate. The main results of the experimentation were the demonstration that these four parameters were sufficiently repeatable, reproducible, and appropriate to be used for quantitative evaluation of the inflammatory process, and that training of both animals and investigators was required. Finally, it was illustrated that an adjuvant periarthritis in dogs can be used to carry out a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling of an antiinflammatory drug. PMID:7865864

  1. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats. PMID:26508519

  2. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. inhibits inflammation and oxidative stress in adjuvant induced model of arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Shyni, G L; Helen, A

    2009-04-01

    Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae) are traditionally used for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions in the traditional medicine of India. The purpose of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens L. in adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. Methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens (MER) exhibited maximum percentage of oedema inhibition at a dose of 20 mg/kg on 21st day of adjuvant arthritis. The effect was higher than that of standard drug indomethacin. The activities of cycloxygenase-2 and myeloperoxidase and concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes, vitamins C & E and reduced glutathione level were increased on treatment with MER. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and haemoglobin and aberrant changes to the C-reactive protein (CRP) and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in MER treated rats. Histopathology of paw tissue showed decreased oedema formation and cellular infiltration on supplementation with MER. Thus the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of methanolic extract of Ruta graveolens on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

  3. Combination of coenzyme Q10 with methotrexate suppresses Freund's complete adjuvant-induced synovial inflammation with reduced hepatotoxicity in rats: Effect on oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mona K

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a cornerstone disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug. One of its major drawbacks is hepatotoxicity, resulting in poor compliance of therapy. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, possessing both anti-arthritic and hepatoprotective potential. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of CoQ10 (10mg/kg) alone and in combination with MTX (2mg/kg) on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, and to elucidate the potential properties of CoQ10 in ameliorating MTX-induced liver damage in rats. Rats were assigned to; normal, arthritic, MTX treated, CoQ10 treated or a combination of MTX and CoQ10. CoQ10 administration potentiated the antiarthritic effect of MTX. Moreover, the combination therapy was effective in attenuating the severity of MTX-induced liver damage displayed by the improvement in hepatospecific serum markers and confirmed by the histo-pathological evaluation. Additionally, it attenuated the hepatic oxidative stress and the intensity of inflammatory mediators associated with MTX administration as evident by the regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and the inhibitory effects on TNF-α and IL-6 levels. These results revealed that CoQ10 can serve as a useful adjuvant and promote the safe use of MTX in the management of arthritis, not only by potentiating the antiarthritic effect of MTX, but also by alleviating MTX-induced hepatocellular injury.

  4. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  5. 'ASIA' - autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Agmon-Levin, Nancy

    2011-02-01

    The role of various environmental factors in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diseases is well established. Of which, factors entailing an immune adjuvant activity such as infectious agents, silicone, aluminium salts and others were associated with defined and non-defined immune mediated diseases both in animal models and in humans. In recent years, four conditions: siliconosis, the Gulf war syndrome (GWS), the macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome (MMF) and post-vaccination phenomena were linked with previous exposure to an adjuvant. Furthermore, these four diseases share a similar complex of signs and symptoms which further support a common denominator.Thus, we review herein the current data regarding the role of adjuvants in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diseases as well as the amassed data regarding each of these four conditions. Relating to the current knowledge we would like to suggest to include these comparable conditions under a common syndrome entitled ASIA, "Autoimmune (Auto-inflammatory) Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants". PMID:20708902

  6. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. PMID:27433576

  7. Xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata exert significant therapeutic efficacy on adjuvant-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian; Xia, Yan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jian-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The study was designed to investigate effects of the xanthones from Securidaca inappendiculata on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) mice in vivo. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score, body weight loss, paw circumference, histological changes and hyperplasia of lymphatic tissues. Plasma samples were collected for estimation of interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The levels of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), N-acetyl glucosaminidase (NAG) and sialic acid (SA) in liver were assessed by colorimetric method. Xanthones significantly ameliorated the severity of AA indicated by the physical parameters changes, and reverted the abnormal changes of MDA, GSH, NAG and SA in liver. Levels of IL-1, TNF-α, MCP-1 and VEGF reduced dramatically meanwhile. The effects of xanthones on AA were the outcome of the multitargets activities, and probably associated with NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24419745

  8. Evaluation of liposome-encapsulated butorphanol tartrate for alleviation of experimentally induced arthritic pain in green-cheeked conures (Pyrrhura molinae)

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Murphy, Joanne R.; Krugner-Higby, Lisa A.; Tourdot, Renee L.; Sladky, Kurt K.; Klauer, Julia M.; Keuler, Nicholas S.; Brown, Carolyn S.; Heath, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate injection of microcrystalline sodium urate (MSU) for inducing articular pain in green-cheeked conures (Pyrrhura molinae) and the analgesic efficacy of liposome-encapsulated butorphanol tartrate (LEBT) by use of weight load data, behavioral scores, and fecal corticosterone concentration. Animals 8 conures. Procedures In a crossover study, conures were randomly assigned to receive LEBT (15 mg/kg) or liposomal vehicle subsequent to experimental induction of arthritis or sham injection. The MSU was injected into 1 tibiotarsal-tarsometatarsal (intertarsal) joint to induce arthritis (time 0). Weight-bearing load and behavioral scores were determined at 0, 2, 6, 26, and 30 hours. Results MSU injection into 1 intertarsal joint caused a temporary decrease in weight bearing on the affected limb. Treatment of arthritic conures with LEBT resulted in significantly more weight bearing on the arthritic limb than treatment with vehicle. Administration of vehicle to arthritic conures caused a decrease in activity and feeding behaviors during the induction phase of arthritis, but as the arthritis resolved, there was a significant increase in voluntary activity at 30 hours and feeding behaviors at 26 and 30 hours, compared with results for LEBT treatment of arthritic birds. Treatment with LEBT or vehicle in conures without arthritis resulted in similar measurements for weight bearing and voluntary and motivated behaviors. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Experimental induction of arthritis in conures was a good method for evaluating tonic pain. Weight-bearing load was the most sensitive measure of pain associated with induced arthritis. Pain associated with MSU-induced arthritis was alleviated by administration of LEBT. PMID:19795935

  9. Protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced arthritic rats: detailed histopathological study of the joints and white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Kamarudin, Taty Anna; Othman, Faizah; Mohd Ramli, Elvy Suhana; Md Isa, Nurismah; Das, Srijit

    2012-01-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes contains curcumin, an active compound which possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an accepted experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. The present study aimed to observe the histological changes in the joints of experimental arthritic rats treated with curcumin. Twenty four male Sprague-Dawley (approximately 7 weeks-old) rats were randomly divided into four groups. Three groups were immunized with 150 µg collagen. All rats with established CIA, with arthritis scores exceeding 1, were orally treated with betamethasone (0.5 mg/ml/kg body weight), curcumin (110 mg/ml/kg body weight) or olive oil (1.0 ml/kg body weight) daily, for two weeks. One remaining group was kept as normal control. Treatment with 110 mg/ml/kg curcumin showed significant mean differences in the average white blood cell (WBC) count (p<0.05), cell infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion scores (p<0.05) compared to the olive oil treated group. Pannus formation scores showed that curcumin supplementation successfully suppressed the pannus formation process that occurred in the articular cartilage of the CIA joints. The mean difference for histological scores for the curcumin group was insignificant compared to the betamethasone treated group. It is concluded that supplementation of curcumin has protective effect on the histopathological and degenerative changes in the joints of CIA rats which was at par with betamethasone. PMID:27366139

  10. Adjuvant disease induced by mycobacteria, determinants of arthritogenicity.

    PubMed

    Audibert, F; Chedid, L

    1976-02-01

    Genetic, endocrine and immunological factors are probably involved in adjuvant polyarthritis. The nature of the vehicle and of the mycobacterial components administered also has a major influence. It was originally assumed that arthritogenicity and adjuvanticity of mycobacterial fractions such as wax D were intimately related. Our previous findings showed that the water soluble adjuvant (WSA) of M.smegmatis which could substitute for mycobacterial cells in Freund's complete adjuvant and induce delayed hypersensitivity was not arthritogenic in the Wistar rat. We have since observed that auto-immune diseases could be elicited by WSA. Therefore experiments were repeated using the very susceptible Lewis strain. The activity of cord factor and of various mycobacterial preparations suspended in mineral or in peanut oil was also evaluated in mice and in normal or hypophysectomized rats. Our present findings confirm the absence of arthritogenicity of WSA in the Lewis strain. They also indicate that cord factor with WSA does not suffice to induce a generalized adjuvant disease, but that a mycobacterial component which could be susceptible to lysozyme treatment is required also. However, the local inflammation of the injected limb was produced by a preparation of cord factor administered in mineral or even in peanut oil. This was observed in normal or hypophysectomized rats and in Swiss mice which were not susceptible to the generalized disease.

  11. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic activity of flavonoids from Daphne genkwa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cui-Ping; He, Xin; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Su-Li; Li, Hui; Song, Zi-Jing; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Yang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Ping; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-rheumatoid arthritic activity of four flavonoids from Daphne genkwa (FFD) in vivo and in vitro. Flavonoids of D. genkwa were extracted by refluxing with ethanol and purified by polyamide resin. An in vivo carrageenan-induced paw edema model, tampon-granuloma model and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis mouse model were used to evaluate the anti-rheumatoid arthritic activities of FFD. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO) release and neutral red uptake (NRU) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect in vitro. In addition, antioxidant effect of FFD was determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. A high dose of FFD significantly reduced the degree of acute inflammatory paw edema in mice as a response to carrageenan administration (p<0.01). FFD displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of granuloma formation in mice (p<0.05). FFD also inhibited chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats when administered orally at the dose of 50mg/kg/day (p<0.001). In addition, FFD suppressed the production of NO and exhibited immunoregulatory function in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-related manner. Simultaneously, FFD revealed conspicuous antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 18.20μg/ml. FFD possesses significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, which could be a potential therapeutic agent for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24561028

  12. Anti-TNF-α and anti-arthritic effect of patuletin: A rare flavonoid from Tagetes patula.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Almas; Mesaik, M Ahmed; Simjee, Shabana U; Lubna; Bano, Samina; Faizi, Shaheen

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) poses a serious health problem as a chronic autoimmune joint disease with significant mortality and morbidity. Proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activated CD4(+) T-cells play key roles in the progression of arthritis. The aim of the study is to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory and anti-arthritic effect of flavonoid patuletin, isolated from Tagetes patula. ELISA was applied for quantification of TNF-α and IL-1β. Intracellular and extracellular ROS production from phagocytes was measured by the chemiluminescence technique. Proliferation of T-cells was observed using a liquid scintillation counter. Cytotoxicity was assessed by a MTT assay. The serological and histological analysis studies were performed using a rodent model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Expression of p38 and NF-κB after treatment of compound was observed by western blotting. Patuletin showed potent inhibitory effects on TNF-α in vitro as well as inhibited the production of both cytokines in vivo. It also showed potent suppression of proliferation of T-cells and significantly inhibited the extracellular and intracellular ROS production. Patuletin revealed significant anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activities in the rodent model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Histologically, it causes mild bone destruction compared to the arthritic control group, thus representing its anti-arthritic potential. Based on these studies, patuletin could be considered as a potential immunosuppressive and anti-arthritic lead candidate. PMID:27177082

  13. Suppression of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and tumor necrosis factor-α by Pongamia pinnata seed extract in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Madhura; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Mandal, Suvra; Kar, Manoj; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata is a plant known for its therapeutic usage in Indian traditional medicine. Despite the controversy regarding toxic flavonoid and erucic acid content, the seed of this plant is consumed in tribal medicine and its oil is used in Ayurveda to treat psoriasis and arthritis. This study explored the potential anti-arthritic effects of a P. pinnata seed (hexane) extract (PSE) at non-lethal doses in an adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model; possible mechanisms of any observed effects were also explored. After establishing the lethal doses arising from oral exposure to the extract, the material was administered per os daily at two doses (0.3 g/kg/day; 0.5 g/kg/day) to arthritic rats. Other rats received indomethacin or vehicle (control). Treatments were performed for a total of 14 days. One day after the final exposure, the rats were euthanized to permit harvest of various cells, blood, and tissues for analyses. Paw diameter and tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the paws were evaluated as indices for edema and neutrophil infiltration into the tissue. The severity of arthritis in the experimental rats was assessed via measures of urinary hydroxyproline (HP) and glucosamine, and of serum pro-inflammatory TNFα and anti-inflammatory IL-10. The extent of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in peritoneal macrophages harvested from naïve rats and then treated in vitro was also assessed. The results indicated that exposure to PSE significantly decreased paw diameter, tissue myeloperoxidase level, and levels of urinary HP and glucosamine, as well as of serum TNFα and IL-10 in adjuvant-injected (arthritic) rats. In vitro PSE treatment also resulted in a marked inhibition of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in primary cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Thus, PSE appears to be able to prevent experimental arthritis, in part, by helping to maintain the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and by inhibiting NF-κB activation. PMID:23971718

  14. Berberis aristata Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis by Inhibition of NF-κB and Activating Nuclear Factor-E2-related Factor 2/hem Oxygenase (HO)-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rohit; Nair, Vinod; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender; Arunraja, S

    2016-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) in formaldehyde-induced arthritis and adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Arthritis was induced by administration of either formaldehyde (2% v/v) or CFA into the subplantar surface of the hind paw of the animal. In formaldehyde-induced arthritis and AIA, treatment of BAHE at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg orally significantly decreased joint inflammation as evidenced by decrease in joint diameter and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in histopathological examination. BAHE treatment demonstrated dose-dependent improvement in the redox status of synovium (decrease in GSH, MDA, and NO levels and increase in SOD and CAT activities). The beneficial effect of BAHE was substantiated with decreased expression of inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and VEGF by immunohistochemistry analysis in AIA model. BAHE increased HO-1/Nrf-2 and suppressed NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in adjuvant immunized joint. Additionally, BAHE abrogated degrading enzymes, as there was decreased protein expression of MMP-3 and -9 in AIA. In conclusion, we demonstrated the anti-arthritic activity of Berberis aristata hydroalcoholic extract via the mechanism of inhibition of NF-κB and activation of Nrf-2/HO-1.

  15. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  16. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P.; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  17. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  18. Lupeol, a triterpenoid isolated from Calotropis gigantea latex ameliorates the primary and secondary complications of FCA induced adjuvant disease in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Saratha, Venkatesan; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2012-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder that affects 1% of the adult population worldwide. Calotropis gigantea is a xerophytic, latex producing medicinal plant widely distributed in nature. Different parts of the plant have been traditionally used for the treatment of various ailments including arthritis. In the present study, we have isolated and characterized lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpene from the dialyzable fraction of the latex and evaluated the anti-arthritic properties of lupeol in Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis in rats. Lupeol (50 mg/kg b.w/day) was administered orally to AA rats for 4 weeks. The alterations in body weight gain, paw volume, RBC, WBC, Hb, EPO, ESR, platelets and PCV were recorded. The activities of serum AST, ALT and ALP were also assayed. The levels of lipid profile were estimated. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 were also analyzed. The results of present study indicate the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of lupeol present in the C. gigantea latex.

  19. Efficacy of Combined Ultrasound-and-Microbubbles-Mediated Diclofenac Gel Delivery to Enhance Transdermal Permeation in Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Chung, Huan-Yu; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2016-08-01

    A previous study that investigated the effect of ultrasound (US) on the transdermal permeation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac found that therapeutic US can increase circulation in an inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Transdermal drug delivery has recently been demonstrated by US combined with microbubbles (MB) contrast agent (henceforth referred to as "US-MB"). The present study evaluated the efficacy of US-MB-mediated diclofenac delivery for treating adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats. RA was induced by injecting 100 μL of complete Freund's adjuvant into the ankle joint of male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) that were randomly divided into five treatment groups: (i) carbopol gel alone (the control [group C]), (ii) diclofenac-carbopol gel (group D), (iii) US plus carbopol gel (group U), (iv) US plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DU) and (v) US-MB plus diclofenac-carbopol gel (group DUB). The ankle width was measured over 10 d using high-frequency (40-MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler-mode imaging, covering the period before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of the induced RA showed synovitis and neovascularity. Only a small amount of neovascularity was observed after treatment. The recovery rate on day 10 was significantly higher in group DUB (97.7% ± 2.7%, mean ± standard deviation [SD]) than in groups C (1.0% ± 2.7%), D (37.5% ± 4.6%), U (75.5% ± 4.2%) and DU (87.3% ± 5.2%) (p < 0.05). The results obtained indicate that combining US and MB can increase the skin permeability and thereby enhance the delivery of diclofenac sodium gel and thereby inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounding the arthritic ankle. Color Doppler-mode imaging revealed that US-MB treatment induced a rapid reduction in synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area. PMID:27181685

  20. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  1. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  2. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  3. N-feruloylserotonin in preventive combination therapy with methotrexate reduced inflammation in adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kuncirova, Viera; Ponist, Silvester; Mihalova, Danica; Drafi, Frantisek; Nosal, Radomir; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Gardi, Concetta; Harmatha, Juraj; Hradkova, Iveta; Bauerova, Katarina

    2014-12-01

    Many of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs often have side effects at high doses and/or during long-term administration. Increased efficacy without increased toxicity is expected for combination therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT) and methotrexate (MTX) in monotherapy and in combination therapy on disease progression and inflammation in arthritic rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of Mycobacterium butyricum in incomplete Freund's adjuvant in Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy animals, arthritic animals without any drug administration, arthritic animals with administration of N-f-5HT in the oral daily dose of 15 mg/kg b.w., arthritic animals with administration of MTX in the oral dose of 0.3 mg/kg b.w. twice a week and arthritic animals treated with the combination of N-f-5HT and MTX. N-f-5HT in monotherapy reduced only activation of NF-κB and did not have any significant effect on other parameters monitored. Low-dose treatment of MTX decreased the level of IL-1β and MCP-1 on day 14 and activation of NF-κB in liver without significant effect on other parameters. N-f-5HT and MTX combination showed both the anti-arthritic (hind paw volume and arthritic score) and anti-inflammatory effect (plasmatic levels of IL-1β, IL-17, MCP-1, CRP, and activation of NF-κB in liver). In combination with MTX, N-f-5HT markedly potentiated the therapeutic effect of MTX low dose, which resulted in significant improvement of all parameters measured. The findings showed that the combination therapy simultaneously decreased multiple markers of inflammation, a result crucial for future therapy of RA.

  4. Vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated serum homocysteine levels in rat adjuvant arthritis: effect of vitamin E administration.

    PubMed

    Can, Cenk; Cinar, Mehtap G; Koşay, Sezen; Evinç, Akgün

    2002-06-14

    We aimed to study the alterations in serum homocysteine levels and endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular relaxant responses in adjuvant-induced arthritis of the rat and to determine the effects of vitamin E administration on these changes. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant into the paw. 26 days after the induction of arthritis, serum homocysteine levels and relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodiumnitroprusside in thoracic aortas were evaluated. The relaxant responses to acetylcholine were decreased in aortas from arthritic rats, whereas the responses to sodiumnitroprusside were not significantly different when compared to the aortas from control rats. A significant increase was observed in serum homocysteine levels of the arthritic rats in comparison to those of controls. Vitamin E administration (100 mg/kg/day, i.m. for 26 days) to arthritic rats resulted in a significant increase in endothelium-dependent aortic responses to acetylcholine and a significant decrease in serum homocysteine levels with respect to the non-treated arthritic rats. However, in healthy rats, vitamin E treatment significantly decreased the acetylcholine-induced relaxant responses. We conclude that adjuvant-induced arthritis in the rat is associated with increased serum homocysteine levels and this is accompanied by a reduction in endothelium-dependent vascular responses in the thoracic aortas. Vitamin E treatment leads to normalization of the increased serum homocysteine levels and improves the endothelium-dependent relaxant responses in this experimental model. PMID:12044840

  5. Use of synthetic prostaglandin E1 (misoprostol) for prevention of aspirin-induced gastroduodenal ulceration in arthritic dogs.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, R J; Matz, M E; Labato, M A; Boudrieau, R J

    1993-01-15

    A randomized, double-blind, controlled study was performed with 18 arthritic dogs administered aspirin (25 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 8 h) and excipient (control group) or aspirin and misoprostol (100 micrograms, PO, q 8 h). Dogs in the misoprostol (n = 10) and control (n = 8) groups were primarily compared by use of sequential gastroduodenoscopy, changes in PCV, and prevalence of clinical signs of gastrointestinal disturbance over a 14-day treatment period. The misoprostol/aspirin-treated group had significantly (P < 0.05) less gastroduodenal hemorrhage and ulceration and a significantly (P < 0.05) lower prevalence of vomiting than did the control group. PMID:8428830

  6. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Keijzer, Chantal; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation and the observed side effects of these therapies illustrate the pressing need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are pivotal controllers of (auto-aggressive) immune responses and inflammation, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Therefore, Treg became frequently studied targets for more specific immunotherapy. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable local and tailor made interventions, while obviating the negative side effect of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for antigen-specific interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory-site. In this perspective heat shock proteins (Hsp) have several characteristics that make them highly attractive targets for antigen-specific Treg inducing therapy. The development of an antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccine is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. However, progress is hampered not only by the lack of effective antigens, but also by the fact that other factors such as dose, route, and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to the effective induction of Treg. In addition, the use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve an effective regulatory response, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals in clinical trials will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or

  7. The histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine, inhibits the articular osteopenia in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis by suppressing the osteoclast differentiation induced by histamine.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Yonekawa, Taeko; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yano, Shingo; Ueno, Koichi

    2003-05-01

    The effects of cimetidine on rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) and rat osteoclast differentiation were studied. For the in vivo experiments, AA was induced by injections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA either subcutaneously into the base of the tail or into the right hind paw. The osteoclast differentiation was assessed by estimating the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells in the bone marrow culture. Cimetidine, at the dose of 25 mg/kg body weight, reduced the paw swelling by 70% (P<0.01). Cimetidine, at 10 microM concentration, inhibited 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25[OH](2)D(3)) and histamine mediated osteoclast differentiations by 40% (P<0.01) and 60% (P<0.001), respectively. Dimaprit, at 0.3 microM, stimulated the cell differentiation by 100% (P<0.01). Mepyramine reduced osteoclast differentiation, but the reduction was not statistically significant. Measurements of bone mineral density of the femur indicated that 5 mg/kg of cimetidine treated animals had 30% (P<0.01) higher mineral density in comparison with that of the AA control group that received no cimetidine. These results suggest that histamine is a potent inducer of osteoclast differentiation, at least in part, through the histamine H(2)-receptor, and cimetidine has a preventive effect on articular destruction and accompanying inflammation in arthritic rats. These observations may provide critical insights into the pathogenesis of the bone pathology seen in patients with RA.

  8. Bone-protective effects of nonviral gene therapy with folate-chitosan DNA nanoparticle containing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Julio C; Wang, Huijie; Jreyssaty, Christian; Benderdour, Mohamed; Lavigne, Patrick; Qiu, Xingpin; Winnik, Francoise M; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dai, Kerong; Shi, Qin

    2008-07-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), is a natural blocker of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1. Using a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined the protective effects of IL-1Ra in bone metabolism in vivo after folate-mediated nonviral gene delivery. We detected secreted human IL-1Ra protein in serum and cultured primary osteoblasts of rats that were treated with chitosan-IL-1Ra and folate-IL-1Ra-chitosan nanoparticles, respectively. In vivo, IL-1Ra gene delivery significantly reverted alterations in bone turnover observed in arthritic animals by modulating the level of osteocalcin (OC) as well as the activities of alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. The protective effects of these nanoparticles were evident from the decrease in the expression levels of interleukine-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) as well as osteoclast number and other histopathological findings. Compared to naked DNA and chitosan-DNA, folate-chitosan-DNA nanoparticles were less cytotoxic and enhanced IL-1Ra protein synthesis in vitro and offered a better protection against inflammation and abnormal bone metabolism in vivo. Nonviral gene therapy with folate-chitosan-DNA nanoparticles containing the IL-1 Ra gene seemed to protect against bone damage and inflammation in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model.

  9. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor enhances the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids without decreasing bone mineral density in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Yoshida, H; Hashizume, M; Tanaka, K; Matsumoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    In a mouse arthritis model, we investigated whether interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade would enhance the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids (GCs). DBA/1J mice were immunized with type II collagen (CII), and were treated with prednisolone (PSL) and/or anti-mouse IL-6R antibody (MR16-1). Also, the effects of IL-6 on gene expression and the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) were examined in cultured cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX). PSL reduced the arthritis score dose-dependently in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The arthritis score in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group was lower than in the PSL (3 mg/kg) group, and at the same level as in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. Lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased significantly in CIA mice and was higher in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group than in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. In the in-vitro synovial cells, IL-6 pretreatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of DEX on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR induced by DEX. In contrast, in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, IL-6 pretreatment exacerbated the decrease in expression of osteocalcin and the increase in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by DEX. We demonstrated that IL-6 signalling blockade by an anti-IL-6R antibody can augment the anti-arthritic effect of GCs and inhibit the bone loss they cause. PMID:26201536

  10. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  11. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  12. Effect of galantamine on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gowayed, Mennatallah A; Refaat, Rowaida; Ahmed, Walid M; El-Abhar, Hanan S

    2015-10-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses cytokine production and macrophage activation, via the interaction of its neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) with the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), present on neurons and inflammatory cells. The present study aimed to verify the potential anti-inflammatory effect of galantamine against experimental arthritis induced in rats. Fourteen days post adjuvant injection, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with three doses of galantamine (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg) or leflunomide (10 mg/kg) for 2 weeks and arthritis progression was assessed by hind paw swelling. Additionally, serum biomarkers, viz., anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (Anti-CCP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Radiological examination of the hind paws was also carried out to evaluate the degree of joint damage. Adjuvant arthritis led to a significant weight loss, marked swelling of the hind paw and alteration in the serum levels of anti-CCP, TNF-α, IL-10 and MCP-1. These alterations were associated with significant radiological changes of the joints. Galantamine, in a dose-dependent manner, reduced significantly all biomarkers of inflammation, with the highest dose showing the best beneficial anti-inflammatory effect that was superior in magnitude to the reference drug leflunomide in most of the studied parameters. In conclusion, these results suggest that galantamine may represent a novel, inexpensive and effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26189022

  13. Profiling of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, p38 and JAK inhibitors in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    Balagué, C; Pont, M; Prats, N; Godessart, N

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Translational animal models are essential in the prediction of the efficacy and side effects of new chemical entities. We have carried out a thorough study of three distinct disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model in the rat and critically appraised the results in the context of the reported clinical experience in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Teriflunomide – a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitor; AL8697 – a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor; and tofacitinib – a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; were selected as representatives of their class and dose-response studies carried out using a therapeutic 10-day administration scheme in arthritic rats. Paw swelling and body weight were periodically monitored, and joint radiology and histology, lymph organ weight and haematological and biochemical parameters evaluated at study completion. KEY RESULTS All three drugs demonstrated beneficial effects on paw swelling, bone lesions and splenomegalia, with p38 inhibition providing the best anti-inflammatory effect and JAK inhibition the best DMARD effect. Leukopenia, body weight loss and gastrointestinal toxicity were dose-dependently observed with teriflunomide treatment. p38 MAPK inhibition induced leukocytosis and increased total plasma cholesterol. JAK inhibition, normalized platelet, reticulocyte and neutrophil counts, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels while inducing lymphopenia and cholesterolemia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This multiparametric approach can reveal specific drug properties and provide translational information. Whereas the complex profile for p38 inhibition in AIA is not observed in human RA, immunosuppressants such as DHODH and JAK inhibitors show DMARD properties and side effects seen in both AIA and RA. PMID:22229697

  14. The adjuvant MF59 induces ATP release from muscle that potentiates response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vono, Maria; Taccone, Marianna; Caccin, Paola; Gallotta, Marilena; Donvito, Giovanna; Falzoni, Simonetta; Palmieri, Emiliano; Pallaoro, Michele; Rappuoli, Rino; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Gregorio, Ennio; Montecucco, Cesare; Seubert, Anja

    2013-12-24

    Vaccines are the most effective agents to control infections. In addition to the pathogen antigens, vaccines contain adjuvants that are used to enhance protective immune responses. However, the molecular mechanism of action of most adjuvants is ill-known, and a better understanding of adjuvanticity is needed to develop improved adjuvants based on molecular targets that further enhance vaccine efficacy. This is particularly important for tuberculosis, malaria, AIDS, and other diseases for which protective vaccines do not exist. Release of endogenous danger signals has been linked to adjuvanticity; however, the role of extracellular ATP during vaccination has never been explored. Here, we tested whether ATP release is involved in the immune boosting effect of four common adjuvants: aluminum hydroxide, calcium phosphate, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and the oil-in-water emulsion MF59. We found that intramuscular injection is always associated with a weak transient release of ATP, which was greatly enhanced by the presence of MF59 but not by all other adjuvants tested. Local injection of apyrase, an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, inhibited cell recruitment in the muscle induced by MF59 but not by alum or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. In addition, apyrase strongly inhibited influenza-specific T-cell responses and hemagglutination inhibition titers in response to an MF59-adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccine. These data demonstrate that a transient ATP release is required for innate and adaptive immune responses induced by MF59 and link extracellular ATP with an enhanced response to vaccination. PMID:24324152

  15. ASIA or Shoenfeld's syndrome--an autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, M; Chicoş, B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, reports have suggested grouping different autoimmune conditions that are triggered by external stimuli as a single syndrome called autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). This syndrome is characterized by the appearance of myalgia, myositis, muscle weakness, arthralgia, arthritis, chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment and memory loss, and the possible emergence of a demyelinating autoimmune disease caused by systemic exposure after vaccines and adjuvants. As there are no markers for ASIA, the authors intend to present ASIA, or Shoenfeld's syndrome, as an autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants. PMID:24620624

  16. Effects of simvastatin, atorvastatin, ezetimibe, and ezetimibe + simvastatin combination on the inflammatory process and on the liver metabolic changes of arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Lívia; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Bracht, Adelar; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2012-12-01

    In this study, simvastatin, atorvastatin, ezetimibe, and ezetimibe + simvastatin combination were administered to arthritic rats, first to determine their effects on the inflammatory response, employing a low-dose adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats. Arthritis was induced by the subcutaneous injection of a suspension of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (100 μg) in mineral oil [complete Freund's adjuvant used (CFA)] into the plantar surface of the hind paws. Simvastatin(40 mg/kg), atorvastatin(10 mg/kg), ezetimibe(10 mg/kg), ezetimibe(10 mg/kg) + simvastatin(20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg) were given intragastrically and the treatment began on the day of CFA injection and continued daily up to the 28th day after arthritis induction. The ezetimibe + simvastatin combination was more effective in reducing the inflammatory response in arthritic rats than in atorvastatin, simvastatin, or ezetimibe monotherapy. The observed effect seems to be cholesterol-independent as there were no changes in plasma cholesterol levels. In spite of the benefits on joint lesions, treatment with ezetimibe + simvastatin combination caused a marked increment in liver, kidneys, spleen size, and plasma transaminases activities. Therefore, animals treated with the ezetimibe(10 mg/kg) + simvastatin(40 mg/kg) combination were also submitted to liver perfusion experiments. In this regard, ezetimibe + simvastatin did not improve the liver metabolic alterations seen in control arthritic rats, on the contrary, a worsening was observed in liver production of glucose from alanine, as well as in oxygen uptake. All of these metabolic changes appear to be induced by treatment with ezetimibe + simvastatin combination, as the same metabolic effects were observed in normal and treated arthritic animals.

  17. Assessment of anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic properties of Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. based on experiments in arthritic rat models and qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Subhashis; Sarkar, Sudeb; Dutta, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Soumen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The principle objective of the study was to explore the anti-arthritic properties of Acmella uliginosa (AU) (Sw.) Cass. flower in a rat model and to identify potential anti-inflammatory compounds derived from flower extracts. The synergistic role played by a combination of AU flower and Aloe vera (AV) gel crude extracts was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats induced with Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA) were used as a disease model of arthritic paw swelling. There were three experimental and two control groups, each consisting of five rats. Paw circumference and serum biochemical parameters were evaluated to investigate the role of the flower extracts in disease amelioration through a feeding schedule spanning 21 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses were performed to search for the presence of anti-inflammatory compounds in the ethanolic and n-hexane solvent extracts of the flower. Results: As a visual cue to the experimental outcomes, FCA-induced paw swelling decreased to the normal level; and hemoglobin, serum protein, and albumin levels were significantly increased in the treated animals. The creatinine level was estimated to be normal in the experimental rats after the treatment. The combination of AU and AV showed the best recovery potential in all the studied parameters, confirming the synergistic efficacy of the herbal formulation. GC/MS analyses revealed the presence of at least 5 anti-inflammatory compounds including 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, phenylmethyl ester, astaxanthin, à-N-Normethadol, fenretinide that have reported anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic properties. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that the crude flower homogenate of AU contains potential anti-inflammatory compounds which could be used as an anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic medication. PMID:27366352

  18. Effective treatment of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis by celastrol

    PubMed Central

    Cascão, R.; Vidal, B.; Raquel, H.; Neves-Costa, A.; Figueiredo, N.; Gupta, V.; Fonseca, J.E.; Moita, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported an increase in interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-17 levels, and a continuous activation of caspase-1 in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These results suggest that drugs targeting IL-1β regulatory pathways, in addition to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), may constitute promising therapeutic agents in early RA. We have recently used a THP-1 macrophage-like cell line to screen 2320 compounds for those that down-regulate both IL-1β and TNF secretion. Celastrol was one of the most promising therapeutic candidates identified in that study. Our main goal in the present work was to investigate whether administration of celastrol is able to attenuate inflammation in a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Moreover, since IL-1β is known to play a role in the polarization of Th17 cells, we also investigate whether administration of digoxin, a specific inhibitor of Th17 cells polarization, is able to attenuate inflammation in the same rat model. We found that celastrol administration significantly suppressed joint inflammation. The histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that celastrol-treated rats had a normal joint structure with complete abrogation of the inflammatory infiltrate and cellular proliferation. In contrast, we observed that digoxin administration significantly ameliorated inflammation but only if administrated in the early phase of disease course (after 4 days of disease induction), and it was not efficient at inhibiting the infiltration of immune cells within the joint and in preventing damage. Thus, our results suggest that celastrol has significant anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties and can constitute a potential anti-inflammatory drug with therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as RA. Furthermore, we find that early inhibition of Th17 cells polarization ameliorates arthritis but it is not as effective as celastrol. PMID:22415021

  19. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:27228647

  20. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine.

  1. Evening primrose oil and celecoxib inhibited pathological angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in adjuvant-induced arthritis: novel role of angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, R M; Moustafa, Y M; El-Azab, M F

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by overproduction of inflammatory mediators along with undermined oxidative defensive mechanisms. Pathological angiogenesis was found to play a critical role in the progression of this disease. The current study was carried out to evaluate the anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of evening primrose oil (EPO), rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA), either alone or in combination with aspirin or celecoxib, on adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced by subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the right hind paw of male albino rats. All treatments were administered orally from day 0 (EPO, 5 g/kg b.w.) or day 4 (celecoxib, 5 mg/kg; aspirin, 150 mg/kg) till day 27 after CFA injection. In the arthritic group, the results revealed significant decrease in the body weight and increase in ankle circumference, plasma angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels. Anti-oxidant status was suppressed as manifested by significant decline in reduced glutathione content along with decreased enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and increased lipid peroxidation. Oral administration of EPO exerted normalization of body weight, ANG-1, and TNF-α levels with restoration of activity as shown by reduced malondialdehyde levels. Moreover, histopathological examination demonstrated that EPO significantly reduced the synovial hyperplasia and inflammatory cells invasion in joint tissues, an effect that was enhanced by combination with aspirin or celecoxib. The joint use of GLA-rich natural oils, which possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities, with traditional analgesics represents a promising strategy to restrain the progression of rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Curcuma longa (turmeric) versus Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Gamal; Al-Kahtani, Mohammed Ali; El-Sayed, Wael Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    Turmeric (rich in curcuminoids) and ginger (rich in gingerols and shogaols) rhizomes have been widely used as dietary spices and to treat different diseases in Ayurveda/Chinese medicine since antiquity. Here, we compared the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of these two plants in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Both plants (at dose 200 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed (but with different degrees) the incidence and severity of arthritis by increasing/decreasing the production of anti-inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, and activating the anti-oxidant defence system. The anti-arthritic activity of turmeric exceeded that of ginger and indomethacin (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug), especially when the treatment started from the day of arthritis induction. The percentage of disease recovery was 4.6-8.3% and 10.2% more in turmeric compared with ginger and indomethacin (P < 0.05), respectively. The present study proves the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant activity of turmeric over ginger and indomethacin, which may have beneficial effects against rheumatoid arthritis onset/progression as shown in AIA rat model.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Damre, A S; Kulkami, K R; Saraf, M N

    2002-07-01

    Saussurea lappa, Argyreia speciosa and Achyranthes aspera are well known Indian medicinal plants used in the indigenous systems of medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. The ethanolic extracts of the plants at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o. were screened for their effect on acute and chronic inflammation induced in mice and rats. S. lappa and A. speciosa were found to significantly inhibit paw edema induced by carrageenan and Freund's complete adjuvant and to prevent accumulation of inflammatory cells in carrageenan-induced peritonitis at doses of 50-200 mg/kg. A. aspera inhibited these inflammatory responses at doses of 100-200 mg/kg. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extracts of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera possess anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity and support the rationale behind the traditional use of these plants in inflammatory conditions.

  4. Adjuvant-induced antired blood cell activity in CBA mice

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Ann; McBride, W. H.; Weir, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Various micro-organisms are known to act as immunological adjuvants and included amongst these are Corynebacteriaceae. Numerous studies on Corynebacterium parvum have shown, in particular, its ability to cause proliferation and enhanced activity of the reticulo-endothelial system. This organism also leads in mice to anaemia and this report describes the simultaneous appearance of a red cell autoantibody in mice injected with C. parvum or another diphtheroid (SF 16) isolated from rheumatoid joint fluid. The significance of this latter observation is considered in relation to the unexplained anaemia of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:4933319

  5. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Arab, Hany H; El-Sawalhi, Maha M

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10mg/kg/day p.o. for 21days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α & IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE2 & LTB4) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids.

  6. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  7. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  8. Oral curcumin has anti-arthritic efficacy through somatostatin generation via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dou, Yannong; Zhao, Di; Wang, Ting; Bian, Difei; Tong, Bei; Xia, Ying; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has been proven to be clinically effective in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapy, but its low oral bioavailability eclipses existent evidence that attempts to explain the underlying mechanism. Small intestine, the only organ exposed to a relatively high concentration of CUR, is the main site that generates gut hormones which are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. This study aims at addressing the hypothesis that one or more gut hormones serve as an intermediary agent for the anti-arthritic action of CUR. The protein and mRNA levels of gut hormones in CUR-treated rats were analyzed by ELISA and RT-PCR. Somatostatin (SOM) depletor and receptor antagonist were used to verify the key role of SOM in CUR-mediated anti-arthritic effect. The mechanisms underlying CUR-induced upregulation of SOM levels were explored by cellular experiments and immunohistochemical staining. The data showed that oral administration of CUR (100 mg/kg) for consecutive two weeks in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats still exhibited an extremely low plasma exposure despite of a dramatic amelioration of arthritis symptoms. When injected intraperitoneally, CUR lost anti-arthritic effect in rats, suggesting that it functions in an intestine-dependent manner. CUR elevated SOM levels in intestines and sera, and SOM depletor and non-selective SOM receptor antagonist could abolish the inhibitory effect of CUR on arthritis. Immunohistochemical assay demonstrated that CUR markedly increased the number of SOM-positive cells in both duodenum and jejunum. In vitro experiments demonstrated that CUR could augment SOM secretion from intestinal endocrine cells, and this effect could be hampered by either MEK1/2 or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor. In summary, oral administration of CUR exhibits anti-arthritic effect through augmenting SOM secretion from the endocrine cells in small intestines via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways.

  9. Oral curcumin has anti-arthritic efficacy through somatostatin generation via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dou, Yannong; Zhao, Di; Wang, Ting; Bian, Difei; Tong, Bei; Xia, Ying; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has been proven to be clinically effective in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapy, but its low oral bioavailability eclipses existent evidence that attempts to explain the underlying mechanism. Small intestine, the only organ exposed to a relatively high concentration of CUR, is the main site that generates gut hormones which are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. This study aims at addressing the hypothesis that one or more gut hormones serve as an intermediary agent for the anti-arthritic action of CUR. The protein and mRNA levels of gut hormones in CUR-treated rats were analyzed by ELISA and RT-PCR. Somatostatin (SOM) depletor and receptor antagonist were used to verify the key role of SOM in CUR-mediated anti-arthritic effect. The mechanisms underlying CUR-induced upregulation of SOM levels were explored by cellular experiments and immunohistochemical staining. The data showed that oral administration of CUR (100 mg/kg) for consecutive two weeks in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats still exhibited an extremely low plasma exposure despite of a dramatic amelioration of arthritis symptoms. When injected intraperitoneally, CUR lost anti-arthritic effect in rats, suggesting that it functions in an intestine-dependent manner. CUR elevated SOM levels in intestines and sera, and SOM depletor and non-selective SOM receptor antagonist could abolish the inhibitory effect of CUR on arthritis. Immunohistochemical assay demonstrated that CUR markedly increased the number of SOM-positive cells in both duodenum and jejunum. In vitro experiments demonstrated that CUR could augment SOM secretion from intestinal endocrine cells, and this effect could be hampered by either MEK1/2 or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor. In summary, oral administration of CUR exhibits anti-arthritic effect through augmenting SOM secretion from the endocrine cells in small intestines via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways. PMID:25836921

  10. Proniosomal formulation of curcumin having anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity in different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Rai, A K

    2012-10-01

    Curcumin, the active ingredient of the spice turmeric, has a long history as an herbal remedy for a variety of diseases. Transdermal drug delivery has been recognized as an alternative route to oral delivery. Proniosomes offer a versatile vesicle delivery concept with the potential for drug delivery via the transdermal route. In this study, different proniosomal gel bases were prepared by the ether injection method, using Span 60 and Span 80, Tween 20, cholesterol, and formulation PA2. They were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, revealing vesicular structures, and assessed for stability and effect on in vitro skin permeation using rat skin. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of formulation PA2 and PB1 were compared with a standard market product containing indomethacin. The effect of formulation PA2 and PB1 was evaluated for acute inflammation in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and for chronic inflammation in complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in rats. Further histopathological and radiographic evaluation was performed. The investigated curcumin loaded proniosomal formula proved to be non-irritant, non-toxic, but had lower anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects than the marketed indomethacin products.

  11. Proniosomal formulation of curcumin having anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity in different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Rai, A K

    2012-10-01

    Curcumin, the active ingredient of the spice turmeric, has a long history as an herbal remedy for a variety of diseases. Transdermal drug delivery has been recognized as an alternative route to oral delivery. Proniosomes offer a versatile vesicle delivery concept with the potential for drug delivery via the transdermal route. In this study, different proniosomal gel bases were prepared by the ether injection method, using Span 60 and Span 80, Tween 20, cholesterol, and formulation PA2. They were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, revealing vesicular structures, and assessed for stability and effect on in vitro skin permeation using rat skin. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of formulation PA2 and PB1 were compared with a standard market product containing indomethacin. The effect of formulation PA2 and PB1 was evaluated for acute inflammation in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and for chronic inflammation in complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in rats. Further histopathological and radiographic evaluation was performed. The investigated curcumin loaded proniosomal formula proved to be non-irritant, non-toxic, but had lower anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects than the marketed indomethacin products. PMID:23136720

  12. Distinct Pathways of Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced with the Mucosal Administration of a Nanoemulsion Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Makidon, Paul E.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Blanco, Luz P.; Swanson, Benjamin; Smith, Douglas M.; Pham, Tiffany; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Baker, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal administration of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) adjuvant W805EC produces potent systemic and mucosal, Th-1– and Th-17–balanced cellular responses. However, its molecular mechanism of action has not been fully characterized and is of particular interest because NE does not contain specific ligands for innate immune receptors. In these studies, we demonstrate that W805EC NE adjuvant activates innate immunity, induces specific gene transcription, and modulates NF-κB activity via TLR2 and TLR4 by a mechanism that appears to be distinct from typical TLR agonists. Nasal immunization with NE-based vaccine showed that the TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 pathways and IL-12 and IL-12Rβ1 expression are not required for an Ab response, but they are essential for the induction of balanced Th-1 polarization and Th-17 cellular immunity. NE adjuvant induces MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 costimulatory molecule expression and dendritic cell maturation. Further, upon immunization with NE, adjuvant mice deficient in the CD86 receptor had normal Ab responses but significantly reduced Th-1 cellular responses, whereas animals deficient in both CD80 and CD86 or lacking CD40 failed to produce either humoral or cellular immunity. Overall, our data show that intranasal administration of Ag with NE induces TLR2 and TLR4 activation along with a MyD88-independent Ab response and a MyD88-dependent Th-1 and Th-17 cell–mediated immune response. These findings suggest that the unique properties of NE adjuvant may offer novel opportunities for understanding previously unrecognized mechanisms of immune activation important for generating effective mucosal and systemic immune responses. PMID:24532579

  13. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  14. Knockdown of FcγRIII in an arthritic temporomandibular joint reduced the nociceptive response

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Puri, Jyoti; Bellinger, Larry L.

    2010-01-01

    FcγRIII (CD16) is a receptor expressed on immune cells that selectively binds immmunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules, IgG binding results in cellular activation and cytokine release. IgG is an important factor in arthritis and can be found in arthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJ). We hypothesize that a reduction in FcγRIII expression in the TMJ tissues will reduce the nociceptive and inflammatory response in an inflamed joint. To test this hypothesis siRNA, either naked or complexed with linear polyethylenimine (PEI) was injected into the superior joint space of the TMJ. After administration of siRNA the joint was injected with saline or with complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Nociceptive responses were quantitated in the rat by measuring the animal’s meal duration. FcγRIII expression in the TMJ tissue was assayed by immunocytochemistry or western. Cleavage of FcγRIII transcript was then assayed by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends method (5′ RACE). Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IgG content was measured in the TMJ tissue by ELISA. The results indicate that injection of FcγRIII siRNA reduced the amount of FcγRIII in the TMJ tissues and that the transcript was cleaved in a manner consistent with a RNA interference mechanism. Moreover, injection of FcγRIII siRNA reduced the nociceptive response of rats with an arthritic TMJ and reduced the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We conclude that FcγRIII contributes to the pain resulting from inflammatory arthritis of the TMJ and that siRNA has the potential to be an effective treatment for this disorder. PMID:20589683

  15. Adjuvants and immunization strategies to induce influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk antibodies.

    PubMed

    Goff, Peter H; Eggink, Dirk; Seibert, Christopher W; Hai, Rong; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The global population remains vulnerable in the face of the next pandemic influenza virus outbreak, and reformulated vaccinations are administered annually to manage seasonal epidemics. Therefore, development of a new generation of vaccines is needed to generate broad and persistent immunity to influenza viruses. Here, we describe three adjuvants that enhance the induction of stalk-directed antibodies against heterologous and heterosubtypic influenza viruses when administered with chimeric HA proteins. Addavax, an MF59-like nanoemulsion, poly(I:C), and an RNA hairpin derived from Sendai virus (SeV) Cantell were efficacious intramuscularly. The SeV RNA and poly(I:C) also proved to be effective respiratory mucosal adjuvants. Although the quantity and quality of antibodies induced by the adjuvants varied, immunized mice demonstrated comparable levels of protection against challenge with influenza A viruses on the basis of HA stalk reactivity. Finally, we present that intranasally, but not intramuscularly, administered chimeric HA proteins induce mucosal IgA antibodies directed at the HA stalk. PMID:24223176

  16. The vaccine-site microenvironment induced by injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant, with or without melanoma peptides

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Rebecca C.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Petroni, Gina R.; Schaefer, Jochen T.; Brill, Louis B.; Molhoek, Kerrington R.; Deacon, Donna H.; Patterson, James W.; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have not been optimized. They depend on adjuvants to create an immunogenic microenvironment for antigen presentation. However, remarkably little is understood about cellular and molecular changes induced by these adjuvants in the vaccine microenvironment. We hypothesized that vaccination induces dendritic cell activation in the dermal vaccination microenvironment but that regulatory processes may also limit the effectiveness of repeated vaccination. We evaluated biopsies from immunization sites in two clinical trials of melanoma patients. In one study (Mel38), patients received one injection with an adjuvant mixture alone, comprised of incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) plus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In a second study, patients received multiple vaccinations with melanoma peptide antigens plus IFA. Single injections with adjuvant alone induced dermal inflammatory infiltrates consisting of B cells, T cells, mature dendritic cells (DC) and vessels resembling high endothelial venules (HEV). These cellular aggregates usually lacked organization and were transient. In contrast, multiple repeated vaccinations with peptides in adjuvant induced more organized and persistent lymphoid aggregates containing separate B and T cell areas, mature DC, HEV-like vessels, and lymphoid chemokines. Within these structures, there are proliferating CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, as well as FoxP3+CD4+ lymphocytes, suggesting a complex interplay of lymphoid expansion and regulation within the dermal immunization microenvironment. Further study of the physiology of the vaccine site microenvironment promises to identify opportunities for enhancing cancer vaccine efficacy by modulating immune activation and regulation at the site of vaccination. PMID:22130163

  17. The vaccine-site microenvironment induced by injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant, with or without melanoma peptides.

