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Sample records for adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy

  1. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  2. Use of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Older Women

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D. Haffty, Bruce G.; Smith, Grace L.; Hurria, Arti; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Gross, Cary P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials and guidelines published between 1997 and 2001 concluded that postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves overall survival for women with high-risk breast cancer. However, the effect of these findings on current practice is not known. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare cohort, we sought to characterize the adoption of PMRT from 1992 to 2002 and identify risk factors for PMRT omission among high-risk older patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 28,973 women aged {>=}66 years who had been treated with mastectomy for invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2002. Trends in the adoption of PMRT for low- (T1-T2N0), intermediate- (T1-T2N1), and high- (T3-T4 and/or N2-N3) risk patients were characterized using a Monte Carlo permutation algorithm. Multivariate logistic regression identified the risk factors for PMRT omission and calculated the adjusted use rates. Results: Postmastectomy radiotherapy use increased gradually and consistently for low-risk (+2.16%/y) and intermediate-risk (+7.20%/y) patients throughout the study interval. In contrast, PMRT use for high-risk patients increased sharply between 1996 and 1997 (+30.99%/y), but subsequently stabilized. Between 1998 and 2002, only 53% of high-risk patients received PMRT. The risk factors for PMRT omission included advanced age, moderate to severe comorbidity, smaller tumor size, fewer positive lymph nodes, and geographic region, with adjusted use rates ranging from 63.5% in San Francisco to 44.9% in Connecticut. Conclusion: Among the high-risk patients, PMRT use increased sharply in 1997 after the initial clinical trial publication. Despite subsequent guidelines recommending the use of PMRT, no further increase in PMRT use has occurred, and nearly 50% of high-risk patients still do not receive PMRT.

  3. Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Abdominal Free Flap and Adjuvant Radiotherapy: Evaluation of Quality of Life and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pont, Luis Parra; Marcelli, Stefano; Robustillo, Manuel; Song, Dajiang; Grandes, Daniel; Martin, Marcos; Iglesias, Israel; Aso, Jorge; Laloumet, Iñaki; Díaz, Antonio J

    2017-10-01

    The effects of postoperative radiotherapy on free flap-based breast reconstruction are still controversial. Poor outcomes, breast distortion, and fat necrosis have been traditionally documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adjuvant radiotherapy affects the quality of life, satisfaction, and cosmetic result in patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with autologous free flap. Between January of 2013 and December of 2016, 230 patients underwent mastectomy with immediate free flap reconstruction at the authors' institution. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they received postmastectomy radiotherapy. Quality of life measured with the BREAST-Q questionnaire, self-reported aesthetic outcomes, and general satisfaction were assessed and compared. Fat necrosis of the flap and its severity were also analyzed as the main surgical outcomes. Mean follow-up time after reconstruction was 23 months (range, 6 to 48 months). No significant difference in quality of life or satisfaction scores were found between patients that underwent postmastectomy radiotherapy and patients who did not receive adjuvant radiotherapy. There were no significant differences in rates of fat necrosis between the groups (11.1 percent versus 13.76 percent; p = 0.75). Postmastectomy radiotherapy in patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with free flaps does not seem to affect quality of life, satisfaction with the outcome, or the cosmetic result as perceived by the patients. The potential need for postoperative radiotherapy should not hinder women from the benefits of autologous immediate breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  4. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  5. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  6. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  7. Outcomes of Node-Negative Breast Cancer 5 Centimeters and Larger Treated With and Without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goulart, Jennifer; Truong, Pauline; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline H.; Kennecke, Hagen; Nichol, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) remains controversial for the rare presentation of pT3pN0cM0 breast cancer. The present analysis examined locoregional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in pT2 = 5.0-cm and pT3 >5.0-cm tumors treated with mastectomy, stratified by PMRT use. Materials and Methods: Between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2000, the British Columbia provincial database yielded 100 node-negative patients with tumors {>=}5 cm of 19,846 nonmetastatic breast cancer patients (0.5%). Of these 100 patients, 44 (44%) had received adjuvant PMRT. Results: The PMRT group contained significantly more pT3 >5-cm cases (p = 0.001) and margin-positive cases (p = .03). With a median follow-up of 10 years, the cumulative 10-year LRR rate was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-10.5) in the PMRT group vs. 8.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.2-18.2) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). Regarding LRR in the no-PMRT group, all patients had Grade 3 histologic features (LRR 17%, 5 of 29) and had not received hormonal therapy (LRR 15%, 5 of 34). The 10-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 85.8% (95% confidence interval 71.0-93.4) in the PMRT group vs. 74.6% (95% confidence interval 59.9-84.5) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). On multivariate analysis, adjusted for the prognostic and predictive variables, PMRT did not significantly improve the LRR or breast cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a low LRR rate for node-negative breast cancer {>=}5 cm. Our results indicate that PMRT should be considered for Grade 3 histologic features and patients not undergoing hormonal therapy.

  8. Multivariate analyses of locoregional recurrences and skin complications after postmastectomy radiotherapy using electrons or photons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Chen, H.-C.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Hsu, H.-C.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Huang, Y.-J.; Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, C.-J. . E-mail: cjw1010@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed factors of locoregional (LR) recurrence and skin complications in patients after postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: From January 1988 to December 1999, a total of 246 women with Stage II and III breast cancer received PMRT. Doses of 46 to 52.2 Gy/23 to 29 fractions were delivered to the chest wall (CW) and peripheral lymphatic drainage with 12 to 15 MeV single-portal electrons or 6MV photons. Of the patients, 84 patients received an additional 6 to 20 Gy boost to the surgical scar using 9 MeV electrons. We used the Cox regression model for multivariate analyses of CW, supraclavicular nodes (SCN), and LR recurrence. Results: N3 stage (positive nodes >9) (p = 0.003) and diabetes (p = 0.004) were independent factors of CW recurrence. Analysis of ipsilateral SCN recurrence showed that N3 stage (p < 0.001) and electrons (p = 0.006) were independent factors. For LR recurrence, N3 (p < 0.001), T3 to T4 (p = 0.033) and electrons (p = 0.003) were significant factors. Analysis of skin telangiectasia revealed that electrons (p < 0.001) and surgical scar boost (p = 0.003) were independent factors. Conclusions: Photons are superior to single-portal electrons in patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy because of better locoregional control and less skin telangiectasia. In patients in whom the number of positive axillary nodes is >9, more aggressive treatment may be considered for better locoregional control.

  9. Electron Conformal Radiotherapy for Post-Mastectomy Irradiation: A Bolus-Free, Multi-Energy, Multi-Segmented Field Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    that compared to customized electron bolu s radiotherapy for post-mastectomy irradiation, ECT with multi-energy, multi-segmente d treatment fields has...PTV dos e homogeneity was quite good . Use of the treatment plan modification techniques improved dose sparin g for the non-target portion of the...phantom . For the patient treatment plans, the algorithm provided acceptable results for PTV conformality and dose homogeneity, in comparison to the bolus

  10. [Optimized definition and delineation of supraclavicular lymph nodes target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shujing; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Xicheng; Zhang, Yujing; Sun, Jiayuan; He, Liru; Wen, Ge; He, Zhichun

    2014-07-01

    To explore the optimized methods to define and delineate supraclavicular lymph nodal target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. From September 2012 to August 2013, a total of 10 breast cancer patients at Sun Yan-sen University Cancer were selected for mastectomy plus postoperative radiotherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV) of every patient was delineated on CT-slices after computed tomography (CT) simulation by 6 radiation oncologists. Then the coverage discrepancy in anatomic lymphatic drainage subregions was analyzed among both CTVs by different oncologists and CTVs for patients with different clinical characters. The average volume of SCLN-CTVs was 110 ± 28 cm(3). All SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions were covered in CTV, none of axillaIregion. The covergy rates of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIregions was 75%, 85%, 73%, 88%, 68%, 10%, 17% , respectively. SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions should be covered according to consensus. However, the opinions of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIremain divisive.

  11. Use of hypofractionated post-mastectomy radiotherapy reduces health costs by over $2000 per patient: An Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Joshua W; McLachlan, Craig S; Hansen, Carmen J; Assareh, Hassan; Last, Andrew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2016-02-01

    The most recent clinical practice guidelines released by Cancer Australia draw attention to unanswered questions concerning the health economic considerations associated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. This study aimed to quantify and compare the healthcare costs at a regional Australian radiotherapy institute with respect to conventionally fractionated post-mastectomy radiotherapy (Cf-PMRT) versus hypofractionated post-mastectomy radiotherapy (Hf-PMRT) administration. Medical records of 196 patients treated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy at the NSW North Coast Cancer Institute from February 2008 to June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Australian Medicare item numbers billed for patients receiving either Cf-PMRT of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions or Hf-PMRT of 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions were calculated. Decision tree analysis was used to model costs. Independent-samples t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to compare crude average costs for Cf-PMRT and Hf-PMRT and determine which treatment components accounted for any differences. Hf-PMRT, with or without irradiation to the regional lymph nodes, was associated with significantly reduced Medicare costs ($5613 AUD per patient for Hf-PMRT vs $8272 AUD per patient for Cf-PMRT; P < 0.001). Savings associated with Hf-PMRT ranged from $1353 (22.1%) for patients receiving no regional irradiation to $2898 (32.0%) for patients receiving both axillary and supraclavicular therapy. Hf-PMRT results in a significant reduction in the financial costs associated with treating breast cancer patients in a regional Australian setting when compared with Cf-PMRT. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. The impact of immediate breast reconstruction on the technical delivery of postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Motwani, Sabin B.; Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Schechter, Naomi R.; Butler, Charles E.; Lee, Gordon K.; Langstein, Howard N.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ibrahim, Nuhad K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) planning. Methods: A total of 110 patients (112 treatment plans) who had mastectomy with immediate reconstruction followed by radiotherapy were compared with contemporaneous stage-matched patients who had undergone mastectomy without intervening reconstruction. A scoring system was used to assess optimal radiotherapy planning using four parameters: breadth of chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, minimization of lung, and avoidance of heart. An 'optimal' plan achieved all objectives or a minor 0.5 point deduction; 'moderately' compromised treatment plans had 1.0 or 1.5 point deductions; and 'major' compromised plans had {>=}2.0 point deductions. Results: Of the 112 PMRT plans scored after reconstruction, 52% had compromises compared with 7% of matched controls (p < 0.0001). Of the compromised plans after reconstruction, 33% were considered to be moderately compromised plans and 19% were major compromised treatment plans. Optimal chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, lung minimization, and heart avoidance was achieved in 79%, 45%, 84%, and 84% of the plans in the group undergoing immediate reconstruction, compared respectively with 100%, 93%, 97%, and 92% of the plans in the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.0015, and p = 0.1435). In patients with reconstructions, 67% of the 'major' compromised radiotherapy plans were left-sided (p < 0.16). Conclusions: Radiation treatment planning after immediate breast reconstruction was compromised in more than half of the patients (52%), with the largest compromises observed in those with left-sided cancers. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer, the potential for compromised PMRT planning should be considered when deciding between immediate and delayed reconstruction.

  13. Autologous fat graft in postmastectomy pain syndrome following breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Caviggioli, Fabio; Klinger, Francesco; Banzatti, Barbara; Catania, Barbara; Lisa, Andrea; Klinger, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, affecting one in eight women. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has become a well-established alternative to mastectomy in the treatment of breast cancer, providing a less invasive treatment. Just as life expectancy after breast cancer has improved, so has morbidity increased. One of the most relevant and debilitating consequences of oncological breast surgery is postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS). Our results published in 2011 on the treatment of PMPS in patients who had undergone mastectomy and radiotherapy and our experience in scar treatment with fat grafts were the theoretical bases for this prospective study. From April 2011 to April 2012 a total of 96 patients, who had undergone lumpectomy and radiation therapy, with the diagnosis of PMPS were considered for fat grafts. We performed autologous fat grafting in 59 patients (study group), whereas 37 patients did not receive any further surgical procedure (control group). Pain assessment was performed using the visual analog scale (VAS) before and after treatment in the treated group and in the control group at the first visit and the control visit, with a mean follow-up of 10 months. Results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Four patients were lost to follow-up (two patients in the control group and two patients in the treated group). A significant VAS pain decrease was detected in patients treated with autologous fat grafting (3.1 point reduction, p ≤ 0.005). Because of the safety, efficacy, and optimal tolerability of the procedure, we believe that fat grafting can be considered useful in treating PMPS in patients who have undergone BCS and radiotherapy. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  14. Does post-mastectomy radiotherapy represent a contraindication to skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction: an update.

    PubMed

    Lambert, K; Mokbel, K

    2012-06-01

    The use of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) to facilitate breast reconstruction is increasing due to a wide acceptance of improved cosmetic outcomes and evidence of equivalence in oncologic outcomes. The rates of patients undergoing mastectomy for whom post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) will be recommended is increasing as evidence of decreased loco-regional recurrence and increased survival mounts. PMRT may adversely effect complication rates and cosmetic outcomes for patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction and PMRT--although the evidence for this is methodologically flawed. This article summarises the above evidence and highlights a reconstructive algorithm that may be used to mitigate the possible deleterious effects of PMRT on results.

  15. ATM sequence variants and risk of radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis after postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreassen, Christian N.; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Marie; Herskind, Carsten; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Stock, Richard G.; Rosenstein, Barry S. . E-mail: barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the hypothesis that women who are carriers of genetic alterations in the ATM gene are more likely to develop subcutaneous fibrosis after radiotherapy for treatment of breast cancer compared with patients who do not possess DNA sequence variations in this gene. Methods and Materials: DNA samples isolated from fibroblast cell lines established from 41 women treated with postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer were screened for genetic variants in ATM using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). A minimum follow-up of 2 years enabled analysis of late effects to generate dose-response curves and to estimate the dose that resulted in a 50% incidence of Grade 3 fibrosis (ED{sub 5}). Results: A total of 26 genetic alterations in the expressed portions of the ATM gene, or within 10 bases of each exon in regions encompassing putative splice sites, were detected in 22 patients. The ED{sub 5} (95% confidence interval) of 60.2 (55.7-65.1) Gy calculated for patients without a sequence variation did not differ significantly from the ED{sub 5} of 58.4 (54.0-63.1) Gy for the group of patients with any ATM sequence abnormality. The ED{sub 5} of 53.7 (50.2-57.5) Gy for those patients who were either homozygous or heterozygous for the G{sup {yields}}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which results in substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein, was substantially lower than the ED{sub 5} of 60.8 (57.0-64.8) Gy for patients not carriers of this sequence alteration. This resulted in an enhancement ratio (ratio of the ED{sub 5} values) of 1.13 (1.05-1.22), which was significantly greater than unity. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest an association between the ATM codon 1853 Asn/Asp and Asn/Asn genotypes with the development of Grade 3 fibrosis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy.

  16. In vivo dosimetric impact of breast tissue expanders on post-mastectomy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gee, Harriet E; Bignell, Fiona; Odgers, David; Gill, Simran; Martin, Darren; Toohey, Joanne; Carroll, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Temporary tissue expanders with metallic ports for gradual saline injection are increasingly employed to facilitate breast reconstruction after post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Treatment beams therefore pass through a high-density rare-earth magnet. Measurements ex vivo suggest attenuation of dose to the skin and chest wall at clinical risk of relapse. The purpose of the study was to quantify the resulting dose reduction in vivo, compared with treatment planning system (TPS). Sixteen patients receiving PMRT had in vivo dosimetry prospectively performed with ethics board approval. Port was located within the expanded chest wall using the planning CT scan. Strips of radiochromic film were laid on the skin surface underneath the bolus. To aid interpretation, ex vivo measurements were also performed, including comparison with TPS predictions. An average 7% reduction in dose to skin surface was measured in 15 of 16 patients. This was reproducibly located in the 'shadow' of the magnet, corresponding to each of the paths of the medial and lateral tangents. The average area was 1.07 cm(2) (range 0.39 cm(2) to 2.36 cm(2)). Ex vivo measurements confirmed attenuation of the beam in the shadow of the port. The surface area of the 'cold-spot' varied with angle of the beam relative to the metallic port. Dose attenuation in vivo differed from that predicted by the TPS. Dose is attenuated in the 'shadow' of the tissue expander port in patients receiving PMRT. This is likely to be clinically insignificant for most, but centres should undertake appropriate measurements before utilising TPS predictions. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. Accuracy of a multidisciplinary team-led discussion in predicting postmastectomy radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dordea, M; Light, A; Serra, MP; Aspinall, SR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is performed increasingly following mastectomy for breast cancer. The literature suggests higher reconstructive failure and poorer cosmesis in the subgroup of patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following IBR. We set out to determine the accuracy of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion in predicting PMRT. Methods Preoperative MDT discussions were recorded prospectively over a 12-month period (from February 2011) in a symptomatic breast unit. The estimated need for PMRT was stratified into ‘PMRT not required’, ‘PMRT possibly required’, ‘PMRT probably required’ and ‘PMRT required’ groups. Results Of 156 referrals included in the study, 76 patients (49%) underwent mastectomy: 61 simple mastectomy, 10 skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) and delayed-immediate breast reconstruction, 3 SSM and implant-based IBR, and 2 mastectomy IBR with an autologous flap. The IBR rate was therefore 19.7%. The proportion of patients who received PMRT was 14% (3/21) in the ‘PMRT not required’, 30% (7/23) in the ‘PMRT possibly required’, 65% (9/14) in the ‘PMRT probably required’ and 94% (17/18) in the ‘PMRT required’ groups. Assigning a linear numerical score (1–4) to these groups (higher score representing greater likelihood of receiving PMRT), the predicted need for PMRT correlated with the proportion of patients who ultimately received PMRT (linear regression r2=0.98, p=0.01). Conclusions This study has examined the factors influencing MDT discussions regarding IBR, demonstrating that the MDT is reasonably accurate at predicting need for PMRT. Whether such accuracy is clinically adequate and/or reproducible across units is debatable. PMID:26263804

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. Objectives To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. Main results We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes. EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-03-14

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRT or VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBT with no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes.EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2,965 women; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.20; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; RR 0

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-04-18

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2007. The role of radiotherapy (both pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and vaginal intracavity brachytherapy (VBT)) in stage I endometrial cancer following hysterectomy remains controversial. To assess the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Specialised Register to end-2005 for the original review, and extended the search to January 2012 for the update. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy (either EBRTor VBT, or both) versus no radiotherapy or VBT in women with stage I endometrial cancer. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a specifically designed data collection form. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-related deaths, locoregional recurrence and distant recurrence. Meta-analyses were performed using Cochrane Review Manager Software 5.1. We included eight trials. Seven trials (3628 women) compared EBRT with no EBRT (or VBT), and one trial (645 women) compared VBTwith no additional treatment. We considered six of the eight trials to be of a high quality. Time-to-event data were not available for all trials and all outcomes.EBRT (with or without VBT) compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) for stage I endometrial carcinoma significantly reduced locoregional recurrence (time-to-event data: five trials, 2965 women; Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.52; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; Risk Ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.47). This reduced risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into improved overall survival (time-to-event data: five trials, 2,965 women; HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.82 to1.20; and dichotomous data: seven trials, 3628 women; RR 0.98, 95

  1. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy.

  2. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L. Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  3. Non-compliance with a postmastectomy radiotherapy guideline: decision tree and cause analysis.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Amir R; Gill, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans; Shahsavar, Nosrat

    2008-09-21

    The guideline for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), which is prescribed to reduce recurrence of breast cancer in the chest wall and improve overall survival, is not always followed. Identifying and extracting important patterns of non-compliance are crucial in maintaining the quality of care in Oncology. Analysis of 759 patients with malignant breast cancer using decision tree induction (DTI) found patterns of non-compliance with the guideline. The PMRT guideline was used to separate cases according to the recommendation to receive or not receive PMRT. The two groups of patients were analyzed separately. Resulting patterns were transformed into rules that were then compared with the reasons that were extracted by manual inspection of records for the non-compliant cases. Analyzing patients in the group who should receive PMRT according to the guideline did not result in a robust decision tree. However, classification of the other group, patients who should not receive PMRT treatment according to the guideline, resulted in a tree with nine leaves and three of them were representing non-compliance with the guideline. In a comparison between rules resulting from these three non-compliant patterns and manual inspection of patient records, the following was found: In the decision tree, presence of perigland growth is the most important variable followed by number of malignantly invaded lymph nodes and level of Progesterone receptor. DNA index, age, size of the tumor and level of Estrogen receptor are also involved but with less importance. From manual inspection of the cases, the most frequent pattern for non-compliance is age above the threshold followed by near cut-off values for risk factors and unknown reasons. Comparison of patterns of non-compliance acquired from data mining and manual inspection of patient records demonstrates that not all of the non-compliances are repetitive or important. There are some overlaps between important variables acquired from manual

  4. Non-compliance with a postmastectomy radiotherapy guideline: Decision tree and cause analysis

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Amir R; Gill, Hans; Åhlfeldt, Hans; Shahsavar, Nosrat

    2008-01-01

    Background The guideline for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), which is prescribed to reduce recurrence of breast cancer in the chest wall and improve overall survival, is not always followed. Identifying and extracting important patterns of non-compliance are crucial in maintaining the quality of care in Oncology. Methods Analysis of 759 patients with malignant breast cancer using decision tree induction (DTI) found patterns of non-compliance with the guideline. The PMRT guideline was used to separate cases according to the recommendation to receive or not receive PMRT. The two groups of patients were analyzed separately. Resulting patterns were transformed into rules that were then compared with the reasons that were extracted by manual inspection of records for the non-compliant cases. Results Analyzing patients in the group who should receive PMRT according to the guideline did not result in a robust decision tree. However, classification of the other group, patients who should not receive PMRT treatment according to the guideline, resulted in a tree with nine leaves and three of them were representing non-compliance with the guideline. In a comparison between rules resulting from these three non-compliant patterns and manual inspection of patient records, the following was found: In the decision tree, presence of perigland growth is the most important variable followed by number of malignantly invaded lymph nodes and level of Progesterone receptor. DNA index, age, size of the tumor and level of Estrogen receptor are also involved but with less importance. From manual inspection of the cases, the most frequent pattern for non-compliance is age above the threshold followed by near cut-off values for risk factors and unknown reasons. Conclusion Comparison of patterns of non-compliance acquired from data mining and manual inspection of patient records demonstrates that not all of the non-compliances are repetitive or important. There are some overlaps between

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Shindel, Alan W.; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    There is relatively little literature on adjuvant radiotherapy after radical nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision (RNU) for patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). This study was designed to determine the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC. We retrospectively reviewed 198 patients treated with RNU between December 2001 and January 2015. Postoperative radiotherapy was administered in 40 (20.2%) of patients. Patients who received radiotherapy were younger than those that did not (65.2 vs. 70.5 years, p = 0.023). With median follow up of 29.1 months, Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test demonstrated no significant differences between those omitting vs receiving adjuvant radiotherapy in regards to 2-year rates of overall survival (72.0% vs. 73.4%, p = 0.979), cancer-specific survival (73.2% vs. 75.3%, p = 0.844), and recurrence-free survival (61.2% vs. 66.3%, p = 0.742). However, in multivariable analysis with Cox regression, young age, absence of chronic kidney disease, negative lymphovascular invasion, negative surgical margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy were also associated with better cancer-specific survival. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy did not offer any significant benefit in terms of overall, cancer-specific, and recurrence-free survivals in patients with pT3N0M0 UTUC after RNU. More effective systemic adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:27910890

  6. Current attitudes to breast reconstruction surgery for women at risk of post-mastectomy radiotherapy: A survey of UK breast surgeons.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Paula J; Gandhi, Ashu; Kirwan, Cliona C; Jain, Yogesh; Harvey, James R

    2015-08-01

    Decision-making for women requiring reconstruction and post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) includes oncological safety, cosmesis, patient choice, potential delay/interference with adjuvant treatment and surgeon/oncologist preference. This study aimed to quantitatively assess surgeons' attitudes and perceptions about reconstructive options in this setting, and to ascertain if surgical volume influenced advice given. A questionnaire was sent to surgical members of the UK Association of Breast Surgery (ABS) in March-June 2014. The questionnaire elicited information on surgeon volume, reconstructive practice and drivers influencing decision-making. Response rate was 42% (148/355), representing 71% of UK breast units. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) was offered more commonly than immediate implant, delayed-immediate or immediate autologous reconstruction (p < 0.05). Cosmesis was thought to be equivalent between IBR and DBR by 15% of surgeons, and 26% believe IBR and DBR offer similar Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Surgeon volume had no effect on reconstruction choice. Common decision-making drivers included negative effects of radiotherapy upon reconstructive and cosmetic outcome. The majority of surgeons (77%) believe the current evidence base is insufficient to guide decision-making. Despite surgeons believing that cosmesis and quality of life are not equivalent between IBR and DBR, DBR remains the commonest approach to this difficult clinical scenario. Surgeons perceive they are using a variety of newer techniques such as Delayed-Immediate Reconstruction and Acellular Dermal Matrices to try to ameliorate the effects of PMRT. This survey demonstrates that there is wide variation in reported surgical practice in this difficult setting. There is widespread acknowledgement of the lack of evidence to guide decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Margin Proximity Correlates with Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Patients Not Receiving Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Glorioso, Jaime M; Gonzalez Juarrero, Alexandra B; Rodysill, Brian R; Harmsen, William S; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Carter, Jodi M; Mutter, Robert W; Degnim, Amy C; Jakub, James W

    2017-07-05

    Although considerable evidence exists regarding margin status and reexcision for patients undergoing breast conservation therapy, few data address the impact of a close margin for patients undergoing mastectomy without postmastectomy radiotherapy. This retrospective review identified 1147 patients who underwent 1206 mastectomies with negative final margins for breast cancer from 2006 to 2010. Margin distance was analyzed as a continuous variable and dichotomized variable ((≤2 vs >2 mm). Patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy were excluded from the study. Uni- and multivariable analyses were used to assess the association of reexcision, proximity of the final margin, adjuvant therapy, and other clinical and pathologic factors with local recurrence (LR). In 158 mastectomies (13.1%), a reexcision was performed for a close (n = 90) or positive (n = 68) margin. All but one were identified intraoperatively using frozen section analysis. The reexcision rates for skin- and nipple-sparing mastectomy (SSM/NSM) were higher than for simple mastectomy (SM) (19.8 vs 9.3%; p < 0.001). The overall 5-year risk for an LR was 3.8%. The risk was 3.1% for a margin greater than 2 mm and 11.2% for a margin of 2 mm or smaller. In the multivariable model, proximity of the final margin measured as a continuous variable was found to be a significant risk factor for LR (p = 0.009), whereas adjuvant endocrine therapy was found to be protective (p = 0.03). Intraoperative reexcision was not significant in the multivariable model (p = 0.23). For patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer, a wider final margin correlated with a reduced risk for LR. The rates for LR were similar between SSM/NSM and SM despite higher rates of intraoperative reexcision for SSM/NSM.

  8. Late toxicities and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy combined with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with triple-negative non-metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pernin, V; Belin, L; Cottu, P; Bontemps, P; Lemanski, C; De La Lande, B; Baumann, P; Missohou, F; Levy, C; Peignaux, K; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Denis, F; Gobillion, A; Bollet, M; Vago, N A; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Fourquet, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of the concurrent combination of bevacizumab with adjuvant radiotherapy (B-RT) in breast cancer (BC). Methods: Multicentre, prospective study, of the toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone or B-RT in patients with non-metastatic BC enrolled in randomized Phase 3 BEATRICE trial. Early and late toxicities were assessed by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3.0 during and 12 months after the completion of RT. Results: From 2007 to 2012, 39 females received adjuvant B-RT and 45 received adjuvant RT alone. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. All patients had triple-negative non-metastatic BC and received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT. 90% of the 39 females treated by concurrent B-RT received whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost and 4 (10%) received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 49% of the females with internal mammary chain irradiation. The mean duration of bevacizumab was 11.7 months. 38 (84%) females treated by RT alone received WBI with a boost and 16% of the females received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 47% of the females with internal mammary chain RT in 31%. Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed in 9% of patients receiving B-RT and 5% of patients receiving RT alone with no significant difference. 1 year after the completion of RT, the most common late grade 1–2 toxicities in the B-RT group were pain (18%), fibrosis (8%) and telangiectasia (5%). Conclusion: The concurrent bevacizumab with locoregional RT is associated with acceptable early and late 1-year toxicities in patients with BC. Advances in knowledge: The largest series of this association. PMID:25645108

  9. Late toxicities and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy combined with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with triple-negative non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pernin, V; Belin, L; Cottu, P; Bontemps, P; Lemanski, C; De La Lande, B; Baumann, P; Missohou, F; Levy, C; Peignaux, K; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Denis, F; Gobillion, A; Bollet, M; Vago, N A; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the safety of the concurrent combination of bevacizumab with adjuvant radiotherapy (B-RT) in breast cancer (BC). Multicentre, prospective study, of the toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone or B-RT in patients with non-metastatic BC enrolled in randomized Phase 3 BEATRICE trial. Early and late toxicities were assessed by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3.0 during and 12 months after the completion of RT. From 2007 to 2012, 39 females received adjuvant B-RT and 45 received adjuvant RT alone. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. All patients had triple-negative non-metastatic BC and received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT. 90% of the 39 females treated by concurrent B-RT received whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost and 4 (10%) received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 49% of the females with internal mammary chain irradiation. The mean duration of bevacizumab was 11.7 months. 38 (84%) females treated by RT alone received WBI with a boost and 16% of the females received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 47% of the females with internal mammary chain RT in 31%. Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed in 9% of patients receiving B-RT and 5% of patients receiving RT alone with no significant difference. 1 year after the completion of RT, the most common late grade 1-2 toxicities in the B-RT group were pain (18%), fibrosis (8%) and telangiectasia (5%). The concurrent bevacizumab with locoregional RT is associated with acceptable early and late 1-year toxicities in patients with BC. The largest series of this association.

  10. Clinical analysis of cholangiocarcinoma patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nantajit, Danupon; Trirussapanich, Pornwaree; Rojwatkarnjana, Sunanta; Soonklang, Kamonwan; Pattaranutraporn, Poompis; Laebua, Kanyanee; Chamchod, Sasikarn

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or bile duct cancer is a rare cancer type in developed countries, while its prevalence is increased in southeast Asia, affecting ~33.4 men and ~12.3 women per 100,000 individuals. CCA is one of the most lethal types of cancer. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies have been shown to have limited efficacy in improving the overall prognosis of patients. Radiotherapy has been reported to prolong the survival times of patients with certain characteristics. The present study retrospectively evaluated the medical records and follow-up data from 27 CCA patients who received radiotherapy at Chulabhorn Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) between 2008 and 2014. A total of 14 patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Of the 27 CCA patients, 14 had intrahepatic CCA, 2 had extrahepatic CCA and 11 had hilar CCA. The 2-year survival rate was 40.7%. Tumor resectability, clinical symptoms and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score were found to be indicative of patient prognosis. In addition, the planning target volume and biologically effective radiotherapy dose were of prognostic value; however, initial treatment response was ambiguous in predicting survival time. The findings of the present study suggested that the currently used radiotherapy protocols for CCA may require modification to improve their efficacy. PMID:28105359

  11. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  12. No difference in dose distribution in organs at risk in postmastectomy radiotherapy with or without breast implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, Annelie; Unukovych, Dmytro; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Bjöhle, Judith; Wickman, Marie; Johansson, Hemming; Sandelin, Kerstin

    2014-01-09

    The aim of this study was to quantify the variation in doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung and heart) and the clinical target volume (CTV) in the presence of breast implants. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were identified through the National Breast Cancer Register. Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy between 2009 and 2011 and completing a full course of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) were eligible. All included patients (n = 818) were identified in the ARIA© oncology information system and further stratified for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR+, n = 162) and no immediate breast reconstruction (IBR-, n = 656). Dose statistics for ipsilateral lung, heart and CTV were retrieved from the system. Radiation plans for patients with chest wall (CW) only (n = 242) and CW plus lymph nodes (n = 576) irradiation were studied separately.The outcome variables were dichotomized as follows: lung, V(20Gy) ≤ 30% vs. V(20Gy) > 30%; heart, D(mean) ≤ 5 Gy vs. D(mean) > 5 Gy; CTV, V95% ≥ median vs. V95% < median.In the univariate and multivariate regression models no correlation between potential confounders (i.e. breast reconstruction, side of PMRT, CW index) and the outcome variables was found. Multivariate analysis of CW plus lymph nodes radiation plans, for example, showed no association of breast reconstruction with dosimetric outcomes in neither lung nor heart- lung V(20Gy) (odds ratio [OR]: 0.6, 95%CI, 0.4 to 1.0, p = 0.07) or heart D(mean) (OR: 1.2, 95%CI, 0.5 to 3.1, p = 0.72), respectively.CTV was statistically significantly larger in the IBR+ group (i.e. included breast implant), but no correlation between the implant type and dosimetric characteristics of the organs at risk was revealed.In the current study, the presence of breast implants during postmastectomy radiotherapy was not associated with increased doses to ipsilateral lung and heart, but CTV definition and its dosimetric characteristics urge further

  13. No difference in dose distribution in organs at risk in postmastectomy radiotherapy with or without breast implant reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the variation in doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung and heart) and the clinical target volume (CTV) in the presence of breast implants. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were identified through the National Breast Cancer Register. Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy between 2009 and 2011 and completing a full course of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) were eligible. All included patients (n = 818) were identified in the ARIA© oncology information system and further stratified for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR+, n = 162) and no immediate breast reconstruction (IBR-, n = 656). Dose statistics for ipsilateral lung, heart and CTV were retrieved from the system. Radiation plans for patients with chest wall (CW) only (n = 242) and CW plus lymph nodes (n = 576) irradiation were studied separately. The outcome variables were dichotomized as follows: lung, V20Gy ≤ 30% vs. V20Gy > 30%; heart, Dmean ≤ 5 Gy vs. Dmean > 5 Gy; CTV, V95% ≥ median vs. V95% < median. In the univariate and multivariate regression models no correlation between potential confounders (i.e. breast reconstruction, side of PMRT, CW index) and the outcome variables was found. Multivariate analysis of CW plus lymph nodes radiation plans, for example, showed no association of breast reconstruction with dosimetric outcomes in neither lung nor heart- lung V20Gy (odds ratio [OR]: 0.6, 95%CI, 0.4 to 1.0, p = 0.07) or heart Dmean (OR: 1.2, 95%CI, 0.5 to 3.1, p = 0.72), respectively. CTV was statistically significantly larger in the IBR+ group (i.e. included breast implant), but no correlation between the implant type and dosimetric characteristics of the organs at risk was revealed. In the current study, the presence of breast implants during postmastectomy radiotherapy was not associated with increased doses to ipsilateral lung and heart, but CTV definition and its

  14. Number of Negative Lymph Nodes Can Predict Survival after Postmastectomy Radiotherapy According to Different Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Gang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; Bao, Yong; He, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of the number of negative lymph nodes (NLNs) in breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes after mastectomy and its predictive value for radiotherapy efficacy of different breast cancer subtypes (BCS). Methods: The records of 1,260 breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes who received mastectomy between January 1998 and December 2007 were reviewed. The prognostic impact and predictive value of the number of NLNs with respect to locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up time was 58 months, and 444 patients (35.2%) received postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Univariate and multivariate Cox survival analysis indicated the number of NLNs was an independent prognostic factor of LRFS, DFS, and OS. Patients with a higher number of NLNs had better survival. PMRT improved the LRFS of patients with ≤ 8 NLNs ( p < 0.001), while failing to improve the LRFS of patients with > 8 NLNs (p = 0.075). In patients with luminal A subtype, PMRT improved the LRFS, DFS, and OS of patients with ≤ 8 NLNs, but in patients with > 8 NLNs only the LRFS was improved. For patients with luminal B subtype, PMRT only improved the LRFS of patients with ≤ 8 NLNs. The number of NLNs had no predictive value for the efficacy with PMRT in Her2+ and triple-negative subtypes. Conclusions: The number of NLNs is a prognostic indicator in patients with node-positive breast cancer, and it can predict the efficacy of PMRT according to different BCS. PMID:25663944

  15. 'Reconstruction: before or after postmastectomy radiotherapy?' A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berbers, Judith; van Baardwijk, Angela; Houben, Ruud; Heuts, Esther; Smidt, Marjolein; Keymeulen, Kristien; Bessems, Maud; Tuinder, Stefania; Boersma, Liesbeth J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate the effect of timing of the reconstruction and radiotherapy, with respect to complication rate and cosmetic outcome, with a special focus on the timing of the placement of the definite implant. PubMed was searched for publications between January 2000 and December 2012. Of 37 eligible studies, timing of reconstruction, type, and incidence of complications were recorded. First, we calculated the weighted mean including confidence intervals for complications and cosmetic outcome overall, and for the following subgroups: (1) Autologous reconstruction after radiotherapy; (2) Definite implant reconstruction after radiotherapy; (3) Autologous reconstruction before radiotherapy; (4) Definite implant reconstruction before radiotherapy. A second analysis was performed using only studies that directly compared group 1 versus 3 and 2 versus 4. A large variation in complication rates (8.7-70.0%) and in acceptable cosmetic outcome (41.4-93.3%) was reported. The first analysis showed more complications and a higher revision rate if an implant reconstruction was performed after radiotherapy; for autologous reconstruction fibrosis occurred more often if reconstruction was applied first. The second analysis showed no significant differences in total complication rate. Only implant failure occurred more often if applied after radiotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 3.03 [1.59-5.77]). No differences were found in both patient and physician satisfaction. A definite implant reconstruction placed before radiotherapy limits the rate of complications. For autologous reconstruction, less fibrosis is seen if reconstruction is performed after radiotherapy, but timing had no significant impact on total complication rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-risk endometrial cancer may be benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy plus chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jin-Wei; Deng, Xiao-Hong

    2012-12-01

    To present patterns of practice and outcomes in the adjuvant treatment of intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer. Retrospective data on 224 women with intermediate-risk and high-risk endometrial cancer from 1999 to 2006 were reviewed. All patients underwent surgical staging. Patterns of adjuvant treatment, consisting of pelvic radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy plus chemotherapy, were assessed. The 3- and 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The difference in 5-year DSS rate was statistically significant between adjuvant group and non-adjuvant group (80.65% vs. 63.80%, P=0.040). In 110 high-risk patients who underwent adjuvant treatment, both 5-year DSS rate and recurrent rate were significantly different in combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy group compared with radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone groups (DSS rate, P=0.049; recurrent rate, P=0.047). In 83 intermediate-risk women who underwent adjuvant treatment, there was no significant difference in 5-year DSS rate and recurrence rate among the combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone groups (DSS rate, P=0.776; recurrent rate, P=0.937). Adjuvant radiotherapy plus chemotherapy is associated with a higher 5-year DSS rate and lower recurrence rate compared with radiotherapy alone and chemotherapy alone in high-risk endometrial cancer patients. Patients with intermediate-risk endometrial cancer may be not likely to benefit from adjuvant combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  17. Hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-11-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging.

  18. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  19. Cost-effectiveness Analysis Of Breast Reconstruction Options In The Setting Of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Using The BREAST-Q

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Ro, Teresa; Cohen, Wess A.; Mehrara, Babak J.; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Disa, Joseph J.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Matros, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background A consensus is lacking on a uniform reconstructive algorithm for patients with locally advanced breast cancer who require postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Both delayed autologous and immediate prosthetic techniques have inherent advantages and complications. The study hypothesis is that implants are more cost-effective than autologous reconstruction in the setting of PMRT because of immediate restoration of the breast mound. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis model using the payer perspective was created comparing delayed autologous and immediate prosthetic techniques against the do-nothing option of mastectomy without reconstruction. Costs were obtained from Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2010 database. Effectiveness was determined using the BREAST-Q patient reported outcome measure. A Breast-QALY was considered one year of perfect breast health related quality of life. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated for both treatments compared to the do-nothing option. Results BREAST-Q scores were obtained from patients who underwent immediate prosthetic reconstruction (n=196), delayed autologous reconstruction (n=76) and mastectomy alone (n=71). The ICER for immediate prosthetic and delayed autologous reconstruction compared to mastectomy alone was $57,906 and $102,509 respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that the ICER for both treatment options decreased with increasing life expectancy. Conclusion For patients with advanced breast cancer who require PMRT, immediate prosthetic based breast reconstruction is a cost-effective approach. Despite high complication rates, implant use can be rationalized based on low cost as well as HRQOL benefit derived from early breast mound restoration. If greater life expectancy is anticipated, autologous transfer is cost-effective as well and may be a superior option. PMID:26910695

  20. Impact of Radiotherapy on Psychological, Financial, and Sexual Aspects in Postmastectomy Carcinoma Breast Patients: A Prospective Study and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelam; Purkayastha, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT) on psychological, financial, and sexual aspects in postmastectomy carcinoma breast patients affecting their quality of life (QOL) before, during, and after RT with a strong emphasis on their management and rehabilitation aspects. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in a specialized institution, comprising sixty women. Two standardized questionnaires European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30-item Quality of Life Questionnaire and Quality of Life Questionnaire breast cancer-23 (QLQ-BR23) for health-related quality, translated and validated for the Hindi language were used. The scores’ manual of the EORTC was used to calculate the domain scores of the questionnaires. Results: According to the first questionnaire, the emotional function was most affected even at onset of RT treatment and it was worst at the completion of RT treatment with a mean score of 63.75. The global QOL score was also worst at the end of radiation treatment with a mean score of 32.36, while the score 3 months after completion of treatment was 68.16. The symptoms with the highest scores were insomnia with a worst scoring at completion of treatment (29.99), fatigue (26.57), and pain (23.05). According to the QLQ-BR23, the mean score for side effects such as sexual functioning was minimum 0.55 at the completion of RT, which improved to 11.66 on the first follow-up after 3 months. Mean future perspective score which was 57.22 before the start of RT which was reduced to 50.55 at completion, which means that many women experience side effects of RT and impaired sexual satisfaction. Conclusions: Women with breast cancer showed changes in the following domains: financial, emotional, sexual satisfaction, and future prospects. The most frequently mentioned symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, and pain. PMID:28217733

  1. Characteristics and prognosis of patients with early-stage endometrial cancer who refuse adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koskas, Martin; Huchon, Cyrille; Amant, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the risk factors for refusing adjuvant radiotherapy in patients who have undergone surgery for early-stage endometrial cancer, and to compare their survival rates with patients who have undergone adjuvant radiotherapy. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database for patients operated on for histologically-proven early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer, between 1988 and 2012, were screened. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses tested the associations between refusal of adjuvant radiotherapy and demographic, tumoral, and management characteristics. Overall and cancer-related survival rates were compared between 376 patients who refused adjuvant radiotherapy and 752 patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy, matched for demographics (age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, region), tumoral (grade, FIGO stage, size), and management (lymphadenectomy performed) criteria. 434 of the 16,014 patients (2.7%) who were proposed adjuvant radiotherapy refused this treatment. Older, widowed, divorced, or separated patients, who were recently diagnosed and managed in the Northern plains or Pacific coast (USA), with limited tumoral extension, were more likely to refuse adjuvant radiotherapy. Five-year cancer-related survival was significantly lower in patients who refused adjuvant radiotherapy (88.9% vs. 95.7%, p<0.001) whereas overall survival did not significantly differ between the two groups (76.4% vs. 83.7%, p=0.23). We have identified the patients' characteristics related to refusal of adjuvant radiotherapy. Refusing adjuvant radiotherapy increased cancer-related death but probably does not reduce overall survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  3. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Methods Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Results Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24495453

  4. Incidence of radiation toxicity in cervical cancer and endometrial cancer patients treated with radiotherapy alone versus adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roszak, Andrzej; Wareńczak-Florczak, Żaneta; Bratos, Krystyna; Milecki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Aim The study was made to evaluate early and late toxicity in a diversified group of patients receiving definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy in terms of clinical diagnosis and treatment methods. Background Radiotherapy is a standard way of treatment in cervical and endometrial cancer patients, both as definitive and adjuvant therapy. But every radiation treatment may be involved with toxicity. Materials and methods A detailed analysis was performed of 263 patients with gynaecological cancer treated with definitive (90 patients with cervical cancer received radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy exclusively) and adjuvant radiotherapy (38 with cervical and 135 with endometrial cancer). Results Acute reactions were found in 51.3% and late reactions were found in 14.8% of patients. It was stated that early (p < 0.007) and late (p < 0.003) post radiation reaction appear more frequently in women treated with definitive than adjuvant radiotherapy. The analysis of the whole group revealed higher rate of toxicity, both early and late, in the gastrointestinal tract than in the urinary system (p < 0.004). Comparing the subgroups, it was found that intestinal reactions occurred more frequently in the definitive radiotherapy group than in the adjuvant one. The occurrence of side effects was associated with the prolongation of total irradiation time due to necessary interruptions of radiotherapy. The comparison of the subgroups showed that interruptions occurred more frequently in patients receiving definitive rather than adjuvant radiotherapy (17.7–2.9%). Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy compared with adjuvant treatment may by associated with higher percentage of side effects caused by dose of therapy and correlation with chemotherapy. PMID:24377035

  5. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Roncadin, Mario; Perin, Tiziana; Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica; Quitadamo, Daniela; Massarut, Samuele; Carbone, Antonino; Trovo, Mauro G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

  6. Adjuvant treatment for Stage I seminoma: Why radiotherapy is better than carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Yathiraj, Prahlad H; Sharan, Krishna; Fernandes, Donald J; Vidyasagar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant treatment options for Stage I seminoma include active surveillance, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Active surveillance may not be ideal for the average Indian patient. Of the two accepted adjuvant therapy options, namely single-dose carboplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the retroperitoneal nodes, though it intuitively appears more appealing, a deeper review reveals the potential drawbacks of chemotherapy. This article highlights the misconceptions regarding carboplatin and provides reasons for an argument why radiotherapy is better when a patient with Stage I seminoma chooses to undergo adjuvant treatment.

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious.

  8. Pushing the limits of hypofractionation for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Randomised trials report no disadvantages for hypofractionation based on 2.67 Gy fractions of adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy in terms of local tumour control and late adverse effects. Current 15- or 16-fraction schedules may not represent the limits of this approach, and limited data suggest that fewer larger fractions can be delivered safely provided appropriate downward adjustments are made to the total dose. Therapeutic gain will be undermined if breast cancer proves to be, on average, significantly less sensitive to fraction size than the dose-limiting late reacting normal tissues. If so, shortening overall treatment time might wholly or partially offset these limitations, and these uncertainties are addressed in ongoing or planned trials. Meanwhile, the experience of accelerated partial breast irradiation suggests a strong volume effect for late normal tissue damage. Schedules that may be safe when delivered to small partial volumes cannot be assumed to be safe if delivered to larger partial volumes or to the whole breast. Based on current evidence, testing the effectiveness of a 5-fraction schedule of hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy appears to be a realisable research objective.

