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Sample records for adjuvant radiotherapy rt

  1. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  2. Roles of adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy for desmoplastic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Daniel E; Patel, Kirtesh R; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Parker, Douglas; Lawson, David H; Delman, Keith A; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Khan, Mohammad K

    2016-02-01

    Current guidelines are unclear as to the precise role of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with desmoplastic melanoma (DM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institutional outcomes in patients with DM, and to explore the roles of both adjuvant and salvage RT in these patients. We identified 100 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of DM who received treatment at our institution from 2000 to 2014. Local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in the 95 patients managed surgically with or without adjuvant and/or salvage RT. The overall rate of local recurrence (LR) was 10%. There was no LR in either adjuvant or salvage RT cohort. Adjuvant RT did not significantly improve LR-free survival at 5 years (100 vs. 81%, P=0.59), despite the RT patients having worse pathological features. Four of seven (57%) salvage patients developed distant metastases, despite 100% local control. Adjuvant RT did not significantly impact 5-year overall survival (86 vs. 82%, P=0.43). RT shows a trend towards improved local control in both the adjuvant and salvage settings for patients with DM, and likely overcomes adverse risk factors after surgery in appropriately selected patients. Future prospective studies are needed to better address the optimal management for these patients. PMID:26397051

  3. Roles of adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy for desmoplastic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Daniel E.; Patel, Kirtesh R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Parker, Douglas; Lawson, David H.; Delman, Keith A.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines are unclear as to the precise role of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with desmoplastic melanoma (DM). The purpose of this study was to evaluate our institutional outcomes in patients with DM, and to explore the roles of both adjuvant and salvage RT in these patients. We identified 100 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of DM who received treatment at our institution from 2000 to 2014. Local control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in the 95 patients managed surgically with or without adjuvant and/or salvage RT. The overall rate of local recurrence (LR) was 10%. There was no LR in either adjuvant or salvage RT cohort. Adjuvant RT did not significantly improve LR-free survival at 5 years (100 vs. 81%, P = 0.59), despite the RTpatients having worse pathological features. Four of seven (57%) salvage patients developed distant metastases, despite 100% local control. Adjuvant RT did not significantly impact 5-year overall survival (86 vs. 82%, P = 0.43). RT shows a trend towards improved local control in both the adjuvant and salvage settings for patients with DM, and likely overcomes adverse risk factors after surgery in appropriately selected patients. Future prospective studies are needed to better address the optimal management for these patients. PMID:26397051

  4. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy for early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with perineural invasion: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bur, Andrés M; Lin, Alexander; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2016-04-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is widely regarded as a negative prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment guidelines recommend adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with adverse pathologic features, including PNI. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine if patients with PNI as their only indication for adjuvant therapy benefit from adjuvant RT. In total, 339 abstracts were reviewed for relevance leaving 85 articles, which were evaluated in detail. Thirteen retrospective studies addressed the role of adjuvant RT for patients with PNI. Evidence is lacking to recommend adjuvant RT for all patients with HNSCC with PNI. However, the literature suggests that large nerve or multifocal PNI may predict worse outcome and may be a more appropriate indication for adjuvant therapy. We advocate that patients decide whether to undergo adjuvant therapy after a discussion of the limitations of current evidence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2350-E2357, 2016. PMID:26613965

  6. Adjuvant radiotherapy for cutaneous melanoma: Comparing hypofractionation to conventional fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G. M.S.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To examine locoregional control after adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for cutaneous melanoma and compare outcomes between conventional fractionation and hypofractionation. Methods and Materials: Between January 1980 and June 2004, 56 patients with high-risk disease were treated with adjuvant RT. Indications for RT included: recurrent disease, cervical lymph node involvement, lymph nodes >3 cm, more than three lymph nodes involved, extracapsular extension, gross residual disease, close or positive margins, or satellitosis. Hypofractionation was used in 41 patients (73%) and conventional fractionation was used in 15 patients (27%). Results: The median age was 61 years (21->90). The median follow-up among living patients was 4.4 years (range, 0.6-14.4 years). The primary site was located in the head and neck in 49 patients (87%) and below the clavicles in 7 patients (13%). There were 7 in-field locoregional failures (12%), 3 out-of-field regional failures (5%), and 24 (43%) distant failures. The 5-year in-field locoregional control (ifLRC) and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 87% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) was 57% and 46%, respectively. The only factor associated with ifLRC was satellitosis (p = 0.0002). Nodal involvement was the only factor associated with FFDM (p = 0.0007), CSS (p = 0.0065), and OS (p = 0.016). Two patients (4%) who experienced severe late complications, osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone and radiation plexopathy, and both received hypofractionation (5%). Conclusions: Although surgery and adjuvant RT provides excellent locoregional control, distant metastases remain the major cause of mortality. Hypofractionation and conventional fractionation are equally efficacious.

  7. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Granulosa Cell Tumors of the Ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Hauspy, Jan; Beiner, Mario E.; Harley, Ian; Rosen, Barry; Murphy, Joan; Chapman, William; Le, Lisa W.; Fyles, Anthony; Levin, Wilfred

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To review the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the outcome and recurrence patterns of granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with GCTs referred to the Princess Margaret Hospital University Health Network between 1961 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using disease-free survival (DFS) as the endpoint. Results: A total of 103 patients with histologically confirmed GCTs were included in the present study. The mean duration of follow-up was 100 months (range, 1-399). Of the 103 patients, 31 received adjuvant RT. A total of 39 patients developed tumor recurrence. The tumor size, incidence of intraoperative rupture, and presence of concurrent endometrial cancer were not significant risk factors for DFS. The median DFS was 251 months for patients who underwent adjuvant RT compared with 112 months for patients who did not (p = .02). On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant prognostic factor for DFS (p = .004). Of the 103 patients, 12 had died and 44 were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ovarian GCTs can be indolent, with patients achieving long-term survival. In our series, adjuvant RT resulted in a significantly longer DFS. Ideally, randomized trials with long-term follow-up are needed to define the role of adjuvant RT for ovarian GCTs.

  8. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  9. Late toxicities and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy combined with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with triple-negative non-metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pernin, V; Belin, L; Cottu, P; Bontemps, P; Lemanski, C; De La Lande, B; Baumann, P; Missohou, F; Levy, C; Peignaux, K; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Denis, F; Gobillion, A; Bollet, M; Vago, N A; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Fourquet, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of the concurrent combination of bevacizumab with adjuvant radiotherapy (B-RT) in breast cancer (BC). Methods: Multicentre, prospective study, of the toxicity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) alone or B-RT in patients with non-metastatic BC enrolled in randomized Phase 3 BEATRICE trial. Early and late toxicities were assessed by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3.0 during and 12 months after the completion of RT. Results: From 2007 to 2012, 39 females received adjuvant B-RT and 45 received adjuvant RT alone. Median follow-up was 21.5 months. All patients had triple-negative non-metastatic BC and received adjuvant chemotherapy followed by RT. 90% of the 39 females treated by concurrent B-RT received whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost and 4 (10%) received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 49% of the females with internal mammary chain irradiation. The mean duration of bevacizumab was 11.7 months. 38 (84%) females treated by RT alone received WBI with a boost and 16% of the females received post-mastectomy RT. Lymph node RT was delivered in 47% of the females with internal mammary chain RT in 31%. Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed in 9% of patients receiving B-RT and 5% of patients receiving RT alone with no significant difference. 1 year after the completion of RT, the most common late grade 1–2 toxicities in the B-RT group were pain (18%), fibrosis (8%) and telangiectasia (5%). Conclusion: The concurrent bevacizumab with locoregional RT is associated with acceptable early and late 1-year toxicities in patients with BC. Advances in knowledge: The largest series of this association. PMID:25645108

  10. Survival of women with clear cell and papillary serous endometrial cancer after adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II (papillary serous and clear cell) endometrial carcinoma (EC) is a rare subgroup and is considered to have an unfavorable prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to elucidate the meaning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for clinical outcome and to define prognostic factors in these patients (pts). Methods From 2004-2012 forty-two pts with type II EC underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at our department. Median age was 72 years. The majority were early stage carcinomas (FIGO I n = 27 [64.3%], FIGO II n = 4 [9.5%], FIGO III n = 11 [26.2%]. Seven pts (16.7%) received adjuvant chemotherapy (ChT). Pts were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (IVB) boost. Results Five-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS), distant metastases free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.4%, 78%, and 64.5% respectively. LRFS was better with lower pT stage, without lymphangiosis (L0), without haemangiosis (V0) and negative resection margins (R0). DMFS was prolonged in lymph node negatives (N0), L0, V0 and R0. OS was improved in younger pts, N0, L0, V0 and after lymphadenectomy (LNE). Multivariate analysis revealed haemangiosis (V1) as the only independent prognostic factor for OS (p = .014) and DMFS (p = .008). For LRFS pT stage remained as an independent prognostic factor (p = .028). Conclusions Adjuvant RT with EBRT/IVB ensures adequate local control in type II EC, but control rates remain lower than in type I EC. A benefit of additional adjuvant ChT could not be demonstrated and a general omission of EBRT cannot be recommended at this point. Lymphovascular infiltration and pT stage might be the best predictive factors for a benefit from combined local and systemic treatment. PMID:24941899

  11. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do Hoon

    2012-12-01

    In gastric adenocarcinoma, high rates of loco-regional recurrences have been reported even after complete resection, and various studies have been tried to find the role of postoperative adjuvant therapy. Among them, Intergroup 0116 trial was a landmark trial, and demonstrated the definite survival benefit in adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, compared with surgery alone. However, the INT 0116 trial had major limitation for global acceptance of the INT 0116 regimen as an adjuvant treatment modality because of the limited lymph node dissection. Lately, several randomized studies that were performed to patients with D2-dissected gastric cancer were published. This review summarizes the data about patterns of failure after surgical resection and the earlier prospective studies, including INT 0116 study. Author will introduce the latest studies, including ARTIST trial and discuss whether external beam radiotherapy should be applied to patients receiving extended lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23346491

  12. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  13. Timing of Radiotherapy and Outcome in Patients Receiving Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Colleoni, Marco; Roncadin, Mario; Chua, Boon H.; Murray, Elizabeth; Price, Karen N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gruber, Guenther

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between the interval from breast-conserving surgery (BCS) to radiotherapy (RT) and the clinical outcome among patients treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients and Methods: Patient information was obtained from three International Breast Cancer Study Group trials. The analysis was restricted to 964 patients treated with BCS and adjuvant endocrine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median number of days between BCS and RT and into four groups according to the quartile of time between BCS and RT. The endpoints were the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Proportional hazards regression analysis was used to perform comparisons after adjustment for baseline factors. Results: The median interval between BCS and RT was 77 days. RT timing was significantly associated with age, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, no significant effect of a RT delay {<=}20 weeks was found. The adjusted hazard ratio for RT within 77 days vs. after 77 days was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-1.87) for the interval to local recurrence, 1.05 (95% CI, 0.82-1.34) for disease-free survival, and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.77-1.49) for overall survival. For the interval to local recurrence the adjusted hazard ratio for {<=}48, 49-77, and 78-112 days was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.34-2.37), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.33-2.25), and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.33-2.41), respectively, relative to {>=}113 days. Conclusion: A RT delay of {<=}20 weeks was significantly associated with baseline factors such as age, menopausal status, and estrogen-receptor status. After adjustment for these factors, the timing of RT was not significantly associated with the interval to local recurrence, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  14. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Willett, Christopher G.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Deshpande, Vikram; Niemierko, Andrzej; Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  15. Early adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of atypical meningioma.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Michael D; Waqar, Mueez; Farah, Jibril Osman; Farrell, Michael; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; McManus, Robin; Looby, Seamus; Hussey, Deirdre; Fitzpatrick, David; Certo, Francesco; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Atypical meningiomas have a greater propensity to recur than benign meningiomas and the benefits of early adjuvant radiotherapy are unclear. Existing studies report conflicting results. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the role of early adjuvant radiotherapy following surgical resection of atypical meningioma. A triple center case-note review of adults with newly-diagnosed atypical meningiomas between 2001 and 2010 was performed. Pathology diagnosis was made according to the World Health Organization classification in use at the time of surgery. Patients with multiple meningiomas, neurofibromatosis type 2 and radiation-induced meningiomas were excluded. Extent of resection was defined as gross total resection (GTR; Simpson Grade I-III) or subtotal resection (STR; Simpson Grade IV-V). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. One hundred thirty-three patients were identified with a median age of 62years (range 22-86years) and median follow-up of 57.4months (range 0.1-152.2months). Tumors were mostly located in the convexity (50.4%) or falcine/parasagittal regions (27.1%). GTR (achieved in 85%) was associated with longer progression free survival (PFS) (5year PFS 81.2% versus 40.08%, log-rank=11.117, p=0.001) but not overall survival (OS) (5year OS 76.6% versus 39.7%, log-rank=3.652, p=0.056). Following GTR, early adjuvant radiotherapy was administered to 28.3% of patients and did not influence OS (5year OS 77.0% versus 75.7%, log-rank=0.075, p=0.784) or PFS (5year PFS 82.0% versus 79.3%, log-rank=0.059, p=0.808). Although extent of resection emerged as an important prognostic variable, early adjuvant radiotherapy did not influence outcome following GTR of atypical meningiomas. Prospective randomized controlled trials are planned. PMID:26775147

  16. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  17. The impact of patient compliance with adjuvant radiotherapy: a comprehensive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Badakhshi, Harun; Gruen, Arne; Sehouli, Jalid; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) is the standard of care for early stage breast cancer. It reduces the risk for local recurrence and prolongs survival. We assessed whether, the omission of RT because of patient's preference may influence the prognosis and, thus, the quality of cancer care. Detailed information from a prospectively collected database of a breast cancer center was analyzed. Multiple regression analysis and univariate and multivariate analysis for risk factors for recurrence were performed. The entire cohort of primary breast cancer patients in a given time period was analyzed. Data from 1903 patients undergoing treatment at breast cancer center between 2003 and 2008 were used. All patient underwent breast conserving surgery and RT was performed for all patients of the cohort. Local tumor control and disease-free survival were calculated. After a median follow-up of 2.18 years (maximum 6.39 years), 5.5% of patients did not follow guideline-based recommendations for RT. There was a significant correlation between noncompliance and patient's age, adjuvant hormonal therapy (97.0%), and adjuvant chemotherapy (96.8%). Seventy local recurrences occurred that corresponds to a local recurrence rate of 3.9%. The difference in regard to local recurrence-free 5-year survival between the compliant patients and the noncompliant patients is absolute 17.9 (93.3% and 75.4%). Noncompliant patients had suffered a 5.02-fold increased risk of local recurrence than compliant patients. The omission of RT after breast-conserving surgery results in a higher local failure rate and significantly worsens clinical outcome. Age may play an important role because of the comorbidities of aged patients or the assumed low RT tolerance in this group. On a clinical level, this data suggests that improvement is needed to correct this situation, and the question remains as to how best to improve RT compliance. PMID:24403236

  18. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  19. The efficacy and safety of postoperative adjuvant transarterial embolization and radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Si-Da; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to find out the safety and efficiency of postoperative adjuvant transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiotherapy (RT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Methods From 2009 to 2010, a total of 92 HCC patients with PVTT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into three groups according to their adjuvant therapies (conservative group, n=51; TACE group, n=31; RT group, n=10). Results In our analysis, median survival in patients with postoperative adjuvant TACE (21.91±3.60 months) or RT (14.53±1.61 months) was significantly longer than patients with hepatectomy alone (8.99±1.03 months). But the difference between adjuvant TACE and RT was of no significance (P=0.716). Also a similar result could be observed in median disease-free survival: conservative group (6.51±1.44 months), TACE group (13.98±3.38 months), and RT group (14.03±2.40 months). Treatment strategies (hazard ratio [HR] =0.411, P<0.001) and PVTT type (HR =4.636, P<0.001) were the independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Similarly, the risk factors were the same when multivariate analysis was conducted in disease-free survival (treatment strategies, HR =0.423, P<0.001; PVTT type, HR =4.351, P<0.001) and recurrence (treatment strategies, HR =0.459, P=0.030; PVTT type, HR =2.908, P=0.047). Patients with PVTT type I had longer overall survival than patients with PVTT type II (median survival: 18.43±2.88 months vs 11.59±1.45 months, P=0.035). Conclusion Postoperative adjuvant TACE and RT may be a choice for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27390524

  20. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  1. New approach to adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, M.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Kramer, S.

    1980-02-01

    A sandwich technique of adjuvant radiotherapy was used to treat twenty-three patients with rectal cancer. In this technique, low dose preoperative irradiation (500 rad in one treatment) was given to all patients followed by immediate surgery (usually an A-P resection); on the basis of histopathological findings, patients with stage B/sub 2/ and C rectal cancer were selectively given 4500 rad post-operative irradiation in 5 weeks. Nine patients had early lesions (stage A and B/sub 1/) and did not receive postoperative irradiation. Thirteen patients had stage B/sub 2/ and C disease and hence received the full course of postoperative irradiation. One patient was found to have liver metastasis at the time of surgery, and hence received only palliative therapy. Follow-up of these twenty-three patients ranges from 10 months to 24 months with a median follow-up of 15 months. Treatment was well-tolerated with few side effects. Only two of the twenty-two patients who were treated for cure have failed to date. Both patients had stage C/sub 2/ disease; one patient developed an anterior abdominal wall recurrence in the surgical scar 3 months post-treatment and the second patient developed brain and bone metastases. No patients have failed in the pelvis. We feel this technique of adjuvant therapy is a logical approach to the treatment of rectal cancer and has potential for improving survival. The rationale for this approach to adjuvant radiotherapy is discussed together with implications for survival.

  2. Adjuvant Radiotherapy with Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy of Lacrimal Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, Vikas; Mallick, Supriya; Chander, Subhash; Sen, Seema; Chawla, Bhavna

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of lacrimal gland is a rare tumour with aggressive behaviour. There is sparse data to address optimum therapy for such tumours. So, the present study was aimed at evaluating the role of adjuvant three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in cases of incomplete (R1) resection along with review of literature pertaining to management of lacrimal adenoid cystic carcinoma Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the demographic and treatment data of 10 biopsy proven ACC of lacrimal gland patients, treated from December 2006 to June 2013. They were treated with radiotherapy following surgical resection. Eight patients underwent gross total excision of the tumour mass (enbloc excision) followed by conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray/30fractions/ 6 weeks. Two patients with advanced disease were treated with palliative radiotherapy after biopsy. Results The median age was 32 years. There were equal numbers of male and female patients. The median duration of symptoms was 7 months. At a median follow up of 21 months, eight patients had no evidence of disease and had complete tumour response, two patients worsened, and one of the two had systemic failure with bone metastasis. Conclusion Despite a small sample size and short follow, enbloc surgical excision with adjuvant radiotherapy is well tolerated and shows good control in ACC of lacrimal gland. PMID:26557600

  3. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jing

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}/day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m{sup 2}/day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m{sup 2}, daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles.

  4. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassam, Zahra |; Lockwood, Gina |; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James |; Swallow, Carol ||; Oza, Amit |; Siu, Lillian |; Knox, Jennifer J. |; Wong, Rebecca |; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John |; Moore, Malcolm |; Ringash, Jolie |. E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.cag

    2006-07-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study.

  5. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  6. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  7. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  8. Prospective Evaluation of Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Children With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Rakesh; Raut, Nirmal; Arora, Brijesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Dutta, Debnarayan; Munshi, Anusheel; Sarin, Rajiv; Kurkure, Purna

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To present outcome data in a prospective study of radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed DIPGs were prospectively treated with focal RT to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions along with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1-42). Four weeks after completing the initial RT-TMZ schedule, adjuvant TMZ (200 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1-5) was given every 28 days to a maximum of 12 cycles. Response was evaluated clinically and radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans. Results: Between March 2005 and November 2006, 20 children (mean age, 8.3 years) were accrued. Eighteen patients have died from disease progression, one patient is alive with progressive disease, and one patient is alive with stable disease. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.15 months and 6.9 months, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity during the concurrent RT-TMZ phase included thrombocytopenia in 3 patients, leucopenia in 2, and vomiting in 7. Transient Grade II skin toxicity developed in the irradiated fields in 18 patients. During the adjuvant TMZ phase, Grade III/IV leucopenia developed in 2 patients and Grade IV thrombocytopenia in 1 patient. Patients with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of a high-grade tumor had worse survival than those with a low-grade tumor (p = 0.001). Patients with neurologic improvement after RT-TMZ had significantly better survival than those who did not (p = 0.048). Conclusions: TMZ with RT has not yielded any improvement in the outcome of DIPG compared with RT alone. Further clinical trials should explore novel treatment modalities.

  9. Impact of margin status and lymphadenectomy on clinical outcomes in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma: implications for adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Naziri, Jason; Hendifar, Andrew; Dhall, Deepti; Rutgers, Joanne K.; Chopra, Shefali; Li, Quanlin; Tighiouart, Mourad; Annamalai, Alagappan; Nissen, Nicholas N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Minimal data exists regarding the clinical significance of margin clearance distance and lymph node (LN) parameters, such as extent of dissection and LN ratio. We assessed the impact of these variables on clinical outcomes to more clearly define the subset of patients who may benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods We identified 106 patients with resected stage 1-3 PDA from 2007-2013. Resection margins were categorized as positive (tumor at ink), ≤1, or >1 mm. LN evaluation included total number examined (NE), number of positive nodes (NP), ratio of NP to NE (NR), extent of dissection, and positive periportal LNs. The impact of these variables was assessed on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) using multivariate cox proportional hazards modeling. Results In patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) alone, greater margin clearance led to improved DFS (P=0.0412, HR =0.51). Range of NE was 4-37, with a mean of 19. NE was not associated with DFS or OS, yet absolute NP of 5 or more was associated with a significantly worse DFS (P=0.005). Whereas periportal lymphadenectomy did not result in improved DFS or OS, patients with positive periportal LN had worse clinical outcomes (DFS, P=0.0052; OS, P=0.023). The use of adjuvant CRT was associated with improved OS (P=0.049; HR=0.29). Conclusions In patients receiving adjuvant CT alone, there was a clinically significant benefit to clearing the surgical margin beyond tumor at ink. Having ≥5 NP and positive periportal LN led to significantly worse clinical outcomes. The addition of adjuvant RT to CT in resected PDA improved OS. A comprehensive evaluation of resection margin distance and LN parameters may identify more patients at risk for locoregional failure who may benefit from adjuvant CRT. PMID:27034792

  10. Is Radiotherapy a Good Adjuvant Strategy for Men With a History of Cryptorchism and Stage I Seminoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Gorayski, Peter; Zwahlen, Daniel; Fay, Michael; Keller, Jacqui; Millar, Jeremy

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Men with cryptorchism can have aberrant abdominopelvic lymph node (LN) drainage or a different natural history if they develop Stage I seminoma. If so, the nodal echelons for metastases will not be reliable, and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) would not be an ideal strategy. Methodsand Materials: Two prospectively maintained oncology databases were reviewed for men with a history of testicular seminoma and cryptorchidism. The primary endpoint was the 5-year relapse-free rate. Results: A total of 23 men were identified, most (n = 13) had had a tumor in a scrotal location after orchiopexy. After orchiectomy, 5 men were managed with surveillance, and 18 underwent RT to a median dose of 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy). All the radiation fields included the para-aortic LNs, and 13 included the ipsilateral pelvic LNs. After a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-148), 2 patients developed a relapse. One did so 4 months into a surveillance program in the para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic LNs, sites that would have been treated had he undergone RT. The other patient developed a relapse in the contralateral testis 46 months after having undergone RT. It is likely that the latter patient had a metachronous primary rather than a relapse; hence, the 5-year relapse-free rate was 80% for surveillance and 100% for RT. Both patients underwent successful salvage treatment, and all patients were disease free and alive at the last follow-up visit. Conclusion: A history of cryptorchism does not appear to confer a greater risk of relapse for men with Stage I seminoma managed with radiotherapy. RT, surveillance, and adjuvant carboplatin chemotherapy are treatment options for these patients.