    PubMed

    Harris, Rebecca C; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A; Petroni, Gina R; Schaefer, Jochen T; Brill, Louis B; Molhoek, Kerrington R; Deacon, Donna H; Patterson, James W; Slingluff, Craig L

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have not been optimized. They depend on adjuvants to create an immunogenic microenvironment for antigen presentation. However, remarkably little is understood about cellular and molecular changes induced by these adjuvants in the vaccine microenvironment. We hypothesized that vaccination induces dendritic cell (DC) activation in the dermal vaccination microenvironment but that regulatory processes may also limit the effectiveness of repeated vaccination. We evaluated biopsies from immunization sites in 2 clinical trials of melanoma patients. In 1 study (Mel38), patients received 1 injection with an adjuvant mixture alone, composed of incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) plus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In a second study, patients received multiple vaccinations with melanoma peptide antigens plus IFA. Single injections with adjuvant alone induced dermal inflammatory infiltrates consisting of B cells, T cells, mature DCs, and vessels resembling high endothelial venules (HEVs). These cellular aggregates usually lacked organization and were transient. In contrast, multiple repeated vaccinations with peptides in adjuvant induced more organized and persistent lymphoid aggregates containing separate B and T cell areas, mature DCs, HEV-like vessels, and lymphoid chemokines. Within these structures, there are proliferating CD4and CD8 T lymphocytes, as well as FoxP3CD4 lymphocytes, suggesting a complex interplay of lymphoid expansion and regulation within the dermal immunization microenvironment. Further study of the physiology of the vaccine site microenvironment promises to identify opportunities for enhancing cancer vaccine efficacy by modulating immune activation and regulation at the site of vaccination. PMID:22130163

  18. Linking Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis With Decreases in Mortality Following Long-term Adjuvant Tamoxifen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The impressive first results of the Adjuvant Tamoxifen: Longer Against Shorter (ATLAS) and the adjuvant Tamoxifen To offer more (aTTom) trials both demonstrate that 10 years of tamoxifen is superior to five years of treatment. Tamoxifen is a nonsteroidal antiestrogen that blocks estrogen-stimulated tumor growth. Paradoxically, mortality decreases dramatically only in the decade after long-term tamoxifen is stopped. It is proposed that the evolution and clonal selection of micrometastases that acquire tamoxifen resistance now become increasingly vulnerable to endogenous estrogen-induced apoptosis. Laboratory and clinical studies confirm the concept, and supporting clinical evidence from the estrogen-alone trial in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), demonstrate that long-term estrogen-deprived women given exogenous physiologic estrogen have a decreased incidence of breast cancer and decreased mortality. It is proposed that a natural process of apoptosis is recruited to execute the long-term survival benefit of stopping ten years of adjuvant tamoxifen, but only after clonal selection of vulnerable breast cancer cells in an estrogen-deprived environment. PMID:25269699

  19. Serum IL-10 involved in morphine tolerance development during adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zaringhalam, Jalal; Hormozi, Asef; Tekieh, Elaheh; Razavi, Jafar; Khanmohammad, Ramin; Golabi, Sahar

    2014-06-01

    Opioid receptors play an important role in modulation of hyperalgesia in inflamed tissues, but chronic morphine application induces such side effects as tolerance. There is near communications between cytokines and mu opioid receptor expression. This study was aimed to assess the role of serum IL-10 in morphine tolerance development during adjuvant-induced arthritis. Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced on day 0 by single injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the rats' hindpaw. Hyperalgesia, edema, and spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) variations were assessed on 0, 7, 14, and 21 days of the study. For assessment of the morphine tolerance development, morphine effective dose (4 mg/kg) was administered from the 14th day after CFA injection and continued until the morphine post-dose paw withdrawal latency (PWL); it did not significantly differ from the baseline. For assessment of the effects of IL-10 on tolerance induction, a neutralizing dose (ND50) of anti-IL-10 was administered daily during different stages of the study. AA induction in the right hindpaw of rats resulted in unilateral inflammation and hyperalgesia within 21 days of the study. Anti-IL-10 antibody administration in the AA rats induced marked elevation of hyperalgesia compared to the AA control group. Our data also indicated that morphine effective anti-hyperalgesic dose significantly decreased in the AA rats compared to the control group, which this symptom was aligned with spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR) expression increase during AA. Moreover, there was a significant difference in morphine tolerance induction between the AA and control rats, and our results also demonstrated that IL-10 played an important role in tolerance-induction process. It can be concluded that morphine tolerance slowly progressed when administered morphine effective dose was reduced during AA chronic inflammation. On the other hand, it seems that increased level of serum IL-10 may affect morphine tolerance

  20. Antiarthritic activity of a polyherbal formulation against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Petchi, R. Ramesh; Parasuraman, S.; Vijaya, C.; Gopala Krishna, S. V.; Kumar, M. Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To formulate a polyherbal formulation and evaluate its antiarthritic activity against Freund's complete adjuvant induced arthritis in Female Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Glycosmis pentaphylla, Tridax procumbens, and Mangifera indica are well-known plants available throughout India and they are commonly used for the treatment of various diseases including arthritis. The polyherbal formulation was formulated using the ethanol extracts of the stem bark of G. pentaphylla, whole plant of T. procumbens, and leaves of M. indica. The polyherbal formulation contains the ethanol extracts of G. pentaphylla, T. procumbens, and M. indica in the ratio of 2:2:1. The quality of the finished product was evaluated as per the World Health Organization's guidelines for the quality control of herbal materials. Arthritis was induced in female Wistar rats using Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), and the antiarthritic effect of polyherbal formulation was studied at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg. The effects were compared with those of indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At the end of the study, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological analysis. The radiological examination was carried out before terminating the study. Results: Polyherbal formulation showed significant antiarthritic activity at 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively, and this effect was comparable with that of indomethacin. The antiarthritic activity of polyherbal formulation is supported by biochemical and hematological analysis. Conclusion: The polyherbal formulation showed signinicant antiarthritic activity against FCA-induced arthritis in female Wistar rats. PMID:26229343

  1. The melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreases inflammation and muscle wasting in arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gómez‐SanMiguel, Ana Belen; Martín, Ana Isabel; Nieto‐Bona, María Paz; Fernández‐Galaz, Carmen; Villanúa, María Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic inflammatory diseases induce cachexia that increases mortality and morbidity of the illness. Adjuvant‐induced arthritis is an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis that is associated with body weight loss and muscle wasting. Alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone has an anti‐inflammatory effect in arthritic rats and decreases muscle wasting. The aim of this work was to elucidate whether the anti‐cachectic action of alpha‐melanocyte stimulating hormone is mediated by the melanocortin receptor type 3 pathway. Methods Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by intradermal injection of Freund's adjuvant, and 6 days afterwards, arthritic rats were injected with the selective melanocortin receptor type 3 agonist d‐Trp(8)‐gammaMSH ( d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH) 500 µg/kg subcutaneously. or saline twice a day, for 10 days. Results d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased the external signs of inflammation and body weight loss, but it was not able to modify the anorexigenic effect of arthritis or the increase in hypothalamic cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) expression. In contrast, d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH prevented arthritis‐induced increase in hypothalamic IL‐1β and serum corticosterone levels and the decrease in serum IGF‐I levels. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH treatment also prevented arthritis‐induced NF‐kB(p65) phosphorylation and tumour necrosis factor‐α mRNA increase in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH administration to arthritic rats increased gastrocnemius mass, its cross‐sectional area, and mean fast fibre area. Those effects of d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH were associated with a decreased expression of atrogin‐1 and muscle ring‐finger protein‐1 in the gastrocnemius. In rats treated with saline, arthritis increased the expression of autophagy marker genes LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap1 as well as the conversion of LC3b I to LC3b II by lipidation in the gastrocnemius. d‐Trp(8)‐γMSH decreased gastrocnemius LC3b, Bnip‐3, and Gabarap

  2. Immunity to heat shock proteins and arthritic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, W

    1999-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a frequently used model of experimental arthritis. Because of its histopathology, which is reminiscent of rheumatoid arthritis in humans, AA is used as a model for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, it has become evident that AA is a typical T-cell-mediated autoimmune condition. Therefore, novel immunotherapies targeted to T cells can be developed in this model. Analysis of responding T cells in AA have now led to the definition of various antigens with potential relevance to arthritis, including human arthritic conditions. One such antigen defined in AA is the 60kD heat shock protein. Both T-cell vaccination approaches and active antigen immunizations and antigen toleration approaches have turned out to be effective in suppressing AA. PMID:10231009

  3. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of lymphocyte activation in serum from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Binderup, L; Bramm, E; Arrigoni-Martelli, E

    1978-01-01

    Serum from adjuvant arthritic rats inhibits the concanavalin A- (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide-induced stimulation of lymph node cells, leaving the basal and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation unaffected. Con A-stimulated 3H-thymidine uptake is also inhibited in rat spleen and peripheral blood lymphocytes and in dog peripheral blood lymphocytes. The intensity of the inhibitory activity in serum is positively correlated with the intensity of the secondary lesions of adjuvant arthritis. Inhibitory activity was not found in serum from rats bearing nystatin-induced inflammation. Serum fractionation studies indicated that the inhibitory activity cannot be attributed to low molecular weight alpha2-glycoproteins or to gamma-globulins and alpha2-macroglobulins, but it is present in a fraction migrating with beta-globulins. The inhibitory activity in arthritic rat serum is reduced by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but is unaltered by D-penicillamine. It is suggested that this inhibitory activity is part of the systemic response to an immunologically mediated inflammation. PMID:151867

  4. Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep.

    PubMed

    Luján, Lluís; Pérez, Marta; Salazar, Eider; Álvarez, Neila; Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Irusta, Silvia; Santamaría, Jesús; Insausti, Nerea; Cortés, Yerzol; Figueras, Luis; Cuartielles, Isabel; Vila, Miguel; Fantova, Enrique; Chapullé, José Luis Gracia

    2013-07-01

    We describe a form of the autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep, linked to the repetitive inoculation of aluminum-containing adjuvants through vaccination. The syndrome shows an acute phase that affects less than 0.5% of animals in a given herd, it appears 2-6 days after an adjuvant-containing inoculation and it is characterized by an acute neurological episode with low response to external stimuli and acute meningoencephalitis, most animals apparently recovering afterward. The chronic phase is seen in a higher proportion of flocks, it can follow the acute phase, and it is triggered by external stimuli, mostly low temperatures. The chronic phase begins with an excitatory phase, followed by weakness, extreme cachexia, tetraplegia and death. Gross lesions are related to a cachectic process with muscular atrophy, and microscopic lesions are mostly linked to a neurodegenerative process in both dorsal and ventral column of the gray matter of the spinal cord. Experimental reproduction of ovine ASIA in a small group of repeatedly vaccinated animals was successful. Detection of Al(III) in tissues indicated the presence of aluminum in the nervous tissue of experimental animals. The present report is the first description of a new sheep syndrome (ovine ASIA syndrome) linked to multiple, repetitive vaccination and that can have devastating consequences as it happened after the compulsory vaccination against bluetongue in 2008. The ovine ASIA syndrome can be used as a model of other similar diseases affecting both human and animals. A major research effort is needed in order to understand its complex pathogenesis.

  5. Free radical scavenging activity of Cleome gynandra L. leaves on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Narendhirakannan, R T; Subramanian, S; Kandaswamy, M

    2005-08-01

    The generation of free radicals has been implicated in the causation of several diseases of known and unknown etiologies such as, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, cancer, etc., and compounds that can scavenge free radicals have great potential in ameliorating these disease processes. The present study was aimed to investigate the possible anti-oxidant potential of Cleome gynandra leaf extract at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 30 days on adjuvant induced arthritis in experimental rats. Oral administration of C. gynandra leaf extract significantly increased the levels of lipid peroxides and activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and decreased the levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in arthritis induced rats. The free radical scavenging activity of the plant was further evidenced by histological observations made on the limb tissue. The presence of biologically active ingredients and vital trace elements in the leaves readily account for free radical scavenging property of C. gynandra. PMID:16132687

  6. Resin monomers act as adjuvants in Ni-induced allergic dermatitis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bando, K; Takahashi, H; Kinbara, M; Tanaka, Y; Kuroishi, T; Sasaki, K; Takano-Yamamoto, T; Sugawara, S; Endo, Y

    2014-11-01

    Resin monomers (RMs) are inflammatory agents and are thought to cause allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). However, mouse models are lacking, possibly because of the weak antigenicities of RMs. We previously reported that inflammatory substances can promote the allergic dermatitis (AD) induced by intradermally injected nickel (Ni-AD) in mice. Here, we examined the effects of RMs on Ni-AD. To sensitize mice to Ni, a mixture containing non-toxic concentrations of NiCl2 and an RM [either methyl methacrylate (MMA) or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)] was injected intraperitoneally or into ear-pinnae intradermally. Ten days later, a mixture containing various concentrations of NiCl2 and/or an RM was intradermally injected into ear-pinnae, and ear-swelling was measured. In adoptive transfer experiments, spleen cells from sensitized mice were transferred intravenously into non-sensitized recipients, and 24 h later NiCl2 was challenged to ear-pinnae. Whether injected intraperitoneally or intradermally, RM plus NiCl2 mixtures were effective in sensitizing mice to Ni. AD-inducing Ni concentrations were greatly reduced in the presence of MMA or HEMA (at the sensitization step from 10 mM to 5 or 50 µM, respectively, and at the elicitation step from 10 µM to 10 or 100 nM, respectively). These effects of RMs were weaker in IL-1-knockout mice and in macrophage-depleted mice. Cell-transfer experiments in IL-1-knockout mice indicated that both the sensitization and elicitation steps depended on IL-1. Challenge with an RM alone did not induce allergic ear-swelling in mice given the same RM + NiCl2 10 days before the challenge. These results suggest that RMs act as adjuvants, not as antigens, to promote Ni-AD by reducing the AD-inducing concentration of Ni, and that IL-1 and macrophages are critically important for the adjuvant effects. We speculate that what were previously thought of as "RM-ACD" might include ACD caused by antigens other than RMs that have undergone promotion by

  7. Resin Monomers Act as Adjuvants in Ni-induced Allergic Dermatitis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bando, K.; Takahashi, H.; Kinbara, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Kuroishi, T.; Sasaki, K.; Takano-Yamamoto, T.; Sugawara, S.; Endo, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Resin monomers (RMs) are inflammatory agents and are thought to cause allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). However, mouse models are lacking, possibly because of the weak antigenicities of RMs. We previously reported that inflammatory substances can promote the allergic dermatitis (AD) induced by intradermally injected nickel (Ni-AD) in mice. Here, we examined the effects of RMs on Ni-AD. To sensitize mice to Ni, a mixture containing non-toxic concentrations of NiCl2 and an RM [either methyl methacrylate (MMA) or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)] was injected intraperitoneally or into ear-pinnae intradermally. Ten days later, a mixture containing various concentrations of NiCl2 and/or an RM was intradermally injected into ear-pinnae, and ear-swelling was measured. In adoptive transfer experiments, spleen cells from sensitized mice were transferred intravenously into non-sensitized recipients, and 24 h later NiCl2 was challenged to ear-pinnae. Whether injected intraperitoneally or intradermally, RM plus NiCl2 mixtures were effective in sensitizing mice to Ni. AD-inducing Ni concentrations were greatly reduced in the presence of MMA or HEMA (at the sensitization step from 10 mM to 5 or 50 µM, respectively, and at the elicitation step from 10 µM to 10 or 100 nM, respectively). These effects of RMs were weaker in IL-1-knockout mice and in macrophage-depleted mice. Cell-transfer experiments in IL-1-knockout mice indicated that both the sensitization and elicitation steps depended on IL-1. Challenge with an RM alone did not induce allergic ear-swelling in mice given the same RM + NiCl2 10 days before the challenge. These results suggest that RMs act as adjuvants, not as antigens, to promote Ni-AD by reducing the AD-inducing concentration of Ni, and that IL-1 and macrophages are critically important for the adjuvant effects. We speculate that what were previously thought of as “RM-ACD” might include ACD caused by antigens other than RMs that have undergone promotion

  8. Histamine H3 and H4 receptor ligands modify vascular histamine levels in normal and arthritic large blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Zampeli, Evangelia; Palaiologou, Marina; Tiniakos, Dina; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence associates histamine with arthritis, but its implication in shaping vascular function in chronic inflammation remains largely elusive. This study explored the involvement of vascular histamine in the extra-articular responses in peripheral large blood vessels using a rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Histamine levels were increased in the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava of arthritic animals. Contrary to the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene, histamine induction was observed following administration of the H3 and H4 receptor ligands GSK334429 and JNJ7777120, respectively. In arthritis, prophylactic treatment with GSK334429 partially attenuated the clinical signs and restored basal histamine levels only in the abdominal aorta. This study is the first to implicate the H3 and H4 receptors in a concerted constitutive regulation of basal vascular histamine in the rat large blood vessels and to identify the H3 receptor as a component that may influence arterial histamine during the onset of arthritis.

  9. Antinociceptive Effect of Racemic Flurbiprofen and Caffeine Co-Administration in an Arthritic Gout-Type Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liévano-Reyes, Ricardo; Pérez-Méndez, Hermínia Ines; Solís-Oba, Aida; Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research Drug combinations are routinely used in the treatment of pain. In drug associations, adjuvants such as caffeine, are employed with different non-steroidal anti-inflammatories drugs (NSAIDs), however, at present does not exist studies showing the effect of the combination of racemic flurbiprofen (rac-Flur) in association with caffeine. The objective of this work was to evaluate the combination of rac-Flur + caffeine oral in arthritic gout-type pain in rats. The antinociceptive effects of the rac-Flur alone and in combination with caffeine were analyzed on a pain-induced functional impairment model in rat. rac-Flur induced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect and caffeine did not present any effect. The combination of rac-Flur and caffeine achieve a higher percentage of antinociceptive effect compared with the individual administration of rac-Flur. The dose-response curve (DRCs) shows that the combination of rac-Flur (31.6 mg/kg) + caffeine (17.8 mg/kg) exhibited the maximal antinociceptive efficacy (294.0 ± 21.2 area units), while rac-Flur alone (31.6 mg/kg) showed 207.2 ± 35.2 au, thus indicating an increase in efficacy (potentiation). Furthermore, the DRCs of the combinations presented a displacement to the left, indicating a change in the potency. Caffeine is able to increase the effect of rac-Flur in the arthritic gout-type pain in rats. Drug Dev Res 77 : 192-198, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241234

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of Racemic Flurbiprofen and Caffeine Co-Administration in an Arthritic Gout-Type Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liévano-Reyes, Ricardo; Pérez-Méndez, Hermínia Ines; Solís-Oba, Aida; Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research Drug combinations are routinely used in the treatment of pain. In drug associations, adjuvants such as caffeine, are employed with different non-steroidal anti-inflammatories drugs (NSAIDs), however, at present does not exist studies showing the effect of the combination of racemic flurbiprofen (rac-Flur) in association with caffeine. The objective of this work was to evaluate the combination of rac-Flur + caffeine oral in arthritic gout-type pain in rats. The antinociceptive effects of the rac-Flur alone and in combination with caffeine were analyzed on a pain-induced functional impairment model in rat. rac-Flur induced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect and caffeine did not present any effect. The combination of rac-Flur and caffeine achieve a higher percentage of antinociceptive effect compared with the individual administration of rac-Flur. The dose-response curve (DRCs) shows that the combination of rac-Flur (31.6 mg/kg) + caffeine (17.8 mg/kg) exhibited the maximal antinociceptive efficacy (294.0 ± 21.2 area units), while rac-Flur alone (31.6 mg/kg) showed 207.2 ± 35.2 au, thus indicating an increase in efficacy (potentiation). Furthermore, the DRCs of the combinations presented a displacement to the left, indicating a change in the potency. Caffeine is able to increase the effect of rac-Flur in the arthritic gout-type pain in rats. Drug Dev Res 77 : 192-198, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of methotrexate on the mandibular development of arthritic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Philipp; Rafayelyan, Smbat; Minden, Kirsten; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe disturbances of the mandibular development. Methotrexate (MTX) is often administered as a common used remission-inducing agent to treat this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low dose MTX on the mandibular growth in arthritic rabbits. Subjects and methods: Eighteen 10-week-old female New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups with six animals in each group. After being sensitized to ovalbumin (OA), the first and the second group received intra-articular injections with OA. The first group remained untreated, the second was treated by weekly injections of MTX. Cephalograms were taken from each animal at 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 weeks of age and six mandibular distances measured. Results: All distances showed an increase between 10 and 20 per cent, whereas growth was more accentuated in the sagittal dimension. Significant differences in the overall growth could be observed between the arthritic and the control animals and less accentuated between the arthritic and the MTX animals. In contrast, existing differences between the groups were not significant during the intervals, but time had the greatest influence on mandibular growth. Conclusions: MTX seems to have a positive impact on growth in rabbits suffering from experimental arthritis of the TMJ. PMID:25518996

  12. Regression of Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bekkum, Dirk W.; Bohre, Els P. M.; Houben, Paul F. J.; Knaan-Shanzer, Shoshan

    1989-12-01

    Total body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation was found to be an effective treatment for adjuvant arthritis induced in rats. This treatment is most effective when applied shortly after the clinical manifestation of arthritis--i.e., 4-7 weeks after administration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transplantation of bone marrow at a later stage results in a limited recovery, in that the inflammatory reaction regresses but the newly formed excessive bone is not eliminated. Local irradiation of the affected joints had no effect on the disease. It could also be excluded that the recovery of arthritis following marrow transplantation is due to lack of available antigen. Transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow is as effective as that of allogeneic bone marrow from a rat strain that is not susceptible to induction of adjuvant arthritis. The beneficial effect of this treatment cannot be ascribed to the immunosuppressive effect of total body irradiation, since treatment with the highly immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporin A resulted in a regression of the joint swelling but relapse occurred shortly after discontinuation of the treatment.

  13. Mechanism of Xinfeng Capsule on Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Analysis of Urinary Metabolomic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-juan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the potential effects of Xinfeng capsule (XFC) on urine metabolic profiling in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS). GC-TOF/MS technology was combined with multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). These methods were used to distinguish the healthy group, untreated group, and XFC treated group and elucidate potential biomarkers. Nine potential biomarkers such as hippuric acid, adenine, and L-dopa were identified as potential biomarkers, indicating that purine metabolism, fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and energy metabolism were disturbed in AA rats. This study demonstrated that XFC is efficacious for RA and explained its potential metabolomics mechanism. PMID:26989506

  14. Fish Oil and Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis: Inhibitory Effect on Leukocyte Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Estevão-Silva, Camila Fernanda; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Silva-Comar, Francielli Maria de Souza; Kummer, Raquel; Tronco, Rafael Prizon; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    Fish oil, a rich source of n-3 fatty acids, has been studied for its beneficial effects in many diseases. Recent studies have shown the robust anti-inflammatory activity of fish oil (FO), when administered orally to rats, in models of acute inflammation. Herein, we investigated if treatment with fish oil preparation (FOP) could interfere with the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. We also evaluated the effect of treatment on rolling behavior and leukocyte adhesion in vivo and on leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro. Treatment with FOP (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) initiated on the day of induction of arthritis (day 0) and maintained for 21 days reduced the total number of leukocytes recruited into the joint cavity, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in arthritic rats, and leukocyte migration in response to stimulation with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Together, our data provide evidence that FOP plays an important inhibitory role in the recruitment of leukocytes into the joint cavity of arthritic rats. PMID:26378008

  15. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces antibody-independent memory responses in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Offersen, Rasmus; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S

    2012-08-01

    HIV-patients have excess of pneumococcal infection. We immunized 40 HIV-patients twice with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar, Pfizer) +/- a TLR9 agonist (CPG 7909). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and cytokine concentrations measured. The CPG 7909 adjuvant group had significantly higher relative cytokine responses than the placebo group for IL-1β, IL-2R, IL-6, IFN-γ and MIP-β, which, did not correlate with IgG antibody responses. These findings suggests that CPG 7909 as adjuvant to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces cellular memory to pneumococcal polysaccharides in HIV-patients, independently of the humoral response. PMID:22854665

  16. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of boswellic acid-NSAID hybrid molecules as anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agents.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Suvarna; Kiran, K R; Kumar, Krishna; Diwakar, Latha; Reddy, G Chandrasekara

    2015-06-15

    Methyl esters of the β-boswellic acid (BA) and 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA) obtained from Boswellia serrata resin were subjected to Steglich esterification with the different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) viz., ibuprofen, naproxen, diclophenac and indomethacin. The novel hybrids of methyl boswellate (5-8) and that of methyl 11-keto boswellate (9-12) were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema model and anti-arthritic activity by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in Wister albino rat. Significant inhibition on carrageenan-induced paw edema has been observed with 5, 6 and 10 where as in CFA induced rats, hybrids 5, 8, 9 and 12 exhibited pronounced antiarthritic activity. Hybrid molecules 5 and 9 have been found to be more effective in inhibiting in-vivo COX-2 than ibuprofen by itself, thus showing the synergistic effect. Hybrid 5 and 9 tested for in-vitro lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 (LOX/COX-2) inhibitory activity. The studies revealed that both 5 and 9 inhibited COX-2 relatively better than LOX enzyme. PMID:26010018

  18. Characterisation of proton pump antibodies and stomach pathology in gastritis induced by neonatal immunisation without adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D L; Sentry, J W; Toh, B H

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been reported that neonatal BALB.D2 mice injected with native proton pump antigens without adjuvant develop an irreversible gastritis (Claeys et al, 1997). The ease of inititating gastritis in the neonate stands in contrast with the difficulty in initiating gastritis in adult mice that require repeated immunisation in adjuvant that is reversible following cessation of immunisation (Scarff et al, 1997). In view of these contrasting observations, we set out to ascertain whether we could confirm the observations in neonatal mice as well as further characterise the pathology and the autoantibody response. We found that neonatal gastritis-susceptible BALB/c mice (n=12), immunised with either pig or mouse gastric membranes in the absence of adjuvant, develop gastritis without circulating antibody to parietal cells detected by immunofluorescence, a hallmark of murine and human gastritis (Toh et al, 1997). However, mice immunized with pig gastric membranes (n=6) had circulating antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to recombinant alpha and/or beta subunit of gastric H+/K+-ATPase expressed by insect cells (Sfalpha and Sfbeta). Four mice from this cohort with antibodies to Sfbeta also had reactivity to gastric H+/K+-ATPase by ELISA, and 3 immunoblotted the beta but not the alpha subunit of the ATPase. In the cohort of mice immunised with mouse gastric membranes (n=6), four produced antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to Sfalpha, two of which were also reactive to Sfbeta and one developed antibodies detected by ELISA to gastric H+/K+-ATPase. However, no members of this cohort had antibodies reactive by immunoblotting to either the beta or alpha subunit of the ATPase. In all cases gastritic stomachs were characterised by areas deficient in ribosome-rich zymogenic cells and marked reductions in H+/K+-ATPase-positive parietal cells. Metaplasia detected by Maxwell stain, as clusters of mucus-producing cells throughout gastric units, were non

  19. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  20. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs.

  1. The effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heesung; Son, Taeyoon; Lee, Aeju; Youn, Inchan; Seo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Han Sung; Jung, Byungjo

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) on the acute progression of arthritis. Previous studies showed controversial clinical results regarding the effects of low-level laser therapy on arthritis, with the outcomes depending upon stimulation parameters such as laser wavelength and dosage. Based on the positive effects of MILNS on osteoporotic mice, we hypothesized that MILNS could potentially suppress the progression of arthritis owing to its biostimulation effects. Eight C57BL/6 mice with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis were used as acute progression arthritis models and divided into the laser and control groups (n = 4 each). In the laser group, after minimally invasive laser stimulation, laser speckle contrast images (LSCIs) were obtained every 6 h for a total of 108 h. The LSCIs in the control group were obtained without laser stimulation. The effects of MILNS on the acute progression of arthritis were indirectly evaluated by calculating the paw area and the average laser speckle index (LSI) at the arthritis-induced area. Moreover, the macrophage population was estimated in the arthritis-induced area. Compared to the control group, the laser group showed (1) lower relative variations of the paw area, (2) lower average LSI in the arthritis-induced area, and (3) lower macrophage population in the arthritis-induced area. These results indicate that MILNS may suppress the acute progression of CFA-induced arthritis in mice and may thus be used as a potential treatment modality of arthritis in clinics.

  2. Use of Adjuvants to Enhance the Immune Response Induced by a DNA Vaccine Against Bovine Herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Sebastián; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Zamorano, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the induction of humoral and cellular immune response by a DNA vaccine based on the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) glycoprotein D with commercial adjuvants (SEPPIC), in the murine model and in a preliminary assay in cattle, in order to select vaccines candidates that can improve cellular response. A DNA vaccine with most of the adjuvants used in this study was able to elicit a gD and viral-specific humoral immune response in vaccinated mice. Nevertheless, only a DNA vaccine with Montanide GEL 01 PR and Montanide Essai 903110 induced viral-specific proliferation and the highest levels of IFN-γ secretion. Since a cellular response is important to deal with BoHV-1 infection, both adjuvants were tested in a small trial using bovines to corroborate improvement of a cellular response in the natural host. It was observed that a DNA vaccine with Montanide Essai 903110 induced the highest BoHV-1 specific IFN-γ production in cattle. So, this adjuvant is proposed as a suitable candidate to be tested in a BoHV-1 DNA vaccine for protection against viral challenge in bovines.

  3. Biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G; Wirth, Stephan H; Espinosa, Norman

    2012-12-01

    Understanding biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint can aid in analysis of an underlying clinical problem and provide a strategic basis for a more optimal management. The challenge to the clinician and the biomechanist is that the mechanical complexity of the ankle joint still clouds current understanding. This article provides an overview of current understanding of functional ankle anatomy, how this function can be altered in the degenerated ankle, and how surgical intervention further affects foot and ankle biomechanics. The focus is on how altered loading of neighboring joints in the midfoot and hindfoot may induce postoperative joint remodeling and can manifest in secondary clinical problems.

  4. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  5. Protective potential of MMR vaccine against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahman, Rehab S; Suddek, Ghada M; Gameil, Nariman M; El-Kashef, Hassan A

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MMR vaccine on inflammation which was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomly divided into the control, CFA, MMR and CFA + MMR groups. Inflammatory symptoms such as paw oedema was measured in CFA-injected rats' paw. Body weight changes and alterations in some haematological parameters and oxidative stress markers following CFA injection were checked. In CFA-inflammed rats, there was a significant increase in rat paw thickness and decrease in body weight increment. MMR exhibited a significant anti-inflammatory effect as manifested by reduction in paw thickness and normal gain in body weight when administered 1 week prior to induction of inflammation. The altered haematological parameters (TLC) and oxidative stress markers (MDA, GSH, SOD) in the inflammed rats were significantly brought back to near normal by MMR treatment. In conclusion, MMR vaccine showed a reduction in rat paw thickness and it could significantly normalize the haematological and biochemical abnormalities in CFA-induced inflammatory pain model in rats. Our data suggested that MMR could be a potential protective agent against certain types of inflammatory pain. Further histopathological and radiological studies are required to confirm the possibility of developing novel therapeutic vaccines against some forms of arthritis.

  6. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A.; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity. PMID:25599112

  7. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity.

  8. Detecting changes in arthritic fibroblast-like synoviocytes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-Wook; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Sangmook; Lim, Jin Ik

    2015-11-01

    The morphological and quantitative differences between arthritic fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and normal FLS were determined as an effective diagnostic tool for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) mice and normal mice were prepared and FLS were isolated by enzymatic digestion from the synovial tissue of sacrificed mice at 5-week and 8-week pathogenesis periods. Analysis of cell morphology using AFM revealed that the surface roughness around the nucleus and around the branched cytoplasm was significantly higher in CIA FLS (P < 0.05) than that in normal FLS. In addition, the roughness of two different sites on the arthritic FLS increased with an increase in the duration of pathogenesis. These results strongly suggest that AFM can be widely used as a diagnostic tool in cytopathology to detect the early signs of RA and various others diseases at the intercellular level.

  9. Hyperoside exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects in LPS-stimulated human fibroblast-like synoviocytes in vitro and in mice with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang-nan; Yan, En-zhi; Wang, Han-ming; Sui, Hai-juan; Liu, Zhou; Gao, Wei; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Hyperoside is a flavonol glycoside mainly found in plants of the genera Hypericum and Crataegus, which has shown anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperoside on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) in vitro and on mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in vivo. Methods: FLSs were isolated from primary synovial tissues obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and exposed to LPS (1 μg/mL). Cell viability and proliferation were measured with MTT and BrdU assay. Cell migration was assessed using wound-healing assay and Transwell assay. DNA binding of NF-κB was measured using a TransAM-NFkappaB kit. The localization of p65 subunit was detected with immunocytochemistry. CIA was induced in mice by primary immunization with Bovine Type II collagen (CII) emulsified in CFA, followed by a booster injection 3 weeks later. The arthritic mice were treated with hyperoside (25, 50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 3 weeks, and the joint tissues were harvested for histological analysis. Results: Hyperoside (10, 50, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced proliferation and migration of human RA FLSs in vitro. Furthermore, hyperoside decreased LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 and MMP-9 in the cells. Moreover, hyperoside inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65 and IκBα, and suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 and DNA biding of NF-κB in the cells. Three-week administration of hyperoside significantly decreased the clinical scores, and alleviated synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration and cartilage damage in mice with CIA. Conclusion: Hyperoside inhibits LPS-induced proliferation, migration and inflammatory responses in human RA FLSs in vitro by suppressing activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which contributes to the therapeutic effects observed in mice with CIA. PMID:27041460

  10. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-01-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity. PMID:892904

  11. Effect of oil composition on both adjuvant-induced arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative and peptidoglycans in various rat strains.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, M; Beck, F J; Alexander, M

    1977-08-01

    We confirmed that, when immunized with a conventional complete Freund adjuvant (water in oil), Lewis rats were highly susceptible to adjuvant arthritis, Fisher rats were less susceptible, and Buffalo rats were much less susceptible. However, mycobacterial delipidated cells in squalane (squalane-type adjuvant) produced severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence even in the less susceptible rat strains except for Buffalo rats. With regard to an immune response, Freund complete adjuvant induced strong delayed hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) and peptidoglycan (PG) in all rat strains used, Whereas the squalane-type adjuvant induced these hypersensitivities only in Lewis and Buffalo rats, but not in Fisher and Brown Norway rats. No correlation was found between development of arthritis and delayed hypersensitivity to either PPD or PG, or both. It seems that PPD hypersensitivity may be inherited differently from PG hypersensitivity.

  12. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  13. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  14. Pulmonary gallium uptake in rats with granulomatosis induced by complete Freund adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislas-Leguern, G.; Masse, R.; Jaubert, F.; Chretien, J.; Huchon, G.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of gallium-67 uptake in lung granulomatosis, we studied 13 rats in which lung granulomatosis was induced by injection of complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) and 14 controls. Gallium uptake was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lavaged lung. The cells responsible for gallium uptake were identified by latent image activation autoradiography. Gallium activity in both lavaged lungs and bronchoalveolar cells (BAC) was higher in CFA-treated animals than in controls (172,205 +/- 134,783 DPM versus 44,456 +/- 14,486 DPM +/- SD (p less than 0.05) and 40,083 +/- 16,350 DPM versus 9100 +/- 4114 DPM (p less than 0.05), respectively). In control rats, about two-thirds of total lung gallium was located in the interstitium, whereas in CFA-treated rats it was found in the mononuclear cells of lung granulomas. Gallium tracks were more numerous in the alveolar macrophages (AM) of CFA-treated rats than in control AM (28.4 +/- 10.0/field versus 8.4 +/- 3.8/field, p less than 0.001) but the number of tracks was proportional to the number of AM (52.4 +/- 18.7 versus 12.2 +/- 4.3, respectively; p less than 0.001). It is concluded that in rats with CFA-induced lung granulomatosis 1) pulmonary gallium uptake increases, 2) mononuclear cells are responsible for this uptake in both granulomas and AM, and 3) the increased uptake is due to the increased number of mononuclear cells.

  15. Laser-assisted intradermal delivery of adjuvant-free vaccines targeting XCR1+ dendritic cells induces potent antitumoral responses.

    PubMed

    Terhorst, Dorothea; Fossum, Even; Baranska, Anna; Tamoutounour, Samira; Malosse, Camille; Garbani, Mattia; Braun, Reinhard; Lechat, Elmira; Crameri, Reto; Bogen, Bjarne; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    The development of vaccines inducing efficient CD8(+) T cell responses is the focus of intense research. Dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the XCR1 chemokine receptor, also known as CD103(+) or CD8α(+) DCs, excel in the presentation of extracellular Ags to CD8(+) T cells. Because of its high numbers of DCs, including XCR1(+) DCs, the skin dermis is an attractive site for vaccine administration. By creating laser-generated micropores through the epidermis, we targeted a model protein Ag fused to XCL1, the ligand of XCR1, to dermal XCR1(+) DCs and induced Ag-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses. Efficient immunization required the emigration of XCR1(+) dermal DCs to draining lymph nodes and occurred irrespective of TLR signaling. Moreover, a single intradermal immunization protected mice against melanoma tumor growth in prophylactic and therapeutic settings, in the absence of exogenous adjuvant. The mild inflammatory milieu created in the dermis by skin laser microporation itself most likely favored the development of potent T cell responses in the absence of exogenous adjuvants. The existence of functionally equivalent XCR1(+) dermal DCs in humans should permit the translation of laser-assisted intradermal delivery of a tumor-specific vaccine targeting XCR1(+) DCs to human cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, considering that the use of adjuvants in vaccines is often associated with safety issues, the possibility of inducing protective responses against melanoma tumor growth independently of the administration of exogenous adjuvants should facilitate the development of safer vaccines. PMID:25941327

  16. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  17. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  18. [The sick building syndrome as a part of 'ASIA' (autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants)].

    PubMed

    Maoz-Segal, Ramit; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The entity 'sick building syndrome' is poorly defined and comprises of a set of symptoms resulting from environmental exposure to a work or a living environment. The symptoms are mainly "allergic"-like and include nasal, eye, and mucous membrane irritation, dry skin as well as respiratory symptoms and general symptoms such as fatigue, lethargy, headaches and fever. The Autoimmune [Auto-inflammatory] Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA) is a wider term which describes the role of various environmental factors in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diseases. Factors entailing an immune adjuvant activity such as infectious agents, silicone, aluminium salts and others were found in association with defined and non-defined immune mediated diseases. The sick building syndrome and ASIA share a similar complex of signs and symptoms and probably the same immunological mechanisms which further support a common denominator. PMID:25856869

  19. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  20. Effect of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc root extracts on behavioral and radiology changes in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Madan L; Jalalpure, Sunil S

    2011-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of petroleum ether, chloroform, and methanol root extracts of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc (Family: Zingiberaceae) on behavioral and radiology aspects of Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA)-induced monoarthritis in left ankle joint of rats using open-field test. Traditionally, Curcuma zedoaria root has been used as anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic drug. Behavioral aspects include latency time to explore, ambulatory, rearing, grooming, urination, and defecation. Animals were divided into ten groups each of six rats, all the animals were subjected to open-field test before the induction of arthritis at 0 day and thereafter 3, 7, 14 21, 28, 35, and 42 days of postinoculation FCA injection. The rat was placed in an open field and observed all behavioral aspects for 5 minutes and radiography analysis was made on day 42. Selected doses were 10 mg/kg.i.p. Indomethacin 200 mg/kg.p.o. marketed herbal drug Rumalaya forte and 200 and 400 mg/kg.p.o. of each extracts, respectively. The results showed significant decrease in ambulation and rearing; however, increase in latency time to explore and grooming, urination, and defecation in control group, but in contrast, drug-treated groups showed significant recovery in all behavioral aspects except methanol groups. On the basis of radiography examination, control and methanol groups showed highest swelling compared with normal group; however, all drug-treated groups showed significant reduced swelling. Treatments with petroleum ether and chloroform extracts recovery were observed in behavioral and radiological aspects in arthritic rats. PMID:22171314

  1. Ossicular Bone Damage and Hearing Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Correlated Functional and High Resolution Morphometric Study in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, a body of comparative case-control studies suggests that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are more prone to developing hearing loss (HL). However, experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis is still lacking because the human auditory organ is not readily accessible. The aim of this study was to determine the association between bone damage to the ossicles of the middle ear and HL, using a widely accepted murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (RA mice). Diarthrodial joints in the middle ear were examined with microcomputer tomography (microCT), and hearing function was assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR). RA mice exhibited significantly decreased hearing sensitivity compared to age-matched controls. Additionally, a significant narrowing of the incudostapedial joint space and an increase in the porosity of the stapes were observed. The absolute latencies of all ABR waves were prolonged, but mean interpeak latencies were not statistically different. The observed bone defects in the middle ear that were accompanied by changes in ABR responses were consistent with conductive HL. This combination suggests that conductive impairment is at least part of the etiology of RA-induced HL in a murine model. Whether the inner ear sustains bone erosion or other pathology, and whether the cochlear nerve sustains pathology await subsequent studies. Considering the fact that certain anti-inflammatories are ototoxic in high doses, monitoring RA patients’ auditory function is advisable as part of the effort to ensure their well-being. PMID:27690307

  2. The effect of curcumin and its nanoformulation on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoling; Sun, YanHua; Liu, Ziliang; Zhang, Mingqin; Li, Chunqing; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), induced by the prolonged inappropriate inflammatory responses, is one of the most prevalent of all chronic inflammatory joint diseases. Curcumin (CM), a yellow hydrophobic polyphenol derived from the herb turmeric, has various pharmacological activities against many chronic diseases and acts by inhibiting cell proliferation and metastasis and downregulating various factors, including nuclear factor kappa B, interleukin-1β and TNF-α. Given the pathogenesis of RA, we hypothesized that the drug also has antiarthritic effects. The aims of the present study included the following: 1) examining the therapeutic effect of CM administered via intravenous (iv) injection on RA and 2) formulating the drug into oil–water nanoemulsions (Ns) to overcome the low oral bioavailability of CM and achieve oral delivery of the drug. Methods The effect of CM administered through iv injection on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was studied in terms of paw swelling, weight indices of the thymus and spleen, and pathological changes in nuclear factor kappa B expression and inflammatory cytokines. Methotrexate was used as a positive control. The CM-Ns were prepared using a high-pressure homogenizing method and characterized with respect to the particle size and morphology. The stability of the CM-Ns in simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids and in vitro release were also investigated. A pharmacokinetic study of the CM-Ns and suspensions in which the plasma levels were determined using an high performance liquid chromatography method and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a statistical moment theory was also performed in rats. Results CM administered via iv injection had a therapeutic effect on RA similar to methotrexate. CM-Ns with a diameter of approximately 150 nm were successfully prepared, and the drug was well encapsulated into the Ns without degradation in simulated GI conditions. The area under the curve (AUC) and Cmax

  3. Pathogen-Mimicking Polymeric Nanoparticles based on Dopamine Polymerization as Vaccines Adjuvants Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Fan, Qingze; Wang, Lianyan; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Aiming to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines, a novel antigen delivery and adjuvant system based on dopamine polymerization on the surface of poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple mechanisms of immunity enhancement is developed. The mussel-inspired biomimetic polydopamine (pD) not only serves as a coating to NPs but also functionalizes NP surfaces. The method is facile and mild including simple incubation of the preformed NPs in the weak alkaline dopamine solution, and incorporation of hepatitis B surface antigen and TLR9 agonist unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motif with the pD surface. The as-constructed NPs possess pathogen-mimicking manners owing to their size, shape, and surface molecular immune-activating properties given by CpG. The biocompatibility and biosafety of these pathogen-mimicking NPs are confirmed using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Pathogen-mimicking NPs hold great potential as vaccine delivery and adjuvant system due to their ability to: 1) enhance cytokine secretion and immune cell recruitment at the injection site; 2) significantly activate and maturate dendritic cells; 3) induce stronger humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. Furthermore, this simple and versatile dopamine polymerization method can be applicable to endow NPs with characteristics to mimic pathogen structure and function, and manipulate NPs for the generation of efficacious vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26849717

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A; Salgado, Ana Paula C; Cunha, Thiago M; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L O; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4(+) T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  5. Combination therapies in adjuvant with topical ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch premalignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Fu; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2012-03-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer has becomes the fastest growth male cancer disease due to the betel nut chewing habit combing with smoking and alcohol-drinking lifestyle of people. In order to eliminate the systemic phototoxic effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), this study was designed to use a topical ALA-mediated PDT for treatment of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions. DMBA was applied to one of the buccal pouches of hamsters thrice a week for 10 to 12 weeks. Cancerous lesions were induced and proven by histological examination. These DMBA-induced cancerous lesions were used for testing the efficacy of topical ALA-mediated PDT. Before PDT, fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine when ALA reached its peak level in the lesional epithelial cells after topical application of ALA gel. We found that ALA reached its peak level in precancerous lesions about 2.5 hrs after topical application of ALA gel. The cancerous lesions in hamsters were then treated with topical ALA -mediated PDT with light exposure dose of 150 J/cm2 using LED 635 nm fiber-guided light device. Visual examination demonstrated that adjuvant topical ALA -mediated PDT group has shown better therapeutic results in compared to those of non-adjuvant topical ALA-mediated PDT group for DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch precancerous lesions.