  9. Selection criteria for postmastectomy radiotherapy in t1-t2 tumors with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Moo, Tracy Ann; McMillan, Robert; Lee, Michele; Stempel, Michelle; Patil, Sujata; Ho, Alice; El-Tamer, Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is well established in patients with ≥4 positive axillary lymph nodes (ALN); indications in 1 to 3 positive ALN remains controversial. We examined clinicopathologic criteria used for PMRT selection and compared locoregional recurrence (LRR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) among patients with and without PMRT. Between 1995 and 2006, a total of 1,331 patients with T1-T2 tumors and 1 to 3 positive ALN underwent mastectomy. We excluded T3/T4 tumors and neoadjuvant chemotherapy; we analyzed 1,087 patients (924 without PMRT, 163 with PMRT). Chi square testing compared clinicopathologic features between groups. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis examined the association between PMRT and LRR, RFS, and OS. PMRT patients were more likely to be ≤50 years old (p = 0.001) and to have larger tumors (p = 0.01), disease of a higher histologic grade (p = 0.03), lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p < 0.0001), a greater number of positive ALN (p < 0.0001), extranodal invasion (p < 0.0001), and macroscopic ALN metastases (p < 0.0001). With a median follow-up of 7 years, PMRT and no-PMRT groups were similar in LRR (p = 0.57), RFS (p = 0.70), and OS (p = 0.28). On multivariate analysis of the no-PMRT group, age ≤50 years (p = 0.002) and presence of LVI (p < 0.0001) were associated with LRR. Stratified by age and LVI, patients ≤50 years old and with LVI had the highest 5-year LRR, 10.1 versus 1.1 %, than in patients >50 years old without LVI (p < 0.001). By using clinicopathologic features, clinicians delivered PMRT to a select group of patients with T1-T2 tumors and 1 to 3 positive ALN, resulting in similarly low rates of 5-year LRR. Among patients not receiving PMRT, age ≤50 years and LVI were associated with increased LRR rates and warrant PMRT consideration.

  10. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in women with pathologic T3N0M0 breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Kahn, Shannon T; Jegadeesh, Naresh K; Liu, Xi; Subhedar, Preeti D; Arciero, Cletus A; Gillespie, Theresa W; Torres, Mylin A

    2017-08-01

    The authors determined the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) on overall survival (OS) among patients with pT3N0M0 breast cancer in the National Cancer Data Base. A total of 3437 patients with pT3N0M0 breast cancer who initially were treated with mastectomy between 2003 and 2011 were identified. Of these women, 1644 (47.8%) received PMRT (67% treated with chest wall RT alone and 33% treated with chest wall and regional lymph node irradiation). Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify characteristics associated with PMRT and OS. In addition, propensity score matching and interaction effect testing also were performed. PMRT was associated with age <40 years, private insurance coverage, treatment facility location within 10 miles of the patient's home zip code, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of 0, tumor size ≥7 cm, and treatment with chemotherapy or hormone therapy (all P<.05). PMRT was associated with improved 5-year OS (86.3% for patients treated with PMRT vs 66.4% for patients not treated with PMRT; P<.01). In addition to PMRT (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.87 [P<.01]), age ≤50 years, treatment at an academic/research program, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score of 0, tumor size <7 cm, chemotherapy receipt, and hormone therapy receipt were associated with improved OS on multivariable analyses (all P<.05). Interaction testing found that PMRT improved OS independent of age, facility type, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, tumor grade and size, surgical margin status, and receipt of chemotherapy or hormone therapy (all P>.1). Finally, propensity score matching analysis confirmed the impact of PMRT on OS (P = .02). It is interesting to note that regional lymph node irradiation did not improve OS versus chest wall RT alone (P = .09). Among patients with pT3N0M0 breast cancer in the National Cancer Data Base, PMRT was found to be associated with improved OS regardless of surgical margin status, tumor size, and

  11. Risk factors for locoregional recurrence after postmastectomy radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Wu, S.; Zhou, J.; Sun, J.; Li, F.; Lin, Q.; Guan, X.; Lin, H.; He, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated risk factors for locoregional recurrence (lrr) in breast cancer patients with 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy (pmrt). Methods Medical records (1998–2007) were retrospectively reviewed for the population of interest. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate; Cox regression models were used for univariate and multivariate analysis of predictors of breast cancer lrr. Results The study enrolled 439 patients. Median duration of follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year rates of locoregional recurrence-free survival (lrrfs), distant metastasis–free survival (dmfs), and breast cancer–specific survival (bcss) were 87.8%, 59.5%, and 70.7% respectively. In patients with lrr and no concomitant metastasis, and in those without lrr, the 5-year rates of dmfs were 21.1% and 65.7% respectively (p < 0.001), and the 5-year rates of bcss were 34.5% and 76.4% respectively (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed that menopausal status (p = 0.041), pN stage (p = 0.006), and positivity for her2 [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (p = 0.003)] or the triple-negative disease subtype (p < 0.001) were determinants of lrrfs. Multivariate analysis showed that pN3 stage [hazard ratio (hr): 2.241; 95% confidence interval (ci): 1.270 to 3.957; p = 0.005], her2 positivity (hr: 2.705; 95% ci: 1.371 to 5.335; p = 0.004), and triple-negative disease subtype (hr: 4.617; 95% ci: 2.192 to 9.723; p < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors of lrrfs. Conclusions In breast cancer patients with 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes who undergo pmrt for breast cancer, lrr significantly influences survival. Patients who developed lrr carried a high risk for distant metastasis and death. Pathologic stage (pN3), her2 positivity, and the triple-negative disease subtype are risk factors that significantly influence lrrfs. PMID:25302039

  12. Stage I testicular seminoma: a SEER analysis of contemporary adjuvant radiotherapy trends.

    PubMed

    Thong, Alan E; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Almario, Leanne; Ingels, Alexandre; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Gonzalgo, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    Patients with clinical stage I testicular seminoma have historically been treated with adjuvant radiotherapy in the United States. However, nearly 80% of patients on surveillance will not experience relapse and even with relapse, salvage rates approach 100%. It remains unclear how practice patterns have changed with recently accumulating evidence and changes in guidelines. In a population based setting we evaluated contemporary trends and factors that may affect the use of adjuvant radiotherapy. A total of 8,151 men diagnosed with stage I testicular seminoma from 2000 to 2009 were identified in the national SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) registry. A multivariate regression model was constructed to analyze the association of year, age, race, socioeconomic status, SEER region, pathological stage and tumor size with the administration of adjuvant radiotherapy. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy decreased significantly from 2000 to 2009. In 2000, 74.7% of patients received radiation, compared with only 37.7% of patients in 2009 (p <0.0001). Later year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased odds of receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (p <0.0001, 2000 to 2005 vs 2006 to 2009, OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.36-0.44). Men age 35 years or older (p <0.0002, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.09-1.32) and men in the highest socioeconomic index quartile (p <0.0001, OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.16-1.54) were more likely to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy for clinical stage I testicular seminoma has decreased significantly in the last decade. Older age and higher socioeconomic status are associated with higher rates of adjuvant radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer--a comparative review of radiotherapy technique with acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y V; Tang, J I; Choo, B A; Koh, M S; Lee, K M

    2014-01-01

    The addition of pelvic radiotherapy to brachytherapy (EBRT-BT) in early-stage endometrial cancer is controversial and may cause unnecessary toxicity. The incidence of acute toxicity of EBRT-BT will have an impact on clinical decision and patient compliance but is currently poorly understood. This study compares the acute toxicities of EBRT-BT versus BT alone. Seventy-nine patients with FIGO Stage IA-II endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, (EBRT-BT or BT alone) from 2001 to 2011 were included in the study. Medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively and toxicity graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Patients were followed up for at least three months post-treatment to assess resolution of toxicity. The mean age of the study group was 60.6 years. Median follow-up was four years. Forty patients received EBRT-BT. There was a 37% increase in Grade 1-3 diarrhea with the addition of pelvic radiotherapy (OR 18.67, p < 0.0005) and a 34% increase in lethargy (p < 0.0005). There was also an increased occurrence of genitourinary and skin toxicities. Two patients in the EBRT-BT group required hospitalisation for severe diarrhea and three patients were unable to complete the treatment. All acute toxicities had resolved by three months post treatment. EBRT-BT causes significantly more acute toxicities compared to BT alone. Patients should be informed of this during counselling.

  14. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Finelli, Antonio; Chen, Ronald C; Slovin, Susan; Stein, Mark N; Mendelson, David S; Wackett, Colin; Sandler, Howard M

    2014-12-01

    To endorse the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The panel determined that the guideline recommendations on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, published in August 2013, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, adding one qualifying statement that not all candidates for adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy have the same risk of recurrence or disease progression, and thus, risk-benefit ratios are not the same for all men. Those at the highest risk for recurrence after radical prostatectomy include men with seminal vesicle invasion, Gleason score 8 to 10, extensive positive margins, and detectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Physicians should discuss adjuvant radiotherapy with patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiotherapy with patients with PSA or local recurrence after prostatectomy. The discussion of radiotherapy should include possible short- and long-term adverse effects and potential benefits. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and multidisciplinary treatment team, keeping in mind that not all men are at equal risk of recurrence or clinically meaningful disease progression. Thus, the risk-benefit ratio will differ for each patient. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical

  15. Adjuvant whole abdominal radiotherapy in epithelial cancer of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Baeza, Mario R; Olfos, Patricio; Suarez, Eugenio

    2002-06-01

    To reexamine the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in optimally debulked patients. Between January 1985 and April 1998, 60 patients were treated with adjuvant whole abdominal radiotherapy (A-WART). The stage distribution was Stage IC in 17 patients, Stage II in 9, and Stage III in 34. The grade distribution was Grade 1 in 9 patients, Grade 2 in 27, and Grade 3 in 24; thus, 60% of the patients had Stage III disease and 40% had Grade 3 tumors. After surgery, no residuum was left in 42 (70%), 2 cm in 5 (8%) of 60 patients. Of the 60 patients, 19 also received platinum-based chemotherapy; in 12 of the 19, the chemotherapy was before A-WART. Thirty-seven of the patients had undergone previous abdominal procedures and a second-look operation was performed in 25% of them. A-WART consisted of 22 Gy in 22 fractions, at 5 fractions weekly in 90% of the patients. The remaining 10% received 25 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. The A-WART was delivered using a 4-MV linear accelerator. After abdominal irradiation, a boost to the pelvis was given to reach 45 Gy at 1.8 cGy/fraction, using a 4-15-MV linear accelerator. Treatment was delivered in a median of 50 days (range 48-70). In 12 (20%) of the 60 patients, a transient treatment interruption occurred because of acute toxicity, mainly vomiting and diarrhea. The overall survival rate was 55% at 5 years (median follow-up 96.5 months). Patients with low-histologic grade tumors (Grade 1-2) had a better 5-year survival rate (66%) than those with Grade 3 tumors (35%; p <0.03). A tendency for better survival was found for those with Stage I-II than for those with Stage III (69% vs. 43%). Nonetheless, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.17). For patients receiving chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate was 51%, not statistically different from the 58% 5-year survival rate observed among those patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.9). The abdominal control rate was 83%. Thirty

  16. Efficacy of Rasayana Avaleha as adjuvant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in reducing adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Purvi; Thakar, A. B.; Baghel, M. S.; Sisodia, Arvind; Deole, Yogesh

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is the most dreadful disease affecting mankind. The available treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy have cytotoxic effects, which are hazardous to the normal cells of the patient, causing many unnecessary effects. This further leads to complications of the therapy, impaired health, and deterioration of quality of life, resulting in mandatory stoppage of the treatment. In the present study, the efficacy of an Ayurvedic formulation, Rasayana Avaleha, has been evaluated as an adjuvant medication to modern radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A total of 36 cancer patients were registered in this trial and were divided into two groups, group A and group B. In group A, the patients were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy along with adjuvant Rasayana Avaleha (RT + CT + RA), while in group B only radiotherapy and chemotherapy (RT + CT) were given, as the control group. After assessing the results, it was observed that Rasayana Avaleha gave better results in controlling the adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in comparison with the control group. Therefore, Rasayana Avaleha has proved to be an effective adjuvant therapy in protecting patients from the adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:22048532

  17. Adjuvant Whole Brain Radiotherapy: Strong Emotions Decide But Rational Studies Are Needed

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. Asher, Anthony L.; Farace, Elana

    2008-04-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival.

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, Olivier . E-mail: opradier@gwdg.de; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO{sub 2} laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy.

  19. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathological high-risk muscle invasive bladder cancer: time to reconsider?

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Brian C.; Eapen, Libni J.; Bahl, Amit; Murthy, Vedang; Roubaud, Guilhem; Orré, Mathieu; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Shariat, Shahrokh; Larré, Stephane; Richaud, Pierre; Christodouleas, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Radical cystectomy with extended pelvic lymph-node dissection, associated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, remains the standard of care for advanced, non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Loco-regional control is a key factor in the outcome of patients since it is related to overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and cause-specific survival. The risk of loco-regional recurrence (LRR) is correlated to pathological factors as well as the extent of the lymphadenectomy. In addition, neither pre- nor post-operative chemotherapy have shown a clear impact on LRR-free survival. Several recent publications have led to the development of a nomogram predicting the risk of LRR, in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy. Given the high risk of LRR for selected patients and improvements in radiation techniques that can reduce toxicity, there is a growing interest in adjuvant radiotherapy; international cooperative groups have come together to provide the rationale in favor of adjuvant radiotherapy. Clinical trials in order to reduce the risk of pelvic relapse are opened based on this optimizing patient selection. The aim of this critical literature review is to provide an overview of the rationale supporting the studies of adjuvant radiation for patients with pathologic high-risk MIBC. PMID:27785427

  1. The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy combined with postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jong; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Young Tae

    2013-09-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether adjuvant chemotherapy combined with postoperative radiotherapy would have benefits for the disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Electronic searches for studies of adjuvant chemotherapy combined with postoperative radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients between March 1971 and March 2012 were made on MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane library. Articles with more than 4 stars on the Newcastle-Ottawa scale or a score of more than 4 on the modified Jadad scale were included. A meta-analysis was performed, and pooled hazard ratios (HR) of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between patients whose adjuvant chemotherapy was combined with radiotherapy (the CTx+RTx group) and patients with adjuvant radiotherapy only (the RTx group) were derived from the fixed effect model or random effect model. Three observational studies and 3 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included in the final analysis. Subgroup analysis for FIGO stage showed that the CTx+RTx group had a more significant survival benefit compared to that of the RTx group in advanced stage endometrial cancer (OS HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.80; PFS HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37-0.77), but no significant benefit in early stage endometrial cancer (OS HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.70-1.32; PFS HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.39-2.58). This meta-analysis suggests that adjuvant chemotherapy combined with postoperative radiotherapy could probably reduce disease progression and overall death in patients with advanced-stage disease. In order to examine whether the multimodal treatment has benefit in high-risk endometrial cancer, we need further large-scale RCTs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Timing of radiotherapy and outcome in patients receiving adjuvant endocrine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Günther

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between time from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy and clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Methods Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. Analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on the median number of days between BCS and radiotherapy and into 4 groups based on the quartile of time between BCS and radiotherapy. Endpoints were time to local recurrence (TLR), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results The median time between BCS and radiotherapy was 77 days. Radiotherapy timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors no significant effect of radiotherapy delay of up to 20 weeks was found. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) (radiotherapy within 77 days vs. after 77 days) were 0.94 (95% CI 0.47–1.87) for TLR, 1.05 (95% CI 0.82–1.34) for DFS and 1.07 (95% CI 0.77–1.49) for OS. For TLR the adjusted HRs for ≤48 days, 49–77 days, and 78–112 days were 0.90 (CI 95% 0.34–2.37), 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33–2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33–2.41), respectively relative to ≥ 113 days. Conclusions Radiotherapy delay of up to 20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, timing of radiotherapy was not significantly associated with TLR, DFS, or OS. PMID:20729007

  3. Treatment outcomes after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Kyung-Ja; Park, Kyung-Ran; Ha, Boram; Kim, Yi-Jun; Jung, Wonguen; Lee, Rena; Kim, Seung Cheol; Moon, Hye Sung; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jihae

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0-50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  4. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Improves Disease-Free Survival of High Risk of Locoregional Recurrence Breast Cancer Patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 Positive Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients). Results The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) (P = 0.010). Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005), but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P = 0.494), disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.215), and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.645). For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0–1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence) of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence) (80.9%, P < 0.001). PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001) and DFS (P = 0.027) in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients. Conclusions PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes. PMID:25781605

  5. Patient-centered outcomes of breast reconstruction in the setting of post-mastectomy radiotherapy: A comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    El-Sabawi, Bassim; Ho, Adelyn L; Sosin, Michael; Patel, Ketan M

    2017-06-01

    The impact of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) on patient-centered outcomes of breast reconstruction remains unclear. This comprehensive review aims to consolidate the available data regarding aesthetic outcomes, patient satisfaction, and the BREAST-Q(©) following breast reconstruction in the setting of PMRT to facilitate the informed consent and shared decision-making process. A systematic search of the literature published from 2000 to 2016 in the PubMed/MEDLINE database was performed to identify all manuscripts reporting aesthetic outcome, patient satisfaction, or BREAST-Q(©) scores of patients undergoing PMRT and breast reconstruction. The initial search identified 1604 potential titles. Ultimately, 29 manuscripts fit inclusion criteria and were included in this review. A total of 21 studies reported measures of aesthetic outcomes (1611 patients). Positive aesthetic outcomes ("good" or "better") widely varied in patients with prosthetic reconstruction and ranged from 36% to 100%. In addition, positive aesthetic outcomes following autologous reconstruction ranged from 70% to 90%. Measures of patient satisfaction were evaluated in eight studies (722 patients). Satisfaction rates ranged from 41% to 90% following prosthetic reconstruction and 74%-75% following autologous reconstruction. BREAST-Q(©) findings were reported in four studies (575 patients), all evaluating outcomes following prosthetic reconstruction. The range of satisfaction with breasts was 48.9-57.2; satisfaction with outcome, 63.8-70.2; psychosocial well-being, 63.9-72.3; sexual well-being, 45.4-55.4; and physical well-being, 71.7-75.1. Breast reconstruction in the setting of PMRT is associated with poorer outcomes. However, the majority of studies indicate that acceptable rates of positive aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction can be achieved in the setting of PMRT. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    2016-12-20

    Purpose A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. Recommendations The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

  7. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients

  8. Stage IB endometrial cancer. Does lymphadenectomy replace adjuvant radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Bottke, Dirk; Wiegel, Thomas; Kreienberg, Rolf; Kurzeder, Christian; Sauer, Georg

    2007-11-01

    The role of surgical lymph node dissection and adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in early stage endometrial cancer is no longer clearly defined. The increased appreciation of lymphadenectomy and the absence of survival advantage from adjuvant RT rise controversies how patients should adequately be treated in stage IB endometrial cancer. The aim of this review is to rule out the validity of either treatment option and determine which preference provides the best therapeutic benefit. Reports of relevant studies obtained from a search of PubMed and studies referenced in those reports were reviewed. Based on the available data in the literature, for stage IB grade 1 or 2, the risk of pelvic relapse is considered too low to justify pelvic RT. However, intravaginal RT (IVRT) should be recommended for those >or= 60 years old or with lymphovascular invasion (LVI). For patients with stage IB grade 3 (and IC all grades), the treatment recommendation is mainly based on whether surgical lymph node staging was performed. These patients have--without surgical lymph node staging--a high risk of pelvic recurrence and should therefore primarily undergo relaparotomy for lymphadenectomy or pelvic RT as second choice. If these patients had a surgical lymph node staging, then IVRT alone is a reasonable alternative to pelvic RT. Overall survival may not be the only ideal endpoint for stage IB endometrial cancer since causes of death are mostly other than endometrial cancer. Conventional pelvic RT may be overtreatment in some patients, in particular in those patients with a large number of negative lymph nodes after lymphadenectomy. However, negative surgical staging should not be understood as adjuvant RT can be omitted in all patients.

  9. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  10. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E.; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W.; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  11. Evaluation of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.H.; O'Neill, M. Jr.; DeMuth, W.E. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    One hundred eighteen patients with lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed to determine whether postoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves survival. Patterns of treatment failure and three year NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates were assessed according to extent of tumor spread, histology, and treatment method. Patients with hilar or mediastinal node metastases were at higher risk of local failure compared to those with negative nodes. Postoperative RT reduced local recurrence and improved 3 year survival among patients with positive nodes. However, postoperative RT did not improve survival among those with negative nodes. Our data indicated that patients with positive hilar or mediastinal nodes may require postoperative RT to improve survival.

  12. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in pT3N0M0 breast cancer: is it needed?

    PubMed

    Helintö, M; Blomqvist, C; Heikkilä, P; Joensuu, H

    1999-09-01

    It is not been established whether breast cancer patients who have a primary tumor 5 cm or larger but no axillary nodal or distant metastases at the time of the diagnosis (pT3N0M0) benefit from post-operative radiation therapy after mastectomy. We identified 81 patients with T3N0M0 breast cancer out of the total of 4190 breast cancer patients treated in one university radiotherapy department from 1987 to 1994 from the department patient registry, and examined the clinical records and histopathological slides. Only 38 of the 81 patients had true pT3N0M0 breast cancer after the review (0.9% of the 4190 new breast cancer patients registered in the department from 1987 to 1994). Three (60%) of the five patients who were not treated with post-operative radiation therapy developed locoregional recurrence of breast cancer as compared with only three (9%) of the 33 patients who were given post-operative radiotherapy during a median follow-up of 58 months (P = 0.0003). Patients who were given post-operative radiotherapy had a better distant disease-free survival rate (P = 0.04) and overall survival rate (P = 0.03) than the ones who were not treated with radiation therapy after surgery. Of the 29 patients who had chest wall irradiation only, one had in-field recurrence at the surgical scar, one both at the scar and the unirradiated axilla, and only one (3%) solely in the axilla. Patients with true pT3N0M0 breast cancer are rare. The results suggest that women with pT3N0M0 breast cancer benefit from post-operative radiotherapy, but the value of irradiating the dissected ipsilateral axilla remains unsettled.

  13. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  15. Investigation into dosimetric effect of a MAGNA-SITE{sup TM} tissue expander on post-mastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Rosemary C.A.; Morgan, Andrew M.

    2005-06-15

    It is increasingly common for radiotherapy departments to encounter high density objects in patients being planned for radiotherapy. Many cases, such as artificial hip prostheses, are well documented. In our cancer center we have recently come across a new type of implant--a McGhan Style 133 Tissue Expander--implanted in patients who have undergone a mastectomy and will in future have breast reconstruction. This type of implant contains a small rare earth magnet encased in a titanium body, which induces significant perturbations in the dose distribution. These perturbations have been measured using a p-type semiconductor diode. Attenuation of up to 30% of local dose has been observed for a single beam. However, in more realistic clinical situations using tangential parallel opposed beams, it is estimated that part of the planning target volume maybe be underdosed by approximately 10%. Comparisons have been made between measured attenuation and that calculated by a treatment planning system, which demonstrates inadequate modeling of the dose perturbation caused by the implant in this case.

  16. Survival of women with clear cell and papillary serous endometrial cancer after adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Robert; Kluck, Robert; Rief, Harald; Rieken, Stefan; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja

    2014-06-18

    Type II (papillary serous and clear cell) endometrial carcinoma (EC) is a rare subgroup and is considered to have an unfavorable prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to elucidate the meaning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for clinical outcome and to define prognostic factors in these patients (pts). From 2004-2012 forty-two pts with type II EC underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at our department. Median age was 72 years. The majority were early stage carcinomas (FIGO I n = 27 [64.3%], FIGO II n = 4 [9.5%], FIGO III n = 11 [26.2%]. Seven pts (16.7%) received adjuvant chemotherapy (ChT). Pts were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (IVB) boost. Five-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS), distant metastases free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.4%, 78%, and 64.5% respectively. LRFS was better with lower pT stage, without lymphangiosis (L0), without haemangiosis (V0) and negative resection margins (R0). DMFS was prolonged in lymph node negatives (N0), L0, V0 and R0. OS was improved in younger pts, N0, L0, V0 and after lymphadenectomy (LNE). Multivariate analysis revealed haemangiosis (V1) as the only independent prognostic factor for OS (p = .014) and DMFS (p = .008). For LRFS pT stage remained as an independent prognostic factor (p = .028). Adjuvant RT with EBRT/IVB ensures adequate local control in type II EC, but control rates remain lower than in type I EC. A benefit of additional adjuvant ChT could not be demonstrated and a general omission of EBRT cannot be recommended at this point. Lymphovascular infiltration and pT stage might be the best predictive factors for a benefit from combined local and systemic treatment.

  17. The importance of adjuvant chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy in high-risk early stage endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jutzi, Leah; Hoskins, Paul; Lim, Peter; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Tinker, Anna; Kwon, Janice S

    2013-12-01

    To determine the impact of a policy change in which women with high-risk early stage endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This is a population-based retrospective cohort study of British Columbia Cancer Registry patients diagnosed from 2008 to 2012 with high-risk early stage EEC, who received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after primary surgery. High-risk early stage was defined as the presence of two or more high-risk uterine factors: grade 3 tumor, more than 50% myometrial invasion, and/or cervical stromal involvement. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 3 or 4 cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy, followed by pelvic radiotherapy. Sites and rate of recurrence were compared to a historical cohort diagnosed from 2005 to 2008 in which none of the patients received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated. The study includes 55 patients. All patients except for 2 received at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy. All patients received pelvic radiotherapy except for 2 who received brachytherapy only. Median follow-up was 27 months (7-56 months). Four patients (7.3%) recurred, including three with distant recurrence only and one with both a pelvic and paraaortic nodal recurrence. The historical cohort had a 29.4% recurrence rate, and therefore the hazard ratio for recurrence was 0.27 (95% CI 0.02-4.11). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 88.6% and 97.3%, respectively. Patients with high-risk early stage endometrial carcinoma treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy have a low rate of recurrence compared to those not receiving such therapy. © 2013.

  18. Comparison of "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" and six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Ata, Ozlem; Yılmaz, Setenay Arzu; Celik, Cetin

    2013-10-01

    To compare "sandwich chemo-radiotherapy" with six cycles of chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy with respect to tolerability and acute toxicity. Twenty-five women with surgically staged IIIC endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of either three cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m²) and carboplatin (AUC 6) on a q21-day schedule followed by irradiation (45-50.4 Gy) or six cycles of the same chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Acute toxicity related to either chemotherapy or radiotherapy was evaluated. Median age was 61.5 years (range 36-83 years). Eleven patients had sandwich chemo-radiotherapy, and the other 14 patients had 6 cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. Three out of the five patients who could not complete all the cycles in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Acute radiotherapy related grade 1-2 gastrointestinal system (GIS) and genitourinary system (GUS) toxicities were observed in 72.8 and 63.6 % of patients, respectively, for sandwich group. Undesired treatment breaks in the course of radiotherapy were observed in six patients for sandwich chemo-radiotherapy and in one patient receiving six cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. All the patients who had undesired treatment breaks in the sandwich chemo-radiotherapy group had pelvic and para-aortic radiotherapy. Sandwich chemo-radiotherapy seems to be more toxic particularly for patients who had pelvic and para-aortic irradiation. Therefore, it might be more convenient to delay radiotherapy after six cycles of chemotherapy for patients with the indication of pelvic para-aortic radiotherapy.

  19. Treatment outcomes after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Kyung-Ja; Park, Kyung-Ran; Ha, Boram; Kim, Yi-Jun; Jung, Wonguen; Lee, Rena; Kim, Seung Cheol; Moon, Hye Sung; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jihae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. Materials and Methods The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. Results The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery. PMID:27703126

  20. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, A; Simera, I; Collingwood, M; Williams, C; Kitchener, H

    2007-10-01

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I endometrial cancer following surgery remains unclear. The management for these patients varies widely, particularly in stage I patients with different risk factors. Using the methodology of Cochrane Collaboration, we did a systematic and meta-analysis of all know randomised controlled trials which compared adjuvant radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer. The meta-analysis was carried out on four trials (three published and one unpublished) and a total of 1770 patients. The addition of pelvic external beam radiotherapy to surgery reduced locoregional recurrence, a relative risk (RR) of 0.28 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.44, P < 0.00001], which is a 72% reduction in the risk of pelvic relapse (95% CI 56% to 83%) and an absolute risk reduction of 6% (95% CI of 4% to 8%). The reduction in the risk of locoregional recurrence did not translate into a reduction in the risks of death from all causes, endometrial cancer death or distant recurrence. A subgroup analysis showed a trend towards the reduction in the risks of death from all causes and endometrial cancer in patients with multiple high risk factors (including stage 1c and grade 3). External beam pelvic radiotherapy should be considered in patients with multiple high-risk features including stage 1c and grade 3. However, it carries an inherent risk of damage and toxicity and should be avoided in stage 1 endometrial cancer patients with no high risk factors.

  1. Carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system--results of primary and adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, J.N.; Emami, B.

    1987-03-01

    From 1975-1983, 20 patients with primary carcinomas of the gallbladder (GB) or extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBD) were irradiated with curative intent at the Washington University Medical Center and affiliated hospitals. Of the 17 patients with EHBD cancer, one received adjuvant irradiation after gross resection with positive microscopic margins. All others received primary irradiation for unresectable tumors, or for gross residual tumor after incomplete resection. The 8 patients receiving Ir192 implant in addition to external radiation showed improved survival compared to the 9 receiving external only: median 15 months (range 1.5-34 + months) versus 7 months (range 2.5-21 months). Failures were predominantly local-regional, with only one patient showing metastatic spread without known local-regional tumor. Adjuvant radiation therapy was given after cholecystectomy to 3 patients with GB cancers showing tumor extension beyond the serosa or to regional lymphatics. Of these, two survived at 22+ and 27+ months; the third died of local recurrence at 5 1/2 months. Although numbers are small, these results appear to support the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with microscopic residual GB cancer. Aggressive local and regional radiotherapy can add to the quality and length of survival in both patient groups, that is, those with resectable lesions with high likelihood of microscopic residual, and also those with unresectable or gross residual disease after surgery.

  2. Carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary system--results of primary and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fields, J N; Emami, B

    1987-03-01

    From 1975-1983, 20 patients with primary carcinomas of the gallbladder (GB) or extrahepatic bile ducts (EHBD) were irradiated with curative intent at the Washington University Medical Center and affiliated hospitals. Of the 17 patients with EHBD cancer, one received adjuvant irradiation after gross resection with positive microscopic margins. All others received primary irradiation for unresectable tumors, or for gross residual tumor after incomplete resection. The 8 patients receiving Ir192 implant in addition to external radiation showed improved (p = 0.06) survival compared to the 9 receiving external only: median 15 months (range 1.5-34 + months) versus 7 months (range 2.5-21 months). Failures were predominantly local-regional, with only one patient showing metastatic spread without known local-regional tumor. Adjuvant radiation therapy was given after cholecystectomy to 3 patients with GB cancers showing tumor extension beyond the serosa or to regional lymphatics. Of these, two survived at 22+ and 27+ months; the third died of local recurrence at 5 1/2 months. Although numbers are small, these results appear to support the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with microscopic residual GB cancer. Aggressive local and regional radiotherapy can add to the quality and length of survival in both patient groups, that is, those with resectable lesions with high likelihood of microscopic residual, and also those with unresectable or gross residual disease after surgery.

  3. [Adjuvant radiotherapy for bladder cancer in patients with risk of locoregional recurrence: Who, what and how?

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Larré, S; Chapet, O; Latorzeff, I; Fléchon, A; Roubaud, G; Orré, M; Belhomme, S; Richaud, P

    2017-02-01

    Radical cystectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection remains the standard of care for non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Locoregional control is a key factor in the outcome of patients since it is related to overall survival, metastasis-free survival and specific survival. Locoregional recurrence rate is directly correlated to pathological results and the quality of lymphadenectomy. In addition, while pre- or postoperative chemotherapy improved overall survival, it showed no impact on locoregional recurrence-free survival. Several recent publications have led to the development of a nomogram that predicts the risk of locoregional recurrence, in order to identify patients for which adjuvant radiotherapy could be beneficial. International cooperative groups have then come together to provide the rational for adjuvant radiotherapy, reinforced by recent technical developments limiting toxicity, and to develop prospective studies to reduce the risk of relapse. The aim of this critical literature review is to provide an overview of the elements in favor of adjuvant radiation for patients treated for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  4. Overview on cardiac, pulmonary and cutaneous toxicity in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Guenzi, Marina; Fozza, Alessandra; Vidali, Cristiana; Rovea, Paolo; Meacci, Fiammetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of breast cancer represents the standard treatment for early disease. Breast conserving surgery associated with radiotherapy for stage I-II has been proven to be as equally effective as mastectomy in term of local control, distant disease, and overall survival. The growing minimal invasive surgical approach on the axillary region, and the new breast reconstructive techniques, will probably lead to a significant decrease of the rate of side-effects related to mastectomy. Therefore, the adverse events caused by adjuvant radiation still remain a challenge. Cutaneous, pulmonary and cardiac toxicity represent the main toxicities of adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Safety profile of radiation is strongly dependent on the multidisciplinary management of the single case (systemic treatment, endocrine therapy, surgery), individual characteristics (i.e., co-morbidities, age, habits), and radiation-related aspects. Radiation techniques development, and facilities implementation concerning organs-at-risk sparing systems (i.e., image-guided radiotherapy, tracking systems, respiratory gating), represent brand new tools for the clinical oncologist, that would certainly minimize toxicity profile in the next future. However, data reported from published literature will greatly help physicians, to give to the patients appropriate counseling regarding the efficacy and potential adverse events of treatments, thus optimizing the informed decision-making process.

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  6. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yidong

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  7. Sequential adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in endometrial cancer - results from two randomised studies

    PubMed Central

    Hogberg, Thomas; Signorelli, Mauro; de Oliveira, Carlos Freire; Fossati, Roldano; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; Sorbe, Bengt; Andersson, Håkan; Grenman, Seija; Lundgren, Caroline; Rosenberg, Per; Boman, Karin; Tholander, Bengt; Scambia, Giovanni; Reed, Nicholas; Cormio, Gennaro; Tognon, Germana; Clarke, Jackie; Sawicki, Thomasz; Zola, Paolo; Kristensen, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial cancer patients with high grade tumours, deep myometrial invasion, or advanced stage disease have a poor prognosis. Randomized studies have demonstrated prevention of loco-regional relapses with radiotherapy with no effect on overall survival. The possible additive effect of chemotherapy remains unclear. Two randomized clinical trials (NSGO-EC-9501/EORTC-55991 and MaNGO ILIADE-III) were undertaken to clarify if sequential combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy improves progression-free survival in high-risk endometrial cancer. The two studies were pooled. Methods Patients (n=540; 534 evaluable) with operated endometrial cancer FIGO stage I-III with no residual tumour and prognostic factors implying high-risk were randomly allocated to adjuvant radiotherapy with or without sequential chemotherapy. Results In the NSGO/EORTC study, combined modality treatment was associated with a 36 % reduction in the risk for relapse or death (HR 0.64, 95 % CI 0.41-0.99; P=0.04); two-sided tests were used. The result from the MaNGO-study pointed in the same direction (HR 0.61), but was not significant. In combined analysis, the estimate of risk for relapse or death was similar but with narrower confidence limits (HR 0.63, CI 0.44-0.89; P=0.009). Neither study showed significant differences in overall survival. In combined analysis, overall survival approached statistical significance (HR 0.69, CI 0.46-1.03; P = 0.07) and cancer-specific survival was significant (HR 0.55, CI 0.35-0.88; p=0.01). Conclusion Addition of adjuvant chemotherapy to radiation improves progression-free survival in operated endometrial cancer patients with no residual tumour and high risk profile. A remaining question for future studies is if addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy improves the results. PMID:20619634

  8. [Hypofractionated adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer: no signs of increased risk of cardiotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Aleman, Berthe M P; van Leeuwen, Floor E

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is frequently used in women with breast cancer to improve both local control of the tumour and overall survival. Hypofractionated regimens are increasingly being used as they involve fewer treatment sessions and, in terms of tumour control, the effects of conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated radiotherapy seem to be comparable. However, there is concern regarding increased cardiotoxicity following hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment to the left side. In order to determine if cardiac mortality increases with hypofractionation relative to conventional fractionation, a Canadian research group performed a retrospective analysis in 5334 women with breast cancer treated between 1990-1998 with postoperative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall only. At 15-year follow-up the authors concluded that cardiac mortality was not statistically different among patients with left-sided breast cancer whether treated with hypofractionated or conventionally fractionated whole breast/chest wall irradiation. This commentary discusses the data presented in the paper, puts them into perspective and describes the clinical implications.

  9. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  10. Surveillance versus adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high-risk stage I seminoma.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Mette S; Bandak, Mikkel; Kier, Maria G G; Lauritsen, Jakob; Agerbaek, Mads; Holm, Niels V; von der Maase, Hans; Daugaard, Gedske

    2017-04-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for patients with clinical stage I (CS-1) seminoma is controversial. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence with a tumor size ≥6 cm. Patients were treated with either adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or followed with surveillance. From the Danish Testicular Cancer database, the authors identified 473 patients with CS-1 seminoma with a tumor size ≥6 cm. Of these, 254 patients underwent adjuvant RT and 219 were followed with surveillance. Cumulative incidence function was applied to estimate the risk of disease recurrence, risk of second malignant neoplasm, and risk of receiving >1 line of treatment. Survival of the 2 groups was compared with the log-rank test and Cox model including age at diagnosis. No significant differences were found with regard to overall survival or risk of a second malignant neoplasm. Patients undergoing adjuvant RT received more treatments per patient than patients followed with surveillance, but there was no significant difference noted with regard to the risk of receiving >1 line of treatment. The 10-year cumulative incidence of disease recurrence was 32% versus 2.8%, respectively, for patients followed with surveillance and adjuvant RT. In patients followed with surveillance who developed disease recurrence, there was a high incidence of second recurrences after RT. The 10-year overall survival was found to be similar irrespective of primary treatment. Adjuvant RT was found to effectively reduce the rate of disease recurrence but resulted in the overtreatment of approximately two-thirds of the patients. The high incidence of second disease recurrences after RT in the patients followed with surveillance needs be addressed in future studies. Cancer 2017;123:1212-1218. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral testicular seminoma: a case report and a review of the pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel A; Ester, Elizabeth C; Leavitt, David; Sweet, Robert; Konety, Badrinath; Jha, Gautam; Cho, L Chinsoo

    2013-01-01

    Few cases of synchronous bilateral stage I seminomas have been reported in the world literature. We present a case of bilateral synchronous testicular seminoma, the current literature on the management of stage I seminoma, and the implications for radiotherapy. A forty-year-old man presented with synchronous bilateral classical seminomas, both stage IA. After undergoing bilateral inguinal orchiectomy, he received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy, with a standard paraaortic field. After 18 months of followup, he remains well, without evidence of recurrence. Bilateral germ cell tumors (BGCTs) are reported consistently at a low rate. Bilateral radical inguinal orchiectomy is standard of care, yet some groups have proposed an organ preservation approach. Of the reported cases of bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, most of them were treated with bilateral orchiectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although morbidity associated with radiotherapy directed at the abdomen is not negligible, adjuvant paraaortic radiotherapy remains safe and well-tolerated treatment regime. Bilateral synchronous stage I seminoma of the testes is rare. Organ preservation remains investigational. Chemotherapy is probably a reasonable option. We propose that patients with bilateral stage I synchronous GCT, with concordant seminoma histology, should be managed with bilateral orchiectomy, followed by paraaortic radiotherapy.

  12. Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of gall bladder carcinoma: What is the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2016-03-01

    Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC) is considered the fifth most common one of the most aggressive gastro intestinal tract malignancies. Owing to their large incidence randomised controlled trials have hardly been conducted to look into their optimum treatment. Over the years surgical resection has been considered the only curative treatment of these tumors. However, the outcome still remains guarded. The predominant pattern of failure is loco-regional followed by systemic. Hence, local adjuvant radiation has been used by different institutes with concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy. The large retrospective series with their limitations showed improved survival in patients with regional spread or tumors infiltrating the liver when treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In the present era with modern radiation techniques and target delineation radiation may further improve upon the impact without adding to the toxicity profile. Hence, radiation in gall bladder cancer needs a relook to optimize treatment outcome of such aggressive disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer: an updated Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony; Johnson, Nick; Kitchener, Henry C; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-11-07

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in stage I endometrial cancer has changed in recent years. This updated Cochrane systematic review aimed to reexamine the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy vs no treatment in stage I endometrial cancer. We searched various databases including The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group (CGCRG) for randomized controlled trials that met the predefined inclusion criteria. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS); secondary outcomes were endometrial cancer-specific survival, locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and toxicity. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated and pooled if possible; otherwise, dichotomous data were extracted. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of the eight included trials, seven trials (3628 women) compared external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and no EBRT (or vaginal brachytherapy [VBT]), and one trial (645 women) compared VBT and no additional treatment. EBRT statistically significantly reduced locoregional recurrence compared with no EBRT (or VBT alone) (HR = 0.36, 95% confidence Interval [CI] = 0.25 to 0.52; P < .001), but this did not translate into an improvement in OS (HR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.82 to 1.20; P = .95), endometrial cancer-specific survival (HR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.72 to 1.28; P = .80), or distant recurrence rates (risk ratio = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.35; P = .77). EBRT was associated with an increased risk of severe acute toxicity, severe late toxicity, and reduced quality of life scores. EBRT reduces the risk of locoregional recurrence but has no statistically significant impact on cancer-related deaths or OS. However, EBRT is associated with clinically and statistically significant morbidity and a reduction in quality of life.

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage II endometrial carcinoma: Is brachytherapy alone sufficient for local control?

    PubMed

    Paydar, Ima; DeWees, Todd; Powell, Matthew; Mutch, David G; Grigsby, Perry W; Schwarz, Julie K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate recurrence patterns and overall survival in patients treated with adjuvant radiation after surgical staging for Stage II endometrial carcinoma. Secondary goals include identification of prognostic factors for recurrence and toxicity assessment. The medical records of 41 patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy at Washington University School of Medicine after surgical staging for endometrial cancer (total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal cytology, lymph node dissection) were reviewed. Nineteen were treated with a combination of external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy (VB), and 22 patients were treated with postoperative VB alone. Median followup for all patients was 41 months. Median patient age was 59 years (range, 42-87 years). All tumors were of endometrioid histology. There were 20 Grade 1 tumors, 13 Grade 2 tumors, and 8 Grade 3 tumors. For all patients, the 5-year overall survival was 69.8%, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival was 89.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival (p = 0.510) or freedom from vaginal (p = 0.840), distant (p = 0.133), or any recurrence (p = 0.275) with respect to modality of treatment (external beam radiotherapy and VB vs. VB alone). There were no pelvic lymph node recurrences. In the univariate analysis, there were no risk factors influencing overall survival or recurrences. One patient experienced a toxicity requiring hospital admission. She was treated with pelvic external beam radiation plus brachytherapy. VB alone results in excellent local control for patients with Stage II endometrial cancer after surgical staging. Long-term toxicities are rare and more common in the group of patients who were treated with pelvic external beam plus brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Should adjuvant radiotherapy to the supraclavicular fossa be routinely given in patients with breast conservative treatment?

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Wei; Kuo, Wen-Hong; Chang, King-Jen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2007-08-01

    To analyze the overall outcome, supraclavicular fossa (SCF) recurrence rate, and pattern of failure in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy excluding SCF treatment. A total of 143 patients were enrolled in the study. Ninety-two percent of patients were stages I and II, and 8% were stage III. The median age was 44 years, and 31% of patients were Radiotherapy was delivered to the ipsilateral breast excluding the SCF. The 5-year overall survival rate of the cohort was 95%, and disease-free survival rate was 91%. The cumulative incidence of SCF recurrence was 18% in patients with involved axillary nodes (N) >/= 4, and 0.8% in patients with N < 4. The 5-year SCF-recurrence-free survival in patients with N >/= 4 and N < 4 was 80% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). N >/= 4 was the only independent predictor for locoregional control (P = 0.045), disease-free survival (P = 0.001), and overall survival (P = 0.008) in multivariate analysis. Women with N >/= 4 have a significantly higher risk of SCF recurrence and poorer survival. The SCF might be safely spared in patients with N < 4, but should be routinely included in the radiotherapy design for those with N >/= 4.

  16. Exclusive and adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and the European Concerted Action on survival and Care of Cancer Patients (EUROCARE) project indicate that about 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer have stage IV disease, representing about 12 600 new cases per year in the United States in 2005. Historically, local therapy of the primary tumor in this setting has been aimed solely at symptom palliation. However, several studies suggest that surgical excision of the primary tumor can prolong these patients' survival. Discussion Exclusive locoregional radiotherapy is an alternative form of locoregional treatment in this setting and may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Here we discuss current issues regarding exclusive and adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Summary Several studies suggest that surgery or exclusive irradiation of the primary tumor is associated with better survival in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases and that exclusive locoregional radiotherapy may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Results of well-designed prospective studies are needed to re-evaluate treatment of the primary breast tumor in patients with metastases at diagnosis, and to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit. PMID:21083907

  17. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E. ); Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field [sup 60]Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with [sup 99m]Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy outcome of stage I testicular seminoma: a single institution study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hayoon; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-01-01

    To analyze treatment outcome and side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy using radiotherapy fields and doses which have evolved over the last two decades in a single institution. Forty-one patients received radiotherapy after orchiectomy from 1996 to 2007. At our institution, the treatment field for stage I seminoma has changed from dog-leg (DL) field prior to 2003 to paraaortic (PA) field after 2003. Fifteen patients were treated with the classic fractionation scheme of 25.5 Gy at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Other patients had been treated with modified schedules of 25.05 Gy at 1.67 Gy per fraction (n=15) and 25.2 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction (n=11). With a median follow-up of 112 months, the 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 100% and 96%, respectively, and 5-year and 10-year relapse-free survival rates were both 97.1%. No in-field recurrence occurred. Contralateral seminoma occurred in one patient 5 years after treatment. No grade III-IV acute toxicity occurred. An increased rate of grade 1-2 acute hematologic toxicity was found in patients with longer overall treatment times due to 1.5 Gy per fraction. The rate of grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was significantly higher with DL field than with PA field and also higher in the 1.8-Gy group than in the 1.5-Gy and 1.67-Gy groups. Patients with stage I seminoma were safely treated with PA-only radiotherapy with no pelvic failure. Optimal fractionation schedule needs to be explored further in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity.