  11. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Scaringi, Claudia; Caporello, Paola; Salvati, Maurizio; Arcella, Antonella; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Giangaspero, Felice; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  12. Androgen suppression adjuvant to definitive radiotherapy in prostate carcinoma-long-term results of phase III RTOG 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, Miljenko V. . E-mail: mpilepich@mednet.ucla.edu; Winter, Kathryn; Lawton, Colleen A.; Krisch, Robert E.; Wolkov, Harvey B.; Movsas, Benjamin; Hug, Eugen B.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Grignon, David

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 85-31 was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of adjuvant androgen suppression, using goserelin, in unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were those with palpable primary tumor extending beyond the prostate (clinical Stage T3) or those with regional lymphatic involvement. Patients who had undergone prostatectomy were eligible if penetration through the prostatic capsule to the margin of resection and/or seminal vesicle involvement was documented histologically. Stratification was based on histologic differentiation, nodal status, acid phosphatase status, and prior prostatectomy. The patients were randomized to either RT and adjuvant goserelin (Arm I) or RT alone followed by observation and application of goserelin at relapse (Arm II). In Arm I, the drug was to be started during the last week of RT and was to be continued indefinitely or until signs of progression. Results: Between 1987 and 1992, when the study was closed, 977 patients were entered: 488 to Arm I and 489 to Arm II. As of July 2003, the median follow-up for all patients was 7.6 years and for living patients was 11 years. At 10 years, the absolute survival rate was significantly greater for the adjuvant arm than for the control arm: 49% vs. 39%, respectively (p = 0.002). The 10-year local failure rate for the adjuvant arm was 23% vs. 38% for the control arm (p <0.0001). The corresponding 10-year rates for the incidence of distant metastases and disease-specific mortality was 24% vs. 39% (p <0.001) and 16% vs. 22% (p = 0.0052), respectively, both in favor of the adjuvant arm. Conclusion: In a population of patients with unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate, androgen suppression applied as an adjuvant after definitive RT was associated not only with a reduction in disease progression but in a statistically significant improvement in absolute

  13. Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Survival for Patients With Node-Positive Head and Neck Cancer: An Analysis by Primary Site and Nodal Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Johnny Lavaf, Amir; Teng, Marita S.; Huang, Delphine; Genden, Eric M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is frequently recommended for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary surgery. The impact of RT on survival for various subgroups of node-positive HNSCC has not been clearly demonstrated. Methods and Materials: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, we identified 5297 patients with node-positive (N1 to N3) HNSCC treated with definitive surgery with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2001. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Results: Adjuvant RT significantly improved 5-year overall survival (46.3%: 95% confidence interval [CI], 44.7-48.0% for surgery + RT, vs. 35.2%: 95% CI, 32.0-38.5% for surgery alone, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (54.8%: 95% CI, 53.2-56.4% for surgery + RT, vs. 46.2% for surgery alone 95% CI, 42.4-50.0%, p < 0.05). Use of adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.68-0.83; p < 0.001). Subset analyses demonstrated that adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved survival for N1 (HR, 0.78; 95% CI; 0.67-0.90; p = 0.001), N2a (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99, p = 0.048) and N2b to N3 nodal disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.75; p < 0.001). Adjuvant RT increased overall survival for node-positive patients with oropharynx (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90; p 0.004), hypopharynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88; p = 0.004), larynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.84; p = 0.001), and oral cavity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; p = 0.025) primary tumors. Conclusions: In a large population-based analysis, adjuvant RT significantly improves overall survival for patients with node-positive HNSCC. All nodal stages, including N1, appear to benefit from the addition of RT to definitive surgery.

  14. Integrating Geriatric Assessment into Decision-Making after Prostatectomy: Adjuvant Radiotherapy, Salvage Radiotherapy, or None?

    PubMed Central

    Goineau, Aurore; d’Aillières, Bénédicte; de Decker, Laure; Supiot, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advancements in the field, management of older prostate cancer patients still remains a big challenge for Geriatric Oncology. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (ISGO) has recently updated its recommendations in this area, and these have been widely adopted, notably by the European Association of Urology. This article outlines the principles that should be observed in the management of elderly patients who have recently undergone prostatectomy for malignancy or with a biochemical relapse following prostatectomy. Further therapeutic intervention should not be considered in those patients who are classified as frail in the geriatric assessment. In patients presenting better health conditions, salvage radiotherapy is to be preferred to adjuvant radiotherapy, which is only indicated in certain exceptional cases. Radiotherapy of the operative bed presents a higher risk to the elderly. Additionally, hormone therapy clearly shows higher side effects in older patients and therefore it should not be administered to asymptomatic patients. We propose a decision tree based on the ISGO recommendations, with specific modifications for patients in biochemical relapse. PMID:26528437

  15. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0–III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8–2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26986158

  16. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26986158

  17. Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yu, Chang-Sik; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do; Kim, Woo-Kun; Kim, Jin-Cheon; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

  18. A Study on Dosimetric Outcomes and Acute Toxicity of Post Mastectomy Adjuvant Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shivaprasad; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Srinivasa, Vidyasagar Mamidipudi; Yathiraj, Prahlad Hiremagalur; Singh, Anshul; Reddy, Anusha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy (HFRT) is a relatively new adjuvant Radiotherapy (RT) schedule for breast cancers following breast conservation surgery and less commonly, following mastectomy. Here we report our experience on normal tissue exposure and acute toxicity of HFRT after mastectomy. Aim To assess the dosimetric outcomes and acute toxicity profile of adjuvant HFRT following mastectomy for breast cancer. Materials and Materials This prospective observational study considered consecutive patients planned for adjuvant HFRT (42.5 Gy in 16 sessions delivered over 3 weeks) to the chest wall with/without regional nodes between October 2014 and June 2015. The dosimetric parameters including dose homogeneity to the target volume and exposure to heart and lung were analyzed. Acute haematological and dermatological toxicity was recorded until upto three months after completion of RT. Results Among the 56 patients treated with HFRT, the mean age was 49 years (range: 28-69 years). Pathologically positive nodes and ≥pT3 primary was observed in 44 (78.6%) and 12 (21.4%) patients, respectively. Majority (87.5%) received prior adjunct chemotherapy. RT to the supraclavicular fossa was delivered for 39 (69.6%) patients. The mean V90 and V95 to the Planning Target Volume (PTV) were 95% (± 3.3%) and 93% (± 4%), respectively. The maximum dose received was on average 47.7 Gy (112%; range: 46.2-48.5 Gy). The mean lung dose was 10.2 Gy (± 3.5 Gy) and V20 was 20.9% (± 6%). The mean V25 to heart was 6.6% (± 4.8%) for left sided and 0% for right sided tumours (p=0.001). Acute skin toxicity peaked at completion of RT and was tolerable (grade 0, I, II and III reactions were 75%, 16% and 1.8%, respectively). No patient had ≥ grade III haematological toxicity, and treatment was not interrupted for any patient. Conclusion Adjuvant HFRT could be planned while meeting the dose constraints to normal tissues in all patients and was well tolerated, with mild

  19. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate.

  20. Adjuvant Whole Brain Radiotherapy: Strong Emotions Decide But Rational Studies Are Needed

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. Asher, Anthony L.; Farace, Elana

    2008-04-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival.

  1. NI-20ADC HISTOGRAM ANALYSIS FOLLOWING RADIOTHERAPY PREDICTS RESPONSE TO ADJUVANT TEMOZOLOMIDE IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED GBM

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin; Chang, Warren; Harris, Robert; Mody, Reema; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh; Cloughesy, Timothy; Pope, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The current standard of care for newly diagnosed GBM consists of concurrent radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ) plus adjuvant TMZ. We hypothesize there is a subset of patients that will have a significant benefit from this adjuvant therapy. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to identify a diffusion imaging phenotype for patients with newly diagnosed GBM that will benefit from adjuvant TMZ following concurrent radiotherapy and TMZ. METHODS: A total of 120 patients with: 1) histologically confirmed glioblastoma, 2) treated with concurrent radiotherapy and TMZ followed by adjuvant TMZ; and 3) high quality diffusion MR data were included in the current study. Diffusion and standard structural MRI were performed approximately 10 weeks after the start of radiotherapy and concurrent TMZ. ADC histogram analysis was performed by fitting a double Gaussian mixed model to ADC data extracted from contrast enhancement tumor. ADCL was defined as the mean ADC of the lower Gaussian distribution. We hypothesize that patients with a high ADCL have a lower tumor burden and thus favorable response to adjuvant TMZ in terms of TTP and OS. RESULTS: Results demonstrate that patients with an ADCL lower than 1 um2/ms has a significantly shorter PFS compared with patients having a higher ADCL (Log-rank, P < 0.0001), showing almost twice the median PFS (297 days vs. 156 days). Additionally, patients with a high ADCL had a significantly longer OS (Log-rank, P = 0.0049). Patients with a high ADCL had a median OS of 648 days while patients with a low ADCL had a median OS of only 407 days from the start of adjuvant TMZ. CONCLUSION: Newly diagnosed GBM patients with elevated tumor diffusivity after completion of radiotherapy and concurrent TMZ have a favorable prognosis.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yanlan; Wang, Juan; Wang, Tao; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Su, Jin; Yang, Yunyi; Zhou, Xi; Ma, Hailin; He, Bin; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent literature reports that radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy has comparable progression-free survival and overall survival compared to radical radiotherapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB cervical cancer. Now, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness (CE) of these two treatment regimens. Primary and secondary outcome measures A decision-tree model was constructed comparing CE between treatment arms using the published studies for overall survival rates and treatment-related toxicity rates for 5 years. The cost data were obtained from the hospital system of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University. Effectiveness was measured as quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Treatment arms were compared with regard to costs and life expectancy using incremental CE ratio, and the results were presented using costs per QALY. Results The mean cost was $10,872 for radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy versus $5,702 for radical radiotherapy. The incremental CE ratio for surgery-based treatment compared to radiotherapy-based treatment was –$76,453 per QALY. Conclusion Radical radiotherapy would be a cost-effective method for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer and would be favored in settings where resources are limited. PMID:26855584

  3. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, Olivier . E-mail: opradier@gwdg.de; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO{sub 2} laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy.

  4. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  5. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  6. Multiple Cutaneous Angiosarcomas after Breast Conserving Surgery and Bilateral Adjuvant Radiotherapy: An Unusual Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Meattini, Icro; Santi, Raffaella; Scartoni, Daniele; Giacomelli, Irene; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Nori, Jacopo; Paglierani, Milena; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Breast angiosarcomas (BAs) are rare but serious events that may arise after radiation exposure. Disease outcome is poor, with high risk of local and distant failure. Recurrences are frequent also after resection with negative margins. The spectrum of vascular proliferations associated with radiotherapy in the setting of breast cancer has expanded, including radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions (AVLs) of the breast skin as a rare, but well-recognized, entity. Although pursuing a benign behavior, AVLs have been regarded as possible precursors of postradiation BAs. We report an unusual case of a 71-year-old woman affected by well-differentiated bilateral cutaneous BA, diagnosed 1.9 years after adjuvant RT for synchronous bilateral breast cancer. Whole-life clinical followup is of crucial importance in breast cancer patients. PMID:24744928

  7. [Electronic dataflow management in radiotherapy: routine use of the DICOM-RT protocol].

    PubMed

    Germond, J F; Haefliger, J M

    2001-11-01

    The DICOM standard protocol of medical image exchange and its extensions to radiotherapy data has been implemented in order to enable electronic communication between all modalities within our radiology and radiotherapy departments. The network architecture used for radiotherapy includes as basic elements one CT simulator, several treatment planning systems, one linear accelerator fitted with multileaf collimator, one electronic portal imaging system and several laser imagers. As customary in radiotherapy departments, our equipments are heterogeneous with respect to manufacturers and computer operating systems. Choosing to resort to the DICOM-RT protocol spared us the acquisition of a proprietary information system because its elementary inter-connectivity characteristics can effectively be used for dataflow management. It has the advantage to minimally change the user's way of working since the electronic data transfer is taking place sequentially from one workstation to the other in a manner analogous to what is done with the paper document. Quality assurance management of treatments is simplified by the electronic nature of the transfers from the CT-simulation down to the accelerator since modalities interfaces, instead of users, are performing consistency checks. This process results in substantial time saving, but the DICOM computer interface is requiring a better skill that the one needed for operating standard office software. The DICOM-RT protocol is presently missing some functionality necessary for its integration into our hospital information system. Our experience is however showing that it represents a viable and promising solution for a small radiotherapy department. PMID:11797279

  8. Adjuvant radiation for soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Colleen I; Haas, Rick; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades, limb-preservation surgery in combination with radiotherapy achieves local control rates exceeding 90% for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Local control is not as successful for retroperitoneal sarcoma (approximately 60%) despite aggressive surgical approaches including en bloc resection of uninvolved adjacent organs combined with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This review will discuss the indications for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for primary presentation of soft tissue sarcoma: "What," referring to the type and manner of planning and delivery of RT; "When," referring to the timing and scheduling of RT; and "Why," referring to the rationale for the use of RT will be addressed. From a practical stand point, this Educational Chapter on "adjuvant RT" will focus on pre- and postoperative RT in the context of gross total resection for extremity and retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma, the two most frequent paradigms for the use of adjuvant RT. PMID:25993234

  9. Vesicocutaneous fistula following adjuvant radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, Derek Barry; Bolton, Eva; Thomas, Arun Z; Lynch, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Vesicocutaneous fistulas (VCF) are a rare complication of radical radiotherapy to the pelvis. Timely diagnosis and management are often difficult and complex. We report the unusual case of a 64-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department with worsening sepsis and profuse discharge from a cutaneous opening in the left groin. This presentation was 6 weeks following the completion of external beam radiotherapy for apical margin-positive prostate cancer (pT3a). A diagnosis of a VCF was confirmed after CT scanning of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast. Urinary diversion was achieved by a temporary urethral catheter insertion. Full resolution of this gentleman's symptoms was accomplished. In this article, we present a non-invasive approach to the management of VCF. This case raises intricate management issues in the atypical development of an early urinary tract fistula postradiotherapy. PMID:23625668

  10. Adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of gall bladder carcinoma: What is the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2016-03-01

    Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC) is considered the fifth most common one of the most aggressive gastro intestinal tract malignancies. Owing to their large incidence randomised controlled trials have hardly been conducted to look into their optimum treatment. Over the years surgical resection has been considered the only curative treatment of these tumors. However, the outcome still remains guarded. The predominant pattern of failure is loco-regional followed by systemic. Hence, local adjuvant radiation has been used by different institutes with concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy. The large retrospective series with their limitations showed improved survival in patients with regional spread or tumors infiltrating the liver when treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In the present era with modern radiation techniques and target delineation radiation may further improve upon the impact without adding to the toxicity profile. Hence, radiation in gall bladder cancer needs a relook to optimize treatment outcome of such aggressive disease. PMID:26265290

  11. Identification of High-Risk Subgroups of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Need of Postoperative Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemo-Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Fang, Chiung-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2016-05-01

    Patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) undergoing surgery are recommended to receive adjuvant radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy if there are unfavorable prognostic factors. A positive resection margin (PRM) and extra-capsular extension (ECE) of lymph nodes are well-known major prognostic factors. However, there is no agreement on whether oral cavity cancer patients should receive postoperative chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) if they present with other risk factors or a combination of 2 or more risk factors. In this study, we investigated this issue and provide suggestions for adjuvant treatments.From January 2002 to December 2013, 567 OSCC patients who had undergone radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year loco-regional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free (DMF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed.In univariate analysis, pathological T classification, positive node, tumor depth, ECE, lymphatic or vascular or perineural invasion and histology grade are significant prognostic factors for LRC, DMF, DFS, or OS. By multivariate analysis, pathological T4 (pT4), positive node, positive surgical margin are prognostic factors for LRC. pT4, positive node and lymphatic invasion predicted for higher rate of distant metastasis. pT4, positive node, and poor differentiation tumor were prognostic factors for DFS. pT4, positive nodes, and ECE were prognostic factors for OS. These factors were used to define risk groups. We proposed PRM and ECE as major risk factors and pT4, positive nodes, close margin (≤ 5 mm, > 1 mm), tumor depth ≥ 1 cm, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, and poor differentiation as minor risk factors. By subgroups analysis, 192 patients with at least 2 minor prognostic factors and no other major risk factors, postoperative radiotherapy (RT), or CCRT yielded significantly better 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS compared to surgery only group. For 179

  12. Identification of High-Risk Subgroups of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Need of Postoperative Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemo-Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Fang, Chiung-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) undergoing surgery are recommended to receive adjuvant radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy if there are unfavorable prognostic factors. A positive resection margin (PRM) and extra-capsular extension (ECE) of lymph nodes are well-known major prognostic factors. However, there is no agreement on whether oral cavity cancer patients should receive postoperative chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) if they present with other risk factors or a combination of 2 or more risk factors. In this study, we investigated this issue and provide suggestions for adjuvant treatments. From January 2002 to December 2013, 567 OSCC patients who had undergone radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year loco-regional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free (DMF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. In univariate analysis, pathological T classification, positive node, tumor depth, ECE, lymphatic or vascular or perineural invasion and histology grade are significant prognostic factors for LRC, DMF, DFS, or OS. By multivariate analysis, pathological T4 (pT4), positive node, positive surgical margin are prognostic factors for LRC. pT4, positive node and lymphatic invasion predicted for higher rate of distant metastasis. pT4, positive node, and poor differentiation tumor were prognostic factors for DFS. pT4, positive nodes, and ECE were prognostic factors for OS. These factors were used to define risk groups. We proposed PRM and ECE as major risk factors and pT4, positive nodes, close margin (≤ 5 mm, > 1 mm), tumor depth ≥ 1 cm, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, and poor differentiation as minor risk factors. By subgroups analysis, 192 patients with at least 2 minor prognostic factors and no other major risk factors, postoperative radiotherapy (RT), or CCRT yielded significantly better 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS compared to surgery only group. For

  13. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  14. Comparison of the outcome between cervical adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients with adjuvant radiotherapy following radical surgery: SGSG/TGCU Intergroup Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    SHIMADA, MUNEAKI; NISHIMURA, RYUICHIRO; NOGAWA, TAKAMITSU; HATAE, MASAYUKI; TAKEHARA, KAZUHIRO; YAMADA, HIDEKAZU; KURACHI, HIROHISA; YOKOYAMA, YOSHIHITO; SUGIYAMA, TORU; KIGAWA, JUNZO

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for adenocarcinoma (AC) is controversial, although patients with AC of the uterine cervix are treated in a similar manner to those with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant RT for patients with AC compared to those with SCC following radical hysterectomy. A total of 820 patients with stage IB-IIB cervical cancer, who underwent type III radical hysterectomy between 1997 and 2003, were retrospectively examined; the sample included 280 patients with AC and 540 with SCC. A total of 139 patients with AC and 327 with SCC underwent adjuvant treatment. The histological type did not affect the outcome for patients with stage I disease; however, stage II patients with AC exhibited a significantly worse 5-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with SCC. Patients with SCC exhibited significantly higher lymph node involvement compared to those with AC in stage IB1; however, there were no differences between stages IB2 and II. Among patients with lymph node involvement, patients with AC exhibited a significantly worse 5-year survival rate compared to those with SCC (46.4 vs. 72.3%, respectively; P=0.0005). Among patients receiving adjuvant RT, those with AC recurred more frequently compared to those with SCC, particularly in the pelvic cavity, including the vaginal stump and/or pelvis (24.6 vs. 10.5%, respectively; P= 0.0022). By contrast, the histological type did not affect the incidence of recurrence in paraaortic lymph nodes and/or distant recurrence. In conclusion, RT may not suffice as an adjuvant treatment for patients with cervical AC following radical hysterectomy. PMID:24649246

  15. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  16. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  17. Tattoo allergy in patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sewak, S; Graham, P; Nankervis, J

    1999-11-01

    Tattooing is routinely employed prior to radiotherapy treatment but allergies to tattoos are rare. New information on the incidence of tattoo allergy at St George Hospital is presented with details of two clinical cases. The literature on tattoo allergy has been unable to estimate the incidence of allergic reaction to tattoos because the total number of patients treated is unknown and not all patients were followed up. Our radiation oncology population for the first time has provided a known denominator, but wide confidence intervals prevent an accurate estimate of the incidence. Salient issues about tattoo allergy are highlighted based on a review of the published literature from 1966 to 1998. PMID:10901983

  18. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  19. Ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy: wave of the future or a fool's errand?