  6. Natural acetabular orientation in arthritic hips

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, S. T.; Deakin, A. H.; Deep, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acetabular component orientation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) influences results. Intra-operatively, the natural arthritic acetabulum is often used as a reference to position the acetabular component. Detailed information regarding its orientation is therefore essential. The aim of this study was to identify the acetabular inclination and anteversion in arthritic hips. Methods Acetabular inclination and anteversion in 65 symptomatic arthritic hips requiring THA were measured using a computer navigation system. All patients were Caucasian with primary osteoarthritis (29 men, 36 women). The mean age was 68 years (SD 8). Mean inclination was 50.5° (SD 7.8) in men and 52.1° (SD 6.7) in women. Mean anteversion was 8.3° (SD 8.7) in men and 14.4° (SD 11.6) in women. Results The difference between men and women in terms of anteversion was significant (p = 0.022). In 75% of hips, the natural orientation was outside the safe zone described by Lewinnek et al (anteversion 15° ± 10°; inclination 40° ± 10°). Conclusion When using the natural acetabular orientation to guide component placement, it is important to be aware of the differences between men and women, and that in up to 75% of hips natural orientation may be out of what many consider to be a safe zone. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:6–10. PMID:25628463

  7. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  8. Adjuvant liposomal doxorubicin markedly affects radiofrequency (RF) ablation-induced effects on periablational microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwan; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Tasawwar, Beenish; Sawant, Rupa R.; Levchenko, Tatyana; Kumar, Gaurav; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Ahmed, Muneeb

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of radiofrequency (RF) ablation without and with adjuvant IV liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®) on microvessel morphology and patency and intratumoral drug delivery and retention. Materials and Methods A total of 133 tumors/animals were used. First, single subcutaneous tumors (R3230 in Fischer rats, and 786-0 in nude mice) were randomized to receive RF alone or no treatment, and sacrificed 0-72hr post-treatment. Next, combined RF/liposomal doxorubicin (1mg given 15min post-RF) was studied in R3230 tumors at 0-72hr post-treatment. Histopathologic assessment including immunohistochemical staining for ced caspase-3), heat shock protein 70 and CD34 were performed to assess morphologic vessel appearance, vessel diameter, and microvascular density. Subsequently, animals were randomized to receive RF alone, RF/liposomal doxorubicin, or control tumors, followed by intravenous fluorescent-labeled liposomes (a surrogate marker) given 0-24hr post-RF to permit qualitative assessment. Results RF ablation alone results in enlarged and dysmorphic vessels from 0-4hr, peaking at 12-24hr post-RF, occurring preferentially closer to the electrode. The addition of doxorubicin resulted in earlier vessel contraction (mean vessel area 47539±9544μm² vs. 1854±458μm² for RF alone at 15min, p<0.05). Combined RF/liposomal doxorubicin produced similar fluorescence 1hr post-treatment (40.88±33.53 AU/μm² vs. 22.1±13.19 AU/μm², p=0.14), but significantly less fluorescence at 4hr (24.3±3.65 AU/μm² vs. 2.8 ±3.14 AU/μm², p<0.002) compared to RF alone denoting earlier reduction in microvascular patency. Conclusion RF ablation induces morphologic changes to vessels within the ablation zone lasting up to 12-24hr post-treatment. The addition liposomal doxorubicin causes early vessel contraction and a reduction in periablational microvascular patency. Such changes will likely need to be considered when determining optimal drug administration and imaging

  9. Aluminum adjuvant linked to Gulf War illness induces motor neuron death in mice.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Michael S; Wong, Margaret C; Tabata, Rena C; Garry, Robert F; Shaw, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Gulf War illness (GWI) affects a significant percentage of veterans of the 1991 conflict, but its origin remains unknown. Associated with some cases of GWI are increased incidences of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological disorders. Whereas many environmental factors have been linked to GWI, the role of the anthrax vaccine has come under increasing scrutiny. Among the vaccine's potentially toxic components are the adjuvants aluminum hydroxide and squalene. To examine whether these compounds might contribute to neuronal deficits associated with GWI, an animal model for examining the potential neurological impact of aluminum hydroxide, squalene, or aluminum hydroxide combined with squalene was developed. Young, male colony CD-1 mice were injected with the adjuvants at doses equivalent to those given to US military service personnel. All mice were subjected to a battery of motor and cognitive-behavioral tests over a 6-mo period postinjections. Following sacrifice, central nervous system tissues were examined using immunohistochemistry for evidence of inflammation and cell death. Behavioral testing showed motor deficits in the aluminum treatment group that expressed as a progressive decrease in strength measured by the wire-mesh hang test (final deficit at 24 wk; about 50%). Significant cognitive deficits in water-maze learning were observed in the combined aluminum and squalene group (4.3 errors per trial) compared with the controls (0.2 errors per trial) after 20 wk. Apoptotic neurons were identified in aluminum-injected animals that showed significantly increased activated caspase-3 labeling in lumbar spinal cord (255%) and primary motor cortex (192%) compared with the controls. Aluminum-treated groups also showed significant motor neuron loss (35%) and increased numbers of astrocytes (350%) in the lumbar spinal cord. The findings suggest a possible role for the aluminum adjuvant in some neurological features associated with GWI and possibly an

  10. Vaccine adjuvant systems containing monophosphoryl lipid A and QS21 induce strong and persistent humoral and T cell responses against hepatitis B surface antigen in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vandepapelière, Pierre; Horsmans, Yves; Moris, Philippe; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Janssens, Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Van Belle, Pascale; Clement, Frédéric; Hanon, Emmanuel; Wettendorff, Martine; Garçon, Nathalie; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-03-01

    A randomised, double-blind study assessing the potential of four adjuvants in combination with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen has been conducted to evaluate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in healthy adults after three vaccine doses at months 0, 1 and 10. Three Adjuvant Systems (AS) contained 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21, formulated either with an oil-in-water emulsion (AS02B and AS02V) or with liposomes (AS01B). The fourth adjuvant was CpG oligonucleotide. High levels of antibodies were induced by all adjuvants, whereas cell-mediated immune responses, including cytolytic T cells and strong and persistent CD4(+) T cell response were mainly observed with the three MPL/QS21-containing Adjuvant Systems. The CD4(+) T cell response was characterised in vitro by vigorous lymphoproliferation, high IFN-gamma and moderate IL-5 production. Antigen-specific T cell immune response was further confirmed ex vivo by detection of IL-2- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells, and in vivo by measuring increased levels of IFN-gamma in the serum and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The CpG adjuvanted vaccine induced consistently lower immune responses for all parameters. All vaccine adjuvants were shown to be safe with acceptable reactogenicity profiles. The majority of subjects reported local reactions at the injection site after vaccination while general reactions were recorded less frequently. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Importantly, no increase in markers of auto-immunity and allergy was detected over the whole study course. In conclusion, the Adjuvant Systems containing MPL/QS21, in combination with hepatitis B surface antigen, induced very strong humoral and cellular immune responses in healthy adults. The AS01B-adjuvanted vaccine induced the strongest and most durable specific cellular immune responses after two doses. These Adjuvant Systems, when added to recombinant protein antigens, can be

  11. Urinary metabolite profiling provides potential differentiation to explore the mechanisms of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Jian; Wang, Ting; Gao, Jia-Rong; Sun, Yue; Huang, Chuan-Bing; Meng, Mei; Qin, Xiu-Juan

    2016-09-01

    To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the perspective of metabolomics, gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) technology was used to observe changes in the metabolic profiles of urine output from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and an experimental group, with eight in each. Rats in the experimental group were induced by intracutaneous innoculation of 0.1 mL Freund's complete adjuvant to right paws. On day 20 after immunization, the metabolic profiles between rat control and experimental groups were compared by combining GC-TOF/MS technology with multivariate statistical approaches, including principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis. Nine potential biomarkers were identified, including 2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid, tartronic acid, dehydroshikimic acid, hippuric acid, adenine, phenaceturic acid, l-dopa, 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and melibiose. The findings indicate that the rats with AA are disturbed in metabolism of purine, amino acid, fat and energy. This study also demonstrates that the dysfunction in a range of biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, which leads to increased oxygen free radicals and inflammation, could cause underlying pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26856389

  12. Antioxidant and Angiostatic Effect of Spirulina platensis Suspension in Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Eman A. I.; Barakat, Bassant M.; Hassan, Ranya

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many degenerative diseases, mainly rheumatoid arthritis. Recent studies suggest that Spirulina, a unicellular blue-green alga, may have a variety of health benefits and curative properties and is also competent of acting as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and recently anti-angiogenic agent. In the present study, the antioxidant and the immunomodulatory effect of Spirulina platensis as well as its anti-angiogenic effect against complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat model were tested. Results We found that the development of arthritis was concealed; moreover it successfully inhibited the development of macroscopic as well as microscopic and histopathological lesions in AIA rats when compared to control. Spirulina treated group showed a higher survival rate and moreover, it reduced the clinical score of RA in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Spirulina decreased serum levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, TBARS, VEGF and increased serum levels of GSH compared to the RA non-treated group. Conclusions The present study concluded that Spirulina is able to restrain the changes produced through adjuvant-induced arthritis. The suppressing effect of Spirulina could be attributed, at least in part, to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. PMID:25853428

  13. Antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Pistia stratiotes in adjuvant-induced arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Samuel; Koffuor, George A; Boampong, Johnson N

    2012-01-01

    Background Pistia stratiotes has been used effectively to treat a number of inflammatory conditions. This study aims to determine the antiarthritic effect of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes. Methods Arthritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats, paw swelling was measured, and arthritis indices were estimated in rats treated with aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of P. stratiotes (AQ PSE and ET PSE, respectively), methotrexate, diclofenac, dexamethasone, and normal saline-treated rats. Radiologic imaging, hematological assessment of red and white blood cells, C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, as well as histopathological studies were also done. The data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 5. Results The 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg doses of AQ PSE and the 30 and 100 mg/kg doses of ET PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) reduction in ipsilateral paw swelling, similar to the effects of methotrexate, dexamethasone, and diclofenac. Only the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE caused a significant (P ≤ 0.01) reduction in contralateral paw swelling. Arthritic indices reduced significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.001) at all drug doses, except for the 100 and 300 mg/kg doses of ET PSE. White blood cell levels decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) in arthritic rats treated with the 30 mg/kg dose of AQ PSE and those treated with methotrexate. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.01–0.001) lower in all the treatment groups except for the rats treated with AQ PSE 300 mg/kg and ET PSE 100 and 300 mg/kg doses. The arthritic animals treated with 30 mg/kg of the aqueous extract showed no inflammatory changes in the ipsilateral paw, while the contralateral paw showed only foci of mild chronic inflammatory changes, as seen with the reference drug treatment in histopathological studies. Conclusion This study establishes that aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. stratiotes have antiarthritic

  14. Matrix-M™ Adjuvant Induces Local Recruitment, Activation and Maturation of Central Immune Cells in Absence of Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Jenny M.; Karlsson, Karin H.; Lövgren-Bengtsson, Karin; Magnusson, Sofia E.; Fuentes, Alexis; Stertman, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Saponin-based adjuvants are widely used to enhance humoral and cellular immune responses towards vaccine antigens, although it is not yet completely known how they mediate their stimulatory effects. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of action of adjuvant Matrix-M™ without antigen and Alum was used as reference adjuvant. Adjuvant Matrix-M™ is comprised of 40 nm nanoparticles composed of Quillaja saponins, cholesterol and phospholipid. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously injected once with, 3, 12 or 30 µg of Matrix-M™, resulting in recruitment of leukocytes to draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spleen 48 h post treatment. Flow cytometry analysis identified CD11b+ Gr-1high granulocytes as the cell population increasing most in dLNs and spleen. Additionally, dendritic cells, F4/80int cells, T-, B- and NK-cells were recruited to dLNs and in spleen the number of F4/80int cells, and to some extent, B cells and dendritic cells, increased. Elevated levels of early activation marker CD69 were detected on T-, B- and NK-cells, CD11b+ Gr-1high cells, F4/80int cells and dendritic cells in dLNs. In spleen CD69 was mainly up-regulated on NK cells. B cells and dendritic cells in dLNs and spleen showed an increased expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and dendritic cells in dLNs expressed elevated levels of MHC class II. The high-dose (30 µg) of Matrix-M™ induced detectable serum levels of IL-6 and MIP-1β 4 h post administration, most likely representing spillover of locally produced cytokines. A lesser increase of IL-6 in serum after administration of 12 µg Matrix-M™ was also observed. In conclusion, early immunostimulatory properties were demonstrated by Matrix-M™ alone, as therapeutic doses resulted in a local transient immune response with recruitment and activation of central immune cells to dLNs. These effects may play a role in enhancing uptake and presentation of vaccine antigens to elicit a competent immune response. PMID:22844480

  15. Vaccine Potentiation by Combination Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Levast, Benoît; Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne; Mutwiri, George; Gerdts, Volker; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial components of vaccines. They significantly improve vaccine efficacy by modulating, enhancing, or extending the immune response and at the same time reducing the amount of antigen needed. In contrast to previously licensed adjuvants, current successful adjuvant formulations often consist of several molecules, that when combined, act synergistically by activating a variety of immune mechanisms. These “combination adjuvants” are already registered with several vaccines, both in humans and animals, and novel combination adjuvants are in the pipeline. With improved knowledge of the type of immune responses needed to successfully induce disease protection by vaccination, combination adjuvants are particularly suited to not only enhance, but also direct the immune responses desired to be either Th1-, Th2- or Th17-biased. Indeed, in view of the variety of disease and population targets for vaccine development, a panel of adjuvants will be needed to address different disease targets and populations. Here, we will review well-known and new combination adjuvants already licensed or currently in development—including ISCOMs, liposomes, Adjuvant Systems Montanides, and triple adjuvant combinations—and summarize their performance in preclinical and clinical trials. Several of these combination adjuvants are promising having promoted improved and balanced immune responses. PMID:26344621

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  17. Protection against H5N1 Influenza Virus Induced by Matrix-M Adjuvanted Seasonal Virosomal Vaccine in Mice Requires Both Antibodies and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Baart, Matthijs; Huizingh, Jeroen; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Goudsmit, Jaap; Saeland, Eirikur; Radošević, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains important to develop the next generation of influenza vaccines that can provide protection against vaccine mismatched strains and to be prepared for potential pandemic outbreaks. To achieve this, the understanding of the immunological parameters that mediate such broad protection is crucial. Method In the current study we assessed the contribution of humoral and cellular immune responses to heterosubtypic protection against H5N1 induced by a Matrix-M (MM) adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine by serum transfer and T-cell depletion studies. Results We demonstrate that the heterosubtypic protection against H5N1 induced by MM adjuvanted vaccine is partially mediated by antibodies. The serum contained both H5N1 cross-reactive hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-specific antibodies but with limited virus neutralizing and no hemagglutination inhibiting activity. The cross-reactive antibodies induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro, suggesting a role for the Fc part of the antibodies in protection against H5N1. Besides H5N1 specific antibody responses, cross-reactive HA- and NA-specific T-cell responses were induced by the adjuvanted vaccine. T-cell depletion experiments demonstrated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells contribute to protection. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that cross-protection against H5N1 induced by MM adjuvanted seasonal virosomal influenza vaccine requires both the humoral and cellular arm of the immune system. PMID:26696245

  18. Inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α and NO production in mouse macrophage and inflammatory response in rat animal models by a novel Ayurvedic formulation, BV-9238.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debendranath; Chaskar, Sunetra; Athavale, Nitin; Chitre, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic crippling disease, where protein-based tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors show significant relief, but with potentially fatal side effects. A need for a safe, oral, cost-effective small molecule or phyto-pharmaceutical is warranted. BV-9238 is an Ayurvedic poly-herbal formulation containing specialized standardized extracts of Withania somnifera, Boswellia serrata, Zingiber officinale and Curcuma longa. The anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 were evaluated for inhibition of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) production, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated, RAW 264.7, mouse macrophage cell line. BV-9238 reduced TNF-α and NO production, without any cytotoxic effects. Subsequently, the formulation was tested in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) and carrageenan-induced paw edema (CPE) rat animal models. AIA was induced in rats by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant intra-dermally in the paw, and BV-9238 and controls were administered orally for 21 days. Arthritic scores in AIA study and inflamed paw volume in CPE study were significantly reduced upon treatment with BV-9238. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of BV-9238 are due to its inhibition of TNF-α, and NO, and this formulation shows promise as an alternate therapy for inflammatory disorders where TNF-α and NO play important roles. PMID:24706581

  19. Anti-arthritic effects and toxicity of the essential oils of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Funk, Janet L; Frye, Jennifer B; Oyarzo, Janice N; Zhang, Huaping; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2010-01-27

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa L., Zingiberaceae) rhizomes contain two classes of secondary metabolites, curcuminoids and the less well-studied essential oils. Having previously identified potent anti-arthritic effects of the curcuminoids in turmeric extracts in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), studies were undertaken to determine whether the turmeric essential oils (TEO) were also joint protective using the same experimental model. Crude or refined TEO extracts dramatically inhibited joint swelling (90-100% inhibition) in female rats with streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis when extracts were administered via intraperitoneal injection to maximize uniform delivery. However, this anti-arthritic effect was accompanied by significant morbidity and mortality. Oral administration of a 20-fold higher dose TEO was nontoxic, but only mildly joint-protective (20% inhibition). These results do not support the isolated use of TEO for arthritis treatment but, instead, identify potential safety concerns in vertebrates exposed to TEO.

  20. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  1. Ferulic acid ethyl ester diminished Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced incapacitation through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Valmor Macedo; Gomes, Bruno de Sousa; Neto, Benedito de Sousa; Ferreira, Alana Rodrigues; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Carvalho e Martins, Maria do Carmo; Oliveira, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid ethyl ester (FAEE) is a derivate from ferulic acid which reportedly has antioxidant effect; however, its role on inflammation was unknown. In this study, we investigated the orally administered FAEE anti-inflammatory activity on experimental inflammation models and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. CFA-induced arthritis has been evaluated by incapacitation model and radiographic knee joint records at different observation time. FAEE (po) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.001) within the 1st to 5th hours at 50 and 100 mg/kg doses. FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg, po inhibited leukocyte migration into air pouch model (p < 0.001), and myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities (p < 0.001) increased total thiol concentration and decreased the TNF-α and IL-1β concentrations, NO, and thiobarbituric acid reactive species. In the CFA-induced arthritis, FAEE 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the edema and the elevation paw time, a joint disability parameter, since second hour after arthritis induction (p < 0.001). FAEE presented rat joint protective activity in radiographic records (p < 0.001). The data suggest that the FAEE exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte migration, oxidative stress reduction, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  3. Effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and adjuvant-induced inflammation on desensitization to and metabolism of substance P in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Larson, A A; Igwe, O J; Seybold, V S

    1989-06-01

    We have previously shown that the caudally directed biting and scratching response to repeated intrathecal (i.t.) injections of substance P (SP) is decreased by the third injection of SP and that this apparent desensitization to SP is less pronounced in mice pretreated with Freund's adjuvant. This study was designed to study the mechanism of this desensitization to SP and to examine the effect of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate (LSD) on desensitization. Our results indicate that while 25 micrograms of LSD/kg body weight i.p. in naive mice had no effect on the response to a single injection of SP, LSD decreased the development of desensitization to SP-induced behaviors. In contrast, identical injections of LSD in adjuvant-pretreated mice not only failed to prevent desensitization but enhanced the degree of apparent desensitization to SP. Tolerance developed to the effects of LSD on desensitization to SP-induced behaviors in both adjuvant- and saline-pretreated mice. When injected i.t. with SP, LSD failed to alter the degree of desensitization to SP-induced behaviors, suggesting that the effect of LSD is not produced at the spinal cord level. Separation and quantification of SP and its metabolites in the spinal cord using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques indicated that either a single injection of LSD or pretreatment with Freund's adjuvant produced similar patterns of changes in the concentrations of SP-related peptides in mouse spinal cord.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Malvidin-3-O-β glucoside, major grape anthocyanin, inhibits human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and decreases clinical scores in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Decendit, Alain; Mamani-Matsuda, Maria; Aumont, Virginie; Waffo-Teguo, Pierre; Moynet, Daniel; Boniface, Katia; Richard, Emmanuel; Krisa, Stéphanie; Rambert, Jérôme; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Mossalayi, M D

    2013-11-15

    Polyphenolic anthocyanins are major colorful compounds in red fruits, known to prevent cardiovascular and other diseases. Grape polyphenols are a mixture of various molecules and their exact contribution to above bioactivities remains to be clarified. In the present study, we first analyzed the effect of purified grape-derived compounds on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival, proliferation, as well as for their ability to inhibit the activation of human normal macrophages. Data indicated that malvidin-3-O-β glucoside (Malβg), the major grape anthocyanin, is bioactive with no toxicity on human PBMC. Malβg decreased the transcription of genes encoding inflammatory mediators, confirmed by the inhibition of TNFα, IL1, IL-6 and iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) secretion from activated macrophages. As Malβg also inhibited inflammatory response of rat macrophages, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of Malβg in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Malβg significantly diminished inflammatory cachexia and arthritic paw scores in AIA rats at both therapeutic and preventive levels. In vivo effects of Malβg correlated with down-regulation of NO generation from AIA rats' peritoneal macrophages ex vivo. These data indicate that Malβg, major grape anthocyanin, is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in vitro and in vivo, without detectable toxic effect.

  5. [Adjuvants in modern medicine and veterinary].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, V G; Ozherelkov, S V; Sanin, A V; Kozhevnikova, T N

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to immunologic adjuvants--various natural and synthetics substances that are added to vaccines for stimulation of specific immune response, but they do not induce specific response themselves. Critically important is the selection of the correct adjuvants, for which mechanisms of effect on immune system are studied the most. The majority of these mechanisms as well as physical-chemical and biological features of modern adjuvants are analyzed in the review. The problem of safety of adjuvants, types of immune response induced by adjuvants of various nature, excipients that are being verified or already in use in modern medicine and veterinary are also examined.

  6. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Masaaki; Morikawa, Katsuma; Suda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Naohito; Matsushita, Sho; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsui, Masanori

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  7. A novel liposome adjuvant DPC mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis subunit vaccine well to induce cell-mediated immunity and high protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Da, Zejiao; Wang, Yue; Niu, Hongxia; Li, Ruiying; Yu, Hongjuan; He, Shanshan; Guo, Ming; Wang, Yong; Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease around the world, and protein based subunit vaccine is supposed to be a kind of promising novel vaccine against it. However, there is no effective adjuvant available in clinic to activate cell-mediated immune responses which is required for TB subunit vaccine. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new adjuvant. Here we reported an adjuvant composed of dimethyl dioctadecylammonium (DDA), Poly I:C and cholesterol (DPC for short). DDA can form a kind of cationic liposome with the ability to deliver and present antigen and can induce Th1 type cell-mediated immune response. Poly I:C, a ligand of TLR3 receptor, could attenuate the pathologic reaction induced by following Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Cholesterol, which could enhance rigidity of lipid bilayer, is added to DDA and Poly I:C to improve the stability of the adjuvant. The particle size and Zeta-potential of DPC were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, DPC was mixed with a TB fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-Rv2626c (LT70) to construct a subunit vaccine. The subunit vaccine-induced immune responses and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. The results showed that the DPC adjuvant with particle size of 400 nm and zeta potential of 40 mV was in good stability. LT70 in the adjuvant of DPC generated strong antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and induced long-term higher protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis infection (5.41 ± 0.38log10CFU) than traditional vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (6.01 ± 0.33log10CFU) and PBS control (6.53 ± 0.26log10CFU) at 30 weeks post-vaccination. In conclusion, DPC would be a promising vaccine adjuvant with the ability to stimulate Th1 type cell-mediated immunity, and could be used in TB subunit vaccine.

  8. The adjuvant effect induced by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is mediated through oxidative stress in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    You, Huihui; Chen, Shaohui; Mao, Lin; Li, Bing; Yuan, Ye; Li, Rui; Yang, Xu

    2014-09-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, as the most commonly used plasticizer, is considered to be related to the asthma prevalence. There are studies affirming that the DEHP has an adjuvant effect in the pathogenesis of allergy asthma. Oxidative stress is one possible pathway for DEHP-adjuvant effect. Thus, this study explored whether DEHP could induce adjuvant effect in mouse asthma model via oxidative stress pathway. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into six groups: (1) saline group, (2) DEHP group, (3) ovalbumin (OVA) group, (4) DEHP+OVA group, (5) OVA+vitamin E (Vit E) group, (6) DEHP+OVA+Vit E group. The exposure dose of DEHP was 30 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. After 18 days of the exposure protocol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA) levels and biomarkers related to asthma model were measured. Collectively, these data indicated higher ROS and MDA levels and lower GSH contents in DEHP+OVA group than that in OVA group, while Vit E, an antioxidant, could restore ROS, MDA and GSH levels to control levels and attenuate the DEHP and/or OVA effects. Our observations suggested that there was a relationship between oxidative stress and the adjuvant effect induced by DEHP in this mouse asthma model.

  9. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  10. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  11. Quercetin reduced inflammation and increased antioxidant defense in rat adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardi, C; Bauerova, K; Stringa, B; Kuncirova, V; Slovak, L; Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Bezakova, L; Tedesco, I; Acquaviva, A; Bilotto, S; Russo, G L

    2015-10-01

    Novel therapies for rheumatoid arthritis also include the use of naturally occurring compounds possessing antioxidant properties. In the present work, the effects of oral administration of quercetin were investigated in a rat model of adjuvant arthritis. Arthritis was induced by a single intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. The experimental groups were treated with an oral daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. of quercetin for 28 days. Results indicated that quercetin was able to ameliorate all markers of inflammation and oxidative stress measured. Quercetin lowered levels of interleukin-1β, C-reactive protein, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and restored plasma antioxidant capacity. In addition, quercetin inhibited the enzymatic activity of pro-inflammatory 12/15-lipoxygenase in lung and liver and increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 in joint and lung of arthritic rats. Finally, quercetin inhibited the 2-fold increase of NF-қB activity observed in lung, liver and joint after induction of arthritis. PMID:26297952

  12. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  13. Distribution of blood flow in normal and arthritic joints. Role of arteriovenous shunting studied in growing dogs.

    PubMed

    Stender Hansen, E; He, S Z; Hjortdal, V E; Kjølseth, D; Søballe, K

    1992-01-01

    Juvenile dog knee with chronic carrageenin-induced arthritis was studied under general anesthesia with 15-microns and 50-microns-sized microspheres (MS) to compare the distribution of absolute and weight-standardized blood flow in normal and arthritic limbs and to localize possible sites of arteriovenous (AV) shunting. Arthritic joints had severe synovial and capsular hyperemia. Absolute as well as standardized blood flow was increased in juxta-articular epiphyses and patella. Shafts were atrophic and had decreased absolute flow but normal standardized flow. However, redistribution of blood flow occurred among regions within the shafts, e.g., in metaphyses away from growth plates. The mean nonentrapment of 15-microns MS was 13.8% in arthritic limbs and 4.2% in control limbs. The uptake of 50-microns MS was lower than that of 15-microns MS in all bony flow compartments due to differences in their rheologic behavior in larger arteries. The relative distribution of 50-microns MS and 15-microns MS varied considerably among regions within bone. Arthritis caused a net shift in the uptake of 50-microns MS relative to that of 15-microns MS from central to subchondral epiphyseal bone, evidencing precapillary vasodilation, but the relationship was strictly unchanged when bones were examined in toto. This result militates against the hypothesis of AV shunting in arthritic bone. PMID:1733320

  14. In Vitro Evidence for the Use of Astragali Radix Extracts as Adjuvant against Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Karioti, Anastasia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Vannacci, Alfredo; Mugelli, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-08-01

    The repeated exposure to the anticancer drug oxaliplatin induces a disabling, painful neuropathy. The current pharmacological treatments are unsatisfactory and unable to modify the complex nervous damage induced by the platin derivative. Recently, we described a system of cellular measures of oxidative stress as a method for studying features of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity and screening new compounds able to reduce oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Based on this experimental design, the protective properties of Astragali radix were studied comparing aqueous and two hydroalcoholic root extracts. Aqueous and the 20 % hydroalcoholic (20 % water) extract were prepared from plant material, while the 50 % hydroalcoholic (50 % water) extract was a commercial one. All of the extracts were characterized in terms of drug extract ratio and content of typical isoflavonoids, Astragaloside IV, and related saponins. Furthermore, the molecular weight of the polysaccharide fraction was evaluated by light scattering analysis. Oxaliplatin increased the superoxide anion production both in the neuronal-derived cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. Aqueous and the 50 % hydroalcoholic extract (50 µg/mL) showed significant antioxidant effects. In astrocytes, aqueous and the 50 % hydroalcoholic extract showed protective effects against oxaliplatin-induced lipid peroxidation (malonyl dialdehyde levels), protein (carbonylated proteins), and DNA oxidation (8-OH-2-dG levels). The 50 % hydroalcoholic extract was the most active in preventing the activation of the apoptotic enzyme caspase-3 and it was the only able to stimulate astrocyte viability. None of the tested extracts interfered with the toxicity elicited by oxaliplatin in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. The pharmacological profile of Astragali radix extracts, in particular, the aqueous and 50 % hydroalcoholic extracts, makes these natural products candidates as therapeutic

  15. Synthetic Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7 Ligands as Influenza Virus Vaccine Adjuvants Induce Rapid, Sustained, and Broadly Protective Responses

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Peter H.; Hayashi, Tomoko; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Corr, Maripat; Crain, Brian; Yao, Shiyin; Cottam, Howard B.; Chan, Michael; Ramos, Irene; Eggink, Dirk; Heshmati, Mitra; Krammer, Florian; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current vaccines against influenza virus infection rely on the induction of neutralizing antibodies targeting the globular head of the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Protection against seasonal antigenic drift or sporadic pandemic outbreaks requires further vaccine development to induce cross-protective humoral responses, potentially to the more conserved HA stalk region. Here, we present a novel viral vaccine adjuvant comprised of two synthetic ligands for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7. 1Z105 is a substituted pyrimido[5,4-b]indole specific for the TLR4-MD2 complex, and 1V270 is a phospholipid-conjugated TLR7 agonist. Separately, 1Z105 induces rapid Th2-associated IgG1 responses, and 1V270 potently generates Th1 cellular immunity. 1Z105 and 1V270 in combination with recombinant HA from the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 strain (rPR/8 HA) effectively induces rapid and sustained humoral immunity that is protective against lethal challenge with a homologous virus. More importantly, immunization with the combined adjuvant and rPR/8 HA, a commercially available split vaccine, or chimeric rHA antigens significantly improves protection against both heterologous and heterosubtypic challenge viruses. Heterosubtypic protection is associated with broadly reactive antibodies to HA stalk epitopes. Histological examination and cytokine profiling reveal that intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 1Z105 and 1V270 is less reactogenic than a squalene-based adjuvant, AddaVax. In summary, the combination of 1Z105 and 1V270 with a recombinant HA induces rapid, long-lasting, and balanced Th1- and Th2-type immunity; demonstrates efficacy in a variety of murine influenza virus vaccine models assaying homologous, heterologous, and heterosubtypic challenge viruses; and has an excellent safety profile. IMPORTANCE Novel adjuvants are needed to enhance immunogenicity and increase the protective breadth of influenza virus vaccines to reduce the seasonal disease burden and ensure pandemic

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation–Induced Upregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Can Be Suppressed with Adjuvant Bortezomib or Liposomal Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwan; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Kumar, Gaurav; Sawant, Rupa R.; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Ahmed, Muneeb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α after radiofrequency (RF) ablation and the influence of an adjuvant HIF-1α inhibitor (bortezomib) and nanodrugs on modulating RF ablation–upregulated hypoxic pathways. Materials and Methods Fisher 344 rats (n = 68) were used. First, RF ablation–induced periablational HIF-1α expression was evaluated in normal liver or subcutaneous R3230 tumors (14–16 mm). Next, the effect of varying RF ablation thermal dose (varying tip temperature 50°C–90°C for 2–20 minutes) on HIF-1α expression was studied in R3230 tumors. Third, RF ablation was performed in R3230 tumors without or with an adjuvant HIF-1α inhibitor, bortezomib (single intraperitoneal dose 0.1 mg/kg). Finally, the combination RF ablation and intravenous liposomal chemotherapeutics with known increases in periablational cellular cytotoxicity (doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and quercetin) was assessed for effect on periablational HIF-1α. Outcome measures included immunohistochemistry of HIF-1α and heat shock protein 70 (marker of nonlethal thermal injury). Results RF ablation increased periablational HIF-1α in both normal liver and R3230 tumor, peaking at 24–72 hours. Tumor RF ablation had similar HIF-1α rim thickness but significantly greater percent cell positivity compared with hepatic RF ablation (P < .001). HIF-1α after ablation was the same regardless of thermal dose. Bortezomib suppressed HIF-1α (rim thickness, 68.7 μm ± 21.5 vs 210.3 μm ± 85.1 for RF ablation alone; P < .02) and increased ablation size (11.0 mm ± 1.5 vs 7.7 mm ± 0.6 for RF ablation alone; P < .002). Finally, all three nanodrugs suppressed RF ablation–induced HIF-1α (ie, rim thickness and cell positivity; P < .02 for all comparisons), with liposomal doxorubicin suppressing HIF-1α the most (P < .03). Conclusions RF ablation upregulates HIF-1α in normal liver and tumor in a temperature-independent manner. This progrowth, hypoxia pathway can be

  17. Vaccine adjuvants alum and MF59 induce rapid recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes that participate in antigen transport to draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Samuele; Tortoli, Marco; Baudner, Barbara C; Pacitto, Alessandra; Cortese, Mario; O'Hagan, Derek T; De Gregorio, Ennio; Seubert, Anja; Wack, Andreas

    2011-02-17

    Vaccine adjuvants such as alum and the oil-in-water emulsion MF59 are used to enhance immune responses towards pure soluble antigens, but their mechanism of action is still largely unclear. Since most adjuvanted vaccines are administered intramuscularly, we studied immune responses in the mouse muscle and found that both adjuvants were potent inducers of chemokine production and promoted rapid recruitment of CD11b(+) cells. The earliest and most abundantly recruited cell type are neutrophils, followed by monocytes, eosinophils and later dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. Using fluorescent forms of MF59 and ovalbumin (OVA) antigen, we show that all recruited cell types take up both adjuvant and antigen to transport them to the draining lymph nodes (LNs). There, we found antigen-positive neutrophils and monocytes within hours of injection, later followed by B cells and DCs. Compared to alum, MF59-injection lead to a more prominent neutrophil recruitment and a more efficient antigen re-localization from the injection site to the LN. As antigen-transporting neutrophils were observed in draining LNs, we asked whether these cells play an essential role in MF59-mediated adjuvanticity. However, antibody-mediated neutrophil ablation left MF59-adjuvanticity unaltered. Further studies will reveal whether other single cell types are crucial or whether the different recruited cell populations are redundant with overlapping functions.

  18. Enhancing Methotrexate Tolerance with Folate Tagged Liposomes in Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Lager, Franck; Le Roux, Delphine; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Charvet, Celine; Renault, Gilles; Loureiro, Ana; Almeida, Catarina R; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Moreira, Alexandra; Stockinger, Hannes; Burnet, Michael; Carmo, Alexandre M; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Bismuth, Georges; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexate is the first line of treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Since many patients become unresponsive to methotrexate treatment, only very expensive biological therapies are effective and increased methotrexate tolerance strategies need to be identified. Here we propose the encapsulation of methotrexate in a new liposomal formulation using a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein conjugated to a linker and folate to enhance their tolerance and efficacy. In this study we aim to evaluate the efficiency of this system to treat rheumatoid arthritis, by targeting folate receptor β present at the surface of activated macrophages, key effector cells in this pathology. The specificity of our liposomal formulation to target folate receptor β was investigated both in vitro as in vivo using a mouse model of arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice strain). In both systems, the liposomal constructs were shown to be highly specific and efficient in targeting folate receptor β. These liposomal formulations also significantly increase the clinical benefit of the encapsulated methotrexate in vivo in arthritic mice, together with reduced expression of CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases by joint-infiltrating macrophages. Thus, our formulation might be a promising cost effective way to treat rheumatoid arthritis and delay or reduce methotrexate intolerance.

  19. The Lymphatic Immune Response Induced by the Adjuvant AS01: A Comparison of Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Immunization Routes.

    PubMed

    Neeland, Melanie R; Shi, Wei; Collignon, Catherine; Taubenheim, Nadine; Meeusen, Els N T; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M; de Veer, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    The liposome-based adjuvant AS01 incorporates two immune stimulants, 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A and the saponin QS-21. AS01 is under investigation for use in several vaccines in clinical development. i.m. injection of AS01 enhances immune cell activation and dendritic cell (DC) Ag presentation in the local muscle-draining lymph node. However, cellular and Ag trafficking in the lymphatic vessels that connect an i.m. injection site with the local lymph node has not been investigated. The objectives of this study were: 1) to quantify the in vivo cellular immune response induced by AS01 in an outbred ovine model, 2) to develop a lymphatic cannulation model that directly collects lymphatic fluid draining the muscle, and 3) to investigate the function of immune cells entering and exiting the lymphatic compartments after s.c. or i.m. vaccination with AS01 administered with hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg). We show that HBsAg-AS01 induces a distinct immunogenic cellular signature within the blood and draining lymphatics following both immunization routes. We reveal that MHCII(high) migratory DCs, neutrophils, and monocytes can acquire Ag within muscle and s.c. afferent lymph, and that HBsAg-AS01 uniquely induces the selective migration of Ag-positive neutrophils, monocytes, and an MHCII(high) DC-like cell type out of the lymph node via the efferent lymphatics that may enhance Ag-specific immunity. We report the characterization of the immune response in the lymphatic network after i.m. and s.c. injection of a clinically relevant vaccine, all in real time using a dose and volume comparable with that administered in humans. PMID:27549170

  20. Effect of solid nanoparticle of indomethacin on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2014-01-01

    We designed new oral formulations containing indomethacin (IMC) solid nanoparticles, and investigate their usefulness by evaluating bioavailability and gastrointestinal lesions. The IMC solid nanoparticles were prepared using methylcellulose (MC), 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), and the bead mill method, and high quality dispersions containing 1.0% IMC nanoparticles were prepared (IMC(nano), particle size: 76 ± 58 nm, means ± S.D.). The fate of serum IMC and the induction of paw edema in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats receiving low-doses IMC(nano) (0.4 mg/kg) were similar to those following the administration of a therapeutic dose of conventional IMC prepared with MC and HPβCD (conventional IMC, 2 mg/kg), and the bioavailability in 0.4 mg/kg IMC(nano) was 5.3-fold higher in comparison with that in 2 mg/kg conventional IMC. IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions in AA rats administered IMC(nano) (8 mg/kg), in consideration of bioavailability, were significantly less than for conventional IMC (40 mg/kg). On the other hand, the toxicity caused by conventional IMC and IMC(nano) was similar in Caco-2 cells. It is possible that the oral administration of IMC solid nanoparticles will show increased effectiveness in treating RA without causing IMC-induced gastrointestinal lesions, since the bioavailability is higher than that of conventional IMC. An oral drug delivery system using drug nanoparticles may expand the usage of NSAIDs for therapy in the inflammatory field.

  1. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza.

  2. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza. PMID:26930068

  3. Immunopotentiation of Different Adjuvants on Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Induced by HA1-2 Subunit Vaccines of H7N9 Influenza in Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Xiong, Dan; Hu, Maozhi; Kang, Xilong; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2013, human infections with a novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in China. The number of cases has increased with over 200 mortalities reported to date. However, there is currently no vaccine available for the H7 subtype of influenza A virus. Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during influenza infection. In this study, we undertook a side-by-side evaluation of two different adjuvants, Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (fliC) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), through intraperitoneal administration to assess their effects on the immunogenicity of the recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine of H7N9 influenza. The fusion protein HA1-2-fliC and HA1-2 combined with PEI could induce significantly higher HA1-2-specific IgG and hemagglutination inhibition titers than HA1-2 alone at 12 days post-boost, with superior HA1-2 specific IgG titers in the HA1-2-fliC group compared with the PEI adjuvanted group. The PEI adjuvanted vaccine induced higher IgG1/IgG2a ratio and significantly increased numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells than HA1-2 alone, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th2 bias. Meanwhile, the HA1-2-fliC induced higher IgG2a and IgG1 levels, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile. Consistent with this, significant levels, and equal numbers, of IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing cells were detected after HA1-2-fliC vaccination. Moreover, the marked increase in CD69 expression and the proliferative index with the HA1-2-fliC and PEI adjuvanted vaccines indicated that both adjuvanted vaccine candidates effectively induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses. Taken together, our findings indicate that the two adjuvanted vaccine candidates elicit effective and HA1-2-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, offering significant promise for the development of a successful recombinant HA1-2 subunit vaccine for H7N9 influenza. PMID:26930068

  4. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy. PMID:26702587

  5. Innocuous IFNγ induced by adjuvant-free antigen restores normoglycemia in NOD mice through inhibition of IL-17 production

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Renu; Tartar, Danielle M.; Gregg, Randal K.; Divekar, Rohit D.; Bell, J. Jeremiah; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Yu, Ping; Ellis, Jason S.; Hoeman, Christine M.; Franklin, Craig L.; Zaghouani, Habib

    2008-01-01

    The role of Th17 cells in type I diabetes (TID) remains largely unknown. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) sequence 206–220 (designated GAD2) represents a late-stage epitope, but GAD2-specific T cell receptor transgenic T cells producing interferon γ (IFNγ) protect against passive TID. Because IFNγ is known to inhibit Th17 cells, effective presentation of GAD2 peptide under noninflammatory conditions may protect against TID at advanced disease stages. To test this premise, GAD2 was genetically incorporated into an immunoglobulin (Ig) molecule to magnify tolerance, and the resulting Ig-GAD2 was tested against TID at different stages of the disease. The findings indicated that Ig-GAD2 could not prevent TID at the preinsulitis phase, but delayed TID at the insulitis stage. More importantly, Ig-GAD2 sustained both clearance of pancreatic cell infiltration and β-cell division and restored normoglycemia when given to hyperglycemic mice at the prediabetic stage. This was dependent on the induction of splenic IFNγ that inhibited interleukin (IL)-17 production. In fact, neutralization of IFNγ led to a significant increase in the frequency of Th17 cells, and the treatment became nonprotective. Thus, IFNγ induced by an adjuvant free antigen, contrary to its usual inflammatory function, restores normoglycemia, most likely by localized bystander suppression of pathogenic IL-17–producing cells. PMID:18195074

  6. Self-adjuvanted nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy: Role of lysosomal rupture-induced ROS in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ce; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanlan; Pan, Hong; Li, Hongchang; Cai, Lintao; Ma, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    MHC class I (MHC I) antigen presentation of exogenous antigens (so called "cross presentation") is a central mechanism of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses essential for successful vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. The present study constructed amphiphilic pH-sensitive galactosyl dextran-retinal (GDR) nanogels for cancer vaccine delivery, in which dextran was conjugated with all-trans retinal (a metabolite of vitamin A) through a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, followed by galactosylation to acquire dendritic cell (DC)-targeting ability. Our results showed that pH-sensitive GDR nanogel was a self-adjuvanted vaccine carrier that not only promoted DC maturation through activating retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling, but also facilitated antigen uptake and cytosolic antigen release in DCs. Furthermore, pH-sensitive GDR nanogel effectively augmented MHC I antigen presentation and evoked potent anti-cancer immune responses in vivo. More importantly, we first reported that nanoparticle-triggered lysosome rupture could directly induce ROS production in DCs, which was found to be essential for augmenting proteasome activity and downstream MHC I antigen presentation. Hence, DC-targeted pH-sensitive GDR nanogels could be a potent delivery system for cancer vaccine development. Triggering lyososomal rupture in DCs with pH-sensitive nanoparticles might be a plausible strategy to elevate intracellular ROS production for promoting antigen cross presentation, thereby improving cancer vaccine efficacy.

  7. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under physiological conditions the gut-associated lymphoid tissues not only prevent the induction of a local inflammatory immune response, but also induce systemic tolerance to fed antigens. A notable exception is coeliac disease, where genetically susceptible individuals expressing human leukocyte...

  8. Trichilia monadelpha bark extracts inhibit carrageenan-induced foot-oedema in the 7-day old chick and the oedema associated with adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ainooson, G K; Owusu, G; Woode, E; Ansah, C; Annan, K

    2012-01-01

    Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Meliaceae) bark extract is used in African traditional medicine for the management of various disease conditions including inflammatory disorders such as arthritis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of aqueous (TWE), alcoholic (TAE) and petroleum ether extract (TPEE) of T. monadelpha using the 7-day old chick-carrageenan footpad oedema (acute inflammation) and the adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats (chronic inflammation). TWE and TPEE significantly inhibited the chick-carrageenan footpad oedema with maximal inhibitions of 57.79±3.92 and 63.83±12 respectively, but TAE did not. The reference anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and dexamethasone) inhibited the chick-carrageenan-induced footpad oedema, with maximal inhibitions of 64.92±2.03 and 71.85±15.34 respectively. Furthermore, all the extracts and the reference anti-inflammatory agents (diclofenac, dexamethasone, methotrexate) inhibited the inflammatory oedema associated with adjuvant arthritis with maximal inhibitions of 64.41±5.56, 57.04±8.57, 62.18±2.56%, for TWE, TAE and TPEE respectively and 80.28±5.79, 85.75±2.96, 74.68±3.03% for diclofenac, dexamethasone and methotrexate respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant bark confirmed the presence of a large array of plant constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins, steroids, tannins and terpenoids, all of which may be potential sources of phyto-antiinflammatory agents. In conclusion, our work suggests that T. monadelpha is a potential source of antiinflammatory agents.

  9. Differential immune responses to HIV-1 envelope protein induced by liposomal adjuvant formulations containing monophosphoryl lipid A with or without QS21.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Matyas, Gary R; Jalah, Rashmi; Rao, Mangala; Polonis, Victoria R; Alving, Carl R

    2015-10-13

    Liposomes have shown promise as constituents of adjuvant formulations in vaccines to parasitic and viral diseases. A particular type of liposomal construct, referred to as Army Liposome Formulation (ALF), containing neutral and anionic saturated phospholipids, cholesterol, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), has been used as an adjuvant for many years. Here we investigated the effects of physical and chemical changes of ALF liposomes on adjuvanted immune responses to CN54 gp140, a recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein. While holding the total amounts of liposomal MPLA and the gp140 antigen constant, different liposome sizes and liposomal MPLA:phospholipid molar ratios, and the effect of adding QS21 to the liposomes were compared for inducing immune responses to the gp140. For liposomes lacking QS21, higher titers of IgG binding antibodies to gp140 were induced by small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) rather than by large multilamellar vesicle (MLV) liposomes, and the highest titers were obtained with SUV having the MPLA:phospholipid ratio of 1:5.6. ALF plus QS21 (ALFQ) liposomes induced the same maximal binding antibody titers regardless of the MPLA:phospholipid ratio. ALF MLV liposomes induced mainly IgG1 and very low IgG2a antibodies, while ALF SUV liposomes induced IgG1≥IgG2a>IgG2b antibodies. Liposomes containing QS21 induced IgG1>IgG2a>IgG2b>IgG3 antibodies. ELISPOT analysis of splenocytes from immunized mice revealed that ALF liposomes induced low levels of IFN-γ, but ALFQ induced high levels. ALF and ALFQ liposomes each induced approximately equivalent high levels of IL-4. Based on antibody subtypes and cytokine secretion, we conclude that ALF liposomes predominantly stimulate Th2, while ALFQ strongly induces both Th1 and Th2 immunity. When CN54 gp140 was adjuvanted with either ALF or ALFQ liposomes, antibodies were induced that neutralized two HIV-1 tier 1 clade C strain pseudoviruses.

  10. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  11. Chemotherapy-induced pain and neuropathy: a prospective study in patients treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin or docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Ventzel, Lise; Jensen, Anders B; Jensen, Anni R; Jensen, Troels S; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of cancer therapy. This study evaluates symptoms of CIPN and CIPN-related pain and its influence on psychological functioning and potential predictors of chronic CIPN and pain. In this large prospective questionnaire study, 174 patients receiving adjuvant oxaliplatin or docetaxel were consecutively included. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire with validated questions on peripheral neuropathy, pain, anxiety and depression, and quality of life at baseline, after the first cycle, halfway through therapy, and 1 year after baseline. Chronic CIPN symptoms (tingling and/or numbness) in the feet at 1-year follow-up were present in 63.6% of patients without preexisting neuropathy in the oxaliplatin group and in 44.8% in the docetaxel group, whereas pain in hands and feet was found in 31.3% and 35.1%, respectively. Both groups had significantly different pain profiles, and persistent pain in the docetaxel group was found to have effect on psychological function. Cumulative dose predicted oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy (P = 0.004), whereas endocrine therapy predicted peripheral pain in the docetaxel group (P = 0.04). There are important differences in acute neuropathic symptoms and chronic pain profiles in patients after oxaliplatin and docetaxel treatment. It is, however, important to recognize that chronic peripheral pain may be unrelated to neuropathy and can be caused by concomitant treatments. Future studies should focus on characterizing and distinguishing CIPN-related pain from other types of pain to determine the best outcome measures for trials on prevention or relief. PMID:26529271

  12. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of grape melanin. Inhibitory effects on paw edema and adjuvant induced disease.

    PubMed

    Avramidis, N; Kourounakis, A; Hadjipetrou, L; Senchuk, V

    1998-07-01

    Natural or synthetic melanin (CAS 8049-97-6) is a high molecular weight heteropolymer, product of the enzyme tyrosinase, found to possess radical scavenging and antioxidant functions. It was of interest, therefore, to study in detail the possible anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties of a melanin isolated from grapes. The inhibitory effect of melanin on carrageenin-induced edema, as well as on edemas produced by other phlogistics, was remarkable suggesting that melanin interferes with the prostaglandin as well as the leukotriene and/or complement system mediated inflammation. Grape melanin showed potent inhibitory effect on adjuvant induced disease (AID) in rat, suppressing significantly the primary inflammation and almost totally the secondary lesions of arthritis. Melanin under the present experimental conditions not only strongly inhibited the in vitro lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomal membranes, but furthermore protected the in vivo hepatic peroxidation occurring in AID rats, demonstrating its antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The serum proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-a and the serum globulin fraction were elevated in AID rats, parameters which were more or less normalised by melanin treatment in contrast to the reduced serum levels of IL-2 which were not affected. Similarly to other lipoxygenase inhibitors and hydroxyl radical scavenger NSAIDs, melanin treatment did not affect IL-1 neither increased the splenic mitogenic responses, unlike the classical cyclooxygenase inhibitory NSAIDs. The subpopulation Th1 (T4+ or T8+) of lymphocytes is mainly responsible for cellular immune responses and thus their possible inhibition by melanin could lead to suppression of the development of AID, a model for cell-mediated immunity. The effect of melanin on T-cells is exhibited by the reduced spleen mitogenic responses to a T-cell mitogen and the reduced serum levels of IL-2 of treated rats. In conclusion, grape melanin is an

  13. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response.

  14. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  15. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  16. The arthritic in an urban environment

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, M. Anne; Buchanan, Jean M.; Hanks, Helga

    1979-01-01

    Ninety-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthrosis were interviewed and questioned in their homes, being randomly selected from 354 outpatients with these diseases. The findings were compared with answers from 30 matched able-bodied controls. The handicapped were mainly female and elderly; over half were severely or appreciably handicapped; nearly one-third lived alone. The average weekly income of these households was £25, at least £6 a week less than their age-matched counterparts. Very few subjects lived in adapted or specially designed housing, and half the housing had at least 2 steps to street level. A third of the sample could not walk more than 10 yards (9 m), and only half could walk 100 yards (90 m); yet only one-third had a bus stop, one-quarter a local park, and one-third a local shop within this distance. One-third of the patients could not shop for themselves. Powered wheelchairs were not used. Buses were rarely or never used by nearly half these arthritics because of severe disability. Cars were owned by less than a quarter of the sample, and only by those financially better off. Over a third were unable to get a lift when wanted. Cars ameliorated much of the frustration and lack of social contact caused by physical disability. Adequate financing would enable those with severe disability to engage in normal activities. Better designed buses stopping nearer the homes of handicapped would improve independence for those less severely disabled. Correct siting of mobility housing, shops, community facilities, and parks would be greatly appreciated, as would removal of all unnecessary steps and kerbs. PMID:155427

  17. Molecular signatures of vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Thorunn; Lindqvist, Madelene; Harandi, Ali M

    2015-09-29

    Mass vaccination has saved millions of human lives and improved the quality of life in both developing and developed countries. The emergence of new pathogens and inadequate protection conferred by some of the existing vaccines such as vaccines for tuberculosis, influenza and pertussis especially in certain age groups have resulted in a move from empirically developed vaccines toward more pathogen tailored and rationally engineered vaccines. A deeper understanding of the interaction of innate and adaptive immunity at molecular level enables the development of vaccines that selectively target certain type of immune responses without excessive reactogenicity. Adjuvants constitute an imperative element of modern vaccines. Although a variety of candidate adjuvants have been evaluated in the past few decades, only a limited number of vaccine adjuvants are currently available for human use. A better understanding of the mode of action of adjuvants is pivotal to harness the potential of existing and new adjuvants in shaping a desired immune response. Recent advancement in systems biology powered by the emerging cutting edge omics technology has led to the identification of molecular signatures rapidly induced after vaccination in the blood that correlate and predict a later protective immune response or vaccine safety. This can pave ways to prospectively determine the potency and safety of vaccines and adjuvants. This review is intended to highlight the importance of big data analysis in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms of actions of adjuvants to inform rational development of future human vaccines. PMID:25989447

  18. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general.

  19. Synthetic innate defense regulator peptide combination using CpG ODN as a novel adjuvant induces long‑lasting and balanced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao-Heng; Luo, Zi-Chao; Li, Meng; Lu, Lian; Li, Zhan; Wu, Xiao-Zhe; Fan, Ying-Zi; Zhang, Hai-Long; Zhou, Bai-Ling; Wan, Yang; Men, Ke; Tian, Yao-Mei; Chen, Shuang; Yuan, Feng-Jiao; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are critical tools for the prevention and treatment of several diseases. Adjuvants have been traditionally used to enhance immunity to vaccines and experimental antigens. In the present study, the adjuvant combination of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) and the innate defense regulator (IDR) peptide, IDR‑HH2, was evaluated for its ability to enhance and modulate the immune response when formulated with alum and the recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The CpG‑HH2 complex enhanced the secretions of tumor necrosis factor‑α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and interferon‑γ by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and promoted murine bone marrow dentritic cell maturation. In addition, the present study demonstrated that IDR‑HH2 was chemotactic for human neutrophils, THP‑1 cells and RAW264.7 cells at concentrations between 2.5 and 40 µg/ml. The present study also observed that significantly higher anti‑HBs antibody titers, which were sustained at high levels for as long as 35 weeks following the boost immunization, were induced by the combination adjuvant, even when co‑administered with a commercial hepatitis B vaccine at a low antigen dose (0.1 µg HBsAg). Notably, the level of IgG2a was almost equal to the level of IgG1, indicating that a balanced T helper (Th)1/Th2 immune response was elicited by the novel vaccine, which was consistent with the ELISpot results. These data suggest that the CpG‑HH2 complex may be a potential effective adjuvant, which facilitates a reduction in the dose of antigen and induces long‑lasting, balanced immune responses. PMID:26647852

  20. Topical therapies for rheumatoid arthritis by gel ointments containing indomethacin nanoparticles in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin (IMC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although its clinical use has been limited by its systemic side effects that include gastrointestinal lesions. Therefore, the development of IMC formulations that do not cause gastrointestinal lesions is highly anticipated. In this study, we designed new topical formulations containing IMC solid nanoparticles (IMCnano gel ointment), and investigated their pharmacokinetics. In addition, we demonstrate the preventive effects of this topical application of IMC nanoparticles on inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis rat (AA rat). The IMCnano gel ointment was prepared using Bead Smash 12 (a bead mill) and additives including 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, methylcellulose and Carbopol 934; the mean particle size of the IMC nanoparticles was 173 ± 91 nm (means ± S.D.). The application of the IMCnano gel ointment attenuated the increase in paw edema of the hind feet of AA rats in comparison with AA rats treated with gel ointment containing IMC microparticles (IMCmicro gel ointment, particle diameter 17.1 ± 11.6 mm, means ± S.D). In addition, the accumulation of IMC from the IMCnano gel ointment in skin tissue was significantly large than for the IMCmicro gel ointment; however, the plasma IMC concentrations were similar for the IMCmicro and IMCnano gel ointments. Our findings suggest that the dermal application of nanoparticles may enable a medication to be applied without high-systemic drug levels, which could provide efficient and effective therapy that spares patients from unwanted side effects. A formulation of a topical drug delivery system using IMC nanoparticles may provide a delivery option for the clinical treatment of RA.