  19. Early cardiac toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer with or without concurrent trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Chang, Cai; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Feng, Yan; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of concurrent trastuzumab on the cardiotoxicity in patients receiving left-sided adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records of stage I-III left-sided breast cancer patients, including 64 receiving concurrent trastuzumab with radiotherapy and 73 receiving radiotherapy alone were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had normal LVEF after adjuvant chemotherapy. Information of doses volume to cardiac structures was collected. Cardiac events were assessed according to CTC 2.0. Results Median follow-up of LVEF and clinical assessment of cardiac function from the initiation of radiotherapy was 6.7 months (range 3–60.9) and 26 months (range 6.4–60.9), respectively. Grade 1 LVEF dysfunction occurred in 5 (7.8%) and 3 (4.1%) patients of the concurrent-trastuzumab and radiotherapy alone cohort, respectively. Trastuzumab was the only significant factor influencing absolute LVEF decrease in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis of concurrent-trastuzumab cohort, IMC radiotherapy and start trastuzumab during radiotherapy were independent risk factors. For concurrent cohort, mean heart dose, as well as D10-D30, D50-D55, V5-V20 of the heart and D30-D45, D65-D75, V6-V15 of the LV were significantly higher in patients developing LVEF dysfunction. Conclusions Concurrent trastuzumab and left-sided radiotherapy is well tolerated in terms of cardiotoxicity in patients with normal baseline cardiac function after adjuvant chemotherapy. However, increases in mean dose and low–dose volume of cardiac structures are associated with a higher risk of acute LVEF dysfunction. PMID:26460956

  20. Sequential adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in endometrial cancer--results from two randomised studies.

    PubMed

    Hogberg, Thomas; Signorelli, Mauro; de Oliveira, Carlos Freire; Fossati, Roldano; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; Sorbe, Bengt; Andersson, Håkan; Grenman, Seija; Lundgren, Caroline; Rosenberg, Per; Boman, Karin; Tholander, Bengt; Scambia, Giovanni; Reed, Nicholas; Cormio, Gennaro; Tognon, Germana; Clarke, Jackie; Sawicki, Tomasz; Zola, Paolo; Kristensen, Gunnar

    2010-09-01

    Endometrial cancer patients with high grade tumours, deep myometrial invasion or advanced stage disease have a poor prognosis. Randomised studies have demonstrated the prevention of loco-regional relapses with radiotherapy (RT) with no effect on overall survival (OS). The possible additive effect of chemotherapy (CT) remains unclear. Two randomised clinical trials (NSGO-EC-9501/EORTC-55991 and MaNGO ILIADE-III) were undertaken to clarify if sequential combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy improves progression-free survival (PFS) in high-risk endometrial cancer. The two studies were pooled. Patients (n=540; 534 evaluable) with operated endometrial cancer International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (FIGO) stage I-III with no residual tumour and prognostic factors implying high-risk were randomly allocated to adjuvant radiotherapy with or without sequential chemotherapy. In the NSGO/EORTC study, the combined modality treatment was associated with 36% reduction in the risk for relapse or death (hazard ratio (HR) 0.64, 95%confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.99; P=0.04); two-sided tests were used. The result from the Gynaecologic Oncology group at the Mario Negri Institute (MaNGO)-study pointed in the same direction (HR 0.61), but was not significant. In the combined analysis, the estimate of risk for relapse or death was similar but with narrower confidence limits (HR 0.63, CI 0.44-0.89; P=0.009). Neither study showed significant differences in the overall survival. In the combined analysis, overall survival approached statistical significance (HR 0.69, CI 0.46-1.03; P=0.07) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was significant (HR 0.55, CI 0.35-0.88; P=0.01). Addition of adjuvant chemotherapy to radiation improves progression-free survival in operated endometrial cancer patients with no residual tumour and a high-risk profile. A remaining question for future studies is if addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy improves the results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  1. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  2. Skin-sparing helical tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: in vivo skin dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin(V50) (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin(V40) and skin(V30) (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Preservation of Facial Nerve With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Recurrent Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma of Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shufang; Ma, Hailong; He, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands harbors the recurrent ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion because of the translocation t (12; 15) (p13; q25) and resembles breast secretory carcinoma. This tumor composed of papillary, cystic, solid, and cribriform patterns. Immunohistochemically, the tumors are positive for mammaglobin, CK7, CK8, STAT5a, vimentin, and S100. In this report, the authors presented a patient of recurrent parotid gland mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in a 22-year-old woman. The patient received extended parotidectomy with partial adhesive masseter surgery. The facial nerve was preserved during the surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy was performed postoperation. The patient did not suffer local recurrence and facial paralysis in the 18 months follow-up period.

  4. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment.

  5. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  6. Critical decision-making in radiotherapy for early stage breast cancer in a neo-adjuvant treatment era.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Francesca; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    In breast cancer management, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been the subject of intense controversy over the past several years, due to the improvement in neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) prescription. One of the most controversial questions regarding indication for adjuvant RT is whether or not RT is essential in patients with early stage disease at diagnosis. The value of adjuvant RT remains highly debatable in those patients with clinically negative nodes at the completion of NACT. Areas covered: This review is focused on this gray area and is intended to assist with clinical decision-making. We provide a comprehensive review using PubMed and meeting proceedings of San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology, European Society of Medical Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology. Expert commentary: The identification of potential prognostic factors may lead to novel adjuvant RT indications. Phase III clinical trials are underway and their results will help guide treatment decisions.

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy in stage 1 seminoma: Evaluation of prognostic factors and results of survival.

    PubMed

    Serdar, Lasif; Canyilmaz, Emine; Topcu, Turkan Ozturk; Sahbaz, Asli; Memis, Yahyahan; Soydemir, Gulsen; Aynaci, Ozlem; Kandaz, Mustafa; Bahat, Zümrüt; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors affecting overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and survival among patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for stage-1 seminoma. Between August 1997 and May 2013, 68 patients diagnosed with stage-1 seminoma were retrospectively evaluated. The median age was 39 (24-74) years. All patients received adjuvant RT after inguinal orchiectomy. Fifty-eight (85.3%) patients received paraaortic RT; 10 (14.7%) received dog-leg field RT. The median RT dose was 23.4 (23.4-30.6) Gy. The median follow-up period was 77.5 (6.7-198.5) months. During the follow-up period, two patients developed distant metastasis, and none developed local recurrence. Two patients died from seminoma, and three died for other reasons. The 5, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 94.7%, 89.6%, and 89.6%, respectively. The 5, 10, and 15-year CSS rates were 98.5%, 96%, and 96%, respectively. The 5, 10, and 15-year PFS rate was 96.1%. The univariate analysis showed that only histological subtype was significant for OS. The 10-year survival rate was 100% among patients with seminoma histology, 90.8% among patients with a classic seminoma histology, and 50% among patients with an anaplastic seminoma histology (P < 0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that the anaplastic seminoma was a negative prognostic indicator for OS (P = 0.042). Adjuvant RT resulted in excellent long-term survival and local control in patients with stage-1 seminoma after orchiectomy. During a short follow-up, secondary malignancy (SM) and late cardiovascular morbidity were not observed. Despite those results, concern of SM and late cardiovascular morbidity remains.

  8. Patterns of Care and Outcomes of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Meningiomas: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare Linked Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Burton, Eric; Skirboll, Stephen; Woo, Shiao; Boakye, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated radiotherapy (XRT) are unknown in patients with resected meningiomas. Objective: To identify patterns of care and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy for meningiomas in the Linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare data. Methods: A total of 1,964 patients older than 66 years included in the SEER-Medicare data, who were diagnosed with meningioma, and underwent craniotomy were included for analysis. Results: Patients were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy if they were older than 75 (OR 0.730, 95% CI 0.548-0.973), female sex (OR 0.731, 95% CI 0.547-0.978), or unmarried (OR 0.692, 95% CI 0.515-0.929). Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant treatment for Grade II/III tumors (OR 5.586, 95% CI 2.135-13.589), tumors over 5 cm (OR 1.850, 95% CI 1.332-2.567), or partial resection (OR 3.230, 95% CI 2.327-4.484). Yearly between 2000 and 2009, 10.65 – 19.77% of patients received adjuvant therapy. Although no survival benefit was seen with the addition of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.1236), the subgroup of patients receiving SRS had a decreased risk of death compared to those receiving surgery alone (aHR 0.544, 95% CI 0.318 – 0.929). Conclusion: Utilization of adjuvant XRT and SRS remained stable between 2000 and 2010. Male sex, young age, marriage, partial resection, Grade II/III tumors, and large tumors predicted the use of adjuvant therapy. For all patients, SRS decreased the risk of death compared to craniotomy alone. PMID:27186449

  9. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    SciTech Connect

    Rouesse, Jacques . E-mail: j.rouesse@stcloud-huguenin.org; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.

  10. Adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy in the "sandwich" method for high risk endometrial cancer--a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaolan

    2015-06-24

    Endometrial cancer is a common female malignancy. Patients with high-risk endometrial cancer have relatively high incidence of metastasis and recurrence. Despite complete resection, patients with stage III or IV are at high risk of local or distant recurrence. Systemic adjuvant treatment includes chemotherapy and radiotherapy. But the optimal scheduling is not known. Recently proposed sequential chemo-radiotherapy as sandwich therapy for high risk endometrial cancer have yielded encouraging results. This article is to review the adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy in the "sandwich" method for high risk endometrial cancer to help clinicians identify the most effective adjuvant treatment for patients with high risks of it. We used MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and CBM databases to search the literature. A systematic review was made. And most data showed "sandwich" therapy is feasible, efficacious, well-tolerated and resulted in excellent long-term progression free and overall survival in the setting of advanced endometrial cancer. Randomized trials are necessary to compare chemo-radio therapy given in the "sandwich" fashion to other means of sequencing these treatment modalities. It is also necessary to define which population is best suited for "sandwich" adjuvant therapy.

  11. For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54 months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

  12. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Willett, Christopher G.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Deshpande, Vikram; Niemierko, Andrzej; Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  13. Adjuvant Radiotherapy Is Associated With Increased Sexual Dysfunction in Male Patients Undergoing Resection for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heriot, Alexander G.; Tekkis, Paris P.; Fazio, Victor W.; Neary, Paul; Lavery, Ian C.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on sexual function in patients undergoing oncologic resection for rectal cancer, and to develop a mathematical model for quantifying the risk of sexual dysfunction through time for this group of patients. Methods: Data were prospectively collected on patients undergoing proctosigmoidectomy (group 1: n = 101) or adjuvant radiotherapy (40–50 Gy) and resection (group 2: n = 100) for rectal cancer at a tertiary referral center between December 1998 and July 2004. Study end points were recorded at 7 time intervals (preoperatively, 4 months, 8 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years after surgery) and included: 1) ability to have an erection, 2) maintain an erection, 3) attain orgasm, 4) dry orgasm, and 5) whether they were sexually active. Multilevel logistic regression analysis for repeated measures was used to identify factors associated with the sexual dysfunction. A predictive model was developed and internally validated by comparing observed and model-predicted outcomes. Results: Radiotherapy had an adverse effect on the ability to get an erection, maintain an erection, attain orgasm, and being sexually active in comparison with patients undergoing surgery alone (7.4%, 12.6%, 16.2%, and 13.7% reduction 8 months after surgery respectively; P < 0.05). The effect of sexual dysfunction deteriorated with age (odds ratio for erectile function, 0.40 per 10-year increase in age; 95% confidence interval, 0.29–0.49; P < 0.001). A significant variability in sexual function was present among the 7 time points with a maximal deterioration occurring at 8 months after surgery with subsequent slow but not complete recovery (P < 0.001). The predictive model showed adequate discrimination on 4 of the 5 domains of sexual dysfunction (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve >0.70). Conclusions: Radiotherapy has an adverse effect on sexual function, the effect being

  14. Enhanced efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in selected cases of surgically resected neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Sixia; Song, Liang; Yang, Fan; Tang, Chendian; Yang, Shaoyan; He, Ji; Pan, Xiaoling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study is to identify the prognostic factors of overall survival and examine the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the overall survival in neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix (NECUC) patients. Forty-eight surgically treated patients were retrospectively recruited and clinicopathologic characteristics and treatments were reviewed. Kaplan–Meier product-limit method and Cox proportional-hazards regression were utilized for univariate and multivariate analyses. The median follow-up time was 20.6 months and the median overall survival was 30.7 months. The estimated 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 31.3%, respectively. Forty patients had ≤ stage IIA disease and 8 had >IIA disease. Univariate analysis identified the clinical stage ≤ IIA (P = 0.042), tumor size ≤ 4 cm (P = 0.005), negative lymph nodes metastasis (P < 0.001), depth of stromal invasion ≤ 1/2 (P = 0.001), negative parametrial involvement (P = 0.004), and weak staining of synaptophysin (P = 0.037), and chromogranin (P = 0.011) as the prognostic factors for an improved overall survival, while chemotherapy and radiotherapy were not prognostic factors in the whole cohort. However, surgery combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy produced a survival advantage over surgery alone in patients with large tumors (P = 0.006). The combination of surgery and chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy) did not show any significant difference in overall survival for small tumors (P = 0.816), compared with no chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy). In addition, radiotherapy for tumors with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma components achieved a better survival (P = 0.01), and there was a tendency of an unfavorable survival for radiotherapy in homogeneous carcinoma (P = 0.099). Tumor size was an independent prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis (HR: 12.724, 95% CI

  15. Prone versus supine position for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a prospective study in patients with pendulous breasts.

    PubMed

    Krengli, Marco; Masini, Laura; Caltavuturo, Tina; Pisani, Carla; Apicella, Giuseppina; Negri, Eleonora; Deantonio, Letizia; Brambilla, Marco; Gambaro, Giuseppina

    2013-10-08

    To analyze dosimetric parameters of patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) in the prone versus supine position. Forty-one out of 55 patients with pendulous breasts and candidates for adjuvant RT were enrolled in the study after informed consent. They underwent computed tomography (CT)-simulation in both prone and supine position. Target and non target volumes were outlined on CT images. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields followed by 10 Gy electron boost. Target coverage and dose homogeneity to clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were assessed by V95, V105 and V107 and dose to lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) by V5, V10, V20, and mean and maximum dose. Data were analyzed by Student's t-test. CTV and PTV coverage was significantly better in supine than in prone position. Lung V5, V10, and V20 were significantly lower in prone than in supine position. Heart V5, V10, V20, and LAD mean and maximum dose, in the 17 patients with left breast tumor, were lower in prone than in supine position, but without statistical significance. Based on treatment planning data and on treatment feasibility, 29/41 patients (70.7%) were treated in prone position. Acute and late toxicities of patients treated in prone and in supine position were not statistically different. Prone position is a favorable alternative for irradiation of mammary gland in patients with pendulous breasts and in our series was adopted in 71% of the cases.

  16. Prone versus supine position for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a prospective study in patients with pendulous breasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze dosimetric parameters of patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) in the prone versus supine position. Methods and materials Forty-one out of 55 patients with pendulous breasts and candidates for adjuvant RT were enrolled in the study after informed consent. They underwent computed tomography (CT)-simulation in both prone and supine position. Target and non target volumes were outlined on CT images. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields followed by 10 Gy electron boost. Target coverage and dose homogeneity to clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were assessed by V95, V105 and V107 and dose to lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) by V5, V10, V20, and mean and maximum dose. Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test. Results CTV and PTV coverage was significantly better in supine than in prone position. Lung V5, V10, and V20 were significantly lower in prone than in supine position. Heart V5, V10, V20, and LAD mean and maximum dose, in the 17 patients with left breast tumor, were lower in prone than in supine position, but without statistical significance. Based on treatment planning data and on treatment feasibility, 29/41 patients (70.7%) were treated in prone position. Acute and late toxicities of patients treated in prone and in supine position were not statistically different. Conclusion Prone position is a favorable alternative for irradiation of mammary gland in patients with pendulous breasts and in our series was adopted in 71% of the cases. PMID:24103708

  17. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  18. Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon H.; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Guenther

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {<=}20 weeks was found. The adjusted hazard ratio for RT within 77 days vs. after 77 days was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.87) for the interval to local recurrence, 1.05 (95% CI, 0.82-1.34) for disease-free survival, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.77-1.49) for overall survival. For the interval to local recurrence the adjusted hazard ratio for {<=}48, 49-77, and 78-112 days was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.34-2.37), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.33-2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33-2.41), respectively, relative to {>=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  19. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  20. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS).This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5-85.5 months).The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities.TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity.

  1. Hypofractionation in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients: seven-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Eldeeb, Hany; Awad, Iman; Elhanafy, Osman

    2012-12-01

    To compare three fractionation schedules in post-mastectomy patients treated with radiotherapy as regard acute and early late effects as well as local recurrence rates. One hundred and seven breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy±adjuvant systemic treatments between November 2001 and July 2004 were enrolled in this study. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group A (41 patients) received conventional fractionation 50 Gy over 25 fractions. Group B (36 patients) received other fractionation regimen 45 Gy over 17 fractions. Group C (30 patients) received 40 Gy over 15 fractions. The median follow-up period was 23 months. There has been no statistical significant difference in local control (P=0.88), pain (P=0.98), telangectasis (P=0.23), fibrosis (P=0.13), arm oedema (P=0.96) or pigmentation (P=0.80) between the three groups. GII-III Erythema was significantly higher in the two hypofractionation arms compared to the control arm (P=0.001). Although acute skin reactions were higher in the hypofractionated arms, there was no significant difference in the local recurrence rates or late radiation effects. A national randomized multicentre study is recommended to explore this further.

  2. Assessing the Quality of Life in Patients With Endometrial Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karabuga, Havva; Gultekin, Melis; Tulunay, Gokhan; Yuce, Kunter; Ayhan, Ali; Yuce, Deniz; Yildiz, Ferah

    2015-10-01

    The current study evaluates long-term quality of life (QOL) and sexual function of patients with endometrial cancer who received adjuvant pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or vaginal brachytherapy (BRT). One hundred forty-four endometrial cancer survivors who were treated between January 2000 and December 2009 in our department were included in this study. Median follow-up was 79 months (range, 31-138 months). Fifty-two patients were treated with 45 to 50.4 Gy EBRT, 76 were with BRT, and 16 were with both EBRT and BRT. Brachytherapy was in the form of vaginal cuff BRT with 5 × 550 cGy high dose rate BRT, prescribed to the first 4 cm and whole wall thickness of vagina. Quality of life was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 and subscales from the supplemental 24-item Cervical Cancer Module. Vaginal BRT patients reported better physical functioning (P = 0.01), role functioning (P = 0.03), and sexual enjoyment (P = 0.01) compared to EBRT group. Symptom score (P = 0.01), lymphedema (P = 0.03), pain (P = 0.02), and diarrhea (P = 0.009) scores were also higher with EBRT. Vaginal BRT did not worsen symptom scores or sexual functions when added to EBRT. Obese patients experienced higher rates of lymphedema (P = 0.008). Cognitive and role functioning scores were significantly higher in patients with normal body mass index. External beam radiotherapy negatively affects long-term QOL and sexual functions in endometrial cancer survivors. Vaginal BRT provides higher QOL. Patients with body mass index within normal limits have improved QOL.

  3. On the apparent failure of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy to improve survival for women with uterine sarcomas confined to the uterus.

    PubMed

    Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Potish, Roger A; Argenta, Peter A; Judson, Patricia L

    2005-06-01

    Despite numerous studies documenting reduction of pelvic relapses after adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy stage I and II uterine sarcomas, improved survival remains unproven. This retrospective report analyzes patterns of failure, survival, and toxicity in 42 women with stage I and 7 patients with stage II uterine sarcomas treated from 1972 through 1998 to identify patients likely to benefit from pelvic or abdominal radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Four of these patients also received adjuvant chemotherapy. There were 20 leiomyosarcomas, 18 homologous mixed mullerian tumors, and 11 heterologous mixed mullerian tumors. Disease-free survivals for mixed mullerian tumors were 65% at 5 years and 61% at 15 years. Disease-free survivals for leiomyosarcomas were 40% at 5 years and 40% at 15 years. There were 14 distant only, 5 distant and abdominal, 1 abdominal, 1 distant and pelvic, and 2 unknown initial sites of failure. Acute toxicity was acceptable as measured by a median 1-kg weight loss from radiotherapy and a 2% rate of failure to complete therapy. Chronic toxicity consisted of 3 small bowel obstructions and 1 sigmoid colon obstruction. In conclusion, the efficacy of adjuvant pelvic radiation is demonstrated by the absence of any isolated pelvic failures. Although the frequent occurrence of peritoneal failures suggests a role for prophylactic abdominal radiation for mixed mullerian tumors, more effective systemic therapy is necessary to substantially increase the chance of cure for women with early-stage uterine sarcomas.

  4. Adjuvant radiotherapy after radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Orré, Mathieu; Latorzeff, Igor; Fléchon, Aude; Roubaud, Guilhem; Brouste, Véronique; Gaston, Richard; Piéchaud, Thierry; Richaud, Pierre; Chapet, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Radical cystectomy (RC) and pelvic lymph-node dissection (LND) is standard treatment for non-metastatic muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer (MIBC). However, loco-regional recurrence (LRR) is a common early event associated with poor prognosis. We evaluate 3-year LRR-free (LRRFS), metastasis-free (MFS) and overall survivals (OS) after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for pathological high-risk MIBC. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed data from patients in 3 institutions. Inclusion criteria were MIBC, histologically-proven urothelial carcinoma treated by RC and adjuvant RT. Patients with conservative surgery were excluded. Outcomes were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method. Acute toxicities were recorded according to CTCAE V4.0 scale. Results Between 2000 and 2013, 57 patients [median age 66.3 years (45–84)] were included. Post-operative pathological staging was ≤pT2, pT3 and pT4 in 16%, 44%, and 39%, respectively. PLND revealed 28% pN0, 26% pN1 and 42% pN2. Median number of lymph-nodes retrieved was 10 (2–33). Forty-eight patients (84%) received platin-based chemotherapy. For RT, clinical target volume 1 (CTV 1) encompassed pelvic lymph nodes for all patients. CTV 1 also included cystectomy bed for 37 patients (65%). CTV 1 median dose was 45 Gy (4–50). A boost of 16 Gy (5–22), corresponding to CTV 2, was administered for 30 patients, depending on pathological features. One third of patients received intensity-modulated RT. With median follow-up of 40.4 months, 8 patients (14%) had LRR. Three-year LRRFS, MFS and OS were 45% (95%CI 30–60), 37% (95%CI 24–51) and 49% (95%CI 33–63), respectively. Five (9%) patients had acute grade ≥3 toxicities (gastro-intestinal, genito-urinary and biological parameters). One patient died with intestinal fistula in a septic context. Conclusions Because of poor prognosis, an effective post-operative standard of care is needed for pathological high-risk MIBC. Adjuvant RT is feasible and may have

  5. Reliability of Reconstructed Breast Flap after Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Heon; Park, Su-Seong; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Cho, Se-Heon; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Dae-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Background Postmastectomy adjuvant therapy is used to prevent locoregional recurrence and improve overall breast cancer specific survival rates. However, it can adversely affect the cosmetic results of reconstruction. Therefore, the authors examined flap stability and patients' satisfaction with immediate breast reconstruction after adjuvant therapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 204 patients from January 2006 to November 2011. For complication rates, the authors categorized the patients who underwent the immediate breast reconstruction into 4 groups: adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy group, adjuvant chemotherapy only group, adjuvant radiotherapy only group, and the group that did not undergo adjuvant therapy. For comparison of patients' satisfaction, the study was performed with an additional 16 patients who had undergone delayed breast reconstruction. Results Regarding complication rates, the group that had undergone adjuvant therapy showed no significant difference compared to the group that did not undergo adjuvant therapy. In evaluating the patients' satisfaction, there was no significant difference. Conclusions Even after adjuvant therapy, immediate breast reconstruction showed good results with respect to flap stability and patients' satisfaction. Immediate breast reconstruction and adjuvant therapy is a safe and useful option for breast cancer patients. PMID:23094245

  6. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed

    Bagnera, Silvia; Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology-Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. "No change" was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5-9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after AWB-RT treatment (up to 5-9 years after radiotherapy) justifies large

  7. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed Central

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  8. Adjuvant treatment with concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Patrizia; Frigerio, Luigi; Cipriani, Sonia; Parazzini, Fabio; Busci, Luisa; Carlini, Laura; Viganò, Riccardo; Mangili, Giorgia

    2010-03-01

    The concurrent use of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) as adjuvant treatment after surgery in high-risk endometrial cancer has been generally considered cautiously. Recently some of us have reported preliminary data on the efficacy and tolerability of concomitant CT and RT. In this paper, we update our experience. A total of 47 patients aged >18 years and <80 years with histological diagnosis of high-risk endometrial endometrioid carcinomas entered the study. Inclusion criteria were stages IC G3, IIB, IIIA (patients with positive washing without other unfavourable prognostic factors were omitted), IIIB and IIIC. The radiation plan consisted of a total dose of 50.4 Gy, given in five fractions per week (1.8 Gy: daily dose) for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel (P) at a dose of 60 mg/m(2) was infused intravenously in 250 mL of normal saline for 1 h once weekly during RT for 5 weeks. Three further cycles of Paclitaxel, at a dose of 80 mg/m(2), have been given weekly at the end of RT. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The overall 5-year relapse-free survival was 81.8% (95% CI, 65.2-90.9). The 5-year percent overall disease-specific survival was 88.4% (95% CI, 71.1-95.6). These results, based on a larger series, support our previous data: Paclitaxel plus RT may represent an effective and well-tolerated treatment in high-risk endometrial cancer patients.

  9. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  10. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  11. Combination of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy is associated with improved survival at early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sozen, Hamdullah; Çiftçi, Rumeysa; Vatansever, Dogan; Topuz, Samet; Iyibozkurt, Ahmet Cem; Bozbey, Hamza Ugur; Yaşa, Cenk; Çali, Halime; Yavuz, Ekrem; Kucucuk, Seden; Aydiner, Adnan; Salihoglu, Yavuz

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment modalities and identify risk factors associated with recurrence and survival rates in women diagnosed with early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma. In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with early stage (stages I-II) carcinosarcoma and type II endometrial cancer were reviewed. All women underwent comprehensive surgical staging. Postoperative treatment options of chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), observation (OBS) and chemotherapy-radiotherapy (CT-RT) combination were compared in terms of recurrence and survival outcome. In CT-RT treatment arm, recurrence rate was found as 12.5% and this result is significantly lower than the other treatment approaches (P = 0.01 CT alone: 33.3%, RT alone: 26.7%, OBS: 62.5%). Three-year disease free survival(DFS) rate and overall survival (OS) rate were statistically higher for the group of women treated with combination of CT-RT (92-95%) compared to the women treated with RT alone (65-72%), treated with CT alone (67-74%) and women who received no adjuvant therapy (38-45%). The multivariate analysis revealed that carcinosarcoma histology was associated with shortened DFS and OS (P = 0.001, P = 0.002). On the other hand, being at stage Ia (P = 0.01, P = 0.04) and receiving adjuvant treatment of CT-RT combination (P = 0.005, P = 0.002) appeared to lead to increased DFS and OS rates. We identified that a combination treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is superior compared to other postoperative adjuvant treatment approaches concerning PFS, OS and recurrence rates in stages I-II of type II endometrial cancers and uterine carcinosarcoma. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  13. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  14. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Hirokawa, Naoki; Shibuya, Keiko; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  15. Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Adjuvant and Palliative Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T. Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (EHC) are rare tumors of the biliary tree because of their low incidence, large randomized studies examining radiotherapy (RT) for EHC have not been performed. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and palliative RT in the treatment of EHC in a large patient population. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 4,758 patients with EHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: Patients underwent surgery (28.8%), RT (10.0%), surgery and RT (14.7%), or no RT or surgery (46.4%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 23-104), 52.5% were men, and 80.7% were white. The median overall survival time was 16 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-17), 9 months (95% CI 9-11), 9 months (95% CI 9-10), and 4 months (95% CI 3-4) for surgery and RT, surgery, RT, and no RT or surgery, respectively. The overall survival was significantly different between the surgery and surgery and RT groups (p < .0001) and RT and no RT or surgery groups (p < .0001) on the log-rank test. The propensity score-adjusted analyses of surgery and RT vs. surgery (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.84-1.05) were not significantly different, but that for RT vs. no RT or surgery (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.54-0.70) was significantly different. Conclusion: These results suggest that palliative RT prolongs survival in patients with EHC. The benefit associated with surgery and RT was significant on univariate analysis but not after controlling for potential confounders using the propensity score. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologic agents for the treatment of EHC.

  16. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy improves loco-regional recurrence of head and neck mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wushou, Alimujiang; Hou, Jing; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Miao, Xin-chao

    2015-05-01

    Primary head and neck mucosal melanoma (HNMM) is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Controversy remains as to whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (PORT) achieves a significant benefit in HNMM treatment. Because of the lack of available conclusive prospective data, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all relevant available studies to clarify the benefits of PORT. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases was conducted to collect relevant studies until April 30, 2014. Studies published in the English language comparing surgery alone and surgery plus PORT for HNMM were included, with more than 15 study populations. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 12.0. A total of 423 patients were available from eight studies and the median sample size was 53 cases. The median follow-up time was 38.2 months (range 18.3-65.2 months). There was a positive association between PORT and loco-regional recurrence of HNMM (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22-0.60, P = 0.000). No associations were found between the PORT and 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.94-2.09, P = 0.093 and OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.70-1.61, P = 0.161, respectively). PORT had no impact on 3-year and 5-year OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.80-1.61, P = 0.472 and HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 0.97-1.85, P = 0.227, respectively). PORT improved loco-regional recurrence of HNMM independent of OS.

  17. Distress in couples approached for genetic counseling and BRCA1/2 testing during adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schlich-Bakker, Kathryn J; ten Kroode, Herman F J; Wárlám Rodenhuis, Carla C; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van den Bout, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Breast cancer patients mostly rely on their partners for support in dealing with their cancer diagnosis and treatment. Genetic counseling and BRCA1/2 testing during primary treatment may add to demands made on their partners. This study aimed to gain insight into the extent of psychological distress in partners of recently diagnosed patients and to find factors to help identify couples vulnerable to high psychological distress after an active approach for genetic counseling. Breast cancer patients and their partners (n=110) completed psychological distress measures (HADS and IES) prior to the approach for counseling (T0), after the approach (T1), and after leaving the genetic counseling protocol (T2). Couples not approached for counseling (n=85) completed similar questionnaires. Partners reported an equal or lower level of distress than patients, with a positive correlation between the two, although partners and patients differed in the course of their distress. Couples approached for genetic counseling did not differ in the level or course of either distress measure from not approached couples. A high baseline distress best predicts long-term high distress in patients and their partners. Younger patients were found to be particularly vulnerable. The approach for genetic counseling during adjuvant radiotherapy was not associated with extra psychological distress in partners or patients in the first year following the breast cancer diagnosis. A partner's long-term level of distress was significantly associated with that of the patient. Highly distressed patients with highly distressed partners were most likely to experience high distress in the long term.

  18. Multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS). Diminished acceptance of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Biermann, M; Pixberg, M K; Schuck, A; Heinecke, A; Köpcke, W; Schmid, K W; Dralle, H; Willich, N; Schober, O

    2003-12-01

    The Multicenter Study Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (MSDS) is an ongoing study in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland on the clinical benefit of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in TNM stages pT4 pN0/1/x M0/x (5th ed. 1997). MSDS was designed as a prospective randomized trial. Patients receive thyroidectomy, radioiodine therapy (RIT) to ablate the thyroid remnant, and TSH-suppressive L-thyroxine therapy with or without RTx after documented elimination of cervical iodine-131 uptake (http://msds-studie.uni-muenster.de). 311 patients were enrolled between January 2000 and March 2003. 279 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. 45 consented to randomization, of whom 17 were randomized into treatment arm A (RTx) and 18 into arm B (no RTx). Advised by the trial's independent Data Monitoring and Safety Committee, the MSDS steering committee decided to terminate randomization in April 2003 and continue MSDS as a prospective cohort study. 23 of the 234 patients in the observation arm of the trial were prescribed RTx by their physicians. Thus, 14% of the trial cohort were randomized or assigned to receive RTx (in-tention-to-treat analysis). In contrast, at least 44% of all patients with pT4 papillary DTC in Germany in the nation-wide PCES study underwent RTx in 1996 (p <0.001, chi(2)-test). Acceptance of external beam RTx as a treatment modality for DTC has receded to a degree that accrual of a sufficient number of patients for a randomized trial has been impossible. Observation of the trial cohort is continued in order to assess clinical event rates with and without RTx and chronic RTx toxicity.

  19. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  20. Survival benefit associated with adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy combined with radiotherapy for high- and low-risk patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeliadt, Steven B. . E-mail: szeliadt@fhcrc.org; Potosky, Arnold L.; Penson, David F.

    2006-10-01

    Background: The use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) combined with radiotherapy has become common in low-risk patients, although clinical trials have focused primarily on high-risk patients. This study examines the effectiveness of adjuvant ADT combined with radiotherapy for a wide range of patients treated in the 1990s. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer survival was examined in a population based cohort of 31,643 patients aged 65 to 85 years who were diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer and treated with external beam radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy. Instrumental variable analysis methods were used to control for selection bias. Results: Patients with stage T3/T4 disease who received adjuvant ADT experienced improved 5-year and 8-year survival. No survival advantage was observed for men with T1/T2 disease during this interval. Conclusion: High-risk patients who receive primary radiotherapy have benefited from adjuvant ADT, whereas low-risk patients with disease confined to the prostate have not yet benefited from adjuvant therapy within the first 8 years after treatment. These findings are consistent with practice guidelines, which recommend adjuvant ADT for patients with high-risk disease.

  1. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  2. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an analysis from the NCDB

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Kai; Kim, Betty Y.S.; Liu, Qiang; Jacobs, Lisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) remains controversial. Methods A total of 1560 clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients treated with NAC and mastectomy who achieved ypN0 between 1998 and 2009 in the National Cancer Database were analyzed. The effects of PMRT on overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort and multiple subgroups were evaluated. Imputation and propensity score matching were used as sensitivity analyses to minimize biases. Results Of the entire 1560 eligible patients, 903 (57.9%) received PMRT and 657 (42.1%) didn’t. At a median follow-up of 56.0 months, no statistical difference was observed for OS between two groups by univariate and multivariate analyses (P = 0.120; HR 1.571, 95% CI 0.839-2.943). On subgroup analyses, PMRT significantly improved OS in patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast cancer after NAC (P < 0.05). This improvement in OS remained significant after sensitivity analyses for the propensity score-matched patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PMRT showed a heterogeneous effect in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with ypN0 following NAC. PMRT improved OS for patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast tumor after NAC. In the absence of definitive conclusions from prospective studies, including the ongoing NSABP B-51 trial, our findings may help identify specific groups of women with clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancers who could benefit from PMRT after NAC. PMID:26709538

  3. Immediate expander/implant breast reconstruction followed by post-mastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer: Aesthetic, surgical, satisfaction and quality of life outcomes in women with high-risk breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meagan E; Flitcroft, Kathy; Warrier, Sanjay; Snook, Kylie; Spillane, Andrew J

    2016-12-01

    Immediate tissue expander/implant-based breast reconstruction (BR) is often avoided when post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is planned due to concerns about high complication rates and poor aesthetic outcomes. This study evaluated surgical, aesthetic and quality of life (QoL) outcomes in women undergoing immediate implant-based BR (IIBR) followed by PMRT. Participants were recruited at least six months after completing the final stage of BR. They completed validated on-line questionnaires assessing satisfaction, QoL, distress, body image and regret. Aesthetic outcomes were rated by their operating surgeon through clinical examination and assessed by an independent surgeon using photographs. Forty-seven participants completed questionnaires and reported good outcomes for QoL (FACT-B = 115; TOI = 73), satisfaction (Breast-Q), distress (Impact of Events scale <4.8 all subscales) and body image (Body Image scale), with a low score on the Decisional Regret scale (mean 12.1). Aesthetic outcomes were rated fair-to-good (Kroll scale). The surgical complication rate was low (expander/implant loss rate 6.4%, wound infection 10.6%, seroma 4.1%). At follow-up, 33 (70.2%) participants retained their permanent implant and 12 (25.5%) converted to a TRAM or DIEP flap; there were two LD flaps. This study demonstrated acceptable cosmetic results, high patient satisfaction and low complication rates. It provides evidence that women are willing to accept the potential risks of IIBR in exchange for its benefits including enhanced body image during chemotherapy and PMRT and the possible avoidance of more complicated and costly delayed autologous BR. The results support the importance of access to BR, even in women with high-risk disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of adjuvant radiotherapy on completely resected gastric cancer: A radiation oncologist's view of the ARTIST randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lee, Jeeyun; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Sung; Sohn, Tae Sung; Choi, Min Gew; Bae, Jae Moon; Nam, Heerim

    2015-10-01

    We investigated which subgroups might benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and suggested optimal RT targets by analyzing the results of the Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Stomach Cancer (ARTIST) trial. We conducted randomized controlled trial in 458 gastric cancer patients. Patients were randomly assigned to XP (6 cycles of capecitabine and) or XPRT (2 cycles of XP+RT 45Gy/25 fraction with capecitabine+2 cycles of XP) groups after D2 resection. Minimum follow-up was 5years. During follow-up, 77 patients (33.8%) in the XP arm and 60 (26.1%) in the XPRT arm experienced recurrence. Among these patients, locoregional recurrence (LRR) developed in 44 (9.6%; 29 in XP, 15 in XPRT; P=0.03). The local recurrence rate (4.8%) did not vary between arms. Regional recurrence was the most important difference between the two groups (23 in the XP arm, 5 in the XPRT arm, P<0.001). LRR-free survival (LRRFS) was significantly different between study arms (P=0.03), especially in patients with LN metastasis (P=0.009). Adjuvant RT after D2 resection in gastric cancer reduced LRR, especially in group 3 LNs, and improved LRRFS. Patients with LN metastasis benefited more from the adjuvant RT treatment than the other subgroups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates radiation-induced acute skin damage in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Hanxi; Sun, Xiaorong; Meng, Xiangjiao; Zhao, Xianguang; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming; Zheng, Meizhu

    2016-01-01

    There are few effective treatment options for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. We conducted a single-arm trial to tested the hypothesis that topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is effective against radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Forty-nine patients participated in this study. The patients underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Topical EGCG was applied daily, starting when grade I dermatitis appeared and ending two weeks after radiotherapy. The maximum dermatitis observed during the EGCG treatment was as follows: Grade 1 toxicity, 71.4% (35 patients); grade 2 toxicity, 28.6% (14 patients); there were no patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The majority of the radiation-induced dermatitis was observed 1 week after the end of radiotherapy. EGCG reduced the pain in 85.7% of patients, burning-feeling in 89.8%, itching in 87.8%, pulling in 71.4%, and tenderness in 79.6%. These findings suggest topical EGCG may be an effective treatment for radiation-induced dermatitis and has acceptable toxicity. PMID:27224910

  6. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valerie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  7. The efficacy and safety of postoperative adjuvant transarterial embolization and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Si-Da; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to find out the safety and efficiency of postoperative adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiotherapy (RT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods From 2009 to 2010, a total of 92 HCC patients with PVTT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into three groups according to their adjuvant therapies (conservative group, n=51; TACE group, n=31; RT group, n=10). Results In our analysis, median survival in patients with postoperative adjuvant TACE (21.91±3.60 months) or RT (14.53±1.61 months) was significantly longer than patients with hepatectomy alone (8.99±1.03 months). But the difference between adjuvant TACE and RT was of no significance (P=0.716). Also a similar result could be observed in median disease-free survival: conservative group (6.51±1.44 months), TACE group (13.98±3.38 months), and RT group (14.03±2.40 months). Treatment strategies (hazard ratio [HR] =0.411, P<0.001) and PVTT type (HR =4.636, P<0.001) were the independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Similarly, the risk factors were the same when multivariate analysis was conducted in disease-free survival (treatment strategies, HR =0.423, P<0.001; PVTT type, HR =4.351, P<0.001) and recurrence (treatment strategies, HR =0.459, P=0.030; PVTT type, HR =2.908, P=0.047). Patients with PVTT type I had longer overall survival than patients with PVTT type II (median survival: 18.43±2.88 months vs 11.59±1.45 months, P=0.035). Conclusion Postoperative adjuvant TACE and RT may be a choice for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27390524

  8. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  9. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-08-02

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype.

  10. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype. PMID:27340922

  11. The hypoxia-selective cytotoxin NLCQ-1 (NSC 709257) controls metastatic disease when used as an adjuvant to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, S J; Cawthorne, C; Ali, M; Telfer, B A; Babur, M; Smigova, A; Julyan, P J; Price, P M; Stratford, I J; Bloomer, W D; Papadopoulou, M V; Williams, K J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Metastases cause most cancer-related deaths. We investigated the use of hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as adjuvants to radiotherapy in the control of metastatic tumour growth. Methods: The NLCQ-1, RB6145 and tirapazamine were assessed against the spontaneously metastasising KHT model. Subcutaneous KHT tumours (250 mm3) were irradiated with 25 Gy (single fraction) to control primary growth. Equitoxic drug treatments (NLCQ-1 (10 mg kg–1) once daily; RB6145 (75 mg kg–1) and tirapazamine (13 mg kg–1) twice daily) were administered 3–6 days post-radiotherapy when hypoxic cells were evident in lung micrometastases. Mice were culled when 50% of controls exhibited detrimental signs of lung metastases. Results: In total, 95% of control mice presented with lung disease. This was significantly reduced by NLCQ-1 (33% P=0.0002) and RB6145 (60% P=0.02). Semi-quantitative grading of lung disease revealed a significant improvement with all treatments, with NLCQ-1 proving most efficacious (median grades: control, 4; NLCQ, 0 (P<0.0001); RB6145, 1 (P<0.001), tirapazamine, 3 (P=0.007)). Positron emission tomography (PET) was evaluated as a non-invasive means of assessing metastatic development. Primary and metastatic KHT tumours showed robust uptake of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG). Metastatic burden discernable by [18F]FDG PET correlated well with macroscopic and histological lung analysis. Conclusion: The hypoxia-selective cytotoxin NLCQ-1 controls metastatic disease and may be a successful adjuvant to radiotherapy in the clinical setting. PMID:20588272

  12. Impact of hypofractionation and tangential beam IMRT on the acute skin reaction in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Ghaida, Salam Abou; Alaradi, Aziz

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of multiple prognostic factors on the acute skin reaction in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, in particular the impact of hypofractionation (HF) compared to conventional fractionation (CF) and tangential beam (TB) IMRT compared to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Two-hundred and sixty-six breast cancer patients with postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were treated with HF (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy; n = 121) or CF (28 fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy; n = 145) and TB-IMRT (n = 151) or 3DCRT (n = 115). The acute skin reactions were prospectively assessed using the CTCAE v4 grading scale. Ordinal regression analysis was used to assess the impact of possible prognostic factors on the maximal acute skin reaction. Grade 2 skin reactions were observed in 19 % of the patients treated with CF compared to 2 % treated with HF. On univariate analysis, the fractionation regimen, the PTV (breast versus chest wall), the volume of the PTV and the body mass index were significant prognostic factors for the maximum acute skin reaction. On multivariate analysis, the fractionation regimen (p < 0.00001) and the volume of the PTV (p = 0.0002) remained as independent significant factors. Our data suggest that HF is associated with a significantly reduced maximal acute skin reaction compared to CF.

  13. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E.; Huang, Bin; Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B.; Tucker, Thomas C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  14. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy versus observation following lumpectomy in ductal carcinoma in-situ: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Rambha; Chishi, Nilokali; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2017-08-22

    The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following lumpectomy for ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) was addressed in four major randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which were conducted two to three decades ago. Initial results of these trials suggested the protective role of RT in reducing the ipsilateral breast recurrences. Long-term results of all these four trials, based on more than 10-years follow-up data, have recently been published. A meta-analysis of four published RCTs which have addressed the role of adjuvant RT following lumpectomy for DCIS was conducted. Review manager (Cochrane Collaboration's software) version RevMan 5.2 was used for analysis. Evaluated events were ipsilateral breast recurrences (both DCIS and invasive), regional recurrences, contralateral breast events, distant recurrences, and overall mortality. The events were entered as dichotomous variable. The present meta-analysis included four RCTs and a total of 3680 patients - 1710 received adjuvant RT following lumpectomy while 1970 patients did not receive any adjuvant treatment. Patients who received RT had almost half of risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence (RR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.45-0.62) and regional recurrence (RR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.32-0.91) compared to those who did not receive adjuvant treatment - there was absolute risk reduction in 15% (95% CI = 12%-17%) for ipsilateral breast recurrences in adjuvant RT treated patients. There was no significant difference in distant recurrence (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.74-1.53), contralateral breast events (RR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.98-1.52) and overall mortality (RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.79-1.09). Though addition of postoperative RT to lumpectomy does not reduce overall mortality, the present meta-analysis confirms that it decreases the ipsilateral breast and regional recurrence by almost half. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Adjuvant docetaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy administered alone or with radiotherapy in a "sandwich" protocol in patients with advanced endometrial cancer: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chunyan; Huang, Xin; Cao, Xinping; Huang, He; Feng, Yanling; Huang, Yongwen; Liu, Jihong

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy administered alone or with radiotherapy in a "sandwich" protocol in patients with advanced endometrial cancer. The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients with staged III - IV disease who received adjuvant chemotherapy (docetaxel plus carboplatin) administered alone or interposed with radiotherapy between January 2004 and August 2010. Of the 35 study patients, 10 (28.6%) had stage IIIA disease, 15 (42.9%) had IIIC1 disease, 7 (20.0%) had IIIC2 disease and 3 (8.6%) had IVB disease. Nine (90.0%) of the 10 patients with stage IIIA disease received four to six cycles of adjuvant docetaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy alone. All 25 patients with stage IIIC - IVB disease and 1 patient with stage IIIA disease received radiotherapy sandwiched between chemotherapy cycles (total, three to six cycles). The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 73.0 and 87.0%, respectively, for all patients. For patients with stage IIIC - IVB disease, the 3-year PFS and OS rates were 62.4 and 81.8%, respectively. Combination chemotherapy with docetaxel and carboplatin interposed with radiotherapy is efficacious and well tolerated for stage IIIC - IVB endometrial cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy alone with docetaxel and carboplatin might be sufficient for stage IIIA disease.

  17. Technical innovation in adjuvant radiotherapy: Evolution and evaluation of new treatments for today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian H; Ward, Carol; Langdon, Simon P

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in breast cancer radiotherapy include intensity modulated radiotherapy, brachytherapy and intraoperative radiotherapy and current trials are seeking to evaluate their value in optimizing local control while maintaining cosmetic effects. Future clinical dividends in local control and survival may come from the identification of molecular signatures of breast cancer radiosensitivity, the development of predictive signatures and identification of immunohistochemical markers of risk of local recurrence. The importance of tumour heterogeneity is being increasingly recognized as an important factor in determining radiotherapy response and an improved understanding of the biology of the tumour microenvironment may identify targets that allow enhanced radiosensitisation or reversal of radioresistance when inhibited. This review describes recent developments in these areas.