    PubMed

    Khan, Atif J; Dale, Roger G; Arthur, Douglas W; Haffty, Bruce G; Todor, Dorin A; Vicini, Frank A

    2012-04-15

    In accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), the most commonly used fractionation schemes include 340 or 385 centigrays delivered in a twice daily administration. A further progression of the APBI literature has been the recent interest in extremely short courses of adjuvant radiotherapy, usually delivered by intraoperative radiotherapy techniques. This newer area of single-fraction radiotherapy approaches remains highly contentious. In particular, the recently reported TARGIT trial has been the subject of both praise and scorn, and a critical examination of the trial data and the underlying hypotheses is warranted. Short-term outcomes of the related Italian ELIOT approach have also been reported. Although the assumptions of linear quadratic formalism are likely to hold true in the range of 2 to 8 grays, equating different schedules beyond this range is problematic. A major problem of current single-fraction approaches is that the treatment doses are chosen empirically, or are based on tolerability, or on the physical dose delivery characteristics of the chosen technology rather than radiobiological rationale. This review article summarizes the current data on ultrashort courses of adjuvant breast radiotherapy and highlights both the promise and the potential pitfalls of the abbreviated treatment. PMID:22009259

  20. Impact of Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Survival after Pancreatic Cancer Resection: An Appraisal of Data from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Kooby, David A.; Gillespie, Theresa W.; Liu, Yuan; Byrd-Sellers, Johnita; Landry, Jerome; Bian, John; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of adjuvant radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) remains controversial. We examined effects of adjuvant therapy on overall survival (OS) in PAC, using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Methods Patients with resected PAC from 1998 to 2002 were queried from the NCDB. Factors associated with receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy (ChemoOnly) versus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (ChemoRad) versus no adjuvant treatment (NoAdjuvant) were assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to examine effect of adjuvant therapy type on OS. Propensity scores (PS) were developed for each treatment arm and used to produce matched samples for analysis to minimize selection bias. Results From 1998 to 2002, a total of 11,526 patients underwent resection of PAC. Of these, 1,029 (8.9 %) received ChemoOnly, 5,292 (45.9 %) received ChemoRad, and 5,205 (45.2 %) received NoAdjuvant. On univariate analysis, factors associated with improved OS included: younger age, higher income, higher facility volume, lower tumor stage and grade, negative margins and nodes, and absence of adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis with matched PS, factors independently associated with improved OS included: younger age, higher income, higher facility volume, later year of diagnosis, smaller tumor size, lower tumor stage, and negative tumor margins and nodes. ChemoRad had the best OS (hazard ratio 0.70, 95 % confidence interval 0.61–0.80) in a PS matched comparison with ChemoOnly (hazard ratio 1.04, 95 % confidence interval 0.93–1.18) and NoAdjuvant (index). Conclusions Adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy is associated with improved OS after PAC resection in a large population from the NCDB. On the basis of these analyses, radiotherapy should be a part of adjuvant therapy for PAC. PMID:23771249

  1. Adjuvant Pelvic Radiotherapy vs. Sequential Chemoradiotherapy for High-Risk Stage I-II Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Hadaad, Hend Ahmed; Wahba, Hanan Ahmed; Gamal, Anas Mohamed; Dawod, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore if the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin to radiotherapy confers an advantage for overall survival (OAS), and progression free survival (PFS); to assess the incidence of relapses over standard pelvic radiotherapy; and to evaluate the related toxicity in high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma Methods Medical records were reviewed to identify high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma cases treated in the Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine department between 2002 and 2008 with adjuvant radiotherapy alone (arm I) (57 patients) or with sequential carboplatin (AUC5-6) and paclitaxel (135−175 mg/m2) with radiotherapy (arm II) (51 patients). Radiotherapy was performed through the four-field box technique at doses of 45−50 Gy (1.8 Gy/day × 5 days/week). Results The toxicity was manageable and predominantly hematologic with a grade 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 9.8% and 6% of the patients in arm I and arm II, respectively, without febrile neutropenia. All patients experienced hair loss. Chemoradiotherapy arm was associated with a lower incidence rate of relapse (9.8% vs. 22.7%). After a median follow-up period of 48 months, the 5-year OAS and PFS rates for chemoradiotherapy-treated patients were significantly more favorable than those who did not receive chemotherapy (P=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). In arm I, the OAS and PFS rates were 73.7% and 66.7% compared with those in arm II, whose rates were 90.2% and 84.3%. Conclusions Adjuvant chemoradiation with paclitaxel and carboplatin improved the survival rates and decreased the recurrence rates in patients with high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Chemotherapy was associated with an acceptable rate of toxicity. However, a prospective study with a larger number of patients is needed to define a standard adjuvant treatment for high-risk stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. PMID:23691474

  2. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  3. Primary Spinal Cord Oligodendroglioma with Postoperative Adjuvant Radiotherapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Woon Tak; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Primary spinal cord oligodendrogliomas are rare tumors comprising two percent of all spinal cord tumors. Although a treatment guideline has yet to be established, maximal surgical resection is primary in the treatment of spinal cord oligodendrogliomas. Adjuvant radiotherapy has remained controversial, and it is unclear whether chemotherapy adds any benefit. In this case report, the authors present a 24-year-old male who had a seven-year history of left leg weakness and a radiating pain in both legs. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed an intramedullary mass at the T4-T8 level. He underwent subtotal removal of the tumor and pathologic diagnosis revealed a WHO grade II oligodendroglioma. The patient was treated with radiotherapy postoperatively and followed up with MRI annually. Clinical and radiological status of the patient had been stationary for four years after the surgery. The five-year follow-up MRI showed an increase in the size and extent of the residual tumor. Despite radiological progression, considering that symptoms and the performance status of the patient had remained unchanged, further treatment has not been performed. Given the clinical outcome of this patient, close observation after subtotal removal with adjuvant radiotherapy is one of the acceptable treatment options for WHO grade II spinal cord oligodendrogliomas. PMID:26512274

  4. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yidong

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  5. Influence of site on the therapeutic ratio of adjuvant radiotherapy in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to improve the therapeutic ratio by increasing local control while minimizing morbidity. Most efforts in trying to improve this ratio have focused on the sequencing of RT and surgery, with little attention to the potential influence of the tumor site. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of tumor site on local control and complications in a group of patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity treated at a single institution with postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: Between July 1982 and December 2000, 369 adult patients with primary high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity were treated with limb-sparing surgery and postoperative RT. Patients who underwent surgery or RT outside our institution were excluded. The tumor site was the upper extremity (UE) in 103 (28%) and the lower extremity (LE) in 266 (72%). The tumor was {<=}5 cm in 98 patients (27%), and the microscopic margins were positive in 44 (12%). Of the 369 patients, 104 (28%) underwent postoperative external beam RT (EBRT), 233 (63%) postoperative brachytherapy (BRT), and 32 underwent a combination (9%); 325 (88%) received a 'conventional' radiation dose, defined as 60-70 Gy for EBRT, 45 Gy for BRT, and 45-50 Gy plus 15-20 Gy for EBRT plus BRT. Complications were assessed in terms of wound complications requiring repeat surgery, fracture, joint stiffness, edema, and Grade 3 or worse peripheral nerve damage. Results: The UE and LE groups were balanced with regard to age, depth, margin status, and type of RT (EBRT vs. BRT {+-} EBRT). However, more patients in the UE group had tumors {<=}5 cm and more received a conventional radiation dose (p = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). With a median follow-up of 50 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control, distant relapse-free survival, and overall survival for the whole population was 82% (95

  6. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  7. Axillary radiotherapy: an alternative treatment option for adjuvant axillary management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Axillary lymph node dissection is standard management of axilla in invasive breast cancer. Radiotherapy also is important in local treatment. It is controversial as to whether axillary radiotherapy can displace axillary lymph node dissection. We performed a meta-analysis comparing axillary radiotherapy with axillary dissection. No significant difference was observed for disease free survival and overall survival between the radiation group and the dissection group. There was also no significant difference in either the axillary recurrence or the local recurrence between the two groups. But the axillary relapse rate in the radiation group was higher than in the surgery group at five-year follow-up while the local recurrence rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group. A subgroup analysis showed that the difference in the axillary recurrence rate (RR = 0.20, P = 0.01) and local recurrence rate (RR = 4.7, P = 0.01) mainly appeared in the clinical node-positive subgroup. The edema rate in the surgery group was higher than in the radiation group (RR = 2.08, 95%: 1.71–2.54, P < 0.0001). We concluded that radiotherapy may be an alternative treatment option for adjuvant management of the axilla in selected sub-groups of patients. PMID:27212421

  8. The Impact of Individual In Vivo Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks on Oral Mucositis in Adjuvant Radiotherapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kuehne, Martin; Seegmueller, Katharina; Derschang, Sarah; Melchior, Patrick; Graeber, Stefan; Fricke, Andreas; Ruebe, Claudia E.; Ruebe, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of individual in vivo DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity on the incidence of severe oral mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). Patients and Methods: Thirty-one patients with resected head-and-neck cancer undergoing adjuvant RT or RCT were examined. Patients underwent RT of the primary tumor site and locoregional lymph nodes with a total dose of 60-66 Gy (single dose 2 Gy, five fractions per week). Chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. To assess DSB repair, {gamma}-H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes were quantified before and 0.5 h, 2.5 h, 5 h, and 24 h after in vivo radiation exposure (the first fraction of RT). World Health Organization scores for oral mucositis were documented weekly and correlated with DSB repair. Results: Sixteen patients received RT alone; 15 patients received RCT. In patients who developed Grade {>=} 3 mucositis (n = 18) the amount of unrepaired DSBs 24 h after radiation exposure and DSB repair half-times did not differ significantly from patients with Grade {<=}2 mucositis (n = 13). Patients with a proportion of unrepaired DSBs after 24 h higher than the mean value + one standard deviation had an increased incidence of severe oral mucositis. Conclusions: Evaluation of in vivo DSB repair by determination of {gamma}-H2AX foci loss is feasible in clinical practice and allows identification of patients with impaired DSB repair. The incidence of oral mucositis is not closely correlated with DSB repair under the evaluated conditions.

  9. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  10. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Boost with Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolamide for Glioblastoma in Good Performance Status Elderly Patients – Early Results of a Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Scott R.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Wong, Eric T.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks [Standard radiation therapy (RT)] with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS > 70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1–3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females) were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65–87 years). At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7–32 months), 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated

  11. Risk of Second Malignancies After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Large-Scale, Single-Institution Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. . E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net; Gambotti, Laetitia; De Rycke, Yann; Vilcoq, Jacques R.; Asselain, Bernard; Fourquet, Alain

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of second malignancies (SM) after radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer (BC) in a large, institutional, homogeneous cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 16,705 patients with nonmetastatic BC treated at the Institut Curie in Paris between 1981 and 1997. Adjuvant RT was given to 13,472 of these patients, and no RT was given to 3,233. The SM included all first nonBCs occurring during follow-up. Cumulative risks for each group were calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimates, censoring for contralateral cancer or death. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis of BC was 55 years for the whole population, and 53 and 60 years for patients who had and had not undergone irradiation, respectively. At the 10.5-year median follow-up, 709 patients were diagnosed with SM (113 in the non-RT and 596 in the RT group). There was a significant increase in the rate of sarcomas and lung cancers in the RT group compared with non-RT group (p 0.02). Treatment with RT was not found to increase the risk of other types of cancers such as thyroid cancer, malignant melanoma, gastrointestinal or genitourinary, and hematologic SM. Conclusions: This study suggests that adjuvant RT increased the rate of sarcomas and lung cancers, whereas it did not increase the rate of other malignancies.

  12. Adjuvant Radiotherapy Outcome of Stage I Testicular Seminoma: A Single Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hayoon; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyze treatment outcome and side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy using radiotherapy fields and doses which have evolved over the last two decades in a single institution. Materials and Methods Forty-one patients received radiotherapy after orchiectomy from 1996 to 2007. At our institution, the treatment field for stage I seminoma has changed from dog-leg (DL) field prior to 2003 to paraaortic (PA) field after 2003. Fifteen patients were treated with the classic fractionation scheme of 25.5 Gy at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Other patients had been treated with modified schedules of 25.05 Gy at 1.67 Gy per fraction (n=15) and 25.2 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction (n=11). Results With a median follow-up of 112 months, the 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 100% and 96%, respectively, and 5-year and 10-year relapse-free survival rates were both 97.1%. No in-field recurrence occurred. Contralateral seminoma occurred in one patient 5 years after treatment. No grade III-IV acute toxicity occurred. An increased rate of grade 1-2 acute hematologic toxicity was found in patients with longer overall treatment times due to 1.5 Gy per fraction. The rate of grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was significantly higher with DL field than with PA field and also higher in the 1.8-Gy group than in the 1.5-Gy and 1.67-Gy groups. Conclusion Patients with stage I seminoma were safely treated with PA-only radiotherapy with no pelvic failure. Optimal fractionation schedule needs to be explored further in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity. PMID:25510743

  13. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E. ); Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field [sup 60]Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with [sup 99m]Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Early cardiac toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer with or without concurrent trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Chang, Cai; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Feng, Yan; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of concurrent trastuzumab on the cardiotoxicity in patients receiving left-sided adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records of stage I-III left-sided breast cancer patients, including 64 receiving concurrent trastuzumab with radiotherapy and 73 receiving radiotherapy alone were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had normal LVEF after adjuvant chemotherapy. Information of doses volume to cardiac structures was collected. Cardiac events were assessed according to CTC 2.0. Results Median follow-up of LVEF and clinical assessment of cardiac function from the initiation of radiotherapy was 6.7 months (range 3–60.9) and 26 months (range 6.4–60.9), respectively. Grade 1 LVEF dysfunction occurred in 5 (7.8%) and 3 (4.1%) patients of the concurrent-trastuzumab and radiotherapy alone cohort, respectively. Trastuzumab was the only significant factor influencing absolute LVEF decrease in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis of concurrent-trastuzumab cohort, IMC radiotherapy and start trastuzumab during radiotherapy were independent risk factors. For concurrent cohort, mean heart dose, as well as D10-D30, D50-D55, V5-V20 of the heart and D30-D45, D65-D75, V6-V15 of the LV were significantly higher in patients developing LVEF dysfunction. Conclusions Concurrent trastuzumab and left-sided radiotherapy is well tolerated in terms of cardiotoxicity in patients with normal baseline cardiac function after adjuvant chemotherapy. However, increases in mean dose and low–dose volume of cardiac structures are associated with a higher risk of acute LVEF dysfunction. PMID:26460956

  15. Patterns of Care and Outcomes of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Meningiomas: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare Linked Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Burton, Eric; Skirboll, Stephen; Woo, Shiao; Boakye, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated radiotherapy (XRT) are unknown in patients with resected meningiomas. Objective: To identify patterns of care and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy for meningiomas in the Linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare data. Methods: A total of 1,964 patients older than 66 years included in the SEER-Medicare data, who were diagnosed with meningioma, and underwent craniotomy were included for analysis. Results: Patients were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy if they were older than 75 (OR 0.730, 95% CI 0.548-0.973), female sex (OR 0.731, 95% CI 0.547-0.978), or unmarried (OR 0.692, 95% CI 0.515-0.929). Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant treatment for Grade II/III tumors (OR 5.586, 95% CI 2.135-13.589), tumors over 5 cm (OR 1.850, 95% CI 1.332-2.567), or partial resection (OR 3.230, 95% CI 2.327-4.484). Yearly between 2000 and 2009, 10.65 – 19.77% of patients received adjuvant therapy. Although no survival benefit was seen with the addition of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.1236), the subgroup of patients receiving SRS had a decreased risk of death compared to those receiving surgery alone (aHR 0.544, 95% CI 0.318 – 0.929). Conclusion: Utilization of adjuvant XRT and SRS remained stable between 2000 and 2010. Male sex, young age, marriage, partial resection, Grade II/III tumors, and large tumors predicted the use of adjuvant therapy. For all patients, SRS decreased the risk of death compared to craniotomy alone.

  16. Brief chemotherapy (Stanford V) and adjuvant radiotherapy for bulky or advanced Hodgkin's disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Horning, S J; Rosenberg, S A; Hoppe, R T

    1996-01-01

    From May 1989 to August 1995, 94 previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease stage II with bulky mediastinal involvement (n = 28) or stage III or IV (n = 66) received an abbreviated chemotherapy regimen, Stanford V, +/-radiotherapy (RT). Chemotherapy was given weekly for 12 weeks followed by consolidative RT to sites of initial bulky disease. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the actuarial 6-year survival is 93% and the freedom from progression is 89%. There have been no relapses or deaths among the 28 patients with stage II bulky mediastinal disease. Eight relapses and three deaths have occurred in the group of 66 patients with stage III-IV disease. The abbreviated chemotherapy regimen, Stanford V, in combination with RT is well tolerated and highly effective therapy for bulky, limited stage and advanced stage HD. Lower cumulative exposure to alkylating agents, doxorubicin, bleomycin and limited use of radiation is expected to improved the prospects for fertility and decrease the risks for second neoplasms and late cardiopulmonary toxicity. PMID:8836420

  17. Comparison of the dosimetries of 3-dimensions Radiotherapy (3D-RT) with linear accelerator and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in children irradiated for neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensity modulated radiotherapy is an efficient radiotherapy technique to increase dose in target volumes and decrease irradiation dose in organs at risk. This last objective is mainly relevant in children. However, previous results suggested that IMRT could increase low dose, factor of risk for secondary radiation induced cancer. This study was performed to compare dose distributions with 3D-radiotherapy (3D-RT) and IMRT with tomotherapy (HT) in children with neuroblastoma. Seven children with neuroblastoma were irradiated. Treatment plans were calculated for 3D-RT, and for HT. For the volume of interest, the PTV-V95% and conformity index were calculated. Dose constraints of all the organs at risk and integral dose were compared. Results The conformity index was statistically better for HT than for 3D-RT. PTV-V95% constraint was reached in 6 cases with HT compared to 2 cases with 3D-RT. For the ipsilateral kidney of the tumor, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for 3 patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in two cases and higher in one case. The threshold was not reached for one patient with either technique, but the value was lower with HT than with 3D-RT. For the contralateral kidney of the tumors, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for all patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in 5 of 7 children, equal in one patient and higher in one patient. The organ-at-risk volumes receiving low doses were significantly lower with 3D-RT but larger for the highest doses, compared to those irradiated with HT. The integral doses were not different. Conclusions IMRT with HT allows a better conformity treatment, a more frequently acceptable PTV-V95% than 3D-RT and, concomitantly, a better shielding of the kidneys. The integral doses are comparable between both techniques but consideration of differences in dose distribution between the two techniques, for the organs at risk, has to be taken in

  18. Early Arising Sarcoma After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, Giuseppina; Marci, Valerio; Berrone, Mattia; Pentenero, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma of the head and neck (RISHN) is a rare and long-term complication of radiation therapy (RT). This report describes a case of RISHN characterized by early and insidious onset. An 80-year-old man was surgically treated for advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma of the left retromolar trigone (pT4aN0). Sixteen months after completion of adjuvant RT, an exophytic sessile lesion arose in the left border of the soft palate. Histologic assessment showed a malignant neoplasm with spindle-shaped cells and areas of bone matrix without perivascular or perineural invasion; such features in addition to immunohistochemical assessment (negative for pan-cytokeratin; positive for vimentin; negative for epithelial membrane antigen; negative for p63; Ki-67, 30%) are consistent with poorly differentiated sarcoma (cT1aN0M0). Fifteen months after a wide surgical resection, the patient was free of disease. RISHN is usually an aggressive neoplasm with insidious onset. Nevertheless, early diagnosis followed by complete surgical excision could make the prognosis comparable to that of spontaneous sarcoma. PMID:26752187

  19. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Pediatric and Young Adult Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Knapik, Jacquelyn A.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, outcomes, and complications in patients aged {<=}30 years with resectable nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma treated at the University of Florida with radiotherapy (RT) during a 34-year period. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 pediatric or young adult patients with nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft-tissue sarcoma were treated with curative intent with surgery and RT at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. The most common histologic tumor subtypes were synovial sarcoma in 22 patients, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 19, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 11 patients. The mean age at RT was 22 years (range, 6-30). Of the 95 patients, 73 had high-grade tumors; 45 had undergone preoperative RT and 50 postoperative RT. The prognostic factors for survival, local recurrence, and distant recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 0.4-30.5). The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 88%. A microscopically negative margin was associated with superior local control. Although 83% of local recurrence cases initially developed in the absence of metastases, all patients with local failure ultimately died of their disease. The actuarial estimate of 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival was 65% and 63%, respectively. Of all the deaths, 92% were disease related. An early American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, tumor <8 cm, and the absence of neurovascular invasion were associated with superior disease-free survival. The National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, Grade 3-4 treatment complication rate was 9%. No secondary malignancies were observed. Conclusion: In the present large single-institution study, we found positive margins and locally advanced features to be poor prognostic factors for both local progression and survival. The results from the present study have helped to characterize the therapeutic ratio of RT in pediatric and young

  20. Incorporating breath holding and image guidance in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The respiratory related target motion and setup error will lead to a large margin in the gastric radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric benefit and the possibility of incorporating the breath-hold (BH) technique with online image-guided radiotherapy in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy. Methods Setup errors and target motions of 22 post-operative gastric cancer patients with surgical clips were analyzed. Clips movement was recorded using the digital fluoroscopics and the probability distribution functions (pdf) of the target motions were created for both the free breathing (FB) and BH treatment. For dosimetric comparisons, two intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans, i.e. the free breathing treatment plan (IMRTFB) and the image-guided BH treatment plan (IMRTIGBH) using the same beam parameters were performed among 6 randomly selected patients. Different margins for FB and BH plans were derived. The plan dose map was convoluted with various pdfs of the setup errors and the target motions. Target coverage and dose to organs at risk were compared and the dose-escalation probability was assessed. Results The mean setup errors were 1.2 mm in the superior-inferior (SI), 0.0 mm in the left-right (LR), and 1.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions. The mean target motion for the free breathing (vs. BH) was 11.1 mm (vs. 2.2 mm), 1.9 mm (vs. 1.1 mm), and 5.5 mm (vs. 1.7 mm) in the SI, LR, and AP direction, respectively. The target coverage was comparable for all the original plans. IMRTIGBH showed lower dose to the liver compared with IMRTFB (p = 0.01) but no significant difference in the kidneys. Convolved IMRTIGBH showed better sparing in kidneys (p < 0.01) and similar in liver (p = 0.08). Conclusions Combining BH technique with online image guided IMRT can minimize the organ motion and improve the setup accuracy. The dosimetric comparison showed the dose could be

  1. Debate: adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy or not? More data is the wiser choice.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Gerald B; Hong, Angela; Gondi, Vinai; Burmeister, Bryan; Jacobsen, Kari; Lo, Serigne; Paton, Elizabeth; Shivalingam, Brindha; Thompson, John F

    2016-01-01

    Every year 170,000 patients are diagnosed with brain metastases (BMs) in the United States. Traditionally, adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (AWBRT) has been offered following local therapy with neurosurgery (NSx) and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to BMs. The aim is to increase intracranial control, thereby decreasing symptoms from intracranial progression and a neurological death. There is a rapidly evolving change in the radiation treatment of BMs happening around the world. AWBRT is now being passed over in favour of repeat scanning at regular intervals and more local therapies as more BMs appear radiologically, BMs that may never become symptomatic. This change has happened after the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in Item 5 of its "Choosing Wisely 2014" list recommended: "Don't routinely add adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy to SRS for limited brain metastases". The guidelines are supposed to be based on the highest evidence to hand at the time. This article debates that the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published prior to this recommendation consistently showed AWBRT significantly increases intracranial control, and avoids a neurological death, what it is meant to do. It also points out that, despite the enormity of the problem, only 774 patients in total had been randomised over more than three decades. These trials were heterogeneous in many respects. This data can, at best, be regarded as preliminary. In particular, there are no single histology AWBRT trials yet completed. A phase two trial investigating hippocampal avoiding AWBRT (HAWBRT) showed significantly less NCF decline compared to historical controls. We now need more randomised data to confirm the benefit of adjuvant HAWBRT. However, the ASTRO Guideline has particularly impacted accrual to trials investigating this, especially the international ANZMTG 01.07 WBRTMel trial. This is an RCT investigating AWBRT following local treatment in patients with one to three BMs

  2. [Quadrantectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy in carcinoma of the breast. Initial results of our cases].

    PubMed

    Gabriele, A M; Boidi Trotti, A; Tardy, A

    1987-06-01

    The conservative treatment of early breast cancer always requires irradiation of residual mammary tissue. The preliminary results obtained in 45 early breast cancer patients, who received quadrantectomy plus axillary dissection, followed by radiation of residual breast are reported. Radiation was performed by the two opposed field technique. In some cases the residual breast tissue was compressed using a special accessory provided with the Theratron 780. In addition to the tumor dose of 50 GY, 10 GY boots was added to the surgical scar using 7 MeV electrons. The 6 patients with positive axillary nodes received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF) after radiotherapy. All patients are currently alive and free of disease. The 64% (29 patients) were followed up for at least 5 years, and 36% (16 patients) for at least 3 years. Only 2 cases of local recurrence were encountered (4.4%). The esthetic result was satisfactory in all cases. No side effects due to treatment were noted. PMID:3602483

  3. The effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on testicular function in men undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-05-15

    Testicular function was studied in 26 men with sarcoma who received adjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate (with or without radiotherapy). Testicular size, sperm output, and serum FSH, LH and testosterone levels were assessed after treatment. Five of 17 men who received chemotherapy or chemotherapy with radiotherapy to the neck, arm, chest, or leg, had normal testicular function. Eight of the remaining 12 men who provided ejaculates were oligospermic or azoospermic and serum FSH was increased threefold and LH twofold; testosterone levels were normal. In the five men with normal testicular function, FSH was increased fourfold during therapy but returned to normal six to 21 months after treatment. In men less than 40 years old, the mean FSH was less than that of men over 40 years of age (P . to 0.05), suggesting that recovery from the injury was age-related. By contrast, all nine men who received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to the abdomen or thigh had decreased testicular size, azoospermia, fourfold increase in FSH, and twofold increase in LH levels; but testosterone concentration was normal. These data increase in FSH, and reversible testicular injury occurs after treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate; recovery is age-related. However, these agents in combination with use of adjuvant radiotherapy to the thigh or abdomen may produce permanent testicular injury even in young patients.