  1. Inactivated Eyedrop Influenza Vaccine Adjuvanted with Poly(I:C) Is Safe and Effective for Inducing Protective Systemic and Mucosal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Do; Han, Soo Jung; Byun, Young-Ho; Yoon, Sang Chul; Choi, Kyoung Sub; Seong, Baik Lin; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The eye route has been evaluated as an efficient vaccine delivery routes. However, in order to induce sufficient antibody production with inactivated vaccine, testing of the safety and efficacy of the use of inactivated antigen plus adjuvant is needed. Here, we assessed various types of adjuvants in eyedrop as an anti-influenza serum and mucosal Ab production-enhancer in BALB/c mice. Among the adjuvants, poly (I:C) showed as much enhancement in antigen-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody production as cholera toxin (CT) after vaccinations with trivalent hemagglutinin-subunits or split H1N1 vaccine antigen in mice. Vaccination with split H1N1 eyedrop vaccine antigen plus poly(I:C) showed a similar or slightly lower efficacy in inducing antibody production than intranasal vaccination; the eyedrop vaccine-induced immunity was enough to protect mice from lethal homologous influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1) virus challenge. Additionally, ocular inoculation with poly(I:C) plus vaccine antigen generated no signs of inflammation within 24 hours: no increases in the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines nor in the infiltration of mononuclear cells to administration sites. In contrast, CT administration induced increased expression of IL-6 cytokine mRNA and mononuclear cell infiltration in the conjunctiva within 24 hours of vaccination. Moreover, inoculated visualizing materials by eyedrop did not contaminate the surface of the olfactory bulb in mice; meanwhile, intranasally administered materials defiled the surface of the brain. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the use of eyedrop inactivated influenza vaccine plus poly(I:C) is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine strategy for inducing protective anti-influenza immunity.

  2. Inactivated Eyedrop Influenza Vaccine Adjuvanted with Poly(I:C) Is Safe and Effective for Inducing Protective Systemic and Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Do; Han, Soo Jung; Byun, Young-Ho; Yoon, Sang Chul; Choi, Kyoung Sub; Seong, Baik Lin; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The eye route has been evaluated as an efficient vaccine delivery routes. However, in order to induce sufficient antibody production with inactivated vaccine, testing of the safety and efficacy of the use of inactivated antigen plus adjuvant is needed. Here, we assessed various types of adjuvants in eyedrop as an anti-influenza serum and mucosal Ab production-enhancer in BALB/c mice. Among the adjuvants, poly (I:C) showed as much enhancement in antigen-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody production as cholera toxin (CT) after vaccinations with trivalent hemagglutinin-subunits or split H1N1 vaccine antigen in mice. Vaccination with split H1N1 eyedrop vaccine antigen plus poly(I:C) showed a similar or slightly lower efficacy in inducing antibody production than intranasal vaccination; the eyedrop vaccine-induced immunity was enough to protect mice from lethal homologous influenza A/California/04/09 (H1N1) virus challenge. Additionally, ocular inoculation with poly(I:C) plus vaccine antigen generated no signs of inflammation within 24 hours: no increases in the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines nor in the infiltration of mononuclear cells to administration sites. In contrast, CT administration induced increased expression of IL-6 cytokine mRNA and mononuclear cell infiltration in the conjunctiva within 24 hours of vaccination. Moreover, inoculated visualizing materials by eyedrop did not contaminate the surface of the olfactory bulb in mice; meanwhile, intranasally administered materials defiled the surface of the brain. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the use of eyedrop inactivated influenza vaccine plus poly(I:C) is a safe and effective mucosal vaccine strategy for inducing protective anti-influenza immunity. PMID:26355295

  3. Diurnal rhythms in ornithine decarboxylase activity and norepinephrine and acetylcholine synthesis in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen of young and aged rats during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, D P; Brusco, L I; Selgas, L; Esquifino, A I

    1998-04-13

    Aging has been associated with attenuation of amplitude and changes in period of many circadian rhythms. The present study was carried out to examine, in young (50 days old) and old (18 months old) rats, whether 24-h rhythms of cell proliferation (as assessed by measuring ornithine decarboxylase activity) and of presynaptic adrenergic and cholinergic markers change in lymph nodes and spleen during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis. Groups of young and old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied the day before, and on days 6, 12 and 18 after Freund's adjuvant injection. On day 16 after adjuvant injection, inflammation of hind paws, mainly in the ankle joints, was less marked in old than in young rats. Lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase activity exhibited significant 24-h variations with maximal activity during daily hours. Before treatment, enzyme activity values were significantly lower in old rats in both tissues examined. During the immune reaction, lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase augmented 8-10-fold, with progressively smaller amplitude of daily variations as arthritis developed. In every case, mesor and amplitude of ornithine decarboxylase activity were lowest in old rats. Submaxillary lymph node and splenic tyrosine hydroxylase activity attained maximal values at night. At every time interval after mycobacterium adjuvant injection, amplitude and mesor of tyrosine hydroxylase activity rhythm were lowest in old rats. A maximum in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis occurred at the afternoon. On day 6 and 12 after Freund's adjuvant injection, lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis was significantly smaller in old rats. Day-night differences in submaxillary lymph node or splenic ornithine decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase activities, or in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis, of rats treated with the adjuvant's vehicle, did not differ significantly from those seen in untreated controls. The results are

  4. Subcutaneous injection of interleukin 12 induces systemic inflammatory responses in humans: implications for the use of IL-12 as vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Portielje, Johanna E A; Kruit, Wim H J; Eerenberg, Anke J M; Schuler, Martin; Sparreboom, Alex; Lamers, Cor H J; Gratama, Jan-Willem; Stoter, Gerrit; Huber, Christoph; Hack, C Erik

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) is a cytokine with important regulatory functions bridging innate and adaptive immunity. It has been proposed as an immune adjuvant for vaccination therapy of infectious diseases and malignancies. The inflammatory properties of IL-12 play an important role in the adjuvant effect. We studied the effect of s.c. injections of recombinant human IL-12 (rHuIL-12) in 26 patients with renal cell cancer and demonstrated dose-dependent systemic activation of multiple inflammatory mediator systems in humans. rHuIL-12 at a dose of 0.5 microg/kg induced degranulation of neutrophils with a significant increase in the plasma levels of elastase (p < 0.05) and lactoferrin (p = 0.01) at 24 h. Additionally, rHuIL-12 injection mediated the release of lipid mediators, as demonstrated by a sharp increase in the plasma secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) level (p = 0.003). rHuIL-12, when administered at a dose of 0.1 microg/kg, showed minimal systemic effects. In conclusion, when IL-12 is used as an adjuvant, doses should not exceed 0.1 microg/kg, in order to avoid severe systemic inflammatory responses.

  5. Decreased plasma gonadotropin and testosterone levels in arthritic rats: are corticosteroids involved?

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1995-05-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases are often accompanied by abnormal reproductive functions, and the present working hypothesis is that proteins (called cytokines or interleukins, ILs) released by activated immune cells are at least in part responsible for these neuroendocrine changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we need paradigms of immune pathologies in which concentrations of cytokines are increased, and those of hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are blunted. We chose a rodent model of arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), in which rats show elevated plasma IL-6 and decreased testosterone (T) concentrations. We describe here the first phase of our studies, in which we determined whether gonadotropin release was also altered, whether this change was responsible for the low T levels, and whether elevated corticosterone participated in the decreased activity of the HPG axis.AIA is induced by the intramuscular injection ofMycobacterium butyricum (MBB) into the tail base of the rat, with swelling of the limbs occurring 11-12 days later. We observed significant decreases in LH and FSH secretion of castrated AIA male rats, suggesting that altered gonadotropin output was independent of the gonads. The absence of significant alterations in GnRH gene expression in the hypothalamus of AIA rats, as well as only modest declines in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, indicate that these mechanisms are not primarily responsible for the blunted gonadotropin concentrations. Intact AIA rats exhibited a dramatic decline in T levels, but no concimitant rise in LH concentrations. The observation that gonadotropin secretion does not increase despite significantly reduced T levels suggests the presence of an unidentified defect within the GnRH neuronal circuitry that prevents the gonadotrophs to respond to decreased steroid feedback. Testicular responsiveness to hCG was significantly blunted in AIA rats, and this decrease was not reversed by acute

  6. Identification of inflammation sites in arthritic joints using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Grandaunet, Berit; Dhainaut, Alvilde; Hoff, Mari; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritic diseases have prevalence between 2 and 3% and may lead to joint destruction and deformation resulting in a loss of function. Patient's quality of life is often severely affected as the disease attacks hands and finger joints. Pathology involved in arthritis includes angiogenesis, hyper-vascularization, hyper-metabolism and relative hypoxia. We have employed hyperspectral imaging to study the hemodynamics of affected- and non-affected joints and tissue. Two hyperspectral, push-broom cameras were used (VNIR-1600, SWIR-320i, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS, Norway). Optical spectra (400nm - 1700nm) of high spectral resolution were collected from 15 patients with visible symptoms of arthritic rheumatic diseases in at least one joint. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals. Concentrations of dominant chromophores were calculated based on analytical calculations of light transport in tissue. Image processing was used to analyze hyperspectral data and retrieve information, e.g. blood concentration and tissue oxygenation maps. The obtained results indicate that hyperspectral imaging can be used to quantify changes within affected joints and surrounding tissue. Further improvement of this method will have positive impact on diagnosis of arthritic joints at an early stage. Moreover it will enable development of fast, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic tool of arthritic joints

  7. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which led to a significant increase in survival rate against lethal influenza virus challenge compared with subcutaneous vaccination. After sublingual administration of ovalbumin with LPSpa, ovalbumin-specific mucosal IgA responses were induced at both mucosal surfaces close to the immunized site and at remote mucosal surfaces. Sublingual administration of LPSpa evoked local antigen-uptake by dendritic cells in cervical lymph nodes. LPSpa induced cytokine production and the maturation and proliferation of innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 in dendritic cells. Collectively, these results suggest that LPSpa can be used as an effective mucosal adjuvant to stimulate and activate local innate immune cells to improve and enhance mucosal vaccine potency against various pathogens. PMID:25978818

  8. A Novel Prime and Boost Regimen of HIV Virus-Like Particles with TLR4 Adjuvant MPLA Induces Th1 Oriented Immune Responses against HIV.

    PubMed

    Poteet, Ethan; Lewis, Phoebe; Li, Feng; Zhang, Sheng; Gu, Jianhua; Chen, Changyi; Ho, Sam On; Do, Thai; Chiang, SuMing; Fujii, Gary; Yao, Qizhi

    2015-01-01

    HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) present the HIV envelope protein in its native conformation, providing an ideal vaccine antigen. To enhance the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine, we sought to improve upon two components; the route of administration and the additional adjuvant. Using HIV VLPs, we evaluated sub-cheek as a novel route of vaccine administration when combined with other conventional routes of immunization. Of five combinations of distinct prime and boost sequences, which included sub-cheek, intranasal, and intradermal routes of administration, intranasal prime and sub-cheek boost (IN+SC) resulted in the highest HIV-specific IgG titers among the groups tested. Using the IN+SC regimen we tested the adjuvant VesiVax Conjugatable Adjuvant Lipid Vesicles (CALV) + monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) at MPLA concentrations of 0, 7.5, 12.5, and 25 μg/dose in combination with our VLPs. Mice that received 12.5 or 25 μg/dose MPLA had the highest concentrations of Env-specific IgG2c (20.7 and 18.4 μg/ml respectively), which represents a Th1 type of immune response in C57BL/6 mice. This was in sharp contrast to mice which received 0 or 7.5 μg MPLA adjuvant (6.05 and 5.68 μg/ml of IgG2c respectively). In contrast to IgG2c, MPLA had minor effects on Env-specific IgG1; therefore, 12.5 and 25 μg/dose of MPLA induced the optimal IgG1/IgG2c ratio of 1.3. Additionally, the percentage of germinal center B cells increased significantly from 15.4% in the control group to 31.9% in the CALV + 25 μg MPLA group. These mice also had significantly more IL-2 and less IL-4 Env-specific CD8+ T cells than controls, correlating with an increased percentage of Env-specific central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Our study shows the strong potential of IN+SC as an efficacious route of administration and the effectiveness of VLPs combined with MPLA adjuvant to induce Env specific Th1-oriented HIV-specific immune responses. PMID:26312747

  9. AS03-adjuvanted H7N1 detergent-split virion vaccine is highly immunogenic in unprimed mice and induces cross-reactive antibodies to emerged H7N9 and additional H7 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Mallett, Corey P; Beaulieu, Edith; Joly, Marie-Hélène; Baras, Benoît; Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Levine, Min Z; Katz, Jacqueline M; Innis, Bruce L; Giannini, Sandra L

    2015-07-31

    Avian H7 is one of several influenza A virus subtypes that have the potential to cause pandemics. Herein we describe preclinical results following administration of an investigational H7N1 inactivated detergent-split virion vaccine adjuvanted with the AS03 Adjuvant System. The adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine was highly immunogenic compared to the non-adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine in unprimed mice with less than 100ng of hemagglutinin antigen per dose. In addition, compared to the non-adjuvanted vaccine, the AS03-adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine also induced robust HI and VN antibody responses that cross-reacted with other H7 subtypes, including recently emerged H7N9 virus. These H7 data from the preclinical mouse model add to the existing H5 data to suggest that AS03 adjuvant technology may be generally effective for formulating antigen-sparing detergent-split virion vaccines against intrinsically sub-immunogenic avian influenza A virus subtypes.

  10. Adjuvants for allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently performed via either the subcutaneous or sublingual routes as a treatment for type I (IgE dependent) allergies. Aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate are broadly used as adjuvants for subcutaneous allergy vaccines, whereas commercial sublingual vaccines rely upon high doses of aqueous allergen extracts in the absence of any immunopotentiator. Adjuvants to be included in the future in products for allergen specific immunotherapy should ideally enhance Th1 and CD4+ regulatory T cell responses. Imunomodulators impacting dendritic or T cell functions to induce IL10, IL12 and IFNγ production are being investigated in preclinical allergy models. Such candidate adjuvants encompass synthetic or biological immunopotentiators such as glucocorticoids, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, selected probiotic strains (e.g., Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species) as well as TLR2 (Pam3CSK4), TLR4 (monophosphoryl lipid A, synthetic lipid A analogs) or TLR9 (CpGs) ligands. Furthermore, the use of vector systems such as mucoadhesive particules, virus-like particles or liposomes are being considered to enhance allergen uptake by tolerogenic antigen presenting cells present in mucosal tissues.

  11. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory.

  12. Simulation of light transport in arthritic- and non-arthritic human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has high incidence rates worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patient's quality of life due to pain, swelling and stiffness of the affected joints. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve course of the disease, therefore sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are required. Optical imaging techniques have capability for early diagnosis and monitoring of arthritis. As compared to conventional diagnostic techniques optical technique is a noninvasive, noncontact and fast way of collecting diagnostic information. However, a realistic model of light transport in human joints is needed for understanding and developing of such optical diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to develop a 3D numerical model of light transport in a human finger. The model will guide development of a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) diagnostic modality for arthritis in human fingers. The implemented human finger geometry is based on anatomical data. Optical data of finger tissues are adjusted to represent either an arthritic or an unaffected finger. The geometry and optical data serve as input into a 3D Monte Carlo method, which calculate diffuse reflectance, transmittance and absorbed energy distributions. The parameters of the model are optimized based on HIS-measurements of human fingers. The presented model serves as an important tool for understanding and development of HSI as an arthritis diagnostic modality. Yet, it can be applied to other optical techniques and finger diseases.

  13. Cure of established, intracerebral rat gliomas induced by therapeutic immunizations with tumor cells and purified APC or adjuvant IFN-gamma treatment.

    PubMed

    Siesjö, P; Visse, E; Sjögren, H O

    1996-09-01

    We have previously reported that immunizations with mutagen-induced immunogenic variants of a weakly immunogenic rat glioma could protect against isografts of the original tumor cells. In this study we show that prolonged survival and cures of rats with established gliomas in their brains can be achieved by therapeutic immunizations with tumor cell mutants, combined with in vitro and in vivo interferon (IFN)-gamma (adjuvant) treatment, or tumor cells admixed with semipurified syngeneic dendritic cells. Cure of rats with established intracerebral gliomas was possible when immunizations were initiated up to 5 days after intracerebral isografting of original tumor cells. Unexpectedly, immunizations combined with in vitro and in vivo IFN-gamma treatment or with admixed semipurified dendritic cells equalized the immunogenic potential of the original tumor cells and that of mutagen-induced immunogenic cell variants (tum-). This demonstrates that effective immunizations against a weakly immunogenic brain tumor can be achieved by different adjuvant concepts. The therapeutic effect of immunizations with tumor cells admixed with semipurified dendritic cells was highly significant in female rats, whereas only occasional cures and prolonged survival were recorded in male rats. The overall results show that therapeutic immunizations can indeed be effective against an established and growing intracerebral tumor.

  14. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Non-Human Primates1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Non-live vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in non-human primates (NHPs) after immunization with peptide antigens adjuvanted with an agonistic αCD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that intravenous administration of the αCD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated co-stimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently-labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, the αCD40Ab bound to all leucocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the αCD40Ab was co-administered with poly IC:LC compared to either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, antigen-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ~5–10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of αCD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies requiring T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  15. Efficacy of ultrasound mediated microbubbles in diclofenac gel to enhance transdermal permeation in rheumatoid arthritis induced rat.

    PubMed

    Liao, A H; Chuang, H C; Chung, H Y

    2015-08-01

    In previous study in the literature, the effect of ultrasound on the transdermal permeation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac has been investigated. Therapeutic ultrasound can increase circulation in the inflamed joint and decrease arthritic pain. Recently, transdermal drug delivery has been demonstrated by ultrasound (US) combining with microbubbles (MBs) contrast agent. In this study, the efficiency of US-MBs mediated diclofenac delivery for adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in rats was evaluated. RA was induced by injection of 100 μl Freund's complete adjuvant into the ankle joint in SD male rats (250-300g) and were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group (C); (2) penetrating diclofenac alone (D); (3) US alone (U); (4) US combined with penetrating diclofenac (DU); (5) US combined with MBs and penetrating diclofenac (DUB). The evaluations of ankle width were performed for 10 days by high frequency (40MHz) US B-mode and color Doppler mode imaging before and after treatment. Longitudinal US images of arthritis induced show synovitis and neovascularity. After treatment, only a little neovascularity has been observed. The recovery rate at 10th day in the group DUB (97.7±2.7 %) was significantly higher than in the group C (1.0±2.7 %), group D (37.5±4.6 %), group U (75.5±4.2 %) and group DU (87.3±5.2 %) (p <; 0.05). Our results investigated that the treatments of US and MBs can increase skin permeability to enhance diclofenac sodium delivery and inhibit inflammation of the tissues surrounded the arthritic ankle. In color Doppler imaging, after the combination treatment, the synovial neoangiogenesis in the arthritic area was reduced quickly.

  16. Adjuvant aqueous ozone in the treatment of bisphosphonate induced necrosis of the jaws: report of two cases and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brozoski, M A; Lemos, C A; Da Graça Naclério-Homem, M; Deboni, M C Z

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonate induced necrosis of the jaws (BONJ) does not have a unique protocol of treatment and many therapeutic approaches have been arising in oral medicine with debatable results. A male and a female attended the University Oral Surgery Clinic presenting oral bone lesions induced by intravenous and oral bisphosphonates respectively as complications of dental extraction. Treatment included daily mouthwashes and weekly intra oral irrigations with 4 mg/L of aqueous-ozone, antibiotic therapy and sequential superficial debridment for sequestrectomies. Long-standing follow-ups showed complete mucosa covering of exposed bone area and resolution of purulent secretion. Antibacterial and antifungal properties of aqueous ozone may have played important roles in the treatment. The outcome measured intra oral examination and panoramic radiographs of the affected bone. The application of aqueous ozone daily mouthwashes and weekly professional irrigation were safe; free from adverse effects, easily of handling and worked as an important adjuvant therapeutic strategy for the treatment of BONJ.

  17. Mucosal adjuvants: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingbin

    2016-09-01

    Most pathogens access the body via mucosal surfaces. Mucosal vaccination is a highly effective and recommended method to prevent mucosally transmitted infections. Compared with immunization via intramuscular injection, mucosal immunization offers remarkable advantages, including non-invasiveness, low costs and reduced risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases, which make it more acceptable to human beings, especially to young children. However, only few mucosal vaccines are licensed for human, which is mainly due to the deficiency of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants. Adjuvants, as important components of most vaccines, are essential to enhance immunity and induce immune memory. The development of mucosal adjuvants, unfortunately, has been severely hampered by research strategies based on empiric trials and non-comprehensive methods for safety evaluation. Therefore, changing the research and development strategies of mucosal adjuvant field from empiricism based discovery to rational design based invention is highly demanded. The change of strategies mainly depends upon clarification of mechanism of mucosal adjuvant activity though a combination of life science, information science and materials science. PMID:27159278

  18. A pilot randomized controlled trial of D-cycloserine and distributed practice as adjuvants to constraint-induced movement therapy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Stephen E; Davis, Sandra E; Wu, Samuel S; Dai, Yunfeng; Richards, Lorie G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Phase III trials of rehabilitation of paresis after stroke have proven the effectiveness of intensive and extended task practice, but they have also shown that many patients do not qualify, because of severity of impairment, and that many of those who are treated are left with clinically significant deficits. Objective. To test the value of 2 potential adjuvants to normal learning processes engaged in constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT): greater distribution of treatment over time and the coadministration of d-cycloserine, a competitive agonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor. Methods. A prospective randomized single-blind parallel-group trial of more versus less condensed therapy (2 vs 10 weeks) and d-cycloserine (50 mg) each treatment day versus placebo (in a 2 × 2 design), as potential adjuvants to 60 hours of CIMT. Results. Twenty-four participants entered the study, and 22 completed it and were assessed at the completion of treatment and 3 months later. Neither greater distribution of treatment nor treatment with d-cycloserine significantly augmented retention of gains achieved with CIMT. Conclusions. Greater distribution of practice and treatment with d-cycloserine do not appear to augment retention of gains achieved with CIMT. However, concentration of CIMT over 2 weeks ("massed practice") appears to confer no advantage either.

  19. Immunological adjuvants: a role for liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gregoriadis, G

    1990-03-01

    Recent technological advances have resulted in the production of safe subunit and synthetic small peptide vaccines. These vaccines are weakly or non-immunogenic and cannot, therefore, be used effectively in the absence of immunological adjuvants (agents that can induce strong immunity to antigens). Owing to the toxicity of adjuvants, only one (aluminium salts) has hitherto been licensed for use in humans, and it is far from ideal. In this article, Gregory Gregoriadis discusses the use of liposomes as an alternative safe, versatile, universal adjuvant that can induce humoral- and cell-mediated immunity to antigens when administered parenterally or enterally. PMID:2186746

  20. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens. PMID:21635554

  1. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met) diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05). High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet. PMID:27738392

  2. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the "Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants": Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic, Lucija; Colafrancesco, Serena; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280), lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud's syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient), a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  3. Selective inhibition by magnosalin and magnoshinin, compounds from 'shin-i' (Flos magnoliae), of adjuvant-induced angiogenesis and granuloma formation in the mouse pouch.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Kobayashi, S; Luo, B; Kimura, I

    1990-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of magnosalin and magnoshinin, compounds from the crude drug 'Shin-i' (Flos magnoliae), on angiogenesis and pouch granuloma formation induced by an adjuvant containing croton oil were investigated. Magnosalin inhibited angiogenesis 2.4-fold (intra-pouch) and 9.7-fold (intraperitoneal) more strongly than granuloma formation. The inhibition of angiogenesis by magnosalin was 5-fold (intra-pouch) and 21-fold (intraperitoneal) weaker than that by hydrocortisone. In contrast, intraperitoneal magnoshinin inhibited granuloma formation 2.5-fold more strongly than angiogenesis. The regression coefficients of anti-angiogenesis vs. the inhibition of granuloma formation were 1.79 for magnosalin, 1.11 for hydrocortisone, and 0.61 for magnoshinin. These results show that the anti-chronic inflammatory effect of 'Shin-i' was caused by selective inhibition of angiogenesis by magnosalin and of granuloma formation by magnoshinin.

  4. Intranasal immunization of mice with CpG DNA induces strong systemic and mucosal responses that are influenced by other mucosal adjuvants and antigen distribution.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskie, M. J.; Weeratna, R. D.; Davis, H. L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory cytosine-guanine phosphate-linked dinucleotide (CpG) motifs are potent systemic and mucosal adjuvants in mice that have synergistic action with numerous other adjuvants, including alum and cholera toxin (CT). Herein, we evaluate CpG ODN with intranasal (IN) delivery of purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), relative to and in combination with CT, Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin (LT), the B subunit of CT (CTB), and a nontoxic derivative of LT (LTK63). MATERIALS AND METHODS: BALB/c mice were immunized by IN administration of HBsAg, alone or combined with CT, LT, CTB, or LTK63, and/or CpG ODN, or non-CpG control ODN. In addition, the effect of low-or high-volume administration was assessed, in order to target upper respiratory or entire respiratory tract, respectively. HBsAg-specific systemic (immunoglobulins: IgG, IgG1, IgG2a in plasma) and mucosal (IgA in fecal, lung, vaginal, saliva, and gut samples) humoral responses, as well as cell-mediated immune responses including T-cell proliferation and cytokines (interleukins: IL-4, IL-5; interferon: IFN-gamma) were evaluated. RESULTS: CpG ODN, CT, and LT augmented anti-HBs titers equally, and more so than did CTB or LTK63. CpG ODN acted synergistically with CT and LT, but not CTB or LTK63 to enhance anti-HBs titers. Nevertheless, CpG ODN induced a more Th1-like response for all combinations, compared with the same formulation without CpG. Strength of induced systemic and mucosal immune responses was better with IN delivery of a large volume. A small volume required multiple administrations and higher doses of antigen and adjuvant for equal results. This suggests that delivery of antigen to the lung and/or diges-tive system is superior to delivery to the nasal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the synergy between CpG ODN and native toxins (CT, LT) may depend on their enzymatic activity and that the lack of synergy

  5. Effect of Different Adjuvants on Protection and Side-Effects Induced by Helicobacter suis Whole-Cell Lysate Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bosschem, Iris; Bayry, Jagadeesh; De Bruyne, Ellen; Van Deun, Kim; Smet, Annemieke; Vercauteren, Griet; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter suis (H. suis) is a widespread porcine gastric pathogen, which is also of zoonotic importance. The first goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of several vaccine adjuvants (CpG-DNA, Curdlan, Freund's Complete and Incomplete, Cholera toxin), administered either subcutaneously or intranasally along with H. suis whole-cell lysate, to protect against subsequent H. suis challenge in a BALB/c infection model. Subcutaneous immunization with Freund's complete (FC)/lysate and intranasal immunization with Cholera toxin (CT)/lysate were shown to be the best options for vaccination against H. suis, as determined by the amount of colonizing H. suis bacteria in the stomach, although adverse effects such as post-immunization gastritis/pseudo-pyloric metaplasia and increased mortality were observed, respectively. Therefore, we decided to test alternative strategies, including sublingual vaccine administration, to reduce the unwanted side-effects. A CCR4 antagonist that transiently inhibits the migration of regulatory T cells was also included as a new adjuvant in this second study. Results confirmed that immunization with CT (intranasally or sublingually) is among the most effective vaccination protocols, but increased mortality was still observed. In the groups immunized subcutaneously with FC/lysate and CCR4 antagonist/lysate, a significant protection was observed. Compared to the FC/lysate immunized group, gastric pseudo-pyloric metaplasia was less severe or even absent in the CCR4 antagonist/lysate immunized group. In general, an inverse correlation was observed between IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17, KC, MIP-2 and LIX mRNA expression and H. suis colonization density, whereas lower IL-10 expression levels were observed in partially protected animals.

  6. Effect of Different Adjuvants on Protection and Side-Effects Induced by Helicobacter suis Whole-Cell Lysate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bosschem, Iris; Bayry, Jagadeesh; De Bruyne, Ellen; Van Deun, Kim; Smet, Annemieke; Vercauteren, Griet; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter suis (H. suis) is a widespread porcine gastric pathogen, which is also of zoonotic importance. The first goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of several vaccine adjuvants (CpG-DNA, Curdlan, Freund’s Complete and Incomplete, Cholera toxin), administered either subcutaneously or intranasally along with H. suis whole-cell lysate, to protect against subsequent H. suis challenge in a BALB/c infection model. Subcutaneous immunization with Freund’s complete (FC)/lysate and intranasal immunization with Cholera toxin (CT)/lysate were shown to be the best options for vaccination against H. suis, as determined by the amount of colonizing H. suis bacteria in the stomach, although adverse effects such as post-immunization gastritis/pseudo-pyloric metaplasia and increased mortality were observed, respectively. Therefore, we decided to test alternative strategies, including sublingual vaccine administration, to reduce the unwanted side-effects. A CCR4 antagonist that transiently inhibits the migration of regulatory T cells was also included as a new adjuvant in this second study. Results confirmed that immunization with CT (intranasally or sublingually) is among the most effective vaccination protocols, but increased mortality was still observed. In the groups immunized subcutaneously with FC/lysate and CCR4 antagonist/lysate, a significant protection was observed. Compared to the FC/lysate immunized group, gastric pseudo-pyloric metaplasia was less severe or even absent in the CCR4 antagonist/lysate immunized group. In general, an inverse correlation was observed between IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17, KC, MIP-2 and LIX mRNA expression and H. suis colonization density, whereas lower IL-10 expression levels were observed in partially protected animals. PMID:26115373

  7. Effects of different adjuvants in the context of intramuscular and intranasal routes on humoral and cellular immune responses induced by detergent-split A/H3N2 influenza vaccines in mice.

    PubMed

    Baz, Mariana; Samant, Mukesh; Zekki, Hakima; Tribout-Jover, Pascale; Plante, Martin; Lanteigne, Anne-Marie; Hamelin, Marie-Eve; Mallett, Corey; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Boivin, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Influenza A/H3N2 viruses have caused the most severe epidemics since 1968 despite current immunization programs with inactivated vaccines. We undertook a side-by-side preclinical evaluation of different adjuvants (Alum, AS03, and Protollin) and routes of administration (intramuscular [i.m.] and intranasal [i.n.]) for assessing their effect on the immunogenicity and cross-reactivity of inactivated split vaccines (A/H3N2/New York/55/2004). Humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses against the homologous virus and a heterologous drifted strain (A/H3N2/Wisconsin/67/2005) were measured in BALB/c mice at 2, 6, and 19 weeks postboost. The AS03- and Alum-adjuvanted i.m. vaccines induced at least an 8-fold increase over the nonadjuvanted vaccine in functional antibody titers against both the homotypic and heterotypic strains and low IgG2a and high IgG1 levels, suggesting a mixed Th1/Th2 response with a Th2 trend. The Protollin-adjuvanted i.n. vaccine induced the lowest IgG1/IgG2a ratio, which is indicative of a mixed Th1/Th2-type profile with a Th1 trend. This adjuvanted vaccine was the only vaccine to stimulate a mucosal IgA response. Whatever the timing after the boost, both hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and microneutralization (MN) titers were higher with the AS03-adjuvanted i.m. vaccine than with the protollin-adjuvanted i.n. vaccine. Finally, the Alum-adjuvanted i.m. vaccine and the lower-dose Protollin-adjuvanted i.n. vaccine elicited significantly higher CD4(+) Th1 and Th2 responses and more gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD8(+) T cells than the nonadjuvanted vaccine. Our data indicate that the adjuvanted vaccines tested in this study can elicit stronger, more persistent, and broader immune responses against A/H3N2 strains than nonadjuvanted inactivated influenza vaccines.

  8. Protective and anti-arthritic effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA), inhibiting dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, on phosphate ions-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis and rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanp-Sung; Choi, Yoo-Haeng; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kang, Seung-Goo; Park, Young-Guk

    2004-07-01

    The effect of water extract of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA; Cervi Pantotrichum Cornu) prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong in Korean), a traditional immunosuppressive and immunoactivating Korean herbal acupuncture [Int. Immunopharm. 3 7 (2003) 1001] on rat chondrocyte apoptosis was studied. Terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes were isolated from rat costochondrial cartilage and cell death was measured in the presence of 3-5 mM phosphate ions (Pi). The effect of 10 microg/ml DAA was compared to that of phosphonoformic acid (PFA), a competitive inhibitor of the Na-Pi co-transport on Pi-induced apoptosis in chondrocytes. A total of 1 mM PFA blocked anion-induced cell death and prevented an increase in the cell Pi content. In a parallel study, we determined that the DAA also protected chondrocytes from death. On the other hand, the effect of DAA was also evaluated as an inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DHase) and tested in the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Female 7-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the evaluation of DAA in the CIA model. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis score, body weight loss, bone destruction score. DAA was administered by bilateral Shinsu (B23) acupuncture five times per week (10, 20, 30, and 100 microg/kg/day). DAA inhibited rat liver DHO-DHase in vitro with Ki = 843 +/- 43 microg/ml. The anti-proliferative effect of DAA was caused by cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Treatment with 300 mg/kg/day of DAA completely prevented the development of CIA based on the reduction of the arthritis score. The 50% effective dose (ED50) of DAA on arthritis score was 64 mg/kg. DAA ameliorated body weight loss associated with disease onset. DAA suppressed the development of arthritis, even when it was administered after a booster immunization of collagen. DAA is a novel immunosuppressant which inhibits DHO-DHase and its effects in CIA suggest that

  9. The up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats with inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ting; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral inflammation induces central sensitization that displays the features by the development of pain hypersensitivity to the stimuli. It has been shown that activation of glia contributes to the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after peripheral inflammation. It has been suggested that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) primarily expressed on microglia affects central pain response. The present study was designed to examine the expressions of TLR4 and microglia in the spinal cord in different time points of inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The results show that CFA induces significant pain hypersensitivity and paw edema as well as spinal dorsal horn (SDH) microglia activation with the increased expressions of OX-42 and TLR4 during the inflammatory pain, respectively. The quantification of TLR4 with Western Blot analysis also suggests the same patter with the morphological results during the progress of inflammatory pain. In addition, chronic minocycline hydrochloride intrathecal injection reverses pain hypersensitivity and suppresses activation of microglia and TLR4 induced by CFA, but has hardly any effects on paw edema. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of TLR4 and microglia in rats in CFA inflammatory pain states, and suggest that blockade of microglia should likely be considered as a therapeutic opportunity.

  10. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  11. A LC-ESI-MS method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma: comparison pharmacokinetics in normal and collagen-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Leng, Dan-Dan; Gao, Fei-Fei; Jiang, Chun-Jie; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue

    2014-12-01

    To develop a simple and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) method for the simultaneous determination of madecassoside and its major metabolite madecassic acid in rat plasma, and compare the pharmacokinetics of the two compounds in normal and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Glycyrrhetinic acid was used as the internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Inertsil ODS-3 column, using a gradient elution with the mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and water acidified with 0.1% (V/V) formic acid. Detection was achieved by ESI-MS under the negative selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. In normal and CIA rats, madecassoside (30 mg·kg(-1)) was orally administered for 21 consecutive days from the day of arthritis onset. For madecassoside, the linear range was 10-1 000 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.998 9, while for madecassic acid, the linear range was 10-500 ng·mL(-1) with the square regression coefficient (r) of 0.996 1. The lower limit of quantification was 10 ng·mL(-1) for both analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.78% to 13.42% for madecassoside and 2.30% to 14.90% for madecassic acid, and the accuracy was between -0.95% and 6.30% for madecassoside and between -1.48% and 5.34% for madecassic acid. The average recoveries of madecassoside, madecassic acid and IS from spiked plasma samples were > 81%. The developed method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of madecassoside and madecassic acid in rats after an oral administration of madecassoside. During initial 7 days of dosing, the cmax and AUC of madecassoside were greatly decreased and Vd/F was markedly increased in CIA rats, and no significant difference was observed on the first day of dosing. In contrast, the T1/2, cmax and AUC of madecassic acid were significantly increased, and Ke of madecassic acid was greatly decreased in CIA

  12. Tamarind seed extract mitigates the liver oxidative stress in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam Shanmuga; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Thushara, Ram M; Santhosh, Martin Sebastin; Kumar, Somanathapura K Naveen; Paul, Manoj; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Girish, Kesturu S

    2014-03-01

    Although arthritis is primarily a joint disorder that mainly targets the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, several recent investigations have reported oxidative burst and vital organ damage that are being considered as secondary complications of arthritis. The continuous generation of free radicals like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is considered as a key culprit in the initiation and propagation of oxidative damage. In addition, activation of T and B cells, macrophages, inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 aggravates the oxidative damage of the vital organs, particularly the liver. The current piece of work demonstrates oxidative stress in the liver of arthritic rats and its amelioration by the procyanidin-rich tamarind seed extract (TSE). The arthritic liver homogenate, mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions were found with increased levels of oxidative stress markers including free radicals. As a consequence, depletion in the levels of glutathione, total thiols, glutathione peroxidase and reductase was evident. Furthermore, the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were found to be significantly altered. The increased and decreased activity of transaminases respectively in serum and liver, along with histological observations, further confirms the liver damage. Unfortunately, the commonly used drugs like NSAIDs and DMARDs have failed to prevent oxidative damage, rather they were found to be the inducers themselves. Interestingly, TSE supplementation was found to significantly inhibit oxidative burst in the liver and maintain homeostasis. Thus, the study clearly demonstrates the protective efficacy of TSE against arthritis-associated oxidative liver damage, including mitochondrial oxidative burst and its associated secondary complications.

  13. Tamarind seed extract mitigates the liver oxidative stress in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam Shanmuga; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Thushara, Ram M; Santhosh, Martin Sebastin; Kumar, Somanathapura K Naveen; Paul, Manoj; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Girish, Kesturu S

    2014-03-01

    Although arthritis is primarily a joint disorder that mainly targets the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, several recent investigations have reported oxidative burst and vital organ damage that are being considered as secondary complications of arthritis. The continuous generation of free radicals like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is considered as a key culprit in the initiation and propagation of oxidative damage. In addition, activation of T and B cells, macrophages, inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 aggravates the oxidative damage of the vital organs, particularly the liver. The current piece of work demonstrates oxidative stress in the liver of arthritic rats and its amelioration by the procyanidin-rich tamarind seed extract (TSE). The arthritic liver homogenate, mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions were found with increased levels of oxidative stress markers including free radicals. As a consequence, depletion in the levels of glutathione, total thiols, glutathione peroxidase and reductase was evident. Furthermore, the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were found to be significantly altered. The increased and decreased activity of transaminases respectively in serum and liver, along with histological observations, further confirms the liver damage. Unfortunately, the commonly used drugs like NSAIDs and DMARDs have failed to prevent oxidative damage, rather they were found to be the inducers themselves. Interestingly, TSE supplementation was found to significantly inhibit oxidative burst in the liver and maintain homeostasis. Thus, the study clearly demonstrates the protective efficacy of TSE against arthritis-associated oxidative liver damage, including mitochondrial oxidative burst and its associated secondary complications. PMID:24500568

  14. DDA adjuvant induces a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response when associated with BBG2Na, a respiratory syncytial virus potential vaccine.

    PubMed

    Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Libon, Christine; Plotnicky-Gilquin, Hélène; Bussat, Marie Claire; Revy, Lydie; Nguyen, Thien; Bonnefoy, Jean Yves; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Beck, Alain

    2002-06-21

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is one of the most common causes of respiratory infection in infants and the elderly. Previous attempts to vaccinate children against RSV failed and the induction of an aberrant Th2-type immune response was shown to induce severe to fatal pulmonary disease characterised in part by eosinophilia. BBG2Na is a promising human RSV subunit vaccine candidate which successfully passed phase II clinical trials in adults in association with Adju-Phos((R)). However, this formulation is not the most suitable for use in children since aluminium salts are known to induce a Th2-based immune response. In this study, we describe a potent and safe adjuvant formulation for BBG2Na in dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA) that induces a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, BBG2Na showed the same protective efficacy against RSV challenge when formulated either in DDA or in alum in mice and cotton rats. PMID:12034101

  15. Adjuvant Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell Therapy Improves Disease-Free and Overall Survival in Solitary and Nonmicrovascular Invasive Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Lin; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Lin, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Li; Cui, Bo-Kang; Wang, Jun; Lin, Guo-He; Shuang, Ze-Yu; Mao, Yi-Ze; Huang, Xin; Yun, Jing-Ping; Jin, Jie-Tian; Li, Sheng-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy has recently been used as an adjuvant setting following resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), while its benefit remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant CIK application in solitary HCC patients undergoing curative resection with stratification of microvascular invasion (MVI). In total, specimens and data from 307 solitary HCC patients undergoing curative resection between January 2007 and December 2010 were included. Of these, 102 patients received CIK treatment after surgery (CIK group), whereas 205 patients did not (control group). Pathological evaluation was used to retrospectively determine MVI status. The CIK group had 60 MVI-negative and 42 MVI-positive patients, while the numbers in control group were 124 and 81. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to validate possible effects of CIK treatment on disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) as appropriate. For all patients, the CIK group exhibited significantly higher OS than the control group (log-rank test; PDFS = 0.055, POS = 0.020). Further analysis based on MVI stratification showed that for patients with MVI, DFS and OS did not differ between the 2 groups (PDFS = 0.439, POS = 0.374). For patients without MVI, the CIK group exhibited better DFS and OS than the control group (PDFS = 0.042, POS = 0.007), and multivariate analyses demonstrated that CIK treatment was an independent prognostic factor both for DFS and OS. For solitary HCC, CIK cell therapy after curative resection improves DFS and OS for patients without MVI, but has no statistically significant survival benefit for patients with MVI. PMID:26844496

  16. Changes in mRNA expression of ABC and SLC transporters in liver and intestines of the adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Uno, Satoshi; Uraki, Misato; Ito, Ayami; Shinozaki, Yuki; Yamada, Ayano; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effects of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) on the amounts of mRNA of 12 types of rat ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters in the liver and small intestine, 7 (D7) and 21 days (D21) after the injection of adjuvant. There were no significant differences in mRNA levels of ABC and SLC transporters between the livers of AA and control rats on D7, except in the case of Mdr1a. However, levels of Mdr1a, Mrp2 and Oatp SLC transporters were significantly lower in AA than in the control livers on D21. In contrast, the mRNA levels of several ABC and SLC transporters, especially Mrp2, Bcrp, LAT2 and Oatp1a5, were significantly lower in the small intestines of AA rats compared with the controls on D7, though there were no significant differences by D21. The time-dependent alterations in mRNA levels of the pregnane X receptor, but not the constitutive androstane receptor, in the liver and intestine were similar to the changes in mRNA levels of most transporters examined. The present study showed that AA was associated with reduced mRNA expression of several ABC and SLC transporters in the liver and small intestine, but that the time courses of the effects of AA on mRNA expression differed between the liver and small intestine. These results raise the possibility of a functional change of the transporters of liver and intestine in AA rats.

  17. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  18. Recombinant baculovirus vaccine containing multiple M2e and adjuvant LTB induces T cell dependent, cross-clade protection against H5N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Fan, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Jiao; Huang, Jian-Ni; Ye, Yu; Liao, Ming

    2016-01-27

    H5N1, highly pathogenic avian influenza poses, a threat to animal and human health. Rapid changes in H5N1 viruses require periodic reformulation of the conventional strain-matched vaccines, thus emphasizing the need for a broadly protective influenza vaccine. Here, we constructed BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB, a recombinant baculovirus based on baculovirus display and BacMam technology. BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB harbors a gene cassette expressing three tandem copies of the highly conserved extracellular domain of influenza M2 protein (M2e) and the mucosal adjuvant, LTB. We showed that BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB displayed the target protein (M2e/LTB) on the baculoviral surface and expressed it in transduced mammalian cells. BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB, when delivered nasally in mice, was highly immunogenic and induced superior levels of anti-M2e IgA than the non-adjuvanted baculovirus (BV-Dual-3M2e). Importantly, after challenge with different H5N1 clades (clade 0, 2.3.2.1, 2.3.4 and 4), mice inoculated with BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB displayed improved survival and decreased lung virus shedding compared with mice inoculated with BV-Dual-3M2e. The enhanced protection from BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB is mediated by T cell immunity and is primarily based on CD8(+) T cells, while mucosal antibodies alone were insufficient for protection from lethal H5N1 challenge. These results suggest that BV-Dual-3M2e-LTB has potential to protect against a broad range of H5N1 strains thereby providing a novel direction for developing broadly protective vaccines based on cellular immunity. PMID:26724200

  19. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Xin; Fan, Arthur Yin; Zhou, An-Nan; Moudgil, Kamal D.; Ma, Zhong-Ze; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Fong, Harry HS; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) and its modifications have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for about one hundred years to alleviate pain and inflammation. Aim To investigate the effects of HLXL on complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced multiple-joint arthritis in rats. Materials and Methods Male Lewis rats, 190–210g, were immunized subcutaneously at the base of the tail with 200 µl of heat-killed M. tuberculosis in mineral oil (5 mg/ml). HLXL (2.30g/kg and 4.60g/kg) or vehicle control (n=8 per group) was administered orally (i.g.) once a day between days 16–25 post-CFA injection. The rats were observed for signs of arthritis with arthritic changes (erythema, edema, induration) being scored on a scale of 0 to 4 of increasing severity using a standard scoring system. The maximum arthritis score per rat was 16. A plethysmometer was used to measure edema volume in each paw. Adverse effects of HLXL were monitored by closely observing the animals for unusual behavioral changes. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in local tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on day 25 post-CFA. Results HLXL significantly decreased arthritis scores between days 23–25 in the 2.30g/kg group and 21–25 in the 4.60g/kg group (p<0.05). It reduced paw edema on days 22 and 24 in the 2.30g/kg group and on days 20, 22 and 24 in the 4.60g/kg group compared to control (p<0.05). Local tissue TNF-α and IL-1β levels on day 25 post-CFA injection were significantly (p<0.05) lower in rats treated with HLXL than in control rats. No observable adverse effects were found. Conclusion The data suggest that HLXL produces significant anti-arthritic effects that may be mediated by suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, and it appears to be safe. PMID:19100323

  20. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  1. Activation-Induced TIM-4 Expression Identifies Differential Responsiveness of Intestinal CD103+ CD11b+ Dendritic Cells to a Mucosal Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Hilligan, Kerry L; Connor, Lisa M; Schmidt, Alfonso J; Ronchese, Franca

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) populations residing in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are highly heterogeneous and have disparate yet collaborative roles in the promotion of adaptive immune responses towards intestinal antigen. Under steady-state conditions, macrophages are efficient at acquiring antigen but are non-migratory. In comparison, intestinal DC are inefficient at antigen uptake but migrate to the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) where they present antigen to T cells. Whether such distinction in the roles of DC and macrophages in the uptake and transport of antigen is maintained under immunostimulatory conditions is less clear. Here we show that the scavenger and phosphatidylserine receptor T cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin (TIM)-4 is expressed by the majority of LP macrophages at steady-state, whereas DC are TIM-4 negative. Oral treatment with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) induces expression of TIM-4 on a proportion of CD103+ CD11b+ DC in the LP. TIM-4+ DC selectively express high levels of co-stimulatory molecules after CT treatment and are detected in the mLN a short time after appearing in the LP. Importantly, intestinal macrophages and DC expressing TIM-4 are more efficient than their TIM-4 negative counterparts at taking up apoptotic cells and soluble antigen ex vivo. Taken together, our results show that CT induces phenotypic changes to migratory intestinal DC that may impact their ability to take up local antigens and in turn promote the priming of mucosal immunity.

  2. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically.