  18. Adjuvant radiotherapy is not supported in patients with verrucous carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Suresh; Pai, Sara I; Bhattacharyya, Neil

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the impact of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with verrucous carcinoma (VC) as compared to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity. Cross-sectional population analysis. Cases of nonmetastatic VC/SCC of the oral cavity were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (1988-2013). Kaplan-Meier survivals, stratified according to T stage, were compared between VC and SCC for treatment with or without adjuvant RT. A total of 18,819 VC/SCC cases were identified. There were 581 (3.1%) VC (mean age 69.6 years, 48.9% female) versus 18,238 (97.0%) SCC (mean age, 65.3, 37.1% female) patients. Verrucous carcinoma patients receiving surgery alone (N = 539) demonstrated a trend toward improved OS versus VC patients receiving surgery and RT (N = 40) (117.0 vs. 71.4 months, respectively, P = 0.119). There was a statistically significant improvement in DSS in VC patients receiving surgery alone (217.2 vs. 110.9 months, P = 0.05). Verrucous carcinoma patients treated with adjuvant RT demonstrated a trend toward a worse OS (71.4 vs. 93.0 months, P = 0.992) and DSS (110.9 vs. 162.3 months, P = 0.275) compared to SCC treated with adjuvant RT, suggesting a different biology and radiosensitivity between VC and SCC. Verrucous carcinoma treated with adjuvant RT had a worse OS and DSS compared to both VC treated with surgery alone and SCC treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Consideration should be given to surgical re-section rather than adjuvant RT in patients with positive margins or local recurrence. 2C. Laryngoscope, 127:1334-1338, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Is Radiotherapy a Good Adjuvant Strategy for Men With a History of Cryptorchism and Stage I Seminoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Gorayski, Peter; Zwahlen, Daniel; Fay, Michael; Keller, Jacqui; Millar, Jeremy

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Men with cryptorchism can have aberrant abdominopelvic lymph node (LN) drainage or a different natural history if they develop Stage I seminoma. If so, the nodal echelons for metastases will not be reliable, and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) would not be an ideal strategy. Methodsand Materials: Two prospectively maintained oncology databases were reviewed for men with a history of testicular seminoma and cryptorchidism. The primary endpoint was the 5-year relapse-free rate. Results: A total of 23 men were identified, most (n = 13) had had a tumor in a scrotal location after orchiopexy. After orchiectomy, 5 men were managed with surveillance, and 18 underwent RT to a median dose of 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy). All the radiation fields included the para-aortic LNs, and 13 included the ipsilateral pelvic LNs. After a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-148), 2 patients developed a relapse. One did so 4 months into a surveillance program in the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic LNs, sites that would have been treated had he undergone RT. The other patient developed a relapse in the contralateral testis 46 months after having undergone RT. It is likely that the latter patient had a metachronous primary rather than a relapse; hence, the 5-year relapse-free rate was 80% for surveillance and 100% for RT. Both patients underwent successful salvage treatment, and all patients were disease free and alive at the last follow-up visit. Conclusion: A history of cryptorchism does not appear to confer a greater risk of relapse for men with Stage I seminoma managed with radiotherapy. RT, surveillance, and adjuvant carboplatin chemotherapy are treatment options for these patients.

  20. An unusual case of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the shoulder: A multidisciplinary approach with arthroscopic synovectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Tânia Quinás; Morais, João; Gonçalves, Zico; Agostinho, Francisco; Melo, Gilberto; Henriques, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovial membrane. This condition is usually monoarticular, can be locally destructive, and involves muscles, tendons, bursae, bones, and skin. The most commonly affected joints are the knee and hip, followed by the ankle and shoulder. Patients often present with pain, swelling, and joint effusion; however, the duration of symptoms varies. Total synovectomy is the preferred treatment for PVNS. Subtotal synovectomy is a factor of recurrence, and in diffuse PVNS, total excision is very difficult to achieve. Radiotherapy may have an adjunctive role, particularly in incomplete resection or as a treatment of salvation in recurrent cases. This treatment modality has low toxicity levels and enables satisfactory joint function. This is a case report of a rare case of diffuse PVNS of the shoulder that was treated with partial arthroscopic synovectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. A 74-year-old male patient presented with gradual onset pain, hemarthrosis, and functional impairment of the right shoulder without previous trauma history. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder demonstrated a diffuse synovial thickening that was compatible with PVNS and rotator cuff destruction. The lesion was partially excised by arthroscopy. The patient underwent adjuvant radiation therapy with a total dose of 40 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks. At the final follow-up, i.e., 1 month after treatment, the patient had increased shoulder mobility and no pain, with a mild change in cutaneous pigmentation. Radiation therapy is safe and effective in treating and preventing recurrence of diffuse PVNS, particularly after incomplete synovectomy. PMID:28638690

  1. An unusual case of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the shoulder: A multidisciplinary approach with arthroscopic synovectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Serra, Tânia Quinás; Morais, João; Gonçalves, Zico; Agostinho, Francisco; Melo, Gilberto; Henriques, Mónica

    2017-06-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovial membrane. This condition is usually monoarticular, can be locally destructive, and involves muscles, tendons, bursae, bones, and skin. The most commonly affected joints are the knee and hip, followed by the ankle and shoulder. Patients often present with pain, swelling, and joint effusion; however, the duration of symptoms varies. Total synovectomy is the preferred treatment for PVNS. Subtotal synovectomy is a factor of recurrence, and in diffuse PVNS, total excision is very difficult to achieve. Radiotherapy may have an adjunctive role, particularly in incomplete resection or as a treatment of salvation in recurrent cases. This treatment modality has low toxicity levels and enables satisfactory joint function. This is a case report of a rare case of diffuse PVNS of the shoulder that was treated with partial arthroscopic synovectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. A 74-year-old male patient presented with gradual onset pain, hemarthrosis, and functional impairment of the right shoulder without previous trauma history. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder demonstrated a diffuse synovial thickening that was compatible with PVNS and rotator cuff destruction. The lesion was partially excised by arthroscopy. The patient underwent adjuvant radiation therapy with a total dose of 40 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks. At the final follow-up, i.e., 1 month after treatment, the patient had increased shoulder mobility and no pain, with a mild change in cutaneous pigmentation. Radiation therapy is safe and effective in treating and preventing recurrence of diffuse PVNS, particularly after incomplete synovectomy.

  2. Definite vs adjuvant radiotherapy. Comparative effects on lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.T.; Amendola, B.E.; Diaz, R.; Lovett, E.J. III; Hammerschmidt, R.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1985-11-01

    The recent association of alterations in T-lymphocyte subpopulations and impaired cellular immunity prompted an investigation of the effects of radiotherapy (RT) on serial levels of lymphocyte subsets in 30 patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma. Percentage and absolute levels of T3, T4, T6, T8, T10, T11, and Leu 7 cells were measured before, during, and after RT at monthly intervals for six months and compared with levels in 40 normal subjects. Sixteen patients received curative and 14 postoperative adjuvant RT. Before treatment, mean subset levels were similar among the patient and normal groups except for elevated Leu 7 (natural killer) cells in patients with stage I and II disease. There were profound decreases in absolute levels of each subpopulation during and after RT. The percentage of T4 (helper/inducer) cells decreased, whereas that of T8 (cytotoxic/suppressor) and Leu 7 cells tended to increase. Compared with normal values, the mean T4/T8 ratio decreased significantly by six months after RT, when absolute levels of the subsets had rebounded to pretreatment levels in the definitive RT group but remained profoundly decreased in the adjuvant group. The differing recovery patterns suggest that factors other than RT may contribute to persistent immunosuppression following RT.

  3. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Scaringi, Claudia; Caporello, Paola; Salvati, Maurizio; Arcella, Antonella; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Giangaspero, Felice; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh; Raut, Nirmal; Arora, Brijesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Dutta, Debnarayan; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Kurkure, Purna

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To present outcome data in a prospective study of radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed DIPGs were prospectively treated with focal RT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions along with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1-42). Four weeks after completing the initial RT-TMZ schedule, adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1-5) was given every 28 days to a maximum of 12 cycles. Response was evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. Results: Between March 2005 and November 2006, 20 children (mean age, 8.3 years) were accrued. Eighteen patients have died from disease progression, one patient is alive with progressive disease, and one patient is alive with stable disease. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.15 months and 6.9 months, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity during the concurrent RT-TMZ phase included thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, leucopenia in 2, and vomiting in 7. Transient Grade II skin toxicity developed in the irradiated fields in 18 patients. During the adjuvant TMZ phase, Grade III/IV leucopenia developed in 2 patients and Grade IV thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. Patients with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of a high-grade tumor had worse survival than those with a low-grade tumor (p = 0.001). Patients with neurologic improvement after RT-TMZ had significantly better survival than those who did not (p = 0.048). Conclusions: TMZ with RT has not yielded any improvement in the outcome of DIPG compared with RT alone. Further clinical trials should explore novel treatment modalities.

  5. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  6. Do comorbidity influences acute toxicity and outcome in elderly patients with endometrial cancer treated by adjuvant radiotherapy plus brachytherapy?

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, A; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2013-08-01

    To correlate comorbidity and acute radiation toxicity in elderly patients treated with adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus brachytherapy-high dose rate (HDR-BRT) for endometrial cancer (EC). Endometrial cancer patients over 65 were treated and evaluated for comorbidity assessment with ACE-27 and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). EBRT total dose was 45-50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day). The vault vagina boost of dose was performed by HDR-BRT with 2/3 fractions with a total dose of 10-15 Gy. From 2008 to 2011, 35 patients were analyzed. Eighteen patients (51.43 %) had not ACE-27 comorbidity; while 27 patients (77.14 %) had CCI lower than three. During treatment, acute toxicity was mild and not influenced by the comorbidity score. Two-year Progression Free and Overall Survival were 69 and 80 %. ACE-27 and CCI did not affect progression-free survival (p = 0.51, p = 0.3) and OS (p = 0.26, p = 0.5). External beam radiotherapy plus BRT-HDR are well tolerated in EC elderly with good performance status and low comorbidity profile.

  7. Phase I study of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Xianguang; Li, Xiaolin; Meng, Xiangjiao; Kong, Lingling; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary effectiveness of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) for radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy to the chest wall after mastectomy were enrolled. EGCG solution was sprayed to the radiation field from the initiation of Grade 1 radiation dermatitis until 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. EGCG concentration escalated from 40 to 660 μmol l−1 in 7 levels with 3–6 patients in each level. EGCG toxicity was graded using the NCI (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) v. 3.0. Any adverse event >Grade 1 attributed to EGCG was considered dose-limiting toxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was defined as the dose level that induced dose-limiting toxicity in more than one-third of patients at a given cohort. Radiation dermatitis was recorded weekly by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring and patient-reported symptoms. Results: From March 2012 to August 2013, 24 patients were enrolled. Acute skin redness was observed in 1 patient and considered to be associated with the EGCG treatment at 140 μmol l−1 level. Three more patients were enrolled at this level and did not experience toxicity to EGCG. The dose escalation stopped at 660 μmol l−1. No other reported acute toxicity was associated with EGCG. Grade 2 radiation dermatitis was observed in eight patients during or after radiotherapy, but all decreased to Grade 1 after EGCG treatments. Patient-reported symptom scores were significantly decreased at 2 weeks after the end of radiotherapy in pain, burning, itching and tenderness, p < 0.05. Conclusion: The topical administration of EGCG was well tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose was not found. EGCG may be effective in treating radiation dermatitis with preliminary investigation. Advances in

  8. Quality of life in patients treated by adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancers: correlation with dose-volume parameters.

    PubMed

    Pisani, C; Deantonio, L; Surico, D; Brambilla, M; Galla, A; Ferrara, E; Masini, L; Gambaro, G; Surico, N; Krengli, M

    2016-09-01

    Modern multidisciplinary cancer treatments aim at obtaining minimal influence on patients' quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to assess QoL and correlate it with dose-volume parameters of organ at risks (OARs) in patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancers. We administered the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EN24 or CX24 questionnaires to 124 patients, 100 with endometrial cancer and 24 with cervical cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy ± chemotherapy in regular follow-up. Bladder function, fecal incontinence or urgency and sexual functioning were investigated and correlated with dose-volume parameters of OAR by multiple linear regression analysis. This correlation was assessed by R (2) value. QoL was very high in the majority of patients (82.3 % of patients). Few patients referred urinary incontinence (3.2 %) or abdominal discomfort of high grade (4.0 %). We found a significant correlation between bladder V40, i.e., absolute percentage of bladder volume that received a dose of 40 Gy, and global health status (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.17), urinary urgency (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.24), urinary incontinence (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.23) and dyspareunia (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.04). We found also a correlation between global health status and mean dose to vagina (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.17) and between maximum dose to lumbo-sacral plexus and abdominal pain (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.07). Women treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancers have good QoL with minimal limitations of daily activities. QoL was correlated with dose-volume parameters such as bladder V40, mean dose to vagina, maximum dose to trigone and LSP.

  9. Use of deodorants during adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a survey of compliance with standard advice, impact on patients and a literature review on safety.

    PubMed

    Graham, P H; Graham, J L

    2009-12-01

    Proscription of antiperspirant or deodorant use during adjuvant breast radiotherapy is common. The investigators were seeking an information base to facilitate design of an appropriate controlled trial of the use of deodorants during radiotherapy. The first component consisted of a survey of women after adjuvant breast radiotherapy seeking information about routine deodorant use and potential concern if deodorants were not permitted during radiotherapy. The second component comprised a literature search for any existing controlled evidence regarding harm from deodorant use during radiotherapy. Four hundred fourteen women completed surveys. Two hundred eighty recalled advice against deodorants. Two hundred ninety-nine women routinely used deodorants, 70% of whom used roll-on products. Forty-five continued deodorant use during radiation, 20 of these despite recalling advice not to wear a deodorant. Of the 233 women who routinely wore a deodorant but abstained during radiotherapy, 19% expressed a lot of concern about body odour and 45% were slightly concerned. Three controlled studies totalling 310 patients report specific deodorants versus no deodorant use which did not show statistically significantly increased skin reactions, but had only a small subset with axillary irradiation. The proscription of deodorant use during radiotherapy is of unproven benefit and causes body odour concern to the majority of women who are usual deodorant users. The next most appropriate trial would compare use of the usual deodorant versus no deodorant, would encompass a significant number of women with radiotherapy to the axilla or application of deodorant to irradiated skin areas, and include endpoints other than skin reaction alone.

  10. Stage II Adenocarcinoma of the Endometrium: Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Recurrence Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cozad, Scott C.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Review patterns of recurrence for Stage II endometrial cancer in a community practice. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985-2002. Patients were excluded for Stages I, III, or IV or treatment with preoperative pelvic radiation (external beam radiation therapy [EBRT]). Results: Eighty-six patients with a mean follow-up of 70 months are reported. Higher risk patients were selected for adjuvant radiation with no apparent differences for those receiving only EBRT compared with EBRT with brachytherapy. Five-year actuarial vaginal, pelvic sidewall/nodal, and metastatic control rates were 100% and 100%, 96.9% and 100%, and 79% and 84.2% for patients receiving EBRT or EBRT with brachytherapy. Overall survival rates were 70.5% and 75.8%, and cause-specific survival rates were 78.8% and 82.9% for those receiving EBRT or EBRT with brachytherapy. A select group was observed and experienced one vaginal recurrence with overall and cause-specific survival rates of 100%. Conclusion: In higher risk patients with Stage II, adjuvant EBRT achieves excellent vaginal and pelvic sidewall/nodal control without apparent benefit from additional brachytherapy. Select patients may not require adjuvant treatment.

  11. Individual positioning: a comparative study of adjuvant breast radiotherapy in the prone versus supine position.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán; Hideghéty, Katalin; Mezo, Tamás; Nikolényi, Alíz; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% +/- 4.2% vs. 89.2 +/- 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V(20Gy), was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  12. Individual Positioning: A Comparative Study of Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy in the Prone Versus Supine Position

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Hideghety, Katalin; Mezo, Tamas; Nikolenyi, Aliz; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Methods and Materials: Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. Results: The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% {+-} 4.2% vs. 89.2 {+-} 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V{sub 20Gy}, was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  13. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ung, Yee C.

    2010-07-01

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  14. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy in the management of esophageal cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carcaterrra, Maurizio; Osti, Martia Falchetto; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Caruso, Cristina; Berardi, Francesca; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2005-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the mainstay treatment for esophageal cancer and the failure of surgery alone is attributed to the systemic nature of the disease at the time of presentation. In an effort to improve local control of the disease that should correspond to a benefit in survival, postoperative adjuvant schemes of treatment have been explored. Current standard treatment, and future implications in light of the new knowledge are analyzed, based on the present literature. The possibility of different treatments in relation to different histology findings, is stressed.

  16. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  17. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  18. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Mehee; Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George; Byrne, Richard W.; Diaz, Aidnag Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ondine's curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine's curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97 mm Hg. He was diagnosed with Ondine's curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case.

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  20. Evaluation of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer. [/sup 60/Co; X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.; Stryker, J.A.; O'Neill, M. Jr.; DeMuth, W.E. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    One hundred eighteen patients with lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed to determine whether postoperative radiotherapy (RT) improves survival. Patterns of treatment failure and three year NED (no evidence of disease) survival rates were assessed according to extent of tumor spread, histology, and treatment method. Patients with hilar or mediastinal node metastases were at higher risk of local failure compared to those with negative nodes. Postoperative RT reduced local recurrence and improved 3 year survival among patients with positive nodes. However, postoperative RT did not improve survival among those with negative nodes. Our data indicated that patients with positive hilar or mediastinal nodes may require postoperative RT to improve survival.

  1. Characterization of risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy-associated pain in a tri-racial/ethnic breast cancer population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean L; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Nelson, Omar L; Hu, Jennifer J

    2016-05-01

    Pain related to cancer or treatment is a critical quality of life issue for breast cancer survivors. In a prospective study of 375 patients with breast cancer (enrolled during 2008-2014), we characterized the risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT)-associated pain. Pain score was assessed at pre-RT and post-RT as the mean of 4 pain severity items (ie, pain at its worst, least, average, and now) from the Brief Pain Inventory with 11-point numeric rating scale (0-10). Pain scores of 4 to 10 were considered clinically relevant pain. The study consists of 58 non-Hispanic whites (15%), 78 black or African Americans (AA; 21%), and 239 Hispanic whites (HW; 64%). Overall, the prevalence of pre-RT, post-RT, and RT-associated clinically relevant pain was 16%, 31% and 20%, respectively. In univariate analysis, AA and HW had significantly higher pre-RT and post-RT pain than non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-RT pain was significantly associated with HW and obesity; post-RT pain was significantly associated with AA, HW, younger age, ≥2 comorbid conditions, above-median hotspot volume receiving >105% prescribed dose, and pre-RT pain score ≥4. Radiotherapy-associated pain was significantly associated with AA (odds ratio [OR] = 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-9.82), younger age (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.24-4.79), and 2 or ≥3 comorbid conditions (OR = 3.06, 95% CI = 1.32-7.08; OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.49-14.25, respectively). These risk factors may help to guide RT decision-making process, such as hypofractionated RT schedule. Furthermore, effective pain management strategies are needed to improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer with clinically relevant pain.

  2. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  3. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 ..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E/sub 2/ (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E/sub 2/, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  4. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  5. Improved overall survival with adjuvant radiotherapy for high-intermediate and high risk Stage I endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Adams, William; Block, Alec M; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Small, William; Grover, Surbhi

    2017-03-01

    To perform a large analysis of Stage I endometrioid-type endometrial cancer patients to determine the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) on survival. 132,976 FIGO Stage I endometrioid-type endometrial cancer patients treated surgically were identified within the National Cancer Database (NCDB) comprising Commission on Cancer facilities in the United States. Patients were categorized as observation (OBS) or ART (vaginal brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, or both). Univariable generalized linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the odds of receiving ART, and a multivariable frailty survival model was used to estimate the instantaneous hazard of death for those receiving OBS versus ART. Due to the presence of a significant interaction, these estimates were stratified by PORTEC-based low, low-intermediate, high-intermediate, and high risk groups. 104,645 (79%) underwent OBS while 28,331 (21%) received ART. Of those receiving ART, 12,913 (46%) received VBT alone, 12,857 (45%) received EBRT alone, and 2561 (9%) received EBRT+VBT. On univariable analysis, increasing stage/myometrial invasion, higher grade, older age, presence of lymphovascular space invasion, and larger tumor size predicted poorer survival (all p<0.01). On multivariable analysis, patients at high-intermediate risk and high risk experienced improved survival with ART with a hazard ratio of 0.796 (95% CI: 0.731-0.867; p<0.001) and 0.783 (95% CI: 0.693-0.885; p<0.001), respectively. There was no survival benefit for ART among patients at low or low-intermediate risk. In Stage I high-intermediate and high risk endometrioid-type endometrial cancer patients, ART significantly improves overall survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiotherapy plus concurrent and adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy for patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Ho; Hong, Yong-Kil; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Kim, Bum-Soo; Lee, Youn-Soo; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Kim, Moon-Chan; Park, Chun-Kun

    2007-06-01

    We analyzed the clinical efficacy and toxicity of concurrent therapy as a first line modality for malignant glioma patients. From 1998 to 2004, 39 patients, 22 with glioblastoma (GM), nine with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), 7 with anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and 1 with anaplastic oligodendro-astrocytoma (AOA) were enrolled in this study. The median age was 46.2 years (range 8-67). Both external involved field radiotherapy and chemotherapy, composed of CCNU (75-110 mg/m(2)), procarbazine (60 mg/m(2)) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m(2)), were started simultaneously two weeks after surgery. The median progression-free survival time for the GM, AA, and AO patients was 6, 26, and 31 months, respectively. The median survival of the patients with GM and AA was 27 and 41 months. The two-year survival rate of the GM and AA patients was 50.4 and 66.7%, respectively. Grade III/IV hematological toxicity was reduced from 25.6 to 13% after reduction of the dose of CCNU (75 mg/m(2)). Radiation necrosis was confirmed by pathologic examination in four patients (10.3%). The median interval from the completion of radiotherapy to the diagnosis of necrosis was 19 weeks. Modified concurrent chemoradiotherapy may be a feasible option for treating malignant glioma with acceptable toxicity.

  7. [Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer by concomitant hormonotherapy and radiotherapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Azria, D; Lemanski, C; Zouhair, A; Gutowski, M; Belkacémi, Y; Dubois, J B; Romieu, G; Ozsahin, M

    2004-06-01

    Combining radiation and hormone therapy has become common clinical practice in recent years for locally advanced prostate cancer. The use of such concomitant therapy in the treatment of breast disease has been very infrequently reported in the literature, but such an application seems justified given the common hormonal dependence of breast cancer and the potential synergetic effect of these two treatment modalities. As adjuvant therapy, tamoxifen is the key drug in the hormonal treatment arsenal, providing a significant improvement in both local control and global survival rates. Aromatase inhibitors are currently being evaluated in this setting, and initial results are promising. In vitro, tamoxifen does not seem to offer a protective effect against radiation. In clinical use, the few available published studies confirm the superiority of the association of radiation with tamoxifen as opposed to radiation therapy alone in decreasing local recurrences of surgically removed breast tumors. Toxicity associated with such concomitant therapy includes mainly subcutaneous and pulmonary fibroses. However, subcutaneous fibrosis and its cosmetic impact on the treated breast are frequently described side effects of radiation therapy, and their incidence may actually be reduced when tamoxifen is associated. The evidence is less controversial for pulmonary fibrosis, which is more common with the concomitant therapy. The association of radiation and aromatase inhibitors has as of yet rarely been reported. Letrozole (Femara) has a radiosensitizing effect on breast-cancer cell lines transfected with the aromatase gene. Clinical data assessing this effect in vivo are not available. The FEMTABIG study (letrozole vs. tamoxifen vs. sequential treatment) did not specify the sequence of radiation and hormonal therapy. The ATAC study comparing the adjuvant use of anastrozole (Arimidex) and tamoxifen does not provide any information on the number of patients receiving radiation

  8. Factors influencing acute and late toxicity in the era of adjuvant hypofractionated breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M C; Bonfantini, F; Di Salvo, F; Dispinzieri, M; Mantero, E; Soncini, F; Baili, P; Sant, M; Bianchi, G; Maggi, C; Di Cosimo, S; Agresti, R; Pignoli, E; Valdagni, R; Lozza, L

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. 537 early breast cancer patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy after conservative surgery were enrolled from April 2009 to December 2014, in an Italian cancer institute. The dose was 42.4 Gy in 16 daily fractions, 2.65 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered only in grade III breast cancer patients and in patients with close or positive margins. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy according to RTOG scale. The impact of patients clinical characteristics, performed treatments and dose inhomogeneities on the occurrence of an higher level of acute skin toxicity and late fibrosis has been evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The mean age was 74 (range 46-91 yrs). 27% of patients received boost. 22% of cases (n = 119) received also chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 32 months. G1 and G2/G3 acute skin toxicity were 61.3% and 20.5% and G1 and G2/G3 late fibrosis 12.6% and 4.3% respectively. Chemotherapy (p = 0.04), diabetes (p = 0.04) and boost administration (p < 0.01) were found to be statistically significant on the occurrence of late fibrosis, but a multivariate analysis did not show any factors connected. The boost administration (p < 0.01), the breast volume (p = 0.05), dose inhomogeneities (p < 0.01) and boost volume (p = 0.04) were found to be statistically significant as concerns the occurrence of acute skin reaction at the univariate analysis, but only the boost administration (p = 0.02), at multivariate analysis. The results of our study, according to the large randomized trials, confirmed that hypofractionated whole breast irradiation is safe, and only the boost administration seems to be an important predictor for toxicity. Chemotherapy does not

  9. Smoking as an independent risk factor for severe skin reactions due to adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Lena; Johansson, Hemming; Hatschek, Thomas; Bergenmar, Mia

    2013-10-01

    Risk factors for severe acute radiation skin reactions (ARSR) have been described with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of severe ARSR in women undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer. 390 women were assessed at the first and final RT sessions and at followup. ARSR were measured by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/The Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria (RTOG/EORTC scale). Patients reported symptoms using visual analogue scale (VAS). Health related quality of life was assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 and sleep disturbances by the MOS-Sleep questionnaire. Clinical data included smoking status (carbon monoxide in expired air), body mass index (BMI) and treatment data. RT dose, ≥ 50 Gy (mean difference 1.9 CI: 1.0 to 3.5, p = 0.040), high BMI (mean difference 4.3 CI: 2.2 to 8.3, p < 0.001) and smoking (mean difference 2.5 CI. 1.1 to 5.7, p = 0.027) were the factors strongest related to severe ARSR. Patients' with severe ARSR reported higher levels of pain and increased sleeping problems. To stop smoking during RT is the best decision patients can make to reduce the risk for severe ARSR since smoking is an independent risk factor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Adjuvant Magnetic Fields in Radiotherapy on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jianguo; Sheng, Huaying; Zhu, Chihong; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Shenglin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To explore sensitization and possible mechanisms of adjuvant magnetic fields (MFs) in radiotherapy (RT) of non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods. Human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells were treated with MF, RT, and combined MF-RT. Colony-forming efficiency was calculated, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured, and changes in cell cycle- and apoptosis-related gene expression were measured by microarray. Results. A 0.5 T, 8 Hz stationary MF showed a duration-dependent inhibitory effect lasting for 1–4 hours. The MF-treated groups had significantly greater cell inhibition than did controls (P < 0.05). Surviving fractions and growth curves derived from colony-forming assay showed that the MF-only, RT-only, and MF-RT groups had inhibited cell growth; the MF-RT group showed a synergetic effect. Microarray of A549 cells exposed for 1 hour to MF showed that 19 cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes had 2-fold upregulation and 40 genes had 2-fold downregulation. MF significantly arrested cells in G2 and M phases, apparently sensitizing the cells to RT. Conclusions. MF may inhibit A549 cells and can increase their sensitivity to RT, possibly by affecting cell cycle- and apoptosis-related signaling pathways. PMID:24224175

  11. Adjuvant sequential chemo and radiotherapy improves the oncological outcome in high risk endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Mauro; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; De Ponti, Elena; Grassi, Tommaso; Ponti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the impact of sequential chemoradiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Two hundred fifty-four women with stage IB grade 3, II and III EC (2009 FIGO staging), were included in this retrospective study. Results Stage I, II, and III was 24%, 28.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Grade 3 tumor was 53.2% and 71.3% had deep myometrial invasion. One hundred sixty-five women (65%) underwent pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy and 58 (22.8%) had nodal metastases. Ninety-eight women (38.6%) underwent radiotherapy, 59 (23.2%) chemotherapy, 42 (16.5%) sequential chemoradiotherapy, and 55 (21.7%) were only observed. After a median follow-up of 101 months, 78 women (30.7%) relapsed and 91 women (35.8%) died. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved survival rates in women who did not undergo nodal evaluation (disease-free survival [DFS], p=0.040; overall survival [OS], p=0.024) or pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy (DFS, p=0.008; OS, p=0.021). Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved both DFS (p=0.015) and OS (p=0.014) in stage III, while only a trend was found for DFS (p=0.210) and OS (p=0.102) in stage I-II EC. In the multivariate analysis, only age (≤65 years) and sequential chemoradiotherapy were statistically related to the prognosis. Conclusion Sequential chemoradiotherapy improves survival rates in high risk EC compared with chemotherapy or radiotherapy alone, in particular in stage III. PMID:26197768

  12. Adjuvant sequential chemo and radiotherapy improves the oncological outcome in high risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Mauro; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto; De Ponti, Elena; Grassi, Tommaso; Ponti, Serena; Fruscio, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of the impact of sequential chemoradiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer (EC). Two hundred fifty-four women with stage IB grade 3, II and III EC (2009 FIGO staging), were included in this retrospective study. Stage I, II, and III was 24%, 28.7%, and 47.3%, respectively. Grade 3 tumor was 53.2% and 71.3% had deep myometrial invasion. One hundred sixty-five women (65%) underwent pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy and 58 (22.8%) had nodal metastases. Ninety-eight women (38.6%) underwent radiotherapy, 59 (23.2%) chemotherapy, 42 (16.5%) sequential chemoradiotherapy, and 55 (21.7%) were only observed. After a median follow-up of 101 months, 78 women (30.7%) relapsed and 91 women (35.8%) died. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved survival rates in women who did not undergo nodal evaluation (disease-free survival [DFS], p=0.040; overall survival [OS], p=0.024) or pelvic (+/- aortic) lymphadenectomy (DFS, p=0.008; OS, p=0.021). Sequential chemoradiotherapy improved both DFS (p=0.015) and OS (p=0.014) in stage III, while only a trend was found for DFS (p=0.210) and OS (p=0.102) in stage I-II EC. In the multivariate analysis, only age (≤ 65 years) and sequential chemoradiotherapy were statistically related to the prognosis. Sequential chemoradiotherapy improves survival rates in high risk EC compared with chemotherapy or radiotherapy alone, in particular in stage III.

  13. Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Safety and Efficacy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Souhami, Luis; Roberge, David; Kavan, Petr; Shakibnia, Lily; Muanza, Thierry; Lambert, Christine; Leblanc, Richard; Del Maestro, Rolando; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Shenouda, George

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Despite multimodality treatments, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. In an attempt to improve results, we have begun a program of accelerated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and June 2006, 35 unselected patients with glioblastoma multiforme were treated with hypo-IMRT. During a 4-week period, using a concomitant boost technique, a dose of 60 Gy and 40 Gy were delivered in 20 fractions prescribed to the periphery of the gross tumor volume and planning target volume, respectively. TMZ was administered according to the regimen of Stupp et al. Results: The median follow-up was 12.6 months. Of the 35 patients, 29 (82.8%) completed the combined modality treatment, and 25 (71.4%) received a median of four cycles of adjuvant TMZ. The median overall survival was 14.4 months, and the median disease-free survival was 7.7 months. The median survival time differed significantly between patients who underwent biopsy and those who underwent partial or total resection (7.1 vs. 16.1 months, p = 0.035). The median survival was also significantly different between patients with methylated vs. unmethylated 0-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoters (14.4 vs. 8.7 months, p = 0.049). The pattern of failure was predominantly central, within 2 cm of the initial gross tumor volume. Grade 3-4 toxicity was limited to 1 patient with nausea and emesis during adjuvant TMZ administration. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypo-IMRT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated with a useful 2-week shortening of radiotherapy. Despite a high number of patients with poor prognostic features (74.3% recursive partitioning analysis class V or VI), the median survival was comparable to that after standard radiotherapy fractionation schedules plus TMZ.

  14. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC and NCIC CTG EN.5 randomised trials): pooled trial results, systematic review, and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Blake, P; Swart, Ann Marie; Orton, J; Kitchener, H; Whelan, T; Lukka, H; Eisenhauer, E; Bacon, M; Tu, D; Parmar, M K B; Amos, C; Murray, C; Qian, W

    2009-01-10

    Early endometrial cancer with low-risk pathological features can be successfully treated by surgery alone. External beam radiotherapy added to surgery has been investigated in several small trials, which have mainly included women at intermediate risk of recurrence. In these trials, postoperative radiotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of isolated local recurrence but there is no evidence that it improves recurrence-free or overall survival. We report the findings from the ASTEC and EN.5 trials, which investigated adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in women with early-stage disease and pathological features suggestive of intermediate or high risk of recurrence and death from endometrial cancer. Between July, 1996, and March, 2005, 905 (789 ASTEC, 116 EN.5) women with intermediate-risk or high-risk early-stage disease from 112 centres in seven countries (UK, Canada, Poland, Norway, New Zealand, Australia, USA) were randomly assigned after surgery to observation (453) or to external beam radiotherapy (452). A target dose of 40-46 Gy in 20-25 daily fractions to the pelvis, treating five times a week, was specified. Primary outcome measure was overall survival, and all analyses were by intention to treat. These trials were registered ISRCTN 16571884 (ASTEC) and NCT 00002807 (EN.5). After a median follow-up of 58 months, 135 women (68 observation, 67 external beam radiotherapy) had died. There was no evidence that overall survival with external beam radiotherapy was better than observation, hazard ratio 1.05 (95% CI 0.75-1.48; p=0.77). 5-year overall survival was 84% in both groups. Combining data from ASTEC and EN.5 in a meta-analysis of trials confirmed that there was no benefit in terms of overall survival (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI 0.84-1.29) and can reliably exclude an absolute benefit of external beam radiotherapy at 5 years of more than 3%. With brachytherapy used in 53% of women in ASTEC/EN.5, the local recurrence rate in the observation group at 5 years

  15. Acute toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy in locally advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma. First results of the multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS).

    PubMed

    Schuck, Andreas; Biermann, Martin; Pixberg, Michaela K; Müller, Stefan B; Heinecke, Achim; Schober, Otmar; Willich, Normann

    2003-12-01

    The indication for adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) extending beyond the thyroid capsule has been an issue of controversy during the past 2 decades. No randomized studies evaluating the benefit of radiotherapy have been published so far. In the Multicenter Study Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (MSDS), a randomization has been performed concerning external-beam radiotherapy in patients with DTC extending beyond the thyroid capsule (pT4 pN0/1/x cM0, TNM classification, 5th edition, 1997) following surgery and radioiodine therapy. Radiation-associated toxicity has been prospectively evaluated. Radiotherapy was performed with 50.4 Gy (pN0) or 54.0 Gy (pN1/x) to the cervical, supraclavicular and upper mediastinal lymph nodes. A total dose of 59.4 Gy (R0 resection) or 66.6 Gy (R1) was used to treat the tumor bed. Conventional fractionation was used with 1.8 Gy/d. At the time of the analysis, 36 patients were randomized or allocated to treatment arm A (with external-beam radiotherapy). Of these, 22 were treated with radiotherapy, and documentation of acute toxicity was available. Toxicity was evaluated prospectively according to the RTOG/EORTC criteria. The maximal acute toxicity observed during radiotherapy was grade I in four patients, grade II in 16 patients, and grade III in two patients (9.1%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.1-29.2%). Toxicity was mainly observed at the pharynx, larynx, and skin. In 19 patients, residual toxicity within 100 days following radiotherapy was evaluated. No residual toxicity was observed in two patients. Maximal residual toxicity was grade I in 13 patients and grade II in four. No further grade III toxicity could be observed. The majority of patients experience mild to moderate side effects from adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy. At the first follow-up examination, most side effects have subsided. Acute toxicity is tolerable in these patients.

  16. Prevalence of cerebral small-vessel disease in long-term breast cancer survivors exposed to both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koppelmans, Vincent; Vernooij, Meike W; Boogerd, Willem; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ikram, M Arfan; Breteler, Monique M B; Schagen, Sanne B

    2015-02-20

    Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for breast cancer have been related to transient ischemic attacks and stroke. To date, no studies have investigated the relationship between these adjuvant therapies and subclinical cerebral small-vessel disease in survivors of breast cancer. We compared white matter lesion (WML) volume and prevalence of brain infarctions and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) between breast cancer survivors exposed to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy (aRCeBCSs) for primary disease and a population-based reference group. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) was performed in 187 aRCeBCSs who received primary breast cancer treatment on average more than 20 years before this study and 374 age-matched reference women without a history of cancer. WML volume was segmented using fully automated software. Experienced raters reviewed all scans for cortical infarctions, lacunar infarctions, strictly lobar CMBs, and deep/infratentorial CMBs with or without lobar CMBs. Within the aRCeBCS group, we also analyzed the association between relative radiotherapy exposure to the carotid artery and prevalence of WML volume and CMBs. The aRCeBCS group had a higher prevalence of both total CMBs and CMBs in a deep/infratentorial region than the reference group. No between-group differences were observed in the prevalence of infarctions or WML volume. Exposure of the carotid artery to radiation was not associated with WML volume or CMBs. More CMBs were found in the aRCeBCS group than in the population-based controls. These vascular lesions potentially mark cerebrovascular frailty that could partially explain the well-documented association between chemotherapy and cognitive dysfunction. No support was found for a radiotherapy-related origin of CMBs. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy for the treatment of stage IV rectal cancer after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Sung-Chan; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Heung Kwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Joo, Jung Nam; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in stage IV rectal cancer with total mesorectal excision (TME) has not been defined. We evaluated the impact of RT on oncologic outcomes among patients with stage IV rectal cancer who underwent TME and performed a meta-analysis of published studies. The records of stage IV rectal cancer patients who underwent TME between August 2001 and December 2011 were reviewed. Patients who received pelvic RT (RT group) and those who did not (non-RT group) were matched using a propensity score. Oncologic outcomes were compared between the groups. A systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted. One hundred seventy-six patients were matched with propensity score matching, resulting in 39 patients in each group. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) of the RT group was significantly higher than that of the non-RT group (2-year LRFS: 100% vs 83.6%, respectively, P = 0.038). The overall survival, disease-free survival, and systemic recurrence were not significantly different between the groups. In the meta-analysis, the RT group had a reduced risk for loco-regional recurrence than the non-RT group (RR: 0.48, 95% confidence interval: 0.29–0.79). Pelvic RT might have benefits for loco-regional control in patients with stage IV rectal cancer who undergo TME. PMID:27893653

  18. The morbidity of surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nunns, D.; Williamson, K.; Swaney, L.; Davy, M.

    2000-05-01

    A retrospective review of side effects and complications of treatment in 522 patients with endometrial cancer managed in a gyneoncology unit was conducted. This study evaluated 517 patients who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH BSO). Lymphadendectomy or lymph node sampling was performed with the primary surgery in 264 and 41 cases, respectively. Postoperative radiotherapy was given as external beam or vault brachytherapy. Serious morbidity included lymphedema, hemorrhage, and vaginal stenosis. Lymphadenectomy was associated with lymphedema and lymphocyst formation in 11% of the cases. Vascular injury associated with lymphadenectomy occurred in 0.7% of the cases; however, this was satisfactorily managed through adequate surgical training and experience by staff within the unit. The incidence of vaginal stenosis (54.7%) following postoperative vault brachytherapy was a particular concern for clinical follow-up and sexual function. Although many women were not sexually active prior to treatment, those who were had high levels of sexual dysfunction, even when vaginal stenosis was not present.

  19. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  20. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-08-01

    Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival.This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months.Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival.TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT.

  1. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and

  2. Comparison of clinical outcomes and toxicity in endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy or conventional radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Lily; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Jin-Ching; Jan, Jian-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes and toxicity in endometrial cancer patients treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). There were 101 patients with stage IA-IIIC2 endometrial carcinoma treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. In total, 36 patients received adjuvant CRT and 65 were treated with adjuvant IMRT. The endpoints were overall survival, local failure-free survival, and disease-free survival. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The 5-year overall survival, local failure-free survival, and disease-free survival for the CRT group and the IMRT group were 82.9% versus 93.5% (p = 0.26), 93.7% versus 89.3% (p = 0.68), and 88.0% versus 82.8% (p = 0.83), respectively. Four (11.1%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and three (8.3%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity in the CRT group, whereas four (6.2%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute GI toxicity in the IMRT group and no patient had severe GU toxicity. There was one (2.8%) patient who had Grade 3 or greater late GI toxicity and one (2.8%) patient had Grade 3 or greater late GU toxicity in the CRT group, whereas no patient had severe GI or GU toxicity in the IMRT group. Adjuvant IMRT for endometrial cancer patients had comparable clinical outcomes with CRT and had less acute and late toxicity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Adjuvant versus salvage radiotherapy in prostate cancer: multi-institutional retrospective analysis of the Spanish RECAP database.

    PubMed

    Hervás, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Casaña, M; Gómez-Iturriaga, A; Pastor, J; Jove, J; Mengual, J L; Gónzalez-San Segundo, C; Muñoz, J

    2017-06-30

    To compare adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) to salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) in a cohort of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. The primary aim was to comparatively assess 2- and 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS). A secondary aim was to identify predictors of survival. Data were acquired from the RECAP database, a population-based prostate cancer registry in Spain. Inclusion criteria included RP (with or without lymphadenectomy) followed by ART or SRT. A total of 702 patients were analyzed. Pre-RT PSA values (>0.5 vs. ≤0.5 ng/ml), pathological stage (T1-2 vs. T3-4), post-surgical Gleason score (≤7 vs. 8-10), margin status (positive vs. negative), hormonal treatment (yes vs. no), and RT dose (≤66 Gy vs. >66 Gy) were evaluated to assess their impact on BRFS. The mean patient age in the ART and SRT groups, respectively, was 64 years (range 42-82) and 64.8 years (range 42-82). Median follow-up after RT in the whole sample was 34 months (range 3-141). A total of 702 patients were included: 223 (31.8%) received ART and 479 (68.2%) SRT. BRFS rates (95% CI) in the ART and SRT groups at months 24 and 60 were, respectively: 98.1% (95.9-100.0%) vs. 91.2% (88.2-94.2%) and 84.5% (76.4-92.6%) vs. 74.0% (67.4-80.7%) (p = 0.004). No significant differences in OS were observed (p = 0.053). The following variables were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence in the SRT group: (1) positive surgical margin status (p = 0.049); (2) no hormonotherapy (p = 0.03); (3) total prostate dose ≤66 Gy (p = 0.004); and pre-RT PSA ≥0.5 ng/ml (p = 0.013). This is the first nationwide study in Spain to evaluate a large cohort of PCa patients treated with RP followed by postoperative RT. ART yielded better 2- and 5-year BRFS rates, although OS was equivalent. These findings are consistent with most other published studies and support ART in patients with adverse prognostic characteristics after radical prostatectomy

  4. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  5. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Palpable Melanoma Metastases to the Groin: When to Irradiate?

    SciTech Connect

    Gojkovic-Horvat, Andreja; Jancar, Boris; Blas, Mateja; Zumer, Barbara; Karner, Katarina; Hocevar, Marko; Strojan, Primoz

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of and criteria for postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with palpable melanoma metastases to the groin. Methods and Materials: Patients with palpable metastases to the groin who were treated with therapeutic nodal dissection during 2000 to 2006 were identified in a prospective institutional database. Results: In 101 patients, 103 therapeutic nodal dissections were performed; 37 of these were treated with PORT to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}) of 50.6 Gy (range, 50-72 Gy). In the surgery-only and PORT groups, 2-year regional control rates were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 76-95%) and 91% (95% CI, 81-100%), respectively (p = 0.395). Of five recurrences in radiation-treated patients, four were of dermal type, and in three of these cases, no bolus over the operative scar was used. PORT improved 2-year regional control (46% [95% CI, 11-82%] vs. 82% [95% CI, 63-100%], p = 0.022) among patients in which the sum of risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score) was {>=}2. In multivariate analysis, risk-factor score (<2 vs. {>=}2: HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.00-8.56; p < 0.0001) and PORT (yes vs. no: HR, 7.81; 95% CI, 2.83-21.74; p = 0.050) was predictive for regional control and on logistic-regression testing, number of involved lymph nodes was predictive for systemic dissemination (p = 0.011). Conclusions: PORT should follow therapeutic nodal dissection in cases with two or more adverse factors. More conventional fractionation ({<=}2.5 Gy), cumulative eqTD{sub 2} <60 Gy and use of bolus over the operative scar are recommended.

  6. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  7. Toxicity and outcome of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kuniaki; Mukasa, Akitake; Narita, Yoshitaka; Tabei, Yusuke; Shinoura, Nobusada; Shibui, Soichiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) is the standard therapy for nonelderly patients with glioblastoma. However, TMZ-based chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients with glioblastoma is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefits and adverse effects of this combined therapy in elderly patients with glioblastoma. Of the 76 newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients who were treated with standard radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) and TMZ, treatment toxicity and therapeutic outcome were evaluated in 27 elderly patients (age 65 years or older) and compared with those of 49 nonelderly counterparts (age younger than 65 years). The incidence of common toxicity criteria Grade 4 adverse events during the concomitant course was higher in the elderly group than that in the nonelderly group (26% versus 8%; p = 0.046). Cognitive dysfunction was observed only in the elderly group (p = 0.042). The median overall survival (OS) and median progression-free survival in the elderly group were 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI]; 12.9-18.5) and 8.4 months (95% CI; 5.1-11.7), respectively. OS was significantly shorter in the elderly group than in the nonelderly group (p = 0.021). The recursive partitioning analysis score was a prognostic factor for OS. TMZ-based chemoradiotherapy was associated with an increased risk of Grade 4 adverse events in the elderly patients during concomitant use. Thus, elderly patients who undergo a concomitant course of TMZ must be closely monitored for adverse events. Treatment of glioblastoma in elderly patients must be optimized to reduce toxicity to acceptable levels and to maintain efficacy.