  4. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on testicular function in men undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-05-15

    Testicular function was studied in 26 men with sarcoma who received adjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate (with or without radiotherapy). Testicular size, sperm output, and serum FSH, LH and testosterone levels were assessed after treatment. Five of 17 men who received chemotherapy or chemotherapy with radiotherapy to the neck, arm, chest or leg, had normal testicular function. Eight of the remaining 12 men who provided ejaculates were oligospermic or azoospermic and serum FSH was increased threefold and LH twofold; testosterone levels were normal. In men less than 40 years old, the mean FSH level was less than that of men over 40 years of age (P = 0.05), suggesting that recovery from the injury was age-related. By contrast, all nine men who received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy to the abdomen or thigh had decreased testicular size, azoospermia, fourfold increase in FSH, and twofold increase in LH levels; but testosterone concentration was normal. These data indicate that reversible testicular injury occurs after treatment with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate; recovery is age-related. However, these agents in combination with use of adjuvant radiotherapy to the thigh or abdomen may produce permanent testicular injury even in young patients.

  5. Diffuse Osteoradionecrosis of Temporal Bone as a Late Complication of Adjuvant Radiotherapy to Parotid Bed: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sisha Liz; Iype, Elizabeth Mathew; Jagan, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Localized osteoradionecrosis of bony external auditory canal has been described as a late complication of external beam radiotherapy which is delivered to parotid bed after surgical resection of parotid malignancies. Diffuse osteoradionecrosis of temporal bone is rarely seen in such a setting and it is usually caused by resection of part of the bone for surgical clearance, followed by post-operative radiotherapy.This condition warrants aggressive treatment, in order to avoid potentially life threatening intracranial complications. In this report, we are presenting an uncommon case of extensive osteoradionecrosis which involved the entire temporal bone, in a patient who was treated for mucoepidermoid carcinoma of parotid twelve years ago, with total conservative parotidectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:24995229

  6. Gliadel wafer implantation combined with standard radiotherapy and concurrent followed by adjuvant temozolomide for treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Lynn S; Smith, Kris A; Stea, Baldassarre

    2016-01-01

    Since 2003, only two chemotherapeutic agents, evaluated in phase III trials, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade glioma (HGG): Gliadel wafers (intracranially implanted local chemotherapy) and temozolomide (TMZ) (systemic chemotherapy). Neither agent is curative, but each has been shown to improve median overall survival (OS) compared to radiotherapy (RT) alone. To date, no phase III trial has tested these agents when used in sequential combination; however, a number of smaller trials have reported favorable results. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the combination of Gliadel wafers with standard RT (60 Gy) plus concurrent and adjuvant TMZ (RT/TMZ) for newly diagnosed HGG. A literature search was conducted for the period of January 1995 to September 2015. Data were extracted and categorized, and means and ranges were determined. A total of 11 publications met criteria, three prospective trials and eight retrospective studies, representing 411 patients who received Gliadel plus standard RT/TMZ. Patients were similar in age, gender, and performance status. The weighted mean of median OS was 18.2 months (ten trials, n = 379, range 12.7 to 21.3 months), and the weighted mean of median progression-free survival was 9.7 months (seven trials, n = 287, range 7 to 12.9 months). The most commonly reported grade 3 and 4 adverse events were myelosuppression (10.22 %), neurologic deficit (7.8 %), and healing abnormalities (4.3 %). Adverse events reflected the distinct independent safety profiles of Gliadel wafers and RT/TMZ, with little evidence of enhanced toxicity from their use in sequential combination. In the 11 identified trials, an increased benefit from sequentially combining Gliadel wafers with RT/TMZ was strongly suggested. Median OS tended to be improved by 3 to 4 months beyond that observed for Gliadel wafers or TMZ when used alone in the respective phase III

  7. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  8. Stress Response Leading to Resistance in Glioblastoma—The Need for Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT) Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Vaupel, Peter; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. In spite of multimodal therapy concepts, consisting of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival, merely 15–18 months, is still poor. Mechanisms for resistance of GBM to radio(chemo)therapy are not fully understood yet and due to the genetic heterogeneity within the tumor including radiation-resistant tumor stem cells, there are several factors leading to therapy failure. Recent research revealed that, hypoxia during radiation and miRNAs may adversely affect the therapeutic response to radiotherapy. Further molecular alterations and prognostic markers like the DNA-repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), anti-apoptotic molecular chaperones, and/or the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) have also been identified to play a role in the sensitivity to cytostatic agents. Latest approaches in the field of radiotherapy to use particle irradiation or dose escalation strategies including modern molecular imaging, however, need further evaluation with regard to long-term outcome. In this review we focus on current information about the mechanisms and markers that mediate resistance to radio(chemo)therapy, and discuss the opportunities of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT) concepts to improve treatment options for GBM patients. PMID:26771644

  9. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  10. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  11. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Hirokawa, Naoki; Shibuya, Keiko; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  12. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  13. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valerie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  14. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Hans . E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de; Hermann, Robert Michael; Martin, Alexios; Florez, Rodrigo; Kahler, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Hille, Andrea; Steiner, Wolfgang; Hess, Clemens F.; Pradier, Olivier

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

  15. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. Methods One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Results Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. Conclusions For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations. PMID:23497574

  16. Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Gastric Cancer-Rapid, Yet Incomplete Adoption Following Results of Intergroup 0116 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, Natalie G. Guller, Ulrich; Baxter, Nancy N.; Kiss, Alex; Ringash, Jolie; Swallow, Carol J.; Law, Calvin H.L.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The Southwest Oncology Group/Intergroup 0116 (INT-0116) trial showed that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves survival in high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma patients. This study examined the adoption of adjuvant treatment following the trial results and the factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, patients aged 18-85 years with resected gastric adenocarcinoma were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and classified as diagnosed before (January 1996 to April 2000) or after (May 2000 to December 2003) presentation of the INT-0116 trial findings. Univariate and multivariable models were used to determine the factors associated with use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Results: Of 10,230 patients studied, 14.6% were given adjuvant RT before the INT-0116 trial, increasing to 30.4% afterward (p < 0.001). Significant increases in adjuvant RT from before to after INT-0116 were seen in all demographic categories. Younger patients were significantly more likely to receive adjuvant RT (44.5%, 18-59 years; 31.0%, 60-74 years; and 12.6%, 75-85 years, p < 0.0001). Married patients were significantly more likely to receive adjuvant RT (30.9%) than were unmarried patients (23.6%, p < 0.001). A greater depth of tumor invasion, worse nodal status, and more lymph nodes assessed were associated with adjuvant RT (p < 0.0001). The rate of adjuvant RT varied from 22.9-44.2% across SEER regions. On multiple logistic regression analysis, age, SEER region, marital status, assessed lymph nodes, tumor depth, and nodal status were all significant independent predictors of the use of adjuvant RT. Conclusion: Use of adjuvant RT doubled after the INT-0116 trial results became public; however, the fraction of patients receiving adjuvant RT is still low. Additional examination of the statistically significant and clinically relevant variability between different SEER regions, tumor characteristics, and patient

  17. Five-Year Results From a Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study (SSG XIII) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Combined With Accelerated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremities and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Engellau, Jacob; Turesson, Ingela; Folin, Annika; Trovik, Clement S.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate adjuvant chemotherapy and interpolated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) for adult patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma in the extremities or trunk wall. Methods and Materials: High-risk soft tissue sarcoma was defined as high-grade malignancy and at least two of the following criteria: size {>=}8 cm, vascular invasion, or necrosis. Six cycles of doxorubicin and ifosfamide were prescribed for all patients. RT to a total dose of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy twice daily) was inserted between two chemotherapy cycles after marginal margin resection regardless of tumor depth or after wide-margin resection for deep-seated tumors. RT was boosted to 45 Gy in a split-course design in the case of intralesional margin resection. Results: A total of 119 patients were eligible, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate of the local recurrence, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 12%, 59%, and 68%, respectively. The group receiving RT to 36 Gy had a local recurrence rate of 10%. In contrast, the local recurrence rate was 29% in the group treated with RT to 45 Gy. The presence of vascular invasion and low chemotherapy dose intensity had a negative effect on metastasis-free and overall survival. Toxicity was moderate after both the chemotherapy and the RT. Conclusions: Accelerated RT interposed between chemotherapy cycles in a selected population of patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcoma resulted in good local and distant disease control, with acceptable treatment-related morbidity. The greater radiation dose administered after intralesional surgery was not sufficient to compensate for the poorer surgical margin. Vascular invasion was the most important prognostic factor for metastasis-free and overall survival.

  18. A Matched Control Analysis of Adjuvant and Salvage High-Dose Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; De Troyer, Bart; Fonteyne, Valerie; Oosterlinck, Willem; De Meerleer, Gert

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: It is unclear whether immediate adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk disease at prostatectomy (capsule perforation, seminal vesicle invasion, and/or positive surgical margins) is equivalent to delayed salvage radiotherapy at biochemical recurrence. We performed a matched case analysis comparing high-dose adjuvant intensity modulated radiotherapy (A-IMRT) with salvage IMRT (S-IMRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-four patients with high-risk disease at prostatectomy were referred for A-IMRT, and 134 patients with high-risk disease were referred at biochemical recurrence (rising prostate-specific antigen [PSA], following prostatectomy, above 0.2 ng/ml) for S-IMRT. Patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to preoperative PSA level, Gleason score, and pT stage. Median doses of 74 Gy and 76 Gy were prescribed for A-IMRT and S-IMRT, respectively. We report biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) rates using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine tumour- and treatment-related factors. Results: A total of 178 patients were matched (89:89). From the end of radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 36 months for both groups. The 3-year bRFS rate for the A-IMRT group was 90% compared to 65% for the S-IMRT group (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, S-IMRT, Gleason grades of {>=}4+3, perineural invasion, preoperative PSA level of {>=}10 ng/ml, and omission of androgen deprivation (AD) were independent predictors for a reduced bRFS (p < 0.05). From the date of surgery, the median follow-up was 43 and 60 months for A-IMRT and S-IMRT, respectively. The 3-year bRFS rate for A-IMRT was 91% compared to 79% for S-IMRT (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, Gleason grades of {>=}4+3, perineural invasion, and omission of AD were independent predictors for a reduced bRFS (p < 0.05). S-IMRT was no longer an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.08). Conclusions: High-dose A-IMRT significantly improves 3-year bRFS compared to

  19. Commissioning of a novel microCT/RT system for small animal conformal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul; Graves, Edward

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to commission a 120 kVp photon beam produced by a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner for use in irradiating mice to therapeutic doses. A variable-aperture collimator has been integrated with a microCT scanner to allow the delivery of beams with pseudocircular profiles of arbitrary width between 0.1 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate at the isocenter of the system was measured using ion chamber and gafchromic EBT film as 1.56-2.13 Gy min-1 at the water surface for field diameters between 0.2 and 6.0 cm. The dose rate decreases approximately 10% per every 5 mm depth in water for field diameters between 0.5 and 1.0 cm. The flatness, symmetry and penumbra of the beam are 3.6%, 1.0% and 0.5 mm, respectively. These parameters are sufficient to accurately conform the radiation dose delivered to target organs on mice. The irradiated field size is affected principally by the divergence of the beam. In general, the beam has appropriate dosimetric characteristics to accurately deliver the dose to organs inside the mice's bodies. Using multiple beams delivered from a variety of angular directions, targets as small as 2 mm may be irradiated while sparing surrounding tissue. This microCT/RT system is a feasible tool to irradiate mice using treatment planning and delivery methods analogous to those applied to humans.

  20. Porocarcinoma scalp with high risk features treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Melgandi, Wineeta; Benson, Rony; Hakin, Abdul; Bhasker, Suman

    2016-09-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare malignant sweat gland tumor arising from the intra dermal part of the gland and accounts for only 0.005% of all epithelial cutaneous tumors. Commonly involved site includes extremities and face. Scalp is a rare site for porocarcinoma with less than 20 reported cases so far. Wide local excision with clear margins remains the treatment of choice. Review of literature revealed a local recurrence rate of 37.5% and a nodal involvement risk of 20%. Porocarcinoma of the scalp is peculiar in that the primary tumor may be large at presentation, making surgery with adequate margins difficult. Adjuvant radiotherapy must be considered in a case to case basis due to the high local recurrence rates compared to other sites of porocarcinoma and should be given to all patients with close margins and extra capsular extension. PMID:27302529

  1. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  2. A retrospective study of the safety of BCNU wafers with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Edward; Mitchell, Susan B; Tsai, Jerry S

    2008-07-01

    Despite aggressive therapy, most patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) die within 2 years of diagnosis. The efficacy and safety of carmustine (BCNU) wafers followed by radiotherapy have been demonstrated in patients with malignant glioma. However, there is a reluctance to recommend them for newly diagnosed GBM patients due to the potential toxicity of BCNU wafers combined with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of BCNU wafers implanted at initial surgery, followed by concurrent TMZ and radiotherapy, and then adjuvant TMZ for the treatment of newly diagnosed GBM. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinic and hospital records of 21 newly diagnosed GBM patients who received multimodal therapy at Florida Hospital Cancer Institute from January 2003 to December 2005. Three of 21 patients had grade 3 toxicities (two with cerebritis, one with psychosis). Grade 4 toxicities were not observed. Median overall survival was 17 months, median progression-free survival was 8.5 months, and 2-year survival was 39%. Multimodal treatment with surgery, BCNU wafers, radiotherapy, and TMZ did not result in a notable increase in significant toxicities. Survival outcomes were comparable to those in other studies in which patients were treated with concurrent TMZ and radiotherapy followed by adjuvant TMZ. Thus, the implantation of BCNU wafers prior to TMZ and radiotherapy appears safe in newly diagnosed GBM patients. PMID:18389176

  3. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 5 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developed persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 108 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E2 (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7,000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80 mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E2, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  4. Lack of Adjuvant Radiotherapy May Increase Risk of Retropharyngeal Node Recurrence in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck after Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blakaj, Dukagjin M.; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Glanzman, Jonathan; Patel, Shyamal; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has increased in popularity in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. However, TORS does not address the neck or retropharyngeal nodes (RPN). In the current report, we highlight the impact of the lack of adjuvant radiotherapy on RPN recurrence after TORS. Materials and Methods. A 58-year-old Caucasian male presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck of unknown primary. He was offered radiotherapy as a definitive management for clinical stage T0N2aM0, stage IVA, but he opted to left neck dissection. Follow-up PET-CT scan revealed recurrence in the left base of tongue and right level II lymph node. He was offered radiotherapy which he declined and opted to TORS and right neck dissection. Follow-up PET-CT scan showed recurrence in left RPN for which he underwent salvage concurrent chemoradiotherapy to 70 Gy. Results. After a followup of 9 months from the date of salvage chemoradiotherapy completion, the patient is with no evidence of disease. Conclusions. TORS followed by adjuvant radiotherapy seems reasonable in the context of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck due to the odds of RPN involvement. Further reports are warranted to optimize post-TORS adjuvant treatment. PMID:23840995

  5. Stage II Adenocarcinoma of the Endometrium: Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Recurrence Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cozad, Scott C.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Review patterns of recurrence for Stage II endometrial cancer in a community practice. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with endometrial cancer diagnosed between 1985-2002. Patients were excluded for Stages I, III, or IV or treatment with preoperative pelvic radiation (external beam radiation therapy [EBRT]). Results: Eighty-six patients with a mean follow-up of 70 months are reported. Higher risk patients were selected for adjuvant radiation with no apparent differences for those receiving only EBRT compared with EBRT with brachytherapy. Five-year actuarial vaginal, pelvic sidewall/nodal, and metastatic control rates were 100% and 100%, 96.9% and 100%, and 79% and 84.2% for patients receiving EBRT or EBRT with brachytherapy. Overall survival rates were 70.5% and 75.8%, and cause-specific survival rates were 78.8% and 82.9% for those receiving EBRT or EBRT with brachytherapy. A select group was observed and experienced one vaginal recurrence with overall and cause-specific survival rates of 100%. Conclusion: In higher risk patients with Stage II, adjuvant EBRT achieves excellent vaginal and pelvic sidewall/nodal control without apparent benefit from additional brachytherapy. Select patients may not require adjuvant treatment.

  6. Glucose metabolic rate monitored with PET 18-F-FDG for tumor response to radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RT+CT) in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, N.C.; Hamberg, L.M.; Hunter, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Changes in tumor glucose utilization as a result of RT or RT+CT may have prognostic implication. Therefore, the goals of this study were (1) to determine the correlation between tumor control probability (TCP) and the gradient of residual glucose metabolic rate (MRGlc) in response to RT or RT+CT and (2) to define the level of residual MRGlc that corresponds with 80% of TCP (FDG-TCP>80). Quantitative and dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analog, 2-(18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was performed before treatment in 28 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer, and this was repeated 2-3 weeks after full dose RT or RT+CT in 22 patients. Thirteen patients who had adequate follow up for the status of local tumor are the subject of this report. Fifteen, 6 mm, axial slices were acquired over a region that included the tumor. Scanning was performed continuously for two hours. From these data, decay corrected tumor and blood pool time-activity curves were obtained. The glucose metabolic rate was calculated for tissue using the Sokoloff model. The baseline value (mean) of tumor MRGlc was 0.4414 {plus_minus}0.896 {mu}mol/min/gm, and it was reduced to 0.0671 {plus_minus}0.034 {mu}mol/min/gm with treatment, p+0.011. Local tumor control was obtained in 5/5 with residual MRGlc of < 0.0412 {mu}mol/min/gm, 1/2 with MRGlc 0.0532 - 0.0542, 1/4 with 0.0763-0.0888 and 0/2 with 0.160.

  7. Individual Positioning: A Comparative Study of Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy in the Prone Versus Supine Position

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Hideghety, Katalin; Mezo, Tamas; Nikolenyi, Aliz; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Methods and Materials: Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. Results: The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% {+-} 4.2% vs. 89.2 {+-} 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V{sub 20Gy}, was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  8. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  9. Effects of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy on ovarian function in women undergoing treatment for soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamberger, R.C.; Sherins, R.J.; Ziegler, J.L.; Glatstein, E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ovarian function was evaluated in 11 women 16 to 43 years of age at treatment who received doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate with or without radiotherapy in adjuvant therapy of soft tissue sarcoma. Five women (16-33 yr old) who received chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy only at sites distant from the ovaries (chest wall, thigh, and leg) had minimal menstrual irregularities or temporary cessation of menses during therapy; cyclic menses returned promptly after therapy. Gonadotropin levels (expressed as means +/- SD) (follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 10 +/- 15 mlU/ml; luteinizing hormone (LH), 10 +/- 4 mlU/ml) and 17 ..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) levels (means +/- SD, 208 +/- 147 pg/ml) were normal. By contrast, 4 older women (ages 36-43 yr) who received similar treatment developd persistent amenorrhea with postmenopausal levels of gonadotropin (FSH, 109 +/- 29 mlU/ml; LH, 72 +/- 19 mlU/ml) and E/sub 2/ (19 +/- 8 pg/ml). Two additional women (ages 21 and 39 yr) who received radiation (7000 rad) to the pelvis plus chemotherapy developed prompt cessation of menses and became functional castrates (FSH, 77 and 80mlU/ml; LH, 40 and 58 mlU/ml; E/sub 2/, 10 and 19 pg/ml). However, this result would be expected from the radiation dose alone. The data demonstrated that ovarian dysfunction may follow the use of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and high doses of methotrexate and that the injury is age related.

  10. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy and acute toxicity in hypofractionated radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kouloulias, Vassilis; Zygogianni, Anna; Kypraiou, Efrosini; Georgakopoulos, John; Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Beli, Ivelina; Mosa, Eftychia; Psyrri, Amanta; Antypas, Christos; Armbilia, Christina; Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Gennatas, Costas; Zografos, George; Kyrgias, George; Dilvoi, Maria; Patatoucas, George; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouvaris, John

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chemotherapy to the acute toxicity of a hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) schedule for breast cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 116 breast cancer patients with T1, 2N0Mx. The patients received 3-D conformal radiotherapy with a total physical dose of 50.54 Gy or 53.2 Gy in 19 or 20 fractions according to stage, over 23-24 d. The last three to four fractions were delivered as a sequential tumor boost. All patients were monitored for acute skin toxicity according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The maximum monitored value was taken as the final grading score. Multivariate analysis was performed for the contribution of age, chemotherapy and 19 vs 20 fractions to the radiation acute skin toxicity. RESULTS: The acute radiation induced skin toxicity was as following: grade I 27.6%, grade II 7.8% and grade III 2.6%. No significant correlation was noted between toxicity grading and chemotherapy (P = 0.154, χ2 test). The mean values of acute toxicity score in terms of chemotherapy or not, were 0.64 and 0.46 respectively (P = 0.109, Mann Whitney test). No significant correlation was also noted between acute skin toxicity and radiotherapy fractions (P = 0.47, χ2 test). According to univariate analysis, only chemotherapy contributed significantly to the development of acute skin toxicity but with a critical value of P = 0.05. However, in multivariate analysis, chemotherapy lost its statistical significance. None of the patients during the 2-years of follow-up presented any locoregional relapse. CONCLUSION: There is no clear evidence that chemotherapy has an impact to acute skin toxicity after an HFRT schedule. A randomized trial is needed for definite conclusions. PMID:25405195

  12. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Fazekas, J.T.; Sommer, C.; Kramer, S.

    1980-05-01

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage.

  13. Cognition and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT for Pure and Mixed Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 9402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Meihua; Cairncross, Gregory; Shaw, Edward

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9402 compared procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy (PCV + RT) vs. RT alone for anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Here we report longitudinal changes in cognition and quality of life, effects of patient factors and treatments on cognition, quality of life and survival, and prognostic implications of cognition and quality of life. Methods and Materials: Cognition was assessed by Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and quality of life by Brain-Quality of Life (B-QOL). Scores were analyzed for survivors and within 5 years of death. Shared parameter models evaluated MMSE/B-QOL with survival. Results: For survivors, MMSE and B-QOL scores were similar longitudinally and between treatments. For those who died, MMSE scores remained stable initially, whereas B-QOL slowly declined; both declined rapidly in the last year of life and similarly between arms. In the aggregate, scores decreased over time (p = 0.0413 for MMSE; p = 0.0016 for B-QOL) and were superior with age <50 years (p < 0.001 for MMSE; p = 0.0554 for B-QOL) and Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) 80-100 (p < 0.001). Younger age and higher KPS were associated with longer survival. After adjusting for patient factors and drop-out, survival was longer after PCV + RT (HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.9, p = 0.0084; HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.01, p = 0.0592) in models with MMSE and B-QOL. In addition, there were no differences in MMSE and B-QOL scores between arms (p = 0.4752 and p = 0.2767, respectively); higher scores predicted longer survival. Conclusion: MMSE and B-QOL scores held steady in the upper range in both arms for survivors. Younger, fitter patients had better MMSE and B-QOL and longer survival.

  14. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ung, Yee C.

    2010-07-01

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  15. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.