  3. Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206-211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A Soft Coral-Derived Compound, 11-epi-Sinulariolide Acetate Suppresses Inflammatory Response and Bone Destruction in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:23675440

  5. Activation-Induced TIM-4 Expression Identifies Differential Responsiveness of Intestinal CD103+ CD11b+ Dendritic Cells to a Mucosal Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alfonso J.; Ronchese, Franca

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) populations residing in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are highly heterogeneous and have disparate yet collaborative roles in the promotion of adaptive immune responses towards intestinal antigen. Under steady-state conditions, macrophages are efficient at acquiring antigen but are non-migratory. In comparison, intestinal DC are inefficient at antigen uptake but migrate to the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) where they present antigen to T cells. Whether such distinction in the roles of DC and macrophages in the uptake and transport of antigen is maintained under immunostimulatory conditions is less clear. Here we show that the scavenger and phosphatidylserine receptor T cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin (TIM)-4 is expressed by the majority of LP macrophages at steady-state, whereas DC are TIM-4 negative. Oral treatment with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) induces expression of TIM-4 on a proportion of CD103+ CD11b+ DC in the LP. TIM-4+ DC selectively express high levels of co-stimulatory molecules after CT treatment and are detected in the mLN a short time after appearing in the LP. Importantly, intestinal macrophages and DC expressing TIM-4 are more efficient than their TIM-4 negative counterparts at taking up apoptotic cells and soluble antigen ex vivo. Taken together, our results show that CT induces phenotypic changes to migratory intestinal DC that may impact their ability to take up local antigens and in turn promote the priming of mucosal immunity. PMID:27379516

  6. A soft coral-derived compound, 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate suppresses inflammatory response and bone destruction in adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-You; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Chen, Wu-Fu; Sun, Yu-Min; Su, Jui-Hsin; Lu, Yi; Huang, Shi-Ying; Hung, Han-Chun; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a significant number of metabolites with potent anti-inflammatory properties have been discovered from marine organisms, and several of these compounds are now under clinical trials. In the present study, we isolated 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (Ya-s11), a cembrane-type compound with anti-inflammatory effects, from the Formosa soft coral Sinularia querciformis. Preliminary screening revealed that Ya-s11 significantly inhibited the expression of the proinflammatory proteins induced nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. We also examined the therapeutic effects of Ya-s11 on adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in female Lewis rats, which demonstrate features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Animal experiments revealed that Ya-s11 (subcutaneously 9 mg/kg once every 2 days from day 7 to day 28 postimmunization) significantly inhibited AIA characteristics. Moreover, Ya-s11 also attenuated protein expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ankle tissues of AIA-rats. Based on its attenuation of the expression of proinflammatory proteins and disease progression in AIA rats, the marine-derived compound Ya-s11 may serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  7. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. PMID:26763139

  8. The Pattern of Use of Oral NSAIDs with or without Co-prescription of Gastroprotective Agent for Arthritic Knee by Korean Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Chun; Moon, Young-Wan; Seo, Seung Suk; Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Ju Hong; Choi, Choong-Hyeok

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for arthritic knees in clinical practice, particularly focusing on the co-prescription of gastroprotective agents for patients with risk factors for adverse gastrointestinal (GI) events. Materials and Methods Each cross-sectional cohort was a group of outpatients visiting 111 physicians who had prescribed NSAIDs for the patients' arthritic knees for more than three consecutive months. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by each patient and physician. Results Nine hundred and forty five patients (48%) of the whole 1,960 patients belonged to the group with a high or very high risk for NSAID-induced gastropathy determined by northern California Health Maintenance Organization guidelines. Overall, only less than half of the patients were given co-prescription of gastroprotective agents, regardless of the presence or absence of GI symptoms and irrespective of the level of risk for NSAID-induced gastropathy. Conclusions The physician prescribing NSAIDs for arthritic knees should monitor any GI symptoms and the patient monitor anylevel for NSAIDinduced gastropathy, and be willing to add gastroprotective agents as necessary in order to prevent serious adverse GI events. PMID:22570835

  9. Arthritis Induces Early Bone High Turnover, Structural Degradation and Mechanical Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Bruno; Cascão, Rita; Vale, Ana Catarina; Cavaleiro, Inês; Vaz, Maria Fátima; Brito, José Américo Almeida; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously found in the chronic SKG mouse model of arthritis that long standing (5 and 8 months) inflammation directly leads to high collagen bone turnover, disorganization of the collagen network, disturbed bone microstructure and degradation of bone biomechanical properties. The main goal of the present work was to study the effects of the first days of the inflammatory process on the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of bone. Methods Twenty eight Wistar adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats were monitored during 22 days after disease induction for the inflammatory score, ankle perimeter and body weight. Healthy non-arthritic rats were used as controls for compar-ison. After 22 days of disease progression rats were sacrificed and bone samples were collected for histomorphometrical, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical analysis and 3-point bending. Blood samples were also collected for bone turnover markers. Results AIA rats had an increased bone turnover (as inferred from increased P1NP and CTX1, p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0002, respectively) and this was paralleled by a decreased mineral content (calcium p = 0.0046 and phos-phorus p = 0.0046). Histomorphometry showed a lower trabecular thickness (p = 0.0002) and bone volume (p = 0.0003) and higher trabecular sepa-ration (p = 0.0009) in the arthritic group as compared with controls. In addition, bone mechanical tests showed evidence of fragility as depicted by diminished values of yield stress and ultimate fracture point (p = 0.0061 and p = 0.0279, re-spectively) in the arthritic group. Conclusions We have shown in an AIA rat model that arthritis induc-es early bone high turnover, structural degradation, mineral loss and mechanical weak-ness. PMID:25617902

  10. Novel Adjuvants and Immunomodulators for Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Fang, Yongxiang; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial for efficacy of vaccines, especially subunit and recombinant vaccines. Rational vaccine design, including knowledge-based and molecularly defined adjuvants tailored for directing and potentiating specific types of host immune responses towards the antigens included in the vaccine is becoming a reality with our increased understanding of innate and adaptive immune activation. This will allow future vaccines to induce immune reactivity having adequate specificity as well as protective and recallable immune effector mechanisms in appropriate body compartments, including mucosal surfaces. Here we describe these new developments and, when possible, relate new immunological knowledge to the many years of experience with traditional, empirical adjuvants. Finally, some protocols are given for production of emulsion (oil-based) and liposome-based adjuvant/antigen formulations.

  11. Arthrite à pneumocoque chez un adulte immunocompétent

    PubMed Central

    Chemsi, Hicham; Chadli, Maryama; Sekhsokh, Yassine

    2015-01-01

    Les infections à pneumocoques sont avant tout respiratoires, ORL et méningées. Les infections ostéoarticulaires à pneumocoque ont la particularité de survenir dans moins de 20% des cas chez l'adulte sain. Habituellement, un ou plusieurs facteurs favorisants sont retrouvés. Toutefois, nous rapportons lors de cette observation le cas d'une arthrite à Streptococcus pneumoniae chez un adulte immunocompétent sans facteurs prédisposant. Patient âgé de 66 ans, diabétique de type II, a été hospitalisé pour une décompensation acido-cétosique et une monoarthrite du genou droit. Ce patient était fébrile (39°C) et présentait un genou droit inflammatoire en flexion avec rougeur et chaleur locale et un choc rotulien. Une ponction articulaire avec d'autres examens ont été réalisés pour confirmation d'une arthrite septique à pneumocoque. Le résultat de la ponction articulaire réalisée a montré un liquide jaune citron trouble avec 480 000 leucocytes/mm3 à prédominance polynucléaires neutrophiles. L'examen direct a montré des coccis à Gram positif en diplocoque, la culture a permis d'isoler un Streptococcus pneumoniae sensible à la pénicilline G. L’évolution clinique et biologique de l'arthrite du genou était favorable. Un déficit immunitaire, un asplénisme anatomique ou fonctionnel peuvent être en cause. L'alcoolisme est un facteur favorisant mais le mécanisme n'est pas clairement élucidé. La présence de matériel prothétique, peut favoriser une localisation septique. Ces facteurs de risque doivent être systématiquement recherchés, notamment en cas d'infection grave ou récidivante, une antibioprophylaxie ou une vaccination pouvant être proposées chez les sujets à haut risque. PMID:26327976

  12. Biochemical correlates of hypnoanalgesia in arthritic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Domangue, B B; Margolis, C G; Lieberman, D; Kaji, H

    1985-06-01

    Self-reported levels of pain, anxiety, and depression, and plasma levels of beta-endorphin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin were measured in 19 arthritic pain patients before and after hypnosis designed to produce pain reduction. Correlations were found between levels of pain, anxiety, and depression. Anxiety and depression were negatively related to plasma norepinephrine levels. Dopamine levels were positively correlated with both depression and epinephrine levels and negatively correlated with levels of serotonin. Serotonin levels were positively correlated with levels of beta-endorphin and negatively correlated to epinephrine. Following hypnotherapy, there were clinically and statistically significant decreases in pain, anxiety, and depression and increases in beta-endorphin-like immunoreactive material.

  13. PGNAA of human arthritic synovium for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, E.; Yanch, J.C.; Shortkroff, S.

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), is a proposed new therapy modality for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease afflicting the joints. The synovium, which is the membrane lining the joint, becomes inflamed and represents the target tissue for therapy. When a joint is unresponsive to drug treatment, physical removal of the synovium, termed synovectomy, becomes necessary. Existing options include surgery and radiation synovectomy. BNCS has advantages over these options in that it is noninvasive and does not require the administration of radioactive substances. Previous studies have shown that the uptake of {sup 10}B by human arthritic synovium ex vivo is high, ranging from 194 to 545 ppm with an unenriched boron compound. While tissue samples remain viable up to 1 week, ex vivo conditions do not accurately reflect those in vivo. This paper presents results from experiments assessing the washout of boron from the tissue and examines the implications for in vivo studies.

  14. Alcohol consumption in arthritic patients: clinical and laboratory studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bradlow, A; Mowat, A G

    1985-01-01

    In popular belief patients with chronic arthritis take alcohol for its analgesic effect. To test this we studied by validated questionnaire the past and present alcohol consumption of 103 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA), 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 90 orthopaedic non-arthritic controls. OA men were most likely and RA men least likely to have been heavy drinkers at any time of their lives. Mean red corpuscular volume (MCV), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and serum uric acid (SUA) levels did not correlate with reported alcohol consumption. Two of 93 OA femoral heads examined had avascular change; both were from heavy drinkers. The abstemiousness of RA men compared with their OA counterparts was due to a striking increase in joint pain after drinking alcohol (p = 0.004), fear of adverse drug reactions with alcohol, and a widespread belief not expressed by OA men that 'alcohol and arthritis do not mix'. PMID:2858181

  15. Effects of the selective EP4 antagonist, CJ-023,423 on chronic inflammation and bone destruction in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takako; Murata, Yoko; Taniguchi, Kana; Murase, Akio; Nii, Aisuke

    2008-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a potent pro-inflammatory mediator. We have recently discovered CJ-023,423, a highly selective antagonist of EP4 receptors, one of the PGE2 receptors. This agent is suitable for exploring the effects of blocking EP4 receptors following oral administration in rats. In this study, CJ-023,423 was used in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) to investigate the role of the EP4 receptor in chronic inflammation and bone destruction. These effects were compared with those of rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. CJ-023,423 had significant inhibitory effects on paw swelling, inflammatory biomarkers, synovial inflammation and bone destruction in AIA rats. In particular, the inhibitory effect on paw swelling in AIA rats was comparable to that of rofecoxib. These results suggest that PGE2 acting via the EP4 receptor is involved in the development of chronic inflammation and bone destruction, particularly with respect to oedema in AIA rats. This is the first study to confirm the in-vivo effects of EP4 receptor blockade on inflammation and bone destruction in AIA rats with a small-molecule compound.

  16. The role of Montanide ISA 70 as an adjuvant in immune responses against Leishmania major induced by thiol-specific antioxidant-based protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khabazzadeh Tehrani, Narges; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Maleki, Fatemeh; Zarrati, Somayeh; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by several species of the genus Leishmania. Montanide ISA 70 is an adjuvant composed of a natural metabolizable oil and a very refined emulsifier from the manide monooleate family. The TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant) is a important antigen of Leishmania major. The purpose of this work was protein-vaccine efficacy as an protection and excellent candidate in the presence Montanide. The expression of recombinant protein was confirmed with SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) page and Western bloting. 48 BALB/c mice were divided into four groups (TSA/Freund,TSA/Alum + BCG, TSA/Montanide and PBS groups) and immunized with 20 μg of vaccine subcutaneously three times intervals on days 0, 14 and 28. The mice were challenged with parasite 21 days after final immunization. The lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated with Brdu method. Cytokines and also total antibody and subclasses were evaluated with ELISA method. The vaccine formulated with the recombinant TSA protein with Montanide induced lymphocytes proliferation cytokines and total antibody and subclasses as compared with the control group. PMID:27605780

  17. Chemotherapy acts as an adjuvant to convert the tumor microenvironment into a highly permissive state for vaccination-induced antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Heung; Mao, Chih-Ping; Lee, Sung Yong; Chen, Alexander; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Woo; Alvarez, Ronald D; Roden, Richard B S; Pardoll, Drew; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2013-04-15

    Multiple classes of pharmacologic agents have the potential to induce the expression and release of proinflammatory factors from dying tumor cells. As a result, these cells can in theory elicit an immune response through various defined mechanisms to permanently eradicate disseminated cancer. However, the impact of chemotherapy on the tumor-specific immune response in the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Within the tumor microenvironment, the immune response promoted by chemotherapy is antagonized by an immune-suppressive milieu, and the balance of these opposing forces dictates the clinical course of disease. Here, we report that high antigen exposure within the tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy is sufficient to skew this balance in favor of a productive immune response. In elevating antigen exposure, chemotherapy can achieve long-term control of tumor progression without the need of an additional adjuvant. We found that chemotherapy initiated this phenomenon in the tumor microenvironment through an accumulation of dendritic cells, which stimulated CD8(+) T cells and the type I IFN pathway. From this conceptual base, we developed a simple approach to cancer therapy combining chemotherapy and vaccination that may be widely applicable.

  18. Chemotherapy acts as an adjuvant to convert the tumor microenvironment into a highly permissive state for vaccination-induced antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Heung; Mao, Chih-Ping; Lee, Sung Yong; Chen, Alexander; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Woo; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Roden, Richard B.S.; Pardoll, Drew; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2013-01-01

    Multiple classes of pharmacologic agents have the potential to induce the expression and release of pro-inflammatory factors from dying tumor cells. As a result, these cells can in theory elicit an immune response through various defined mechanisms to permanently eradicate disseminated cancer. However, the impact of chemotherapy on the tumor-specific immune response in the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Within the tumor microenvironment, the immune response promoted by chemotherapy is antagonized by an immune-suppressive milieu, and the balance of these opposing forces dictates the clinical course of disease. Here we report that high antigen exposure within the tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy is sufficient to skew this balance in favor of a productive immune response. In elevating antigen exposure, chemotherapy can achieve long-term control of tumor progression without the need of an additional adjuvant. We found that chemotherapy initiated this phenomenon in the tumor microenvironment through an accumulation of dendritic cells, which stimulated CD8+ T cells and the type-I interferon pathway. From this conceptual base, we developed a simple approach to cancer therapy combining chemotherapy and vaccination that may be widely applicable. PMID:23418322

  19. Reexamination of the difference in susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis among LEW/Crj, Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats.

    PubMed

    Banik, Ratan Kumar; Kasai, Masanori; Mizumura, Kazue

    2002-04-01

    The present investigations were performed to assess the differences among rat colonies commonly used for neurophysiological research regarding the development of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Inflammatory signs including edema in the paw fluctuated remarkably among individual Wistar (Slc/Wistar/ST) and Sprague-Dawley (Slc/SD) rats, while the inflammatory signs of Lewis (LEW/Crj) rats appeared earlier and was severer and more consistent than Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats. Edema in the hind paw developed in 100% of LEW/Crj rats with the lowest dose of CFA (0.6 mg/rat) used as compared with 64% of Slc/Wistar/ST (CFA 1 mg/rat) and 38% of Slc/SD rats (CFA 1.2 mg/rat). Retardation of weight gain was observed in Slc/Wistar/ST and Slc/SD rats in contrast to a severe weight decrease in inflamed LEW/Crj rats after the development of arthritis.

  20. New triterpenes, myrrhanol A and myrrhanone A, from guggul-gum resins, and their potent anti-inflammatory effect on adjuvant-induced air-pouch granuloma of mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, I; Yoshikawa, M; Kobayashi, S; Sugihara, Y; Suzuki, M; Oominami, H; Murakami, T; Matsuda, H; Doiphode, V V

    2001-04-23

    Myrrhanol A, a new triterpene isolated from guggul (Balsamodendron or Commiphora mukul Hook.)-gum resin, displays a potent anti-inflammatory effect on exudative pouch fluid, angiogenesis, and granuloma weights in adjuvant-induced air-pouch granuloma of mice. Its effects were more marked than those of hydrocortisone and the 50% aqueous methanolic extract of the crude drug. Myrrhanol A is a plausible candidate for a potent anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:11327606

  1. Adjuvant effect of caffeine on acetylsalicylic acid anti-nociception: prostaglandin E2 synthesis determination in carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation in rat.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sánchez, Sílvia; Planas, Eulàlia; Poveda, Raquel

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we report a synergistic interaction between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAF) on the inhibition of nociception in a model of peripheral inflammation in rat; on the contrary no interaction have been found on anti-inflammatory effects and peripheral prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) synthesis inhibition. Acute inflammation was induced by the subplantar injection of carrageenan into the right hind paw, and the effects of the drugs were evaluated from 0 to 5h. Nociception was assessed using the Randall & Selitto test, and the inflammatory response by plethismometry. Oral administration of ASA (10-400mg/kg) induced dose-related anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. On the other hand, oral CAF administration (5-50mg/kg) did not show a dose-related inhibitory effect, neither on the inhibition of nociception nor on the inflammatory response. To analyze a possible interaction between both drugs a dose-response curve to ASA plus a fixed dose of CAF (5mg/kg) was obtained 3h after the injection of carrageenan, when the inflammatory pain peaked. A fixed dose of CAF was able to improve the anti-nociceptive, but not the anti-inflammatory, effects of ASA. We also assessed, by enzyme immunoassay, the effects of the combination on peripheral PGE-2 levels: CAF did not alter the inhibitory effect of ASA on PGE-2 synthesis. Our results corroborate the well-known clinical effects of combining ASA and CAF; on the other hand, we rule out that prostaglandin synthesis inhibition at peripheral sites would be the mechanism responsible of the adjuvant anti-nociceptive effect of CAF.

  2. Effects of one minute and ten minutes of walking activity in rats with arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant on pain and edema symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Raquel Pinheiro; Bressan, Elisângela; Silva, Tatiane Morgana da; Gevaerd, Monique da Silva; Tonussi, Carlos Rogério; Domenech, Susana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two protocols of exercise on nociception, edema and cell migration in rats with CFA-induced arthritis. Female Wistar rats (200 - 250 g, n = 50) was monoarthritis-induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; Mycobacterium butyricum, 0.5 mg/mL; 50 μL) into the right knee joint (TF; n = 24) or right ankle joint (TT; n = 26). Incapacitation was measured by the paw elevation time (TEP; s) in 1-min periods of observation. The edema of the knee or ankle joints was evaluated by the variation of the articular diameter (DA, cm) and by the paw volume variation (EP, mL), respectively. Both were measured during 10 consecutive days. Two protocols of exercise were performed: (a) in the constant exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 6) performing 1 minute of daily exercise on the cylinder; (b) variable exercise group (TF, n = 6; TT, n = 7), the exercise increased by 1 minute per day. The control groups (TF, n = 12; TT, n = 13) didn't perform the exercise. After 10 days, the animals were euthanized for total (CT; cells/mm3) and differential leukocyte counts (mononuclear - MON, and polymorphonuclear - PMN, cells/mm3) of the articular inflammatory exudate. The variable exercise protocol inhibited incapacitation and edema for both joints. However, cell migration decreased only in the TF.The constant exercise reduced edema in both joints, and cell migration was decreased in the TT. However, the incapacitation was not reduced. Variable exercise seemed to be more effective in reducing the inflammatory parameters than constant exercise.

  3. Molecular weight-dependent effects of hyaluronate on the arthritic synovium.

    PubMed

    Asari, A; Miyauchi, S; Matsuzaka, S; Ito, T; Kominami, E; Uchiyama, Y

    1998-05-01

    Intra-articular injection of hyaluronate (HA) is widely used in the treatment of arthropathies. However, the mechanism of the effects of HA preparations on the arthritic synovium and the relationship between their effects and molecular weights (MW) remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of two hyaluronate preparations, HA84 (MW: 84 X 10(4)) and HA230 (MW: 230 X 10(4)), on the synovium of an arthritis model and to examine the mechanism of the effects of HA. The HA preparations were intra-articularly injected in a model of canine arthritis induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection for a total trial of 5 weeks. To define the accessibility of HA preparations to the synovial lining layers, fluorescein-labeled HA84 or HA230 was injected at the last administration. Pathological changes analyzed included increases in volumes and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in synovial fluids, thickening of the synovial lining layers, vacuolar alterations in the lining cells, and stainability of HA in the synovium. Expression levels of Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) were immunohistochemically detected in the tissues to investigate the ability of the cells to survive the degeneration. The pathological changes described above were more significantly suppressed in the HA84-treated than in the HA230-treated groups. In most cases of the HA84-treated group (five cases out of six), fluorescein particles were intensely distributed in the synovial lining layers, but only two cases in the HA230-treated group showed a weak distribution of fluorescein particles in the layers, indicating a certain difference in the accessibility of HA preparations to the lining cells between the two HA molecules. Moreover, the immunoreactivity for Hsp72 in the lining cells as more intense in the HA84-treated than in the HA230-treated groups. The difference in the accessibility of HA molecules corresponded well with that in the inducibility of Hsp72 in the lining cells. These

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Innate But Not Adaptive Inflammation in ZAP70-Mutated SKG Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Simon; Holmdahl, Rikard; Wing, Kajsa

    2016-09-01

    Polysaccharides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can induce arthritis, ileitis, and interstitial pneumonitis in BALB/c ZAP70 (W163C)-mutant (SKG) mice via T helper 17-cell-dependent pathways. However, little is known regarding the factors influencing disease severity. We investigated mannan-induced arthritis in SKG mice and how NADPH oxidase 2-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate disease. SKG mice were highly susceptible to both IL-17-mediated T-cell-driven arthritis and T-cell-independent acute psoriasis-like dermatitis. In vivo imaging revealed more ROS in joints of arthritic SKG mice compared to wild-type mice, which links ROS and joint inflammation. Still, ROS deficiency in SKG.Ncf1(m1j/m1j) mice greatly increased severity of arthritis and dermatitis, a difference that could not be attributed to increased T-cell activation, thymic selection, or antibody production. However, when ROS production was restored in CD68(+) macrophages, inflammation reverted to baseline, demonstrating a regulatory role of macrophage-derived ROS in autoimmunity. Thus, arthritis in SKG mice is a useful model to study the role of ROS in innate-driven chronic inflammation independently of adaptive immunity. PMID:27427418

  5. Concept analysis of coping with arthritic pain by South Korean older adults: development of a hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Seomun, Gyeong-Ae; Chang, Sung Ok; Lee, Pyoung Sook; Lee, Sook Ja; Shin, Hyun Jeong

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to clarify and conceptualize the phenomenon of coping with arthritic pain by older adults. The Hybrid Model of concept development was applied to develop a conceptual structure of coping with arthritic pain by older adults. A refined definition of coping with arthritic pain by older adults emerged that identified the attributes and structure of the concept. This study reveals the characteristics of the ways that older adults cope with arthritic pain, such as how they experience themselves, how pain affects their daily life, and how they perceive the meaning of coping with arthritic pain. These characteristics indicate the complexity of the concept regarding the coping of older adults with arthritic pain. This area needs to be clarified when nursing staff assess coping with pain and plan pain management for older adults.

  6. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. On vaccine's adjuvants and autoimmunity: Current evidence and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    Adjuvants are compounds incorporated into vaccines to enhance immunogenicity and the development of these molecules has become an expanding field of research in the last decades. Adding an adjuvant to a vaccine antigen leads to several advantages, including dose sparing and the induction of a more rapid, broader and strong immune response. Several of these molecules have been approved, including aluminium salts, oil-in-water emulsions (MF59, AS03 and AF03), virosomes and AS04. Adjuvants have recently been implicated in the new syndrome named "ASIA-Autoimmune/inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants", which describes an umbrella of clinical conditions including post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent studies implicate a web of mechanisms in the development of vaccine adjuvant-induced autoimmune diseases, in particular, in those associated with aluminium-based compounds. Fewer and unsystematised data are instead available about other adjuvants, despite recent evidence indicating that vaccines with different adjuvants may also cause specific autoimmune adverse reactions possible towards different pathogenic mechanisms. This topic is of importance as the specific mechanism of action of each single adjuvant may have different effects on the course of different diseases. Herein, we review the current evidence about the mechanism of action of currently employed adjuvants and discuss the mechanisms by which such components may trigger autoimmunity. PMID:26031899

  8. Immunoliposome co-delivery of bufalin and anti-CD40 antibody adjuvant induces synergetic therapeutic efficacy against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Yuan, Jiani; Yang, Qian; Cao, Wei; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Xie, Yanhua; Tu, Honghai; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Siwang

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes constitute one of the most popular nanocarriers for improving the delivery and efficacy of agents in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate immunoliposome co-delivery of bufalin and anti-CD40 to induce synergetic therapeutic efficacy while eliminating systemic side effects. Bufalin liposomes (BFL) conjugated with anti-CD40 antibody (anti-CD40-BFL) showed enhanced cytotoxicity compared with bufalin alone. In a mouse B16 melanoma model, intravenous injection of anti-CD40-BFL achieved smaller tumor volume than did treatment with BFL (average: 117 mm3 versus 270 mm3, respectively); the enhanced therapeutic efficacy through a caspase-dependent pathway induced apoptosis, which was confirmed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-Fluorescein nick end labeling and Western blot assay. Meanwhile, anti-CD40-BFL elicited unapparent body-weight changes and a significant reduction in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and hepatic enzyme alanine transaminase, suggesting minimized systemic side effects. This may be attributed to the mechanism by which liposomes are retained within the tumor site for an extended period of time, which is supported by the following biodistribution and flow cytometric analyses. Taken together, the results demonstrated a highly promising strategy for liposomal vehicle transport of anti-CD40 plus bufalin that can be used to enhance antitumor effects via synergetic systemic immunity while blocking systemic toxicity. PMID:25506218

  9. Adjuvant anticholinesterase therapy for the management of epilepsy-induced memory deficit: a critical pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Awanish; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is one of the major neurological disorders still awaiting safer drugs with improved antiepileptic effect and lesser side effects. Apart from epilepsy itself, AEDs also have been shown to induce cognitive impairment in patients with epilepsy. There are limited data for the treatment of this menace. As cholinergic approach has widely been practiced for the restoration of memory in various neurodegenerative disorders, this study was envisaged to evaluate add on effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (tacrine) with phenytoin in pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced learning and memory deficit in mice. In this study, mice were kindled using subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg, i.p.; at interval of 48 ± 2 hr) and successfully kindled animals were divided into different groups and treated with vehicle, phenytoin and phenytoinin in combination with tacrine (0.3 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg) and tacrine + atropine. Effect of different interventions on learning and memory was evaluated using elevated plus maze and passive shock avoidance on days 5, 10, 15 and 20. Phenytoin-treated kindled animals were associated with learning and memory deficit, while tacrine supplementation improved memory deficit with increased seizure severity score. Atropine treatment significantly reversed the protective effect of tacrine. Neurochemical findings also support the behavioural finding of the study. Our results suggest the use of anticholinesterases, with better seizure tolerance, for the management of cognitive impairment of epilepsy, as adjunct therapy.

  10. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia during adjuvant treatment for cervical cancer patients: development and validation of a prediction model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kecheng; Luo, Aiyue; Li, Xiong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neuron network (ANN) model combining both the genetic risk factors and clinical factorsmay be effective in prediction of chemotherapy-induced adverse events. Purpose: To identify genetic factors and clinical factors associated with bone marrow suppression in cervical cancer patient, and to build a model for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia prediction. Methods: We performed a genome wide association study on a cohort to identify genetic determinants. Samples were genotyped using the Axiom CHB 1.0. The primary analyses focused on the scan of 657178 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Artificial neural network were used to integrating clinical factors and genetic factors to predict the occurrence of neutropenia. Results: 32 variants associated with neutropenia in the patients after chemotherapy were found (P<1 × 10-4). During internal validation and external validation, artificial neural network performed well in predicting neutropenia with considerable accuracy, which is 88.9% and 81.7% respectively. ROC analysis had acceptable areas under the curve of 0.897 for the internal validation sample and 0.782 for the external validation sample. Conclusion: Neutropenia may be associated with both genetic factors and clinical factors. Our study found that the artificial neural networks model based on the multiple risk factors jointly, can effectively predict the occurring of neutropenia, which provides some guidance before the starting of chemotherapy. PMID:26379877

  11. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  12. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  13. Multifunctional nanoparticles co-delivering Trp2 peptide and CpG adjuvant induce potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against melanoma and its lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenghong; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Shutao; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-11-28

    Immunotherapy has shown the potential to become an essential component of the successful treatment of various malignancies. In many cases, such as in melanoma, however, induction of a potent and specific T-cell response against the endogenous antigen or self-antigen still remains a major challenge. To induce a potent MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response, cytosol delivery of an exogenous antigen into dendritic cells is preferred, if not required. Lipid-calcium-phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles represent a new class of intracellular delivery systems for impermeable drugs. We are interested in exploring the potential of LCP NPs for use as a peptide vaccine delivery system for cancer therapy. To increase the encapsulation of Trp2 peptide into the calcium phosphate precipitate core of LCP, two phosphor-serine residues were added to the N-terminal of the peptide (p-Trp2). CpG ODN was also co-encapsulated with p-Trp2 as an adjuvant. The NPs were further modified with mannose to enhance and prolong the cargo deposit into the lymph nodes (LNs), which ensured persistent antigen loading and stimulation. Compared with free Trp2 peptide/CpG, vaccination with LCP encapsulating p-Trp2 and CpG resulted in superior inhibition of tumor growth in both B16F10 subcutaneous and lung metastasis models. An IFN-γ production assay and in vivo CTL response study revealed that the improved efficacy was a result of a Trp2-specific immune response. Thus, encapsulation of phospho-peptide antigens into LCP may be a promising strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic self-antigens for cancer therapy.

  14. Exposure of brown Norway rats to diesel exhaust particles prior to ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization elicits IgE adjuvant activity but attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Caroline C; Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Millecchia, Lyndell; Barger, Mark W; Roberts, Jenny R; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Antonini, James M; Ma, Joseph K H

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) during the sensitization process has been shown to increase antigen-specific IgE production and aggravate allergic airway inflammation in human and animal models. In this study, we evaluated the effect of short-term DEP exposure on ovalbumin (OVA)-mediated responses using a post-sensitization model. Brown Norway rats were first exposed to filtered air or DEP (20.6 +/- 2.7 mg/m3) for 4 h/day for five consecutive days. One day after the final air or DEP exposure (day 1), rats were sensitized with aerosolized OVA (40.5 +/- 6.3 mg/m3), and then again on days 8 and 15, challenged with OVA on day 29, and sacrificed on days 9 or 30, 24 h after the second OVA exposure or the final OVA challenge, respectively. Control animals received aerosolized saline instead of OVA. DEP were shown to elicit an adjuvant effect on the production of antigen-specific IgE and IgG on day 30. At both time points, no significant airway inflammatory responses and lung injury were found for DEP exposure alone. However, the OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, acellular lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and numbers of T cells and their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in lung-draining lymph nodes were markedly reduced by DEP on day 30 compared with the air-plus-OVA exposure group. The OVA-induced nitric oxide (NO) in the BAL fluid and production of NO, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-12 by alveolar macrophages (AM) were also significantly lowered by DEP on day 30 as well as day 9. DEP or OVA alone decreased intracellular glutathione (GSH) in AM and lymphocytes on days 9 and 30. The combined DEP and OVA exposure resulted in further depletion of GSH in both cell types. These results show that short-term DEP exposure prior to sensitization had a delayed effect on enhancement of the sensitization in terms of allergen-specific IgE and IgG production, but caused an attenuation of the allergen-induced airway

  15. Prognostic Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea and Subsequent Resumption of Menstruation for Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jeong; Lee, Jae Il; Jeon, Myung Jae; Lee, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is a side effect that occurs in patients with breast cancer (BC) as a result of chemotherapy. These patients require special treatments to avoid infertility and menopause. However, the factors controlling CIA, resumption of menstruation (RM), and persistence of menstruation after chemotherapy are unknown. The long-term prognosis for premenopausal patients with BC and the prognostic factors associated with CIA and RM are subject to debate. We performed a retrospective study by reviewing the medical records of 249 patients with BC (stage I to stage III) who were treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy. The median patient age was 43 (range, 26-55 years) and the median duration of follow-up was 64 months (range, 28-100 months). The medical records indicated that 219 patients (88.0%) scored as positive for the hormone receptor (HR); the majority of these patients completed chemotherapy and then received additional therapy of tamoxifen. Our analyses revealed that 88.0% (n = 219) of patients experienced CIA, and the percentage of RM during follow-up was 48.6% (n = 121). A total of 30 patients (12.0%) did not experience CIA. Disease-free survival (DFS) was affected by several factors, including tumour size ≥2 cm, node positivity, HR negative status, and body mass index ≥23 kg/m. Multivariate analysis indicated that tumour size ≥2 cm remained as a significant factor for DFS (hazard ratio = 3.3, P = 0.034). In summary, this study finds that the majority of premenopausal patients with BC (stage I to stage III) who receive chemotherapy experience CIA and subsequent RM. Although tumour size ≥2 cm is negatively associated with DFS, RM after CIA is not associated with poor prognosis.

  16. Prognostic Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea and Subsequent Resumption of Menstruation for Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jeong; Lee, Jae Il; Jeon, Myung Jae; Lee, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is a side effect that occurs in patients with breast cancer (BC) as a result of chemotherapy. These patients require special treatments to avoid infertility and menopause. However, the factors controlling CIA, resumption of menstruation (RM), and persistence of menstruation after chemotherapy are unknown. The long-term prognosis for premenopausal patients with BC and the prognostic factors associated with CIA and RM are subject to debate. We performed a retrospective study by reviewing the medical records of 249 patients with BC (stage I to stage III) who were treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy. The median patient age was 43 (range, 26-55 years) and the median duration of follow-up was 64 months (range, 28-100 months). The medical records indicated that 219 patients (88.0%) scored as positive for the hormone receptor (HR); the majority of these patients completed chemotherapy and then received additional therapy of tamoxifen. Our analyses revealed that 88.0% (n = 219) of patients experienced CIA, and the percentage of RM during follow-up was 48.6% (n = 121). A total of 30 patients (12.0%) did not experience CIA. Disease-free survival (DFS) was affected by several factors, including tumour size ≥2 cm, node positivity, HR negative status, and body mass index ≥23 kg/m. Multivariate analysis indicated that tumour size ≥2 cm remained as a significant factor for DFS (hazard ratio = 3.3, P = 0.034). In summary, this study finds that the majority of premenopausal patients with BC (stage I to stage III) who receive chemotherapy experience CIA and subsequent RM. Although tumour size ≥2 cm is negatively associated with DFS, RM after CIA is not associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27057900

  17. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  18. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L.; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  19. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  20. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria.

  1. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria. PMID:27032516

  2. Physical medicine and rehabilitation in the elderly arthritic patient.

    PubMed

    Schutt, A H

    1977-02-01

    The basic conservative therapy programs for elderly patients with arthritis include adequate physical rest and mental relaxation, analgesics, aspirin, and physical rehabilitation consisting of occupational and physical therapy with a good home therapy program providing appropriate balance between rest and activity. Proper protection from trauma and overuse of the involved joints, and appropriate nutrition can afford optimal improvement in health status and general resistance. Proper orientation of the patient regarding the nature of his disease and treatment program usually is required to obtain his full cooperation. A kind, encouraging, and understanding approach is most helpful in the elderly patient. Physical rehabilitation can help to relieve pain, decrease edema and deformities, improve muscle weakness and incoordination, and increase stamina. Difficulties with gait, transfers, and self-care can be solved or improved. Physical medicine and rehabilitation measures are important components of the challenging treatment of patients of all age groups who are afflicted with severe arthritis. It is most important to tailor these components of the treatment program to the problem presented by geriatric arthritic patients.

  3. Potential of capsaicin-loaded transfersomes in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Sarwa, Khomendra Kumar; Mazumder, Bhaskar; Rudrapal, Mithun; Verma, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the biopotential of capsaicin (an active principle of capsicum) as a topical antiarthritic agent was studied in arthritic rats. Transfersomal vesicular system was employed for the topical administration of capsaicin in experimental rats. The characterization of prepared capsaicin-loaded transfersomes reveals their nano size (94 nm) with negative surface charge (-14.5 mV) and sufficient structural flexibility, which resulted in 60.34% entrapment efficacy, penetration across the biomembrane (220 µm) and 76.76% of drug release from vesicular system in 24 h in their intact form as evident from confocal laser scanning micrographic study. Results of transfersomal nanoformulation (capsaicin loaded, test) were compared with that of conventional gel formulation available in the market (Thermagel, standard), with an aim to assess the antiarthritic efficacy of our prepared capsaicin-loaded transfersomal formulation. In vivo antiarthritic activity study shows that our formulation possesses superior inhibitory activity than the marketed Thermagel formulation at the same dosage level, which could probably be due to the lesser permeability of Thermagel across the dermal barriers compared to our specially designed transfersomal delivery system. Moreover, the better tolerance of prepared vesicular formulation in biological system further enlightens the suitability of the transfersomal vesicle to be used as a novel carrier system for the topical administration of such highly irritant substance.

  4. Prolactin-induced protein as a potential therapy response marker of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Karolina; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna; Stasiolek, Mariusz; Pula, Bartosz; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Ong, Siew Hwa; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Many studies are dedicated to exploring the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-resistance in breast cancer (BC). Some of them are focused on searching for candidate genes responsible for this process. The aim of this study was typing the candidate genes associated with the response to standard chemotherapy in the case of invasive ductal carcinoma. Frozen material from 28 biopsies obtained from IDC patients with different responses to chemotherapy were examined using gene expression microarray, Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Based on the microarray results, further analysis of candidate gene expression was evaluated in 120 IDC cases by RT-PCR and in 224 IDC cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The results were correlated with clinical outcome and molecular subtype of the BC. Gene expression microarray revealed Prolactin-Induced Peptide (PIP) as a single gene differentially expressed in BC therapy responder or non-responder patients (p <0.05). The level of PIP expression was significantly higher in the BC therapy responder group than in the non-responder group at mRNA (p=0.0092) and protein level (p=0.0256). Expression of PIP mRNA was the highest in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) BC cases (p=0.0254) and it was the lowest in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (p=0.0336). Higher PIP mRNA expression was characterized by significantly longer disease free survival (DFS, p=0.0093), as well as metastasis free survival (MFS, p=0.0144). Additionally, PIP mRNA and PIP protein expression levels were significantly higher in luminal A than in other molecular subtypes and TNBC. Moreover significantly higher PIP expression was observed in G1, G2 vs. G3 cases (p=0.0027 and p=0.0013, respectively). Microarray analysis characterized PIP gene as a candidate for BC standard chemotherapy response marker. Analysis of clinical data suggests that PIP may be a good prognostic and predictive marker in IDC patients. Higher levels of PIP were related to longer DFS and MFS

  5. TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1-type cytokine production and inhibits the progression of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Y; Yamane, M; Sohda, T; Makino, H

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that TAK-603, a new anti-rheumatic drug, is more effective in animal models in which cellular immunity plays a central role. Here, we studied the effect of the drug on Th1 cytokines, which are dominantly produced in this type of immune reaction, in an in vitro system and an in vivo model. We established Th1- and Th2-dominant T-cell lines, and studied the effect of TAK-603 on their cytokine production. Th1 cell lines were BALB/c mouse allo-reactive T cells and C57BL mouse mite antigen-reactive T cells, and the Th2 cell line was BALB/c mouse ovalbumin-reactive T cells. TAK-603 suppressed the production of Th1 cytokines [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and not that of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5) in these cell lines. Furthermore, selective suppression of Th1 cytokine production was also observed in the T-cell clones obtained from the ovalbumin-reactive T-cell line. To investigate the effect on cytokine production in animal models of arthritis, we analysed the expression of cytokine messenger RNA using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In adjuvant arthritis rats, Th1-dominant cytokine production was observed both in the arthritic joint and the spleen, and the time-course paralleled the progression of arthritis. On the other hand, in type-II collagen-induced arthritis, in which TAK-603 has little effect, Th1-dominant cytokine production was not observed and Th2 cytokines were shown to be more important. The adjuvant arthritis rats treated with TAK-603 (6.25 mg/kg/day, per os) showed significantly lower cytokine mRNA expression both locally and systemically. These data suggest that TAK-603 selectively suppresses Th1 cytokine production, which is consistent with its effect on cellular immunity in animal models. Images Figure 4 PMID:9370927

  6. Inflammatory responses following intramuscular and subcutaneous immunization with aluminum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Maeda, Mika; Kawashima, Hisashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines are administered through an intramuscular injection (IM) in the US and EU, however, a subcutaneous injection (SC) has been recommended in Japan because of serious muscle contracture previously reported following multiple IMs of antibiotics. Newly introduced adjuvanted vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, have been recommended through IM. In the present study, currently available vaccines were evaluated through IM in mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induced inflammatory nodules at the injection site, which expanded into the intra-muscular space without any muscle degeneration or necrosis, whereas non-adjuvanted vaccines did not. These nodules consisted of polymorph nuclear neutrophils with some eosinophils within the initial 48h, then monocytes/macrophages 1 month later. Inflammatory nodules were observed 6 months after IM, had decreased in size, and were absorbed 12 months after IM, which was earlier than that after SC. Cytokine production was examined in the injected muscular tissues and AS04 adjuvanted HPV induced higher IL-1β, IL-6, KC, MIP-1, and G-CSF levels in muscle tissues than any other vaccine, but similar serum cytokine profiles were observed to those induced by the other vaccines. Currently available vaccines did not induce muscular degeneration or fibrotic scar as observed with muscle contracture caused by multiple IMs of antibiotics in the past.

  7. Delivery of an inactivated avian influenza virus vaccine adjuvanted with poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) encapsulated CpG ODN induces protective immune responses in chickens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shirene M; Alkie, Tamiru N; Nagy, Éva; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Hodgins, Douglas C; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-09-14

    In poultry, systemic administration of commercial vaccines consisting of inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV) requires the simultaneous delivery of an adjuvant (water-in-oil emulsion). These vaccines are often limited in their ability to induce quantitatively better local (mucosal) antibody responses capable of curtailing virus shedding. Therefore, more efficacious adjuvants with the ability to provide enhanced immunogenicity and protective anti-AIV immunity in chickens are needed. While the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 21 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) has been recognized as a potential vaccine adjuvant in chickens, poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, successfully tested as vaccine delivery systems in other species, have not been extensively explored. The present study, therefore, assessed both systemic and mucosal antibody-mediated responses following intramuscular vaccination (administered at 7 and 21days post-hatch) of chickens with PLGA encapsulated H9N2 AIV plus encapsulated CpG ODN 2007 (CpG 2007), and nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccine formulations. Virus challenge was performed at 2weeks post-secondary vaccination using the oculo-nasal route. Our results showed that chickens vaccinated with the nonencapsulated AIV vaccine plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 developed significantly higher systemic IgY and local (mucosal) IgY antibodies as well as haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres compared to PLGA encapsulated AIV plus encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccinated chickens. Furthermore, chickens that received CpG 2007 as an adjuvant in the vaccine formulation had antibodies exhibiting higher avidity indicating that the TLR21-mediated pathway may enhance antibody affinity maturation qualitatively. Collectively, our data indicate that vaccination of chickens with nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 results in qualitatively and quantitatively augmented antibody responses leading to a reduction in

  8. Delivery of an inactivated avian influenza virus vaccine adjuvanted with poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) encapsulated CpG ODN induces protective immune responses in chickens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shirene M; Alkie, Tamiru N; Nagy, Éva; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Hodgins, Douglas C; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-09-14

    In poultry, systemic administration of commercial vaccines consisting of inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV) requires the simultaneous delivery of an adjuvant (water-in-oil emulsion). These vaccines are often limited in their ability to induce quantitatively better local (mucosal) antibody responses capable of curtailing virus shedding. Therefore, more efficacious adjuvants with the ability to provide enhanced immunogenicity and protective anti-AIV immunity in chickens are needed. While the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 21 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) has been recognized as a potential vaccine adjuvant in chickens, poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, successfully tested as vaccine delivery systems in other species, have not been extensively explored. The present study, therefore, assessed both systemic and mucosal antibody-mediated responses following intramuscular vaccination (administered at 7 and 21days post-hatch) of chickens with PLGA encapsulated H9N2 AIV plus encapsulated CpG ODN 2007 (CpG 2007), and nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccine formulations. Virus challenge was performed at 2weeks post-secondary vaccination using the oculo-nasal route. Our results showed that chickens vaccinated with the nonencapsulated AIV vaccine plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 developed significantly higher systemic IgY and local (mucosal) IgY antibodies as well as haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres compared to PLGA encapsulated AIV plus encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccinated chickens. Furthermore, chickens that received CpG 2007 as an adjuvant in the vaccine formulation had antibodies exhibiting higher avidity indicating that the TLR21-mediated pathway may enhance antibody affinity maturation qualitatively. Collectively, our data indicate that vaccination of chickens with nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 results in qualitatively and quantitatively augmented antibody responses leading to a reduction in

  9. Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation—Session 9: Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Dalençon, François

    2013-01-01

    The Session 9 of the Modern Vaccine Adjuvant/Formulation meeting pointed out the permanent need for vaccine improvement and for adjuvant development. Indeed, the increasing use of recombinant subunit vaccines for both parenteral and mucosal vaccination necessitates the development of improved adjuvants. This session dealt with strategies for the development of new vaccine adjuvants with respect to the availability of new molecules targeting specifically the receptors of the systemic or mucosal immune system. PMID:23938771

  10. Vaccine Adjuvants: from 1920 to 2015 and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Alberta; Preiss, Scott; Tavares Da Silva, Fernanda; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The concept of stimulating the body’s immune response is the basis underlying vaccination. Vaccines act by initiating the innate immune response and activating antigen presenting cells (APCs), thereby inducing a protective adaptive immune response to a pathogen antigen. Adjuvants are substances added to vaccines to enhance the immunogenicity of highly purified antigens that have insufficient immunostimulatory capabilities, and have been used in human vaccines for more than 90 years. While early adjuvants (aluminum, oil-in-water emulsions) were used empirically, rapidly increasing knowledge on how the immune system interacts with pathogens means that there is increased understanding of the role of adjuvants and how the formulation of modern vaccines can be better tailored towards the desired clinical benefit. Continuing safety evaluation of licensed vaccines containing adjuvants/adjuvant systems suggests that their individual benefit-risk profile remains favorable. Adjuvants contribute to the initiation of the innate immune response induced by antigens; exemplified by inflammatory responses at the injection site, with mostly localized and short-lived effects. Activated effectors (such as APCs) then move to draining lymph nodes where they direct the type, magnitude and quality of the adaptive immune response. Thus, the right match of antigens and adjuvants can potentiate downstream adaptive immune responses, enabling the development of new efficacious vaccines. Many infectious diseases of worldwide significance are not currently preventable by vaccination. Adjuvants are the most advanced new technology in the search for new vaccines against challenging pathogens and for vulnerable populations that respond poorly to traditional vaccines. PMID:26343190

  11. Matrix-M Adjuvated Seasonal Virosomal Influenza Vaccine Induces Partial Protection in Mice and Ferrets against Avian H5 and H7 Challenge.

    PubMed

    Cox, Freek; Roos, Anna; Hafkemeijer, Nicole; Baart, Matthijs; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Stittelaar, Koert; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radošević, Katarina; Saeland, Eirikur

    2015-01-01

    There is a constant threat of zoonotic influenza viruses causing a pandemic outbreak in humans. It is virtually impossible to predict which virus strain will cause the next pandemic and it takes a considerable amount of time before a safe and effective vaccine will be available once a pandemic occurs. In addition, development of pandemic vaccines is hampered by the generally poor immunogenicity of avian influenza viruses in humans. An effective pre-pandemic vaccine is therefore required as a first line of defense. Broadening of the protective efficacy of current seasonal vaccines by adding an adjuvant may be a way to provide such first line of defense. Here we evaluate whether a seasonal trivalent virosomal vaccine (TVV) adjuvated with the saponin-based adjuvant Matrix-M (MM) can confer protection against avian influenza H5 and H7 virus strains in mice and ferrets. We demonstrate that mice were protected from death against challenges with H5N1 and H7N7, but that the protection was not complete as evidenced by severe clinical signs. In ferrets, protection against H7N9 was not observed. In contrast, reduced upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads and reduced lung pathology, was achieved in H5N1 challenged ferrets. Together these results suggest that, at least to some extent, Matrix-M adjuvated seasonal virosomal influenza vaccine can serve as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with a pandemic outbreak. PMID:26402787

  12. Adjuvant-carrying synthetic vaccine particles augment the immune response to encapsulated antigen and exhibit strong local immune activation without inducing systemic cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Ilyinskii, Petr O; Roy, Christopher J; O'Neil, Conlin P; Browning, Erica A; Pittet, Lynnelle A; Altreuter, David H; Alexis, Frank; Tonti, Elena; Shi, Jinjun; Basto, Pamela A; Iannacone, Matteo; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Langer, Robert S; Farokhzad, Omid C; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Johnston, Lloyd P M; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei

    2014-05-19

    Augmentation of immunogenicity can be achieved by particulate delivery of an antigen and by its co-administration with an adjuvant. However, many adjuvants initiate strong systemic inflammatory reactions in vivo, leading to potential adverse events and safety concerns. We have developed a synthetic vaccine particle (SVP) technology that enables co-encapsulation of antigen with potent adjuvants. We demonstrate that co-delivery of an antigen with a TLR7/8 or TLR9 agonist in synthetic polymer nanoparticles results in a strong augmentation of humoral and cellular immune responses with minimal systemic production of inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, antigen encapsulated into nanoparticles and admixed with free TLR7/8 agonist leads to lower immunogenicity and rapid induction of high levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum (e.g., TNF-a and IL-6 levels are 50- to 200-fold higher upon injection of free resiquimod (R848) than of nanoparticle-encapsulated R848). Conversely, local immune stimulation as evidenced by cellular infiltration of draining lymph nodes and by intranodal cytokine production was more pronounced and persisted longer when SVP-encapsulated TLR agonists were used. The strong local immune activation achieved using a modular self-assembling nanoparticle platform markedly enhanced immunogenicity and was equally effective whether antigen and adjuvant were co-encapsulated in a single nanoparticle formulation or co-delivered in two separate nanoparticles. Moreover, particle encapsulation enabled the utilization of CpG oligonucleotides with the natural phosphodiester backbone, which are otherwise rapidly hydrolyzed by nucleases in vivo. The use of SVP may enable clinical use of potent TLR agonists as vaccine adjuvants for indications where cellular immunity or robust humoral responses are required.