  8. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  9. Concurrent or sequential letrozole with adjuvant breast radiotherapy: final results of the CO-HO-RT phase II randomized trial†

    PubMed Central

    Bourgier, C.; Kerns, S.; Gourgou, S.; Lemanski, C.; Gutowski, M.; Fenoglietto, P.; Romieu, G.; Crompton, N.; Lacombe, J.; Pèlegrin, A.; Ozsahin, M.; Rosenstein, B.; Azria, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We present here final clinical results of the COHORT trial and both translational sub-studies aiming at identifying patients at risk of radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis (RISF): (i) radiation-induced lymphocyte apoptosis (RILA) and (ii) candidates of certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Patients and methods Post-menopausal patients with stage I–II breast cancer (n = 150) were enrolled and assigned to either concurrent (arm A) or sequential radiotherapy (RT)-letrozole (arm B). Among them, 121 were eligible for RILA and SNP assays. Grade ≥2 RISF were the primary end point. Secondary end points were lung and heart events and carcinologic outcome. RILA was performed to predict differences in RISF between individuals. A genome-wide association study was performed to identify SNPs associated with RILA and RISF. Analyses were done by intention to treat. Results After a median follow-up of 74 months, 5 patients developed a grade ≥2 RISF. No significant difference was observed between arms A and B. Neither grade ≥2 lung nor symptomatic cardiac toxicity was observed. Median RILA value of the five patients who had grade ≥2 RISF was significantly lower compared with those who developed grade ≤1 RISF (6.9% versus 13%, P = 0.02). Two SNPs were identified as being significantly associated with RILA: rs1182531 (P = 4.2 × 10−9) and rs1182532 (P = 3.6 × 10−8); both located within the PHACTR3 gene on chromosome 20q13.33. Conclusions With long-term follow-up, letrozole can safely be delivered concomitantly with adjuvant breast RT. Translational sub-studies showed that high RILA values were correlated with patients who did not develop RISF. Registered clinical trial NCT00208273. PMID:26681684

  10. Prognostic factors for long-term quality of life after adjuvant radiotherapy in women with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Robert; Schnetzke, Lara; Bruckner, Thomas; Arians, Nathalie; Rief, Harald; Debus, Juergen; Lindel, Katja

    2016-12-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for endometrial cancer (EC) may affect patients' quality of life (QoL). There is a paucity of data on prognostic factors for long-term QoL and sexual functioning. This study aimed to investigate such factors and assess the role of the vaginal dilator (VD). QoL was assessed in 112 EC patients 6 years (median) after RT. QoL was compared to normative data, and the influence of age, tumor characteristics, lymphadenectomy, RT, and acute toxicities was assessed. VD use and its effect on subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was analyzed. QoL was reduced, particularly in younger patients. Vaginal brachytherapy only and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) were associated with better global health status and reduced chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Higher acute GI toxicity was associated with increased chronic GI symptoms, particularly diarrhea, and reduced role functioning. Higher acute urinary toxicity was associated with increased chronic urological symptoms, muscular/pelvic pain, and chronic GI symptoms, as well as with reduced emotional/social functioning and reduced global health status. Sexual interest/activity was increased despite vaginal dryness and dyspareunia. Sexual interest/activity increased with age. Only few, mainly younger patients used the VD. VD use >1 year was found in women with higher sexual interest/activity. Acute vaginal toxicity and chronic pain prevented VD use. Subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not reduced in VD users. RT technique and acute toxicities are prognostic for the extent of chronic symptoms and long-term QoL. Sexuality is important even at a higher age. Few patients use the VD and a reduction of subjective vaginal shortening/tightness was not achieved.

  11. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged {<=}30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  12. Anthracycline and concurrent radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment of operable breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) after breast surgery was investigated by few authors and remains controversial, because of concerns of toxicity with taxanes/anthracyclines and radiation. This treatment is not standard and is more commonly used for locally advanced breast cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the concomitant use of anthracycline with radiotherapy (RT). Findings Four hundred women having operable breast cancer, treated by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and RT in concomitant way between January 2001 and December 2003, were included in this retrospective cohort study. The study compares 2 adjuvant treatments using CCRT, the first with anthracycline (group A) and the second with CMF (group B). The CT treatment was repeated every 21 days for 6 courses and the total delivered dose of RT was 50 Gy, divided as 2 Gy daily fractions. Locoregional recurrence free (LRFS), event free (EFS), and overall survivals (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival events. Multivariate Cox-regression was used to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics, treatment and survival. In the 2 groups (A+B) (n = 400; 249 in group A and 151 in group B), the median follow-up period was 74.5 months. At 5 years, the isolated LRFS was significantly higher in group A compared to group B (98.7% vs 95.3%; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.258; 95% CI, 0.067 to 0.997; log-rank P = .034). In addition, the use of anthracycline regimens was associated with a higher rate of 5 years EFS (80.4% vs 75.1%; HR = 0.665; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.016; log-rank P = .057). The 5 years OS was 83.2% and 79.2% in the anthracycline and CMF groups, respectively (HR = 0.708; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.128; log-rank P = .143). Multivariate analysis confirmed the positive effect of anthracycline regimens on LRFS (HR = 0.347; 95% CI, 0.114 to 1.053; log-rank P = .062), EFS (HR = 0.539; 95% CI, 0.344 to 0.846; P = 0.012), and

  13. Radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer: a multicenter trial of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Thinh, Dang Huy Quoc; Kato, Shingo; Devi, C R Beena; Tung, Ngo Thanh; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Calaguas, Miriam Joy C; Zhou, Juying; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Banu, Parvin Akhter; Koo, Cho Chul; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, for the treatment of N2-3 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in Asian countries, especially regions of South and Southeast Asian countries where NPC is endemic. Between 2005 and 2009, 121 patients with NPC (T1-4 N2-3 M0) were registered from Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, The Philippines, China and Bangladesh. Patients were treated with 2D radiotherapy concurrently with weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m (2)), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cisplatin (80 mg/m(2) on Day 1) and fluorouracil (800 mg/m(2) on Days 1-5) for 3 cycles. Of the 121 patients, 56 patients (46%) required interruption of RT. The reasons for interruption of RT were acute non-hematological toxicities such as mucositis, pain and dermatitis in 35 patients, hematological toxicities in 11 patients, machine break-down in 3 patients, poor general condition in 2 patients, and others in 8 patients. Of the patients, 93% completed at least 4 cycles of weekly cisplatin during radiotherapy, and 82% completed at least 2 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. With a median follow-up time of 46 months for the surviving 77 patients, the 3-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 89%, 74% and 66%, respectively. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Grade 3-4 toxicities of mucositis, nausea/vomiting and leukopenia were observed in 34%, 4% and 4% of the patients, respectively. In conclusion, further improvement in survival and locoregional control is necessary, although our regimen showed acceptable toxicities.

  14. Rectal cancer patients after neoadjuvant radiotherapy (30Gy/10f) with negative lymph node may not benefit from postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengju; Yao, Yunfeng; Gu, Jin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether adjuvant chemotherapy could bring oncologic benefit to all patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy (30Gy/10f). Rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy between July 2002 and April 2009 were retrospectively identified. A total of 225 patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred thirty-one patients received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, and 94 patients did not. The 120 ypN+ and 105 ypN- patients were divided into chemo and non-chemo groups. Two groups of patients did not show any significant difference in terms of gender, age, ypT stage, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, differentiation, circumferential margin (CRM), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), surgical approach, local recurrence, and distant metastasis (P > 0.05). Survival analysis showed that in ypN+ patients, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate in chemo group were both significantly higher than non-chemo group (P < 0.05). In ypN- patients, the 5-year OS rate and 5-year DFS rate did not show any significant difference in the two groups (P > 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that the 5-year OS rate and 5-year DFS rate in ypT0-2 N- patients (P > 0.05) and ypT3-4 N- patients (P > 0.05) did not show any significant difference, either. Based on a Chinese protocol, patients with ypN- stage may not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, regardless of the ypT stage, while the ypN+ patients may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. More randomized clinical trials are needed in the future.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal and field-in-field radiotherapy techniques for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Acar, Hilal; Buyukyoruk, Ahmet; Cobanoglu, Gokcen; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Yavas, Ozlem; Celik, Cetin

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare field-in-field radiotherapy (FIF) with conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in terms of dosimetric benefits for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Ten consecutive early stage endometrial cancer patients who underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy were included in the study. For each patient, two different treatment plans were created. FIF and CRT plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the organ at risk (OAR) volumes including rectum, bladder, bowel, bilateral femurs and bone marrow, the dose homogeneity index, and the monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique significantly reduced the maximum dose of the PTV, rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow (p values were: <0.001, 0.031, 0.003, <0.001, 0.001, 0.001 and <0.001 respectively). When the OAR volumes irradiated with >30 and >45 Gy were compared, the results were in favor of the FIF technique. The volumes of rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow receiving more than the prescription dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced with FIF technique (p values were 0.016, 0.039, 0.01, 0.04, 0.037 and 0.01 respectively). The dose homogeneity index (DHI) was significantly improved with FIF technique (p < 0.001). FIF allowed more homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV and reduced the doses received by OAR. Considering the lower maximum doses in the OAR and PTV, FIF technique seems to be more advantageous than CRT during adjuvant radiotherapy for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V{sub 20/30}, and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V{sub 20/30} of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V{sub 20} of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future.

  17. Impact of External Beam Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Endometrial Adenocarcinoma: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Vingerhoets, Ad J.J.M.; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 5-10-year survivors of Stage I-II endometrial (adeno-)carcinoma (EC) treated with surgery alone or surgery with external beam adjuvant radiotherapy (EBRT) and an age-matched norm population. Methods and Materials: A population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted by the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. All patients were included who had been diagnosed with EC between 1994 and 1998 (n = 462). Information from the questionnaires returned was linked to data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry on patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Results: Responses were received from 75% of the patients. The analyses were restricted to women with Stage I-II disease at diagnosis, treated with either surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant EBRT, and without recurrent disease or new primary malignancies (n = 264). The patients who had received adjuvant EBRT (n = 80) had had a significantly higher tumor stage and grade at diagnosis (p < 0.0001) and a longer mean time since diagnosis (p = 0.04). Age, number of comorbid diseases, current marital status, nulliparity, education, and occupation were similar for both treatment groups. On multivariate analyses, adjuvant EBRT was independently and negatively associated with the vitality and physical and social well-being scale scores. The HRQOL scores of both treatment groups, however, were similar to those of an age-matched norm population. Conclusion: In general, the HRQOL of EC survivors is good. EC survivors treated with surgery alone had a better HRQOL than women treated with surgery and adjuvant EBRT, although for both groups, the HRQOL was in the range of the norm population.

  18. Surveillance or Adjuvant Treatment With Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy in Stage I Seminoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 13 Studies.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Fausto; Coinu, Andrea; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Borgonovo, Karen; Lonati, Veronica; Barni, Sandro

    2015-10-01

    Testicular stage I seminoma has a remarkable cure rate with orchiectomy alone. The benefit of adjuvant therapy is questionable, and a direct comparison with active surveillance is lacking. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or chemotherapy (CT) compared with surveillance alone on relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and noncancer-related mortality in patients with stage I seminoma. We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Meta-analysis was performed using the fixed- or random-effects models. The primary endpoint was 5-year RFS, and secondary endpoints were 5-year OS and 5-year noncancer-related mortality, reported as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 13 trials (11 retrospective and 2 prospective cohort series), including 12,075 patients with stage I seminoma, were analyzed. The relapse rates were 3.9% versus 14.8% in the adjuvant therapy and surveillance arms, respectively. Overall, adjuvant therapy significantly improved 5-year RFS (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.1-0.29; P < .00001), but not 5-year OS (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.46-2.28; P = .94). Mortality due to other causes was not significantly increased with CT or RT. Adjuvant RT and CT reduce recurrence risk by 80% of stage I seminoma. However, they do not increase OS or noncancer-related mortality. Both treatment options can be offered to patients with stage I seminoma, taking into consideration the side effects and high cure rate of testicular cancer at relapse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (<1/cm2) limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%). Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer

  20. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, D K; Prows, J; Leavitt, D D; Egger, M J; Morgan, J G; Stewart, J R

    1997-01-01

    Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 140 consecutive patients treated from 1980 to 1993. Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 1/2 weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year after completion of radiation treatment, and a mean follow up interval of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (range, 0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. A total of 26% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local-regional control, freedom from distant failure, and cause-specific survival was 91%, 64%, and 75% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 32% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate Cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (P = 0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 11% of patients having arm edema, 17% hyperpigmentation, and 13% telangectasia formation. These data demonstrate that

  1. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Boost with Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolamide for Glioblastoma in Good Performance Status Elderly Patients - Early Results of a Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Scott R; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Uhlmann, Erik J; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Wong, Eric T; Mahadevan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks [Standard radiation therapy (RT)] with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS > 70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females) were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years). At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months), 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated

  2. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Boost with Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolamide for Glioblastoma in Good Performance Status Elderly Patients – Early Results of a Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Scott R.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Wong, Eric T.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks [Standard radiation therapy (RT)] with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS > 70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1–3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females) were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65–87 years). At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7–32 months), 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated

  3. Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yu, Chang-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do; Kim, Woo-Kun; Kim, Jin-Cheon; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

  4. Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Survival for Patients With Node-Positive Head and Neck Cancer: An Analysis by Primary Site and Nodal Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Johnny Lavaf, Amir; Teng, Marita S.; Huang, Delphine; Genden, Eric M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is frequently recommended for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary surgery. The impact of RT on survival for various subgroups of node-positive HNSCC has not been clearly demonstrated. Methods and Materials: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, we identified 5297 patients with node-positive (N1 to N3) HNSCC treated with definitive surgery with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2001. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Results: Adjuvant RT significantly improved 5-year overall survival (46.3%: 95% confidence interval [CI], 44.7-48.0% for surgery + RT, vs. 35.2%: 95% CI, 32.0-38.5% for surgery alone, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (54.8%: 95% CI, 53.2-56.4% for surgery + RT, vs. 46.2% for surgery alone 95% CI, 42.4-50.0%, p < 0.05). Use of adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.68-0.83; p < 0.001). Subset analyses demonstrated that adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved survival for N1 (HR, 0.78; 95% CI; 0.67-0.90; p = 0.001), N2a (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99, p = 0.048) and N2b to N3 nodal disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.75; p < 0.001). Adjuvant RT increased overall survival for node-positive patients with oropharynx (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90; p 0.004), hypopharynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88; p = 0.004), larynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.84; p = 0.001), and oral cavity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; p = 0.025) primary tumors. Conclusions: In a large population-based analysis, adjuvant RT significantly improves overall survival for patients with node-positive HNSCC. All nodal stages, including N1, appear to benefit from the addition of RT to definitive surgery.

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy is superior to chemotherapy following surgical treatment of stage IIIA N2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Tao; Xu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Wei; Xu, Ya-Ping; Mao, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    The use of additional radiotherapy for resected stage IIIA N2 non-small-cell lung cancer in the setting of standard adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial. A comprehensive search (last search updated in March 2015) for relevant studies comparing patients with stage IIIA N2 non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing resection after treatment with adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy alone or adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy (POCRT) was conducted. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from these studies to give pooled estimates of the effects of POCRT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Six studies were included. The meta-analysis demonstrated that POCRT had a greater OS benefit than postoperative chemotherapy (HR =0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79–0.96, P=0.006). Unfortunately, there was no significant difference in DFS between the two groups: the combined HR for DFS was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.57–1.46, P=0.706). In a subgroup analysis of two randomized controlled trials (n=172 patients), adding radiation was of no benefit to either OS (HR =0.72, 95% CI: 0.49–1.06, P=0.094) or DFS (HR =1.45, 95% CI: 1.00–2.09, P=0.047). In summary, compared with postoperative chemotherapy, POCRT was beneficial to OS but not DFS in patients with stage IIIA N2 non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:26966380

  6. Comprehensive Locoregional Treatment and Systemic Therapy for Postmastectomy Isolated Locoregional Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.-H.; Huang, C.-S.; Kuo, W.-H.; Cheng, A.-L.; Chang, K.-J.; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of comprehensive locoregional therapy and systemic therapy on disease control and survival for postmastectomy patients with isolated locoregional recurrence (ILRR). Methods and Materials: A total of 115 postmastectomy breast cancer patients treated for ILRR were included. Of the patients, 98 underwent comprehensive locoregional treatment (local tumor excision plus postoperative radiotherapy), and 17 received definitive radiotherapy alone. Involved-field radiotherapy was given to 69 patients, whereas entire-field radiotherapy (both involved-field and elective-field, involving the chest wall and regional lymphatics) was given to 46 patients. Systemic therapy consisting of hormone therapy, chemotherapy, or both was given to 69% of patients. Results: Patients treated with comprehensive locoregional treatment had a significantly better 5-year invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) and overall survival (OS) after ILRR than patients treated with definitive radiotherapy alone (IDFS rate, 51% vs. 16%, p = 0.006; OS rate, 62% vs. 37%, p = 0.017). Patients with the most comprehensive locoregional treatment (recurrent tumor excision and entire-field radiotherapy) and systemic therapy had a significantly better 5-year IDFS and OS than patients given either treatment or neither treatment (IDFS rate, 52% vs. 39%, p = 0.011; OS rate, 63% vs. 50%, p = 0.026). Multivariate analysis revealed that positive axillary lymph nodes, Grade III tumor, negative estrogen and progesterone receptor status at primary diagnosis, disease-free interval of less than 2 years, and less comprehensive locoregional treatment were significantly associated with worse IDFS and OS. Conclusions: Use of comprehensive locoregional therapy and systemic therapy can achieve good survival outcome in a substantial proportion of postmastectomy patients with ILRR.

  7. Adjuvant Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Versus Observation After Radiosurgery or Surgical Resection of One to Three Cerebral Metastases: Results of the EORTC 22952-26001 Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Villà, Salvador; Fauchon, Francois; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Fariselli, Laura; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Carrie, Christian; Hassel, Mohamed Ben; Kouri, Mauri; Valeinis, Egils; van den Berge, Dirk; Collette, Sandra; Collette, Laurence; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial assesses whether adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) increases the duration of functional independence after surgery or radiosurgery of brain metastases. Patients and Methods Patients with one to three brain metastases of solid tumors (small-cell lung cancer excluded) with stable systemic disease or asymptomatic primary tumors and WHO performance status (PS) of 0 to 2 were treated with complete surgery or radiosurgery and randomly assigned to adjuvant WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) or observation (OBS). The primary end point was time to WHO PS deterioration to more than 2. Results Of 359 patients, 199 underwent radiosurgery, and 160 underwent surgery. In the radiosurgery group, 100 patients were allocated to OBS, and 99 were allocated to WBRT. After surgery, 79 patients were allocated to OBS, and 81 were allocated to adjuvant WBRT. The median time to WHO PS more than 2 was 10.0 months (95% CI, 8.1 to 11.7 months) after OBS and 9.5 months (95% CI, 7.8 to 11.9 months) after WBRT (P = .71). Overall survival was similar in the WBRT and OBS arms (median, 10.9 v 10.7 months, respectively; P = .89). WBRT reduced the 2-year relapse rate both at initial sites (surgery: 59% to 27%, P < .001; radiosurgery: 31% to 19%, P = .040) and at new sites (surgery: 42% to 23%, P = .008; radiosurgery: 48% to 33%, P = .023). Salvage therapies were used more frequently after OBS than after WBRT. Intracranial progression caused death in 78 (44%) of 179 patients in the OBS arm and in 50 (28%) of 180 patients in the WBRT arm. Conclusion After radiosurgery or surgery of a limited number of brain metastases, adjuvant WBRT reduces intracranial relapses and neurologic deaths but fails to improve the duration of functional independence and overall survival. PMID:21041710

  8. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Pathologic N2 Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Review of the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cliff G.; Patel, Aalok P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; DeWees, Todd; Waqar, Saiama N.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Baggstrom, Maria Q.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Colditz, Graham A.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of modern postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on overall survival (OS) for patients with N2 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated nationally with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pathologic N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from 2006 to 2010 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base and stratified by use of PORT (≥ 45 Gy). A total of 4,483 patients were identified (PORT, n = 1,850; no PORT, n = 2,633). The impact of patient and treatment variables on OS was explored using Cox regression. Results Median follow-up time was 22 months. On univariable analysis, improved OS correlated with younger age, treatment at an academic facility, female sex, urban population, higher income, lower Charlson comorbidity score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT. On multivariable analysis, improved OS remained independently predicted by younger age, female sex, urban population, lower Charlson score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT (hazard ratio, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.798 to 0.988). Use of PORT was associated with an increase in median and 5-year OS compared with no PORT (median OS, 45.2 v 40.7 months, respectively; 5-year OS, 39.3% [95% CI, 35.4% to 43.5%] v 34.8% [95% CI, 31.6% to 38.3%], respectively; P = .014). Conclusion For patients with N2 NSCLC after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, modern PORT seems to confer an additional OS advantage beyond that achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25667283

  9. Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy for Stage 1 Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tétreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Nguyen-Huynh, Thu Van; Carrier, Jean-François; Samouëlian, Vanessa; Sauthier, Philippe; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Barkati, Maroie

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare adjuvant chemotherapy followed by either high-dose-rate vaginal vault brachytherapy (VBT) alone or combined with pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage 1 serous or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer. Between 2006 and 2012, 84 women with stage 1 serous or CC endometrial cancer were evaluated postoperatively for adjuvant treatment at our hospital. More than 80% of patients had pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients declining or not completing adjuvant treatments were excluded. Twenty-five women received 4 to 6 cycles of carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by EBRT and VBT. Thirty-two women received 6 cycles of carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by VBT. Locoregional control and toxicities were assessed during follow-up. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates for the VBT group compared with the EBRT + VBT group were 88% versus 84%, P = 0.6, and 100% versus 94%, P = 0.6, respectively. Only 1 patient in the EBRT + VBT group developed a distant recurrence. One patient had grade 3 toxicity (chronic gastrointestinal [GI] toxicity) in the EBRT + VBT group. Acute grade 1-to-2 GI and grade 1 genitourinary (GU) toxicities were less frequent in the VBT group compared with the EBRT + VBT group (P = 0.008 and P = 0.019, respectively). Late GI and GU toxicities were comparable. Grade 1 vaginal toxicity was similar in both groups. No acute or late grade 2 GU or vaginal toxicities were reported. According to this study, VBT alone seems to be as effective as EBRT and VBT for stage 1 serous and CC endometrial cancer treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Furthermore, less acute GI and GU toxicities were seen in the VBT group.

  10. Influence of site on the therapeutic ratio of adjuvant radiotherapy in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to improve the therapeutic ratio by increasing local control while minimizing morbidity. Most efforts in trying to improve this ratio have focused on the sequencing of RT and surgery, with little attention to the potential influence of the tumor site. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of tumor site on local control and complications in a group of patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity treated at a single institution with postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: Between July 1982 and December 2000, 369 adult patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity were treated with limb-sparing surgery and postoperative RT. Patients who underwent surgery or RT outside our institution were excluded. The tumor site was the upper extremity (UE) in 103 (28%) and the lower extremity (LE) in 266 (72%). The tumor was {<=}5 cm in 98 patients (27%), and the microscopic margins were positive in 44 (12%). Of the 369 patients, 104 (28%) underwent postoperative external beam RT (EBRT), 233 (63%) postoperative brachytherapy (BRT), and 32 underwent a combination (9%); 325 (88%) received a 'conventional' radiation dose, defined as 60-70 Gy for EBRT, 45 Gy for BRT, and 45-50 Gy plus 15-20 Gy for EBRT plus BRT. Complications were assessed in terms of wound complications requiring repeat surgery, fracture, joint stiffness, edema, and Grade 3 or worse peripheral nerve damage. Results: The UE and LE groups were balanced with regard to age, depth, margin status, and type of RT (EBRT vs. BRT {+-} EBRT). However, more patients in the UE group had tumors {<=}5 cm and more received a conventional radiation dose (p = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). With a median follow-up of 50 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control, distant relapse-free survival, and overall survival for the whole population was 82% (95

  11. Adjuvant radiotherapy improves overall survival in patients with resected gastric adenocarcinoma: A National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Priscilla K; Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Koshy, Matthew; Sher, David J; Lieu, Christopher H; Schefter, Tracey E; Goodman, Karyn A; Rusthoven, Chad G

    2017-09-01

    For patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma, perioperative chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) are considered standard options. In the current study, the authors used the National Cancer Data Base to compare overall survival (OS) between these regimens. Patients who underwent gastrectomy for nonmetastatic gastric adenocarcinoma from 2004 through 2012 were divided into those treated with perioperative chemotherapy without RT versus those treated with adjuvant CRT. Survival was estimated and compared using univariate and multivariate models adjusted for patient and tumor characteristics, surgical margin status, and the number of lymph nodes examined. Subset analyses were performed for factors chosen a priori, and potential interactions between treatment and covariates were assessed. A total of 3656 eligible patients were identified, 52% of whom underwent perioperative chemotherapy and 48% of whom received postoperative CRT. The median follow-up was 47 months, and the median age of the patients was 62 years. Analysis of the entire cohort demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT on both univariate (median of 51 months vs 42 months; P = .013) and multivariate (hazard ratio, 0.874; 95% confidence interval, 0.790-0.967 [P = .009]) analyses. Propensity score-matched analysis also demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT (median of 49 months vs 39 months; P = .033). On subset analysis, a significant interaction was observed between the survival impact of adjuvant RT and surgical margins, with a greater benefit of RT noted among patients with surgical margin-positive disease (hazard ratio with RT: 0.650 vs 0.952; P for interaction <.001). In this National Cancer Data Base analysis, the use of adjuvant RT in addition to chemotherapy was associated with a significant OS advantage for patients with resected gastric cancer. The survival advantage observed with adjuvant CRT was most pronounced among patients with positive surgical margins. Cancer 2017

  12. Impact of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway Expression on Outcome in HPV Negative Head and Neck Carcinoma Patients after Surgery and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Enzenhofer, Elisabeth; Parzefall, Thomas; Haymerle, Georg; Schneider, Sven; Kadletz, Lorenz; Heiduschka, Gregor; Pammer, Johannes; Oberndorfer, Felicitas; Wrba, Fritz; Loader, Benjamin; Grasl, Matthäus Christoph; Perisanidis, Christos; Erovic, Boban M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HPV positive patients suffering from head and neck cancer benefit from intensified radiotherapy when applied as a primary as well as an adjuvant treatment strategy. However, HPV negative patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy lack validated prognostic biomarkers. It is therefore important to define prognostic biomarkers in this particular patient population. Especially, ´high-risk groups´ need to be defined in order to adapt treatment protocols. Since dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog pathway plays an important role in carcinogenesis, we aimed to assess whether members of the sonic hedgehog-signaling pathway may act as prognostic factors in patients with HPV negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, pretreatment tumor biopsies of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were taken during panendoscopy (2005 to 2008). All patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. After assessment of HPV and p16 status, protein expression profiles of the Sonic hedgehog-signaling pathway were determined by immunohistochemistry and tissue microarray analyses in 36 HPV negative tumor biopsies. Expression profiles of Sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, Patched, Smoothened, Gli-1, Gli-2 and Gli-3 were correlated with patients´ clinical data, local-control rate, disease-free as well as overall survival. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas databank were used for external validation of our results. Results Gli-1 (p = 0.04) and Gli-2 (p = 0.02) overexpression was significantly linked to improved overall survival of HPV negative patients. Gli-2 (p = 0.04) overexpression correlated significantly with prolonged disease-free survival. Cox-multivariate analysis showed that overexpression of Gli-2 correlated independently (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.16–0.95, p = 0.03) with increased overall survival. Discussion Gli-1 and Gli-2 overexpression represents a substantial prognostic factor for

  13. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soyfer, Viacheslav Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  14. Prognostic significance of lymphovascular space invasion and nodal involvement in intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated with curative intent using surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Kailash; Khaw, Pearly; Bernshaw, David; Mileshkin, Linda; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and nodal status provide adequate prognostic information in comparison with the entire set of traditional prognostic factors in intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients treated and staged with primary surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Three hundred twenty-four previously untreated high-intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage I to IIIC; endometrioid, serous, or clear cell histology; diagnosed between November 1995 and December 2006; who presented to Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for adjuvant radiotherapy were included in these analyses. All traditionally recognized prognostic factors and newly created 4 pairs of combination of LVSI and nodal status were studied with respect to survival and patterns of failure. The median follow-up time was 4.8 years. Five-year failure-free survival for all patients according to FIGO stage I, II, and III were 87.4%, 89.0%, and 62.4 %, respectively. In multivariable analysis for relapse, positive LVSI had a hazard ratio of 4.9 (P = 0.000), which increased to 8.8 (P = 0.004) in the presence of positive nodes. For overall survival, only LVSI was significant, with a hazard ratio of 3.02 (P = 0.003). In particular, in the presence of LVSI and nodes, histological type, grade, and myometrial invasion were not significant prognosticators for relapse or overall survival. This model enables the separation of good prognosis patients even among poorly differentiated endometrioid, serous, and clear cell carcinoma patients and can be used in simplifying the staging of endometrial cancer and for selecting patients for high-risk endometrial cancer studies.

  15. The survival outcome and patterns of failure in node positive endometrial cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with curative intent.

    PubMed

    Rajasooriyar, Chrishanthi; Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Mileshkin, Linda; Narayan, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and factors influencing outcome in endometrial cancer patients who presented with metastatic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent. One hundred and twenty-six patients treated between January 1996 to December 2008 with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were identified from our service's prospective database. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions to the whole pelvis. The involved nodal sites were boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. The 5-year OS rate was 61% and the 5-year DFS rate was 59%. Grade 3 endometrioid, serous, and clear cell histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes had lower OS and DFS. The number of positive nodes did not influence survival. Among the histological groups, serous histology had the worst survival. Among the 54 patients relapsed, only three (6%) failed exclusively in the pelvis and the rest of the 94% failed in extrapelvic nodal or distant sites. Patients with grade 3 endometrioid, serous and clear cell histologies did not influence pelvic failure but had significant extrapelvic failures (p<0.001). Majority of node positive endometrial cancer patients fail at extrapelvic sites. The most important factors influencing survival and extrapelvic failure are grade 3 endometrioid, clear cell and serous histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes.

  16. The survival outcome and patterns of failure in node positive endometrial cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy with curative intent

    PubMed Central

    Bernshaw, David; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Mileshkin, Linda; Narayan, Kailash

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of failure, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and factors influencing outcome in endometrial cancer patients who presented with metastatic lymph nodes and were treated with curative intent. Methods One hundred and twenty-six patients treated between January 1996 to December 2008 with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were identified from our service's prospective database. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions to the whole pelvis. The involved nodal sites were boosted to a total dose of 50.4 to 54 Gy. Results The 5-year OS rate was 61% and the 5-year DFS rate was 59%. Grade 3 endometrioid, serous, and clear cell histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes had lower OS and DFS. The number of positive nodes did not influence survival. Among the histological groups, serous histology had the worst survival. Among the 54 patients relapsed, only three (6%) failed exclusively in the pelvis and the rest of the 94% failed in extrapelvic nodal or distant sites. Patients with grade 3 endometrioid, serous and clear cell histologies did not influence pelvic failure but had significant extrapelvic failures (p<0.001). Conclusion Majority of node positive endometrial cancer patients fail at extrapelvic sites. The most important factors influencing survival and extrapelvic failure are grade 3 endometrioid, clear cell and serous histologies and involvement of upper para-aortic nodes. PMID:25142629

  17. Autologous fat graft in postmastectomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Forcellini, Davide; Klinger, Francesco; Klinger, Marco

    2011-08-01

    Mastectomy with axillary dissection is still one of the most common procedures in oncologic surgery. Unfortunately, a condition of neuropathic pain, termed postmastectomy pain syndrome, can appear after mastectomy. Although evidence regarding the epidemiology of postmastectomy pain syndrome is well researched, an effective therapy is still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effectiveness of lipoaspirate graft in the treatment of postmastectomy pain syndrome. From February of 2006 to August of 2008, a total of 113 patients affected by postmastectomy pain syndrome and severe scar retractions were enrolled for this clinical study. Seventy-two patients were treated with autologous fat grafted in painful scars, and 41 patients did not undergo any further surgical procedure. Pain assessment was performed using a visual analogue scale before and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 13 months. In addition, antalgic drug intake was recorded in the 34 patients who received a surgical treatment. Results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. A significant decrease in pain according to the visual analogue scale was detected in patients treated with autologous fat graft (3.23-point reduction, p = 0.0005). Twenty-eight of 34 patients stopped their analgesic therapy with a significant follow-up (13 months). Autologous fat grafting is a safe, relatively noninvasive, and rapid surgical procedure. The authors' results suggest its effectiveness for treatment of postmastectomy pain syndrome. Therapeutic, II.

  18. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  19. Topical hyaluronic acid vs. standard of care for the prevention of radiation dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer: single-blind randomized phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H; Strom, Eric A; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E; Smith, Benjamin D; Buchholz, Thomas A; Yu, T Kuan

    2012-07-15

    To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis. The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only one patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of ≥ Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection as short adjuvant regimen after breast-conserving surgery: interim report.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Tsoutsou, Pelagia G; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M; Sismanidou, Kyriaki; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2009-07-15

    Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  1. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  2. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy after therapeutic groin lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma: a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gerard; Foote, Matthew; Brown, Simon; Burmeister, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Radiotherapy after lymph node dissection is recommended in high-risk melanoma cases. The aim of this study is to assess whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers advantages over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the groin nodal basin. Fifteen consecutively treated patients (5 3DCRT and 10 IMRT) were selected. Optimized theoretical plans using the other modality were created - enabling direct comparisons of 3DCRT and IMRT. Target volume and organs at risk constraints were assessed as achieved or as having minor (≤5%) or major (>5%) deviations. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the dose received from each patient plan (3DCRT vs. IMRT), whereas the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare clinical plans with theoretical plans. Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical data. Target coverage was achievable in most patients (major deviations - 1 IMRT and 3 3DCRT). Conformity index improved with IMRT - median 0.65, range 0.48-0.81, versus median 0.44, range 0.29-0.60 for 3DCRT; P value less than 0.001. All 3DCRT plans had major deviations for femoral head/neck constraints. Twelve and 13 IMRT plans achieved the high (V42<5%) and low (V36<35%) constraints; P value less than 0.001. IMRT delivered statistically significant lower doses to small bowel volumes up to 40 ml. There were no differences in beam numbers used nor dosimetric endpoints measured when clinical plans were compared with theoretical plans. IMRT appears to allow superior conformity of dose to the target volume while relatively sparing the adjacent the bowel and femoral head/neck. This may reduce toxicity while maintaining control rates.

  3. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hans T. Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives {>=}45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans.

  4. Radiotherapy issues in elderly breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older 'low-risk' patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of 'low risk' are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for 'high-risk' patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1-3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational.

  5. Chest Wall Radiotherapy: Middle Ground for Treatment of Patients With One to Three Positive Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Abi-Raad, Rita F.; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kobayashi, Wendy; McGrath, John J.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Powell, Simon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Stage II breast cancer and one to three positive lymph nodes after mastectomy who were treated with observation or adjuvant radiotherapy to the chest wall (CW) with or without the regional lymphatics. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 238 patients with Stage II breast cancer (one to three positive lymph nodes) treated with mastectomy at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1990 and 2004. The estimates of locoregional recurrence (LRR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were analyzed according to the delivery of radiotherapy and multiple prognostic factors. Results: LRR and DFS were significantly improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), with a 5- and 10-year LRR rate without PMRT of 6% and 11%, respectively and, with PMRT, of 0% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .02). The 5- and 10-year DFS rate without PMRT was 85% and 75%, respectively, and, with PMRT, was 93% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .03). A similar benefit was found for patients treated with RT to the CW alone. The LRR, DFS, and overall survival rate for patients treated to the CW only was 0%, 96%, and 95% at 10 years, respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that adjuvant PMRT to the CW alone provides excellent disease control for patients with breast cancer <5 cm with one to three positive lymph nodes.

  6. Informational Needs of Postmastectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilyurt, Duygu Soydaş; Fındık, Ümmü Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine informational needs of postmastectomy patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in the general surgery clinics of a university health center for medical research and practice with 72 voluntary patients. For data collection, a patient identification form was used, which was prepared by the researchers in accordance with the literature. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.66±13.39 years, 87% were married, 58% had primary school education, 76% had moderate economic status, and 53% had undergone simple mastectomy. It was determined that 83% of the patients wanted to be informed about hospital and home care interventions, 82% about symptoms and prevention of post-surgical problems, 76% regarding breast cancer and treatment options, and in the range of 54–68%, patients wanted information on the effects of surgery on the body, shoulder and arm exercises, breast self-examination, the effects of breast cancer on family and work life, lymphedema and prevention interventions. Conclusion We recommend that patients with mastectomy should be informed about topics including care interventions, breast cancer and treatment options, effects of surgery, and reducing these effects.

  7. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  8. In vitro study on the safety of near infrared laser therapy in its potential application as postmastectomy lymphedema treatment.

    PubMed

    Cialdai, Francesca; Landini, Ida; Capaccioli, Sergio; Nobili, Stefania; Mini, Enrico; Lulli, Matteo; Monici, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrated the effectiveness of laser therapy in the management of postmastectomy lymphedema, a discomforting disease that can arise after surgery/radiotherapy and gets progressively worse and chronic. However, safety issues restrict the possibility to treat cancer patients with laser therapy, since the effects of laser radiation on cancer cell behavior are not completely known and the possibility of activating postmastectomy residual cancer cells must be considered. This paper reports the results of an in vitro study aimed to investigate the effect of a class IV, dual-wavelength (808 nm and 905 nm), NIR laser system on the behavior of two human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (namely, MCF7 and MDA-MB361 cell lines), using human dermal fibroblasts as normal control. Cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and ability to form colonies were analyzed in order to perform a cell-based safety testing of the laser treatment in view of its potential application in the management of postmastectomy lymphedema. The results showed that, limited to the laser source, treatment conditions and experimental models used, laser radiation did not significantly affect the behavior of human breast adenocarcinoma cells, including their clonogenic efficiency. Although these results do not show any significant laser-induced modification of cancer cell behavior, further studies are needed to assess the possibility of safely applying NIR laser therapy for the management of postmastectomy lymphedema.

  9. The Impact of Individual In Vivo Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks on Oral Mucositis in Adjuvant Radiotherapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kuehne, Martin; Seegmueller, Katharina; Derschang, Sarah; Melchior, Patrick; Graeber, Stefan; Fricke, Andreas; Ruebe, Claudia E.; Ruebe, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of individual in vivo DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity on the incidence of severe oral mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Patients and Methods: Thirty-one patients with resected head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant RT or RCT were examined. Patients underwent RT of the primary tumor site and locoregional lymph nodes with a total dose of 60-66 Gy (single dose 2 Gy, five fractions per week). Chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. To assess DSB repair, {gamma}-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes were quantified before and 0.5 h, 2.5 h, 5 h, and 24 h after in vivo radiation exposure (the first fraction of RT). World Health Organization scores for oral mucositis were documented weekly and correlated with DSB repair. Results: Sixteen patients received RT alone; 15 patients received RCT. In patients who developed Grade {>=} 3 mucositis (n = 18) the amount of unrepaired DSBs 24 h after radiation exposure and DSB repair half-times did not differ significantly from patients with Grade {<=}2 mucositis (n = 13). Patients with a proportion of unrepaired DSBs after 24 h higher than the mean value + one standard deviation had an increased incidence of severe oral mucositis. Conclusions: Evaluation of in vivo DSB repair by determination of {gamma}-H2AX foci loss is feasible in clinical practice and allows identification of patients with impaired DSB repair. The incidence of oral mucositis is not closely correlated with DSB repair under the evaluated conditions.

  10. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mehee; Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George; Byrne, Richard W; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2015-01-01

    Ondine׳s curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97mmHg. He was diagnosed with Ondine׳s curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case.

  11. Association of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy vs Radiotherapy Alone With Survival in Patients With Resected Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma: Data From the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Waxweiler, Timothy V; Brower, Jeffrey V; Jones, Bernard L; McDermott, Jessica D; Raben, David; Ghosh, Debashis; Bowles, Daniel W; Karam, Sana D

    2016-11-01

    Data on adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after resection of salivary gland carcinomas (SGCs) are limited. To examine overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients who receive CRT vs radiotherapy (RT) alone after resection of SGCs. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a hospital-based registry that represents 70% of all cancer cases in the United States, was queried for patients who underwent resection of major SGCs with at least 1 high-risk feature (T3-T4 stage, N1-N3 stage, or positive margins). Included patients had histologic findings for malignant SGC with grades 2 to 3 disease and at least 1 high-risk feature. All patients underwent resection with postoperative CRT or RT alone. Patients were treated from 1998 to 2011. Data were analyzed from January to March 2016. Patients received CRT, defined as chemotherapy start within 14 days of RT initiation, or RT alone. Univariate, multivariate, and propensity score-matched analyses were performed to compare OS for patients undergoing CRT vs RT alone. Analyses included 2210 eligible patients (1372 men [62.1%] and 838 women [37.9%]; median age [range], 63 [18-90] years); of these, 1842 (83.3%) received RT alone and 368 (16.7%) received CRT. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 2-188) months. Most of the resected major SGCs occurred at the parotid gland (1852 [83.8%]), followed by the submandibular gland (276 [12.5%]), major gland not otherwise specified (66 [3.0%]), and sublingual gland (16 [0.7%]). Unadjusted 2-year OS was worse with adjuvant CRT vs RT alone (71.3% vs 80.2%), as was 5-year OS (38.5% vs 54.2%) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29-1.76; P < .001). Overall survival was inferior with adjuvant CRT on multivariate analysis (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03-1.44; P = .02) and propensity score-matched analysis (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.98-1.47; P = .08) compared with RT alone. Subgroup analyses by age, comorbidity score, primary site, histologic type, grade, T stage, N stage, margin status, and chemotherapy

  12. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  13. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatero, Almudena; Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano; Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  14. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Eng-Yen; Liang, Ji-An; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2013-03-06

    To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations.

  15. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  16. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  17. [The prognostic value of time parameters in adjuvant radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. A retrospective analysis of 138 patients].

    PubMed

    Dietl, Barbara; Schäfer, Christof; Kölbl, Oliver

    2005-12-01

    To answer the question, how the parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and overall treatment time (OTT) influenced the endpoints overall (OS), event-free (EFS) and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, who had received postoperative radiotherapy. 138 patients were included into a retrospective analysis from 10/1993 to 05/2000. Besides the time parameters waiting time, radiation treatment time and OTT, tumor- and therapy-related parameters (T-, N-, R-status, grading, tumor site, surgical technique, and postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl) with potential impact on the endpoints were investigated in the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Individual parameters with a significant impact (p = 0.05) were subjected to a multivariate Cox regression analysis. Besides a postoperative hemoglobin value < 12 g/dl, in the univariate analysis an OTT >/= 105 days negatively influenced all endpoints, as well as a radiation treatment time >/= 60 days. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, postoperative hemoglobin < 12 g/dl and an OTT >/= 105 days were identified as independent negative prognostic factors for all endpoints. The waiting time should be managed according to the ASARA (as short as reasonably achievable) recommendation, radiation treatment should not be protracted exceeding an overall treatment of 105 days. Generally, time parameters should be routinely included in the standard tumor documentation, thus facilitating further evaluation of these prognostically relevant factors.

  18. Association of Fatigue with Perceived Stress in Chinese Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer Awaiting Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Kwan, Tracy T C; Cheung, Irene K M; Chan, Caitlin K P; Lo, Phyllis H Y; Yip, Paul S F; Luk, Mai-Yee; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2015-08-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is common in women with breast cancer, but little is known of its relationship with perceived stress. We conducted a cross-sectional study to explore the associations of CRF with perceived stress, anxiety, depression, pain and sleep quality in 133 Chinese women (aged 25-68 years) with early stage breast cancer. The majority of women had completed surgery and chemotherapy and were awaiting radiotherapy. Self-administered questionnaires consisting of the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale-10, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used to collect data. Forty-five per cent of the women were severely fatigued. Compared with local healthy women and US breast cancer patients, the group's mean perceived stress score was significantly higher (both p < 0.01). Higher perceived stress (β = 0.18, p = 0.032), higher anxiety (β = 0.30, p < 0.001) and higher pain severity (β = 0.38, p < 0.001) were associated with increased severity of CRF. The association of CRF with perceived stress was partially mediated by anxiety, suggesting a possible pathway from cancer and cancer treatment to CRF via stress appraisals and emotional distress. The findings indicate the importance of monitoring the psychological status of patients during treatment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2016-03-15

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ (2) = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  20. Benefit of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Local Control, Distant Metastasis, and Survival Outcomes in Patients with Localized Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of an Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Posch, Florian; Partl, Richard; Döller, Carmen; Riedl, Jakob M; Smolle, Maria; Leitner, Lukas; Bergovec, Marko; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Stotz, Michael; Bezan, Angelika; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin; Kapp, Karin S; Stöger, Herbert; Leithner, Andreas; Szkandera, Joanna

    2017-09-11

    This study aimed to quantify the benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (AXRT) for local control, distant metastasis, and long-term survival outcomes in patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma (STS). This single-center retrospective observational study enrolled 433 STS patients who underwent surgery with curative intent. An inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) analysis was implemented to account rigorously for imbalances in prognostic variables between the adjuvant treatment groups. During a median follow-up period of 5.5 years, the study observed 38 local recurrences (9%), 73 occurrences of distant metastasis (17%), 63 STS-related deaths (15%), and 57 deaths from other causes (13%). As expected, patients receiving AXRT (n = 258, 60%) were more likely to have high-grade G3 tumors (p < 0.0001) than patients not receiving AXRT. A crude analysis showed that AXRT was not associated with improved recurrence-free survival [hazard ratio (HR) 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-1.38; p = 0.98]. However, after IPTW, AXRT was associated with a 38% relative reduction in the risk of recurrence or death (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.39-1.00; p = 0.05). This benefit was driven by a strong reduction in the risk of local recurrence (HR 0.42; 95% CI 0.19-0.91; p = 0.03), whereas the relative risk of distant metastasis (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.39-1.25; p = 0.22) and overall survival (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.44-1.30; p = 0.32) were only nonsignificantly in favor of AXRT. An exploratory analysis showed an overall survival benefit of AXRT for patients with high-grade G3 tumors (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.33-0.78; p = 0.002). However, this finding may have been attributable to residual confounding. In this observational cohort, AXRT was associated with a 58% reduction in the relative risk of local recurrence. No consistent association between AXRT and lower risks of distant metastasis or death was observed.