  16. Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Safety and Efficacy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Souhami, Luis; Roberge, David; Kavan, Petr; Shakibnia, Lily; Muanza, Thierry; Lambert, Christine; Leblanc, Richard; Del Maestro, Rolando; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Shenouda, George

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Despite multimodality treatments, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma multiforme remains poor. In an attempt to improve results, we have begun a program of accelerated hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and June 2006, 35 unselected patients with glioblastoma multiforme were treated with hypo-IMRT. During a 4-week period, using a concomitant boost technique, a dose of 60 Gy and 40 Gy were delivered in 20 fractions prescribed to the periphery of the gross tumor volume and planning target volume, respectively. TMZ was administered according to the regimen of Stupp et al. Results: The median follow-up was 12.6 months. Of the 35 patients, 29 (82.8%) completed the combined modality treatment, and 25 (71.4%) received a median of four cycles of adjuvant TMZ. The median overall survival was 14.4 months, and the median disease-free survival was 7.7 months. The median survival time differed significantly between patients who underwent biopsy and those who underwent partial or total resection (7.1 vs. 16.1 months, p = 0.035). The median survival was also significantly different between patients with methylated vs. unmethylated 0-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoters (14.4 vs. 8.7 months, p = 0.049). The pattern of failure was predominantly central, within 2 cm of the initial gross tumor volume. Grade 3-4 toxicity was limited to 1 patient with nausea and emesis during adjuvant TMZ administration. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypo-IMRT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated with a useful 2-week shortening of radiotherapy. Despite a high number of patients with poor prognostic features (74.3% recursive partitioning analysis class V or VI), the median survival was comparable to that after standard radiotherapy fractionation schedules plus TMZ.

  17. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and

  18. Phase III Multi-Institutional Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy With Paclitaxel, Estramustine, and Oral Etoposide Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression Therapy and Radiotherapy Versus Long-Term Androgen Suppression Plus Radiotherapy Alone for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of RTOG 99-02

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Sobczak, Mark L.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Long-term androgen suppression plus radiotherapy (AS+RT) is standard treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 9902, was undertaken to determine whether adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, estramustine, and etoposide (TEE) plus AS+RT would improve disease outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Methods and Materials: High-risk (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score {>=}7; or Stage T2 or greater, Gleason score 8, prostate-specific antigen level <100 ng/mL) nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients were randomized to AS+RT (Arm 1) vs. AS+RT plus four cycles of TEE (Arm 2). TEE was delivered 4 weeks after RT. AS continued for 2 years for both treatment arms. RT began after 8 weeks of AS began. Results: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 trial opened January 11, 2000. Excess thromboembolic toxicity was noted, leading to study closure October 4, 2004. A total of 397 patients were accrued, and the data for 381 were analyzable. An acute and long-term toxicity analysis was performed. The worst overall toxicities during treatment were increased for Arm 2. Of the 192 patients, 136 (71%) on Arm 2 had RTOG Grade 3 or greater toxicity compared with 70 (37%) of 189 patients on Arm 1. Statistically significant increases in hematologic toxicity (p < 0.0001) and gastrointestinal toxicity (p = 0.017) but not genitourinary toxicity (p = 0.07) were noted during treatment. Two Grade 5 complications related to neutropenic infection occurred in Arm 2. Three cases of myelodysplasia/acute myelogenous leukemia were noted in Arm 2. At 2 and 3 years after therapy completion, excess long-term toxicity was not observed in Arm 2. Conclusion: TEE was associated with significantly increased toxicity during treatment. The toxicity profiles did not differ at 2 and 3 years after therapy. Toxicity is an important consideration in the design of trials using adjuvant chemotherapy for prostate cancer.

  19. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  20. NK-cell and T-cell functions in patients with breast cancer: effects of surgery and adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, F; Lindemalm, C; Choudhury, A; Granstam-Björneklett, H; Helander, I; Lekander, M; Mikaelsson, E; Nilsson, B; Ojutkangas, M-L; Osterborg, A; Bergkvist, L; Mellstedt, H

    2007-07-01

    Breast cancer is globally the most common malignancy in women. Her2-targeted monoclonal antibodies are established treatment modalities, and vaccines are in late-stage clinical testing in patients with breast cancer and known to promote tumour-killing through mechanisms like antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. It is therefore increasingly important to study immunological consequences of conventional treatment strategies. In this study, functional tests and four-colour flow cytometry were used to detect natural killer (NK)-cell functions and receptors as well as T-cell signal transduction molecules and intracellular cytokines in preoperative breast cancer patients, and patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy or adjuvant combined chemo-radiotherapy as well as in age-matched healthy controls. The absolute number of NK cells, the density of NK receptors as well as in vitro quantitation of functional NK cytotoxicity were significantly higher in preoperative patients than the post-treatments group and controls. A similar pattern was seen with regard to T-cell signalling molecules, and preoperative patients produced significantly higher amounts of cytokines in NK and T cells compared to other groups. The results indicate that functions of NK and T cells are well preserved before surgery but decrease following adjuvant therapy, which may speak in favour of early rather than late use of immunotherapeutic agents such as trastuzumab that may depend on intact immune effector functions. PMID:17551492

  1. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  2. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Palpable Melanoma Metastases to the Groin: When to Irradiate?

    SciTech Connect

    Gojkovic-Horvat, Andreja; Jancar, Boris; Blas, Mateja; Zumer, Barbara; Karner, Katarina; Hocevar, Marko; Strojan, Primoz

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of and criteria for postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with palpable melanoma metastases to the groin. Methods and Materials: Patients with palpable metastases to the groin who were treated with therapeutic nodal dissection during 2000 to 2006 were identified in a prospective institutional database. Results: In 101 patients, 103 therapeutic nodal dissections were performed; 37 of these were treated with PORT to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}) of 50.6 Gy (range, 50-72 Gy). In the surgery-only and PORT groups, 2-year regional control rates were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 76-95%) and 91% (95% CI, 81-100%), respectively (p = 0.395). Of five recurrences in radiation-treated patients, four were of dermal type, and in three of these cases, no bolus over the operative scar was used. PORT improved 2-year regional control (46% [95% CI, 11-82%] vs. 82% [95% CI, 63-100%], p = 0.022) among patients in which the sum of risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score) was {>=}2. In multivariate analysis, risk-factor score (<2 vs. {>=}2: HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.00-8.56; p < 0.0001) and PORT (yes vs. no: HR, 7.81; 95% CI, 2.83-21.74; p = 0.050) was predictive for regional control and on logistic-regression testing, number of involved lymph nodes was predictive for systemic dissemination (p = 0.011). Conclusions: PORT should follow therapeutic nodal dissection in cases with two or more adverse factors. More conventional fractionation ({<=}2.5 Gy), cumulative eqTD{sub 2} <60 Gy and use of bolus over the operative scar are recommended.

  3. CAPRA-S predicts outcome for adjuvant and salvage external beam radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michel; Delouya, Guila; Alenizi, Abdullah M.; Rajih, Emad; Zorn, Kevin C.; Taussky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to evaluate the predictive value of the Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Postsurgical Score (CAPRA-S) for patients treated with radical prostatectomy followed by subsequent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods: A total of 373 patients treated with EBRT between January 2000 and June 2015 were identified in the institutional database. Followup and complete CAPRA-S score were available for 334 (89.5%) patients. CAPRA-S scores were sorted into previously defined categories of low- (score 0–2), intermediate- (3–5), and high-risk (6–12). Time to biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.20 ng/mL after EBRT. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and comparisons were made using the log-rank test. Results: Overall median time from surgery to EBRT was 18 months (interquartile range [IQR] 8–36) and median followup since EBRT was 48 months (IQR 28–78). CAPRA-S predicted time to BCR (<0.001), time to palliative androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) (p=0.017), and a trend for significantly predicting overall survival (OS, p=0.058). On multivariate analysis, the CAPRA-S was predictive of time to BCR only (low-risk vs. intermediate-risk; hazard ratio [HR] 0.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.043–0.48, p=0.001). The last PSA measurement before EBRT as a continuous and grouped variable proved highly significant in predicting all outcomes tested, including OS (p≤0.002). Conclusions: CAPRA-S predicts time to BCR and freedom from palliative ADT, and is borderline significant for OS. Together with the PSA before EBRT, CAPRA-S is a useful, predictive tool. The main limitation of this study is its retrospective design. PMID:27217861

  4. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  5. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  6. Impact of External Beam Adjuvant Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Long-Term Survivors of Endometrial Adenocarcinoma: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Vingerhoets, Ad J.J.M.; Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 5-10-year survivors of Stage I-II endometrial (adeno-)carcinoma (EC) treated with surgery alone or surgery with external beam adjuvant radiotherapy (EBRT) and an age-matched norm population. Methods and Materials: A population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted by the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. All patients were included who had been diagnosed with EC between 1994 and 1998 (n = 462). Information from the questionnaires returned was linked to data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry on patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Results: Responses were received from 75% of the patients. The analyses were restricted to women with Stage I-II disease at diagnosis, treated with either surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant EBRT, and without recurrent disease or new primary malignancies (n = 264). The patients who had received adjuvant EBRT (n = 80) had had a significantly higher tumor stage and grade at diagnosis (p < 0.0001) and a longer mean time since diagnosis (p = 0.04). Age, number of comorbid diseases, current marital status, nulliparity, education, and occupation were similar for both treatment groups. On multivariate analyses, adjuvant EBRT was independently and negatively associated with the vitality and physical and social well-being scale scores. The HRQOL scores of both treatment groups, however, were similar to those of an age-matched norm population. Conclusion: In general, the HRQOL of EC survivors is good. EC survivors treated with surgery alone had a better HRQOL than women treated with surgery and adjuvant EBRT, although for both groups, the HRQOL was in the range of the norm population.

  7. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (<1/cm2) limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%). Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer

  8. Topical Hyaluronic acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis after Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation (RT) compared with best supportive care. Materials and Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast RT to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel, on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast, and the control gel to the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥grade 2 dermatitis. Results The study closed early based on a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed significantly higher rate of ≥grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel (61.5% [40/65] vs. 47.7% [31/65], P = 0.027). Only one patient developed grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than petrolatum gel at the end of RT (42% vs. 14%, P = 0.003). Conclusion We found no benefit from use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of grade ≥2 dermatitis after adjuvant RT for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. PMID:22172912

  9. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V{sub 20/30}, and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V{sub 20/30} of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V{sub 20} of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future.

  10. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Pathologic N2 Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Review of the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cliff G.; Patel, Aalok P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; DeWees, Todd; Waqar, Saiama N.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Baggstrom, Maria Q.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Colditz, Graham A.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of modern postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on overall survival (OS) for patients with N2 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated nationally with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pathologic N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from 2006 to 2010 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base and stratified by use of PORT (≥ 45 Gy). A total of 4,483 patients were identified (PORT, n = 1,850; no PORT, n = 2,633). The impact of patient and treatment variables on OS was explored using Cox regression. Results Median follow-up time was 22 months. On univariable analysis, improved OS correlated with younger age, treatment at an academic facility, female sex, urban population, higher income, lower Charlson comorbidity score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT. On multivariable analysis, improved OS remained independently predicted by younger age, female sex, urban population, lower Charlson score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT (hazard ratio, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.798 to 0.988). Use of PORT was associated with an increase in median and 5-year OS compared with no PORT (median OS, 45.2 v 40.7 months, respectively; 5-year OS, 39.3% [95% CI, 35.4% to 43.5%] v 34.8% [95% CI, 31.6% to 38.3%], respectively; P = .014). Conclusion For patients with N2 NSCLC after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, modern PORT seems to confer an additional OS advantage beyond that achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25667283

  11. Adjuvant Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Versus Observation After Radiosurgery or Surgical Resection of One to Three Cerebral Metastases: Results of the EORTC 22952-26001 Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Villà, Salvador; Fauchon, Francois; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Fariselli, Laura; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Carrie, Christian; Hassel, Mohamed Ben; Kouri, Mauri; Valeinis, Egils; van den Berge, Dirk; Collette, Sandra; Collette, Laurence; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial assesses whether adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) increases the duration of functional independence after surgery or radiosurgery of brain metastases. Patients and Methods Patients with one to three brain metastases of solid tumors (small-cell lung cancer excluded) with stable systemic disease or asymptomatic primary tumors and WHO performance status (PS) of 0 to 2 were treated with complete surgery or radiosurgery and randomly assigned to adjuvant WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) or observation (OBS). The primary end point was time to WHO PS deterioration to more than 2. Results Of 359 patients, 199 underwent radiosurgery, and 160 underwent surgery. In the radiosurgery group, 100 patients were allocated to OBS, and 99 were allocated to WBRT. After surgery, 79 patients were allocated to OBS, and 81 were allocated to adjuvant WBRT. The median time to WHO PS more than 2 was 10.0 months (95% CI, 8.1 to 11.7 months) after OBS and 9.5 months (95% CI, 7.8 to 11.9 months) after WBRT (P = .71). Overall survival was similar in the WBRT and OBS arms (median, 10.9 v 10.7 months, respectively; P = .89). WBRT reduced the 2-year relapse rate both at initial sites (surgery: 59% to 27%, P < .001; radiosurgery: 31% to 19%, P = .040) and at new sites (surgery: 42% to 23%, P = .008; radiosurgery: 48% to 33%, P = .023). Salvage therapies were used more frequently after OBS than after WBRT. Intracranial progression caused death in 78 (44%) of 179 patients in the OBS arm and in 50 (28%) of 180 patients in the WBRT arm. Conclusion After radiosurgery or surgery of a limited number of brain metastases, adjuvant WBRT reduces intracranial relapses and neurologic deaths but fails to improve the duration of functional independence and overall survival. PMID:21041710

  12. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  13. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soyfer, Viacheslav Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy in adult medulloblastoma: is it an option for average-risk patients?

    PubMed

    Franceschi, E; Bartolotti, M; Paccapelo, A; Marucci, G; Agati, R; Volpin, L; Danieli, D; Ghimenton, C; Gardiman, M P; Sturiale, C; Poggi, R; Mascarin, M; Balestrini, D; Masotto, B; Brandes, A A

    2016-06-01

    The standard treatment in children with average-risk medulloblastoma (MB) is reduced-dose radiotherapy (RT) followed by chemotherapy. However, in adults, there is no agreement on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of adult MB patients with average-risk disease, defined as no postsurgical residual (or ≤1.5 cm(2)) and no metastatic disease (M0). Main inclusion criteria were: age >16 years, post-surgical treatment with craniospinal irradiation with or without adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide ± cyclophosphamide). From 1988 to 2012 were accrued 43 average-risk MB patients treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifteen (34.9 %) patients received also chemotherapy: 7 before RT, 5 after RT, and 3 before and after RT. Reasons to administer chemotherapy were presence of residual disease (even if ≤1.5 cm) and delay in RT. After a median follow up time of 10 years (range: 8-13), median survival was 18 years (95 % CI 9-28) in patients who receive RT alone, and was not reached in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years were 100 %, 78.6 % (95 % CI 60.0-97.2 %) and 60.2 % (95 % CI 36.9-83.5 %), in patients treated with RT alone, and 100, 100 and 100 %, in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy (p = 0.079). Our findings suggest a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of average-risk MB adult patients. Further improvements might drive to add chemotherapy in average-risk setting with less favourable biological signatures (i.e., non-WNT group). PMID:26940908

  15. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30<=80%, V40<=65%, V50<=55%, V60<=40%, V65<=30%, V70<=15%, and V75<=3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  16. Late Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiotherapy for Early Prostate Cancer: Results From the UK Medical Research Council RT01 Trial (ISRCTN47772397)

    SciTech Connect

    Syndikus, Isabel; Morgan, Rachel C.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Graham, John D.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: In men with localized prostate cancer, dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) improves efficacy outcomes at the cost of increased toxicity. We present a detailed analysis to provide further information about the incidence and prevalence of late gastrointestinal side effects. Methods and Materials: The UK Medical Research Council RT01 trial included 843 men with localized prostate cancer, who were treated for 6 months with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and were randomly assigned to either 64-Gy or 74-Gy CFRT. Toxicity was evaluated before CFRT and during long-term follow-up using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading, the Late Effects on Normal Tissue: Subjective, Objective, Management (LENT/SOM) scale, and Royal Marsden Hospital assessment scores. Patients regularly completed Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--Prostate (FACT-P) and University of California, Los Angeles, Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI) questionnaires. Results: In the dose-escalated group, the hazard ratio (HR) for rectal bleeding (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2) was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.17-2.04); for diarrhea (LENT/SOM grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.10-2.94); and for proctitis (RTOG grade {>=}2), the HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.20-2.25). Compared to baseline scores, the prevalence of moderate and severe toxicities generally increased up to 3 years and than lessened. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of patient-reported severe bowel problems was 6% vs. 8% (standard vs. escalated, respectively) and severe distress was 4% vs. 5%, respectively. Conclusions: There is a statistically significant increased risk of various adverse gastrointestinal events with dose-escalated CFRT. This remains at clinically acceptable levels, and overall prevalence ultimately decreases with duration of follow-up.

  17. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  18. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice . E-mail: Janice.kwon@lhsc.on.ca; D'Souza, David; Gawlik, Christine; Stitt, Larry; Whiston, Frances; Nascu, Patricia; Wong, Eugene; Carey, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age, 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.

  19. A phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan in combination with concurrent pelvic radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, F; Horisberger, K; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U; Wenz, F; Leitner, A; Hochhaus, A; Grobholz, R; Willer, A; Kähler, G; Post, S; Hofheinz, R-D

    2007-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety data of a combination regimen using weekly irinotecan in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer in a phase-II trial. Patients with rectal cancer clinical stages T3/4 Nx or N+ were recruited to receive irinotecan (50 mg m−2 weekly) and capecitabine (500 mg m−2 bid days 1–38) with a concurrent RT dose of 50.4 Gy. Surgery was scheduled 4–6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. A total of 36 patients (median age 62 years; m/f: 27:9) including three patients with local recurrence were enclosed onto the trial. The median distance of the tumour from the anal verge was 5 cm. The main toxicity observed was (NCI-CTC grades 1/2/3/4 (n)): Anaemia 23/9/−/−; leucocytopenia 12/7/7/2, diarrhoea 13/15/4/−, nausea/vomiting 9/10/2/−, and increased activity of transaminases 3/3/1/−. One patient had a reversible episode of ventricular fibrillation during chemoradiation, most probably caused by capecitabine. The relative dose intensity was (median/mean (%)): irinotecan 95/91, capecitabine 100/92). Thirty-four patients underwent surgery (anterior resection n=25; abdomino-perineal resection n=6; Hartmann's procedure n=3). R0-resection was accomplished in all patients. Two patients died in the postoperative course from septic complications. Pathological complete remission was observed in five out of 34 resected patients (15%), and nine patients showed microfoci of residual tumour (26%). After a median follow-up of 28 months one patient had developed a local recurrence, and five patients distant metastases. Three-year overall survival for all patients with surgery (excluding three patients treated for local relapse or with primary metastatic disease) was 80%. In summary, preoperative chemoradiation with CapIri-RT exhibits promising efficacy whereas showing managable toxicity. The local recurrence and distant failure rates observed after

  20. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  1. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  2. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hans T. Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives {>=}45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans.

  3. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert; Robertson, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  4. Rectal cancer delivery of radiotherapy in adequate time and with adequate dose is influenced by treatment center, treatment schedule, and gender and is prognostic parameter for local control: Results of study CAO/ARO/AIO-94

    SciTech Connect

    Fietkau, Rainer . E-mail: rainer.fietkau@med.uni-rostock.de; Roedel, Claus; Hohenberger, Werner; Raab, Rudolf; Hess, Clemens; Liersch, Torsten; Becker, Heinz; Wittekind, Christian; Hutter, Matthias; Hager, Eva; Karstens, Johann; Ewald, Hermann; Christen, Norbert; Jagoditsch, Michael; Martus, Peter; Sauer, Rolf

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The impact of the delivery of radiotherapy (RT) on treatment results in rectal cancer patients is unknown. Methods and Materials: The data from 788 patients with rectal cancer treated within the German CAO/AIO/ARO-94 phase III trial were analyzed concerning the impact of the delivery of RT (adequate RT: minimal radiation RT dose delivered, 4300 cGy for neoadjuvant RT or 4700 cGy for adjuvant RT; completion of RT in <44 days for neoadjuvant RT or <49 days for adjuvant RT) in different centers on the locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years. The LRR, DFS, and delivery of RT were analyzed as endpoints in multivariate analysis. Results: A significant difference was found between the centers and the delivery of RT. The overall delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for the LRR (no RT, 29.6% {+-} 7.8%; inadequate RT, 21.2% {+-} 5.6%; adequate RT, 6.8% {+-} 1.4%; p = 0.0001) and DFS (no RT, 55.1% {+-} 9.1%; inadequate RT, 57.4% {+-} 6.3%; adequate RT, 69.1% {+-} 2.3%; p = 0.02). Postoperatively, delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for LRR on multivariate analysis (together with pathologic stage) but not for DFS (independent parameters, pathologic stage and age). Preoperatively, on multivariate analysis, pathologic stage, but not delivery of RT, was an independent prognostic parameter for LRR and DFS (together with adequate chemotherapy). On multivariate analysis, the treatment center, treatment schedule (neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant RT), and gender were prognostic parameters for adequate RT. Conclusion: Delivery of RT should be regarded as a prognostic factor for LRR in rectal cancer and is influenced by the treatment center, treatment schedule, and patient gender.

  5. Does obesity hinder radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients? The implementation of new techniques in adjuvant radiotherapy – focus on obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Moszyńska-Zielińska, Małgorzata; Chałubińska-Fendler, Justyna; Żytko, Leszek; Bigos, Ewelina; Fijuth, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity in Poland and its relation to endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) is resulting in the increasing necessity of treating obese women. Treatment of an overweight patient with EEC may impede not only the surgical procedures but also radiotherapy, especially external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The problems arise both during treatment planning and when delivering each fraction due to the difficulty of positioning such a patient – it implies the danger of underdosing targets and overdosing organs at risk. Willingness to use dynamic techniques in radiation oncology has increased for patients with EEC, even those who are obese. During EBRT careful daily verification is necessary for both safety and treatment accuracy. The most accurate method of verification is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with soft tissue assessment, although it is time consuming and often requires a radiation oncologist. In order to improve the quality of such treatment, the authors present the practical aspects of planning and treatment itself by means of dynamic techniques in EBRT. The authors indicate the advantages and disadvantages of different types of on-board imaging (OBI) verification images. Considering the scanty amount of literature in this field, it is necessary to conduct further research in order to highlight proper planning and treatment of obese endometrial cancer patients. The review of the literature shows that all centres that wish to use EBRT for gynaecological tumours should develop their own protocols on qualification, planning the treatment and methods of verifying the patients’ positioning. PMID:26327837

  6. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mehee; Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George; Byrne, Richard W; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2015-01-01

    Ondine׳s curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97mmHg. He was diagnosed with Ondine׳s curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case. PMID:26087849

  7. Genomic Classifier Identifies Men With Adverse Pathology After Radical Prostatectomy Who Benefit From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Den, Robert B.; Yousefi, Kasra; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Abdollah, Firas; Choeurng, Voleak; Feng, Felix Y.; Dicker, Adam P.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Davicioni, Elai; Karnes, R. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal timing of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) is unclear. We hypothesized that a genomic classifier (GC) would provide prognostic and predictive insight into the development of clinical metastases in men receiving post-RP RT and inform decision making. Patients and Methods GC scores were calculated from 188 patients with pT3 or margin-positive prostate cancer, who received post-RP RT at Thomas Jefferson University and Mayo Clinic between 1990 and 2009. The primary end point was clinical metastasis. Prognostic accuracy of the models was tested using the concordance index for censored data and decision curve analysis. Cox regression analysis tested the relationship between GC and metastasis. Results The cumulative incidence of metastasis at 5 years after RT was 0%, 9%, and 29% for low, average, and high GC scores, respectively (P = .002). In multivariable analysis, GC and pre-RP prostate-specific antigen were independent predictors of metastasis (both P < .01). Within the low GC score (< 0.4), there were no differences in the cumulative incidence of metastasis comparing patients who received adjuvant or salvage RT (P = .79). However, for patients with higher GC scores (≥ 0.4), cumulative incidence of metastasis at 5 years was 6% for patients treated with adjuvant RT compared with 23% for patients treated with salvage RT (P < .01). Conclusion In patients treated with post-RP RT, GC is prognostic for the development of clinical metastasis beyond routine clinical and pathologic features. Although preliminary, patients with low GC scores are best treated with salvage RT, whereas those with high GC scores benefit from adjuvant therapy. These findings provide the first rational selection of timing for post-RP RT. PMID:25667284

  8. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatero, Almudena; Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano; Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  9. Use of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil and Radiation Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection Among the Elderly and Impact on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Joshua; Hershman, Dawn L.; Buono, Donna; McBride, Russell; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Abrams, Julian A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In randomized trials patients with resected nonmetastatic gastric cancer who received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemoRT) had better survival than those who did not. We investigated the effectiveness of adjuvant chemoRT after gastric cancer resection in an elderly general population and its effects by stage. Methods and Materials: We identified individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database aged 65 years or older with Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) gastric cancer, from 1991 to 2002, who underwent gastric resection, using multivariate modeling to analyze predictors of chemoRT use and survival. Results: Among 1,993 patients who received combined chemoRT or no adjuvant therapy after resection, having a later year of diagnosis, having a more advanced stage, being younger, being white, being married, and having fewer comorbidities were associated with combined treatment. Among 1,476 patients aged less than 85 years who survived more than 4 months, the 313 who received combined treatment had a lower mortality rate (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.98) than the 1,163 who received surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy significantly reduced the mortality rate for Stages III and IV (M0), trended toward improved survival for Stage II, and showed no benefit for Stage IB. We observed trends toward improved survival in all age categories except 80 to 85 years. Conclusions: The association of combined adjuvant chemoRT with improved survival in an overall analysis of Stage IB through Stage IV (M0) resected gastric cancer is consistent with clinical trial results and suggests that, in an elderly population, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is effective. However, our observational data suggest that adjuvant treatment may not be effective for Stage IB cancer, is possibly appropriate for Stage II, and shows significant survival benefits for Stages III and IV (M0) for those aged less than 80 years.