  13. Adjuvant-carrying synthetic vaccine particles augment the immune response to encapsulated antigen and exhibit strong local immune activation without inducing systemic cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Ilyinskii, Petr O; Roy, Christopher J; O'Neil, Conlin P; Browning, Erica A; Pittet, Lynnelle A; Altreuter, David H; Alexis, Frank; Tonti, Elena; Shi, Jinjun; Basto, Pamela A; Iannacone, Matteo; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Langer, Robert S; Farokhzad, Omid C; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Johnston, Lloyd P M; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei

    2014-05-19

    Augmentation of immunogenicity can be achieved by particulate delivery of an antigen and by its co-administration with an adjuvant. However, many adjuvants initiate strong systemic inflammatory reactions in vivo, leading to potential adverse events and safety concerns. We have developed a synthetic vaccine particle (SVP) technology that enables co-encapsulation of antigen with potent adjuvants. We demonstrate that co-delivery of an antigen with a TLR7/8 or TLR9 agonist in synthetic polymer nanoparticles results in a strong augmentation of humoral and cellular immune responses with minimal systemic production of inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, antigen encapsulated into nanoparticles and admixed with free TLR7/8 agonist leads to lower immunogenicity and rapid induction of high levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum (e.g., TNF-a and IL-6 levels are 50- to 200-fold higher upon injection of free resiquimod (R848) than of nanoparticle-encapsulated R848). Conversely, local immune stimulation as evidenced by cellular infiltration of draining lymph nodes and by intranodal cytokine production was more pronounced and persisted longer when SVP-encapsulated TLR agonists were used. The strong local immune activation achieved using a modular self-assembling nanoparticle platform markedly enhanced immunogenicity and was equally effective whether antigen and adjuvant were co-encapsulated in a single nanoparticle formulation or co-delivered in two separate nanoparticles. Moreover, particle encapsulation enabled the utilization of CpG oligonucleotides with the natural phosphodiester backbone, which are otherwise rapidly hydrolyzed by nucleases in vivo. The use of SVP may enable clinical use of potent TLR agonists as vaccine adjuvants for indications where cellular immunity or robust humoral responses are required. PMID:24593999

  14. MicroRNA-152 modulates the canonical Wnt pathway activation by targeting DNA methyltransferase 1 in arthritic rat model.

    PubMed

    Miao, Cheng-Gui; Yang, Ying-Ying; He, Xu; Huang, Cheng; Huang, Yan; Qin, Dan; Du, Chuan-Lai; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune and progressive systemic disease of unknown etiology. Research shows that fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) participate in the cartilage erosion, synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cytokine secretion and suggests that fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) display a crucial role in RA pathogenesis. Recent studies have suggested the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of RA. In previous study, we identified that increased methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) reduced the secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) expression in FLS in Arthritic rat model and the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) could induce the SFRP4 expression, indicating that DNMT has a key role in the differential expression of SFRP4. MicroRNAs (MiRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs, are involved in diverse biological functions, regulation of gene expression, pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and carcinogenesis. In light of the directly down-regulation of miR-152 on DNMT1 expression by targeting the 3' untranslated regions of its transcript in nickel sulfide (NiS)-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells, we investigated whether miR-152 is aberrantly expressed and targets DNMT1 in FLS in Arthritic rat model. Our results demonstrated that the expression of miR-152 was specifically down-regulated in Arthritic rat model, whereas up-regulation of miR-152 in FLS resulted in a marked reduction of DNMT1 expression. Further experiments revealed that increased miR-152 indirectly up-regulated the SFRP4 expression, a negative regulator of WNT signaling pathway, by targeting the DNMT1. Moreover, activation of miR-152 expression in FLS could inhibit the canonical Wnt pathway activation and result in a significant decrease of FLS proliferation. MiR-152 and DNA methylation may provide molecular mechanisms for the activation of canonical Wnt pathway in RA. Combination of miR-152 and DNMT1 may be a promising

  15. Activation of Natural Killer T Cells by α-Galactosylceramide Rapidly Induces the Full Maturation of Dendritic Cells In Vivo and Thereby Acts as an Adjuvant for Combined CD4 and CD8 T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Smith, Caroline; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) allows these antigen-presenting cells to initiate immunity. We pursued this concept in situ by studying the adjuvant action of α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) in mice. A single i.v. injection of glycolipid induced the full maturation of splenic DCs, beginning within 4 h. Maturation was manifest by marked increases in costimulator and major histocompatibility complex class II expression, interferon (IFN)-γ production, and stimulation of the mixed leukocyte reaction. These changes were not induced directly by αGalCer but required natural killer T (NKT) cells acting independently of the MyD88 adaptor protein. To establish that DC maturation was responsible for the adjuvant role of αGalCer, mice were given αGalCer together with soluble or cell-associated ovalbumin antigen. Th1 type CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses developed, and the mice became resistant to challenge with ovalbumin-expressing tumor. DCs from mice given ovalbumin plus adjuvant, but not the non-DCs, stimulated ovalbumin-specific proliferative responses and importantly, induced antigen-specific, IFN-γ producing, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon transfer into naive animals. In the latter instance, immune priming did not require further exposure to ovalbumin, αGalCer, NKT, or NK cells. Therefore a single dose of αGalCer i.v. rapidly stimulates the full maturation of DCs in situ, and this accounts for the induction of combined Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immunity to a coadministered protein. PMID:12874260

  16. Activation of natural killer T cells by alpha-galactosylceramide rapidly induces the full maturation of dendritic cells in vivo and thereby acts as an adjuvant for combined CD4 and CD8 T cell immunity to a coadministered protein.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Smith, Caroline; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M

    2003-07-21

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) allows these antigen-presenting cells to initiate immunity. We pursued this concept in situ by studying the adjuvant action of alpha-galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer) in mice. A single i.v. injection of glycolipid induced the full maturation of splenic DCs, beginning within 4 h. Maturation was manifest by marked increases in costimulator and major histocompatibility complex class II expression, interferon (IFN)-gamma production, and stimulation of the mixed leukocyte reaction. These changes were not induced directly by alphaGalCer but required natural killer T (NKT) cells acting independently of the MyD88 adaptor protein. To establish that DC maturation was responsible for the adjuvant role of alphaGalCer, mice were given alphaGalCer together with soluble or cell-associated ovalbumin antigen. Th1 type CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses developed, and the mice became resistant to challenge with ovalbumin-expressing tumor. DCs from mice given ovalbumin plus adjuvant, but not the non-DCs, stimulated ovalbumin-specific proliferative responses and importantly, induced antigen-specific, IFN-gamma producing, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon transfer into naive animals. In the latter instance, immune priming did not require further exposure to ovalbumin, alphaGalCer, NKT, or NK cells. Therefore a single dose of alphaGalCer i.v. rapidly stimulates the full maturation of DCs in situ, and this accounts for the induction of combined Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immunity to a coadministered protein.

  17. Immune Modulation of B. terrestris Worker (a Type of Bumblebee), Extract on CFA-induced Paw Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ja; Han, Jea Woong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    To develop a composition for enhancing immunity, based on alcohol extracts of the bumblebee as an active ingredient, bumblebee ethanol extracts were evaluated for their protective effect in chronic models of inflammation, adjuvant induced rat arthritis. B. terrestris worker extract (SDIEX) and, B. hypocrita sapporoensis lava an pupa extract (SPDYBEX), significantly decreased paw edema in arthritic rats, at a dose 100 mg/kg, respectively. The cytokine levels related inflammation of COX-2, sPLA2, VEGF, and TNF-α, were decreased, compared to positive control, indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Histopathological data demonstrated decreases inflammatory activity, hind paw edema, and repaired hyaline articular cartilage in DRG over a 2 wk administration. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of SDIEX and SPDYBEX revealed the presence of cantharidin. PMID:25584147

  18. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-06-10

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention.

  19. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S.; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M.; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  20. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention. PMID:26059174

  1. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  2. MF59- and Al(OH)3-Adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph) Vaccines Induce Sustained Protective Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses, with a Critical Role for Effector CD4 T Cells at Low Antibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    Monaci, Elisabetta; Mancini, Francesca; Lofano, Giuseppe; Bacconi, Marta; Tavarini, Simona; Sammicheli, Chiara; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Giraldi, Monica; Galletti, Bruno; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; de Gregorio, Ennio; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nuti, Sandra; Bagnoli, Fabio; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections, like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph) with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T-cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell-deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B-cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low-antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen. PMID:26441955

  3. MF59- and Al(OH)3-Adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph) Vaccines Induce Sustained Protective Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses, with a Critical Role for Effector CD4 T Cells at Low Antibody Titers.

    PubMed

    Monaci, Elisabetta; Mancini, Francesca; Lofano, Giuseppe; Bacconi, Marta; Tavarini, Simona; Sammicheli, Chiara; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Giraldi, Monica; Galletti, Bruno; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; de Gregorio, Ennio; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nuti, Sandra; Bagnoli, Fabio; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections, like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph) with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T-cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell-deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B-cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low-antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  4. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation Session 6: Vaccine &Adjuvant Formulation & Production 15-17 May 2013, Lausanne, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    The Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation meeting aims to fill a critical gap in current vaccine development efforts by bringing together formulation scientists and immunologists to emphasize the importance of rational formulation design in order to optimize vaccine and adjuvant bioactivity, safety, and manufacturability. Session 6 on Vaccine and Adjuvant Formulation and Production provided three examples of this theme, with speakers emphasizing the need for extensive physicochemical characterization of adjuvant-antigen interactions, the rational formulation design of a CD8+ T cell-inducing adjuvant based on immunological principles, and the development and production of a rabies vaccine by a developing country manufacturer. Throughout the session, the practical importance of sound formulation and manufacturing design accompanied by analytical characterization was highlighted.

  5. Analgesic activity of diflunisal [MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] in rats with hyperalgesia induced by Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Winter, C A; Kling, P J; Tocco, D J; Tanabe, K

    1979-12-01

    A method is described for testing analgesia for narcotic or nonnarcotic drugs in rats injected with Freund's adjuvant in the tail, by manipulation of the tail the day after injection, or of the feet after the development of adjuvant arthritis. The method is responsive to a behavioral depressant or an anti-inflammatory steroid. Diflunisal (MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] exhibited activity in this assay after oral administration with potency about 25 times greater than that of aspirin, about 3 times that of glafenine and twice that of zomepirac. The onset of activity was within a 1/2 hour for narcotic analgesics but required about an hour for non-narcotic compounds. With the latter, the peak of activity was not attained until 2 to 4 hr, depending on the compound. The peak for diflunisal was delayed until the 3rd or 4th hour, but the onset of action was more prompt and the duration greater as the dose was increased. [14C]Diflunisal was concentrated to some extent in the inflamed tissue after adjuvant injection. Peak levels both in plasma and tissue appeared about 2 hr before peak analgesic effect. Repeated administration of large doses produced neither tolerance nor sensitization to the analgesic action of diflunisal. Naloxone and naltrexone did not antagonize the action of the compound, but when morphine and diflunisal were given together, the overall effect was enhanced.

  6. Advax-adjuvanted recombinant protective antigen provides protection against inhalational anthrax that is further enhanced by addition of murabutide adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Merkel, Tod J

    2014-04-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax adjuvant afforded significantly greater protection against aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain 7702 than three immunizations with PA alone. Murabutide had a weaker adjuvant effect than Advax when used alone, but when murabutide was formulated together with Advax, an additive effect on immunogenicity and protection was observed, with complete protection after just two doses. The combined adjuvant formulation stimulated a robust, long-lasting B-cell memory response that protected mice against an aerosol challenge 18 months postimmunization with acceleration of the kinetics of the anamnestic IgG response to B. anthracis as reflected by ∼4-fold-higher anti-PA IgG titers by day 2 postchallenge versus mice that received PA with Alhydrogel. In addition, the combination of Advax plus murabutide induced approximately 3-fold-less inflammation than Alhydrogel as measured by in vivo imaging of cathepsin cleavage resulting from injection of ProSense 750. Thus, the combination of Advax and murabutide provided enhanced protection against inhalational anthrax with reduced localized inflammation, making this a promising next-generation anthrax vaccine adjuvanting strategy.

  7. Unlipidated Outer Membrane Protein Omp16 (U-Omp16) from Brucella spp. as Nasal Adjuvant Induces a Th1 Immune Response and Modulates the Th2 Allergic Response to Cow’s Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez, Andrés E.; Smaldini, Paola; Coria, Lorena M.; Delpino, María V.; Pacífico, Lucila G. G.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Risso, Gabriela S.; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Docena, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of novel mucosal adjuvants will help to develop new formulations to control infectious and allergic diseases. In this work we demonstrate that U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. delivered by the nasal route (i.n.) induced an inflammatory immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissues. Nasal co-administration of U-Omp16 with the model antigen (Ag) ovalbumin (OVA) increased the amount of Ag in lung tissues and induced OVA-specific systemic IgG and T helper (Th) 1 immune responses. The usefulness of U-Omp16 was also assessed in a mouse model of food allergy. U-Omp16 i.n. administration during sensitization ameliorated the hypersensitivity responses of sensitized mice upon oral exposure to Cow’s Milk Protein (CMP), decreased clinical signs, reduced anti-CMP IgE serum antibodies and modulated the Th2 response in favor of Th1 immunity. Thus, U-Omp16 could be used as a broad Th1 mucosal adjuvant for different Ag formulations. PMID:23861971

  8. Adjuvants for peptide-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khong, Hiep; Overwijk, Willem W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies based on T cells have shown impressive clinical benefit. In particular, immune checkpoint blockade therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 are causing dramatic tumor shrinkage and prolonged patient survival in a variety of cancers. However, many patients do not benefit, possibly due to insufficient spontaneous T cell reactivity against their tumors and/or lacking immune cell infiltration to tumor site. Such tumor-specific T cell responses could be induced through anti-cancer vaccination; but despite great success in animal models, only a few of many cancer vaccine trials have demonstrated robust clinical benefit. One reason for this difference may be the use of potent, effective vaccine adjuvants in animal models, vs. the use of safe, but very weak, vaccine adjuvants in clinical trials. As vaccine adjuvants dictate the type and magnitude of the T cell response after vaccination, it is critical to understand how they work to design safe, but also effective, cancer vaccines for clinical use. Here we discuss current insights into the mechanism of action and practical application of vaccine adjuvants, with a focus on peptide-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27660710

  9. Immunization with Recombinant Brucella Species Outer Membrane Protein Omp16 or Omp19 in Adjuvant Induces Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells as Well as Systemic and Oral Protection against Brucella abortus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Pasquevich, Karina A.; Estein, Silvia M.; Samartino, Clara García; Zwerdling, Astrid; Coria, Lorena M.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Available vaccines against Brucella spp. are live attenuated Brucella strains. In order to engineer a better vaccine to be used in animals and humans, our laboratory aims to develop an innocuous subunit vaccine. Particularly, we are interested in the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. abortus: Omp16 and Omp19. In this study, we assessed the use of these proteins as vaccines against Brucella in BALB/c mice. Immunization with lipidated Omp16 (L-Omp16) or L-Omp19 in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) conferred significant protection against B. abortus infection. Vaccination with unlipidated Omp16 (U-Omp16) or U-Omp19 in IFA induced a higher degree of protection than the respective lipidated versions. Moreover, the level of protection induced after U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 immunization in IFA was similar to that elicited by live B. abortus S19 immunization. Flow cytometric analysis showed that immunization with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 induced antigen-specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells producing gamma interferon. In vivo depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in mice immunized with U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 plus IFA resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that both cell types are mediating immune protection. U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 vaccination induced a T helper 1 response, systemic protection in aluminum hydroxide formulation, and oral protection with cholera toxin adjuvant against B. abortus infection. Both immunization routes exhibited a similar degree of protection to attenuated Brucella vaccines (S19 and RB51, respectively). Overall these results indicate that U-Omp16 or U-Omp19 would be a useful candidate for a subunit vaccine against human and animal brucellosis. PMID:18981242

  10. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-01

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. PMID:22634299

  11. Adjuvants for Vaccines to Drugs of Abuse and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Alving, Carl R.; Matyas, Gary R.; Torres, Oscar; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic vaccines to drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, methamphetamine, and others are being developed. The theoretical basis of such vaccines is to induce antibodies that sequester the drug in the blood in the form of antibody-bound drug that cannot cross the blood brain barrier, thereby preventing psychoactive effects. Because the drugs are haptens a successful vaccine relies on development of appropriate hapten-protein carrier conjugates. However, because induction of high and prolonged levels of antibodies is required for an effective vaccine, and because injection of T-independent haptenic drugs of abuse does not induce memory recall responses, the role of adjuvants during immunization plays a critical role. As reviewed herein, preclinical studies often use strong adjuvants such as complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and others that cannot be, or in the case of many newer adjuvants, have never been, employed in humans. Balanced against this, the only adjuvant that has been included in candidate vaccines in human clinical trials to nicotine and cocaine has been aluminum hydroxide gel. While aluminum salts have been widely utilized worldwide in numerous licensed vaccines, the experience with human responses to aluminum salt-adjuvanted vaccines to haptenic drugs of abuse has suggested that the immune responses are too weak to allow development of a successful vaccine. What is needed is an adjuvant or combination of adjuvants that are safe, potent, widely available, easily manufactured, and cost-effective. Based on our review of the field we recommend the following adjuvant combinations either for research or for product development for human use: aluminum salt with adsorbed monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA); liposomes containing MPLA [L(MPLA)]; L(MPLA) adsorbed to aluminum salt; oil-in-water emulsion; or oil-in-water emulsion containing MPLA. PMID:25111169

  12. Adjuvants for vaccines to drugs of abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R; Torres, Oscar; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan

    2014-09-22

    Immunotherapeutic vaccines to drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine, heroin, oxycodone, methamphetamine, and others are being developed. The theoretical basis of such vaccines is to induce antibodies that sequester the drug in the blood in the form of antibody-bound drug that cannot cross the blood brain barrier, thereby preventing psychoactive effects. Because the drugs are haptens a successful vaccine relies on development of appropriate hapten-protein carrier conjugates. However, because induction of high and prolonged levels of antibodies is required for an effective vaccine, and because injection of T-independent haptenic drugs of abuse does not induce memory recall responses, the role of adjuvants during immunization plays a critical role. As reviewed herein, preclinical studies often use strong adjuvants such as complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant and others that cannot be, or in the case of many newer adjuvants, have never been, employed in humans. Balanced against this, the only adjuvant that has been included in candidate vaccines in human clinical trials to nicotine and cocaine has been aluminum hydroxide gel. While aluminum salts have been widely utilized worldwide in numerous licensed vaccines, the experience with human responses to aluminum salt-adjuvanted vaccines to haptenic drugs of abuse has suggested that the immune responses are too weak to allow development of a successful vaccine. What is needed is an adjuvant or combination of adjuvants that are safe, potent, widely available, easily manufactured, and cost-effective. Based on our review of the field we recommend the following adjuvant combinations either for research or for product development for human use: aluminum salt with adsorbed monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA); liposomes containing MPLA [L(MPLA)]; L(MPLA) adsorbed to aluminum salt; oil-in-water emulsion; or oil-in-water emulsion containing MPLA.

  13. Inorganic pyrophosphate pool size and turnover rate in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Camerlain, M; McCarty, D J; Silcox, D C; Jung, A

    1975-06-01

    Recent studies have shown elevated inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels in most knee joint fluid supernates from patients with pseudogout (PG) or osteoarthritis (OA) and more modestly elevated levels in some supernates from patients with gout or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) relative to PPi levels found in the venous blood plasma of normal or arthritic subjects. We measured the intraarticular PPi pool and its rate of turnover to better understand the significance of the joint fluid-plasma PPi gradient. Preliminary studies in rabbits showed that (32-P)PPi passed from joint space to blood and vice versa without detectable hydrolysis. Incubation of natural or synthetic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) microcrystals with synovial fluid in vitro in the presence of (32P)PPi tracer showed no change in PPi specific activity in the supernate over a 19-h period so that exchange of PPi in solution with that in CPPD microcrystals could be ignored. Clearance rates of (32P)PPi and of (33P)Pi, as determined by serially sampling the catheterized knee joints of volunteers with various types of arthritis over a 3-h period, were nearly identical. The (32P)PPi/(32P)Pi was determined in each sample. A mixture of a large excess of cold PPi did not influence the clearance rate of either nuclide. The quantity of PPi turned over per hous was calculated from the pool size as determined by isotope dilution and the turnover rate. The residual joint fluid nuclide was shown to be (32P)PPi. The PPi pool was generally smaller and the rate of turnover was greater in clinically inflamed joints. The mean plus or minus SEM pool size (mu-moles) and turnover rate (percent/hour) in PG knees was 0.23 plus or minus 0.07 and 117 plus or minus 11.9, hydrolysis rate (%/h) to Pi was 27.7 plus or minus 13.2; in OA knees: 0.45 plus or minus 0.26 and 72 plus or minus 9.2, hydrolysis 6.9 plus or minus 0.9; in gouty knees: 0.8 plus or minus 0.41 and 50 plus or minus 11.6, hydrolysis 9.8 plus or minus 2.8; and in

  14. The role of adjuvant in mediating antigen structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Braun, Latoya Jones; Eldridge, Aimee M; Cummiskey, Jessica; Arthur, Kelly K; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the fate of a model antigen, a cysteine-free mutant of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, to the level of fine structural detail, as a consequence of its interaction with an aluminum (Al)-containing adjuvant. Fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare the thermal stability of the protein in solution versus adsorbed onto an Al-containing adjuvant. Differences in accessible hydrophobic surface areas were investigated using an extrinsic fluorescence probe, 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). As has been observed with other model antigens, the apparent thermal stability of the protein decreased following adsorption onto the adjuvant. ANS spectra suggested that adsorption onto the adjuvant caused an increase in exposure of hydrophobic regions of the protein. Electrostatic interactions drove the adsorption, and disruption of these interactions with high ionic strength buffers facilitated the collection of two-dimensional (15) N heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance data of protein released from the adjuvant. Although the altered stability of the adsorbed protein suggested changes to the protein's structure, the fine structure of the desorbed protein was nearly identical to the protein's structure in the adjuvant-free formulation. Thus, the adjuvant-induced changes to the protein that were responsible for the reduced thermal stability were not observed upon desorption.

  15. Intranasal Delivery of Influenza rNP Adjuvanted with c-di-AMP Induces Strong Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses and Provides Protection against Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Ebensen, Thomas; Schulze, Kai; Cargnelutti, Diego; Blazejewska, Paulina; Scodeller, Eduardo A.; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for new influenza vaccines able to protect against constantly emerging divergent virus strains. This will be sustained by the induction of vigorous cellular responses and humoral immunity capable of acting at the portal of entry of this pathogen. In this study we evaluate the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination with recombinant influenza nucleoprotein (rNP) co-administrated with bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) as adjuvant. Immunization of BALB/c mice with two doses of the formulation stimulates high titers of NP-specific IgG in serum and secretory IgA at mucosal sites. This formulation also promotes a strong Th1 response characterized by high secretion of INF-γ and IL-2. The immune response elicited promotes efficient protection against virus challenge. These results suggest that c-di-AMP is a potent mucosal adjuvant which may significantly contribute towards the development of innovative mucosal vaccines against influenza. PMID:25140692

  16. Arthritis-inducing ability of a synthetic adjuvant, N-acetylmuramyl peptides, and bacterial disaccharide peptides related to different oil vehicles and their composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, O; Tanaka, A; Kotani, S; Shiba, T; Kusumoto, S; Yokogawa, K; Kawata, S; Ozawa, A

    1980-01-01

    A synthetic adjuvant, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP), failed to produce polyarthritis with a wide dose range in a water-in-oil emulsion of mineral oil such as liquid paraffin, Drakeol, or heavy mineral oil. MDP, however, produced moderate to severe arthritis with almost 100% incidence in a water-in-oil emulsion made up of Difco incomplete adjuvant, which consists of Bavol F as an oil vehicle and Arlacel A as an emulsifier. N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-L-isoglutamine did not produce arthritis, whereas 4,6-diacetyl-MDP produced the disease. Bacterial peptidoglycans, such as disaccharide peptides which were N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanine and N-acetylglucosaminyl-6,o-acetyl-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanine, also produced polyarthritis with low incidence in Difco oil but not in the other mineral oils described above. MDP and bacterial disaccharide peptides were able to produce the disease even in the latter mineral oil only when the concentration of Arlacel A was increased from 15% to 20 to 30% in the oil. We concluded that one of the minimal essential structures responsible for development of this disease is MDP, although the role of the oil vehicle remained uncertain, and there is no direct correlation between granulona formation and arthritogenicity of MDP. PMID:7399708

  17. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  18. Adjuvant therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, S S; Kirkwood, J M

    1998-06-01

    Patients with AJCC Stage IIB and III melanoma have a poor 5-year survival rate which has been the driving force behind attempts to find an effective adjuvant therapy for this stage of disease that would effectively reduce relapse and improve survival. Immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), Corynebacterium parvum, and levamisole have not been successful in achieving this goal, nor have trials with chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation. The recent Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 1684 study showed significant improvement in relapse-free and overall survival with high doses of alpha interferon (IFNalpha) given for 1 year. Lower dosages of IFNalpha have to date been unsuccessful in impacting upon long-term survival. Recent data with vaccines have been encouraging, and the GM2-KLH vaccine is the focus of ongoing intergroup study comparing this treatment with IFNalpha in resected Stage IIB and III melanoma. The various regimens are reviewed in this article. PMID:9588723

  19. Alzheimer's disease Advax(CpG)- adjuvanted MultiTEP-based dual and single vaccines induce high-titer antibodies against various forms of tau and Aβ pathological molecules.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Hayk; Zagorski, Karen; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Kazarian, Konstantin; Cribbs, David H; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Agadjanyan, Michael G; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2016-01-01

    Although β-amyloid (Aβ) may be the primary driver of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, accumulation of pathological tau correlates with dementia in AD patients. Thus, the prevention/inhibition of AD may require vaccine/s targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously or sequentially. Since high antibody titers are required for AD vaccine efficacy, we have decided to generate vaccines, targeting Aβ (AV-1959R), Tau (AV-1980R) or Aβ/tau (AV-1953R) B cell epitopes, based on immunogenic MultiTEP platform and evaluate the immunogenicity of these vaccines formulated with Advax(CpG), delta inulin, Alhydrogel(®), Montanide-ISA51, Montanide-ISA720, MPLA-SM pharmaceutical grade adjuvants. Formulation of AV-1959R in Advax(CpG) induced the highest cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. The dual-epitope vaccine, AV-1953R, or the combination of AV-1959R and AV-1980R vaccines formulated with Advax(CpG) induced robust antibody responses against various forms of both, Aβ and tau pathological molecules. While anti-Aβ antibody titers after AV-1953R immunization were similar to that in mice vaccinated with AV-1959R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R combination, anti-tau titers were significantly lower after AV-1953R injection when compared to the AV-1980R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R. In silico 3D-modeling provided insight into the differences in immunogenicity of these vaccine constructs. In sum, AV-1959R and AV-1980R formulated with Advax(CpG) adjuvant were identified as promising immunogenic vaccines for ongoing pre-clinical assessment and future human clinical trials. PMID:27363809

  20. Alzheimer’s disease AdvaxCpG- adjuvanted MultiTEP-based dual and single vaccines induce high-titer antibodies against various forms of tau and Aβ pathological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Hayk; Zagorski, Karen; Rajapaksha, Harinda; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Kazarian, Konstantin; Cribbs, David H.; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2016-01-01

    Although β-amyloid (Aβ) may be the primary driver of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, accumulation of pathological tau correlates with dementia in AD patients. Thus, the prevention/inhibition of AD may require vaccine/s targeting Aβ and tau simultaneously or sequentially. Since high antibody titers are required for AD vaccine efficacy, we have decided to generate vaccines, targeting Aβ (AV-1959R), Tau (AV-1980R) or Aβ/tau (AV-1953R) B cell epitopes, based on immunogenic MultiTEP platform and evaluate the immunogenicity of these vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG, delta inulin, Alhydrogel®, Montanide-ISA51, Montanide-ISA720, MPLA-SM pharmaceutical grade adjuvants. Formulation of AV-1959R in AdvaxCpG induced the highest cellular and humoral immune responses in mice. The dual-epitope vaccine, AV-1953R, or the combination of AV-1959R and AV-1980R vaccines formulated with AdvaxCpG induced robust antibody responses against various forms of both, Aβ and tau pathological molecules. While anti-Aβ antibody titers after AV-1953R immunization were similar to that in mice vaccinated with AV-1959R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R combination, anti-tau titers were significantly lower after AV-1953R injection when compared to the AV-1980R or AV-1959R/AV-1980R. In silico 3D-modeling provided insight into the differences in immunogenicity of these vaccine constructs. In sum, AV-1959R and AV-1980R formulated with AdvaxCpG adjuvant were identified as promising immunogenic vaccines for ongoing pre-clinical assessment and future human clinical trials. PMID:27363809

  1. Dynamic weight bearing is an efficient and predictable method for evaluation of arthritic nociception and its pathophysiological mechanisms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quadros, Andreza U.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Fonseca, Miriam M.; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of articular nociception in experimental animals is a challenge because available methods are limited and subject to investigator influence. In an attempt to solve this problem, the purpose of this study was to establish the use of dynamic weight bearing (DWB) as a new device for evaluating joint nociception in an experimental model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice. AIA was induced in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice, and joint nociception was evaluated by DWB. Western Blotting and real-time PCR were used to determine protein and mRNA expression, respectively. DWB detected a dose- and time-dependent increase in joint nociception during AIA and was able to detect the dose-response effects of different classes of analgesics. Using DWB, it was possible to evaluate the participation of spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) and cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) for the genesis of joint nociception during AIA. In conclusion, the present results indicated that DWB is an effective, objective and predictable test to study both the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in arthritic nociception in mice and for evaluating novel analgesic drugs against arthritis. PMID:26511791

  2. AA-like amyloid deposits confined to arthritic joints in two dogs with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Colbatzky, F; Brunnberg, L; Linke, R P; Geisel, O; Hermanns, W

    1991-10-01

    Two dogs with clinical, serological, radiographic and pathological changes similar to those of rheumatoid arthritis of man and a previously undescribed pattern of amyloid deposits are described. As revealed by light and electron microscopical investigations, amyloid fibrils were found exclusively in articular tissue structures of arthritic joints and in one tonsil of one dog. Based on our immunohistochemical results, the amyloid protein is believed to be of a local AA type. PMID:1761763

  3. An innovative approach to induce cross-protective immunity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in the lungs of pigs through adjuvanted nanotechnology-based vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Ouyang, Kang; Torrelles, Jordi B; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically devastating respiratory disease of pigs. The disease is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV), an Arterivirus which is a highly mutating RNA virus. Widely used modified live PRRSV vaccines have failed to prevent PRRS outbreaks and reinfections; moreover, safety of the live virus vaccines is questionable. Though poorly immunogenic, inactivated PRRSV vaccine is safe. The PRRSV infects primarily the lung macrophages. Therefore, we attempted to strengthen the immunogenicity of inactivated/killed PRRSV vaccine antigens (KAg), especially in the pig respiratory system, through: 1) entrapping the KAg in biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NP-KAg); 2) coupling the NP-KAg with a potent mucosal adjuvant, whole cell lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb WCL); and 3) delivering the vaccine formulation twice intranasally to growing pigs. We have previously shown that a single dose of NP-KAg partially cleared the challenged heterologous PRRSV. Recently, we reported that NP-KAg coupled with unentrapped M. tb WCL significantly cleared the viremia of challenged heterologous PRRSV. Since PRRSV is primarily a lung disease, our goal in this study was to investigate lung viral load and various immune correlates of protection at the lung mucosal surfaces and its parenchyma in vaccinated heterologous PRRSV-challenged pigs. Our results indicated that out of five different vaccine-adjuvant formulations, the combination of NP-KAg and unentrapped M. tb WCL significantly cleared detectable replicating infective PRRSV with a tenfold reduction in viral RNA load in the lungs, associated with substantially reduced gross and microscopic lung pathology. Immunologically, strong humoral (enhanced virus neutralization titers by high avidity antibodies) and cell-mediated immune responses (augmented population of interferon-γ secreting CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and reduced secretion of immunosuppressive

  4. Choice and Design of Adjuvants for Parenteral and Mucosal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ferro, Valerie A; Strioga, Marius M; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2015-03-05

    The existence of pathogens that escape recognition by specific vaccines, the need to improve existing vaccines and the increased availability of therapeutic (non-infectious disease) vaccines necessitate the rational development of novel vaccine concepts based on the induction of protective cell-mediated immune responses. For naive T-cell activation, several signals resulting from innate and adaptive interactions need to be integrated, and adjuvants may interfere with some or all of these signals. Adjuvants, for example, are used to promote the immunogenicity of antigens in vaccines, by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment that enables the recruitment and promotion of the infiltration of phagocytic cells, particularly antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the injection site. Adjuvants can enhance antigen presentation, induce cytokine expression, activate APC and modulate more downstream adaptive immune reactions (vaccine delivery systems, facilitating immune Signal 1). In addition, adjuvants can act as immunopotentiators (facilitating Signals 2 and 3) exhibiting immune stimulatory effects during antigen presentation by inducing the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on APC. Together, these signals determine the strength of activation of specific T-cells, thereby also influencing the quality of the downstream T helper cytokine profiles and the differentiation of antigen-specific T helper populations (Signal 3). New adjuvants should also target specific (innate) immune cells in order to facilitate proper activation of downstream adaptive immune responses and homing (Signal 4). It is desirable that these adjuvants should be able to exert such responses in the context of mucosal administered vaccines. This review focuses on the understanding of the potential working mechanisms of the most well-known classes of adjuvants to be used effectively in vaccines.

  5. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6–35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3–17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination. The vaccine did not raise any safety concern, though these trials were not designed to detect rare events. In conclusion, 2 doses of the AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 2 different dosages had a clinically acceptable safety profile, and induced high and persistent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in children aged 6–35 months and 3–17 years. These studies have been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00971321 and NCT00964158. PMID:26176592

  6. Periaqueductal Grey EP3 Receptors Facilitate Spinal Nociception in Arthritic Secondary Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, R.A.R.; Leith, J.L.; Almahasneh, F.; Martindale, J.; Wilson, A.W.; Lumb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Descending controls on spinal nociceptive processing play a pivotal role in shaping the pain experience after tissue injury. Secondary hypersensitivity develops within undamaged tissue adjacent and distant to damaged sites. Spinal neuronal pools innervating regions of secondary hypersensitivity are dominated by descending facilitation that amplifies spinal inputs from unsensitized peripheral nociceptors. Cyclooxygenase–prostaglandin (PG) E2 signaling within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is pronociceptive in naive and acutely inflamed animals, but its contributions in more prolonged inflammation and, importantly, secondary hypersensitivity remain unknown. In naive rats, PG EP3 receptor (EP3R) antagonism in vlPAG modulated noxious withdrawal reflex (EMG) thresholds to preferential C-nociceptor, but not A-nociceptor, activation and raised thermal withdrawal thresholds in awake animals. In rats with inflammatory arthritis, secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of the hindpaw developed and was associated with spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs alone. In arthritic rats, blockade of vlPAG EP3R raised EMG thresholds to C-nociceptor activation in the area of secondary hypersensitivity to a degree equivalent to that evoked by the same manipulation in naive rats. Importantly, vlPAG EP3R blockade also affected responses to A-nociceptor activation, but only in arthritic animals. We conclude that vlPAG EP3R activity exerts an equivalent facilitation on the spinal processing of C-nociceptor inputs in naive and arthritic animals, but gains in effects on spinal A-nociceptor processing from a region of secondary hypersensitivity. Therefore, the spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs associated with secondary hypersensitivity is likely to be at least partly dependent on descending prostanergic facilitation from the vlPAG. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After tissue damage, sensitivity to painful stimulation develops in undamaged areas (secondary

  7. Learning Impairment in Honey Bees Caused by Agricultural Spray Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Ciarlo, Timothy J.; Mullin, Christopher A.; Frazier, James L.; Schmehl, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Spray adjuvants are often applied to crops in conjunction with agricultural pesticides in order to boost the efficacy of the active ingredient(s). The adjuvants themselves are largely assumed to be biologically inert and are therefore subject to minimal scrutiny and toxicological testing by regulatory agencies. Honey bees are exposed to a wide array of pesticides as they conduct normal foraging operations, meaning that they are likely exposed to spray adjuvants as well. It was previously unknown whether these agrochemicals have any deleterious effects on honey bee behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings An improved, automated version of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) assay with a high degree of trial-to-trial reproducibility was used to measure the olfactory learning ability of honey bees treated orally with sublethal doses of the most widely used spray adjuvants on almonds in the Central Valley of California. Three different adjuvant classes (nonionic surfactants, crop oil concentrates, and organosilicone surfactants) were investigated in this study. Learning was impaired after ingestion of 20 µg organosilicone surfactant, indicating harmful effects on honey bees caused by agrochemicals previously believed to be innocuous. Organosilicones were more active than the nonionic adjuvants, while the crop oil concentrates were inactive. Ingestion was required for the tested adjuvant to have an effect on learning, as exposure via antennal contact only induced no level of impairment. Conclusions/Significance A decrease in percent conditioned response after ingestion of organosilicone surfactants has been demonstrated here for the first time. Olfactory learning is important for foraging honey bees because it allows them to exploit the most productive floral resources in an area at any given time. Impairment of this learning ability may have serious implications for foraging efficiency at the colony level, as well as potentially many social interactions

  8. Different human vaccine adjuvants promote distinct antigen-independent immunological signatures tailored to different pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Niels Peter H.; Olsen, Anja; Buonsanti, Cecilia; Follmann, Frank; Zhang, Yuan; Coler, Rhea N.; Fox, Christopher B.; Meinke, Andreas; D´Oro, Ugo; Casini, Daniele; Bonci, Alessandra; Billeskov, Rolf; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Harandi, Ali M.; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    The majority of vaccine candidates in clinical development are highly purified proteins and peptides relying on adjuvants to enhance and/or direct immune responses. Despite the acknowledged need for novel adjuvants, there are still very few adjuvants in licensed human vaccines. A vast number of adjuvants have been tested pre-clinically using different experimental conditions, rendering it impossible to directly compare their activity. We performed a head-to-head comparison of five different adjuvants Alum, MF59®, GLA-SE, IC31® and CAF01 in mice and combined these with antigens from M. tuberculosis, influenza, and chlamydia to test immune-profiles and efficacy in infection models using standardized protocols. Regardless of antigen, each adjuvant had a unique immunological signature suggesting that the adjuvants have potential for different disease targets. Alum increased antibody titers; MF59® induced strong antibody and IL-5 responses; GLA-SE induced antibodies and Th1; CAF01 showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile and IC31® induced strong Th1 responses. MF59® and GLA-SE were strong inducers of influenza HI titers while CAF01, GLA-SE and IC31® enhanced protection to TB and chlamydia. Importantly, this is the first extensive attempt to categorize clinical-grade adjuvants based on their immune profiles and protective efficacy to inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. PMID:26791076

  9. Different human vaccine adjuvants promote distinct antigen-independent immunological signatures tailored to different pathogens.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Niels Peter H; Olsen, Anja; Buonsanti, Cecilia; Follmann, Frank; Zhang, Yuan; Coler, Rhea N; Fox, Christopher B; Meinke, Andreas; D'Oro, Ugo; Casini, Daniele; Bonci, Alessandra; Billeskov, Rolf; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Harandi, Ali M; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    The majority of vaccine candidates in clinical development are highly purified proteins and peptides relying on adjuvants to enhance and/or direct immune responses. Despite the acknowledged need for novel adjuvants, there are still very few adjuvants in licensed human vaccines. A vast number of adjuvants have been tested pre-clinically using different experimental conditions, rendering it impossible to directly compare their activity. We performed a head-to-head comparison of five different adjuvants Alum, MF59®, GLA-SE, IC31® and CAF01 in mice and combined these with antigens from M. tuberculosis, influenza, and chlamydia to test immune-profiles and efficacy in infection models using standardized protocols. Regardless of antigen, each adjuvant had a unique immunological signature suggesting that the adjuvants have potential for different disease targets. Alum increased antibody titers; MF59® induced strong antibody and IL-5 responses; GLA-SE induced antibodies and Th1; CAF01 showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile and IC31® induced strong Th1 responses. MF59® and GLA-SE were strong inducers of influenza HI titers while CAF01, GLA-SE and IC31® enhanced protection to TB and chlamydia. Importantly, this is the first extensive attempt to categorize clinical-grade adjuvants based on their immune profiles and protective efficacy to inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. PMID:26791076

  10. Development of CpG ODN Based Vaccine Adjuvant Formulations.

    PubMed

    Gursel, Mayda; Gursel, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    Development of effective vaccine mediated immune responses relies on the use of vaccine adjuvants capable of enhancing and directing the adaptive immune response to the antigen. When used as vaccine adjuvants, type I interferon inducing agents can elicit potent effector/memory T cell responses and humoral immunity. Distinct sequences of single stranded synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide motifs (CpG ODN) can generate type I interferon production via a TLR9-MyD88-IRF7-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we describe two different methods of preparing CpG ODN-based vaccine adjuvant formulations that can induce a robust IFNα response from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:27076306

  11. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:25637446

  12. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  13. Treatment Algorithm for Patients with Non-arthritic Hip Pain, Suspect for an Intraarticular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, R. Wejnold; Dippmann, C.; Dahl, L.; Stürup, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The amount of patients referred with longstanding, non-arthritic hip pain is increasing, as are the treatment options. Left untreated hip dysplasia, acetabular retroversion and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) may lead to osteoarthritis (OA). Finding the right treatment option for the right patient can be challenging in patients with non-arthritic hip pain. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the radiographic findings seen in patients with longstanding hip pain, suspect for an intraarticular pathology, and provide a treatment algorithm allocating a specific treatment option for each clinical condition. Material and Methods: A review of the literature was performed using Public Medline searches of MeSH terms combined with synonyms for femoroacetabular impingement, acetabular retroversion, periacetabular osteotomy and hip arthroscopy. Results: Radiographic findings associated with acetabular retroversion described in the literature were the crossover sign, the posterior wall sign and the ischial spine sign, while Wiberg’s lateral center-edge angle (CE-angle) together with Leqeusne’s acetabular index indicate hip dysplasia. A Tönnis index >2 indicates osteoarthritis, however unsatisfying results are documented following joint preserving surgery with a Tönnis index >1. Furthermore, ischial spine sign in combination with the posterior wall sign indicates total acetabular retroversion prone to periacetabular osteotomy in contrast to focal retroversion prone to hip arthroscopy. These findings were used creating a treatment algorithm for intraarticular pathologies in patients with longstanding hip pain. Conclusion: Based on the radiographic findings, the algorithm presented in this study can be a helpful tool in the decision-making for the treatment of patients with non-arthritic hip pain, suspect for intraarticular pathologies. PMID:27583059

  14. Crucial role for the Nalp3 inflammasome in the immunostimulatory properties of aluminium adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Colegio, Oscar R; O'Connor, William; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Flavell, Richard A

    2008-06-19

    Aluminium adjuvants, typically referred to as 'alum', are the most commonly used adjuvants in human and animal vaccines worldwide, yet the mechanism underlying the stimulation of the immune system by alum remains unknown. Toll-like receptors are critical in sensing infections and are therefore common targets of various adjuvants used in immunological studies. Although alum is known to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that alum does not require intact Toll-like receptor signalling to activate the immune system. Here we show that aluminium adjuvants activate an intracellular innate immune response system called the Nalp3 (also known as cryopyrin, CIAS1 or NLRP3) inflammasome. Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 by macrophages in response to alum in vitro required intact inflammasome signalling. Furthermore, in vivo, mice deficient in Nalp3, ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain) or caspase-1 failed to mount a significant antibody response to an antigen administered with aluminium adjuvants, whereas the response to complete Freund's adjuvant remained intact. We identify the Nalp3 inflammasome as a crucial element in the adjuvant effect of aluminium adjuvants; in addition, we show that the innate inflammasome pathway can direct a humoral adaptive immune response. This is likely to affect how we design effective, but safe, adjuvants in the future.

  15. Antisense-mediated knockdown of Na(V)1.8, but not Na(V)1.9, generates inhibitory effects on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Feng; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in sensory neurons were known as key pain modulators. Comparing with the widely reported Na(V)1.8, roles of Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain are poorly studied by antisense-induced specific gene knockdown. Here, we used molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods to examine the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain. Following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammation treatment, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions and increased sodium current densities. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated that Na(V)1.8 mainly localized in medium and small-sized DRG neurons, whereas Na(V)1.9 only expressed in small-sized DRG neurons. Intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of AS ODN was used to down-regulate Na(V)1.8 or Na(V)1.9 expressions confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Unexpectedly, behavioral tests showed that only Na(V)1.8 AS ODN, but not Na(V)1.9 AS ODN could reverse CFA-induced heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that TTX-R sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in primary sensory neurons played distinct roles in CFA-induced inflammatory pain and suggested that antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated blocking of key pain modulator might point toward a potential treatment strategy against certain types of inflammatory pain. PMID:21572961

  16. Ginseng and aluminium hydroxide act synergistically as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Hu, S; Concha, C

    2003-03-01

    The dry extract prepared from the Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer-root (total ginseng (T-ginseng)) contain ginsenosides (G-des) which were shown to have adjuvant properties as demonstrated by: (a) injecting guinea pigs with a mixture of T-ginseng and inactivated porcine parvovirus (PPV) as a conventional vaccine; (b)injecting PPV-antigen and T-ginseng simultaneously but separately at different sites on the animal and (c)injecting only the T-ginseng 1 or 2 weeks prior to immunisation with the PPV-antigen. Using a haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test in the antibody titration, it was found that the mean HI-titre for the animals injected with PPV-antigen only was 320 +/- 0. By comparison, the mean titre value was 2026 +/- 1206 for the sera from the animals injected with the same vaccine but adjuvanted with 4 mg of T-ginseng, while the antibody titre induced by a vaccine containing Al(OH)(3)-gel was 2986 +/- 1596. Interestingly, the T-ginseng and Al(OH)(3) acted synergistically and further improved the antibody response to the PPV-antigen to 6826 +/- 2413, i.e. more than 20 times the HI titre of the non-adjuvanted PPV-vaccine. Immunisations using PPV-vaccines adjuvanted with single purified G-des demonstrated that the ginseng fractions Rb1 and Rg1 are potent adjuvants inducing higher or similar antibody titres than the vaccine adjuvanted with Al(OH)(3), e.g. Rb1 tested at a concentration of 830 microg per dose induced a significantly (P = 0.009) higher antibody titre than the one adjuvanted with Al(OH)(3). Nevertheless, different than the mixture Al(OH)(3)-T-ginseng; Rb1 and Rg1 act antagonistically and partially inhibit each other. The G-des adjuvanted vaccines induced significantly (P = 0.0011) higher titres of IgG2 antibodies compared with IgG1.

  17. The mode of action of immunological adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Allison, A C

    1998-01-01

    Adjuvants augment immune responses to antigens and influence the balance between cell-mediated and humoral responses, as well as the isotypes of antibodies formed. New adjuvant formulations include antigen-carrying vehicles and small molecules with immunomodulating activity. Widely used two-phase vehicles comprise liposomes and microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions. These are believed to target antigens to antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells (DC), follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and B-lymphocytes. Activation of complement generates C3d, which binds CR2 (CD21) on FDC and B-lymphocytes, thereby stimulating the proliferation of the latter and the generation of B-memory. Targeting of antigens to DC may favour cell-mediated immunity. Immunomodulating agents induce the production of cytokine cascades. In a primary cascade at injection sites TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-1 are produced. TNF-alpha promotes migration of DC to lymphoid tissues, while GM-CSF and IL-1 accelerate the maturation of DC into efficient antigen-presenting cells for T-lymphocytes. In a secondary cytokine cascade in draining lymph nodes, DC produce IL-12, which induces Th1 responses with the production of IFN-gamma. The cytokines elicit cell-mediated immune responses and the formation of antibodies of protective isotypes, such as IgG2a in the mouse and IgG1 in humans. Antibodies of these isotypes activate complement and collaborate with antibody-dependent effector cells in protective immune responses.