  1. SWOG S0809: A Phase II Intergroup Trial of Adjuvant Capecitabine and Gemcitabine Followed by Radiotherapy and Concurrent Capecitabine in Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma and Gallbladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Guthrie, Katherine A.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Corless, Christopher L.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Thomas, Charles R.; Alberts, Steven R.; Dawson, Laura A.; Micetich, Kenneth C.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Siegel, Abby B.; Blanke, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of postoperative therapy in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) or gallbladder carcinoma (GBCA) is unknown. S0809 was designed to estimate 2-year survival (overall and after R0 or R1 resection), pattern of relapse, and toxicity in patients treated with this adjuvant regimen. Patients and Methods Eligibility criteria included diagnosis of EHCC or GBCA after radical resection, stage pT2-4 or N+ or positive resection margins, M0, and performance status 0 to 1. Patients received four cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8) and capecitabine (1,500 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 14) every 21 days followed by concurrent capecitabine (1,330 mg/m2 per day) and radiotherapy (45 Gy to regional lymphatics; 54 to 59.4 Gy to tumor bed). With 80 evaluable patients, results would be promising if 2-year survival 95% CI were > 45% and R0 and R1 survival estimates were ≥ 65% and 45%, respectively. Results A total of 79 eligible patients (R0, n = 54; R1, n = 25; EHCC, 68%; GBCA, 32%) were treated (86% completed). For all patients, 2-year survival was 65% (95% CI, 53% to 74%); it was 67% and 60% in R0 and R1 patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 35 months (R0, 34 months; R1, 35 months). Local, distant, and combined relapse occurred in 14, 24, and nine patients. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were observed in 52% and 11% of patients, respectively. The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse effects were neutropenia (44%), hand-foot syndrome (11%), diarrhea (8%), lymphopenia (8%), and leukopenia (6%). There was one death resulting from GI hemorrhage. Conclusion This combination was well tolerated, has promising efficacy, and provides clinicians with a well-supported regimen. Our trial establishes the feasibility of conducting national adjuvant trials in EHCC and GBCA and provides baseline data for planning future phase III trials. PMID:25964250

  2. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  3. Rates and predictors of consideration for adjuvant radiotherapy among high-risk breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Krotneva, Stanimira; Reidel, Kristen; Nassif, Mohammed; Trabulsi, Nora; Mayo, Nancy; Tamblyn, Robyn; Meguerditchian, Ari N

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) represents the standard for local control of breast cancer (BC). However, variations in practice persist. We aimed to characterize the rate of RT consideration (or referral) after BCS and identify predictors in Quebec, Canada, where universal health insurance is in place. A historical prospective cohort study using the provincial hospital discharge and medical services databases was conducted. All women with incident, non-metastatic BC (stages I-III) undergoing BCS (1998-2005) were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for RT consideration were estimated with a generalized estimating equations regression model, adjusting for clustering of patients within physicians. Of the 27,483 women selected, 90 % were considered for RT and 84 % subsequently received it. Relative to women 50-69 years old, younger and older women were less likely to be considered: ORs of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.73-0.93) and 0.10 (0.09-0.12), respectively. Emergency room visits and hospitalizations unrelated to BC were associated with decreased odds of RT consideration: 0.85 (0.76-0.94) and 0.83 (0.71-0.97). Women with regional BC considered for chemotherapy were more likely to be considered for RT: 3.41 (2.83-4.11). RT consideration odds increased by 7 % (OR of 1.07, 95 % CI 1.03-1.10) for every ten additional BCSs performed by the surgeon in the prior year. Social isolation, comorbidities, and greater distance to a referral center lowered the odds. Demographic and clinical patient-related risk factors, health service use, gaps in other aspects of BC management, and surgeon's experience predicted RT consideration.

  4. Delaying implant-based mammary reconstruction after radiotherapy does not decrease capsular contracture: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    El-Diwany, Mostafa; Giot, Jean-Philippe; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Danino, Alain M

    2017-09-01

    The most common complications of irradiated implant-based mammary reconstruction are fibrosis and capsular contracture. The indications for postmastectomy adjuvant radiotherapy have considerably broadened. Facing an increased number of patients who will require radiotherapy, most guidelines recommend delaying reconstruction after radiotherapy to prevent long-term fibrotic complications. Does radiotherapy permanently alter cellular properties which will adversely affect implant-based reconstruction? If so, is there a benefit in delaying reconstruction after radiotherapy? Our in vitro model simulates two implant-based mammary reconstruction approaches: the irradiated implant and the delayed implant reconstructions by using an implant inset beneath healthy non-irradiated tissue post radiotherapy. We performed cell culture of fibroblasts and endothelial cells to simulate these two surgical conditions. Irradiated fibroblasts simulate the capsular tissue seen around the breast implant. The delayed reconstruction approach is simulated by non-irradiated fibroblasts conditioned with supernatant culture media obtained from irradiated endothelial cells. Irradiation induced fibrosis through fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts, as demonstrated by increased α-smooth-muscle actin levels in fibroblasts. This constitutes the basis for scar tissue contraction observed in irradiated implant-based breast reconstruction. Irradiation of endothelial cells induced irreversible cell cycle arrest known as senescence and secretion of the profibrotic connective tissue growth factor. Non-irradiated fibroblasts conditioned with culture media obtained from irradiated endothelial cells exhibited myofibroblast differentiation and the expression of fibrotic phenotype akin to capsular contracture. Our results demonstrate that radiotherapy causes irreversible cellular changes, which permanently alter the microenvironment in favor of fibrosis. Given that these changes are permanent

  5. Selective use of post-mastectomy flap irradiation in high-risk breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Asgeirsson, Kristjan S; Holroyd, Ben; Morgan, David A L; Robertson, John F R; Blamey, Roger W; Pinder, Sarah E; Macmillan, R Douglas

    2005-08-01

    The incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy can be reduced by chest wall radiotherapy. However, only a minority of patients are at substantial risk. No UK national guidelines exist for the use of mastectomy flap radiotherapy. This study evaluated a protocol, whereby only high-risk patients were treated with post-mastectomy flap radiotherapy; identified histologically by grade, vascular invasion and nodal status. All women treated by simple mastectomy for invasive breast cancer at the Nottingham Breast Unit from January 1993 to December 1995 were studied (n=292). Postoperative flap radiotherapy was given to 147 high-risk women (50.3%). Median follow-up was 76 months. Overall, 12 women (4.1%) developed a chest wall recurrence; six were single spot recurrences and the remaining six were either multiple spot (n=3) or field change (field change dermal invasion, n=3). The chest wall recurrence rate was 2.7% in those treated with radiotherapy. A low rate of local recurrence has been achieved with selective use of mastectomy flap radiotherapy.

  6. Long-term events in adult patients with clinical stage IA-IIA nonbulky Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with four cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine and adjuvant radiotherapy: a single-institution 15-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brusamolino, Ercole; Baio, Ambrogia; Orlandi, Ester; Arcaini, Luca; Passamonti, Francesco; Griva, Vassiliki; Casagrande, William; Pascutto, Cristiana; Franchini, Pietro; Lazzarino, Mario

    2006-11-01

    To report on long-term events after short doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in favorable early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. We monitored late events and causes of death over 15 years (median follow-up, 120 months) in 120 patients with nonbulky stage IA-IIA Hodgkin's lymphoma, treated with four cycles of ABVD and limited radiotherapy. Pulmonary and cardiac function tests were done throughout the follow-up. Outcome measures included cause-specific mortality, standardized mortality ratio, and standardized incidence ratio for secondary neoplasia. Projected 15-year event-free and overall survival were 78% and 86%, and tumor mortality was 3%. Standardized mortality ratio was significantly higher than 1 for both males (2.8; P=0.029) and females (9.4; P=0.003). The risk of cardiovascular events at 5 and 12 years was 5.5% and 14%, with a median latent time of 67 months (range: 23-179 months) from the end of radiotherapy. Pulmonary toxicity developed in 8% of patients; all had received mediastinal irradiation and the median time from radiotherapy to pulmonary sequelae was 76 weeks (range: 50-123 weeks). The risk of secondary neoplasia at 5 and 12 years was 4% and 8%, respectively, with no cases of leukemia. Fertility was preserved. Long-term events were mostly related to radiotherapy; the role of short ABVD chemotherapy was very limited, as documented by fertility preservation and lack of secondary myelodysplasia/leukemia. A proportion of patients died from causes unrelated to disease progression and the excess mortality risk was mostly due to the occurrence of secondary neoplasms and cardiovascular diseases. A moderate dose reduction of radiotherapy from 40-44 Gy to 30-36 Gy did not decrease the risk of late complications; abolishing radiotherapy in nonbulky early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma is being evaluated.

  7. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23-62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI {>=}25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI {>=}30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI {>=} 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  8. Quantitative molecular diagnosis of axillary drainage fluid for prediction of locoregional failure in patients with one to three positive axillary nodes after mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Ma Qingyong . E-mail: sage2001china@yahoo.com.cn; Dang Chengxue; Moureau-Zabotto, M.; Chen Wuke

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: A quantitative multiple-marker reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for sensitive detection of cancer cells in axillary drainage fluid was developed to examine whether the presence of cancer cells in axillary drainage fluid can be used as a predictor of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with breast cancer who had T1/2 primary tumors and one to three positive axillary lymph nodes treated with modified radical mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Axillary drainage fluid was collected from 126 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast who were treated with modified radical mastectomy and were found to have one to three positive axillary nodes. Cancer cells in axillary drainage fluid were detected by RT-PCR assay using primers specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) together with numerous clinicopathologic and treatment-related factors and were analyzed for their impact on LRR. Results: A total of 38 patients suffered LRR during follow-up and the multimarker RT-PCR assays for CEA and CK-19 in the axillary drainage fluid both were positive in 34 patients (27.0%), of which 29 patients had LRR. In univariate analysis, the 5-year LRR-free survival showed higher rates in patients with PCR-negative findings in axillary drainage fluid (p < 0.0001), age {>=}40 years old (p < 0.0001), tumor size <2.5 cm (p < 0.0001), negative lymph-vascular space invasion (p = 0.026), and T1 status (< 0.0001); in multivariate analysis, PCR-positive findings together with age and tumor size were found to be independent predictors of LRR (all p < 0.05). Conclusion: Multiplex RT-PCR assay for CEA and CK-19 was highly sensitive for detection and might be useful for prediction of LRR in such subgroup breast cancer patients.

  9. Clinical outcomes of adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer - results after 874 patient-years of follow-up in the MSDS-trial.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Martin; Pixberg, Michaela; Riemann, Burkhard; Schuck, Andreas; Heinecke, Achim; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Willich, Normann; Dralle, Henning; Schober, Otmar

    2009-01-01

    Evaluate the clinical benefit of external beam radiotherapy (RTx) for locally invasive thyroid carcinoma with follicular cell differentiation (DTC). The Multicentre Study on Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (MSDS) was planned as a prospective multicenter trial on the benefit of adjuvant RTx in locally invasive DTC (pT4; UICC 1997) with or without lymph node metastases and no known distant metastases. All patients were treated with thyroidectomy, 131I-therapy, and TSH-suppression and were randomized to receive additional RTx or not. In 4/2003 the trial became a prospective cohort study after only 45 of then 311 patients had consented to randomization. 351 of 422 patients met the trial's inclusion criteria. Age was 48 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD). 25% were men. Tumours were papillary in 90% and follicular in 10%. Of 47 patients randomized or allocated to RTx, 26 actually received RTx. Mean follow-up was 930 days. In an actual treatment analysis, 96% (25/26) of the RTx-patients reached complete remission (CR) vs. 86% in the non-RTx patients. Recurrences occurred in 0 vs. 3 % of patients: 6 reoperated for regional lymph node metastases, 1 tracheal invasion treated with tracheoplasty, 1 local invasion necessitating laryngectomy, 2 distant metastases (1 lung, 1 lung + bone). Serious chronic RTx toxicity occurred in 1/26 patients. The MSDS trial showed low mortality and recurrence rates and a weak benefit of RTx in terms of local control that did however not reach statistical significance. Routine RTx in locally invasive DTC can no longer be recommended.

  10. Changes in Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness after Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2017-09-22

    To evaluate the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in conjunction with intravitreal injections (IVI) of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) thickness in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). This was a retrospective, observational case series of patients with nAMD, who underwent SRT and subsequently had at least 12 months of complete follow-up. After SRT and one mandatory IVI, patients were examined monthly and received further treatment on a pro re nata basis. Examination included spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of the optic disc to measure pRNFL thickness. Patients' data were retrieved from medical records including demographics, disease duration, best-corrected visual acuity, previous number of intravitreal injections, and the type of drug applied. A total of 35 eyes of 35 patients (76.23 ± 7.05 years) were included. The mean duration of nAMD at time of irradiation was 34.57 ± 16.96 months. During that time, patients received a mean total number of 15.83 ± 6.29 intravitreal injections, 6.86 ± 1.57 within the last 12 months before SRT. After SRT, on average 3.46 ± 2.09 injections were administered over 12 months, resulting in a mean total number of 19.29 ± 6.92 injections at final follow-up. The mean global pRNFL thickness was 97.23 ± 12.55 µm at time of irradiation, 95.54 ± 11.07 µm at 6 month (P = 0.299), and 95.29 ± 12.07 µm at 12 month (P = 0.373) follow-up. SRT in conjunction with anti-VEGF injections did not lead to any significant change in pRNFL thickness over 12 months in patients with nAMD. However, long-term results are not yet available. Therefore, prospective studies with longer follow-up are needed to corroborate these findings.

  11. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  12. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  13. Adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and risk of contralateral breast cancer with special attention to patients irradiated at younger age.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan; Akdeniz, Delal; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Koppert, Linetta B; McCool, Danielle; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Hooning, Maartje J; Jager, Agnes

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the influence of adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer (BC) on the risk of contralateral BC (CBC) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation carriers, with special attention to patients irradiated at age younger than 40 years. Additionally, tendencies in locoregional treatments and rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy over time were explored. In this retrospective cohort study, 691 BRCA1/2-associated BC patients treated between 1980 and 2013 were followed from diagnosis until CBC or censoring event including ipsilateral BC recurrence, distant metastasis, contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy, other invasive cancer diagnosis, death, or loss to follow up. Hazard ratios (HR) for CBC associated with radiotherapy were estimated using Cox regression. Median follow-up time was 8.6 years [range 0.3–34.3 years]. No association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was found, neither in the total population (HR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.45–1.49) nor in the subgroup of patients younger than 40 years at primary diagnosis (HR 1.36, 95 % CI 0.60–3.09). During follow-up, the number of patients at risk decreased substantially since a large proportion of patients were censored after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy or BC recurrence. Over the years, increasing preference for mastectomy without radiotherapy compared to breast-conserving surgery with radiotherapy was found ranging from less than 30 % in 1995 to almost 50 % after 2010. The rate of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy increased over the years from less than 40 % in 1995 to more than 60 % after 2010. In this cohort of BRCA1/2-associated BC patients, no association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was observed in the total group, nor in the patients irradiated before the age of 40 years. The number of patients at risk after 10 and 15 years of follow-up, however, was too small to definitively exclude harmful effects of adjuvant

  14. Trends in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction types at a breast cancer tertiary referral centre before and after introduction of acellular dermal matrices.

    PubMed

    Kankam, Hadyn K N; Hourston, George J M; Fopp, Laura J; Benson, John R; Benyon, Sarah L; Irwin, Michael S; Agrawal, Amit; Forouhi, Parto; Malata, Charles M

    2017-08-31

    Reconstructive breast surgery has continued to evolve over the last decade with a key change being the adoption of acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) as an adjunct for implant-based procedures. This retrospective observational study assesses the effect of ADMs on post-mastectomy reconstructive practice performed in a single institution. We conducted a review of all patients undergoing breast reconstruction at a University Teaching Hospital for an 18-month period before and after adopting ADMs. Demographic, procedural and complication data for these two cohorts were compared (χ(2) and Student's t-tests). A total of 264 women (336 breasts), mean age 47.5 years, were identified: 137 before and 127 after the introduction of ADM. Implant-only reconstructions increased from 16% to 52% following the adoption of ADM (p < 0.01), whereas the proportion of both latissimus dorsi and deep inferior epigastric perforator flap reconstructions decreased significantly (31%-11% and 49%-34%, respectively, p < 0.01). The rate of early complications for the implant-only procedures was not significantly different with or without ADM (26% versus 20%, respectively, p = 0.44), despite there being no difference in the rate of adjuvant radiotherapy (22% versus 35%, respectively, p = 0.30). This study showed that since ADM introduction to our centre, more breast reconstructions have been of the implant-only type with consequent reductions in the more complex and expensive autologous techniques. Implant-only procedures that incorporated ADM use had similar complication rates to those that did not. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Postmastectomy irradiation in breast in breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes: Is there a role for radiation therapy?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate retrospectively the correlation of loco-regional relapse (LRR) rate, distant metastasis (DM) rate, disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in a group of breast cancer (BC) patients who are at intermediate risk for LRR (T1-2 tumor and 1-3 positive axillary nodes) treated with or without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods Ninety patients, with T1-T2 tumor, and 1-3 positive nodes who had undergone MRM received adjuvant systemic therapy with (n = 66) or without (n = 24) PMRT. Patient-related characteristics (age, menopausal status, pathological stage/tumor size, tumor location, histology, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histological grade, nuclear grade, extracapsular extension, lymphatic, vascular and perineural invasion and ratio of involved nodes/dissected nodes) and treatment-related factors (PMRT, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) were evaluated in terms of LRR and DM rate. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier DFS and OS rates were analysed. Results Differences between RT and no-RT groups were statistically significant for all comparisons in favor of RT group except OS: LRR rate (3%vs 17%, p = 0.038), DM rate (12% vs 42%, p = 0.004), 5 year DFS (82.4% vs 52.4%, p = 0.034), 5 year OS (90,2% vs 61,9%, p = 0.087). In multivariate analysis DM and lymphatic invasion were independent poor prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion PMRT for T1-2, N1-3 positive BC patients has to be reconsidered according to the prognostic factors and the decision has to be made individually with the consideration of long-term morbidity and with the patient approval. PMID:21450076

  16. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine; Labib, Alain; Le Scodan, Romuald

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  17. The Effect of Molecular Subtype and Residual Disease on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Morrow, Monica; Modi, Shanu; Zhang, Zhigang; Krause, Kate; Siu, Chun; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N.; Ho, Alice Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The relative contribution of biologic subtype to locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients who have been treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), mastectomy and postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is not clearly defined. Methods 233 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer received NAC, mastectomy and PMRT between 2000-2009: 53% (n=123) had HR+ (ER or PR+/HER2−), 23% (n=53) had HER2+ (HER2+/HR+ or HR−), and 24% (n=57) had triple negative disease (TN: HR−/HER2−). The 5-year LRR rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate covariates associated with LRR. Results Median follow-up was 62 months. A pathologic complete response (pCR) was seen in 14% of patients. The 5-year LRR rate was 8% in the entire cohort. The LRR rate was 0% in patients with a pCR versus 9% in patients without a pCR (p=0.05). TN disease (HR=4.4, p=0.003) and pathologic node positivity (HR=9.8, p=0.03) were associated with LRR. Patients with TN disease had a higher LRR rate compared to patients with HER2+ and HR+ disease (20% versus 6% and 4%, p=0.005). In patients without a pCR, TN subtype was associated with increased LRR (26% versus 7% HER+ and 4% HR+, p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with TN breast cancer had the highest LRR rate after NAC, mastectomy and PMRT. While no LRR was observed in TN patients with pCR, TN patients with residual disease had significantly higher LRR risk. Patients with HR+ and HER2+ breast cancer had favorable LRR rates, regardless of NAC response, likely due to receipt of adjuvant systemic targeted therapies. PMID:26130454

  18. Health related quality of life and symptoms after pelvic lymphadenectomy or radiotherapy vs. no adjuvant regional treatment in early-stage endometrial carcinoma: a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; Boll, Dorry; Vos, M Caroline; van den Berg, Hetty; Lybeert, Marnix L M; de Winter, Karin; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M

    2012-10-01

    Routine lymphadenectomy (LA) in early stage endometrial cancer does not improve survival. However, in the absence of lymph node metastasis, radiotherapy (RT) could be withheld and hence could result in less morbidity. Our aim was to evaluate health related quality of life (HRQL) in endometrial cancer survivors that received routine pelvic LA without RT compared to no LA, but RT in the presence of risk factors. Stage I-II endometrial cancer survivors diagnosed between 1999 and 2007 were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. Survivors completed the SF-36 and the EORTC-QLQ-EN24. ANCOVA and multiple linear regression analyses were applied. 742 (77%) of the endometrial cancer survivors returned a completed questionnaire. 377 (51%) had received no LA nor RT (LA-RT-), 198 (27%) had received LA+RT-, 153 (21%) LA-RT+ and 14 patients (2%) had received both. LA+ women reported as higher lymphedema symptom scores (25 vs. 20, p=0.04). Women who were treated with RT reported higher gastrointestinal symptom scores vs. those who did not (23 vs. 16, p=0.04). HRQL scales were comparable between all four treatment groups. Despite distinct symptom patterns among women who received LA or RT, no clinically relevant differences in HRQL were observed when compared to women not receiving adjuvant therapy. Using LA to tailor adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and prevent over-treatment in low-risk patients cannot be recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Should Immediate Autologous Breast Reconstruction Be Considered in Women Who Require Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy? A Prospective Analysis of Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Billig, Jessica; Jagsi, Reshma; Qi, Ji; Hamill, Jennifer B; Kim, Hyungjin M; Pusic, Andrea L; Buchel, Edward; Wilkins, Edwin G; Momoh, Adeyiza O

    2017-06-01

    In women who require postmastectomy radiation therapy, immediate autologous breast reconstruction is often discouraged. The authors prospectively evaluated postoperative morbidity and satisfaction reported by women undergoing delayed or immediate autologous breast reconstruction in the setting of postmastectomy radiation therapy. Patients enrolled in the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study, who received postmastectomy radiotherapy and underwent immediate or delayed free abdominally based autologous breast reconstruction, were identified. Postoperative complications at 1 and 2 years after reconstruction were assessed. Patient-reported outcomes were evaluated using the BREAST-Q questionnaire preoperatively and at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Bivariate analyses and mixed-effects regression models were used to compare outcomes. A total of 175 patients met the authors' inclusion criteria. Immediate reconstructions were performed in 108 patients and delayed reconstructions in 67 patients; 93.5 percent of immediate reconstructions were performed at a single center. Overall complication rates were similar based on reconstructive timing (25.9 percent immediate and 26.9 percent delayed at 1 year; p = 0.54). Patients with delayed reconstruction reported significantly lower prereconstruction scores (p < 0.0001) for Satisfaction with Breasts and Psychosocial and Sexual Well-being than did patients with immediate reconstruction. At 1 and 2 years postoperatively, both groups reported comparable levels of satisfaction in assessed BREAST-Q domains. From this prospective cohort, immediate autologous breast reconstruction in the setting of postmastectomy radiation therapy appears to be a safe option that may be considered in select patients and centers. Breast aesthetics and quality of life, evaluated from the patient's perspective, were not compromised by flap exposure to radiation therapy. Therapeutic, III.

  20. A potent steroid cream is superior to emollients in reducing acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. A randomised study of betamethasone versus two moisturizing creams.

    PubMed

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen; Falkmer, Ursula

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to investigate whether treatment with potent local steroids can reduce signs and symptoms of acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) compared to emollient creams. The study was randomised and double-blinded. Patients with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery were included when they started adjuvant 3-D planned RT. In all, 104 patients were randomised 2:1:1 to three treatment groups, i.e. betamethasone+Essex® cream, Essex® cream or Canoderm® cream. The patients themselves treated the irradiated area during the radiation period (5 weeks) and two weeks after cessation of RT. Signs of RT dermatitis were measured qualitatively with RTOG clinical scoring and quantitatively by colorimeter. In addition, the patients' symptoms were recorded as well as the Fitzpatrick skin type. There was a statistically significant difference (p=0.05) in skin reactions when assessed with RTOG in favour of the group treated with the potent steroid. Patient-related symptoms did not differ between the treatment groups. The effect of the steroid was prominent in three subgroups, i.e. (i) patients treated with ablation of the breast, (ii) patients receiving RT to the armpit and the supraclavicular fossa, and (iii) patients with Fitzpatrick skin type 1. Treatment with betamethasone cream is more efficient than moisturizers for the control of acute RT dermatitis in patients treated with adjuvant RT for breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  2. An ultrasonographic evaluation of skin thickness in breast cancer patients after postmastectomy radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sharon; Kaur, Amarjit; Back, Michael; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jiade Jay

    2011-01-24

    To determine the usefulness of ultrasonography in the assessment of post radiotherapy skin changes in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Patients treated for postmastectomy radiotherapy in National University Hospital (NUH) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), Singapore between January 2004- December 2005 was recruited retrospectively. Ultrasound scan was performed on these Asian patients who had been treated to a total dose of 46-50 Gy with 1 cm bolus placed on the skin. The ultrasound scans were performed blinded to the RTOG scores, and the skin thickness of the individually marked points on the irradiated chest wall was compared to the corresponding points on the non-irradiated breast. The mean total skin thickness inclusive of the epidermis and the dermis of the right irradiated chest wall was 0.1712 mm (± 0.03392 mm) compared with the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast which was 0.1845 mm (± 0.04089 mm; p = 0.007). The left irradiated chest wall had a mean skin thickness of 0.1764 mm (± 0.03184 mm) compared with the right non-irradiated breast which was 0.1835 mm (± 0.02584 mm; p = 0.025). These independent t-tests produced a significant difference of reduced skin thickness on the right irradiated chest wall, p = 0.007 (p < 0.05) and left irradiated chest wall p = 0.025 (p < 0.025) in comparison to the non-irradiated skin thickness investigating chronic skin reactions. Patients with grade 2 acute skin toxicity presented with thinner skin as compared to patients with grade 1 (p = 0.006). This study has shown that there is a statistically significant difference between the skin thicknesses of the irradiated chest wall and the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast and a predisposition to chronic reactions was found in patients with acute RTOG scoring of grade1 and grade 2.

  3. Sodium-24 studies in postmastectomy lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, E.F.; Milland, F.P.; Hellman, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Seven patients were studied with {sup 24}Na to determine the relative disappearance time of the isotope from the postmastectomy lymphedematous arm as compared to the normal side. The results tend to confirm previously held convictions that the edema is usually confined to the subcutaneous fat and skin. The disappearance time (T1/2) of the radioactive sodium from the muscle of the edematous side was usually comparable to that of the control side. The data also indicate that the impairment of fluid drainage from other areas, such as the lateral chest wall, that normally drain into the axilla, is impaired similarly to that of the subcutaneous fat of the arm. Operative procedures designed to relieve the edema of the arm by providing an alternate route of drainage should provide a conduit for the fluid to an area that does not normally drain to the axilla of the affected side.

  4. Toxicity and quality of life after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer (PORTEC-3): an open-label, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Stephanie M; Powell, Melanie E; Mileshkin, Linda; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Bessette, Paul; Haie-Meder, Christine; Ottevanger, Petronella B; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Khaw, Pearly; Colombo, Alessandro; Fyles, Anthony; Baron, Marie-Helene; Kitchener, Henry C; Nijman, Hans W; Kruitwagen, Roy F; Nout, Remi A; Verhoeven-Adema, Karen W; Smit, Vincent T; Putter, Hein; Creutzberg, Carien L

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of patients with endometrial cancer have high-risk features and are at increased risk of distant metastases and endometrial cancer-related death. We designed the PORTEC-3 trial to investigate the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone for women with high-risk endometrial cancer. PORTEC-3 was a multicentre, open-label, randomised, international trial. Women with high-risk endometrial cancer were randomly allocated (1:1) to radiotherapy alone (48·6 Gy) in 1·8 Gy fractions five times a week or chemoradiotherapy (two cycles concurrent cisplatin 50 mg/m(2) and four adjuvant cycles of carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] 5 and paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2)) using a biased coin minimisation procedure with stratification for participating centre, lymphadenectomy, stage of cancer, and histological type. The primary endpoints of the PORTEC-3 trial were overall survival and failure-free survival analysed in the intention-to-treat population. This analysis focuses on 2-year toxicity and health-related quality of life as secondary endpoints; analysis was done according to treatment received. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) the cervix cancer module and chemotherapy and neuropathy subscales of the ovarian cancer module at baseline, after radiotherapy and at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 60 months after randomisation. Adverse events were graded with Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The study was closed on Dec 20, 2013, after achieving complete accrual, and follow-up remains ongoing for the primary outcomes analysis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN14387080, and with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00411138. Between Sept 15, 2006, and Dec 20, 2013, 686 women were randomly allocated in the PORTEC-3 trial. Of these, 660 met eligibility criteria, and 570 (86%) were evaluable for

  5. Endorectal MRI assessment of local relapse after surgery for prostate cancer: A model to define treatment field guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy in patients at high risk for local failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond . E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch; Vees, Hansjoerg; Lozano, Joan; Khan, Haleem; Molla, Meritxell; Hidalgo, Alberto; Linero, Dolors; Rouzaud, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining local relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer to help to reassess the clinical target volume (CTV) for adjuvant postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients undergoing an endorectal MRI before salvage radiotherapy were selected. Spatial coordinates of the relapses were assessed using two reference points: the inferior border of the pubic symphysis (point 1) and the urethro-vesical anastomosis (point 2). Every lesion on MRI was delineated on the planning computed tomography and center of mass coordinates were plotted in two separate diagrams (along the x, y, and z axes) with the urethro-vesical anastomosis as the coordinate origin. An 'ideal' CTV was constructed, centered at a point defined by the mathematical means of each of the three coordinates with dimensions defined as twice 2 standard deviations in each of the three axes. The dosimetric impact of the new CTV definition was evaluated in six adjuvantly treated patients. Results: The ideal CTV center of mass was located at coordinates 0 (x), -5 (y), and -3 (z) mm with SDs of 6 (x), 6 (y), and 9 (z) mm, respectively. The CTV size was 24 (x) x 24 (y) x 36 (z) mm. Significant rectal sparing was observed with the new CTV. Conclusions: A CTV with an approximately cylindrical shape ({approx}4 x 3 cm) centered 5 mm posterior and 3 mm inferior to the urethro-vesical anastomosis was defined. Such CTV may reduce the irradiation of normal nontarget tissue in the pelvis potentially improving treatment tolerance.

  6. The impact of exercise during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer on fatigue and quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Andrea; Barrett, Sarah; Haruna, Fatimah; Mustian, Karen; O'Donovan, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in breast cancer treatment has been proven to enhance outcome, improving recurrence and mortality rates. RT, however, gives rise to unfavourable side-effects, fatigue the most frequent. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of exercise (and different exercise prescription parameters) during adjuvant RT on fatigue among breast cancer patients. Quality of life was a secondary outcome. Randomised controlled trials that investigated the effect of exercise during adjuvant RT on fatigue for breast cancer patients were searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, CINAHL, AMED and ClinicalTrials.gov. Reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews were also checked. Nine studies (802 participants) were included. A meta-analysis, including results for 738 participants, revealed that exercise was statistically more effective at reducing fatigue than the control intervention (SMD - 0.46, 95%CI -0.79 to -0.14). Statistically significant benefits of supervised, combined aerobicresistance exercise on fatigue were achieved. Further research is required to confirm this finding and determine the effect of alternative exercise modes. Exercise during adjuvant RT can be considered beneficial in breast cancer patients. Supervised, combined aerobic-resistance exercise shows promise in alleviating fatigue with further investigation into alternative exercise modes required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictors and consequences of multiple persistent postmastectomy pains.

    PubMed

    Kudel, Ian; Edwards, Robert R; Kozachik, Sharon; Block, Brian M; Agarwal, Shefali; Heinberg, Leslie J; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2007-12-01

    Persistent postmastectomy pain is quite common and has been classified into several distinct types. Few studies, however, have investigated either the predictors or functional impact of multiple types of post mastectomy pain. In this investigation, 278 women, who were, on average, several years post mastectomy, completed questionnaires assessing pain, pain-related physical function, and psychosocial distress. We assessed three distinct categories of postmastectomy pain: phantom breast pain, scar pain, and other mastectomy-related pain. Each of the three types of postmastectomy pain was strongly related to one another (i.e., women reporting one type of pain were more likely to report the other types as well). In general, the more types of postmastectomy pain a woman reported, the greater the degree of disability and distress. Collectively, the presence of "other mastectomy-related pain" was a stronger unique predictor of disability and distress than were the other two categories of pain. Interestingly, demographic and surgical factors, including time since surgery, were not consistent predictors of pain or function. The findings suggest that the assessment of postmastectomy pain should include formal evaluation of multiple types of pain, with additional attention paid to the category of "other mastectomy-related pains," and that the number of types of pain reported by women after surgery may be important in predicting functional outcomes.

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy After Simultaneous Surgical Resection of Rectal Cancer With Liver Metastases: Analysis of Prognosis and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho Jung; Yu, Chang Sik; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Byung Woog; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after simultaneous surgical resection in rectal cancer patients with liver metastases (LM). Materials and Methods: One hundred and eight patients receiving total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and surgical resection for LM were reviewed. Forty-eight patients received adjuvant CRT, and 60 were administered CT alone. Recurrence patterns and prognosis were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared between the CRT and CT groups. The inverse probability of the treatment-weighted (IPTW) method based on the propensity score was used to adjust for selection bias between the two groups. Results: At a median follow-up period of 47.7 months, 77 (71.3%) patients had developed recurrences. The majority of recurrences (68.8%) occurred in distant organs. By contrast, the local recurrence rate was only 4.7%. Median DFS and OS were not significantly different between the CRT and CT groups. After applying the IPTW method, we observed no significant differences in terms of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.347; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.759-2.392; p = 0.309) and OS (HR, 1.413; CI, 0.752-2.653; p = 0.282). Multivariate analyses showed that unilobar distribution of LM and normal preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level (<6 mg/mL) were significantly associated with longer DFS and OS. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate after simultaneous resection of rectal cancer with LM was relatively low. DFS and OS rates were not different between the adjuvant CRT and CT groups. Adjuvant CRT may have a limited role in this setting. Further prospective randomized studies are required to evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment in these patients.

  9. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  10. The incidence of arm edema in women with breast cancer randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project study B-04 to radical mastectomy versus total mastectomy and radiotherapy versus total mastectomy alone.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Melvin; Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p<.001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p=or<.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p=.001) and at last assessment (p=.005). Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  11. Postmastectomy internal mammary nodal irradiation: a long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Aleknavičius, Eduardas; Atkočius, Vydmantas; Kuzmickienė, Irena; Steponavičienė, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The internal mammary lymph nodes (IMN) have been recognized as a potential site of regional breast cancer spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of internal mammary node radiotherapy (RT) to on clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. This cohort study included 588 patients with breast cancers located in the central and medial quadrants. IMN RT was applied to 320 patients and 268 patients did not receive it IMN RT. Inside the IMN RT group, 165 patients received external beam IMN irradiation (IMN-EB). Mastectomy combined with using Californium-252 neutron source implantation was applied to 155 patients (IMN-BT). Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the influence of IMN RT on clinical outcome. Age, tumor size, lymph nodal status, adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy were assessed. IMN-EB resulted in a significant improvement of distant metastasis-free survival, breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival (P=0.033, P=0.037 and P=0.011, respectively). The IMN-EB radiotherapy has a significant impact on event-free survival (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.46-0.91; P=0.043) and breast cancer-specific survival (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 45-0.91; P=0.013) in patients with moderate-risk (stage T1-2N1). There was no association between IMN RT and clinical outcomes of patients with high-risk disease (stage T3-4N2-3) in any of the study end points. The effects of IMN-EB radiotherapy on event-free survival and breast cancer-specific survival were benefit for women with moderate-risk breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing local tissue edema in postmastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N

    2007-06-01

    Overall limb lymphedema can be assessed by several methods but none are suitable to determine local edema. Quantifying local edema could provide important information not previously available. Our goal was to determine the suitability of using the tissue dielectric constant (TDC) as and index of local tissue water to detect and quantify edema in postmastectomy patients with unilateral arm lymphedema. Segmental arm volume and TDC were measured in both arms of 18 women with unilateral lymphedema, and in 15 premenopausal and 15 postmenopausal controls. TDC was measured at a frequency of 300 MHz using open-ended coaxial probes with effective measuring depths of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5 and 5.0 mm. For patients and controls, absolute TDC depended on measurement depth but for any depth the TDC of lymphedematous segments was significantly greater than for non-affected contralateral arms (p<0.001). At a depth of 2.5 mm, the TDC ratio between arms for patients was 1.64+/-0.30 vs.1.04+/-0.04 for both control groups (p<0.001). No patient's TDC ratio was as low as 1.2 and no control subject's TDC ratio was as great as 1.2. Results suggest that this method is a good quantitative discriminator of the presence of lymphedema in patients with unilateral limb lymphedema.

  13. Postmastectomy educational needs and social support.

    PubMed

    Feather, B L; Wainstock, J M; Remington, A; Ringenberg, Q S

    1988-01-01

    Due to shorter hospitalization periods and changes in surgical procedures, breast cancer patients have less inpatient contact with rehabilitation resources. A questionnaire related to educational needs and social support was mailed statewide to 2,000 postmastectomy women who had received a Reach to Recovery visit. The findings are based on quantitative data reported by 933 women and from 27 women in follow-up interviews. Respondents ranked their educational needs in six categories from greatest to least importance as follows: (1) information about breast cancer, (2/3) personal hygiene/exercise and nutrition/weight control (both ranked of equal importance), (4) prosthesis/clothing information, (5) social support, and (6) sexual issues. Performance on the knowledge assessment correlated directly with the amount of educational experience and inversely with age. Respondents who lived in communities of less than 2,500 were less informed than those from other locations. Participation in formalized support groups was infrequent (11%). The major source of information was the media, with 88% indicating they would watch television programs about breast cancer. Thirty-three percent of the respondents indicated they owned a video cassette recorder (VCR); about 93% said VCRs were available for rent in their community. Work associates were identified as a group that encouraged information seeking; health care professionals were the most successful in motivating women to participate in support groups.

  14. Temporal Trends in Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy and Breast Reconstruction Associated With Changes in National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Frasier, Lane L; Holden, Sara; Holden, Timothy; Schumacher, Jessica R; Leverson, Glen; Anderson, Bethany; Greenberg, Caprice C; Neuman, Heather B

    2016-01-01

    Evolving data on the effectiveness of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) have led to changes in National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recommendations, counseling clinicians to "strongly consider" PMRT for patients with breast cancer with tumors 5 cm or smaller and 1 to 3 positive nodes; however, anticipation of PMRT may lead to delay or omission of reconstruction, which can have cosmetic, quality-of-life, and complication implications for patients. To determine whether revised guidelines have increased PMRT and affected receipt of breast reconstruction. We hypothesized that (1) PMRT rates would increase for women affected by the revised guidelines while remaining stable in other cohorts and (2) receipt of breast reconstruction would decrease in these women while increasing in other groups. Retrospective, population-based cohort study of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data on women with stage I to III breast cancer undergoing mastectomy from 2000 through 2011. Our analytic sample (N = 62,442) was divided into cohorts on the basis of current NCCN radiotherapy recommendations: "radiotherapy recommended" (tumors > 5 cm or ≥ 4 positive lymph nodes), "strongly consider radiotherapy" (tumor ≤ 5 cm, 1-3 positive nodes), and "radiotherapy not recommended" (tumors ≤ 5 cm, no positive nodes). We used Joinpoint regression analysis to evaluate temporal trends in receipt of PMRT and breast reconstruction. The 3 cohorts comprised 15,999 in the "radiotherapy recommended" group, 15,006 in the "strongly consider radiotherapy" group, and 31,837 in the "radiotherapy not recommended" group. [corrected]. Rates of PMRT were unchanged in the radiotherapy recommended (29.9%) and radiotherapy not recommended (7.4%) cohorts over the study period. Receipt of PMRT for the strongly consider radiotherapy cohort was unchanged at 26.9% until 2007. At that time, a significant change in the APC was observed (P = .01) with an increase in APC from 2.1% to 9.0% (P

  15. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  16. Topical Hyaluronic acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis after Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation (RT) compared with best supportive care. Materials and Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast RT to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel, on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast, and the control gel to the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥grade 2 dermatitis. Results The study closed early based on a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed significantly higher rate of ≥grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel (61.5% [40/65] vs. 47.7% [31/65], P = 0.027). Only one patient developed grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than petrolatum gel at the end of RT (42% vs. 14%, P = 0.003). Conclusion We found no benefit from use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of grade ≥2 dermatitis after adjuvant RT for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. PMID:22172912

  17. Swallowing outcomes and PEG dependence in head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy with a proactive PEG: a prospective study with long term follow up.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Jane M; Ng, Stephanie; Spurgin, Ann-Louise; Ward, Elizabeth C; Brown, Teresa E; Hughes, Brett G M

    2015-06-01

    This study examined long term swallowing outcomes of a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients identified at high risk of experiencing significant side effects from cancer treatment and were provided with a proactive PEG. Ninety-five HNC patients receiving definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy were identified for proactive PEG placement using validated guidelines and followed for up to 3years. Functional swallowing status was recorded at regular time points and data were collected on PEG use and duration in situ. Mean duration of enteral feeding was 125days. PEGs remained in situ for approximately 7months. PEG removal was achieved by 52% by 6months and 86% by 1year. Only 3 (3%) remained PEG dependent at 3years. Over half (55%) had resumed a full non-texture modified diet by PEG removal. Proactive PEG placement did not lead to high proportion of long term tube dependence in this high risk group and the majority achieved good swallowing outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An assessment of quality of life for early phase after adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer survivors: a Korean multicenter survey (KROG 14-09).

    PubMed

    Rim, Chai Hong; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Kim, Jin Hee; Yoon, Won Sup; Chun, Mison; Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Kyubo; Kong, Moonkyoo; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Juree; Park, Kyung Ran; Shin, Young-Joo; Ma, Sun Young; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Kim, Su Ssan; Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Dong Soo; Cha, Jaehyung

    2017-05-10

    Quality of life (QoL) has become a major concern as the survival time of breast cancer increases. We investigated the changes in QoL through comprehensive categorical analysis, for the first three years after breast cancer treatment including radiotherapy. A total of 1156 patients were enrolled from 17 institutions. All survivors were grouped according to a surveillance period of 9-15 months (first year), 21-27 months (second year), and 33-39 months (third year) from the end of radiotherapy. The 5-dimensional questionnaire by the EuroQol group (EQ-5D) and the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire; breast cancer specific module (QLQ-BR23) were checked by self-administrated method. First, second and third year groups comprised 51.0, 28.9, and 21.0%. In EQ-5D-3 L (3-Likert scale) analysis, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression categories showed lower QoL. In multivariate analyses of EQ-5D-VAS (visual-analogue scale), categories of pain/discomfort and self-care were improved with time; axillary dissection was a significant clinical factor deteriorates pain/discomfort, self-care and usual activities. In QLQ-BR23 analysis, the lowest scored category was sexual activity, followed by sexual enjoyment, future perspective, and hair loss, and the best scored category was breast symptoms. In multivariate analyses, arm symptoms, breast symptoms and body image were improved with time. Categories of pain/discomfort and self-care in EQ-5D-VAS, arm/breast symptoms and body image in QLQ-BR23 were improved, while categories of anxiety/depression and future perspective BR23 were not, suggesting necessity of psychosocial support. This research provides comprehensive information on the categorical aspects of QoL and changes during early follow-up after breast cancer treatment.

  19. An ultrasonographic evaluation of skin thickness in breast cancer patients after postmastectomy radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine the usefulness of ultrasonography in the assessment of post radiotherapy skin changes in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods Patients treated for postmastectomy radiotherapy in National University Hospital (NUH) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), Singapore between January 2004- December 2005 was recruited retrospectively. Ultrasound scan was performed on these Asian patients who had been treated to a total dose of 46-50 Gy with 1 cm bolus placed on the skin. The ultrasound scans were performed blinded to the RTOG scores, and the skin thickness of the individually marked points on the irradiated chest wall was compared to the corresponding points on the non-irradiated breast. Results The mean total skin thickness inclusive of the epidermis and the dermis of the right irradiated chest wall was 0.1712 mm (± 0.03392 mm) compared with the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast which was 0.1845 mm (± 0.04089 mm; p = 0.007). The left irradiated chest wall had a mean skin thickness of 0.1764 mm (± 0.03184 mm) compared with the right non-irradiated breast which was 0.1835 mm (± 0.02584 mm; p = 0.025). These independent t-tests produced a significant difference of reduced skin thickness on the right irradiated chest wall, p = 0.007 (p < 0.05) and left irradiated chest wall p = 0.025 (p < 0.025) in comparison to the non-irradiated skin thickness investigating chronic skin reactions. Patients with grade 2 acute skin toxicity presented with thinner skin as compared to patients with grade 1 (p = 0.006). Conclusions This study has shown that there is a statistically significant difference between the skin thicknesses of the irradiated chest wall and the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast and a predisposition to chronic reactions was found in patients with acute RTOG scoring of grade1 and grade 2. PMID:21261940

  20. [Factors influencing survival and recurrence and potential significance of postoperative radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for stage ⅢA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Han, W; Song, Y Z; He, M; Li, J; Zhang, R; Qiao, X Y

    2016-11-23

    Objective: To investigate the survival, recurrence patterns and risk factors in patients with stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC treated with curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and to explore the significance of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods: The clinical data of 290 patients with pathologically diagnosed stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC after curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from January 2010 to December 2014 at our department were retrospectively analyzed. The survival and recurrence patterns were observed, and the factors affecting locoregional recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median survival time was 31.5 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates were 88.3%, 46.0% and 33.2%, respectively. The median locoregional control time was 38.5 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year locoregional control rates were 78.6%, 55.2% and 41.0%, respectively. The median distant metastasis-free survival was 26.8 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 76.4%, 45.5% and 39.5%, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 19.1 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 64.1%, 32.5% and 23.8%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that clinical N status, histological type, pathological T stage, operation mode, the number of positive N2 lymph nodes and the number of positive N2 lymph node stations had a significant influence on overall survival; clinical N status, histological type, the number of positive N2 lymph nodes and the number of positive N2 lymph node stations had a significant influence on locoregional control. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the number of N2 positive lymph nodes (P= 0.017) was an independent factor for overall survival of stage ⅢA-N2 patients; the number of N2 positive lymph nodes (P=0.009) and histological type (P=0.005) were independent factors for locoregional recurrence. For left-sided lung cancer, the lymph node station failure sites were mostly in 2R, 4R, 5, 6 and 7, and

  1. Clinical evaluation of safety and efficacy of Boswellia-based cream for prevention of adjuvant radiotherapy skin damage in mammary carcinoma: a randomized placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togni, S; Maramaldi, G; Bonetta, A; Giacomelli, L; Di Pierro, F

    2015-04-01

    Acute radiation erythema and other skin reactions are common adverse effects experienced by breast carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. Boswellic acids are pentacyclic triterpenes extracted from the resins of the tropical tree Boswellia serrata with strong anti-inflammatory properties. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and the efficacy of the application of a base cream containing boswellic acids in a proprietary formulation (Bosexil(R)) for the prevention and relief of radiation-induced adverse effects in breast cancer patients. The acute skin reactions were clinically evaluated by visual intensity and computer-assisted skin color analysis, and toxicity was assessed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) rating scale. These findings indicate that the use of a boswellia-based cream is effective in reducing the use of topical corticosteroids and is able to reduce the grade of erythema and the skin superficial symptoms, being well tolerated by the patients. Further studies comparing boswellia cream with other topical agents will be appropriate to confirm the effectiveness of this treatment for breast cancer patients under radiation therapy.