  10. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  11. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma with bulky neck lymph nodes in the era of IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Shen, Chunying; Ou, Xiaomin; He, Xiayun; Ying, Hongmei; Hu, Chaosu

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with N2–3 diseases are prone to develop distant metastasis even treated with standard concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our study is aim to determine the optimal treatment strategy of these patients. Patients with histologically proven NPC were retrospectively analyzed according to the AJCC 2002 stage classification system. A total of 547 patients who had N2–3 diseases were enrolled. They were all treated with Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with systemic treatments, including radiotherapy alone (RT alone), neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (NACT+RT), CCRT, NACT+CCRT, NACT followed by radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT+RT+AC), CCRT+AC and NACT+CCRT+AC. A subgroup analysis was also conducted. With a median follow-up time of 53.8 months, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly decreased the risk of distant metastasis (HR 0.413, 95% CI 0.194–0.881, p = 0.022) as well as significantly increased the OS (HR 0.398, 95% CI 0.187–0.848, p = 0.017) in patients with N3 disease. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to provide benefits to patients with N3 stage NPC and the current study may indicate the need for further randomized investigation. PMID:26942700

  12. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma with bulky neck lymph nodes in the era of IMRT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Shen, Chunying; Ou, Xiaomin; He, Xiayun; Ying, Hongmei; Hu, Chaosu

    2016-04-12

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with N2-3 diseases are prone to develop distant metastasis even treated with standard concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our study is aim to determine the optimal treatment strategy of these patients. Patients with histologically proven NPC were retrospectively analyzed according to the AJCC 2002 stage classification system. A total of 547 patients who had N2-3 diseases were enrolled. They were all treated with Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with systemic treatments, including radiotherapy alone (RT alone), neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (NACT+RT), CCRT, NACT+CCRT, NACT followed by radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT+RT+AC), CCRT+AC and NACT+CCRT+AC. A subgroup analysis was also conducted. With a median follow-up time of 53.8 months, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly decreased the risk of distant metastasis (HR 0.413, 95% CI 0.194-0.881, p = 0.022) as well as significantly increased the OS (HR 0.398, 95% CI 0.187-0.848, p = 0.017) in patients with N3 disease. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to provide benefits to patients with N3 stage NPC and the current study may indicate the need for further randomized investigation. PMID:26942700

  13. SWOG S0809: A Phase II Intergroup Trial of Adjuvant Capecitabine and Gemcitabine Followed by Radiotherapy and Concurrent Capecitabine in Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma and Gallbladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Guthrie, Katherine A.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Corless, Christopher L.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Thomas, Charles R.; Alberts, Steven R.; Dawson, Laura A.; Micetich, Kenneth C.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Siegel, Abby B.; Blanke, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of postoperative therapy in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) or gallbladder carcinoma (GBCA) is unknown. S0809 was designed to estimate 2-year survival (overall and after R0 or R1 resection), pattern of relapse, and toxicity in patients treated with this adjuvant regimen. Patients and Methods Eligibility criteria included diagnosis of EHCC or GBCA after radical resection, stage pT2-4 or N+ or positive resection margins, M0, and performance status 0 to 1. Patients received four cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8) and capecitabine (1,500 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 14) every 21 days followed by concurrent capecitabine (1,330 mg/m2 per day) and radiotherapy (45 Gy to regional lymphatics; 54 to 59.4 Gy to tumor bed). With 80 evaluable patients, results would be promising if 2-year survival 95% CI were > 45% and R0 and R1 survival estimates were ≥ 65% and 45%, respectively. Results A total of 79 eligible patients (R0, n = 54; R1, n = 25; EHCC, 68%; GBCA, 32%) were treated (86% completed). For all patients, 2-year survival was 65% (95% CI, 53% to 74%); it was 67% and 60% in R0 and R1 patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 35 months (R0, 34 months; R1, 35 months). Local, distant, and combined relapse occurred in 14, 24, and nine patients. Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were observed in 52% and 11% of patients, respectively. The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse effects were neutropenia (44%), hand-foot syndrome (11%), diarrhea (8%), lymphopenia (8%), and leukopenia (6%). There was one death resulting from GI hemorrhage. Conclusion This combination was well tolerated, has promising efficacy, and provides clinicians with a well-supported regimen. Our trial establishes the feasibility of conducting national adjuvant trials in EHCC and GBCA and provides baseline data for planning future phase III trials. PMID:25964250

  14. Adjuvant Treatment after Surgery in Stage IIIA Endometrial Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Juree; Yoon, Won Sup; Choi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Mison; Choi, Youngmin; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Kim, Myungsoo; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Chang, Sei Kyung; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the role of adjuvant therapy in stage IIIA endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients who underwent surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) alone or chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) according to risk group. Materials and Methods A multicenter retrospective study was conducted including patients with surgical stage IIIA endometrial cancertreated by radical surgery and adjuvant RT or CTRT. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Ninety-three patients with stage IIIA disease were identified. Nineteen patients (20.4%) experienced recurrence, mostly distant metastasis (17.2%). Combined CTRT did not affect DFS (74.1% vs. 82.4%, p=0.130) or OS (96.3% vs. 91.9%, p=0.262) in stage IIIA disease compared with RT alone. Patients with age ≥ 60 years, grade G2/3, and lymphovascular space involvement had a significantly worse DFS and those variables were defined as risk factors. The high-risk group showed a significant reduction in 5-year DFS (≥ 2 risk factors) (49.0% vs. 88.0%, p < 0.001) compared with the low-risk group (< 2). Multivariate analysis confirmed that more than one risk factor was the only predictor of worse DFS (hazard ratio, 5.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.12 to 13.98; p < 0.001). Of patients with no risk factors, a subset treated with RT alone showed an excellent 5-year DFS and OS (93.8% and 100%, respectively). Conclusion We identified a low-risk subset of stage IIIA endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients who might be reasonable candidates for adjuvant RT alone. Further randomized studies are needed to determine which subset might benefit from combined CTRT. PMID:26511800

  15. Which elderly newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients can benefit from radiotherapy and temozolomide? A PERNO prospective study.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Enrico; Depenni, Roberta; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Ermani, Mario; Faedi, Marina; Sturiale, Carmelo; Michiara, Maria; Servadei, Franco; Pavesi, Giacomo; Urbini, Benedetta; Pisanello, Anna; Crisi, Girolamo; Cavallo, Michele A; Dazzi, Claudio; Biasini, Claudia; Bertolini, Federica; Mucciarini, Claudia; Pasini, Giuseppe; Baruzzi, Agostino; Brandes, Alba A

    2016-05-01

    The role of temozolomide concurrent with and adjuvant to radiotherapy (RT/TMZ) in elderly patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. We evaluated the outcome of patients >70 years in the context of the Project of Emilia-Romagna Region in Neuro-Oncology (PERNO), the first Italian prospective observational population-based study in neuro-oncology. For this analysis the criteria for selecting patients enrolled in the PERNO study were: age >70 years; PS 0-3; histologically confirmed GBM; postoperative radiotherapy (RT) after surgery with or without concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) or postsurgical TMZ alone. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 76 GBM elderly patients were identified in the prospective PERNO study. Twenty-three patients did not receive any treatment after surgery, and 53 patients received postsurgical treatments (25 patients received RT alone and 28 patients RT/TMZ). Median survival was 11.1 months (95 % CI 8.8-13.5), adding temozolomide concomitant and adjuvant to radiotherapy it was 11.6 months (95 % CI 8.6-14.6), and 9.3 months (95 % CI 8.1-10.6) in patients treated with RT alone (P = 0.164). However, patients with MGMT methylated treated with RT/TMZ obtained a better survival (17.2 months, 95 % CI 11.5-22.9) (P = 0.042). No difference in terms of survival were observed if patients with MGMT unmethylated tumor received RT alone, or RT/TMZ or, in MGMT methylated tumor, if patients received radiotherapy alone. In elderly patients RT/TMZ represent a widely used approach but it is effective with methylated MGMT tumors only. PMID:26943851

  16. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Left-Sided Pancreatic Cancer-Population-Based Analysis with Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yu Jin; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, BoKyong; Ha, Sung W

    2015-12-01

    This population-based study evaluated the survival impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in left-sided pancreatic cancer. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify patients with surgically resected left-sided pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 2004 to 2010. Propensity score matching was conducted to compare PORT and non-PORT groups. A total of 445 patients were identified, and PORT was performed in 180 (40 %) patients. In the unmatched population, there were no significant differences in overall survival (OS) (P = 0.197) and cause-specific survival (CSS) (P = 0.379) between the PORT and non-PORT groups. After propensity score matching, the patients treated with PORT had longer median OS (P = 0.012) and CSS (P = 0.039) than the non-PORT group. In propensity-adjusted multivariate analysis, non-receipt of PORT was a poor prognostic factor in OS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.39, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.79), and CSS (HR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.01-1.71). The log odds of positive lymph nodes (LOODS) (≥-0.73) was also associated with worse OS (P = 0.003) and CSS (P = 0.001). In left-sided pancreatic cancer, considering the addition of PORT is a reasonable option as in pancreatic head cancer. The LOODS was suggested as a strong predictive indicator of the patients' prognoses. PMID:26376994

  17. Adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy following transarterial chemoembolization in patients with non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma tumours of ≥3 cm

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rojymon; Turley, Falynn; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed K A; Keene, Kimberly; Yang, Eddy; Zarzour, Jessica; Bolus, David; Smith, J Kevin; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal locoregional treatment for non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of ≥3 cm in diameter is unclear. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the initial intervention most commonly performed, but it rarely eradicates HCC. The purpose of this study was to measure survival in HCC patients treated with adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) following TACE. Methods A retrospective study of patients with HCC of ≥3 cm was conducted. Outcomes in patients treated with TACE alone (n = 124) were compared with outcomes in those treated with TACE + SBRT (n = 37). Results There were no significant baseline differences between the two groups. The pre-TACE mean number of tumours (P = 0.57), largest tumour size (P = 0.09) and total tumour diameter (P = 0.21) did not differ significantly between the groups. Necrosis of the HCC tumour, measured after the first TACE, did not differ between the groups (P = 0.69). Local recurrence was significantly decreased in the TACE + SBRT group (10.8%) in comparison with the TACE-only group (25.8%) (P = 0.04). After censoring for liver transplantation, overall survival was found to be significantly increased in the TACE + SBRT group compared with the TACE-only group (33 months and 20 months, respectively; P = 0.02). Conclusions This retrospective study suggests that in patients with HCC tumours of ≥3 cm, treatment with TACE + SBRT provides a survival advantage over treatment with only TACE. Confirmation of this observation requires that the concept be tested in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. PMID:25186290

  18. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23-62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI {>=}25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI {>=}30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI {>=} 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  19. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Luke; Gorayski, Peter; Harvey, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT). Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU) requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN. PMID:26351442

  20. Review of Adjuvant Radiochemotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer and Results From Mayo Clinic for the 5th JUCTS Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C. Iott, Matthew J.; Corsini, Michele M.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To present an overview of Phase III trials in adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer and review outcomes at the Mayo Clinic after adjuvant radiochemotherapy (RT/CT) for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A literature review and a retrospective review of 472 patients who underwent an R0 resection for T1-3N0-1M0 invasive carcinoma of the pancreas from 1975 to 2005 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Patients with metastatic or unresectable disease at the time of surgery, positive surgical margins, or indolent tumors and those treated with intraoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the analysis. Median radiotherapy dose was 50.4Gy in 28 fractions, with 98% of patients receiving concurrent 5-fluorouracil- based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. Median overall survival (OS) was 1.8 years. Median OS after adjuvant RT/CT was 2.1 vs. 1.6 years for surgery alone (p = 0.001). The 2-y OS was 50% vs. 39%, and 5-y was 28% vs. 17% for patients receiving RT/CT vs. surgery alone. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that adverse prognostic factors were positive lymph nodes (risk ratio [RR] 1.3, p < 0.001) and high histologic grade (RR 1.2, p < 0.001). T3 tumor status was found significant on univariate analysis only (RR 1.1, p = 0.07). Conclusions: Results from recent clinical trials support the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected pancreatic cancer. The role of radiochemotherapy in adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer remains a topic of debate. Results from the Mayo Clinic suggest improved outcomes after the administration of adjuvant radiochemotherapy after a complete resection of invasive pancreatic malignancies.

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and risk of contralateral breast cancer with special attention to patients irradiated at younger age.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan; Akdeniz, Delal; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Koppert, Linetta B; McCool, Danielle; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Hooning, Maartje J; Jager, Agnes

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the influence of adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer (BC) on the risk of contralateral BC (CBC) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation carriers, with special attention to patients irradiated at age younger than 40 years. Additionally, tendencies in locoregional treatments and rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy over time were explored. In this retrospective cohort study, 691 BRCA1/2-associated BC patients treated between 1980 and 2013 were followed from diagnosis until CBC or censoring event including ipsilateral BC recurrence, distant metastasis, contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy, other invasive cancer diagnosis, death, or loss to follow up. Hazard ratios (HR) for CBC associated with radiotherapy were estimated using Cox regression. Median follow-up time was 8.6 years [range 0.3–34.3 years]. No association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was found, neither in the total population (HR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.45–1.49) nor in the subgroup of patients younger than 40 years at primary diagnosis (HR 1.36, 95 % CI 0.60–3.09). During follow-up, the number of patients at risk decreased substantially since a large proportion of patients were censored after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy or BC recurrence. Over the years, increasing preference for mastectomy without radiotherapy compared to breast-conserving surgery with radiotherapy was found ranging from less than 30 % in 1995 to almost 50 % after 2010. The rate of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy increased over the years from less than 40 % in 1995 to more than 60 % after 2010. In this cohort of BRCA1/2-associated BC patients, no association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was observed in the total group, nor in the patients irradiated before the age of 40 years. The number of patients at risk after 10 and 15 years of follow-up, however, was too small to definitively exclude harmful effects of adjuvant

  2. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  3. Temozolomide and Radiotherapy versus Radiotherapy Alone in High Grade Gliomas: A Very Long Term Comparative Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Salvatore; Corsa, Pietro; Raguso, Arcangela; Perrone, Antonio; Cossa, Sabrina; Munafò, Tindara; Sanpaolo, Gerardo; Donno, Elisa; Clemente, Maria Antonietta; Piombino, Michele; Parisi, Federico; Valle, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is the first line drug in the care of high grade gliomas. The combined treatment of TMZ plus radiotherapy is more effective in the care of brain gliomas then radiotherapy alone. Aim of this report is a survival comparison, on a long time (>10 years) span, of glioma patients treated with radiotherapy alone and with radiotherapy + TMZ. Materials and Methods. In this report we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 128 consecutive pts with diagnosis of high grade gliomas referred to our institutions from April 1994 to November 2001. The first 64 pts were treated with RT alone and the other 64 with a combination of RT and adjuvant or concomitant TMZ. Results. Grade 3 (G3) haematological toxicity was recorded in 6 (9%) of 64 pts treated with RT and TMZ. No G4 haematological toxicity was observed. Age, histology, and administration of TMZ were statistically significant prognostic factors associated with 2 years overall survival (OS). PFS was for GBM 9 months, for AA 11. Conclusions. The combination of RT and TMZ improves long term survival in glioma patients. Our results confirm the superiority of the combination on a long time basis. PMID:25815327

  4. Adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy in locally advanced breast cancer: a randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van der Linden, E.H.; Hart, G.; Engelsman, E.

    1985-10-01

    Between 1977 and 1980, 118 breast cancer patients with locally advanced disease, T3B-4, any N, M0 or T1-3, tumor positive axillary apex biopsy, were randomized to one of three arms: I: radiotherapy (RT) to the breast and adjacent lymph node areas; II: RT followed by 12 cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5 fluorouracil (CMF) and tamoxifen during the chemotherapy period; III: 2 cycles of adriamycin and vincristine (AV), alternated with 2 cycles of CMF, then RT, followed by another 4 cycles of AV, alternated with 4 CMF; tamoxifen during the entire treatment period. The median follow-up period was 5 1/2 years. The adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve the overall survival; the 5-year survival was 37% for all three treatment arms. There was no statistically significant difference in RFS between the three modalities, nor when arm I was compared to arm II and III together. LR was not statistically different over the three treatment arms. In 18 of the 24 patients with LR, distant metastases appeared within a few months from the local recurrence. The menopausal status did not influence the treatment results. Dose reduction in more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy was accompanied by better results. In conclusion: adjuvant chemo- and hormonal therapy did not improve RFS and overall survival. These findings do not support the routine use of adjuvant chemo- and endocrine therapy for inoperable breast cancer.

  5. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  6. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  7. Radiotherapy Issues in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older ‘low-risk’ patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of ‘low risk’ are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for ‘high-risk’ patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1–3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational. PMID:24715826

  8. Radiotherapy to Improve Local Control Regardless of Surgical Margin and Malignancy Grade in Extremity and Trunk Wall Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Scandinavian Sarcoma Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L. Trovik, Clement S.; Bauer, Henrik C.F.; Rydholm, Anders; Monge, Odd R.; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Alvegard, Thor; Bruland, Oyvind S.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy has during the past decades become increasingly used in the treatment of localized soft tissue sarcoma. We evaluated the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence rates (LRRs) in Scandinavia between 1986 and 2005. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,093 adult patients with extremity or trunk wall soft tissue sarcoma treated at four Scandinavian sarcoma centers were stratified according to the treatment period (1986-1991, 1992-1997, and 1998-2005). The use of adjuvant RT, quality of the surgical margin, interval between surgery and RT, and LRR were analyzed. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results: The use of RT (77% treated postoperatively) increased from 28% to 53%, and the 5-year LRR decreased from 27% to 15%. The rate of wide surgical margins did not increase. The risk factors for local recurrence were histologic high-grade malignancy (hazard ratio [HR], 5), an intralesional (HR, 6) or marginal (HR, 3) surgical margin, and no RT (HR, 3). The effect of RT on the LRR was also significant after a wide margin resection and in low-grade malignant tumors. The LRR was the same after preoperative and postoperative RT. The median interval from surgery to the start of RT was 7 weeks, and 98% started RT within 4 months. The LRR was the same in patients who started treatment before and after 7 weeks. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that adjuvant RT effectively prevents local recurrence in soft tissue sarcoma, irrespective of the tumor depth, malignancy grade, and surgical margin status. The effect was most pronounced in deep-seated, high-grade tumors, even when removed with a wide surgical margin.

  9. Endorectal MRI assessment of local relapse after surgery for prostate cancer: A model to define treatment field guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy in patients at high risk for local failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond . E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch; Vees, Hansjoerg; Lozano, Joan; Khan, Haleem; Molla, Meritxell; Hidalgo, Alberto; Linero, Dolors; Rouzaud, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining local relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer to help to reassess the clinical target volume (CTV) for adjuvant postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients undergoing an endorectal MRI before salvage radiotherapy were selected. Spatial coordinates of the relapses were assessed using two reference points: the inferior border of the pubic symphysis (point 1) and the urethro-vesical anastomosis (point 2). Every lesion on MRI was delineated on the planning computed tomography and center of mass coordinates were plotted in two separate diagrams (along the x, y, and z axes) with the urethro-vesical anastomosis as the coordinate origin. An 'ideal' CTV was constructed, centered at a point defined by the mathematical means of each of the three coordinates with dimensions defined as twice 2 standard deviations in each of the three axes. The dosimetric impact of the new CTV definition was evaluated in six adjuvantly treated patients. Results: The ideal CTV center of mass was located at coordinates 0 (x), -5 (y), and -3 (z) mm with SDs of 6 (x), 6 (y), and 9 (z) mm, respectively. The CTV size was 24 (x) x 24 (y) x 36 (z) mm. Significant rectal sparing was observed with the new CTV. Conclusions: A CTV with an approximately cylindrical shape ({approx}4 x 3 cm) centered 5 mm posterior and 3 mm inferior to the urethro-vesical anastomosis was defined. Such CTV may reduce the irradiation of normal nontarget tissue in the pelvis potentially improving treatment tolerance.

  10. Adjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy After Simultaneous Surgical Resection of Rectal Cancer With Liver Metastases: Analysis of Prognosis and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho Jung; Yu, Chang Sik; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Kang, Byung Woog; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after simultaneous surgical resection in rectal cancer patients with liver metastases (LM). Materials and Methods: One hundred and eight patients receiving total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and surgical resection for LM were reviewed. Forty-eight patients received adjuvant CRT, and 60 were administered CT alone. Recurrence patterns and prognosis were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were compared between the CRT and CT groups. The inverse probability of the treatment-weighted (IPTW) method based on the propensity score was used to adjust for selection bias between the two groups. Results: At a median follow-up period of 47.7 months, 77 (71.3%) patients had developed recurrences. The majority of recurrences (68.8%) occurred in distant organs. By contrast, the local recurrence rate was only 4.7%. Median DFS and OS were not significantly different between the CRT and CT groups. After applying the IPTW method, we observed no significant differences in terms of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.347; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.759-2.392; p = 0.309) and OS (HR, 1.413; CI, 0.752-2.653; p = 0.282). Multivariate analyses showed that unilobar distribution of LM and normal preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level (<6 mg/mL) were significantly associated with longer DFS and OS. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate after simultaneous resection of rectal cancer with LM was relatively low. DFS and OS rates were not different between the adjuvant CRT and CT groups. Adjuvant CRT may have a limited role in this setting. Further prospective randomized studies are required to evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment in these patients.