  18. The mode of action of immunological adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Allison, A C

    1998-01-01

    Adjuvants augment immune responses to antigens and influence the balance between cell-mediated and humoral responses, as well as the isotypes of antibodies formed. New adjuvant formulations include antigen-carrying vehicles and small molecules with immunomodulating activity. Widely used two-phase vehicles comprise liposomes and microfluidized squalene or squalane emulsions. These are believed to target antigens to antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells (DC), follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and B-lymphocytes. Activation of complement generates C3d, which binds CR2 (CD21) on FDC and B-lymphocytes, thereby stimulating the proliferation of the latter and the generation of B-memory. Targeting of antigens to DC may favour cell-mediated immunity. Immunomodulating agents induce the production of cytokine cascades. In a primary cascade at injection sites TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-1 are produced. TNF-alpha promotes migration of DC to lymphoid tissues, while GM-CSF and IL-1 accelerate the maturation of DC into efficient antigen-presenting cells for T-lymphocytes. In a secondary cytokine cascade in draining lymph nodes, DC produce IL-12, which induces Th1 responses with the production of IFN-gamma. The cytokines elicit cell-mediated immune responses and the formation of antibodies of protective isotypes, such as IgG2a in the mouse and IgG1 in humans. Antibodies of these isotypes activate complement and collaborate with antibody-dependent effector cells in protective immune responses. PMID:9554254

  19. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  20. Effects of adjuvants on the immune response to allergens in a murine model of allergen inhalation: cholera toxin induces a Th1-like response to Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, U; Jahn-Schmid, B; Fritsch, R; Bauer, L; Renz, H; Kraft, D; Ebner, C

    1998-01-01

    Based on the fact that type I allergies are frequently elicited by inhalant allergens, we have established a model of aerosol inhalation leading to allergic sensitization in BALB/c mice. Using this model we studied the effects of aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH)3), known to enhance IgE antibody responses, compared with cholera toxin (CT), a potent mucosal adjuvant, on the immune response to birch pollen (BP) and its major allergen Bet v 1. Two groups of BALB/c mice were either systemically immunized with recombinant Bet v 1 in Al(OH)3 and subsequently aerosol exposed to BP allergen, or aerosolized with BP and CT. IgE-mediated skin reactions were only elicited in the mice which had received Bet v 1/Al(OH)3. Allergen-specific serum IgE and IgG1 antibodies dominated in the Al(OH)3 group, IgG2a antibody levels to BP and rBet v 1 were markedly higher in the sera of mice exposed to CT with the allergen. IgA antibodies were only detected in the bronchial lavage of the CT-treated group. Moreover, the latter group displayed consistently higher T cell proliferative responses to BP and interferon-gamma production in vitro. Thus, the systemic immunization with rBet v 1 in Al(OH)3 before inhalation of the BP extract promoted a Th2-like immune response, while CT mixed with the aerosolized BP extract rather induced a Th1-like immune response. In an attempt to reverse these ongoing immune responses we could achieve a shift towards a Th0 response. Immunization with BP extract without adjuvant treatment led to undetectable antibody or cellular immune responses. We conclude from the present study that the induction of an immune response to BP allergen after aerosol inhalation can be directed towards a Th1- or a Th2-like response. Once established, the immune response can be modulated.

  1. The ultrastructure of tomatine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Wun; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Morrow, W J W

    2002-12-01

    The tomatine adjuvant, consisting of tomatine, n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and ovalbumin, has recently been shown to potentiate the immunogenicity of protein antigen and elicit cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in immunized animals. The physicochemical properties of tomatine adjuvant have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the microstructure of this complex formulation, as directly related to its physicochemical properties. To elucidate the micromorphology of this system, the tomatine adjuvant was separated by isopycnic ultracentrifugation, followed by freeze fracturing and examination by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The adjuvant mixture was shown to be composed of several micro- and nano-structures. The major fraction obtained from isopycnic separation was shown to consist of flaky needle-like microcrystals, approximately 80-160 nm in width and 2-4 microm in length. The tomatine crystals alone in 0.9% NaCl, on the other hand, were shown to be elongated hollow tubular crystals of hundreds of nanometers up to a few microns in length, along which n-octyl-beta-glucopyranoside was speculated to serve as a seeding microtemplate for gel crystallization of protein complexes. Indented marks within the gel phase were observed in the freeze fractured replicas of the adjuvant, suggesting that protein complexes may have been crystallized or precipitated within the gels. Several other forms of micro- and nano-structures were also observed, showing multiple-dispersion features with gel characteristics. The presence of gel crystalline and multiple-dispersed phases is postulated to contribute to the sustained immunopotentiation effect of tomatine adjuvant.

  2. An Enhanced Synthetic Multiclade DNA Prime Induces Improved Cross-Clade-Reactive Functional Antibodies when Combined with an Adjuvanted Protein Boost in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Megan C.; Hutnick, Natalie A.; Pollara, Justin; Myles, Devin J. F.; Williams, Constance; Yan, Jian; LaBranche, Celia C.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Montefiori, David; Barnett, Susan W.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The search for an efficacious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine remains a pressing need. The moderate success of the RV144 Thai clinical vaccine trial suggested that vaccine-induced HIV-1-specific antibodies can reduce the risk of HIV-1 infection. We have made several improvements to the DNA platform and have previously shown that improved DNA vaccines alone are capable of inducing both binding and neutralizing antibodies in small-animal models. In this study, we explored how an improved DNA prime and recombinant protein boost would impact HIV-specific vaccine immunogenicity in rhesus macaques (RhM). After DNA immunization with either a single HIV Env consensus sequence or multiple constructs expressing HIV subtype-specific Env consensus sequences, we detected both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to all vaccine immunogens. These T-cell responses were further increased after protein boosting to levels exceeding those of DNA-only or protein-only immunization. In addition, we observed antibodies that exhibited robust cross-clade binding and neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity after immunization with the DNA prime-protein boost regimen, with the multiple-Env formulation inducing a more robust and broader response than the single-Env formulation. The magnitude and functionality of these responses emphasize the strong priming effect improved DNA immunogens can induce, which are further expanded upon protein boost. These results support further study of an improved synthetic DNA prime together with a protein boost for enhancing anti-HIV immune responses. IMPORTANCE Even with effective antiretroviral drugs, HIV remains an enormous global health burden. Vaccine development has been problematic in part due to the high degree of diversity and poor immunogenicity of the HIV Env protein. Studies suggest that a relevant HIV vaccine will likely need to induce broad cellular and humoral responses from a simple vaccine

  3. Oily adjuvants and autoimmunity: now time for reconsideration?

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M

    2012-02-01

    Immunologists have relied heavily on oil-based adjuvants to generate antibodies or induce auto-allergic responses in experimental animals. These are rarely used today for human vaccination because of their persistent irritancies and propensity to cause ulcers at sites of injection. However oily materials with adjuvant properties abound in our modern environment, both personal and extraneous. Their inadvertent impact as cryptotoxins may contribute to the rising incidence of auto-allergic diseases in recent times. Experimentally, the potential adjuvanticity of various oils, fats and other lipids can be evaluated by their ability (or otherwise) to induce auto-allergic disease(s) in rats and mice with, or even without, the addition of a mycobacterial immunostimulant. Genetic factors have been recognized that determine an animal's susceptibility or resistance to these oil-induced immunopathies. So it may be profitable to further characterize these factors, first in animals and then perhaps in human populations, to help find ways to enhance natural resistance to those adjuvant-active oils that may be widely distributed in the personal environment, notably mineral oil(s). (The six tables in this article summarize some relevant facts and a few conjectures.) A caveat: This review is restricted to the adjuvant properties of some oils in the personal environment. It does not cover the mechanisms of adjuvanticity.

  4. Cyclodextrin-Based Delivery Systems for Arthritic Diseases: From Development to Experimental Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Monteiro Nascimento, Monica Helena; Santos Akkari, Alessandra Cristina; Freitas Mariano, Kelly Cristina; Kimus Braz, Antonio Sergio; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini; de Araujo, Daniele Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Arthritics diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are chronic inflammatory and one of the most prevalent health conditions that cause disability (pain and functional limitation of joints). Despite the research advances, the treatment of those pathological conditions remains ineffective, since the pharmacological therapy is palliative, reducing only the symptoms and, in some cases, the chronic progression of the disease. In this context, the development of new formulations for controlled release would be interesting for reducing the number of injections and would also increase the patient compliance. In this article, we present a review of the cyclodextrin (CD)-based delivery systems focusing from conventional guest-host inclusion complexes and CD-polysulphates, until supramolecular architectures such as drug-CD-polymers conjugates, pseudorotaxanes, hydrogels as well as double-carrier systems and other systems. In particular, this article focuses the main CD-based delivery systems described in the literature emphasizing their possible administration by intra-articular route on the treatment of arthritic diseases, concentrating on their development and also performance as in vivo experimental therapeutic systems. PMID:26290205

  5. Characterization of the Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Response Induced by Prime-Boost Strategies with CAF01 and CpG Adjuvants Administered by the Intranasal and Subcutaneous Routes

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Prota, Gennaro; Christensen, Dennis; Andersen, Peter; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata

    2015-01-01

    The design of heterologous prime-boost vaccine combinations that optimally shape the immune response is of critical importance for the development of next generation vaccines. Here, we tested different prime-boost combinations using the tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56 with CAF01 or CpG ODN 1826 adjuvants, administered by the parenteral and nasal routes. Using peptide-MHC class II tetramers, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were tracked following primary and booster immunizations. Both parenteral priming with H56 plus CAF01 and nasal priming with H56 plus CpG elicited significant expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen; however, only parenterally primed cells responded to booster immunization. Subcutaneous (SC) priming with H56 and CAF01 followed by nasal boosting with H56 and CpG showed the greater expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen and lungs compared to all the other homologous and heterologous prime-boost combinations. Nasal boosting exerted a recruitment of primed CD4+ T cells into lungs that was stronger in subcutaneously than nasally primed mice, in accordance with different chemokine receptor expression induced by primary immunization. These data demonstrate that SC priming is fundamental for eliciting CD4+ T cells that can be efficiently boosted by the nasal route and results in the recruitment of antigen-experienced cells into the lungs. Combination of different vaccine formulations and routes of delivery for priming and boosting is a strategic approach for improving and directing vaccine-induced immune responses. PMID:26379666

  6. Cellular Adjuvant Properties, Direct Cytotoxicity of Re-differentiated Vα24 Invariant NKT-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shuichi; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Tian-Yi; Ueda, Norihiro; Iriguchi, Shoichi; Yasui, Yutaka; Kawai, Yohei; Tatsumi, Minako; Hirai, Norihito; Mizoro, Yasutaka; Iwama, Tatsuaki; Watanabe, Akira; Nakanishi, Mahito; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vα24 invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes implicated in the regulation of broad immune responses. They recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d on antigen-presenting cells and induce both innate and adaptive immune responses, which enhance effective immunity against cancer. Conversely, reduced iNKT cell numbers and function have been observed in many patients with cancer. To recover these numbers, we reprogrammed human iNKT cells to pluripotency and then re-differentiated them into regenerated iNKT cells in vitro through an IL-7/IL-15-based optimized cytokine combination. The re-differentiated iNKT cells showed proliferation and IFN-γ production in response to α-galactosylceramide, induced dendritic cell maturation and downstream activation of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells, and exhibited NKG2D- and DNAM-1-mediated NK cell-like cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. The immunological features of re-differentiated iNKT cells and their unlimited availability from induced pluripotent stem cells offer a potentially effective immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26862702

  7. Mucosal immunization and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideki; van Reit, Elly; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the influenza vaccine is to prevent influenza virus infection and control the yearly seasonal epidemic and pandemic. However, the presently available parenteral influenza vaccine induces only systemic humoral immunity, which does not prevent influenza virus infection on the mucosal surface. Secretary IGA antibodies play an important role in preventing natural infection. Moreover, the IgA antibody response mediates cross-protection against variant viruses in animal models. Thus, a mucosal influenza vaccine that induces mucosal immunity would be a powerful tool to protect individuals from the influenza virus. Although the function of the mucosal immune system, especially in the respiratory tract, is not completely understood, there are several studies underway to develop mucosal influenza vaccines. Here, we will review current knowledge concerning the induction of IgA, the role of B-cell production of influenza virus specific IgA antibodies in anti-influenza immunity, and the role of humoral memory responses induced upon vaccination.

  8. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  9. Adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Molife, R; Hancock, B W

    2002-10-01

    High risk surgically resected melanoma is associated with a less than 50% 5-year survival. Adjuvant therapy is an appropriate treatment modality in this setting, and is more likely to be effective as the tumour burden here is small. Clinical observations of spontaneous tumour regressions and a highly variable rate of disease progression suggest a role of the immune system in the natural history of melanoma. Biological agents have therefore been the subjects of numerous adjuvant studies. Early, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), levamisole, Corynebacterium parvum, chemotherapy, isolated limb perfusion (ILP), radiotherapy, transfer factor (TF), megestrol acetate and vitamin A yielded largely negative results. Current trials focus on vaccines and the interferons. To date the latter is the only therapy to have shown a significant benefit in the prospective randomised controlled phase III setting. This report represents a systematic review of studies in adjuvant therapy in melanoma. Data from ongoing studies is awaited before a role for adjuvant agents in high risk melanoma is confirmed. PMID:12399001

  10. Intranasal hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-adjuvanted influenza vaccine protects against sub-heterologous virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Takato; Ozasa, Koji; Kobari, Shingo; Momota, Masatoshi; Kishishita, Natsuko; Kobiyama, Kouji; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    Intranasal vaccination with inactivated influenza viral antigens is an attractive and valid alternative to currently available influenza (flu) vaccines; many of which seem to need efficient and safe adjuvant, however. In this study, we examined whether hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), a widely used pharmaceutical excipient to improve solubility and drug delivery, can act as a mucosal adjuvant for intranasal flu vaccines. We found that intranasal immunization of mice with hemagglutinin split- as well as inactivated whole-virion influenza vaccine with HP-β-CD resulted in secretion of antigen-specific IgA and IgGs in the airway mucosa and the serum as well. As a result, both HP-β-CD adjuvanted-flu intranasal vaccine protected mice against lethal challenge with influenza virus, equivalent to those induced by experimental cholera toxin-adjuvanted ones. Of note, intranasal use of HP-β-CD as an adjuvant induced significantly lower antigen-specific IgE responses than that induced by aluminum salt adjuvant. These results suggest that HP-β-CD may be a potent mucosal adjuvant for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:27160037

  11. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  12. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26690894

  13. Bacillus subtilis spores as adjuvants for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aps, Luana R M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Porchia, Bruna F M M; Sales, Natiely S; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2015-05-11

    Recently, Bacillus subtilis spores were shown to be endowed with strong adjuvant capacity when co-administered with purified antigenic proteins. In the present study we assessed whether spores possess adjuvant properties when combined with DNA vaccines. We showed that B. subtilis spores promoted the activation of dendritic cells in vitro and induced migration of pro-inflammatory cells after parenteral administration to mice. Likewise, co-administration of spores with a DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 protein enhanced the activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. Mice immunized with the DNA vaccine admixed with spores presented a protective immunity increase to previously implanted tumor cells, capable of expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Finally, we observed that the adjuvant effect can vary accordingly to the number of co-administered spores which may be ascribed with the ability to induce. Collectively, the present results demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis spores can also confer adjuvant effects to DNA vaccines.

  14. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pavan, T R; Di Domenico, J; Kirsten, K S; Nied, C O; Frandoloso, R; Kreutz, L C

    2016-07-25

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60-80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  15. Studies on respiratory immunization with tetanus toxoid: the role of adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bartlema, H. C.; Braunius, Rientsje; Hölscher, Lily

    1972-01-01

    Aerosol vaccination of mice with purified plain tetanus toxoid does not induce an immune response unless a suitable adjuvant is added. Aluminium phosphate is without effect by aerosol treatment. Killed cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae, although effective, are unsatisfactory owing to the long inhalation period needed. Killed Bordetella perussis cells were found to be an excellent adjuvant. A single aerosol treatment with a toxoid—B. pertussis mixture during a moderate exposure period evoked a considerable immune response. With repeated aerosol treatment of primed mice the addition of adjuvant is not required; booster treatment with plain toxoid is at least as effective. Extracts from B. pertussis cells exert as good an adjuvant effect as the whole-cell vaccine. The remaining cell-wall debris also appears to be an active adjuvant. In combination with constant doses of adjuvant (108 B. pertussis cells), the 50% protective doses (ED 50) of toxoid were determined by inhalation and by s.c. injection and were found to be 0·1875 and 0·0625 LFU respectively. This would imply that, as a result of the adjuvant action, the s.c. ED 50 is reduced by approximately a factor of 20; whereas the respiratory ED 50 is decreased by at least a factor of 100. It is suggested that the much more pronounced adjuvant activity in aerosol immunization is associated with the induction of strong cell-mediated hypersensitivity in the respiratory tract. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4346009

  16. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, T.R.; Di Domenico, J.; Kirsten, K.S.; Nied, C.O.; Frandoloso, R.; Kreutz, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60–80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund’s incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  17. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  18. The effect of treatment with whole bee venom on cage activity and plasma cortisol levels in the arthritic dog.

    PubMed

    Vick, J A; Warren, G B; Brooks, R B

    1976-03-01

    A series of 24 mixed-breed dogs were used to study the physiological effects of whole bee venom on canine arthritic-like conditions. 16 were randomly selected normal dogs and 8 were suspect arthritic animals confirmed by X-ray examination and special physical examination. The control dogs were divided into groups I and II and the arthritic groups III and IV. Groups I and III received injections of sterile saline while groups II and IV were given 1 mg whole bee venom subcutaneously on days 30, 37, 50, and 60. Plasma cortisol levels were measured weekly and cage activity recorded daily using a K and R Pedometer. Following bee venom injection plasma cortisol levels increased in both groups II and IV from a control of 5Μg/100 ml to 15Μg/100 ml 15 days after therapy. During this period of time the 4 arthritic dogs in group IV increased daily cage activity from 4 mile/day to 10 mile/day. Groups I, II, and III showed no increase or decrease in cage activity. No injections were given between day 60 and day 90. At 90, 97, 110 and 120 days, groups I and III were given bee venom and groups II and IV sterile saline. As before, bee venom increased plasma cortisol levels in both venom-treated groups and the daily cage activity in group III. At 120 days all injections were discontinued. Plasma cortisol levels returned to normal within 30 days, yet daily cage activity in both groups III and IV remained significantly above control (8 to 11 mile/day). Results indicate that whole bee venom stimulates the production of cortisol and the daily cage activity in dogs exhibiting arthritic-like conditions. No significant side effects were noted in any of the dogs treated with bee venom. PMID:24194426

  19. Mucosal SIV Vaccines Comprising Inactivated Virus Particles and Bacterial Adjuvants Induce CD8+ T-Regulatory Cells that Suppress SIV-Positive CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Prevent SIV Infection in the Macaque Model

    PubMed Central

    Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Guo, Weizhong; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A new paradigm of mucosal vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been investigated in the macaque model. A vaccine consisting of inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 particles together with a living bacterial adjuvant (either the Calmette and Guerin bacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus rhamnosus) was administered to macaques via the vaginal or oral/intragastric route. In contrast to all established human and veterinary vaccines, these three vaccine regimens did not elicit SIV-specific antibodies nor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes but induced a previously unrecognized population of non-cytolytic MHCIb/E-restricted CD8+ T-regulatory cells that suppressed the activation of SIV-positive CD4+ T-lymphocytes. SIV reverse transcription was thereby blocked in inactivated CD4+ T-cells; the initial burst of virus replication was prevented and the vaccinated macaques were protected from a challenge infection. For 3–14 months after intragastric immunization, 24 macaques were challenged intrarectally with a high dose of SIVmac239 or with the heterologous strain SIV B670 (both strains grown on macaques PBMC). Twenty-three of these animals were found to be protected for up to 48 months while all 24 control macaques became infected. This protective effect against SIV challenge together with the concomitant identification of a robust ex vivo correlate of protection suggests a new approach for developing an HIV vaccine in humans. The induction of this new class of CD8+ T-regulatory cells could also possibly be used therapeutically for suppressing HIV replication in infected patients and this novel tolerogenic vaccine paradigm may have potential applications for treating a wide range of immune disorders and is likely to may have profound implications across immunology generally. PMID:25071760

  20. Advances and challenges in mucosal adjuvant technology.

    PubMed

    Newsted, Daniel; Fallahi, Firouzeh; Golshani, Ashkan; Azizi, Ali

    2015-05-15

    Adjuvants play attractive roles in enhancement of immune response during vaccination; however, due to several challenges, only a limited number of adjuvants are licensed by health authorities. The lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant is even more significant as none of the licensed adjuvants revealed a strong enhancement in immune system after mucosal administration. Over the past two decades, several mucosal adjuvants have been developed to deliver antigens to the target cells in the mucosal immune system and increase specific immune responses. However, the safety and efficacy of these adjuvants for testing in human trials is still an important issue, requiring further study. In this article, we briefly review the challenges associated with most common mucosal adjuvants and discuss potential strategies for targeting the mucosal immune system.

  1. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  2. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation--Session 2 (Plenary II): May 15-17, 2013--Lausanne, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Collin, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    On the 15-17th May 2013, the Fourth International Conference on Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation was organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, and gathered stakeholders from academics and from the industry to discuss several challenges, advances and promises in the field of vaccine adjuvants. Plenary session 2 of the meeting was composed of four different presentations covering: (1) the recent set-up of an adjuvant technology transfer and training platform in Switzerland, (2) the proposition to revisit existing paradigms of modern vaccinology, (3) the properties of polyethyleneimine as potential new vaccine adjuvant, and (4) the progresses in the design of HIV vaccine candidates able to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  3. Measuring intranodal pressure and lymph viscosity to elucidate mechanisms of arthritic flare and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouta, Echoe M.; Wood, Ronald W.; Perry, Seth W.; Brown, Edward; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with episodic flares in affected joints, whose etiology is largely unknown. Recent studies in mice demonstrated alterations in lymphatics from affected joints precede flares. Thus, we aimed to develop novel methods for measuring lymph node pressure and lymph viscosity in limbs of mice. Pressure measurements were performed by inserting a glass micropipette connected to a pressure transducer into popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) or axillary lymph nodes (ALN) of mice and determined that the lymphatic pressures were 9 and 12 cm of water, respectively. We are also developing methods for measuring lymph viscosity in lymphatic vessels afferent to PLN, which can be measured by multi-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (MP-FRAP) of FITC-BSA injected into the hind footpad. These results demonstrate the potential of lymph node pressure and lymph viscosity measurements, and warrant future studies to test these outcomes as biomarkers of arthritic flare. PMID:22172039

  4. Repair of Cartilage Defects in Arthritic Tissue with Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olee, Tsaiwei; Grogan, Shawn P.; Lotz, Martin K.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrocytes have been generated in vitro from a range of progenitor cell types and by a number of strategies. However, achieving reconstitution of actual physiologically relevant, appropriately-laminated cartilage in situ that would be applicable to conditions, such as arthritis and cartilage degeneration remains elusive. This lack of success is multifactorial and includes limited cell source, decreased proliferation rate of mature chondrocytes, lack of maintenance of phenotype, reduced matrix synthesis, and poor integration with host tissue. We report an efficient approach for deriving mesenchymal chondroprogenitor cells from human embryonic stem cells. These cells generated tissue containing cartilage-specific matrix proteins that integrated in situ in a partial-thickness defect in ex vivo articular cartilage harvested from human arthritic joints. Given that stem cells provide a virtually inexhaustible supply of starting material and that our technique is easily scalable, cartilaginous tissue primed and grafted in this manner could be suitable for clinical translation. PMID:24028447

  5. Herbal Medicines as Adjuvants for Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Calway, Tyler; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, many patients, including cancer patients, concurrently take prescription drugs and herbal supplements. Co-administration of prescription medicines and herbal supplements may have negative outcomes via pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. However, multiple constituents in botanicals may also yield beneficial pharmacological activities. Botanicals could possess effective anticancer compounds that may be used as adjuvants to existing chemotherapy to improve efficacy and/or reduce drug-induced toxicity. Herbal medicines, such as ginseng, potentiated the effects of chemotherapeutic agents via synergistic activities, supported by cell cycle evaluations, apoptotic observations, and computer-based docking analysis. Since botanicals are nearly always administrated orally, the role of intestinal microbiota in metabolizing ginseng constituents is presented. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical utility of the botanicals in cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22809022

  6. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  7. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  8. Adverse events following immunization with vaccines containing adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cerpa-Cruz, S; Paredes-Casillas, P; Landeros Navarro, E; Bernard-Medina, A G; Martínez-Bonilla, G; Gutiérrez-Ureña, S

    2013-07-01

    A traditional infectious disease vaccine is a preparation of live attenuated, inactivated or killed pathogen that stimulates immunity. Vaccine immunologic adjuvants are compounds incorporated into vaccines to enhance immunogenicity. Adjuvants have recently been implicated in the new syndrome named ASIA autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. The objective describes the frequencies of post-vaccination clinical syndrome induced by adjuvants. We performed a cross-sectional study; adverse event following immunization was defined as any untoward medical occurrence that follows immunization 54 days prior to the event. Data on vaccinations and other risk factors were obtained from daily epidemiologic surveillance. Descriptive statistics were done using means and standard deviation, and odds ratio adjusted for potential confounding variables was calculated with SPSS 17 software. Forty-three out of 120 patients with moderate or severe manifestations following immunization were hospitalized from 2008 to 2011. All patients fulfilled at least 2 major and 1 minor criteria suggested by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin for ASIA diagnosis. The most frequent clinical findings were pyrexia 68%, arthralgias 47%, cutaneous disorders 33%, muscle weakness 16% and myalgias 14%. Three patients had diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome, one patient had Adult-Still's disease 3 days after vaccination. A total of 76% of the events occurred in the first 3 days post-vaccination. Two patients with previous autoimmune disease showed severe adverse reactions with the reactivation of their illness. Minor local reactions were present in 49% of patients. Vaccines containing adjuvants may be associated with an increased risk of autoimmune/inflammatory adverse events following immunization.

  9. Adjuvant-activity of `diphtheroid' organisms isolated from the joints of cases of rhemumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    White, R. G.; Gordon, J.

    1970-01-01

    Two isolates of `diphtheroid' organisms from the joints of cases of rheumatoid arthritis were found to possess a surface network of filaments (125 Å wide) resembling the adjuvant-active peptidoglycolipid filaments of mycobacteria and some Nocardia spp. Tests for adjuvant activity in guinea-pigs showed that both isolates possessed the ability to induce delayed-type hypersensitivity to a simultaneously injected immunogen (ovalbumin) and to increase serum anti-ovalbumin levels (in particular γ2-immunoglobulin). The relationship of adjuvant-active bacilli to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 1 PMID:5477931

  10. Impact of smoking on the quantity and quality of antibodies induced by human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 AS04-adjuvanted virus-like-particle vaccine – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The AS04-adjuvanted bivalent L1 virus-like-particle (VLP) vaccine (Cervarix™) against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16/18 holds great promise to prevent HPV16/18 infections and associated neoplasias, but it is important to rule out significant co-factors of the neoplasias like smoking. Methods We conducted a pilot study to compare the quantity and quality of HPV16/18 antibody response at baseline and 7 months post vaccination in 104 non-smoking and 112 smoking female participants vaccinated at 0, 1 and 6 months with Cervarix™ (55 and 48 study participants) or with Hepatitis A vaccine (HAVRIX™) (48 and 64 participants, respectively). These 216 women were a sub-sample of 4808 baseline 16- to 17-year old Finnish women initially enrolled in the double-blind, randomized controlled phase III PATRICIA trial. Following end-of-study unblinding in 2009 they were randomly chosen out of all the participants of the three major Finnish PATRICIA study sites in the Helsinki metropolitan area (University of Helsinki, N = 535, and Family Federation Finland, N = 432) and Tampere (University of Tampere, N = 428). Following enrolment, serum samples were collected at month 0 and month 7 post 1st vaccination shot, and were analysed for levels and avidity of IgG antibodies to HPV16 and HPV18 using standard and modified (4 M urea elution) VLP ELISAs. Results We found that at month 7 post vaccination women who smoked (cotinine level > 20 ng/ml) had levels of anti-HPV16/18 antibodies comparable to those of non-smoking women. Low-avidity HPV16/18 IgG antibodies were observed in 16% of the vaccinated women, and active smoking conferred a three-fold increased risk (95% CI 1.0-9.3) of having the low-avidity antibodies. Conclusion Our data suggest that while smoking does not interfere with the quantity of vaccine-induced peak IgG levels, it may affect the avidity of IgG induced by HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:25011477

  11. Direct adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor α soluble receptors to rabbit knees with experimental arthritis has local and distal anti-arthritic effects

    PubMed Central

    Ghivizzani, Steven C.; Lechman, Eric R.; Kang, Richard; Tio, Caroline; Kolls, Jay; Evans, Christopher H.; Robbins, Paul D.

    1998-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver genes encoding a soluble interleukin 1 (IL-1)-type I receptor-IgG fusion protein and/or a soluble type I tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor-IgG fusion protein directly to the knees of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis. When tested individually, knees receiving the soluble IL-1 receptor had significantly reduced cartilage matrix degradation and white blood cell infiltration into the joint space. Delivery of the soluble TNFα receptor was less effective, having only a moderate effect on white blood cell infiltration and no effect on cartilage breakdown. When both soluble receptors were used together, there was a greater inhibition of white blood cell infiltration and cartilage breakdown with a considerable reduction of synovitis. Interestingly, anti-arthritic effects were also seen in contralateral control knees receiving only a marker gene, suggesting that sustained local inhibition of disease activity in one joint may confer an anti-arthritic effect on other joints. These results suggest that local intra-articular gene transfer could be used to treat systemic polyarticular arthritides. PMID:9539786

  12. [Expression and adjuvant effects of the fusion peptide TBP5].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Guo, Xiangling; Li, Xiaokang; Wu, Tingcai; Li, Deyuan; Chen, Puyan

    2015-05-01

    Thymopentin (TP5) and bursopentin (BP5) are both immunopotentiators. To explore whether the TP5-BP5 fusion peptide (TBP5) has adjuvant activity or not, we cloned the TBP5 gene and confirmed that the TBP5 gene in a recombinant prokaryotic expression plasmid was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. TBP5 significantly promoted the proliferation of thymic and splenic lymphocytes of mice. The potential adjuvant activity of the TBP5 was examined in mice by coinjecting TBP5 and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) inactivated vaccine. HI antibody titers, HA antibodies and cytokines levels (IL-4 and IFN-γ) were determined. We found that TBP5 markedly elevated serum HI titers and HA antibody levels, induced the secretion of both IL-4 and IFN-γ cytokines. Furthermore, virus challenge experiments confirmed that TBP5 contributed to inhibition replication of the virus [H9N2 AIV (A/chicken/Jiangsu/NJ07/05)] from mouse lungs. Altogether, these findings suggest that TBP5 may be an effective adjuvant for avian vaccine and that this study provides a reference for further research on new vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26571686

  13. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for viral glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-09-01

    Protection against mucosally transmitted infections probably requires immunity at the site of pathogen entry, yet there are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) represents a family of organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo. Here we show that diverse PEI forms have potent mucosal adjuvant activity for viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. A single intranasal administration of influenza hemagglutinin or herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D with PEI elicited robust antibody-mediated protection from an otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen, which were taken up by antigen-presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted dendritic cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host double-stranded DNA that triggered Irf3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  14. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  15. Use of a whole-slide imaging system to assess the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joint sections of arthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, J X; Liang, Q Q; Wang, Y J; Mooney, R A; Boyce, B F; Xing, L

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joints of arthritic mice using a whole-slide imaging system. Joints and long bone sections were cut from paraffin blocks of two mouse models of arthritis: meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) and TNF transgene (TNF-Tg)-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MLI-OA mice were fed a high fat diet to accelerate OA development. TNF-Tg mice were treated with lymphatic growth factor VEGF-C virus to stimulate lymphangiogenesis. Sections were double immunofluorescence stained with anti-podoplanin and alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The area and number of lymphatic capillaries and mature lymphatic vessels were determined using a whole-slide imaging system and its associated software. Lymphatic vessels in joints were distributed in soft tissues mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads and muscles. In long bones, enriched lymphatic vessels were present in the periosteal areas adjacent to the blood vessels. Occasionally, lymphatic vessels were observed in the cortical bone. Increased lymphatic capillaries, but decreased mature lymphatic vessels, were detected in both OA and RA joints. VEGF-C treatment increased lymphatic capillary and mature vessel formation in RA joints. Our findings suggest that the lymphatic system may play an important role in arthritis pathogenesis and treatment.

  16. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27494687

  17. Neisseria lactamica antigens complexed with a novel cationic adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B.; Rosetti, Andreza S.; Lincopan, Nilton; De Gaspari, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Colonization of the nasopharynx by non-pathogenic Neisseria species, including N. lactamica, has been suggested to lead to the acquisition of natural immunity against Neisseria meningitidis in young children. The aim of this study was to identify a model complex of antigens and adjuvant for immunological preparation against N. meningitidis B, based on cross reactivity with N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles (OMV) antigens and the (DDA-BF) adjuvant. Complexes of 25 µg of OMV in 0.1 mM of DDA-BF were colloidally stable, exhibiting a mean diameter and charge optimal for antigen presentation. Immunogenicity tests for these complexes were performed in mice. A single dose of OMV/DDA-BF was sufficient to induce a (DTH) response, while the same result was achieved only after two doses of OMV/alum. In addition, to achieve total IgG levels that are similar to a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF, it was necessary to give the mice a second dose of OMV/alum. Moreover, the antibodies induced from a single immunization with OMV/DDA-BF had an intermediate avidity, but antibodies with a similar avidity were only induced by OMV/alum after two immunizations. The use of this novel cationic adjuvant for the first time with a N. lactamica OMV preparation revealed good potential for future vaccine design. PMID:23296384

  18. Nano-microparticles as immune adjuvants: correlating particle sizes and the resultant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Kumar, Amit; Cui, Zhengrong

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel immune adjuvants is emerging as a significant area of vaccine delivery based on the continued necessity to amplify immune responses to a wide array of new antigens that are poorly immunogenic. This article specifically focuses on the application of nanoparticles and microparticles as vaccine adjuvants. Many investigators are in agreement that the size of the particles is crucial to their adjuvant activities. However, reports on correlating the size of particle-based adjuvants and the resultant immune responses have been conflicting, with investigators on both sides of the fence with impressive data in support of the effectiveness of particles with small sizes (submicron) over those with larger sizes (micron) and vice versa, while other investigators reported data that showed submicron- and micron-sized particles are effective to the same degree as immune adjuvants. We have generated a list of biological, immunological and, more importantly, vaccine formulation parameters that may have contributed to the inconsistency from different studies and made recommendations on future studies attempting to correlate the size of particulate adjuvants and the immune responses induced. The information gathered could lead to strategies to optimize the performance of nano-microparticles as immune adjuvants. PMID:20822351

  19. GLA-AF, an emulsion-free vaccine adjuvant for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Christopher H; Roque, Richard; Perrone, Lucy A; Rininger, Joseph A; Bowen, Richard; Reed, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing threat from Influenza necessitates the development of new vaccine and adjuvant technologies that can maximize vaccine immunogenicity, shorten production cycles, and increase global vaccine supply. Currently, the most successful adjuvants for Influenza vaccines are squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions. These adjuvants enhance seroprotective antibody titers to homologous and heterologous strains of virus, and augment a significant dose sparing activity that could improve vaccine manufacturing capacity. As an alternative to an emulsion, we tested a simple lipid-based aqueous formulation containing a synthetic TLR4 ligand (GLA-AF) for its ability to enhance protection against H5N1 infection. GLA-AF was very effective in adjuvanting recombinant H5 hemagglutinin antigen (rH5) in mice and was as potent as the stable emulsion, SE. Both adjuvants induced similar antibody titers using a sub-microgram dose of rH5, and both conferred complete protection against a highly pathogenic H5N1 challenge. However, GLA-AF was the superior adjuvant in ferrets. GLA-AF stimulated a broader antibody response than SE after both the prime and boost immunization with rH5, and ferrets were better protected against homologous and heterologous strains of H5N1 virus. Thus, GLA-AF is a potent emulsion-free adjuvant that warrants consideration for pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:24551202

  20. Systemic neutralization of IL-17A significantly reduces breast cancer associated metastasis in arthritic mice by reducing CXCL12/SDF-1 expression in the metastatic niches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is normally associated with autoimmune arthritis and other pro-inflammatory conditions. Recently, IL-17A has emerged as a critical factor in enhancing breast cancer (BC)-associated metastases. We generated immune competent arthritic mouse models that develop spontaneous BC-associated bone and lung metastasis. Using these models, we have previously shown that neutralization of IL-17A resulted in significant reduction in metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism/s remains unknown. Methods We have utilized two previously published mouse models for this study: 1) the pro-arthritic mouse model (designated SKG) injected with metastatic BC cell line (4T1) in the mammary fat pad, and 2) the PyV MT mice that develop spontaneous mammary gland tumors injected with type II collagen to induce autoimmune arthritis. Mice were treated with anti-IL-17A neutralizing antibody and monitored for metastasis and assessed for pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with BC-associated metastasis. Results We first corroborate our previous finding that in vivo neutralization of IL-17A significantly reduced metastasis to the bones and lungs in both models. Next, we report that treatment with anti-IL17A antibody significantly reduced the expression of a key chemokine, CXCL12 (also known as stromal derived factor-1 (SDF - 1)) in the bones and lungs of treated mice. CXCL12 is a ligand for CXCR4 (expressed on BC cells) and their interaction is known to be critical for metastasis. Interestingly, levels of CXCR4 in the tumor remained unchanged with treatment. Consequently, protein lysates derived from the bones and lungs of treated mice were significantly less chemotactic for the BC cells than lysates from untreated mice; and addition of exogenous SDF-1 to the lysates from treated mice completely restored BC cell migration. In addition, cytokines such as IL-6 and M-CSF were significantly reduced in the lung and bone lysates

  1. CD23+/CD21hi B-cell translocation and ipsilateral lymph node collapse is associated with asymmetric arthritic flare in TNF-Tg mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with episodic flares in affected joints. However, how arthritic flare occurs only in select joints during a systemic autoimmune disease remains an enigma. To better understand these observations, we developed longitudinal imaging outcomes of synovitis and lymphatic flow in mouse models of RA, and identified that asymmetric knee flare is associated with ipsilateral popliteal lymph node (PLN) collapse and the translocation of CD23+/CD21hi B-cells (B-in) into the paracortical sinus space of the node. In order to understand the relationship between this B-in translocation and lymph drainage from flaring joints, we tested the hypothesis that asymmetric tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced knee arthritis is associated with ipsilateral PLN and iliac lymph node (ILN) collapse, B-in translocation, and decreased afferent lymphatic flow. Methods TNF transgenic (Tg) mice with asymmetric knee arthritis were identified by contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and PLN were phenotyped as "expanding" or "collapsed" using LNcap threshold = 30 (Arbitrary Unit (AU)). Inflammatory-erosive arthritis was confirmed by histology. Afferent lymphatic flow to PLN and ILN was quantified by near infrared imaging of injected indocyanine green (NIR-ICG). The B-in population in PLN and ILN was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Linear regression analyses of ipsilateral knee synovial volume and afferent lymphatic flow to PLN and ILN were performed. Results Afferent lymph flow to collapsed nodes was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than flow to expanding nodes by NIR-ICG imaging, and this occurred ipsilaterally. While both collapsed and expanding PLN and ILN had a significant increase (P < 0.05) of B-in compared to wild type (WT) and pre-arthritic TNF-Tg nodes, B-in of expanding lymph nodes (LN) resided in follicular areas while B-in of collapsed LN were present within LYVE-1+ lymphatic

  2. In vitro cytokine induction by TLR-activating vaccine adjuvants in human blood varies by age and adjuvant.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Simon D; Ganapathi, Lakshmi; Bergelson, Ilana; Dowling, David J; Banks, Michaela; Samuels, Ronald C; Reed, Steven G; Marshall, Jason D; Levy, Ofer

    2016-07-01

    Most infections occur in early life, prompting development of novel adjuvanted vaccines to protect newborns and infants. Several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (TLRAs) are components of licensed vaccine formulations or are in development as candidate adjuvants. However, the type and magnitude of immune responses to TLRAs may vary with the TLR activated as well as age and geographic location. Most notably, in newborns, as compared to adults, the immune response to TLRAs is polarized with lower Th1 cytokine production and robust Th2 and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. The ontogeny of TLR-mediated cytokine responses in international cohorts has been reported, but no study has compared cytokine responses to TLRAs between U.S. neonates and infants at the age of 6months. Both are critical age groups for the currently pediatric vaccine schedule. In this study, we report quantitative differences in the production of a panel of 14 cytokines and chemokines after in vitro stimulation of newborn cord blood and infant and adult peripheral blood with agonists of TLR4, including monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and glucopyranosyl lipid Adjuvant aqueous formulation (GLA-AF), as well as agonists of TLR7/8 (R848) and TLR9 (CpG). Both TLR4 agonists, MPLA and GLA-AF, induced greater concentrations of Th1 cytokines CXCL10, TNF and Interleukin (IL)-12p70 in infant and adult blood compared to newborn blood. All the tested TLRAs induced greater infant IFN-α2 production compared to newborn and adult blood. In contrast, CpG induced greater IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-12p40, IL-10 and CXCL8 in newborn than in infant and adult blood. Overall, to the extent that these in vitro studies mirror responses in vivo, our study demonstrates distinct age-specific effects of TLRAs that may inform their development as candidate adjuvants for early life vaccines. PMID:27081760

  3. [Menstrual abnormality in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant endocrine-chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yasumura, T; Oka, T; Honjo, H; Okada, H

    1988-10-01

    Menstrual status and ovarian function were studied in 24 premenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy and tamoxifen or chemotherapy alone. In 13 of 24 patients (54.1%), abnormal menses, including amenorrhea in 12 cases and oligomenorrhea in 1 case, developed during adjuvant therapy. In patients with abnormal menses, serum estradiol was significantly lower, and the levels of gonadotropins were significantly higher than in patients with normal menses. Among 13 patients with abnormal menses, 4 patients treated with cyclophosphamide revealed persistent amenorrhea during the whole period with adjuvant therapy, and the levels of serum estradiol and progesterone were extremely low. Furthermore, in these patients normal menses has not recovered and the levels of serum estradiol and progesterone remained low 4 to 5 months after cessation of cyclophosphamide administration. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy caused depression of ovarian function, and cyclophosphamide induced ovarian failure, resulting in complete amenorrhea.

  4. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for glycoproteins with innate and adaptive immune activating properties

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    There are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use, despite protection against many mucosally-transmitted infections probably requiring immunity at the site of pathogen entry1. Polyethyleneimines (PEI) are organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro, and gene and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo2, 3. Here we show that PEI has unexpected and unusually potent mucosal adjuvant activity in conjunction with viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. Single intranasal administration of influenza HA or HSV-2 gD with PEI elicited robust protection from otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen that were taken up by antigen presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted DC trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host dsDNA that triggered Irf-3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  5. Evaluation of mucoadhesive carrier adjuvant: toward an oral anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Pawar, Dilip; Agrawal, Udita; Jain, Arvind K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2014-02-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the potential of mucoadhesive alginate-coated chitosan microparticles (A-CHMp) for oral vaccine against anthrax. The zeta potential of A-CHMp was -29.7 mV, and alginate coating could prevent the burst release of antigen in simulated gastric fluid. The results indicated that A-CHMp was mucoadhesive in nature and transported it to the peyer's patch upon oral delivery. The immunization studies indicated that A-CHMp resulted in the induction of potent systemic and mucosal immune responses, whereas alum-adjuvanted rPA could induce only systemic immune response. Thus, A-CHMp represents a promising acid carrier adjuvant for oral immunization against anthrax.

  6. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations. PMID:27274998

  7. Vaccine adjuvants: putting innate immunity to work.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Robert L; Sher, Alan; Seder, Robert A

    2010-10-29

    Adjuvants enhance immunity to vaccines and experimental antigens by a variety of mechanisms. In the past decade, many receptors and signaling pathways in the innate immune system have been defined and these innate responses strongly influence the adaptive immune response. The focus of this review is to delineate the innate mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects. We highlight how adjuvants can be used to influence the magnitude and alter the quality of the adaptive response in order to provide maximum protection against specific pathogens. Despite the impressive success of currently approved adjuvants for generating immunity to viral and bacterial infections, there remains a need for improved adjuvants that enhance protective antibody responses, especially in populations that respond poorly to current vaccines. However, the larger challenge is to develop vaccines that generate strong T cell immunity with purified or recombinant vaccine antigens.

  8. ¹⁵³Sm-HM for arthritic knee pain. Estimated dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hardy-Pérez, Alberto E; Torres-García, Eugenio; Arteaga-de-Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-López, Martha; Mitsoura, Eleni; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely P

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthropathy and after cardiovascular diseases is the most disabling disease in developing countries. The dosimetry for the clinical application of 153-samarium-hydroxymacroaggregates (¹⁵³Sm-HM) for radiation synovectomy (RSV) and palliative treatment for arthritic pain, as far as we know, has not been reported. The aim of this research was to estimate the radiation dose necessary for synovial ablation and pain palliation with minimum risk to the patient. ¹⁵³Sm-HM (370 MBq) was administered intra-articularly in a patient with severe knee pain and hindered motility. Regions of interest drawn on sequential, conjugated, anterior and posterior scintigraphy images were used to obtain the respective activity. The data was entered into a knee joint histological-geometric model designed with micrometric dimensions to represent the synovial cell layers. The Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the absorbed dose in each of the 12 model-cells representing the distance from the synovial liquid to the cartilage or bone. The absorbed dose in the synovial cavity was 114 Gy which is sufficient energy for RSV. The treated patient referred little pain and higher motility with no adverse reactions. ¹⁵³Sm-HM is a potentially valid radiopharmaceutical for RSV, which effectively palliates knee pain.

  9. Comparison of radiographic arthritic changes associated with two variations of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, J A; Allen, D A; Wilson, E R; Tobias, T A; Shaiken, L G; Shiroma, J T; Biller, D S; Lehenbauer, T W

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) progresses in the canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficient stifle. Progression of OA is also documented in canine patients after various surgical repair techniques for this injury. We evaluated the radiographic arthritic changes in canine stifle joints that have sustained a CCL injury, and compared radiographic OA scores between Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO)surgery patients receiving a medial parapatellar exploratory arthrotomy for CCL remnant removal versus those receiving a limited caudal medial arthrotomy without removal of the CCL remnants. Medial/lateral and caudal/cranial stifle radiographs were obtained before surgery, immediately following TPLO surgery and at 7-38 months (mean 20.5) after surgery. Sixty-eight patients (72 stifles) were included in the study. The cases were divided into two groups. The patients in group 1 (n = 49 patients, 51 stifles) had a limited caudal medial arthrotomy, and patients in group 2 (n = 19 patients, 21 stifles) had a medial parapatellar open arthrotomy. A previously described radiographic osteoarthritis scoring system was used to quantify changes in both of the groups. The age, weight, OA scores, initial tibial plateau angle, final tibial plateau angle, and the change in angle were compared between the groups. The results showed that there was significantly less progression of OA in the group that had the limited caudal medial, arthrotomy, versus a medial parapatellar open arthrotomy. There was a significant advancement of the OA scores of patients that had TPLO surgery. PMID:16594211

  10. Resolvin D3 Is Dysregulated in Arthritis and Reduces Arthritic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Hildur H; Dalli, Jesmond; Norling, Lucy V; Colas, Romain A; Perretti, Mauro; Serhan, Charles N

    2016-09-15

    Uncontrolled inflammation is a unifying component of many chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Resolvins (Rvs) are a new family from the endogenous specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) that actively stimulate resolution of inflammation. In this study, using lipid mediator metabololipidomics with murine joints we found a temporal regulation of endogenous SPMs during self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. The SPMs present in self-resolving arthritic joints include the D-series Rvs, for example, RvD1, RvD2, RvD3, and RvD4. Of note, RvD3 levels were reduced in inflamed joints from mice with delayed-resolving arthritis when compared with self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. RvD3 was also reduced in serum from rheumatoid arthritis patients compared with healthy controls. RvD3 administration reduced joint leukocytes as well as paw joint eicosanoids, clinical scores, and edema. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for dysregulated endogenous RvD3 levels in inflamed paw joints and its potent actions in reducing murine arthritis. PMID:27534559

  11. Tibial torsion in non-arthritic Indian adults: A computer tomography study of 100 limbs

    PubMed Central

    Mullaji, Arun B; Sharma, Amit K; Marawar, Satyajit V; Kohli, AF

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of normal tibial torsion is mandatory during total knee replacement (TKR), deformity correction and fracture management of tibia. Different values of tibial torsion have been found in different races due to biological and mechanical factors. Value of normal tibial torsion in Indian limbs is not known, hence this study to determine the norm of tibial torsional value in normal Indian population. Materials and Methods: Computer tomography (CT) scans were performed in 100 non-arthritic limbs of 50 Indian adults (42 males, eight females; age 26-40 years). Value of tibial torsion was measured using dorsal tangent to tibial condyles proximally and bimalleolar axis distally. Results: Normal tibial torsion was found to be 21.6 ± 7.6 (range 4.8 to 39.5) with none of the values in internal rotation. Right tibia was externally rotated by 2 degrees as compared to the left side (P 0.029). No significant difference was found in male and female subjects. Value of tibial torsion was less than in Caucasian limbs, but was comparable to Japanese limbs when studies using similar measurement technique were compared. Conclusions: Indian limbs have less tibial torsion than Caucasian limbs but the value of tibial torsion is comparable to Japanese limbs. PMID:19753157

  12. Potent response of QS-21 as a vaccine adjuvant in the skin when delivered with the Nanopatch, resulted in adjuvant dose sparing

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hwee-Ing; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Depelsenaire, Alexandra C. I.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants play a key role in boosting immunogenicity of vaccines, particularly for subunit protein vaccines. In this study we investigated the induction of antibody response against trivalent influenza subunit protein antigen and a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Clinical trials of QS-21 have demonstrated the safety but, also a need of high dose for optimal immunity, which could possibly reduce patient acceptability. Here, we proposed the use of a skin delivery technology – the Nanopatch – to reduce both adjuvant and antigen dose but also retain its immune stimulating effects when compared to the conventional needle and syringe intramuscular (IM) delivery. We have demonstrated that Nanopatch delivery to skin requires only 1/100th of the IM antigen dose to induce equivalent humoral response. QS-21 enhanced humoral response in both skin and muscle route. Additionally, Nanopatch has demonstrated 30-fold adjuvant QS-21 dose sparing while retaining immune stimulating effects compared to IM. QS-21 induced localised, controlled cell death in the skin, suggesting that the danger signals released from dead cells contributed to the enhanced immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the suitability of reduced dose of QS-21 and the antigen using the Nanopatch to enhance humoral responses, and the potential to increase patient acceptability of QS-21 adjuvant. PMID:27404789

  13. Immunostimulatory Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing the CpG Motif are Effective as Immune Adjuvants in Tumor Antigen Immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, George J.; Liu, Hsin-Ming; Wooldridge, James E.; Dahle, Christopher E.; Krieg, Arthur M.