  2. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Responding to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose G; White, Julia R

    2016-01-01

    When surgery is the first line of breast cancer treatment, numerous randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control and survival for many women with axillary lymph node-positive disease. In contrast, there are no randomized data regarding the use of PMRT in women who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) first followed by mastectomy. This has led to controversy regarding which patient with breast cancer will benefit from PMRT after NAC, particularly in women with clinically node-positive axillary disease that responds well and is down staged to pathologically negative disease at surgery (ypN0). We review the current evidence on this topic, which forms the underlying basis for the ongoing phase III clinical trial-National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B51/RTOG 1304-that is examining the role of regional nodal irradiation in patients with clinical N1 disease that responds to NAC and becomes ypN0 at surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  4. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for isolated vaginal recurrences of endometrial cancer with no prior adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Christopher H; Maghsoudi, Kaveh; Littell, Ramey D; Chen, Lee-May; Hsu, I-Chow

    2017-08-09

    To evaluate clinical outcomes for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer without adjuvant therapy treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate CT-based inverse-planned brachytherapy. Thirty women were included in this retrospective study. Median time to first recurrence was 16.7 months, and median age at recurrence was 73 years. Initial grade was 1 or 2 in 19 patients (63%), and 2009 FIGO stage IA in 19 patients. All patients received pelvic EBRT in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total of 45 or 50.4 Gy. Interstitial brachytherapy was used in 27 patients (90%). The median total EQD2 dose was 68.3 Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), progression free survival (PFS), locoregional failure-free survival, and distant failure-free survival (DFFS) were calculated. Median follow-up was 76.4 months for vital status and 57.7 months for disease status after salvage therapy. The 5-year OS, CSS, PFS, locoregional failure-free survival, and DFFS after salvage therapy were 77%, 83%, 75%, 87%, and 86%. Initial high-grade disease was prognostic for OS, CSS, and DFFS (5-year OS 95% vs. 29%, p = 0.005). Initial stage beyond IA was prognostic for CSS, PFS, and DFFS (5-year CSS 93% vs. 74%, p = 0.025). Salvage EBRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy resulted in a high rate of locoregional control. Initial high-grade and advanced stage disease were associated with greater distant failure and cancer-related mortality after salvage therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trends and Concepts in Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Farhangkhoee, Hana; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    A number of factors have contributed to a paradigm shift in US post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. The increasing numbers of contralateral prophylactic mastectomies strongly correlated to a rise in implant-based reconstructions. Autologous reconstruction, however, has faced a number of barriers including technically complicated perforator flaps and declining reimbursements. As such, a market concentration has developed within high volume microsurgical centers. As more patients receive radiation, the timing and method of reconstruction has become a controversial topic. PMID:26876921

  6. Risk factors for locoregional recurrence in patients with resected N1 non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study to identify patterns of failure and implications for adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis of randomized trials has shown that postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) had a detrimental effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with resected N1 non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Conversely, the locoregional recurrence (LR) rate is reported to be high without adjuvant PORT in these patients. We have evaluated the pattern of failure, actuarial risk and risk factors for LR in order to identify the subset of N1 NSCLC patients with the highest risk of LR. These patients could potentially benefit from PORT. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on 199 patients with pathologically confirmed T1–3N1M0 NSCLC who underwent surgery. None of the patients had positive surgical margins or received preoperative therapy or PORT. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Complete mediastinal lymph node (MLN) dissection and examination was defined as ≥3 dissected and examined MLN stations; incomplete MLN dissection or examination (IMD) was defined as <3 dissected or examined MLN stations. The primary end point of this study was freedom from LR (FFLR). Differences between patient groups were compared and risk factors for LR were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results LR was identified in 41 (20.6%) patients, distant metastasis (DM) was identified in 79 (39.7%) patients and concurrent LR and DM was identified in 25 (12.6%) patients. The 3- and 5-year OS rates in patients with resected N1 NSCLC were 78.4% and 65.6%, respectively. The corresponding FFLR rates were 80.8% and 77.3%, respectively. Univariate analyses identified that nonsmokers, ≤23 dissected lymph nodes, visceral pleural invasion and lymph node ratio >10% were significantly associated with lower FFLR rates (P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses further confirmed positive lymph nodes at station 10 and IMD as risk factors for LR (P < 0.05). The 5-year LR rate was highest in patients with both these risk factors (48%). Conclusions The incidence of LR in patients

  7. Survival and secondary tumors in children with medulloblastoma receiving radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: results of Children's Oncology Group trial A9961.

    PubMed

    Packer, Roger J; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emi; Vezina, Gilbert; Gajjar, Amar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the trial was to determine the survival and incidence of secondary tumors in children with medulloblastoma receiving radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Three hundred seventy-nine eligible patients with nondisseminated medulloblastoma between the ages of 3 and 21 years were treated with 2340 cGy of craniospinal and 5580 cGy of posterior fossa irradiation. Patients were randomized between postradiation cisplatin and vincristine plus either CCNU or cyclophosphamide. Survival, pattern of relapse, and occurrence of secondary tumors were assessed. Five- and 10-year event-free survivals were 81 ± 2% and 75.8 ± 2.3%; overall survivals were 87 ± 1.8% and 81.3 ± 2.1%. Event-free survival was not impacted by chemotherapeutic regimen, sex, race, age at diagnosis, or gender. Seven patients had disease relapse beyond 5 years after diagnosis; relapse was local in 4 patients, local plus supratentorial in 2, and supratentorial alone in 1. Fifteen patients experienced secondary tumors as a first event at a median time of 5.8 years after diagnosis (11 >5 y postdiagnosis). All non-CNS solid secondary tumors (4) occurred in regions that had received radiation. Of the 6 high-grade gliomas, 5 occurred >5 years postdiagnosis. The estimated cumulative 10-year incidence rate of secondary malignancies was 4.2% (1.9%-6.5%). Few patients with medulloblastoma will relapse ≥ 5 years postdiagnosis; relapse will occur predominantly at the primary tumor site. Patients are at risk for development of secondary tumors, many of which are malignant gliomas. This may become an increasing issue as more children survive.

  8. Coronary calcium score in 12-year breast cancer survivors after adjuvant radiotherapy with low to moderate heart exposure - Relationship to cardiac radiation dose and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tjessem, Kristin Holm; Bosse, Gerhard; Fosså, Kristian; Reinertsen, Kristin V; Fosså, Sophie D; Johansen, Safora; Fosså, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We explored the relation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and cardiac radiation doses in breast cancer survivors (BCS) treated with radiotherapy (RT). Additionally, we examined the impact of other risk factors and biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD). 236 BCS (median age 51years [range 30-70], median observation time 12years [9.2-15.7]), treated with 4-field RT of 50GY, were included and examined in 2004 (T1), 2007 (T2) and 2011 (T3) with clinical examination, blood tests and questionnaires. At T3, cardiac computed tomography was performed with quantification of CAC using Agatston score (AS). For 106 patients cardiac dose volume histograms were available. The cohort-based median of the mean cardiac dose was 2.5 (range 0.5-7.0) Gy. There was no correlation between measures of cardiac dose and AS. AS was correlated with high cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.022), high proBNP at T1/T2 (p<0.022) and T3 (p<0.022) and high HbA1c at T3 (p=0.022). In addition, a high AS was significantly associated with hypertension (p=0.022). Age (p<0.001) and cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.001) retained significant associations in multivariate analysis. Traditional, modifiable risk factors of CAD correlate with CAC and may be important for the long term risk of CAD after RT. With low to moderate cardiac radiation exposure, a contribution of radiation dose to CAC could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Omitting adjuvant radiotherapy in endometrial cancer increases the rate of locoregional recurrences but has no effect on long-term survival: the Danish Endometrial Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Ørtoft, Gitte; Hansen, Estrid Stæhr; Bertelsen, Kamma

    2013-10-01

    In 2 prospective nationwide studies, the Danish Endometrial Cancer Study demonstrated that postoperative radiotherapy (RT) could be omitted in low- and intermediate-risk stage I patients without loss of survival when evaluated after 5 years. In the present study, we evaluated the consequence of this decision on the long-term risk of recurrence and death. From 1998 to 1999, 1166 patients newly diagnosed with uterine carcinoma were included. Of these, 586 were low-risk, 231 intermediate-risk, and 78 high-risk stage I. Low- and intermediate-risk patients received standard primary surgery (hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy), and no postoperative RT was given. Long-term recurrence and survival rates were estimated. After 14 years, 6.3% of low-risk and 22% of intermediate-risk patients had relapsed compared with 32% of high-risk patients. Recurrences were dominated by locoregional relapse in the low and intermediate risk, whereas non-locoregional relapses were prominent in high risk. After locoregional relapse, 1.5% of low and 4.3% of intermediate risk experienced a second relapse dominated by non-locoregional relapses. After curative-intended treatment of vaginal recurrence in the low- and intermediate-risk patients, 100% had complete remission after the first vaginal recurrence, whereas only 74% was cured after the first or the second recurrence. The increased recurrence rate, however, does not seem to affect survival because the survival rate did not change compared to earlier Danish population-based data. We conclude that omitting RT in early stage endometrial cancer increase local recurrences, but without affecting long-term survival.

  10. /sup 125/I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  11. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  12. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis : A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Strouthos, Iosif; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Bon, Dimitra; Karagiannis, Efstratios; Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a "matched" group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery.

  13. An Eighteen-Gene Classifier Predicts Locoregional Recurrence in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Skye H; Horng, Chen-Fang; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Huang, Erich S; Tsou, Mei-Hua; Shi, Li-Sun; Yu, Ben-Long; Chen, Chii-Ming; Huang, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    We previously identified 34 genes of interest (GOI) in 2006 to aid the oncologists to determine whether post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is indicated for certain patients with breast cancer. At this time, an independent cohort of 135 patients having DNA microarray study available from the primary tumor tissue samples was chosen. Inclusion criteria were 1) mastectomy as the first treatment, 2) pathology stages I-III, 3) any locoregional recurrence (LRR) and 4) no PMRT. After inter-platform data integration of Affymetrix U95 and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays and quantile normalization, in this paper we used 18 of 34 GOI to divide the mastectomy patients into high and low risk groups. The 5-year rate of freedom from LRR in the high-risk group was 30%. In contrast, in the low-risk group it was 99% (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the 18-gene classifier independently predicts rates of LRR regardless of nodal status or cancer subtype.

  14. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob; Turesson, Ingela; Folin, Annika; Trovik, Clement S.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  15. An Update of the Phase III Trial Comparing Whole Pelvic to Prostate Only Radiotherapy and Neoadjuvant to Adjuvant Total Androgen Suppression: Updated Analysis of RTOG 94-13, With Emphasis on Unexpected Hormone/Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. DeSilvio, Michelle; Roach, Mack; Uhl, Valery; Kirsch, Robert; Seider, Michael; Rotman, Marvin; Jones, Christopher; Asbell, Sucha; Valicenti, Richard; Hahn, Stephen; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: This trial was designed to test the hypothesis that total androgen suppression and whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) followed by a prostate boost improves progression-free survival (PFS) by {>=}10% compared with total androgen suppression and prostate only RT (PORT). This trial was also designed to test the hypothesis that neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) followed by concurrent total androgen suppression and RT improves PFS compared with RT followed by adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) by {>=}10%. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for the study included those with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate and an elevated prostate-specific antigen level of <100 ng/mL. Patients were stratified by T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, and Gleason score and were required to have an estimated risk of lymph node involvement of >15%. Results: The difference in overall survival for the four arms was statistically significant (p = 0.027). However, no statistically significant differences were found in PFS or overall survival between NHT vs. AHT and WPRT compared with PORT. A trend towards a difference was found in PFS (p = 0.065) in favor of the WPRT + NHT arm compared with the PORT + NHT and WPRT + AHT arms. Conclusions: Unexpected interactions appear to exist between the timing of hormonal therapy and radiation field size for this patient population. Four Phase III trials have demonstrated better outcomes when NHT was combined with RT compared with RT alone. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9413 trial results have demonstrated that when NHT is used in conjunction with RT, WPRT yields a better PFS than does PORT. It also showed that when NHT + WPRT results in better overall survival than does WPRT + short-term AHT. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether the failure to demonstrate an advantage for NHT + WPRT compared with PORT + AHT is chance or, more likely, reflects a previously unrecognized biologic phenomenon.

  16. Risk-adapted androgen deprivation and escalated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Does radiation dose influence outcome of patients treated with adjuvant androgen deprivation? A GICOR study.

    PubMed

    Zapatero, Almudena; Valcárcel, Francisco; Calvo, Felipe A; Algás, Rosa; Béjar, Amelia; Maldonado, Javier; Villá, Salvador

    2005-09-20

    Multicenter study conducted to determine the impact on biochemical control and survival of risk-adapted androgen deprivation (AD) combined with high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostate cancer. Results of biochemical control are reported. Between October 1999 and October 2001, 416 eligible patients with prostate cancer were assigned to one of three treatment groups according to their risk factors: 181 low-risk patients were treated with 3DCRT alone; 75 intermediate-risk patients were allocated to receive neoadjuvant AD (NAD) 4-6 months before and during 3DCRT; and 160 high-risk patients received NAD and adjuvant AD (AAD) 2 years after 3DCRT. Stratification was performed for treatment/risk group and total radiation dose. After a median follow-up of 36 months (range, 18 to 63 months), the actuarial biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) at 5 years for all patients was 74%. The corresponding figures for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk disease were 80%, 73%, and 79%, respectively (P = .847). Univariate analysis showed that higher radiation dose was the only significant factor associated with bDFS for all patients (P = .0004). When stratified for treatment group, this benefit was evident for low-risk patients (P = .009) and, more interestingly, for high-risk patients treated with AAD. The 5-year bDFS for high-risk patients treated with AAD was 63% for radiation doses less than 72 Gy and 84% for those > or = 72 Gy (P = .003). The results of combined AAD plus high-dose 3DCRT are encouraging. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing an additional benefit of high-dose 3DCRT when combined with long-term AD for unfavorable disease.

  17. Residual position errors of lymph node surrogates in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: Comparison of two arm fixation devices and the effect of arm position correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapanen, Mika; Laaksomaa, Marko; Skyttä, Tanja; Haltamo, Mikko; Pehkonen, Jani; Lehtonen, Turkka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Hyödynmaa, Simo

    2016-04-01

    Residual position errors of the lymph node (LN) surrogates and humeral head (HH) were determined for 2 different arm fixation devices in radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer: a standard wrist-hold (WH) and a house-made rod-hold (RH). The effect of arm position correction (APC) based on setup images was also investigated. A total of 113 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer with LN irradiation were retrospectively analyzed (53 and 60 using the WH and RH, respectively). Residual position errors of the LN surrogates (Th1-2 and clavicle) and the HH were investigated to compare the 2 fixation devices. The position errors and setup margins were determined before and after the APC to investigate the efficacy of the APC in the treatment situation. A threshold of 5 mm was used for the residual errors of the clavicle and Th1-2 to perform the APC, and a threshold of 7 mm was used for the HH. The setup margins were calculated with the van Herk formula. Irradiated volumes of the HH were determined from RT treatment plans. With the WH and the RH, setup margins up to 8.1 and 6.7 mm should be used for the LN surrogates, and margins up to 4.6 and 3.6 mm should be used to spare the HH, respectively, without the APC. After the APC, the margins of the LN surrogates were equal to or less than 7.5/6.0 mm with the WH/RH, but margins up to 4.2/2.9 mm were required for the HH. The APC was needed at least once with both the devices for approximately 60% of the patients. With the RH, irradiated volume of the HH was approximately 2 times more than with the WH, without any dose constraints. Use of the RH together with the APC resulted in minimal residual position errors and setup margins for all the investigated bony landmarks. Based on the obtained results, we prefer the house-made RH. However, more attention should be given to minimize the irradiation of the HH with the RH than with the WH.

  18. Should all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with postoperative radiotherapy? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyong; Kong, Li; Zhang, Chenyue; Chen, Dawei; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has become a standard adjuvant postoperative therapy for breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes. However, some studies have demonstrated that some subgroups of the breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes did not benefit substantially from PMRT. Therefore, it is of great necessity to identify whether all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with PMRT. In our study, we first established a prognostic model using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 1998 and 2001. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to assess the prognostic factors, and five risk factors individually associated with prognosis including AJCC stage, AJCC T, Grade, ER status, PR status. Prognostic index of PMRT were defined as the number of risk factor (NRF). The NRF scores correlated well with overall survival of PMRT even if the patients were in the sub-poor prognosis group. Then the prognostic model was validated using the SEER database between 2006 and 2009, and the same results were obtained. In conclusion, different from others studies, our study demonstrated that all patients with four or more positive lymph nodes after modified radical mastectomy need to be treated with PMRT ever if the patients belonged to AJCC T4 in a poor prognosis group. PMID:27690343

  19. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  20. Chest and upper body morbidity following immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Colleen M; Mehrara, Babak J; Long, Tua; Garcia, Paula; Kropf, Nina; Klassen, Anne F; Cano, Stefan J; Li, Yuelin; Hurley, Karen; Scott, Amie; Disa, Joseph J; Cordeiro, Peter G; Pusic, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a mastectomy for the treatment or prophylaxis of breast cancer may have long-term implications for both physical and mental well-being in women. The development of breast numbness and phantom breast sensations following mastectomy is well-known; however, relatively little is known about physical morbidity following postmastectomy breast reconstruction. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the level of physical morbidity experienced following three surgical approaches: mastectomy alone, postmastectomy tissue expander/implant reconstruction, and postmastectomy autogenous tissue reconstruction. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a sample of women who had undergone mastectomy with or without reconstruction. Chest and upper body morbidity were evaluated using the BREAST-Q. Physical well-being was compared across three types of breast surgery. In total, 308 of 452 women who received a questionnaire booklet returned completed questionnaires. There was an overall difference in physical morbidity attributable to surgical treatment (P < 0.001). Patients who underwent autogenous tissue reconstruction had the highest (i.e., best) mean physical well-being score. Women who underwent expander/implant reconstruction also had less chronic physical morbidity than women who underwent mastectomy alone (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that women who undergo immediate autogenous tissue reconstruction experience significantly less chest and upper body morbidity than those who undergo either mastectomy with implant-based reconstruction or mastectomy alone. This information can be used to facilitate clinical decision-making, to validate individual experiences of breast cancer survivors, and to inform future innovations to decrease the long-term physical morbidity associated with breast cancer surgery.

  1. [Manual lymph drainage of post-mastectomy "big arm"].

    PubMed

    Moretti, B; Lanzisera, R; Moretti, L; Patella, S; Patella, V; Simone, C

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the effectiveness of the manual lymphodrainage in the patients with post-mastectomy lymphedema of the upper limb associated to axillary lymphnodes dissection of the ipsilateral arm. The best results were found in the patients with soft and recent lymphedema (which means that was seen within one year); the worst were found in the chronic hard lymphedema. An important psychological assistance and physiotherapy were required to complete the rehabilitation. However, the physiotherapy was very effective when associated to pressed bandage of the arm, at the end of the LDM therapy. Furthermore, the muscle contraction in the bandage had reinforced the lymphoematic pump effect.

  2. [Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Stoeckle, E; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Kantor, G

    2016-10-01

    The management of retroperitoneal sarcoma can be very challenging, and the quality of initial treatment strategy appears to be a crucial prognostic factor. En bloc surgery is currently the standard of care for these rare tumours and perioperative treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy have not been validated yet. However, local-regional relapse constitutes the most common disease course. While adjuvant radiotherapy is less and less common due to gastrointestinal toxicities, preoperative radiation therapy offers numerous advantages and is being evaluated as part of a national multicentre phase II study (TOMOREP trial) and is the subject of a European randomized phase III study (STRASS trial). The objective of this article is to present data on preoperative irradiation in terms of dose, volumes and optimal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of this rare disease.

  3. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  4. Phase III Multi-Institutional Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy With Paclitaxel, Estramustine, and Oral Etoposide Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression Therapy and Radiotherapy Versus Long-Term Androgen Suppression Plus Radiotherapy Alone for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of RTOG 99-02

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Sobczak, Mark L.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Long-term androgen suppression plus radiotherapy (AS+RT) is standard treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 9902, was undertaken to determine whether adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, estramustine, and etoposide (TEE) plus AS+RT would improve disease outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Methods and Materials: High-risk (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score {>=}7; or Stage T2 or greater, Gleason score 8, prostate-specific antigen level <100 ng/mL) nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients were randomized to AS+RT (Arm 1) vs. AS+RT plus four cycles of TEE (Arm 2). TEE was delivered 4 weeks after RT. AS continued for 2 years for both treatment arms. RT began after 8 weeks of AS began. Results: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 trial opened January 11, 2000. Excess thromboembolic toxicity was noted, leading to study closure October 4, 2004. A total of 397 patients were accrued, and the data for 381 were analyzable. An acute and long-term toxicity analysis was performed. The worst overall toxicities during treatment were increased for Arm 2. Of the 192 patients, 136 (71%) on Arm 2 had RTOG Grade 3 or greater toxicity compared with 70 (37%) of 189 patients on Arm 1. Statistically significant increases in hematologic toxicity (p < 0.0001) and gastrointestinal toxicity (p = 0.017) but not genitourinary toxicity (p = 0.07) were noted during treatment. Two Grade 5 complications related to neutropenic infection occurred in Arm 2. Three cases of myelodysplasia/acute myelogenous leukemia were noted in Arm 2. At 2 and 3 years after therapy completion, excess long-term toxicity was not observed in Arm 2. Conclusion: TEE was associated with significantly increased toxicity during treatment. The toxicity profiles did not differ at 2 and 3 years after therapy. Toxicity is an important consideration in the design of trials using adjuvant chemotherapy for prostate cancer.

  5. Postmastectomy radiation therapy in T3 node-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Leisha; Deshpande, Anjali; Daly, MacKenzie; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    In the absence of lymph node involvement, tumor size is arguably the most important prognostic factor for women with breast cancer. Radiation therapy use in the T3 node-negative population is controversial. We investigated the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in women with T3 node-negative breast cancer. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by identifying women with T3 node-negative breast cancer from the 1988-2009 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. Our primary outcome was breast cancer-specific survival. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) and propensity score analysis were used to evaluate the impact on survival. We identified 2874 patients with T3 node-negative breast cancer and 961 (33%) received PMRT and 1913 (67%) did not. Statistically significant differences were seen in adjuvant radiation therapy use based on patient age, marital status, tumor grade, tumor size, and receptor status (P < 0.05 for all). Overall survival was lower in the PMRT group in unadjusted analysis (crude HR, 0.718; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.614-0.840); however, adjusted HRs demonstrated no difference in overall survival (adjusted HR, 0.898; 95% CI, 0.765-1.054). Unadjusted analysis of breast cancer-specific survival demonstrated no difference between those who received PMRT and those who did not (crude HR, 0.834; 95% CI, 0.682-1.021). Propensity score analysis demonstrated no difference in breast cancer-specific survival based on PMRT use (adjusted HR, 0.939; 95% CI, 0.762-1.157). Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database suggests that receipt of PMRT is not clinically beneficial in T3 node-negative breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Postmastectomy syndrome after the radical treatment of the breast cancer with the preservation of the intercostal nerve].

    PubMed

    Iarygin, M L; Obmanov, I V; Iarygin, L M; Khokhlov, A A; Shmyrev, V I

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy syndrome often follows the radical surgery oа the breast cancer. The intersection of the branches of the intercostal nerve is an infrequent cause of the postmastectomy syndrome development. We studied the long-term follow up results in 30 patients after radical mastectomy by Madden with preservation of the branches of the intercostal nerve on the level of Th1-Th3. The method demonstrated the decrease of the postmastectomy syndrome and the improvement of quality of life.

  7. Starling pressures in the human arm and their alteration in postmastectomy oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D O; Levick, J R; Mortimer, P S

    1994-01-01

    1. Surgery and radiotherapy to axillary lymph nodes during breast cancer treatment is often followed, commonly years later, by chronic postmastectomy oedema (PMO). PMO is considered a 'high protein' oedema due to reduced axillary lymph drainage. Since oedema formation also depends on fluid input (capillary filtration), we studied the Starling pressures in the affected and contralateral arm. Colloid osmotic pressure was measured in patient serum (pi p) and interstitial fluid (pi i). Subcutis fluid was collected from PMO arms by both wick and aspiration methods, and from the control arm by the wick method only. Interstitial hydraulic pressure (P(i)) was measured by the wick-in-needle method. 2. Oedema pi i was 19.2 +/- 4.1 cmH2O (n = 13, wick) to 16.3 +/- 4.4 cmH2O (n = 41, aspirate; difference not significant; mean +/- S.D. throughout). This was significantly lower than pi i in the control arm (21.4 +/- 3.8 cmH2O, n = 14, P < 0.01, analysis of variance). Also, there was a negative correlation between oedema pi i and the percentage increase in arm volume (correlation coefficient r = -0.35, P < 0.05) in contrast to conventional expectation. 3. Oedema P(i) (1.9 +/- 2.0 cmH2O, n = 28) exceeded the subatmospheric control P(i) (-2.8 +/- 3.0 cmH2O; P < 0.01). Venous and arterial pressures were normal but pi p was subnormal (31.1 +/- 2.7 cmH2O, n = 47). 4. Net pressure opposing capillary blood pressure, P(o), was calculated as P(i) + sigma (pi p-pi i) for a reflection coefficient, sigma, of 0.90-0.99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7932226

  8. Starling pressures in the human arm and their alteration in postmastectomy oedema.

    PubMed

    Bates, D O; Levick, J R; Mortimer, P S

    1994-06-01

    1. Surgery and radiotherapy to axillary lymph nodes during breast cancer treatment is often followed, commonly years later, by chronic postmastectomy oedema (PMO). PMO is considered a 'high protein' oedema due to reduced axillary lymph drainage. Since oedema formation also depends on fluid input (capillary filtration), we studied the Starling pressures in the affected and contralateral arm. Colloid osmotic pressure was measured in patient serum (pi p) and interstitial fluid (pi i). Subcutis fluid was collected from PMO arms by both wick and aspiration methods, and from the control arm by the wick method only. Interstitial hydraulic pressure (P(i)) was measured by the wick-in-needle method. 2. Oedema pi i was 19.2 +/- 4.1 cmH2O (n = 13, wick) to 16.3 +/- 4.4 cmH2O (n = 41, aspirate; difference not significant; mean +/- S.D. throughout). This was significantly lower than pi i in the control arm (21.4 +/- 3.8 cmH2O, n = 14, P < 0.01, analysis of variance). Also, there was a negative correlation between oedema pi i and the percentage increase in arm volume (correlation coefficient r = -0.35, P < 0.05) in contrast to conventional expectation. 3. Oedema P(i) (1.9 +/- 2.0 cmH2O, n = 28) exceeded the subatmospheric control P(i) (-2.8 +/- 3.0 cmH2O; P < 0.01). Venous and arterial pressures were normal but pi p was subnormal (31.1 +/- 2.7 cmH2O, n = 47). 4. Net pressure opposing capillary blood pressure, P(o), was calculated as P(i) + sigma (pi p-pi i) for a reflection coefficient, sigma, of 0.90-0.99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. SU-E-T-437: Dosimetric Assessment of Brass Mesh Bolus for Postmastectomy Chest Wall Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, R; Paxton, A; Cervino, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the use of a brass mesh bolus for chest wall irradiation sufficiently increases surface dose while having little effect on the dose at depth. This work quantified the increase in surface dose when using a brass mesh bolus in postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy compared to tissue-equivalent bolus and assessed its effect on dose at depth. Methods: Percent depth doses with brass bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus were determined for a 6 MV photon beam in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Gafchromic film was used to determine the surface dose for the same three experimental setups. For comparison to a realistic treatment setup, gafchromic film and OSLDs were used to determine the surface dose over the irradiated area of a 6 MV chest wall plan with tangential beams delivered to a heterogeneous thorax phantom. The plan was generated using a CT of the phantom and delivered using brass mesh bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus. Results: For the en face beam, the central surface dose increased to 90% of maximum with the tissue-equivalent bolus, but to only 62% of maximum with the brass mesh. Using tangential beams on the thorax phantom, the surface dose increased from 40–72% to 75–110% of prescribed dose, with the brass mesh, and to 85–109% with the tissue-equivalent bolus. At depths beyond dmax in the plastic water phantom, the dose with and without brass mesh bolus differed by less than 0.5%. Conclusion: A brass mesh may be considered as a substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase the superficial dose of 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. The brass mesh does not significantly change the dose at depth, so a non-bolus plan could be used for bolus and non-bolus treatments.

  10. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Sumita; Miller, Robert C. . E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed.

  11. Impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy in T1-2 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Tengchuang; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yang; Zhang, Siliang; Ma, Hongyu; Xing, Enkang; Liu, Xueying; Xu, Qingyong

    2017-07-25

    The effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) on T1-2 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is controversial up to now. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of postmastectomy radiotherapy for these patients. The prognostic factor effecting locoregional free-survival (LRFS) was also analyzed. In the retrospective clinical data of 1674 eligible patients, survival analysis was performed using the method of Kaplan-Meier and the log-rank test. Cox regression analysis was applied to identify the significant prognostic factors. We found PMRT increased 5-year LRFS (p=0.003), but could not improve 5-year disease-free survival or overall survival statistically. For patients without PMRT, multivariate analysis revealed that age, lymph node ratio and molecule subtype were risk factors effecting LRFS. To further analyze the role of PMRT, we grouped all the patients into low risk group (0 or 1 risk factor) and high risk group (2 or 3 risk factors) depending on these risk factors. We found that in low-risk group, PMRT increased only 5-year LRFS (p=0.012). However, in high-risk group, PMRT increased both 5-year LRFS (p=0.005) and 5-year disease-free survival (p=0.033), but could not improve 5-year overall survival statistically. Thus, these data provide the evidence that PMRT could improve LRFS for T1-2 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes. Additionally, PMRT could improve LRFS and disease-free survival for high risk patients. Age, lymph node ratio and molecule subtype were high risk factors effecting LRFS in our study.

  12. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95%) was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%). The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9). Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively) but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60). Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05). Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated. PMID:22204504

  13. Feasibility of Postmastectomy Treatment With Helical TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenafi, Michael; Boyd, Robert A.; Lee, Tae K.; Lo, Kenneth K.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: By use of the TomoTherapy Hi-Art II treatment-planning system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI), helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for 5 patients and compared with the mixed-beam (electron-photon) plans with which they had been treated. The TomoTherapy plans were evaluated by use of dose-volume quantities, tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Results: The TomoTherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the planning treatment volume containing the chest wall and internal mammary nodes (p = 0.001) and eliminated the need for abutting fields. For the normal tissues, the TomoTherapy plans showed a smaller fractional volume receiving 20Gy or greater for the ipsilateral lung (p = 0.05), no change in NTCP for postradiation pneumonitis, increased SCCP for each lung and both lungs together (p < 0.02), no change in the volume of the heart receiving more than 15Gy, no change in NTCP for excess cardiac mortality, and a larger mean dose and SCCP in the contralateral breast (p < 0.001). For nonspecific tissues, the volume receiving between 5Gy and 25Gy and SCCP were both larger for the TomoTherapy plans (p < 0.01). Total SCCP was larger for the TomoTherapy plans (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Overall, the TomoTherapy plans had comparable tumor control probability and NTCP to the mixed-beam plans and increased SCCP. The TomoTherapy plans showed significantly greater dose homogeneity in the chest wall, which offers the potential for improved cosmesis after treatment. These factors have resulted in TomoTherapy often being the treatment of choice for postmastectomy radiation therapy in our clinic.

  14. Review on adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer - why do treatment guidelines differ so much?

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Laurids Ø; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pfeiffer, Per; Yilmaz, Mette; Falkmer, Ursula; Sorbye, Halfdan

    2015-04-01

    The use of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is controversial for rectal adenocarcinoma. Both international and national guidelines display a great span varying from recommending no adjuvant chemotherapy at all, over single drug 5-fluororuacil (5-FU), to combinations of 5-FU/oxaliplatin. A review of the literature was made identifying 24 randomized controlled trials on adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer based on about 10 000 patients. The trials were subdivided into a number of clinically relevant subgroups. As regards patients treated with preoperative (chemo) radiotherapy, four randomized studies were found where use of adjuvant chemotherapy showed no benefit in survival. Three trials were found in which a subset of patients received preoperative (chemo) radiotherapy. Two of these trials showed a statistically significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty trials were identified in which the patients did not receive preoperative (chemo) radiotherapy, including five Asian studies in which a statistically significant benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy was reported. Most of the data found did not support the use of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for patients already treated with preoperative (chemo) radiotherapy. For patients not treated preoperatively, several studies support the use of single agent 5-FU chemotherapy. Treatment guidelines seem to differ according to if preoperative chemoradiation is considered of importance for use of adjuvant chemotherapy and if adjuvant colon cancer studies are considered transferrable to rectal cancer patients regardless of the molecular differences.

  15. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  16. Adjuvants for Animal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Burakova, Yulia; Madera, Rachel; McVey, Scott; Schlup, John R; Shi, Jishu

    2017-06-15

    Vaccines are essential tools for the prevention and control of infectious diseases in animals. One of the most important steps in vaccine development is the selection of a suitable adjuvant. The focus of this review is the adjuvants used in vaccines for animals. We will discuss current commercial adjuvants and experimental formulations with attention to mineral salts, emulsions, bacterial-derived components, saponins, and several other immunoactive compounds. In addition, we will also examine the mechanisms of action for different adjuvants, examples of adjuvant combinations in one vaccine formulation, and challenges in the research and development of veterinary vaccine adjuvants.

  17. An outcome analysis of intraoperative angiography for postmastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Claire S; Madni, Tarik; Losken, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative angiography is a useful tool for predicting both tissue perfusion during postmastectomy breast reconstruction and mastectomy flap and free flap survival. The authors determine whether the routine use of laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiography (SPY Imaging; LifeCell Corp, Branchburg, New Jersey) in breast reconstruction decreases the incidence of complications and whether this new technology is cost-effective. A retrospective review was conducted for 184 consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction using intraoperative ICG angiography from April 2009 to December 2011 at Emory University (Atlanta, Georgia). The incidence of complications (including mastectomy skin necrosis, flap necrosis, fat necrosis, unexpected reoperations, infections, and dehiscence) among these patients was compared with data for 184 consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction at Emory University from October 2007 to April 2009, prior to the introduction of ICG angiography. Patient data recorded included age, body mass index, smoking status, and history of preoperative radiation as well as the timing and type of reconstruction, along with complications. The cost of unexpected reoperations for perfusion-related complications and associated hospital stays was calculated. The 184 patients who underwent procedures using ICG angiography imaging had a lower incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis (13% vs 23.4%; P = .010) and unexpected reoperations for perfusion-related complications (5.9% vs 14.1%, P = .009). The 184 patients who underwent procedures without ICG angiography had a higher mean degree of severity of mastectomy skin necrosis (2.22 vs 1.83 on a scale of 1-3; P = .065). There were no significant differences in the degree of flap necrosis, nipple necrosis, fat necrosis, dehiscence, infection, implant exposure, flap loss, seroma, hematoma, or the number of overall complications between the 2 groups. The use of ICG angiography

  18. Retroperitoneal sarcoma: a population-based analysis of epidemiology, surgery, and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Porter, Geoffrey A; Baxter, Nancy N; Pisters, Peter W T

    2006-04-01

    No population-based studies of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) have been conducted, and the use and timing of adjuvant radiotherapy for RPS is controversial. The objective of this study was to examine the incidence and treatment of RPS, specifically regarding the use of adjuvant radiotherapy. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was used to evaluate the incidence of RPS over a 29-year period (1973-2001). The rate of surgery, the rate and timing of adjuvant radiotherapy, and the influence of demographic factors on treatment were evaluated. A total of 2348 cases of RPS were identified. The mean annual incidence of RPS was 2.7 cases per 10(6) persons and did not change significantly over time (2.6 in 1973 vs. 2.8 in 2001; P = .92). Most patients (1654; 70.4%) underwent surgical resection. Radiotherapy was used in 428 patients (25.9%) who underwent surgery; radiation was given postoperatively in 366 (85.5%), preoperatively in 20 (4.7%), and intraoperatively or unknown in 42 (9.8%). Patients who received any adjuvant radiotherapy were on average 5 years younger than those who underwent surgery alone (P < .0001). Radiotherapy was more commonly used among whites than African Americans (25.8% vs. 16.7%; P = .02) and there was significant variation in the use of adjuvant radiotherapy by geographic location (P = .003). On multivariate analysis, race (P = 0.004), age (P < .0001), and geographic location (P = .006) were independently associated with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy. The incidence of RPS, a rare disease, appears stable. Most patients who undergo surgery do not receive any adjuvant radiotherapy, and very few receive preoperative radiotherapy. Differences in adjuvant radiotherapy use related to demographic and geographic factors suggest that at least some treatment variations reflect differences in individual and institutional practice patterns. Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.

  19. Adjuvants for malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Coler, R N; Carter, D; Friede, M; Reed, S G

    2009-09-01

    There is a renewed enthusiasm about subunit vaccines for malaria coincident with the formation of new alliances and partnerships raising international public awareness, attracting increased resources and the re-focusing of research programs on adjuvant development for infectious disease vaccines. It is generally accepted that subunit vaccines for malaria will require adjuvants to induce protective immune responses, and availability of suitable adjuvants has in the past been a barrier to the development of malaria vaccines. Several novel adjuvants are now in licensed products or in late stage clinical development, while several others are in the earlier development pipeline. Successful vaccine development requires knowing which adjuvants to use and knowing how to formulate adjuvants and antigens to achieve stable, safe, and immunogenic vaccines. For the majority of vaccine researchers this information is not readily available, nor is access to well-characterized adjuvants. In this minireview, we outline the current state of adjuvant research and development as it pertains to effective malaria vaccines.

  20. Trends in Post-mastectomy Reconstruction: A SEER Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Julie E.; Summers, Danielle E.; Cui, Haiyan; Carey, Joseph N.; Viscusi, Rebecca K.; Hurst, Craig A.; Waer, Amy L.; Ley, Michele L B.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vijayasekaran, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was performed to investigate recent trends and factors associated with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) using a large population-based registry. We hypothesized that rates of IBR have increased since passage of the Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998. Methods The SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database was used to evaluate Stage I–III breast cancer (BC) patients who underwent total mastectomy from 1998–2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to study predictors of IBR. Results Of 112,348 patients with BC treated by mastectomy, 18,001 (16%) had IBR. Rates of IBR increased significantly from 1998–2008 (p<0.0001). Use of IBR significantly decreased as patient age increased (p<0.0001), as stage increased (p<0.0001), and as the number of positive lymph nodes increased (p<0.0001). Estrogen receptor +/progesterone receptor + (ER+/PR+) patients had significantly higher IBR rates than ER−/PR− patients (p<0.0001). IBR was used in 3615 of 25,823 (14.0%) of patients having post-mastectomy radiation (XRT) and in 14,188 of 86,513 (16.4%) of those not having XRT (p<0.0001). Conclusions The utilization of IBR has increased significantly over the last decade. IBR was found to be significantly associated with age, race, geographical region, stage, ER, grade, LN status, and XRT (p<0.0001). PMID:23861196

  1. [Treatment of persistent postmastectomy pain with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster].

    PubMed

    Cruto, M E; Baricocchi, E; Battistella, M; Bona, F; Giacoletto, G; Iacobellis, A; Moselli, N; Palomba, G; Sardo, E; Savojardo, M; Suita, L; Zocca, E; Debernardi, F

    2015-04-01

    Persistent postmastectomy pain (PPMP) syndrome is characterized by neuropathic pain that develops following surgery in breast cancer patients. The reported incidence of PPMP ranges between 30% and 50% and is estimated to increase as the number of women surviving cancer continues to rise. Though effective, today's drug treatments are poorly tolerated, limiting their use and reducing adherence to therapy. Since neuropathic pain is localized, international guidelines suggest that topical treatment with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster either alone or combined with systemic drugs can be considered for pain management. In this retrospective study we reviewed the medical records of 11 patients treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for moderate-to-severe PPMP at our institute between November 2013 and October 2014. Analysis showed that treatment with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster, either alone or in combination with systemic drugs, achieved significant pain control already after the first week of therapy. The effectiveness and tolerability of 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster we observed suggests that it is a viable option in the management of PPMP.

  2. Effects of Sexual Rehabilitation Using the PLISSIT Model on Quality of Sexual Life and Sexual Functioning in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed

    Faghani, Safieh; Ghaffari, Fatemeh

    2016-11-01

    Background and Objectives: As one of the most common treatments for breast cancer, mastectomy has adverse effects on the quality of sexual life and sexual functioning in the impacted women. Various strategies have therefore been proposed to resolve their sexual problems. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of sexual rehabilitation using the PLISSIT model in post-mastectomy breast cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was conducted on a population of post-mastectomy breast cancer survivors and their husbands. Sample size was calculated as 50 each for intervention and non-intervention groups. The former received sexual counseling based on the PLISSIT model consisting of four levels of intervention: permission, limited information, specific suggestion and intensive therapy, presented in four 90-minute sessions. Data were collected using the Sexual Quality of Life-Female (SQOL-F) questionnaire and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Results: No significant differences were observed in the mean quality of sexual life scores between the intervention and control groups (P>0.05) before the intervention; however, a significant difference emerged between the groups after the intervention (P<0.01). Thus the mean score for sexual functioning in the intervention group was 26.3±3.76 before and30.0±4.38 after the intervention (P<0.0001). In the control group, however, the difference between the pre- and post-intervention mean scores was not statistically significant (P=0.713). Conclusion: The present study showed that nurses can use the PLISSIT model in conjunction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to teach coping and problem-solving skills to women with breast cancer and their husbands and to encourage their participation in group programs for expressing their feelings and attitudes about their current sex life and thus help enhance quality of sexual life and sexual functioning in this group. Creative Commons

  3. Review article: surgical, neo-adjuvant and adjuvant management strategies in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, J R A; Olde Damink, S W M; Imber, C; Bridgewater, J; Pereira, S P; Malagó, M

    2011-11-01

    The majority of patients with cholangiocarcinoma present with advanced, irresectable tumours associated with poor prognosis. The incidence and mortality rates associated with cholangiocarcinoma continue to rise, mandating the development of novel strategies for early detection, improved resection and treatment of residual lesions. To review the current evidence base for surgical, adjuvant and neo-adjuvant techniques in the management of cholangiocarcinoma. A search strategy incorporating PubMed/Medline search engines and utilising the key words biliary tract carcinoma; cholangiocarcinoma; management; surgery; chemotherapy; radiotherapy; photodynamic therapy; and radiofrequency ablation, in various combinations, was employed. Data on neo-adjuvant and adjuvant techniques remain limited, and much of the literature concerns palliation of inoperable disease. The only opportunity for long-term survival remains surgical resection with negative pathological margins or liver transplantation, both of which remain possible in only a minority of selected patients. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant techniques currently provide only limited success in improving survival. The development of novel strategies and treatment techniques is crucial. However, the shortage of randomised controlled trials is compounded by the low feasibility of conducting adequately powered trials in liver surgery, due to the large sample sizes that are required. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Galaal, Khadra; Al Moundhri, Mansour; Bryant, Andrew; Lopes, Alberto D; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-05-15

    Approximately 13% of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer present with advanced stage disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III/IV). The standard treatment of advanced endometrial cancer consists of cytoreductive surgery followed by radiation therapy, or chemotherapy, or both. There is currently little agreement about which adjuvant treatment is the safest and most effective. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation, and to determine which chemotherapy agents are most effective in women presenting with advanced endometrial cancer (FIGO stage III/IV). We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Collaborative Review Group's Trial Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 10 2013), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to November 2013. Also we searched electronic clinical trial registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation in women with FIGO stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data, and assessed trials for risk of bias. Where necessary, we contacted trial investigators for relevant, unpublished data. We pooled data using the random-effects model in Review Manager (RevMan) software. We included four multicentre RCTs involving 1269 women with primary FIGO stage III/IV endometrial cancer. We considered the trials to be at low to moderate risk of bias. All participants received primary cytoreductive surgery. Two trials, evaluating 620 women (83% stage III, 17% stage IV), compared adjuvant chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy; one trial evaluating 552 women (88% stage III, 12% stage IV) compared two chemotherapy regimens (cisplatin/doxorubicin/paclitaxel (CDP) versus cisplatin/doxorubicin (CD) treatment) in women who had all undergone adjuvant radiotherapy; and one trial contributed no data

  5. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  6. Verification of Calculated Skin Doses in Postmastectomy Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C.; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi.Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. Results: The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% {+-} 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. Conclusions: The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%.

  7. Do metallic ports in tissue expanders affect postmastectomy radiation delivery?

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Beal, Kathryn . E-mail: bealk@mskcc.org; Ballangrud, Ase; Losasso, Thomas J.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Disa, Joseph J.; Hong, Linda; McCormick, Beryl L.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is often delivered to patients with permanent breast implants. On occasion, patients are irradiated with a tissue expander (TE) in place before their permanent implant exchange. Because of concern of potential under-dosing in these patients, we examined the dosimetric effects of the Magna-Site (Santa Barbara, CA) metallic port that is present in certain TEs. Methods and Materials: We performed ex vivo film dosimetry with single 6-MV and 15-MV photon beams on a water phantom containing a Magna-Site disc in two orientations. Additionally, using in vivo films, we measured the exit dose from 1 patient's TE-reconstructed breast during chest wall treatment with 15-MV tangent beams. Finally, we placed thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on 6 patients with TEs who received PMRT delivered with 15-MV tangent beams. Results: Phantom film dosimetry revealed decreased transmission in the region of the Magna-Site, particularly with the magnet in the parallel orientation (at 22 mm: 78% transmission with 6 MV, 84% transmission with 15 MV). The transmission measured by in vivo films during single beam treatment concurred with ex vivo results. TLD data showed acceptable variation in median dose to the skin (86-101% prescription dose). Conclusion: Because of potential dosimetric effects of the Magna-Site, it is preferable to treat PMRT patients with permanent implants. However, it is not unreasonable to treat with a TE because the volume of tissue affected by attenuation from the Magna-Site is small. In this scenario, we recommend using 15 MV photons with compensating bolus.

  8. Verification of calculated skin doses in postmastectomy helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi·Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% ± 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% ± 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% ± 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Trends in post-mastectomy reconstruction: a SEER database analysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julie E; Summers, Danielle E; Cui, Haiyan; Carey, Joseph N; Viscusi, Rebecca K; Hurst, Craig A; Waer, Amy L; Ley, Michele L B; Sener, Stephen F; Vijayasekaran, Aparna

    2013-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate recent trends and factors associated with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) using a large population-based registry. We hypothesized that rates of IBR have increased since passage of the Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998. The SEER (surveillance, epidemiology and end results) database was used to evaluate Stage I-III breast cancer (BC) patients who underwent total mastectomy from 1998 to 2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to study predictors of IBR. Of 112,348 patients with BC treated by mastectomy 18,001 (16%) had IBR. Rates of IBR increased significantly from 1998 to 2008 (P < 0.0001). Use of IBR significantly decreased as patient age increased (P < 0.0001), as stage increased (P < 0.0001), and as the number of positive lymph nodes increased (P < 0.0001). Estrogen receptor+/progesterone receptor+ (ER+/PR+) patients had significantly higher IBR rates than ER-/PR-patients (P < 0.0001). IBR was used in 3,615 of 25,823 (14.0%) of patients having post-mastectomy radiation (XRT) and in 14,188 of 86,513 (16.4%) of those not having XRT (P < 0.0001). The utilization of IBR has increased significantly over the last decade. IBR was found to be significantly associated with age, race, geographical region, stage, ER, grade, LN status, and XRT (P < 0.0001). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy After Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Jhaveri, Jigna Desai Rush, Stephen C.; Kostroff, Karen; Derisi, Dwight; Farber, Leonard A.; Maurer, Virginia E.; Bosworth, Jay L.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term complication rates and cosmetic results for patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after immediate reconstruction (IR). Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and December 2005, 92 patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, IR, and PMRT in our practice. A total of 69 patients underwent tissue expander and implant reconstruction (TE/I), and 23 underwent autologous tissue reconstruction (ATR). Follow-up regarding complications and cosmesis was obtained for all 92 patients. Complications were scored as follows: Grade 1, no discomfort; Grade 2, discomfort affecting activities of daily living; Grade 3, surgical intervention or intravenous antibiotics required; and Grade 4, removal or replacement of the reconstruction. Cosmesis was rated as either acceptable or unacceptable to the patient. Both complications and cosmesis were correlated with treatment- and patient-related factors. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 38 months. The overall rate of severe complications (Grade 3-4) was 25%. The overall rate of poor functional results (Grade 2-4) was 43.4%. When analyzed as a function of type of reconstruction, the rate of Grade 3 to 4 complications was 33.3% for TE/I vs. 0% for ATR (p = 0.001). The rate of Grade 2 to 4 complications was 55% for TE/I vs. 8.7% for ATR (p < 0.001). Acceptable cosmesis was reported in 51% of TE/I patients vs. 82.6% of ATR patients (p = 0.007). No other treatment or patient-related factors had a significant impact on either complications or cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients undergoing PMRT after IR, ATR is associated with fewer long-term complications and better cosmetic results than TE/I.