  11. Impact of Adjuvant Therapy on Survival in Curatively Resected Gallbladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, Anupam Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) has the propensity to fail at loco-regional (LR) and distant sites despite aggressive radical surgery. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiotherapy (RT), systemic chemotherapy (CT) and chemoradiation (CRT) is the usual practice. Due to rarity of this disease, there is limited evidence to suggest the type of adjuvant treatment which should be offered to the patients. Aim The study was conducted to evaluate the impact of adjuvant treatment on curatively resected GBC patients. Settings and Design Histological proven patients of GBC registered between June, 2008 and July, 2014 were identified from our hospital database and retrospective analysis was done. Materials and Methods Patients of GBC who had curative resection followed by adjuvant treatment as RT alone, CT alone or CRT were included in the study. Statistical Analysis Adverse prognostic factors and the effect of adjuvant treatment on overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were evaluated using Cox Regression Method and Kaplan Meier plot. Results We identified 33 patients of which 23 were Stage I or II disease (Early disease) and the remaining 10 were Stage III or IV disease (Advanced disease). All except one patient had adenocarcinoma. A total of 5 patients were treated with RT alone while 16 patients received CT alone. The remaining 12 patients were treated with CRT. Median follow-up period was 8.5 months. At analysis 4 were alive while the remaining 29 were dead due to disease. With regard to “Early disease” patients who had RT alone, CT alone and CRT, the median OS was 22.3, 10.3 and 15.2 months respectively (p = .440). Cohort of patients with “Advanced disease” who were treated with CT alone and CRT the median OS was 7.5 and 7.0 months respectively (p = .643). On multivariate analysis none of the prognostic factors had an adverse impact on survival. Conclusion The impact of adjuvant treatment in the form of RT, CT or CRT after curative resection

  12. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  13. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  14. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  15. Adjuvant Therapy in Early-Stage Endometrial Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Evidence, Guidelines, and Clinical Practice in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nawar A.; Haggerty, Ashley; Jean, Stephanie; Lin, Lilie

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the U.S., with an increasing incidence likely secondary to the obesity epidemic. Surgery is usually the primary treatment for early stage endometrial cancer, followed by adjuvant therapy in selected cases. This includes radiation therapy [RT] with or without chemotherapy, based on stratification of patients into categories dependent on their future recurrence risk. Several prospective trials (PORTEC-1, GOG#99, and PORTEC-2) have shown that the use of adjuvant RT in the intermediate risk (IR) and the high-intermediate risk (HIR) groups decreases locoregional recurrence (LRR) but has no effect on overall survival. The ad hoc analyses from these studies have shown that an even larger LRR risk reduction was seen within the HIR group compared with the IR group. Vaginal brachytherapy is as good as external beam radiotherapy in controlling vaginal relapse where the majority of recurrence occur, and with less toxicity. In the high-risk group, multimodality therapy (chemotherapy and RT) may play a significant role. Although adjuvant RT has been evaluated in many cost-effectiveness studies, high-quality data in this area are still lacking. The uptake of the above prospective trial results in the U.S. has not been promising. Factors that are driving current practices and defining quality-of-care measures for patients with early-stage disease are what future studies need to address. PMID:24821823

  16. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted HIV-1 Gag-Pol-Nef Fusion Protein and Adenovirus 35 Gag-RT-Int-Nef Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Uninfected African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Mpendo, Juliet; Ruzagira, Eugene; Kilembe, William; Chomba, Elwyn; Roman, François; Bourguignon, Patricia; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Voss, Gerald; Laufer, Dagna; Stevens, Gwynn; Hayes, Peter; Clark, Lorna; Cormier, Emmanuel; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Ackland, Jim; Syvertsen, Kristen; Zachariah, Devika; Anas, Kamaal; Sayeed, Eddy; Lombardo, Angela; Gilmour, Jill; Cox, Josephine; Fast, Patricia; Priddy, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Background Sequential prime-boost or co-administration of HIV vaccine candidates based on an adjuvanted clade B p24, RT, Nef, p17 fusion protein (F4/AS01) plus a non-replicating adenovirus 35 expressing clade A Gag, RT, Int and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) may lead to a unique immune profile, inducing both strong T-cell and antibody responses. Methods In a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 146 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to one of four regimens: heterologous prime-boost with two doses of F4/AS01E or F4/AS01B followed by Ad35-GRIN; Ad35-GRIN followed by two doses of F4/AS01B; or three co-administrations of Ad35-GRIN and F4/AS01B. T cell and antibody responses were measured. Results The vaccines were generally well-tolerated, and did not cause serious adverse events. The response rate, by IFN-γ ELISPOT, was greater when Ad35-GRIN was the priming vaccine and in the co-administration groups. F4/AS01 induced CD4+ T-cells expressing primarily CD40L and IL2 +/- TNF-α, while Ad35-GRIN induced predominantly CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ +/- IL2 or TNF-α. Viral inhibition was induced after Ad35-GRIN vaccination, regardless of the regimen. Strong F4-specific antibody responses were induced. Immune responses persisted at least a year after the last vaccination. The complementary response profiles, characteristic of each vaccine, were both expressed after co-administration. Conclusion Co-administration of an adjuvanted protein and an adenovirus vector showed an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile and resulted in strong, multifunctional and complementary HIV-specific immune responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264445 PMID:25961283

  17. Effect of Nodal Irradiation and Fraction Size on Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Mortality in Women With Breast Cancer Treated With Local and Locoregional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Erika L.; Tyldesley, Scott; Woods, Ryan; Wai, Elaine; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the adjuvant breast cancer radiation volume or fraction size (>2 Gy vs. {<=}2 Gy) affected the risk of fatal cardiac or cerebrovascular (CCV) events and to determine whether the addition of regional radiotherapy (RT) increased the risk of fatal cerebrovascular events compared with breast/chest wall RT alone. Methods and Materials: Overall survival was compared for patients receiving breast/chest wall RT alone or breast/chest wall plus regional node RT (BRCW+NRT) in a population-based cohort of women with early-stage breast cancer who had undergone RT between 1990 and 1996. The effect of laterality, age, systemic therapy, radiation volume, and fraction size on the risk of fatal CCV events was analyzed using a competing risk method. Results: A total of 4,929 women underwent adjuvant RT. The median follow-up was 11.7 years. BRCW+NRT was associated with an increased risk of CCV death at 12 years (5% for BRCW+NRT vs. 3.5% for breast/chest wall RT alone; p = .004), but the fraction size was not (3.92% for a fraction size >2 Gy vs. 3.54% for a fraction size <2 Gy; p = .83). The 12-year absolute risk of death from stroke alone did not differ for either radiation volume (1.17% for BRCW+NRT vs. 0.8% for breast/chest wall RT alone; p = .22) or fraction size (p = .59). Conclusion: Regional RT was associated with a small (1.5% at 12 years), but statistically significant, increased risk of death from a CCV event. The addition of regional RT did not significantly increase the risk of death from stroke, although the number of events was small. An increased fraction size was not significantly associated with a greater risk of fatal CCV events. These data support the continued use of hypofractionated adjuvant regional RT.

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  19. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  20. Clinical Factors Predicting Late Severe Urinary Toxicity After Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: A Single-Institute Analysis of 742 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Alongi, Filippo; Berardi, Genoveffa; Bolognesi, Angelo; Briganti, Alberto; Broggi, Sara; Deli, Aniko; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Perna, Lucia; Pasetti, Marcella; Salvadori, Giovannella; Montorsi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical factors independently predictive of long-term severe urinary sequelae after postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1993 and 2005, 742 consecutive patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy with either adjuvant (n = 556; median radiation dose, 70.2 Gy) or salvage (n = 186; median radiation dose, 72 Gy) intent. Results: After a median follow-up of 99 months, the 8-year risk of Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was almost identical (23.9% vs. 23.7% and 12% vs. 10%) in the adjuvant and salvage cohorts, respectively. On univariate analysis, acute toxicity was significantly predictive of late Grade 2 or greater sequelae in both subgroups (p <.0001 in both cases), and hypertension (p = .02) and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (p = .02) correlated significantly in the adjuvant cohort only. The variables predictive of late Grade 3 sequelae were acute Grade 2 or greater toxicity in both groups and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (8-year risk of Grade 3 events, 21% vs. 11%, p = .007), hypertension (8-year risk, 18% vs. 10%, p = .005), age {<=} 62 years at RT (8-year risk, 16% vs. 11%, p = .04) in the adjuvant subset, and radiation dose >72 Gy (8-year risk, 19% vs. 6%, p = .007) and age >71 years (8-year risk, 16% vs. 6%, p = .006) in the salvage subgroup. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent predictive role of all the covariates indicated as statistically significant on univariate analysis. Conclusions: The risk of late Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 urinary toxicity was almost identical, regardless of the RT intent. In the salvage cohort, older age and greater radiation doses resulted in a worse toxicity profile, and younger, hypertensive patients experienced a greater rate of severe late sequelae in the adjuvant setting. The causes of this latter correlation and apparently different etiopathogenesis of chronic damage in the two subgroups were unclear and deserve additional investigation.

  1. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  2. The Role of Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Mottrie, Alexandre; Bossi, Alberto; Fossati, Nicola; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    A non-negligible proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) harbors aggressive disease. These individuals are at higher risk of experiencing recurrence after surgery. Results from prospective, randomized trials support the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy (aRT) on cancer control in selected patients with adverse disease features at RP. However, only one of these randomized trials found a significant benefit of aRT on survival. Although such a level of evidence is not currently available for salvage RT, retrospective studies demonstrated that this approach leads to excellent outcomes if administered at the earliest sign of PSA recurrence. Prognostic models might help clinicians in identifying patients who would benefit the most from adjuvant and/or salvage RT. This individualized approach would allow sparing the risk of short- and long-term toxicity in a substantial proportion of patients. Nonetheless, results from randomized trials are still awaited to compare the efficacy of (early) salvage and aRT. PMID:26449841

  3. A feasibility study of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy, cisplatin + 5-FU chemo-adjuvant and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. Univ. of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY ); Bowen, M.G.; Van Nagell, J.R.; Gallion, H.H.; DePriest, P. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy combined with hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy for Stage III and IV cervical cancers. Eleven patients with advanced Stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancers were treated with [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy in an up-front schedule followed by cisplatin (CDDP; 50 mg/m[sup 2]) chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated (1.2 Gy bid) radiotherapy given concurrently with intravenous infusion of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) (1000 mg/m[sup 2]/day [times] 4 days) in weeks 1 and 4 with conventional radiation (weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6). Total dose at a paracervical point A isodose surface was 80-85 Gy-eq by external and intracavitary therapy and 60 Gy at the pelvic sidewalls. Patients tolerated the protocol well. There was 91% compliance with the chemotherapy and full compliance with the [sup 252]Cf brachytherapy and the external beam radiotherapy. There were no problems with acute chemo or radiation toxicity. One patient developed a rectovaginal fistula (Grade 3-4 RTOG criteria) but no other patients developed significant late cystitis, proctitis or enteritis. There was complete response (CR) observed in all cases. With mean follow-up to 26 months, local control has been achieved with 90% actuarial 3-year survival with no evidence of disease (NED). [sup 252]Cf neutrons can be combined with cisplatin and 5-FU infusion chemotherapy plus hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy without unusual side effects or toxicity and with a high local response and tumor control rate. Further study of [sup 252]Cf neutron-chemoradiotherapy for advanced and bulky cervical cancer are indicated. The authors found chemotherapy was more effective with the improved local tumor control. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Adjuvant Therapy: Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad; Kirkwood, John M.

    2011-01-01

    With an incidence that is increasing at 2–5% per year, cutaneous melanoma is an international scourge that disproportionately targets young individuals. Despite much research, the treatment of advanced disease is still quite challenging. Immunotherapy with high-dose interferon-α2b or interleukin-2 benefits a select group of patients in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, respectively, with significant attendant toxicity. Advances in the biology of malignant melanoma and the role of immunomodulatory therapy have produced advances that have stunned the field. In this paper, we review the data for the use of interferon-α2b in various dosing ranges, vaccine therapy, and the role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant setting for malignant melanoma. Recent trials in the metastatic setting using anticytoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (anti-CTLA-4) monoclonal antibody therapy and BRAF inhibitor therapy have demonstrated clear benefit with prolongation of survival. Trials investigating combinations of these novel agents with existing immunomodulators are at present underway. PMID:22220281

  5. Improved five year survival after combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy for Stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, S.; Banfi, A.; Bonadonna, G.; Rilke, F.; Milani, F.; Valagussa, P.; Lattuada, A.

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the prognosis of patients with localized non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) who are treated with radiotherapy (RT), a prospective controlled study utilizing a combined modality approach was carried out in patients with pathologic Stage I-II NHL. After treatment with regional RT, patients in complete remission were randomized to receive either no further therapy or 6 cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone (CVP). At 5 years from completion of irradiation, the relapse-free survival was 46.3% after RT and 72.1% after RT plus CVP (P=0.005). The corresponding findings for the overall survival calculated from the beginning of irradiation were 55.8 and 82.8% respectively (P=0.03). The favorable effects of adjuvant chemotherapy on relapse-free survival were statistically significant only in the subgroup with diffuse histology. In patients who relapsed after RT alone, the salvage therapy failed to induce a high incidence of second durable remission. Adjuvant chemotherapy is indicated to improve the curve rate in pathologic stage I-II NHL with diffuse histology when regional RT is utilized.

  6. Phase I Trial of Tipifarnib (R115777) Concurrent With Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Jonathan Moyal, Elizabeth . E-mail: moyal.elizabeth@claudiusregaud.fr; Laprie, Anne; Delannes, Martine; Poublanc, Muriel; Catalaa, Isabelle; Dalenc, Florence; Berchery, Delphine; Sabatier, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe; De Porre, Peter; Alaux, Beatrice; Toulas, Christine

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To conduct a Phase I trial to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: After resection or biopsy, tipifarnib was given 1 week before and then continuously during RT (60 Gy), followed by adjuvant administration until progression. The tipifarnib dose during RT was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 200 mg/day. Results: Thirteen patients were enrolled, and 12 were evaluable for MTD. Of these patients, 7 had undergone biopsy, 4 had partial resection, and 1 had gross total resection. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed during the concomitant treatment at 200 mg. All 3 patients at 300 mg experienced DLT during the concomitant treatment: 1 with sudden death and 2 with acute pneumonitis. The MTD was reached at 300 mg. The adjuvant treatment was suppressed from the protocol after a case of pneumonitis during this treatment. Six additional patients were included at 200 mg/day of the new protocol, confirming the safety of this treatment. Of the 9 evaluable patients, 1 had partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 3 had rapid progression; the patient with gross total resection was relapse-free after 21 months. Median survival of the evaluable patients was 12 months (range, 5.2-21 months). Conclusion: Tipifarnib (200 mg/day) concurrent with standard radiotherapy is well tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Preliminary efficacy results are encouraging.

  7. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  8. The Timing of Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy can potentially eradicate residual microscopic disease. Defining the optimal patient and treatment factors is essential and is particularly relevant within the context of adjuvant vs early vs delayed postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A systematic review of all published SRT studies was performed to identify the pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) after SRT. A total of 41 studies encompassing 5597 patients satisfied the study entry criteria. Radiobiologic interpretation of biochemical tumor control was used to provide the framework for the observed relationships. Results: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before SRT (P<.0001) and RT dose (P=.0052) had a significant and independent association with RFS. There was an average 2.6% loss of RFS for each incremental 0.1 ng/mL PSA at the time of SRT (95% CI, {approx}2.2-3.1). With a PSA level of 0.2 ng/mL or less before SRT, the RFS approached 64%. The dose for salvage RT in the range of 60-70 Gy seemed to be on the steep part of the sigmoidal dose-response curve, with a dose of 70 Gy achieving 54% RFS compared with only 34% for 60 Gy. There was a 2% improvement in RFS for each additional Gy (95% CI, {approx}0.9-3.2). The observed dose-response was less robust on sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: This study provides Level 2a evidence for initiating SRT at the lowest possible PSA. Dose escalation is also suggested by the data. Progressively better tumor control rates with SRT after radical prostatectomy are achieved with a lower PSA at initiation and with a higher RT dose. Early salvage RT may be an equivalent strategy to adjuvant RT.

  9. Adjuvant Brachytherapy Removes Survival Disadvantage of Local Disease Extension in Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer: A SEER Registry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Peter J. Jani, Ashesh B.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p <0.001). In patients with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 50% for NAT, 64% for EBRT, and 67% for EBRT/BT. Again, adjuvant RT contributed to improved survival compared with NAT (p = 0.02). In patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and direct tumor extension, the 5-year OS rate was 34% for NAT, 47% for EBRT, and 63% for EBRT/BT. RT improved OS compared with NAT (p <0.001). Also, in this high-risk subgroup, adding BT to EBRT was superior to EBRT alone (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant EBRT and EBRT/BT had improved OS compared with patients receiving NAT. When direct extension of the primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  10. MGMT Promoter Methylation Is Prognostic but Not Predictive for Outcome to Adjuvant PCV Chemotherapy in Anaplastic Oligodendroglial Tumors: A Report From EORTC Brain Tumor Group Study 26951

    PubMed Central

    van den Bent, Martin J.; Dubbink, Hendrikus J.; Sanson, Marc; van der Lee-Haarloo, Cathleen R.; Hegi, Monika; Jeuken, Judith W.M.; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A.; Taphoorn, Martin J.B.; Frenay, Marc; Lacombe, Denis; Gorlia, Thierry; Dinjens, Winand N.M.; Kros, Johan M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose O6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation has been shown to predict survival of patients with glioblastomas if temozolomide is added to radiotherapy (RT). It is unknown if MGMT promoter methylation is also predictive to outcome to RT followed by adjuvant procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine (PCV) chemotherapy in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors (AOT). Patients and Methods In the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer study 26951, 368 patients with AOT were randomly assigned to either RT alone or to RT followed by adjuvant PCV. From 165 patients of this study, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was available for MGMT promoter methylation analysis. This was investigated with methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Results In 152 cases, an MGMT result was obtained, in 121 (80%) cases MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Methylation strongly correlated with combined loss of chromosome 1p and 19q loss (P = .00043). In multivariate analysis, MGMT promoter methylation, 1p/19q codeletion, tumor necrosis, and extent of resection were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic significance of MGMT promoter methylation was equally strong in the RT arm and the RT/PCV arm for both progression-free survival and overall survival. In tumors diagnosed at central pathology review as glioblastoma, no prognostic effect of MGMT promoter methylation was observed. Conclusion In this study, on patients with AOT MGMT promoter methylation was of prognostic significance and did not have predictive significance for outcome to adjuvant PCV chemotherapy. The biologic effect of MGMT promoter methylation or pathogenetic features associated with MGMT promoter methylation may be different for AOT compared with glioblastoma. PMID:19901104

  11. Sequencing postoperative radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: unanswered questions on the not evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Kepka, Lucyna; Socha, Joanna; Rucinska, Monika; Wasilewska-Tesluk, Ewa; Komosinska, Katarzyna

    2016-07-01

    This editorial comments on the study by Lee et al. which reported on the use of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) as first strategy after resection of stage IIIA-pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After completion of PORT, 41% of patients received postoperative chemotherapy (POCT). The five-year overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in patients treated with PORT and POCT than in patients treated with PORT alone. Authors concluded that PORT used as first postoperative strategy does not compromise a benefit of POCT and its implementation should be further studied. We discuss the pros and cons of using PORT before POCT for stage IIIA-pN2 NSCLC. Some radiobiological data support earlier use of PORT, however, caution should be paid to not to unnecessarily delay or omit POCT because of its demonstrated survival benefit. Concurrent postoperative radio-chemotherapy could be an attractive approach, but we still have very limited clinical data on its use in this indication. PMID:27501290

  12. Sequencing postoperative radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: unanswered questions on the not evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Joanna; Rucinska, Monika; Wasilewska-Tesluk, Ewa; Komosinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    This editorial comments on the study by Lee et al. which reported on the use of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) as first strategy after resection of stage IIIA-pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After completion of PORT, 41% of patients received postoperative chemotherapy (POCT). The five-year overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in patients treated with PORT and POCT than in patients treated with PORT alone. Authors concluded that PORT used as first postoperative strategy does not compromise a benefit of POCT and its implementation should be further studied. We discuss the pros and cons of using PORT before POCT for stage IIIA-pN2 NSCLC. Some radiobiological data support earlier use of PORT, however, caution should be paid to not to unnecessarily delay or omit POCT because of its demonstrated survival benefit. Concurrent postoperative radio-chemotherapy could be an attractive approach, but we still have very limited clinical data on its use in this indication. PMID:27501290

  13. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1–2N0–1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10–131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions. PMID:24385471

  14. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  15. /sup 125/I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  16. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  17. Adjuvant therapy for ampullary carcinomas: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Sumita; Miller, Robert C. . E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 125 patients who underwent definitive surgery for carcinomas involving the ampulla of Vater between April 1977 and February 2005 and who survived more than 50 days after surgery. Twenty-nine of the patients also received adjuvant radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Adverse prognostic factors were investigated, and overall survival (OS) and local and distant failure were estimated. Results: Adverse prognostic factors for decreased OS by univariate analysis included lymph node (LN) involvement, locally advanced tumors (T3/T4), and poor histologic grade. By multivariate analysis, positive LN status (p = 0.02) alone was associated with decreased OS. The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy improved OS for patients with positive LN (p = 0.01). Median survival for positive LN patients receiving adjuvant therapy was 3.4 years, vs. 1.6 years for those with surgery alone. Conclusions: The addition of adjuvant radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy may improve OS in patients with LN involvement. The effect of adjuvant therapy on outcomes for patients with poor histologic grade or T3/T4 tumors without LN involvement could not be assessed.

  18. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  19. Management of Pediatric Myxopapillary Ependymoma: The Role of Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Agbahiwe, Harold C.; Wharam, Moody; Batra, Sachin; Cohen, Kenneth; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-02-01

    Introduction: Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare tumor in children. The primary treatment is gross total resection (GTR), with no clearly defined role for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Published reports, however, suggest that children with MPE present with a more aggressive disease course. The goal of this study was to assess the role of adjuvant RT in pediatric patients with MPE. Methods: Sixteen patients with MPE seen at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) between November 1984 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Fifteen of the patients were evaluable with a mean age of 16.8 years (range, 12-21 years). Kaplan-Meier curves and descriptive statistics were used for analysis. Results: All patients received surgery as the initial treatment modality. Surgery consisted of either a GTR or a subtotal resection (STR). The median dose of adjuvant RT was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-54 Gy). All patients receiving RT were treated at the involved site. After a median follow-up of 7.2 years (range, 0.75-26.4 years), all patients were alive with stable disease. Local control at 5 and 10 years was 62.5% and 30%, respectively, for surgery alone versus 100% at both time points for surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifty percent of the patients receiving surgery alone had local failure. All patients receiving STR alone had local failure compared to 33% of patients receiving GTR alone. One patient in the surgery and adjuvant RT group developed a distant site of recurrence 1 year from diagnosis. No late toxicity was reported at last follow-up, and neurologic symptoms either improved or remained stable following surgery with or without RT. Conclusions: Adjuvant RT improved local control compared to surgery alone and should be considered after surgical resection in pediatric patients with MPE.

  20. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity.

  1. [Rectal cancer and adjuvant chemotherapy: which conclusions?].