    1997-09-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the immune response are allowing for the logical design of new approaches to cancer immunization. One area of interest is the development of new immune adjuvants. Immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides containing the CpG motif (CpG ODN) can induce production of a wide variety of cytokines and activate B cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and NK cells. Using the 38C13 B cell lymphoma model, we assessed whether CpG ODN can function as immune adjuvants in tumor antigen immunization. The idiotype served as the tumor antigen. Select CpG ODN were as effective as complete Freund's adjuvant at inducing an antigen-specific antibody response but were associated with less toxicity. These CpG ODN induced a higher titer of antigen-specific IgG2a than did complete Freund's adjuvant, suggesting an enhanced TH1 response. Mice immunized with CpG ODN as an adjuvant were protected from tumor challenge to a degree similar to that seen in mice immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant. We conclude that CpG ODN are effective as immune adjuvants and are attractive as part of a tumor immunization strategy.

  14. Adjuvants are Key Factors for the Development of Future Vaccines: Lessons from the Finlay Adjuvant Platform

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Oliver; Romeu, Belkis; Cabrera, Osmir; González, Elizabeth; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Labrada, Alexis; Pérez, Rocmira; Reyes, Laura M.; Ramírez, Wendy; Sifontes, Sergio; Fernández, Nelson; Lastre, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines against neglected diseases, especially those associated with poverty and social deprivation, is urgently needed. Modern vaccine technologies and a better understanding of the immune response have provided scientists with the tools for rational and safer design of subunit vaccines. Often, however, subunit vaccines do not elicit strong immune responses, highlighting the need to incorporate better adjuvants; this step therefore becomes a key factor for vaccine development. In this review we outline some key features of modern vaccinology that are linked with the development of better adjuvants. In line with the increased desire to obtain novel adjuvants for future vaccines, the Finlay Adjuvant Platform offers a novel approach for the development of new and effective adjuvants. The Finlay Adjuvants (AFs), AFPL (proteoliposome), and AFCo (cochleate), were initially designed for parenteral and mucosal applications, and constitute potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1 responses against several antigens. This review summarizes the status of the Finlay technology in producing promising adjuvants for unsolved-vaccine diseases including mucosal approaches and therapeutic vaccines. Ideas related to adjuvant classification, adjuvant selection, and their possible influence on innate recognition via multiple toll-like receptors are also discussed. PMID:24348475

  15. Head-to-head comparison of protocol modifications for the generation of collagen-induced arthritis in a specific-pathogen free facility using DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Sherry; Strait, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a widely used mouse model for studying inflammatory arthritis (IA). However, CIA induction protocols differ between laboratories, and direct comparison between protocol variations has not been reported. To address this issue, DBA/1 mice housed in conventional and specific-pathogen free (SPF) facilities were administered various combinations of two doses of collagen type II (CII) in complete (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA); some mice were also injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or additional CII at specific intervals. Mice were evaluated for IA over the subsequent 2 months. Depending directly on the combination of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS used, the incidence of IA ranged between 20%-100%, and severity extended from mild to severe even in an SPF environment. Our results demonstrate for the first time in head-to-head comparisons that specific variations in the use of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS can induce a range of arthritic disease intensity and severity in an SPF facility. Thus, distinct experimental settings can be designed for robust assessment of factors that either exacerbate or inhibit arthritis pathogenesis. Furthermore, by achieving 100% incidence in an SPF facility, the protocols provide a practical and humane benefit by reducing the number of mice necessary for experimental assessment. PMID:26956089

  16. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as antigen carriers and adjuvants for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Donna; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2013-06-21

    Vaccines have been at the forefront of improving human health for over two centuries. The challenges faced in developing effective vaccines flow from complexities associated with the immune system and requirement of an efficient and safe adjuvant to induce a strong adaptive immune response. Development of an efficient vaccine formulation requires careful selection of a potent antigen, efficient adjuvant and route of delivery. Adjuvants are immunological agents that activate the antigen presenting cells (APCs) and elicit a strong immune response. In the past decade, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) has gained significant attention as potential delivery vehicles for various biomolecules. In this review, we aim to highlight the potential of MSNs as vaccine delivery vehicles and their ability to act as adjuvants. We have provided an overview on the latest progress on synthesis, adsorption and release kinetics and biocompatibility of MSNs as next generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. A comprehensive summary on the ability of MSNs to deliver antigens and elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses is provided. Finally, we give insight on fundamental challenges and some future prospects of these nanoparticles as adjuvants. PMID:23657437

  17. Flagellin A Toll-Like Receptor 5 Agonist as an Adjuvant in Chicken Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Deb, Rajib; Chellappa, Madhan Mohan; Dey, Sohini

    2014-01-01

    Chicken raised under commercial conditions are vulnerable to environmental exposure to a number of pathogens. Therefore, regular vaccination of the flock is an absolute requirement to prevent the occurrence of infectious diseases. To combat infectious diseases, vaccines require inclusion of effective adjuvants that promote enhanced protection and do not cause any undesired adverse reaction when administered to birds along with the vaccine. With this perspective in mind, there is an increased need for effective better vaccine adjuvants. Efforts are being made to enhance vaccine efficacy by the use of suitable adjuvants, particularly Toll-like receptor (TLR)-based adjuvants. TLRs are among the types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize conserved pathogen molecules. A number of studies have documented the effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant as well as its ability to promote cytokine production by a range of innate immune cells. This minireview summarizes our current understanding of flagellin action, its role in inducing cytokine response in chicken cells, and the potential use of flagellin as well as its combination with other TLR ligands as an adjuvant in chicken vaccines. PMID:24451328

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as antigen carriers and adjuvants for vaccine delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Karishma T.; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Donna; Cavallaro, Antonino S.; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2013-05-01

    Vaccines have been at the forefront of improving human health for over two centuries. The challenges faced in developing effective vaccines flow from complexities associated with the immune system and requirement of an efficient and safe adjuvant to induce a strong adaptive immune response. Development of an efficient vaccine formulation requires careful selection of a potent antigen, efficient adjuvant and route of delivery. Adjuvants are immunological agents that activate the antigen presenting cells (APCs) and elicit a strong immune response. In the past decade, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) has gained significant attention as potential delivery vehicles for various biomolecules. In this review, we aim to highlight the potential of MSNs as vaccine delivery vehicles and their ability to act as adjuvants. We have provided an overview on the latest progress on synthesis, adsorption and release kinetics and biocompatibility of MSNs as next generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. A comprehensive summary on the ability of MSNs to deliver antigens and elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses is provided. Finally, we give insight on fundamental challenges and some future prospects of these nanoparticles as adjuvants.

  19. Xylaria hypoxylon Lectin as Adjuvant Elicited Tfh Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Zuo, Y; Guo, Q; Wang, H; Liu, Q; Liu, Q; Xia, G; Kang, Y

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) caused by FMD virus (FMDV) is a major health and economic problem in the farming industry. Vaccination of livestock against this highly infectious viral disease is crucial, and inactivated FMD vaccine has been effective at controlling infection. However, accumulated data show that the inactivated vaccine generates weak immune responses and that the oil formulation results in undesirable side effects. Mushroom lectins have recently been shown to display adjuvant effects when incorporated into DNA vaccines. In this study, to enhance the cellular immune response of FMDV antigen (146S), C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 146S combined with Xylaria hypoxylon lectin (XHL). The oil formulation (146S/Oil) was served as control group. Strong humoral immune responses were elicited in mice immunized with 146S/XHL as shown by high 146S antigen-specific IgG levels, and also in 146S/Oil group. Interestingly, XHL in conjunction with inactivated FMD vaccine activated strong Th1 and Tc1 cell responses, especially Tfh cell responses, in immunized mice. XHL stimulated dendritic cell maturation by upregulating expression of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) molecules and co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 in immunized mice. No XHL-specific IgG or inflammatory factors were detected indicating the safety of XHL as an adjuvant. Taken together, these results suggest the effectiveness of XHL at inducing cellular immune responses and therefore confirm its suitability as an adjuvant for inactivated FMD vaccine.

  20. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Optimization of physiological properties of hydroxyapatite as a vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Aoshi, Taiki; Kogai, Yasumichi; Nomi, Daisuke; Haseda, Yasunari; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-01-12

    Various particles such as Alum or silica are known to act as an adjuvant if co-administered with vaccine antigens. Several reports have demonstrated that the adjuvanticity is strongly affected by the physicochemical properties of particles such as the size, shape and surface charge, although the required properties and its relationship to the adjuvanticity are still controversial. Hydroxyapatite particle (HAp) composed of calcium phosphate has been shown to work as adjuvant in mice. However, the properties of HAp required for the adjuvanticity have not been fully characterized yet. In this study, we examined the role of size or shape of HAps in the antibody responses after immunization with antigen. HAps whose diameter ranging between 100 and 400 nm provided significantly higher antibody responses than smaller or larger ones. By comparison between sphere and rod shaped HAps, rod shaped HAps induced stronger inflammasome-dependent IL-1β production than the sphere shaped ones in vitro. However, sphere- and rod-shaped HAp elicited comparable antibody response in WT mice. Vice versa, Nlrp3(-/-), Asc(-/-) or Caspase1(-/-) mice provided comparable level of antibody responses to HAp adjuvanted vaccination. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the size rather than shape is a more critical property, and IL-1β production via NLRP3 inflammasome is dispensable for the adjuvanticity of HAps in mice. PMID:26667613

  2. Vaccine adjuvants--understanding molecular mechanisms to improve vaccines.

    PubMed

    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna; Barakat, Khaled; Zand, Martin; Levin, Aviad; Vollmer, Madeleine; Weisser, Maja; Khanna, Nina; Kumar, Deepali; Tyrrell, Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Battegay, Manuel; O'Shea, Daire

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pathogens are responsible for high utilisation of healthcare resources globally. Attributable morbidity and mortality remains exceptionally high. Vaccines offer the potential to prime a pathogen-specific immune response and subsequently reduce disease burden. Routine vaccination has fundamentally altered the natural history of many frequently observed and serious infections. Vaccination is also recommended for persons at increased risk of severe vaccine-preventable disease. Many current nonadjuvanted vaccines are poorly effective in the elderly and immunocompromised populations, resulting in nonprotective postvaccine antibody titres, which serve as surrogate markers for protection. The vaccine-induced immune response is influenced by: (i.) vaccine factors i.e., type and composition of the antigen(s), (ii.) host factors i.e., genetic differences in immune-signalling or senescence, and (iii.) external factors such as immunosuppressive drugs or diseases. Adjuvanted vaccines offer the potential to compensate for a lack of stimulation and improve pathogen-specific protection. In this review we use influenza vaccine as a model in a discussion of the different mechanisms of action of the available adjuvants. In addition, we will appraise new approaches using "vaccine-omics" to discover novel types of adjuvants.

  3. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Škrnjug, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity – a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines. PMID:25295996

  4. Vaccine adjuvants--understanding molecular mechanisms to improve vaccines.

    PubMed

    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna; Barakat, Khaled; Zand, Martin; Levin, Aviad; Vollmer, Madeleine; Weisser, Maja; Khanna, Nina; Kumar, Deepali; Tyrrell, Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Battegay, Manuel; O'Shea, Daire

    2014-01-01

    Infectious pathogens are responsible for high utilisation of healthcare resources globally. Attributable morbidity and mortality remains exceptionally high. Vaccines offer the potential to prime a pathogen-specific immune response and subsequently reduce disease burden. Routine vaccination has fundamentally altered the natural history of many frequently observed and serious infections. Vaccination is also recommended for persons at increased risk of severe vaccine-preventable disease. Many current nonadjuvanted vaccines are poorly effective in the elderly and immunocompromised populations, resulting in nonprotective postvaccine antibody titres, which serve as surrogate markers for protection. The vaccine-induced immune response is influenced by: (i.) vaccine factors i.e., type and composition of the antigen(s), (ii.) host factors i.e., genetic differences in immune-signalling or senescence, and (iii.) external factors such as immunosuppressive drugs or diseases. Adjuvanted vaccines offer the potential to compensate for a lack of stimulation and improve pathogen-specific protection. In this review we use influenza vaccine as a model in a discussion of the different mechanisms of action of the available adjuvants. In addition, we will appraise new approaches using "vaccine-omics" to discover novel types of adjuvants. PMID:24844935

  5. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winter, M C; Coleman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, significantly reduce the risk of skeletal complications in metastatic bone disease and also prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL). However, more recently, there has been increasing data indicating that bisphosphonates exhibit anti-tumour activity, possibly via both indirect and direct effects, and can potentially modify the metastatic disease process providing more than just supportive care. The evidence from previous studies of an anti-tumour effect of bisphosphonates was inconclusive, with conflicting evidence from adjuvant oral clodronate trials. However, more recent trials using zoledronic acid have shown benefits in terms of disease-free and overall survival outcomes in certain subgroups, most evidently in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression, and in women in established menopause at trial entry. In the adjuvant setting, the use of bisphosphonates has also been focused on the prevention and treatment of CTIBL and recent guidelines have defined treatment strategies for CTIBL. The role of bisphosphonates in CTIBL in early breast cancer is well defined. There have been mixed results from large adjuvant metastasis-prevention studies of bisphosphonates, but there are strong signals from large subgroups analyses of randomised phase III trials suggesting significant anti-tumour beneficial effects in specific patient populations.

  6. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  7. Freund's adjuvants: relationship of arthritogenicity and adjuvanticity in rats to vehicle composition

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, M. W.; Orr, K. J.; Beck, Frances W. J.; Pearson, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Over a hundred compounds and natural materials were examined for their ability to induce arthritis in rats when mixed with heat-killed delipidated Mycobacteria tuberculosis. Many of these materials were also assessed for (CMI) adjuvant activity by their ability to induce allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats when mixed with guinea-pig spinal cord, both with and without added M. tuberculosis. Cyclization and/or the presence of oxygen atoms, or double bonds reduced (or abolished) the arthritogenic potential and adjuvanticity of alkanes>C10. Esters/triglycerides of fatty acids >C12, retinol acetate (not palmitate) and vitamins E and K showed co-arthritogenic and adjuvant activity. Other active lipids included squalene and cholesterol oleate, which are both present in human sebum. Sebaceous lipids may therefore perhaps function as natural adjuvants if resorbed during abrasion and infection. Squalane (perhydrosqualene), pristane and hexadecane were excellent substitutes for mineral oil in preparing arthritogenic adjuvants from various mycobacteria, C. rubrum and N. asteroides. These oily compounds were also very effective adjuvants per se, in the absence of bacterial material or emulsifier, for inducing EAE in Lewis rats. PMID:4214125

  8. Inhibition by Artocarpus tonkinensis of the development of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, D D T; Catrina, A I; Lundberg, K; Harris, H E; Ha, N T; Anh, P T; Larsson, P

    2005-03-01

    Extracts of the leaves and roots from the tree Artocarpus tonkinensis A Cheval (family Moraceae) are used in traditional Vietnamese medicine in order to treat backache as well as rheumatic joint diseases. We prepared an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract from this plant and tested its anti-inflammatory properties in an experimental arthritis model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in Dark Agouti rats by means of immunization with collagen type II (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Starting at the day of immunization, the rats were treated daily with intraperitoneal injections of Artocarpus extract. Arthritis progression was measured by means of clinical scoring of paws and anti-CII antibody titres were measured by means of ELISA. In vitro, lymph node (LN) cell cultures were treated with Artocarpus extract and the apoptosis-inducing effect was determined with FACS staining by using annexin V and propidium iodide as well as the TUNEL method. Treatment of the rats with Artocarpus extract decreased arthritis incidence and severity and delayed disease onset. When treatment was started after the onset of arthritis, a tendency towards arthritis amelioration was observed. In vitro, Artocarpus extract acted as a T-cell modulator, inhibiting mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated LN-derived lymphocytes. Thus, we have demonstrated that an EtOAc extract of Artocarpus, a plant traditionally used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating arthritic conditions, has beneficial effects in an experimental arthritis model. This effect is likely to be T cell-dependent and mediated through apoptosis induction in activated cells.

  9. Relative contribution of contact and complement activation to inflammatory reactions in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Abbink, J J; Kamp, A M; Nuijens, J H; Erenberg, A J; Swaak, A J; Hack, C E

    1992-10-01

    Although both the complement and contact system are thought to contribute to the inflammatory reaction in arthritic joints, only activation of complement has so far been well established, whereas contact activation and its contribution to arthritis has not been systematically explored. Complement and contact activation were assessed in 71 patients with inflammatory arthropathies and 11 with osteoarthritis using sensitive assays for C3a, and C1-inhibitor (C1INH)-kallikrein and C1INH-factor XIIa complexes respectively. Increased plasma concentrations of kallikrein-and factor XIIa-C1INH complexes were found in two and seven of the 71 patients with inflammatory arthropathies, respectively, and in none of the patients with osteoarthritis. Increased synovial fluid concentrations of kallikrein and factor XIIa complexes occurred in 13 and 15 patients with inflammatory joint diseases respectively, and in two patients with osteoarthritis. Contact system parameters did not correlate with clinical symptoms, local activity, or neutrophil activation. In contrast, synovial fluid concentrations of C3a and C1INH-C1 complexes were increased in all patients and in 20 patients with inflammatory arthropathies respectively, and were higher in patients with a higher local activity score. Synovial fluid C3a correlated with parameters of neutrophil activation such as lactoferrin. Increased plasma concentrations of C3a and C1INH-C1 complexes occurred in 13 and 11 patients with inflammatory joint diseases, and in one and two patients with osteoarthritis respectively. Plasma concentrations of C3a correlated with the number of painful joints. Thus contact activation occurs only sporadically in patients with arthritis and contributes little if anything to the local inflammatory reaction and neutrophil activation. These latter events are significantly related to the extent of complement activation.

  10. Efficacy and safety of glycosylated undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in therapy of arthritic dogs.

    PubMed

    Deparle, L A; Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Goad, J T; D'Altilio, M; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2005-08-01

    DeParle L. A., Gupta R. C., Canerdy T. D., Goad J. T., D'Altilio M., Bagchi M., Bagchi D. Efficacy and safety of glycosylated undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in therapy of arthritic dogs. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.28, 385-390. In large breed dogs, arthritis is very common because of obesity, injury, aging, immune disorder, or genetic predispositions. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of undenatured type-II collagen (UC-II) in obese-arthritic dogs. Fifteen dogs in three groups received either no UC-II (Group I) or UC-II with 1 mg/day (Group II) or 10 mg/day (Group III) for 90 days. Lameness and pain were measured on a weekly basis for 120 days (90 days treatment plus 30 days post-treatment). Blood samples were assayed for creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (markers of renal injury); and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (evidence of hepatic injury). Dogs receiving 1 mg or 10 mg UC-II/day for 90 days showed significant declines in overall pain and pain during limb manipulation and lameness after physical exertion, with 10 mg showed greater improvement. At either dose of UC-II, no adverse effects were noted and no significant changes were noted in serum chemistry, suggesting that UC-II was well tolerated. In addition, dogs receiving UC-II for 90 days showed increased physical activity level. Following UC-II withdrawal for a period of 30 days, all dogs experienced a relapse of overall pain, exercise-associated lameness, and pain upon limb manipulation. These results suggest that daily treatment of arthritic dogs with UC-II ameliorates signs and symptoms of arthritis, and UC-II is well tolerated as no adverse effects were noted. PMID:16050819

  11. Sex hormone adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M

    2000-11-01

    , particularly as adjuvant treatment. Interestingly, the increase in serum androgen metabolism induced by RA treatment with CSA should be regarded as a possible marker of androgen-mediated immune-suppressive activities exerted by CSA, at least in RA and at the level of sensitive target cells and tissues (i.e., synovial macrophages). The absence of altered serum levels of estrogens in RA patients and the reported immune-enhancing properties exerted by female hormones have represented a poor stimulus to test estrogen replacement therapy in RA. The different results obtained with OC use seem to depend on dose-related effects and the different type of response to estrogens in relation to the cytokine balance between Th1 cells (cellular immunity, i.e., RA) and Th2 cells (humoral immunity, i.e., SLE). The androgen replacement obtained directly (i.e., testosterone, DHT, DHEAS) or indirectly (i.e., antiestrogens) may represent a valuable concomitant or adjuvant treatment to be associated with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (i.e., MTX, CSA) in the management of RA.

  12. Therapeutic Efficacy and Safety of Undenatured Type II Collagen Singly or in Combination with Glucosamine and Chondroitin in Arthritic Dogs.

    PubMed

    D'Altilio, M; Peal, A; Alvey, M; Simms, C; Curtsinger, A; Gupta, R C; Canerdy, T D; Goad, J T; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of glycosylated undenatured type II collagen (UC-II) alone or in combination with glucosamine HCl and chondroitin sulfate in arthritic dogs. Twenty dogs divided into four groups (n = 5) were daily treated orally for 120 days: group I, placebo; group II, 10 mg UC-II; group III, 2,000 mg glucosamine + 1,600 mg chondroitin; group IV, UC-II (10 mg) + glucosamine (2,000 mg) + chondroitin (1,600 mg), followed by a 30-day withdrawal period. On a monthly basis, dogs were examined for overall pain, pain upon limb manipulation, and exercise-associated lameness. Serum samples were analyzed for markers of liver function (ALT and bilirubin) and renal function (BUN and creatinine). Body weight was also measured at a monthly interval. Dogs in group I exhibited no change in arthritic conditions. Dogs receiving UC-II alone showed significant reductions in overall pain within 30 days (33%) and pain upon limb manipulation and exercise-associated lameness after 60 days (66% and 44%, respectively) of treatment. Maximum reductions in pain were noted after 120 days of treatment (overall pain reduction, 62%; pain reduction upon limb manipulation, 91%; and reduction in exercise-associated lameness, 78%). The overall activity of the dogs in the UC-II supplemented with glucosamine and chondroitin group (group IV) was significantly better than the glucosamine + chondroitin-supplemented group (group III). Glucosamine and chondroitin alleviated some pain, but in combination with UC-II (group IV) provided significant reductions in overall pain (57%), pain upon limb manipulation (53%), and exercise-associated lameness (53%). Following withdrawal of supplements, all dogs (groups II to IV) experienced a relapse of pain. None of the dogs in any groups showed any adverse effects or change in liver or kidney function markers or body weight. Data of this placebo-controlled study demonstrate that daily treatment

  13. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  14. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  15. In silico identified CCR4 antagonists target regulatory T cells and exert adjuvant activity in vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Tchilian, Elma Z; Davies, Matthew N; Forbes, Emily K; Draper, Simon J; Kaveri, Srini V; Hill, Adrian V S; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Beverley, Peter C L; Flower, Darren R; Tough, David F

    2008-07-22

    Adjuvants are substances that enhance immune responses and thus improve the efficacy of vaccination. Few adjuvants are available for use in humans, and the one that is most commonly used (alum) often induces suboptimal immunity for protection against many pathogens. There is thus an obvious need to develop new and improved adjuvants. We have therefore taken an approach to adjuvant discovery that uses in silico modeling and structure-based drug-design. As proof-of-principle we chose to target the interaction of the chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 with their receptor CCR4. CCR4 was posited as an adjuvant target based on its expression on CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), which negatively regulate immune responses induced by dendritic cells (DC), whereas CCL17 and CCL22 are chemotactic agents produced by DC, which are crucial in promoting contact between DC and CCR4(+) T cells. Molecules identified by virtual screening and molecular docking as CCR4 antagonists were able to block CCL22- and CCL17-mediated recruitment of human Tregs and Th2 cells. Furthermore, CCR4 antagonists enhanced DC-mediated human CD4(+) T cell proliferation in an in vitro immune response model and amplified cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo in experimental models when injected in combination with either Modified Vaccinia Ankara expressing Ag85A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MVA85A) or recombinant hepatitis B virus surface antigen (rHBsAg) vaccines. The significant adjuvant activity observed provides good evidence supporting our hypothesis that CCR4 is a viable target for rational adjuvant design. PMID:18621704

  16. Cost–utility of adjuvant zoledronic acid in patients with breast cancer and low estrogen levels

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, N.W.D.; Skedgel, C.; Rayson, D.; Younis, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant zoledronic acid (za) appears to improve disease-free survival (dfs) in women with early-stage breast cancer and low levels of estrogen (lle) because of induced or natural menopause. Characterizing the cost–utility (cu) of this therapy could help to determine its role in clinical practice. Methods Using the perspective of the Canadian health care system, we examined the cu of adjuvant endocrine therapy with or without za in women with early-stage endocrine-sensitive breast cancer and lle. A Markov model was used to compute the cumulative costs in Canadian dollars and the quality-adjusted life-years (qalys) gained from each adjuvant strategy, discounted at a rate of 5% annually. The model incorporated the dfs and fracture benefits of adjuvant za. Probabilistic and one-way sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine key model parameters. Results Compared with a no-za strategy, adjuvant za in the induced and natural menopause groups was associated with, respectively, $7,825 and $7,789 in incremental costs and 0.46 and 0.34 in qaly gains for cu ratios of $17,007 and $23,093 per qaly gained. In one-way sensitivity analyses, the results were most sensitive to changes in the za dfs benefit. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis suggested a 100% probability of adjuvant za being a cost-effective strategy at a threshold of $100,000 per qaly gained. Conclusions Based on available data, adjuvant za appears to be a cost-effective strategy in women with endocrine-sensitive breast cancer and lle, having cu ratios well below accepted thresholds. PMID:26300674

  17. Local innate immune responses in the vaccine adjuvant-injected muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inducing a high magnitude of antibodies, possibly in combination with T-cell responses that offer epitope breadth over prolonged periods of time is likely a prerequisite for effective vaccines against severe diseases such as HIV-1 infection, malaria and tuberculosis. A much better understanding of the innate immune mechanisms that are critical for inducing desired responses to vaccination would help in the design of novel vaccines. The majority of human vaccines are administered into the muscle. In this brief review, we focus on the initial innate immune events that occur locally at the site of intramuscular vaccine delivery, and how they are influenced by clinically approved vaccine adjuvants. In particular, the effects on cell mobilization, cell activation and vaccine antigen uptake are reviewed. Understanding how distinct adjuvants enhance and tailor vaccine responses would facilitate the selection of the best-suited adjuvant to improve vaccine efficacy to a given pathogen. PMID:27195117

  18. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials’ physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25483497

  19. Adjuvant therapy after surgical stone management.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Michael N; Monga, Manoj; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the most widely researched adjuvant medical therapies for the surgical management of urolithiasis. Articles were identified and reviewed from PubMed and Medline databases with MeSH headings focusing on the various surgical treatments of urolithiasis and adjuvant therapy. Additional articles were retrieved from references and conference proceedings. Surgical treatments reviewed included shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Adjuvant therapy was considered medical or complementary therapy as an adjunct to these surgical interventions. Adjuvant therapy for the surgical management of urolithiasis has been documented to increase stone-free rates, reduce stone remission rates, prevent renal damage, and decrease postoperative morbidity. A variety of agents have been studied, ranging from antioxidants to alpha-blockers and to alkalinizing agents. Additionally, there is increasing interest in complementary adjuvant therapy (ie, acupuncture). Adjuvant therapy is a fertile area for research in the surgical management of urolithiasis. The optimal agents have yet to be determined and therefore further investigation is warranted and necessary.

  20. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  1. Formulation, High Throughput In Vitro Screening and In Vivo Functional Characterization of Nanoemulsion-Based Intranasal Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pamela T.; Leroueil, Pascale R.; Smith, Douglas M.; Ciotti, Susan; Bielinska, Anna U.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Mullen, Catherine H.; Groom, Jeffrey V.; Taylor, Erin M.; Passmore, Crystal; Makidon, Paul E.; O’Konek, Jessica J.; Myc, Andrzej; Hamouda, Tarek; Baker, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants have been reported to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity when applied to mucosal surfaces and this dual response appears important for protection against certain pathogens. Despite the potential advantages, however, no mucosal adjuvants are currently approved for human use. Evaluating compounds as mucosal adjuvants is a slow and costly process due to the need for lengthy animal immunogenicity studies. We have constructed a library of 112 intranasal adjuvant candidate formulations consisting of oil-in-water nanoemulsions that contain various cationic and nonionic surfactants. To facilitate adjuvant development we first evaluated this library in a series of high-throughput, in vitro assays for activities associated with innate and adaptive immune activation in vivo. These in vitro assays screened for the ability of the adjuvant to bind to mucin, induce cytotoxicity, facilitate antigen uptake in epithelial and dendritic cells, and activate cellular pathways. We then sought to determine how these parameters related to adjuvant activity in vivo. While the in vitro assays alone were not enough to predict the in vivo adjuvant activity completely, several interesting relationships were found with immune responses in mice. Furthermore, by varying the physicochemical properties of the surfactant components (charge, surfactant polar head size and hydrophobicity) and the surfactant blend ratio of the formulations, the strength and type of the immune response generated (TH1, TH2, TH17) could be modulated. These findings suggest the possibility of using high-throughput screens to aid in the design of custom adjuvants with unique immunological profiles to match specific mucosal vaccine applications. PMID:25962136

  2. Self-adjuvanting synthetic antitumor vaccines from MUC1 glycopeptides conjugated to T-cell epitopes from tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Chen, Mei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Yi; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Kunz, Horst; Li, Yan-Mei

    2013-06-01

    The T-helper epitope peptide P30 (green in the scheme) from tetanus toxoid was used as the immunostimulant in MUC1 glycopeptide antitumor vaccines and apparently also acts as a built-in adjuvant. P30-conjugated glycopeptide vaccines containing three glycans in the immunodominant motifs PDTRP and GSTAP induced much stronger immune responses and complement dependent cytotoxicity mediated killing of tumor cells when applied in plain PBS solution without complete Freund's adjuvant.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of a methanol extract from Vitellaria paradoxa stem bark

    PubMed Central

    Foyet, Harquin Simplice; Tsala, David Emery; Zogo Essono Bodo, J.C; Carine, Azanfack Name; Heroyne, Lissia Toussoumna; Oben, Eyong Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitellaria paradoxa is a traditional medicinal plant of Cameroon. Several studies on this plant have focused on the cosmetic profile of its fruits. The present study focuses on the anti-inflammatory potency of stem barks extract of this plant. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of V. paradoxa (VPME) stem barks on inflammatory response in rats. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of VPME were evaluated in acute and chronic (28 days) inflammation induced in Wistar albino rats. The effects on hyperalgesia and locomotors activity were also quantified. The relative weight of lymphoid organs was obtained as well as some hematological parameters. Results: In the carrageenan-induced inflammation, VPME (75 mg/kg) exhibited a significant (66.67%) inhibition after 1 h. On the complete Freund's adjuvant-induced rheumatoid arthritis, VPME showed a significant protective effect with 8.12% inflammation against 25.00% for the control group after 2 days of the treatment. The extract (75 and 150 mg/kg) significantly reduced the score of arthritis with a maximum obtained on day 19th of the experimentation. There was a significant increase in the reaction time of rats on the hot plate as well as the exploratory activities of the animals in the open field. This extract significantly prevented weight, hemoglobin and red blood cells losses, and spleen hypertrophy. A protective action against skin destruction and cartilage erosion was evident. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the extract revealed the presence of catechins. Conclusions: These findings suggested that V. paradoxa may contribute to the reduction of the inflammatory response. PMID:26692752

  4. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  5. Induction of interleukin 1 secretion by adjuvant-active peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, F; Guenounou, M; Nauciel, C

    1983-01-01

    The ability of differently structured, purified peptidoglycans (PG) to induce interleukin 1 (IL1) secretion was compared. PG from Bacillus megaterium and Staphylococcus aureus stimulated the production of IL1 by mouse peritoneal macrophages and human adherent mononuclear cells, whereas PG from Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Corynebacterium poinsettiae were inactive. There was a correlation between the ability of PG to induce IL1 secretion and previously demonstrated immunoenhancing activities (adjuvant effect, increase of resistance to tumor growth) of PG. PG solubilization by lysozyme decreased but did not abolish the PG effect on IL1 secretion. Active PG induced IL1 production in nude mice and in the C3H/HeJ strain (which is unresponsive to lipopolysaccharides). PMID:6605929

  6. Unmet needs in modern vaccinology: adjuvants to improve the immune response.

    PubMed

    Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2010-08-31

    The key objective of vaccination is the induction of an effective pathogen-specific immune response that leads to protection against infection and/or disease caused by that pathogen, and that may ultimately result in its eradication from humanity. The concept that the immune response to pathogen antigens can be improved by the addition of certain compounds into the vaccine formulation was demonstrated about one hundred years ago when aluminium salts were introduced. New vaccine technology has led to vaccines containing highly purified antigens with improved tolerability and safety profiles, but the immune response they induce is suboptimal without the help of adjuvants. In parallel, the development of effective vaccines has been facing more and more important challenges linked to complicated pathogens (e.g. malaria, TB, HIV, etc.) and/or to subjects with conditions that jeopardize the induction or persistence of a protective immune response. A greater understanding of innate and adaptive immunity and their close interaction at the molecular level is yielding insights into the possibility of selectively stimulating immunological pathways to obtain the desired immune response. The better understanding of the mechanism of 'immunogenicity' and 'adjuvanticity' has prompted the research of new vaccine design based on new technologies, such as naked DNA or live vector vaccines and the new adjuvant approaches. Adjuvants can be used to enhance the magnitude and affect the type of the antigen-specific immune response, and the combination of antigens with more than one adjuvant, the so called adjuvant system approach, has been shown to allow the development of vaccines with the ability to generate effective immune responses adapted to both the pathogen and the target population. This review focuses on the adjuvants and adjuvant systems currently in use in vaccines, future applications, and the remaining challenges the field is facing. PMID:20713254

  7. Effects of adjuvant Montanide™ ISA 763 A VG in rainbow trout injection vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Rzgar M; Chettri, Jiwan K; Dalsgaard, Inger; Al-Jubury, Azmi; Kania, Per W; Skov, Jakob; Buchmann, Kurt

    2015-12-01

    Enteric redmouth disease (ERM) caused by the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri is a major threat to freshwater production of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) throughout all life stages. Injection vaccination of rainbow trout against Y. ruckeri infection has been shown to confer better protection compared to the traditionally applied immersion vaccination. It may be hypothesized, based on experience from other vaccines, that adjuvants may increase the protective level of ERM injection vaccines even more. Controlled comparative vaccination studies have been performed to investigate effects of the oil adjuvant Montanide™ ISA 763 A VG (Seppic) when added to an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin (containing both biotype 1 and 2 of serotype O1). A total of 1000 fish with mean weight 19 g was divided into five different groups (in duplicated tanks 2 × 100 fish per group) 1) non-vaccinated control fish (NonVac), 2) fish injected with a commercial vaccine (AquaVac(®) Relera™) (ComVac), 3) fish injected with an experimental vaccine (ExpVac), 4) fish injected with an experimental vaccine + adjuvant (ExpVacAdj) and 5) fish injected with adjuvant alone (Adj). Injection of the experimental vaccine (both adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted) induced a significantly higher antibody (IgM) level, increased occurrence of IgM(+) cells in spleen tissue and significant up-regulation of several immune genes. Additional experiments using a higher challenge dosage suggested an immune enhancing effect of the adjuvant as the challenge produced 100% mortality in the NonVac group, 60% mortality in both of ComVac and Adj groups and only 13 and 2.5% mortalities in the ExpVac and the ExpVacAdj groups, respectively.

  8. Inflammatory responses and side effects generated by several adjuvant-containing vaccines in turbot.

    PubMed

    Noia, M; Domínguez, B; Leiro, J; Blanco-Méndez, J; Luzardo-Álvarez, A; Lamas, J

    2014-05-01

    Several of the adjuvants used in fish vaccines cause adhesions in internal organs when they are injected intraperitoneally. We describe the damage caused by vaccines containing different adjuvants in the turbot Scophthalmus maximus and show that internal adhesions can be greatly reduced by injecting the fish in a specific way. Injection of fish with the needle directed towards the anterior part of the peritoneal cavity induced formation of a single cell-vaccine mass (CVM) that became attached to the parietal peritoneum. However, injection of the fish with the needle pointing in the opposite direction generated many small CVM that became attached to the visceral and parietal peritoneum and in some cases caused internal adhesions. We describe the structural and cellular changes in the adjuvant-induced CVMs. The CVMs mainly comprised neutrophils and macrophages, although most of the former underwent apoptosis, which was particularly evident from day 3 post-injection. The apoptotic cells were phagocytosed by macrophages, which were the dominant cell type from the first days onwards. All of the vaccines induced angiogenesis in the area of contact between the CVM and the mesothelium. Vaccines containing oil-based adjuvants or microspheres induced the formation of granulomas in the CVM; however, no granulomas were observed in the CVM induced by vaccines containing aluminium hydroxide or Matrix-Q(®) as adjuvants. All of the vaccines induced strong migration of cells to the peritoneal cavity. Although some of these cells remained unattached in the peritoneal cavity, most of them formed part of the CVM. We also observed migration of the cells from the peritoneal cavity to lymphoid organs, indicating bidirectional traffic of cells between the inflamed areas and these organs.

  9. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  10. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  11. Clinical evaluation of CpG oligonucleotides as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Julia; Klinman, Dennis M

    2014-11-12

    Synthetic oligonucleotides (ODN) that express unmethylated "CpG motifs" trigger cells that express Toll-like receptor 9. In humans this includes plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B cells. CpG ODN induce an innate immune response characterized by the production of Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Their utility as vaccine adjuvants was evaluated in a number of clinical trials. Results indicate that CpG ODN improve antigen presentation and the generation of vaccine-specific cellular and humoral responses. This work provides an up-to-date overview of the utility of CpG ODN as adjuvants for vaccines targeting infectious agents and cancer. PMID:24975812

  12. Innate Immune Signaling by, and Genetic Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Aoshi, Taiki; Tozuka, Miyuki; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccines can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although some DNA vaccines are already licensed for infectious diseases in animals, they are not licensed for human use because the risk and benefit of DNA vaccines is still controversial. Indeed, in humans, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines is lower than that of other traditional vaccines. To develop the use of DNA vaccines in the clinic, various approaches are in progress to enhance or improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Recent studies have shown that immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are regulated by innate immune responses via plasmid DNA recognition through the STING-TBK1 signaling cascade. Similarly, molecules that act as dsDNA sensors that activate innate immune responses through STING-TBK1 have been identified and used as genetic adjuvants to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity in mouse models. However, the mechanisms that induce innate immune responses by DNA vaccines are still unclear. In this review, we will discuss innate immune signaling upon DNA vaccination and genetic adjuvants of innate immune signaling molecules.

  13. A Mucosal Adjuvant for the Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Jorquera, Patricia; Westdijk, Janny; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of poliovirus from the majority of the world has been achieved through the use of two vaccines: the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Both vaccines are effective at preventing paralytic poliomyelitis, however, they also have significant differences. Most importantly for this work is the risk of revertant virus from OPV, the greater cost of IPV, and the low mucosal immunity induced by IPV. We and others have previously described the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant that can induce a mucosal immune response to a co-administered antigen even when delivered at a non-mucosal site. In this report, we describe the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant (GVI3000) with IPV. The IPV-GVI3000 vaccine significantly increased systemic IgG, mucosal IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses to all three poliovirus serotypes in mice even when administered intramuscularly. Furthermore, GVI3000 significantly increased the potency of IPV in rat potency tests as measured by poliovirus neutralizing antibodies in serum. Thus, an IPV-GVI3000 vaccine would reduce the dose of IPV needed and provide significantly improved mucosal immunity. This vaccine could be an effective tool to use in the poliovirus eradication campaign without risking the re-introduction of revertant poliovirus derived from OPV. PMID:24333345

  14. [Aluminum as an adjuvant in vaccines and post-vaccine reactions].

    PubMed

    Fiejka, M; Aleksandrowicz, J

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium compounds have been widely used as adjuvants in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Adjuvants are able to stimulate the immune system in a nonspecific manner, i.e. high antibody level can be obtained with minimal dose of the antigen and with reduced number of inoculations. Adjuvants use has been mostly empirically determined by such factors as efficacy and safety. The mechanism of action of the aluminium adjuvants is not completely understood and is very complex. The basic factors of the mode of action: 1) the complex of antigen and aluminium gel is more immunogenic in structure than free antigen, 2) effect "depot"--The antigen stimulus last longer, 3) the production of local granulomas. Vaccines adsorbed onto aluminium salts are a more frequent cause of local post-vaccinal reactions than plain vaccines. 5-10% those vaccinated can develop a nodule lasting several weeks at the injection site. In some rare cases the nodules may become inflammatory and even turn into an aseptic abscess. The nodules persisting more than 6 weeks may indicate development of aluminium hypersensitivity. Finally aluminium adjuvant immunogens induce the production of IgE antibodies. PMID:8235346

  15. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DMT liposome-adjuvanted tuberculosis subunit CTT3H vaccine.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xindong; Tian, Maopeng; Li, Jianrong; Tan, Songwei; Yuan, Xuefeng; Yu, Qi; Jing, Yukai; Zhang, Zhiping; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-01-01

    Different strategies have been proposed for the development of protein subunit vaccine candidates for tuberculosis (TB), which shows better safety than other types of candidates and the currently used Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. In order to develop more effective protein subunits depending on the mechanism of cell-mediated immunity against TB, a polyprotein CTT3H, based on 5 immunodominant antigens (CFP10, TB10.4, TB8.4, Rv3615c, and HBHA) with CD8(+) epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed in this study. We vaccinated C57BL/6 mice with a TB subunit CTT3H protein in an adjuvant of dimethyldioctadecylammonium/monophosphoryl lipid A/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (DDA/MPL/TDB, DMT) liposome to investigate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine. Our results demonstrated that DMT liposome-adjuvanted CTT3H vaccine not only induced an antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 response, but also raised the number of PPD- and CTT3H-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells and elicited strong CTL responses against TB10.4, which provided more effective protection against a 60 CFU M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge than PBS control and DMT adjuvant alone. Our findings indicate that DMT-liposome is an effective adjuvant to stimulate CD8(+) T cell responses and the DMT-adjuvanted subunit CTT3H vaccine is a promising candidate for the next generation of TB vaccine.

  16. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor serves as adjuvant by activating dendritic cells through stimulation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jaemin; Jung, In Duk; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Koh, Sang Seok; Wu, T.-C.; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based cancer vaccines represent a promising immunotherapeutic strategy against cancer. To enhance the modest immunogenicity of DC vaccines, various adjuvants are often incorporated. Particularly, most of the common adjuvants are derived from bacteria. In the current study, we evaluate the use of a human pancreatic cancer derived protein, pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), as a novel DC vaccine adjuvant. We show that PAUF can induce activation and maturation of DCs and activate NFkB by stimulating the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, vaccination with PAUF treated DCs pulsed with E7 or OVA peptides leads to generation of E7 or OVA-specific CD8+ T cells and memory T cells, which correlate with long term tumor protection and antitumor effects against TC-1 and EG.7 tumors in mice. Finally, we demonstrated that PAUF mediated DC activation and immune stimulation are dependent on TLR4. Our data provides evidence supporting PAUF as a promising adjuvant for DC based therapies, which can be applied in conjunction with other cancer therapies. Most importantly, our results serve as a reference for future investigation of human based adjuvants. PMID:26336989

  17. Micro/nanoparticle adjuvants for antileishmanial vaccines: present and future trends.

    PubMed

    Badiee, Ali; Heravi Shargh, Vahid; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-01-21

    Leishmania infection continues to have a major impact on public health inducing significant morbidity and mortality mostly in the poorest populations. Drug resistance, toxicity and side effects associated with expensive chemotherapeutic treatments and difficult reservoir control emphasize the need for a safe and effective vaccine which is not available yet. Although, Leishmanization (LZ) was shown to be effective against cutaneous leishmaniasis, standardization and safety are the main problems of LZ. First generation killed parasites demonstrated limited efficacy in phase 3 trials and moreover well defined molecules have not reached to phase 3 yet. Limited efficacy in vaccines against leishmaniasis is partly due to lack of an appropriate adjuvant. Hence, the use of particulate delivery systems as carriers for antigen and/or immunostimulatory adjuvants for effective delivery to the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is a valuable strategy to enhance vaccine efficacies. Particle-based delivery systems such as emulsions, liposomes, virosomes, and polymeric microspheres have the potential for successfully delivering antigens, which can then be further improved via incorporation of additional antigenic or immustimulatory adjuvant components in or onto the particle carrier system. In this review, we have attempted to provide a list of particulate vaccine delivery systems involved in the production of candidate leishmaniasis vaccines and introduced some potentially useful vaccine delivery systems for leishmaniasis in future experiments. In conclusion, combination vaccines (adjuvant systems) composed of candidate antigens and more importantly well-developed particulate delivery systems, such as lipid-based particles containing immunostimulatory adjuvants, have a chance to succeed as antileishmanial vaccines.

  18. [Immunological adjuvants. Determinant factors in the efficacy-toxicity ratio of the contemporary vaccines].

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Lastre, Miriam; Pérez, Oliver

    2014-02-01

    To achieve effective and safe vaccines for the prevention of not yet controlled or re-emergent infectious diseases, one of the more importance aspects is to have immunological adjuvants that allow inducing a protective immune response with an appropriate safety profile. Since 1926 the aluminium compounds have been used as adjuvants for human vaccines, and only in the last 10 years have some new products been registered. Although there an enormous quantity of proposed candidates, the toxicity is the main factor that has limited their introduction into the clinic. In this work the mechanism of action are updated, and the toxicity of the immunological adjuvants are revised, especially those that have obtained clinical approval or are close to getting it.

  19. Aluminium-adjuvanted vaccines--a review of the current state of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Gołoś, Aleksandra; Lutyńska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Since decades aluminium formulations such as aluminium hydroxide and aluminium phosphate are widely used as adjuvants in vaccines for human use. They increase immune response induced by the vaccine antigens by mechanisms eg. a depot effect at the injection site, activation of the complement and stimulation of the macrophages. Many studies, both case control ones and those performed in vivo on animal models, confirmed the safety of aluminium adjuvants even in vaccinated infants and children. Although some of the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccines have certain limitations such as no Th1 reactivity and low stability at temperatures below 2ºC, its easy use, safety profile and low manufacturing costs confirm its suitability.

  20. Oil-based emulsion vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Strioga, Marius; Ascarateil, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are critical components in experimental and licensed vaccines used in human and veterinary medicine. When aiming to evoke an immune response to a purified antigen, the administration of antigen alone is often insufficient, unless the antigen contains microbial structures or has a natural particulate structure. In most cases, the rationale to use an adjuvant is obvious to the experimental immunologist or the professional vaccinologist, who is familiar with the nature of the antigen, and the aim of the vaccine to elicit a specific antibody response and/or a specific type of T cell response. In this unit, we describe protocols to formulate antigens with oil-based emulsions. Such emulsions represent a major prototype adjuvant category that is frequently used in experimental preclinical vaccines, as well as veterinary and human vaccines.

  1. The effect of different adjuvants on immune parameters and protection following vaccination of sheep with a larval-specific antigen of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection.

  2. The effect of different adjuvants on immune parameters and protection following vaccination of sheep with a larval-specific antigen of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection. PMID:24205209

  3. The Effect of Different Adjuvants on Immune Parameters and Protection following Vaccination of Sheep with a Larval-Specific Antigen of the Gastrointestinal Nematode, Haemonchus contortus

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, David; Preston, Sarah; Kemp, Joanna; de Veer, Michael; Sherrard, Jayne; Kraska, Troy; Elhay, Martin; Meeusen, Els

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognised that vaccine adjuvants play a critical role in directing the nature of a vaccine induced effector response. In the present study, several adjuvants were evaluated for their ability to protect sheep after field vaccination with the larval-specific Haemonchus contortus antigen, HcsL3. Using a suboptimal antigen dose, aluminium adjuvant was shown to reduce the cumulative faecal egg counts (cFEC) and worm burden by 23% and 25% respectively, in agreement with a previous study. The addition of Quil A to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine brought cFEC back to control levels. Vaccination with the adjuvant DEAE-dextran almost doubled the protection compared to the aluminium-adjuvanted vaccine resulting in 40% and 41% reduction in cFEC and worm counts compared to controls. Examination of skin responses following i.d. injection of exsheathed L3, revealed that cFEC was negatively correlated with wheal size and tissue eosinophils for the DEAE-dextran and aluminium-adjuvanted groups respectively. These studies have for the first time shown the potential of DEAE-dextran adjuvant for helminth vaccines, and discovered significant cellular correlates of vaccine-induced protection. PMID:24205209

  4. Formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcus vaccine - effect of aluminum adjuvants on the antibody and IL-17 response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae causes widespread morbidity and mortality. Current vaccines contain free polysaccharides or protein-polysaccharide conjugates, and do not induce protection against serotypes that are not included in the vaccines. An affordable and broadly protective vaccine is very desirable. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcal vaccine with aluminum-containing adjuvants for intramuscular injection. Methods Four aluminium-containing adjuvants were prepared with different levels of surface phosphate groups resulting in different adsorptive capacities and affinities for the vaccine antigens. Mice were immunized three times and the antigen-specific antibody titers and IL-17 responses in blood were analyzed. Results Although all adjuvants induced significantly higher antibody titers than antigen without adjuvant, the vaccine containing aluminum phosphate adjuvant (AP) produced the highest antibody response when low doses of antigen were used. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant (AH) induced an equal or better antibody response at high doses compared with AP. Vaccines formulated with AH, but not with AP, induced an IL-17 response. The vaccine formulated with AH was stable and retained full immunogenicity when stored at 4°C for 4 months. Conclusions Antibodies are important for protection against systemic streptococcal disease and IL-17 is critical in the prevention of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae in the mouse model. The formulation of the whole killed bacterial cells with AH resulted in a stable vaccine that induced both antibodies and an IL-17 response. These experiments underscore the importance of formulation studies with aluminium containing adjuvants for the development of stable and effective vaccines. PMID:21801401

  5. Immunomodulation of TH2 biased immunity with mucosal administration of nanoemulsion adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Bielinska, Anna U; O'Konek, Jessica J; Janczak, Katarzyna W; Baker, James R

    2016-07-25

    TH2-biased immune responses are associated with inadequate protection against some pathogens and with cancer, colitis, asthma and allergy. Since most currently used vaccine adjuvants induce a TH2-biased response, this has led to interest in developing adjuvants capable of activating TH