  11. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  12. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-04-14

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard" adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  13. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  14. Dysphagia after radiotherapy: state of the art and prevention.

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Ali, D; Roubieu, C; Durdux, C; Laccourreye, O; Giraud, P

    2015-02-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery or exclusive radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy is a valuable treatment option in the great majority of patients with head and neck cancer. Recent technical progress in radiotherapy has resulted in a decreased incidence of xerostomia. Another common toxicity of radiotherapy is dysphagia, which alters the nutritional status and quality of life of patients in remission. The objective of this review is to describe the physiology of swallowing function, the pathophysiology of radiation-induced dysphagia and the various strategies currently available to prevent this complication.

  15. Postmastectomy Electron Beam Chest Wall Irradiation in Women With Breast Cancer: A Clinical Step Toward Conformal Electron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Stilhart, Anne; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy of the chest wall with or without lymph node irradiation has been used at the Institut Curie for >20 years. The purpose of this report was to show the latest improvements of our technique developed to avoid hot spots and improve the homogeneity. Methods and Materials: The study was split into two parts. A new electron irradiation technique was designed and compared with the standard one (dosimetric study). The dose distributions were calculated using our treatment planning software ISIS (Technologie Diffusion). The dose calculation was performed using the same calculation parameters for the new and standard techniques. Next, the early skin toxicity of our new technique was evaluated prospectively in the first 25 patients using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria (clinical study). Results: The maximal dose found on the five slices was 53.4 {+-} 1.1 Gy for the new technique and 59.1 {+-} 2.3 Gy for the standard technique. The hot spots of the standard technique plans were situated at the overlap between the internal mammary chain and chest wall fields. The use of one unique field that included both chest wall and internal mammary chain volumes solved the problem of junction. To date, 25 patients have been treated with the new technique. Of these patients, 12% developed Grade 0, 48% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and 8% Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: This report describes an improvement in the standard postmastectomy electron beam technique of the chest wall. This new technique provides improved target homogeneity and conformality compared with the standard technique. This treatment was well tolerated, with a low rate of early toxicity events.

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  17. The effects of breast size in unilateral postmastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Claire S; Grudziak, Joanne; Metcalfe, Drew B; Carlson, Grant W; Losken, Albert

    2013-05-01

    Postmastectomy breast reconstruction is offered to women with breast cancer regardless of body habitus and breast size. The decision regarding technique for breast reconstruction includes patient preference, risk factors, and physical characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between preoperative breast size and choice of reconstruction, choice of contralateral breast symmetry procedure, and incidence of complications. A retrospective review of 355 patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction at Emory University from 2005 to 2009 was performed. Patients were stratified into 3 groups based on mastectomy specimen weight with small breasts defined as less than 500 g, medium breasts as 500 to 1000 g, and large breasts as more than 1000 g. Patient demographics were queried including age and risk factors. Additional data points included type of reconstruction, contralateral procedure, and complications. There were 144 patients with small breasts (40.5%), 150 with medium breasts (42.1%), and 62 with large breasts (17.4%). Women with small breasts were equally likely to undergo tissue expander (34%), latissimus dorsi flap (32%), or TRAM/DIEP flap (34%) reconstruction. Women with medium breasts were most likely to undergo TRAM/DIEP reconstruction (47%), whereas women with large breasts were most likely to undergo latissimus dorsi reconstruction (37%; P = 0.134). Small-breasted women were more likely to undergo contralateral augmentation (P < 0.0001), which varied based on the type of reconstruction. Women with medium-sized breasts were more likely to undergo mastopexy (P = 0.033), and large-breasted women were more likely to undergo reduction (P < 0.0001). Women with complications had a greater mean mastectomy weight than women without complications (744 g compared with 620 g, P = 0.0062), and there was an increasing incidence of postoperative wound infections with increasing breast size (18% of large breasts, 7

  18. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Alone for HPV Related Oropharyngeal Cancers with High Risk Features

    PubMed Central

    Su, William; Liu, Jerry; Miles, Brett A.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.; Posner, Marshall; Gupta, Vishal; Bakst, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current standard of care for oropharyngeal cancers with positive surgical margins and/or extracapsular extension is adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. It is unknown whether HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer benefits from this treatment intensification. Objective To investigate the outcomes of HPV+ patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy alone when chemoradiotherapy was indicated based on high risk pathological features. They were compared with high risk HPV+ patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods All high risk HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer patients (9) who received radiotherapy alone were identified. We also identified 17 patients who received chemoradiotherapy as a comparison group. Median follow up time was 37.3 months. Results No local failures developed in adjuvant radiotherapy group. There was 1 distant recurrence in this cohort and 3 in CRT cohort. Regarding toxicity, 8 (47.1%) chemoradiotherapy patients had >10 lb. weight loss (p = 0.013), despite 75% of them having a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed. No individuals in radiotherapy group experienced a >10 lb. weight loss and none required a gastrostomy tube. Conclusions This series provides preliminary evidence suggesting that the omission of concurrent chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy may offer comparative local control rates with a lower toxicity profile in the setting of HPV+ patients with traditional high risk features. PMID:27930732

  19. A Review of the Use of Acellular Dermal Matrices in Postmastectomy Immediate Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chao, Albert H

    2015-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) are now commonly used in postmastectomy implant-based immediate breast reconstruction. In 2-stage reconstructions involving placement of a tissue expander followed by an implant, they can improve the aesthetic outcome and expedite the expansion process. The use of ADMs has also allowed for 1-stage immediate placement of an implant following mastectomy (direct-to-implant reconstruction). However, the use of ADMs is associated with an increased risk of certain types of complications. An understanding of the use of these materials is essential to the postoperative care of patients who undergo ADM-assisted breast reconstruction. In this article, the use of ADMs in postmastectomy immediate breast reconstruction is reviewed.

  20. P17.11COMBINED RADIOTHERAPY(RT) AND CHEMOTHERAPY(CT) WITH TEMOZOLOMIDE(TMZ) CONCOMITANT(CC) AND ADJUVANT(ADJ) IN GLIOBLASTOMA IN TUNISIA(TN): RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ABOUT 37 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Boussen, H.; Hamba, S. Bach; Benna, F.; Labidi, S.; Afrit, M.; Haddaoui, A.; Jemel, H.; Kchir, N.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of a TN serie of GBM treated recently by CC RT-CT then adjuvant with TMZ, according to Stupp protocol(NEJM 2005;352:987-996). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our retrospective bicentric study included 37 cases of histologically confirmed GBM treated between 2006 and 2012 in Abderrahmen Mami hospital (medical oncology ward) and Taoufik Clinic of Tunis. We collected the following data: age, sex, symptoms, histology, investigations, treatment and evolution. RESULTS: We treated 25 males and 12 females (sex-ratio = 2.08) with a median age of 54 years (13-72). GBM was revealed mainly by deficit symptoms (41%). Surgery consisted in a wide resection in 89% of cases, reported as macroscopically complete in 78% of cases. All our patients received a CC CT-RT and 51% Adj TMZ, 22% receiving the 6 planned cycles. With a median follow-up of 12 months, medican survival was 12 months, 4 remained alive with evolutive disease. 1 and 2 year-actuarial survival were respectively of 77.6% and 38.4%. CONCLUSION: GBM patients in Tunisia have lioblastoma is a rare neoplasm with poor prognosis. Their lower median and overall survivals could be explained by the predominance of high risk cases according to neurofunctional VI-VI RPA classification.

  1. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  2. Angiosarcoma (Stewart-Treves syndrome) in postmastectomy patients: report of 10 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lifang; Zhang, Jixin; Zhang, Xinmin; Chang, Hong; Qu, Congling; Zhang, Jiangying; Zhong, Dingrong

    2015-01-01

    To study the clinicopathologic features of Stewart-Treves syndrome (STS) in postmastectomy patients including the epidemiology, presentation, morphology, differentiation, pathogenesis and therapeutic options. Ten cases of STS in postmastectomy patients were retrospectively identified in our archives, and immunohistochemistry for CD34, CD31, D2-40, HHV-8, CK, EMA and Ki-67 was performed. All ten patients presented with lymphedema after mastectomy as the first sign. Physical examination revealed multiple raised, pinkish-red papulo-vesicular lesions or ulceration as the early evidence of tumor in the field where radiation therapy was introduced. Microscopic examination revealed infiltrative proliferation of vessels and the heteromorphic tumor cells expressed CD34, CD31 and D2-40. Despite the various treatment modalities, 5 patients died in an average of 19 months, 4 patients survived to the last follow-up (9-31 months), and 1 patient got lost. STS is a fatal complication of postmastectomy lymphedema. Patients with STS have very poor prognosis. The key to improve patient's survival is the early diagnosis through a high alert of this disease by primary care physicians and comprehensive physical examination of patients with pertinent history and suspicious clinical presentations followed by prompt biopsy for definitive diagnosis.

  3. The role of lymphovenous communication in the development of postmastectomy lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Aboul-Enein, A.; Eshmawy, I.; Arafa, S.; Abboud, A.

    1984-05-01

    Forty women were investigated 6 to 24 months after radical mastectomy for the presence of functioning lymphovenous communications in the arm; 20 cases were edematous and the rest were not. Ten normal volunteer women were also investigated and served as controls. Iodinated (I125) human serum albumin was injected intralymphatically in the arm, and samples of blood were taken from both basilic veins simultaneously at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. The radioactivity of each sample was determined with a scintillation counter. Lymphangiography was performed in all cases 1 month after the isotopic studies and lymphangiograms were evaluated for the presence of lymphovenous shunts. In the volunteers and the edematous postmastectomy group, there was negligible lymphovenous shunting of labeled albumin. In the nonedematous postmastectomy group, there was an increased quantity of local lymphovenous transfer of iodinated albumin. Lymphovenous shunts were detected radiologically in two patients who did not have edema. On the basis of our observations, the incidence of postmastectomy lymphedema is predetermined and is a consequence of the lack of existence of lymphovenous communications that can allow adequate lymph flow drainage from the arm after radical dissection of axillary lymph nodes.

  4. Improving postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lipman, D; Pieters, B R; De Reijke, Theo M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer has one of the highest incidences in the world, with good curative treatment options like radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy. Unfortunately, about 30% of the patients initially treated with curative intent will develop a recurrence and need adjuvant treatment. Five randomized trials covered the role of postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, but there is still a lot of debate about which patients should receive postoperative radiotherapy. Areas covered: This review will give an overview on the available literature concerning post-operative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy with an emphasis on the five randomized trials. Also, new imaging techniques like prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PSMA-PET) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and the development of biomarkers like genomic classifiers will be discussed in the search for an improved selection of patients who will benefit from postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. With new treatment techniques like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, toxicity profiles will be kept low. Expert commentary: Patients with biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy with an early rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) will benefit most from postoperative radiotherapy. In this way, patients with only high risk pathological features can avoid unnecessary treatment and toxicity, and early intervention in progressing patients would not compromise the outcome.

  5. The Role of Adjuvant Treatment in Patients with High-Grade Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minjae; Joo, Jin-Deok; Kim, In Ah; Han, Jung Ho; Oh, Chang Wan; Kim, Chae-Yong

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of adjuvant treatment in patients with high-grade meningioma. A retrospective analysis was performed for patients with high-grade meningioma, World Health Organization grade 2 or 3, in a single center between 2003 and 2014. The patients were reviewed according to age at diagnosis, sex, the location of meningioma, degree of tumor resection, histological features, and type of adjuvant treatment. These factors were analyzed by Firth logistic regression analyses. Fifty-three patients with high-grade meningioma were enrolled. Thirty-four patients received adjuvant treatment; conventional radiotherapy or radiosurgery. Clinical follow-up ranged from 13-113 months with a median follow-up of 35.5 months. Gross total removal (GTR), Simpson grade 1 or 2, was achieved in 29 patients and, among them, 13 patients received adjuvant treatment. In the other 24 patients with non-GTR, conventional adjuvant radiotherapy and radiosurgery were performed in 11 and 10 patients, respectively. The other 3 patients did not receive any adjuvant treatment. Radiation-related complications did not occur. Of the 53 patients, 19 patients had suffered from recurrence. The recurrence rate in the adjuvant treatment group was 23.5% (8 out of 34). On the other hand, the rate for the non-adjuvant treatment group was 57.9% (11 out of 19) (odds ratio [OR]=0.208, p=0.017). In the GTR group, the recurrence rate was 7.5% (1 out of 13) for patients with adjuvant treatment and 50% (8 out of 16) for patients without adjuvant treatment (OR=0.121, p=0.04). Adjuvant treatment appears to be safe and effective, and could lead to a lower recurrence rate in high-grade meningioma, regardless of the extent of removal. Our results might be used as a reference for making decisions when planning adjuvant treatments for patients with high-grade meningioma after surgery.

  6. Calibrating the High Density Magnetic Port within Tissue Expanders to Achieve more Accurate Dose Calculations for Postmastectomy Patients with Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jasmine; Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Castle, Katherine

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy, an increasing number of patients have tissue expanders inserted subpectorally when receiving immediate breast reconstruction. These tissue expanders are composed of silicone and are inflated with saline through an internal metallic port; this serves the purpose of stretching the muscle and skin tissue over time, in order to house a permanent implant. The issue with administering radiation therapy in the presence of a tissue expander is that the port's magnetic core can potentially perturb the dose delivered to the Planning Target Volume, causing significant artifacts in CT images. Several studies have explored this problem, and suggest that density corrections must be accounted for in treatment planning. However, very few studies accurately calibrated commercial TP systems for the high density material used in the port, and no studies employed fusion imaging to yield a more accurate contour of the port in treatment planning. We compared depth dose values in the water phantom between measurement and TPS calculations, and we were able to overcome some of the inhomogeneities presented by the image artifact by fusing the KVCT and MVCT images of the tissue expander together, resulting in a more precise comparison of dose calculations at discrete locations. We expect this method to be pivotal in the quantification of dose distribution in the PTV. Research funded by the LS-AMP Award.

  7. Old and new adjuvants.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amy S; Marrack, Philippa

    2017-07-19

    Adjuvants have been deliberately added to vaccines since the 1920's when alum was discovered to boost antibody responses, leading to better protection. The first adjuvants were discovered by accident and were used in the safer but less immunogenic subunit vaccines, supposedly by providing an antigen depot to extend antigen presentation. Since that time, much has been discovered about how these adjuvants impact cells at the tissue site to activate innate immune responses, mobilize dendritic cells and drive adaptive immunity. New approaches to vaccine construction for infectious diseases that have so far not been well addressed by conventional vaccines often attempt to induce antibodies, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) CTLs. The discovery of pattern recognition receptors and ligands that drive desired T cell responses has led to development of novel adjuvant strategies using immunomodulatory agents to direct appropriate immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  9. Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticle Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Mitchell, Alaina R.; Johnson, Stacy L.; Wagner-Bartak, Claus; Morcol, Tulin; Bell, Steve J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Vaccination to protect against human infectious diseases may be enhanced by using adjuvants that can selectively stimulate immunoregulatory responses. In a murine model, a novel nanoparticulate adjuvant composed of calcium phosphate (CAP) was compared with the commonly used aluminum (alum) adjuvants for its ability to induce immunity to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections. Results indicated that CAP was more potent as an adjuvant than alum, elicited little or no inflammation at the site of administration, induced high titers of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) antibody and neutralizing antibody, and facilitated a high percentage of protection against HSV-2 infection. Additional benefits of CAP include (i) an insignificant IgE response, which is an important advantage over injection of alum compounds, and (ii) the fact that CAP is a natural constituent of the human body. Thus, CAP is very well tolerated and absorbed. These studies were performed with animal models. By virtue of the potency of this CAP adjuvant and the relative absence of side effects, we believe that this new CAP formulation has great potential for use as an adjuvant in humans. PMID:11063495

  10. Experimental evaluation of the glucose antimetabolite, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) as a possible adjuvant to radiotherapy of tumors: I. Kinetics of growth and survival of ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) in vitro and of growth of solid tumors after 2-DG and x-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, S.C.; Pohlit, W.

    1982-03-01

    Modifications of cell proliferation and survival induced by 2-DG and X-irradiation alone or in combination were studied under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions and for cells both in exponential and plateau phase. The degree of inhibition of cell proliferation was found to be dependent on absorbed dose of X rays and on the 2-DG/Glucose Molar ratio in the medium. At an equimolar ratio (2-DG/Glucose = 1) in nutrient medium the growth of euoxic EATC was ihibited by 80% relative to the control (without 2-DG). This inhibition was fully reversible up to 48 hours of the culture inoculation if 2-DG was removed from the medium, demonstrating the importance of glucose and glycolysis for tumor growth. The inhibitory effects of 2-DG on the viability of cultured cells when applied alone or in combination with radiation was found to be more pronounced in hypoxic cells than in euoxic cells. The combined effect of both noxae (2-DG and X-irradiation) on the growth inhibition of euoxic EATC in cultures was slightly more than additive, while they were clearly snyergistic on the growth inhibition of solid tumors in vivo. As tumors are known to have a fraction of hypoxic cells, it seems likely that synergistic action of 2-DG results from the stronger effect of 2-DG on these cells. The reason for the stronger effect may be a result of inhibition of their glycolytic energy supply limiting repair processes. Our results suggest that 2-DG could be used to advantage as an adjuvant in radiotherapy of human tumors.

  11. Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Node-Positive Male Breast Cancer: A Population Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Matthew J; Koffer, Paul P; Wazer, David E; Hepel, Jaroslaw T

    2017-06-01

    Because of its rarity, there are no randomized trials investigating postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in male breast cancer. This study retrospectively examines the impact of PMRT in male breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The SEER database 8.3.2 was queried for men ages 20+ with a diagnosis of localized or regional nonmetastatic invasive ductal/lobular carcinoma from 1998 to 2013. Included patients were treated by modified radical mastectomy (MRM), with or without adjuvant external beam radiation. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluated predictors for PMRT use after MRM. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) curves of the entire cohort and a case-matched cohort were calculated and compared by the log-rank test. Cox regression was used for multivariate survival analyses. A total of 1933 patients were included in the unmatched cohort. There was no difference in 5-year OS between those who received PMRT and those who did not (78% vs 77%, respectively, P=.371); however, in the case-matched analysis, PMRT was associated with improved OS at 5 years (83% vs 54%, P<.001). On subset analysis of the unmatched cohort, PMRT was associated with improved OS in men with 1 to 3 positive nodes (5-year OS 79% vs 72% P=.05) and those with 4+ positive nodes (5-year OS 73% vs 53% P<.001). On multivariate analysis of the unmatched cohort, independent predictors for improved OS were use of PMRT: HR=0.551 (0.412-0.737) and estrogen receptor-positive disease: HR=0.577 (0.339-0.983). Predictors for a survival detriment were higher grade 3/4: HR=1.825 (1.105-3.015), larger tumor T2: HR=1.783 (1.357-2.342), T3/T4: HR=2.683 (1.809-3.978), higher N-stage: N1 HR=1.574 (1.184-2.091), N2/N3: HR=2.328 (1.684-3.218), black race: HR=1.689 (1.222-2.336), and older age 81+: HR=4.164 (1.497-11.582). There may be a survival benefit with the addition of PMRT for male breast cancer with node-positive disease

  12. Melanoma Metastases to the Neck Nodes: Role of Adjuvant Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz; Jancar, Boris; Cemazar, Maja; Perme, Maja Pohar; Hocevar, Marko

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review experiences in the treatment of regionally advanced melanoma to the neck and/or parotid with emphasis on the role of adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and histopathologic data, treatment details, and outcomes in patients treated during the period 2000-2006 at the Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were reviewed. Results: A total of 40 patients with 42 dissections underwent surgery, and 43 patients with 45 dissections received irradiation postoperatively to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}: 2 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction/day, 5 fractions/week) of 60 Gy (range, 47.8-78.8). Regional control 2 years after surgery was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40-72%) and after postoperative radiotherapy 78% (CI 63-92%) (p = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, postoperative radiotherapy (yes vs. no: hazard ratio [HR] 6.3, CI 2.0-20.6) and sum of the risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score; HR 1.7 per score point, CI 1.2-2.6) were predictive for regional control. On logistic regression testing, the number of involved nodes was associated with the probability of distant metastases (p = 0.021). The incidence of late toxicity did not correlate with the mode of therapy, eqTD{sub 2}, or fractionation pattern. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy has the potential to compensate effectively for the negative impact of adverse histopatologic features to disease control in a dissected nodal basin. More conventionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens using fraction doses of 2-2.5 Gy, with cumulative eqTD{sub 2{>=}}60 Gy, are recommended. The number of involved lymph nodes is proposed as an additional criterion for limiting the implementation of adjuvant irradiation.

  13. Utilization and impact of adjuvant therapy in anaplastic oligodendroglioma: an analysis on 1692 patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jacob Y; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the utilization rates and impact of adjuvant therapy on overall survival (OS) for anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO). Data were extracted from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Chi square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were employed in SPSS 22.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) for data analyses. 1692 patients with AO who underwent surgery were identified. 945 (55.9 %) received adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy (chemoRT), 102 (6.0 %) adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) sequentially followed by chemotherapy, 244 (14.4 %) adjuvant RT alone, and 401 (23.7 %) received no adjuvant therapy. Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant chemoRT if they were diagnosed in 2009-2013 vs. 2004-2008 (p < 0.001), had Karnofsky Performance Status >70 vs. <70 (p = 0.018), had private insurance vs. Medicaid vs. no insurance (p < 0.001), or had median income ≥$63,000 vs. <$63,000 (p = 0.014). Those who received adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) had significantly better 5-year OS than those who received adjuvant RT alone or no adjuvant therapy (59.8 % vs. 65.0 % vs. 44.9 % vs. 45.6 %, p < 0.001). This significant 5-year OS benefit was also observed regardless of age. There was no difference in OS when comparing concomitant chemoRT to sequential RT and chemotherapy (p = 0.481). On multivariate analysis, receipt of adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) remained an independent prognostic factor for improved OS. Adjuvant chemoRT (concomitant or sequential) is an independent prognostic factor for improved OS in anaplastic oligodendroglioma and should be considered for all clinically suitable patients who have undergone surgery for the disease.

  14. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials

  15. Adjuvant Therapy for Gallbladder Carcinoma: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C. Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Quevedo, Fernando; Donohue, John H.; Bhatia, Sumita; Nagorney, David M.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy on gallbladder carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records from consecutive patients who underwent R0 resection of gallbladder carcinoma between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 2004. Patients had either Stage I (T1-T2N0M0) or Stage II (T3N0M0 or T1-T3N1M0) disease. Patients undergoing adjuvant therapy received 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy (median dosage, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Adverse prognostic factors and the effect of adjuvant treatment on overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: A total of 73 patients were included in the analysis; of these, 25 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. On univariate analysis, no adverse prognostic factors for OS reached statistical significance, but trends were noted for Stage N1 vs. N0 (p = .06), Nx vs. N0 (p = .09), Stage T3 vs. T1-T2 (p = .06), and histologic findings other than adenocarcinoma (p = .13). The median OS for patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiotherapy vs. surgery alone was 4.8 years and 4.2 years, respectively (log-rank test, p = .56). However, a significantly greater percentage of patients receiving adjuvant chemoradiotherapy had Stage II disease (p <.001). In the multivariate Cox model, increasing T and N category and histologic findings other than adenocarcinoma were significant predictors of decreased OS. Additionally, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was a significant predictor of improved OS after adjusting for these prognostic factors (hazard ratio for death, 0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.69; p = .004). Conclusion: After adjusting for the stage parameters and histologic findings, our data suggest that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy might improve OS for patients with gallbladder cancer.

  16. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  17. Postmastectomy chest wall radiation with electron-beam therapy: outcomes and complications at the University of Louisville.

    PubMed

    Amin-Zimmerman, F; Paris, K; Minor, G I; Spanos, W

    2005-01-01

    Postmastectomy chest wall radiation therapy using electron-beam therapy has been reported to increase lung radiation dose and the potential for pneumonitis. These reports describe treatment with varying energy electron beams prescribed to the breast/chest wall junction. Because the tissue at risk includes dermal lymphatics and subcutaneous tissues, low-energy electron beams may reduce lung radiation dose and the incidence of pneumonitis yet preserve good local control. At the University of Louisville, patients who have undergone mastectomy are treated with 6-MeV electron beam and bolus. From 1985 through 1998, 273 patients underwent postmastectomy radiation therapy at the University of Louisville. The chest wall was treated using 6-MeV electron beam with 5-mm bolus prescribed to the 90% isodose-line, ensuring adequate dermal lymphatic dose. Internal mammary nodes were treated with electron-beam energy sufficient to treat to depth (approximately 15 MeV). Supraclavicular nodes were treated using 6-MV photon beam. Patients' charts were reviewed with respect to complications and outcome. Radiation pneumonitis was confirmed in one case (0.4%). The pneumonitis resolved with prednisone treatment. Twenty patients experienced locoregional failure (7.3%), 14 of whom failed in the chest wall (5.1%). Local control in our study is excellent and comparable to results expected for postmastectomy radiation therapy as reported in the literature. We conclude that postmastectomy patients can be treated with low-energy electron beam radiation therapy, protecting underlying lung without sacrificing local disease control.

  18. [Evaluation of the objectivity of data obtained in direct lymphography in patients with post-mastectomy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V; Milanov, N; Sadovnilov, V; Abalmassov, K

    1988-01-01

    The post-mastectomy syndrome in 151 patients was investigated by direct lymphography with intra-operative determination of endolymphatic pressure and lymph node biopsy in 42 cases. Results allowed classification into 4 groups as a function of course of lymphatic lesions and selection of patients for either bypass or resection surgery.

  19. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  20. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed. PMID:28105077

  1. Why a D2 gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemotherapy is insufficient in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián Solé, Z; Larsen, Francisco E; Solé, Claudio V

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses all the important published evidence regarding adjuvant treatments in locally advanced gastric cancer. In this process it revealed facts that demonstrate the superiority of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone. Some outstanding work that has not yet been published is also discussed.

  2. What is the best adjuvant treatment for very young patients with medulloblastoma?

    PubMed

    Clarke, James W; Hadziahmetovic, Mersiha; Tzou, Katherine; Lau, Ching C; Paulino, Arnold C; Grecula, John C; Montebello, Joseph F; Mayr, Nina A; Lo, Simon S

    2007-04-01

    The standard treatment for medulloblastoma is surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy to the craniospinal axis and posterior fossa. However, in very young children, craniospinal irradiation has a more significant detrimental effect in terms of neurocognitive function and growth. This article reviews the different strategies used for very young patients with medulloblastoma.

  3. Contralateral breast volume measurement during chest CT for postmastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Osman, Noha Mohamed; Botros, Samer Malak; Ghany, Ahmed Fathy Abdel; Farid, Ashraf Maher

    2015-02-01

    Successful breast reconstruction after mastectomy may be guided by knowledge of the contralateral breast volume. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction based on a CT examination was used to determine the volume of the contralateral normal breast before postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Seventeen female patients scheduled for postmastectomy breast reconstruction using silicon implant prostheses were using noncontrast CT scans of the chest for metastatic work-up. The CT scans were used to measure the volume of contralateral normal breast. The volume estimates were used to specify the proper implant size for cosmesis. The estimated CT volume was correlated with volume estimates obtained using water displacement, as well as anthropometric measurements performed by a plastic surgeon. Breast volume estimates obtained from CT scans were highly correlated with volumes measured by the two nonradiological methods, yielding a positive linear correlation coefficient (r = 0.99). Volume measurement of the intact breast should be added to reports of routine chest CT studies in patients who undergo mastectomy. CT imaging is a feasible method for contralateral normal breast volume measurement in these patients.

  4. Imaging Features of AlloDerm® Used in Postmastectomy Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine U.; Clapp, Allison J.; Jacobson, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate the imaging features (ultrasound, mammogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) of AlloDerm®(LifeCell Corp.; Branchburg, NJ), an acellular dermal matrix sometimes used in both primary and reconstructive breast surgeries. AlloDerm® is derived from cadaveric dermis and provides an immunologically inert scaffold in tissue reconstruction. Since there is little literature on the imaging of this substance, radiologists may be unfamiliar with its appearance in breast imaging. For this manuscript, ex vivo and in vivo images of AlloDerm® in postmastectomy patients were evaluated using different imaging modalities. The appearance of AlloDerm® can vary based on length of time postsurgery and incorporation into the host. AlloDerm® appears as an isodense to glandular tissue on a mammogram and isoechoic to glandular tissue on ultrasound imaging. On MRI, in comparison with normal breast parenchyma, AlloDerm® is hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging and isointense on T1-weighted imaging and demonstrates mild enhancement. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first multimodality imaging description of AlloDerm® used in postmastectomy patients. The conformation of AlloDerm® at surgical placement and the degree of host cell migration and neoangiogenesis are factors to take into consideration when performing diagnostic evaluations; and, familiarity with the various imaging appearances of AlloDerm® can be helpful to exclude residual or recurrent disease. PMID:24987566

  5. Phase I study of concurrent vinorelbine and radiation therapy in high-risk postmastectomy breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kazunori; Riku, Miho; Iwase, Madoka; Hirasawa, Naoki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Goto, Yasutomo; Kawada, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Postmastectomy chest wall irradiation is recommended for high-risk breast cancer patients, such as those with ≥4 positive nodes. Irradiation is performed sequentially rather than concurrently with chemotherapy. However, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival was statistically better in the concurrent method in node-positive patients in a prior study. The benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for postmastectomy breast cancer patients is uncertain. Vinorelbine is often used as concurrent chemoradiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer in Japan and has antitumor activity in breast cancer as well. Thus, we planned this dose-finding study of concurrent vinorelbine and radiation therapy in high-risk postmastectomy breast cancer patients. High-risk postmastectomy breast cancer patients were recruited. Patients received weekly vinorelbine administered concurrently with radiation therapy. The radiation dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Vinorelbine was administered weekly without a break, so the maximum number of vinorelbine cycles was five. A 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used for determining maximal tolerable dose, recommended dose and safety. A total of 10 patients were enrolled in cohorts of 10 and 15 mg/m(2). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in one case in 10 mg/m(2) and two cases in 15 mg/m(2). Therefore, the maximal tolerable dose was defined at 15 mg/m(2) and the recommended dose was determined at 10 mg/m(2). The main adverse events included radiation dermatitis and neutropenia. Recurrence was observed in one patient with a median follow-up of 40 months. Concurrent vinorelbine and radiation therapy has a manageable safety profile at 10 mg/m(2) in high-risk postmastectomy breast cancer patients.

  6. Simvastatin radiosensitizes differentiated and stem-like breast cancer cell lines and is associated with improved local control in inflammatory breast cancer patients treated with postmastectomy radiation.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Lara; Reddy, Jay P; Liu, Diane; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Debeb, Bisrat G; Xu, Wei; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N; Buchholz, Thomas A; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A

    2014-07-01

    Reported rates of local failure after adjuvant radiation for women with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and triple-negative non-IBC are higher than those of women with receptor-expressing non-IBC. These high rates of locoregional recurrence are potentially influenced by the contribution of radioresistant cancer stem cells to these cancers. Statins have been shown to target stem cells and improve disease-free survival among IBC patients. We examined simvastatin radiosensitization of multiple subtypes of breast cancer cell lines in vitro in monolayer and mammosphere-based clonogenic assays and examined the therapeutic benefit of statin use on local control after postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) among IBC patients. We found that simvastatin radiosensitizes mammosphere-initiating cells (MICs) of IBC cell lines (MDA-IBC3, SUM149, SUM190) and of the metaplastic, non-IBC triple-negative receptor cell line (SUM159). However, simvastatin radioprotects MICs of non-IBC cell lines MCF-7 and SKBR3. In a retrospective clinical study of 519 IBC patients treated with PMRT, 53 patients used a statin. On univariate analysis, actuarial 3-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was higher among statin users, and on multivariate analysis, triple negative breast cancer, absence of lymphatic invasion, neoadjuvant pathological tumor response to preoperative chemotherapy, and statin use were independently associated with higher LRFS. In conclusion, patients with IBC and triple-negative non-IBC breast cancer have the highest rates of local failure, and there are no available known radiosensitizers. We report significant improvement in local control after PMRT among statin users with IBC and significant radiosensitization across triple-negative and IBC cell lines of multiple subtypes using simvastatin. These data suggest that simvastatin should be justified as a radiosensitizing agent by a prospective clinical trial. ©AlphaMed Press.

  7. SU-E-T-383: Evaluation of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique for Post-Mastectomy Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Depauw, N; Patel, S; MacDonald, S; Lu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath-hold techniques (DIBH) have been shown to carry significant dosimetric advantages in conventional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of DIBH techniques for post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) using proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Method: Ten PMRT patients, with or without breast implant, underwent two helical CT scans: one with free breathing and the other with deep inspiration breath-hold. A prescription of 50.4 Gy(RBE) to the whole chest wall and lymphatics (axillary, supraclavicular, and intramammary nodes) was considered. PBS plans were generated for each patient’s CT scan using Astroid, an in-house treatment planning system, with the institution conventional clinical PMRT parameters; that is, using a single en-face field with a spot size varying from 8 mm to 14 mm as a function of energy. Similar optimization parameters were used in both plans in order to ensure appropriate comparison. Results: Regardless of the technique (free breathing or DIBH), the generated plans were well within clinical acceptability. DIBH allowed for higher target coverage with better sparing of the cardiac structures. The lung doses were also slightly improved. While the use of DIBH techniques might be of interest, it is technically challenging as it would require a fast PBS delivery, as well as the synchronization of the beam delivery with a gating system, both of which are not currently available at the institution. Conclusion: DIBH techniques display some dosimetric advantages over free breathing treatment for PBS PMRT patients, which warrants further investigation. Plans will also be generated with smaller spot sizes (2.5 mm to 5.5 mm and 5 mm to 9 mm), corresponding to new generation machines, in order to further quantify the dosimetric advantages of DIBH as a function of spot size.

  8. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  9. Omission of Breast Radiotherapy in Low-risk Luminal A Breast Cancer: Impact on Health Care Costs.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Yap, M L; Yong, J H E; Mittmann, N; Hoch, J S; Fyles, A W; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Lymberiou, T; Foxcroft, S; Liu, F F

    2016-09-01

    The economic burden of cancer care is substantial, including steep increases in costs for breast cancer management. There is mounting evidence that women age ≥ 60 years with grade I/II T1N0 luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2- and Ki67 ≤ 13%) breast cancer have such low local recurrence rates that adjuvant breast radiotherapy might offer limited value. We aimed to determine the total savings to a publicly funded health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard of care for these patients. The number of women aged ≥ 60 years who received adjuvant radiotherapy for T1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer in Ontario was obtained from the provincial cancer agency. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy was estimated through activity-based costing from a public payer perspective. The total saving was calculated by multiplying the estimated number of luminal A cases that received radiotherapy by the cost of radiotherapy minus Ki-67 testing. In 2010, 748 women age ≥ 60 years underwent surgery for pT1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer; 539 (72%) underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, of whom 329 were estimated to be grade I/II luminal A subtype. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy per case was estimated at $6135.85; the cost of Ki-67 at $114.71. This translated into an annual saving of about $2.0million if radiotherapy was omitted for all low-risk luminal A breast cancer patients in Ontario and $5.1million across Canada. There will be significant savings to the health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard practice for women with low-risk luminal A breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer and total mesorectal excision].

    PubMed

    Coco, C; Valentini, V; Verbo, A

    2001-01-01

    Local recurrence (LR) after surgical resection for adenocarcinoma of the rectum still remains an unsolved problem. Local relapse often occurs when tumor spreads in perirectal fat (mesorectum) or along the lateral iliac lymph nodes also when surgery is considered radically. There is a close relationship between local recurrence rate and lymphatic involvement, local tumor extension and tumour grading. Total mesorectal excision (TME) appears to be associated with a reduced LR rate when resection of perirectal fat is done "en-bloc" and when a negative radial margins is obtained. TME allows autonomic nerve sparing and sphincter preservation too, but lateral nodes are not treated by TME. Extended lymphadenectomy with lateral dissection for advanced rectal cancer has been often associated with an increase rate of long term morbidity, particularly regarding urinary and sexual function. Concomitant preoperative chemo-radiation for advanced rectal cancer is a relatively safe procedure with an acceptable morbidity and mortality. This approach is associated with a considerable clinical and pathologic tumor downstaging. Tumor resectability is improved and lateral spreading is also better controlled. An improving in survival and a longer disease free period has been reported. More radical sphincter saving operations are also allowed.

  11. Adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy in carcinoma of the rectum and rectosigmoid.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, R B; Gunderson, L L; Dosoretz, D E; Rich, T A; Galdabini, J; Donaldson, G; Cohen, A M

    1985-01-01

    Local recurrence occurs in 30% to 50% of rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone if there is tumor extension beyond the bowel wall alone or in conjunction with nodal involvement. This analysis is of 97 such patients who received postoperative irradiation (XRT) in prospective and standardized fashion at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) (4500 rad in 25 fractions to large fields and minimum dose of 5040 rad in 28 fractions within a boost field). Results were compared with a group of 103 previously analyzed patients treated with surgery alone at MGH. A statistically significant decrease in local recurrence was seen in four of the six irradiated subgroups (modified Astler-Coller Stages B2g, B3, C1 + C2m, and C2g) at an interval 3 years from resection. This improvement was achieved with no increase in small bowel complications (4% with XRT versus 5% with surgery alone) in view of efforts at surgical reconstruction and use of multiple-field XRT techniques, bladder distension, etc.

  12. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Koulis, Theodora A; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of breast cancer management but the dose and fractionation schedules used are variable. A total of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions delivered over 5 weeks is often considered the “standard” adjuvant RT prescription. Hypofractionated regimes such as 42.5 Gy in 16 daily fractions or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions following breast-conserving surgery have proven to be equally effective and achieve similar or better cosmetic and normal tissue outcomes for both invasive and in situ diseases and when treating the regional nodes. Hypofractionation is more convenient for patients and less costly. However, certain patients at higher risk of RT late effects may benefit from a less intense, even more extended fractionation schedule. This review describes the indications for whole breast hypofractionated adjuvant RT for patients with breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and proposes that hypofractionation should be the new “standard” for adjuvant breast cancer RT. PMID:26604820

  13. [How I treat colorectal cancer. I. Prevention and adjuvant treatment].

    PubMed

    Bours, V; Jerusalem, G; Fillet, G

    1998-04-01

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in Belgium and in other western countries. Prevention implies a modification of alimentation and maybe a chronic uptake of acetylsalicylic acid. Treatment of colorectal cancers is based on surgery and the prognosis is determined by the locoregional or metastatic tumor spread. Complete resection of any Astler Coller stage C colorectal malignant tumor has to be followed by a 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In these protocols, 5-fluorouracil is administered together with folinic acid or levamisole. The administration of an adjuvant chemotherapy could also be considered for stage BII diseases. As rectal cancers are characterized by high local relapse rates, their treatment should associate radiotherapy, given either post-surgery or preferentially pre-surgery, with resection and chemotherapy. Appropriate treatment of colorectal cancers thus requires a concerted multidisciplinary approach.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  15. A practical alternative to conventional five-field irradiation postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Steeves, R A; Thomadsen, B R; Hansen, H; Phromratanapongse, P; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    A combination of electron and photon beams has been used as an alternative for the conventional five-field method to irradiate patients postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer. Anterior and posterior opposed photon beams treat in continuity the lateral chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular lymph nodes. An adjacent anterior electron beam is used at an energy matched to the depth of the internal mammary nodes. It includes the anterior chest wall, but bolus is used in the lateral aspect to spare underlying lung. This electron beam eliminates the diverging junction between the internal mammary and medial tangential fields used in the conventional five-field technique. Overlaps along the junction between the photon and electron beams are minimized by placing the center of the photon field along its medial border. Measurements with an Alderson-Rando phantom show dose-distribution advantages for this technique over the conventional five-field approach. There is less chance of underdosing tumor cells or of overdosing normal tissue along beam junctions. Clinical studies on 29 patients treated by this technique between July 1985 and December 1989 show increased rates of acute skin reactions, but otherwise similar side effects compared with 57 breast cancer patients treated with the five-field technique over the same time period. Local recurrence rates and patient survival rates were similar for the two groups. Given the dose-distribution advantages of this technique and its simple adaptation to accommodate unusual surgical scars or cancer recurrences, its use should be considered for postmastectomy patients with locally advanced breast cancer in well-equipped cancer treatment centers.

  16. Scintimammography in conjunction with ultrasonography for local breast cancer recurrence in post-mastectomy breast

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, S; Khan, H; Ahmed, N; Marafi, F; Garvie, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of 99Tcm-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) scintimammography and ultrasonography, alone and in combination, for the detection of chest wall recurrence in the post-mastectomy breast. A total of 41 consecutive post-mastectomy patients (mean age 46.6 years; median age 45 years) with clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence were evaluated. For scintimammography all patients received a 740–900 MBq iv injection of 99Tcm-MIBI; planar images were taken 5–10 min post-injection followed by supine single photon emission CT. Breast ultrasonography was performed in each patient using a 7.5 MHz transducer. Both MIBI uptake and ultrasound findings were documented using standard protocols. All patients had fine needle aspiration cytology biopsy (FNAC), core biopsy or excision biopsy for final tissue diagnosis. Of the 41 patients, 24 had true positive signs of local breast cancer recurrence upon ultrasonography, 10 were diagnosed as true negatives, a sensitivity of 86%, specificity 77%, positive predictive value (PPV) 89%, negative predictive value (NPV) 71% and accuracy 83% (p = 0.001). By comparison, scintimammography findings were found to be true positive in 25 patients and true negative in 12 patients — sensitivity 89%, specificity 92%, PPV 96%, NPV 80% and accuracy 90% (p = 0.001). Using a combination of these two modalities, the combined sensitivity was 100%, specificity 77%, PPV 90%, NPV 100% and accuracy 93%. The high NPV of the two studies in combination implies a potential use of this approach to exclude recurrent disease in patients with a low initial index of suspicion and/or when histology is indeterminate. PMID:20965904

  17. Predictors of satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Hannah; Carroll, Natalie; Renshaw, Derek; Turner, Andrew; Park, Alan; Skillman, Jo; McCarthy, Kate; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-13

    Breast reconstruction is associated with multiple psychological benefits. However, few studies have identified clinical and psychological factors associated with improved satisfaction and quality of life. This study examined factors, which predict satisfaction with breast appearance, outcome satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Women who underwent post-mastectomy breast reconstruction between 2010 and 2016 received a postal questionnaire consisting of The BREAST-Q Patient Reported Outcomes Instrument, The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-30 Questionnaire, The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, and a series of Visual-Analogue Scales. One hundredforty-eight women completed the questionnaire, a 56% response rate. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed psychosocial factors accounted for 75% of the variance in breast satisfaction, 68% for outcome satisfaction, and 46% forquality of life. Psychosocial well-being emerged as a significant predictor of satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .322) and outcome satisfaction (β = .406). Deep inferior epigastric perforator flap patients reported greater satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .120) and outcome satisfaction (β = .167). This study extends beyond the limited research by distinguishing between satisfaction with breast appearance and outcome satisfaction. The study provides evidence for the role of psychosocial factors predicting key patient reported outcomes and demonstrates the importance of psychosocial well-being and reconstruction type. The findings also highlight the need for healthcare providers to consider the psychosocial well-being of patients both preoperatively and post operatively and provide preliminary evidence for the use of deep inferior epigastric perforator reconstructions over other types of reconstructive procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  19. Ureteroiliac fistula secondary to radiotherapy in a patient with single renal metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dormeus, Sarah; Hernández, Erick A.; Nicolazzi, Mickaël; Barba, Javier F.; Algarra, Rubén; Tienza, Antonio; Pascual, Juan I.; Berián, José M.; Zudaire, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old man diagnosed in 2001 with rectal cancer (stage T3N1M0). The patient was treated with surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In 2009, he was admitted to the urology department with a complaint of right hemiabdominal pain. The anatomopathological investigation reported renal metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma. After surgery, he received adjuvant chemotherapy. No tumour recurrence or metastasis was reported at the 22-month follow-up. PMID:23671507

  20. Adjuvant Therapy for a Microscopically Incomplete Resection Margin after an Esophagectomy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bo; Li, JiaXiang; Wang, Bin; Wang, ZhiQiang; Liang, Ying; Cai, Peiqiang; Chen, ZhaoLin; Liu, MengZhong; Fu, JianHua; Yang, Hong; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with a microscopically incomplete (R1) resection margin following an esophagectomy, as well as the impact of adjuvant treatment on survival. Methods: Data obtained from 124 patients with R1-resected ESCC were reviewed. The impact of clinicopathological factors and adjuvant treatment on the overall survival, locoregional recurrence, and distant recurrence were explored. Results: For a median follow-up time of 16.8 months, the median overall survival of 124 patients was 25.6 months. The 1, 3, and 5-year overall survival rates were 75.6%±4.0%, 35.9%±5.1%, and 23.2%±5.0%, respectively. Adjuvant therapy was administered in 78 patients. In the univariate analyses, patients with a pN0 stage (log rank, p=0.028) and adjuvant chemotherapy (log rank, p=0.032) exhibited more favorable overall survival. In the multivariate analyses, the pN stage (HR=2.192, p=0.004) and adjuvant chemotherapy (HR=0.032, p=0.004) were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Locoregional recurrence was the main failure pattern after R1 resection. The pN stage (HR=2.567, p=0.009) and adjuvant radiotherapy (HR=0.278, p=0.000) were independent prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence. Conclusion: In R1-resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy reduced locoregional recurrence; however, it did not improve overall survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated benefits for overall survival. The pN stage was an independent prognostic factor for locoregional recurrence and overall survival. PMID:28243329

  1. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Stefan Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m{sup 2}), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h). A dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m{sup 2} in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m{sup 2} administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy.

  2. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the me