    PubMed

    Bachet, J-B; Rougier, P; de Gramont, A; André, T

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the rectum represents about a third of cases of colorectal cancer, with an annual incidence of 12,000 cases in France. On the contrary of colon cancer, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer has not been definitively proved, more because this question was assessed in few recent studies than because negative results. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is now the reference treatment for mid and lower rectal cancers, and allow to increase the local control without improvement of progression free survival and overall survival. The data of the "historical studies" of adjuvant treatment in rectal cancer published before 1990, of the meta-analysis of adjuvant trials in rectal cancer and of the QUASAR study suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (intravenous or oral), in absence of pre-operative treatment, decrease the risk of metastatic relapse after curative surgery for a rectal cancer of stage II or III. This benefice seems similar to the one observed in colon cancer. In the EORTC radiotherapy group trial 22921, an adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low dose of leucovorin was not associated with a significantly improvement of overall survival but, despite the fact that only 42.9% of patients received all planed cycles, the progression free survival was increased (not significantly) in groups receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The French recommendations are to discuss the indication of adjuvant chemotherapy by fluoropyrimidines in cases of stage III rectal cancer on histopathologic reports and no chemotherapy in case of stade II. Despite the fact that none study have assessed a combination of fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in adjuvant setting in rectal cancer, like in colon cancer, the Folfox4, modified Folfox6 or Xelox regimens are valid options in stage III (experts opinion). In cases of pathologic complete remission or in absence of involved nodes, the benefice of adjuvant chemotherapy is not assessed. In

  2. Primary radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the pyriform sinus.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Amdur, Robert J; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Werning, John W

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to report the long-term outcomes of primary radiotherapy (RT) for patients with T1-T2 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the pyriform sinus. Between November 1964 and March 2008, 135 patients with T1-T2 pyriform sinus SCC were treated with primary RT at the University of Florida. Adjuvant chemotherapy was employed in 21 patients (16 %) and 62 patients (46 %) underwent a planned neck dissection. Median follow-up was 3.5 years (range 0.2-24.7 years); median follow-up on living patients was 8.3 years (range 3.8-24.0 years). The 5-year outcomes were as follows: local control, 85 %; regional control, 81 %; local-regional control, 71 %; distant metastasis-free survival, 76 %; cause-specific survival, 62 %; and overall survival, 38 %. The 5-year local control rate was 88 % for T1 cancers and 84 % for those with T2 SCCs (p = 0.5429). Sixteen patients (12 %) experienced severe late complications. Primary RT results in a high probability of cure with a relatively modest risk of severe late complications for patients with T1-T2 SCCs of the pyriform sinus. PMID:26071621

  3. Chest Wall Radiotherapy: Middle Ground for Treatment of Patients With One to Three Positive Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Abi-Raad, Rita F.; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kobayashi, Wendy; McGrath, John J.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Powell, Simon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Stage II breast cancer and one to three positive lymph nodes after mastectomy who were treated with observation or adjuvant radiotherapy to the chest wall (CW) with or without the regional lymphatics. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 238 patients with Stage II breast cancer (one to three positive lymph nodes) treated with mastectomy at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1990 and 2004. The estimates of locoregional recurrence (LRR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were analyzed according to the delivery of radiotherapy and multiple prognostic factors. Results: LRR and DFS were significantly improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), with a 5- and 10-year LRR rate without PMRT of 6% and 11%, respectively and, with PMRT, of 0% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .02). The 5- and 10-year DFS rate without PMRT was 85% and 75%, respectively, and, with PMRT, was 93% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .03). A similar benefit was found for patients treated with RT to the CW alone. The LRR, DFS, and overall survival rate for patients treated to the CW only was 0%, 96%, and 95% at 10 years, respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that adjuvant PMRT to the CW alone provides excellent disease control for patients with breast cancer <5 cm with one to three positive lymph nodes.

  4. Primary and Central Hypothyroidism After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Kennedy, Laurence; Malyapa, Robert S.; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced central and primary hypothyroidism regarding total dose, fractionation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 312 patients treated with RT for extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1964 and 2000. The cervical lymph nodes were irradiated in 197 patients. The radiation doses to the thyroid gland and hypothalamic-pituitary axis were estimated by reconstructing the treatment plans. Results: Clinical central hypothyroidism (CH) was observed in 17 patients (5.4%); the median clinical latency was 4.8 years. Clinical primary hypothyroidism (PH) was observed in 40 patients (20.3%); the median clinical latency was 3.1 years. Multivariate analysis of clinical CH revealed that fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and total dose to the pituitary were not significant. Multivariate analysis of clinical PH revealed that the total dose to the thyroid (p = 0.043) was significant, but adjuvant chemotherapy, age, and gender were not. Of the patients tested for hypopituitarism, 14 (20.3%) of 69 demonstrated subclinical CH and 17 (27.4%) of 62 demonstrated subclinical PH. The 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from clinical CH and PH were 97% and 87% and 68% and 67%, respectively. Of the patients tested, the 5-year and 10-year rates of freedom from subclinical CH and PH were 91% and 78% and 71% and 71%, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical and subclinical manifestations of late radiation toxicity were observed in the thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although CH did not indicate a dependence on fractionation, adjuvant chemotherapy, or total dose to the pituitary, PH showed a dependence on the total dose to the thyroid gland.

  5. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  6. Trends in vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Lavelle, Ed C

    2011-04-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a century and have been particularly effective at promoting protective humoral immunity. However, alum is not optimally effective for diseases where cell-mediated immunity is required for protection. Furthermore, adjuvants including oil-in-water emulsions have shown improved efficacy for avian influenza protection suggesting that even for diseases where humoral immunity can confer protection, there is scope for developing improved adjuvants. There have been major developments in antigen discovery over the past decade, which has accelerated the vaccine development process for new indications and this demands a new generation of adjuvants that can drive and specifically direct the desired immune responses. A number of systems are under investigation that combine different types of adjuvants into specific formulations with greater activity. Additionally, targeting of vaccines to specific immune cells shows great promise. In the case of cancer and chronic infectious diseases, it may be difficult to develop effective vaccines without blocking immune regulatory pathways, which impede cell-mediated responses. However, increased understanding of immunology and particularly the innate immune system is informing vaccine adjuvant research and consequently driving the development of novel and specifically directed vaccine adjuvant strategies. In this article we address the importance of adjuvants in vaccine development, the known mode of action of specific adjuvants and recent developments in this important field. PMID:21506650

  7. Phase I Study of Vandetanib With Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Wong, Eric T.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence has suggested that angiogenesis inhibition might potentiate the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition might be of therapeutic benefit, because the epidermal growth factor receptor is upregulated in GBM and contributes to radiation resistance. We conducted a Phase I study of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, in patients with newly diagnosed GBM combined with RT and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: A total of 13 GBM patients were treated with vandetanib, radiotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ, using a standard '3 + 3' dose escalation. The maximal tolerated dose was defined as the dose with <1 of 6 dose-limiting toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The eligible patients were adults with newly diagnosed GBM, Karnofsky performance status of {>=}60, normal organ function, who were not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Results: Of the 13 patients, 6 were treated with vandetanib at a dose of 200mg daily. Of the 6 patients, 3 developed dose-limiting toxicities within the first 12 weeks, including gastrointestinal hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, neutropenia in 1 patient, and diverticulitis with gastrointestinal perforation in 1 patient. The other 7 patients were treated with 100 mg daily, with no dose-limiting toxicities observed, establishing this dose as the maximal tolerated dose combined with TMZ and RT. Conclusion: Vandetanib can be safely combined with RT and TMZ in GBM patients. A Phase II study in which patients are randomized to vandetanib 100 mg daily with RT and TMZ or RT and TMZ alone is underway.

  8. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  9. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Tepper, J E; Skates, S J; Wood, W C; Orlow, E C; Duttenhaver, J R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three patients with Stage B2, B3, and C colonic carcinoma had resection for curative intent followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates for these 133 patients were 82% and 61%, respectively. Stage for stage, the development of local regional failure was reduced for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy compared with a historic control series. Local recurrence occurred in 8%, 21%, and 31% of patients with Stage B3, C2, and C3 tumors who had radiation therapy, respectively, whereas the local failure rates were 31%, 36%, and 53% in patients treated with surgery alone. There was a 13% and 12% improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate in the patients with Stage B3 and C3 lesions who had radiotherapy compared with the historic controls. For patients with Stage C disease, local control and disease-free survival rates decreased progressively with increasing nodal involvement; however, local control and disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients who had radiotherapy than in those who had surgery alone. Failure patterns in the patients who had radiotherapy did not show any notable changes compared with those for patients who had surgery alone. Postoperative radiation therapy for Stage B3, C2, and C3 colonic carcinoma is a promising treatment approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:3689006

  10. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy in Myxoid Sarcomas Is Associated With a Dense Vascular Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeze, Ronald S.A. de Jong, Daphne de; Haas, Rick L.; Stewart, Fiona; Coevorden, Frits van

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) have long been the standard treatment for most deep-seated sarcomas; however, since the randomized trial from the National Cancer Institute of Canada, which described similar local control for pre- vs. postoperative RT, both modalities are now widely accepted. As a group, sarcomas are classified as radiation resistant. The subgroup of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS), a sarcoma with a typical vascular crow's feet pattern, is highly radiosensitive, but a mechanism for this phenomenon is unknown. Here we describe our results with preoperative RT and propose a mechanism explaining the high sensitivity based on the distinctive vascularization pattern of MLS. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2006, 31 sarcoma patients, including 10 with MLS, underwent preoperative RT at our institute. Resected specimens were histologically evaluated, focusing on classification, grade, and vascularization patterns. Results: Twenty sarcomas showed more than 80% pathologic response after preoperative RT. A pathologic complete response was found in all 'pure' MLS specimens after preoperative RT (n = 8). There were no pathologic complete responses in the remaining sarcoma patients (n = 23), although 12 showed 80% to 90% pathologic response. In contrast to the remaining RT-resistant sarcomas, the highly responding specimens contained branching vasculature, partial thrombus formation and inflammation of medium sized arterioles, similar to the vascular changes in MLS. Conclusions: Both MLS and sarcomas with MLS-like vasculature are highly radiosensitive. Radiation sensitivity may be explained by changes in medium-sized arterioles, obstructing the specific crow's feet vascularization and inducing hypoxia with secondary tumor cell death.

  11. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine. PMID:22129866

  12. Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx: Radiotherapy vs. Trans-Oral Robotic Surgery (ORATOR) – study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has markedly increased over the last three decades due to newly found associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Primary radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice for OPSCC at most centers, and over the last decade, the addition of concurrent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival, but at the cost of increased acute and late toxicity. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has emerged as a promising alternative treatment, with preliminary case series demonstrating encouraging oncologic, functional, and quality of life (QOL) outcomes. However, comparisons of TORS and RT in a non-randomized fashion are susceptible to bias. The goal of this randomized phase II study is to compare QOL, functional outcomes, toxicity profiles, and survival following primary RT (± chemotherapy) vs. TORS (± adjuvant [chemo] RT) in patients with OPSCC. Methods/Design The target patient population comprises OPSCC patients who would be unlikely to require chemotherapy post-resection: Tumor stage T1-T2 with likely negative margins at surgery; Nodal stage N0-2, ≤3 cm in size, with no evidence of extranodal extension on imaging. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio between Arm 1 (RT ± chemotherapy) and Arm 2 (TORS ± adjuvant [chemo] RT). In Arm 1, patients with N0 disease will receive RT alone, whereas N1-2 patients will receive concurrent chemoradiation. In Arm 2, patients will undergo TORS along with selective neck dissections, which may be staged. Pathologic high-risk features will be used to determine the requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is QOL score using the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), with secondary endpoints including survival, toxicity, other QOL outcomes, and swallowing function. A sample of 68 patients is required. Discussion This study, if successful, will provide a much-needed randomized

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  14. Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Early Outcomes and Dose Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Rombi, Barbara; Yock, Torunn I.; Broussard, George; Friedmann, Alison M.; Huang, Mary; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for children with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon RT (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton RT (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton RT to the postoperative tumor bed. Methods and Materials: All patients with high-risk (International Neuroblastoma Staging System Stage III or IV) neuroblastoma treated between 2005 and 2010 at our institution were included. All patients received induction chemotherapy, surgical resection of residual disease, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, and adjuvant 3D-CPT to the primary tumor sites. The patients were followed with clinical examinations, imaging, and laboratory testing every 6 months to monitor disease control and side effects. IMRT, 3D-CPT, and intensity-modulated proton RT plans were generated and compared for a representative case of adjuvant RT to the primary tumor bed followed by a boost. Results: Nine patients were treated with 3D-CPT. The median age at diagnosis was 2 years (range 10 months to 4 years), and all patients had Stage IV disease. All patients had unfavorable histologic characteristics (poorly differentiated histologic features in 8, N-Myc amplification in 6, and 1p/11q chromosomal abnormalities in 4). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 11.4 cm (range 7-16) in maximal dimension. At a median follow-up of 38 months (range 11-70), there were no local failures. Four patients developed distant failure, and, of these, two died of disease. Acute side effects included Grade 1 skin erythema in 5 patients and Grade 2 anorexia in 2 patients. Although comparable target coverage was achieved with all three modalities, proton therapy achieved substantial normal tissue sparing compared with IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton RT allowed additional sparing of the kidneys, lungs, and heart. Conclusions: Preliminary outcomes reveal excellent local control with proton therapy

  15. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Neville, Bridget A.; Chen, Aileen B.; Schrag, Deborah

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  16. Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy vs mastectomy for ductal carcinoma in situ: French Survey experience

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, B; Lemanski, C; Fourquet, A; de Lafontan, B; Giard, S; Meunier, A; Pioud-Martigny, R; Campana, F; Marsiglia, H; Lancrenon, S; Mery, E; Penault-Llorca, F; Fondrinier, E; Tunon de Lara, C

    2009-01-01

    From March 2003 to April 2004, 77 physicians throughout France prospectively recruited 1289 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients and collected data on diagnosis, patient and tumour characteristics, and treatments. Median age was 56 years (range, 30–84). Ductal carcinoma in situ was diagnosed by mammography in 87.6% of patients. Mastectomy, conservative surgery alone (CS) and CS with radiotherapy (CS+RT) were performed in 30.5, 7.8 and 61.7% of patients, respectively. Thus, 89% of patients treated by CS received adjuvant RT. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and axillary dissection (AD) were performed in 21.3 and 10.4% of patients, respectively. Hormone therapy was administered to 13.4% of the patients (80% tamoxifen). Median tumour size was 14.5 mm (6, 11 and 35 mm for CS, CS+RT and mastectomy, respectively, P<0.0001). Nuclear grade was high in 21% of patients, intermediate in 38.5% and low in 40.5%. Excision was considered complete in 92% (CS) and 88.3% (CS+RT) of patients. Oestrogen receptors were positive in 69.8% of assessed cases (31%). Treatment modalities varied widely according to region: mastectomy rate, 20–37%; adjuvant RT, 84–96%; hormone treatment, 6–34%. Our survey on current DCIS management in France has highlighted correlations between pathological features (tumour size, margin and grade) and treatment options, with several similar variations to those observed in recent UK and US studies. PMID:19277037

  17. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  18. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  19. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Results: Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Conclusion: Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma. PMID:27306775

  20. [Current situation and future prospects of radiotherapy for malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Terahara, Atsuro

    2013-10-01

    Prognosis of malignant gliomas remains poor, although adjuvant radiotherapy increases survival time. To improve treatment outcomes, high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, stereotactic irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and charged particle radiotherapy have been developed for dose distribution optimization and dose escalation. Improvements in clinical outcomes with these new treatment strategies have been reported; however, the efficacy of these treatment strategies has not yet been verified in randomized trials. Further development of radiation delivery techniques, including boron neutron capture therapy, and ways of achieving more adequate target volume delineation using modern multimodality imaging technology are currently being intensively investigated to further improve patient outcomes. PMID:24105051

  1. Planning for RtI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Jennifer; Antrim, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In 2004 the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act authorized funding for Response to Intervention (RtI) instruction in the United States. By 2011, 71 percent of school districts had adopted RtI (Institute of Education Sciences 2011). The goal of RtI is to provide personalized, just-in-time intervention in reading and math for students who…

  2. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  3. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem.

  4. Novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D

    2001-11-01

    Vaccination remains the single most valuable tool in the prevention of infectious disease. Nevertheless, there exists a need to improve the performance of existing vaccines such that fewer boosts are needed or to develop novel vaccines. For the development of effective vaccines for humans, a great need exists for safe and effective adjuvants. A number of novel adjuvants have been reported in recent years including: i) bacterial toxins such as cholera toxin, CT, and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT; ii) less toxic derivatives of CT and LT; iii) endogenous human immunomodulators, such as IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF; iv) hormones; v) lipopeptides; vi) saponins, such as QS-21; vii) synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN); viii) lipid 'A derivatives, such as monophosphoryl lipid A, MPL, and ix) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivatives. Herein, we will review recent findings using these novel adjuvant systems. PMID:12455400

  5. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Ross A.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Regine, William F.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Lustig, Robert; Konski, Andre A.; Benson, Al B.; Macdonald, John S.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

  6. Adjuvant role of radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer without pathological lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Lee, Yoon Se; Kwon, Minsu; Kim, Ji Won; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Nam, Soon Yuhl

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion The application of adjuvant RT to reduce recurrence should be tailored in cases of pathologically negative node metastasis. Objectives The treatment modality following surgical resection of advanced laryngeal cancer is determined by adverse factors. Aside from lymph node metastasis (LNM) or positive margins, definite risk factors supporting adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) have not been clearly suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for advanced laryngeal cancer without LNM and the role of RT. Materials and methods Pathologically T3 and T4-staged laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma without LNM were reviewed. The patients were classified into RT (+) (n = 22) and RT (-) (n = 38) groups. Results Five-year overall survival (OS) of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 84.4% and 83.8%, respectively. Five-year disease-specific survival of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 88.4% and 93.9%. Five-year local control rate of the RT (+) and RT (-) groups was 94.7% and 91.3%. The factors affecting OS were smoking history and recurrence history (p = 0.02). By multivariate analysis, smoking history and recurrence history were determining factors for 5-year OS (p = 0.024 and p = 0.047, respectively). PMID:26924463

  7. Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shyh-An

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:22550433

  8. Impact of Adjuvant External-Beam Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Uterine Papillary Serous and Clear Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Anne; Schreiber, David; Rineer, Justin; Choi, Kwang; Rotman, Marvin

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in early-stage high- to intermediate-risk endometrioid adenocarcinoma is well established and has been shown to improve locoregional control. Its role in the management of early-stage clear cell carcinoma and uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) remains controversial. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, we identified women with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage Sixth Edition. Stage IA-IIB clear cell carcinoma or UPSC who underwent hysterectomy with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2003. We used Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis to compare overall survival (OS) for all patients. Results: We identified 1,333 women of whom 451 had clear cell carcinoma and 882 had UPSC. Of those patients, 775 underwent surgery alone and 558 received adjuvant RT as well. For Stages I-IIB disease, the median OS with surgery alone was 106 months, vs. 151 months with adjuvant RT (p = 0.006). On subgroup analysis, we saw the benefit from adjuvant RT only in Stage IB-C patients. For Stage IB disease, patients undergoing surgery alone had a median OS of 117 months, vs. median survival not reached with the addition of RT (p = 0.006). For Stage IC disease, surgery alone had a median OS of 35 months vs. 120 months with RT (p = 0.001). Although the apparent benefit of RT diminished when measured via multivariate analysis, the impact of RT on survival did show a trend toward significance (hazard ration 0.808, confidence interval 95% 0.651-1.002, p = 0.052) Conclusion: In FIGO Stage IB-C papillary serous and clear cell uterine carcinoma, adjuvant RT seems to play an important role in improving survival.

  9. Survival Outcomes and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients with Stage III or IV Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated with Primary Surgery or Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Warkentin, Heather; Ghosh, Sunita; Scrimger, Rufus; Jha, Naresh; Parliament, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare and contrast the patterns of failure in patients with locally advanced squamous cell oropharyngeal cancers undergoing curative-intent treatment with primary surgery or radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. Methods and materials Two hundred and thirty-three patients with stage III or IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent curative-intent treatment from 2006-2012, were reviewed. The median length of follow-up for patients still alive at the time of analysis was 4.4 years. Data was collected retrospectively from a chart review. Results One hundred and thirty-nine patients underwent primary surgery +/- adjuvant therapy, and 94 patients underwent primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy (CRT). Demographics were similar between the two groups, except primary radiotherapy patients had a higher age-adjusted Charleston co-morbidity score (CCI). Twenty-nine patients from the surgery group recurred; 15 failed distantly only, seven failed locoregionally, and seven failed both distantly and locoregionally. Twelve patients recurred who underwent chemoradiotherapy; ten distantly alone, and two locoregionally. One patient who underwent radiotherapy (RT) alone failed distantly. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients undergoing primary RT were 86.6% and 84.9% respectively. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for primary surgery was 80.9% and 76.3% respectively (p=0.21). There was no significant difference in either treatment when they were stratified by p16 status or smoking status. Conclusions Our analysis does not show any difference in outcomes for patients treated with primary surgery or radiotherapy. Although the primary pattern of failure in both groups was distant metastatic disease, some local failures may be preventable with careful delineation of target volumes, especially near the base of skull region. PMID:27610285

  10. 3D-Conformal Versus Intensity-Modulated Postoperative Radiotherapy of Vaginal Vault: A Dosimetric Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Cilla, Savino; Macchia, Gabriella Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Romanella, Michele; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Padula, Gilbert; Picardi, Vincenzo; Scambia, Giovanni; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated a step-and-shoot IMRT plan in the postoperative irradiation of the vaginal vault compared with equispaced beam arrangements (3-5) 3D-radiotherapy (RT) optimized plans. Twelve patients were included in this analysis. Four plans for each patient were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, homogeneity index (HI), and conformity index (CI): (1) 3 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (2) 4 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (3) 5 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (4) step-and-shoot IMRT technique. CI showed a good discrimination between the four plans. The mean scores of CI were 0.58 (range: 0.38-0.67) for the 3F-CRT plan, 0.58 (range: 0.41-0.66) for 4F-CRT, 0.62 (range: 0.43-0.68) for 5F-CRT and 0.69 (range: 0.58-0.78) for the IMRT plan. A significant improvement of the conformity was reached by the IMRT plan (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). As expected, the increment of 3D-CRT fields was associated with an improvement of target dose conformity and homogeneity; on the contrary, in the IMRT plans, a better conformity was associated to a worse target dose homogeneity. A significant reduction in terms of D{sub mean}, V90%, V95%, V100% was recorded for rectal and bladder irradiation with the IMRT plan. Surprisingly, IMRT supplied a significant dose reduction also for rectum and bladder V30% and V50%. A significant dosimetric advantage of IMRT over 3D-RT in the adjuvant treatment of vaginal vault alone in terms of treatment conformity and rectum and bladder sparing is shown.

  11. Melanoma Metastases to the Neck Nodes: Role of Adjuvant Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz; Jancar, Boris; Cemazar, Maja; Perme, Maja Pohar; Hocevar, Marko

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review experiences in the treatment of regionally advanced melanoma to the neck and/or parotid with emphasis on the role of adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and histopathologic data, treatment details, and outcomes in patients treated during the period 2000-2006 at the Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia, were reviewed. Results: A total of 40 patients with 42 dissections underwent surgery, and 43 patients with 45 dissections received irradiation postoperatively to a median equivalent dose (eqTD{sub 2}: 2 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction/day, 5 fractions/week) of 60 Gy (range, 47.8-78.8). Regional control 2 years after surgery was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI] 40-72%) and after postoperative radiotherapy 78% (CI 63-92%) (p = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, postoperative radiotherapy (yes vs. no: hazard ratio [HR] 6.3, CI 2.0-20.6) and sum of the risk factors present (i.e., risk factor score; HR 1.7 per score point, CI 1.2-2.6) were predictive for regional control. On logistic regression testing, the number of involved nodes was associated with the probability of distant metastases (p = 0.021). The incidence of late toxicity did not correlate with the mode of therapy, eqTD{sub 2}, or fractionation pattern. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy has the potential to compensate effectively for the negative impact of adverse histopatologic features to disease control in a dissected nodal basin. More conventionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens using fraction doses of 2-2.5 Gy, with cumulative eqTD{sub 2{>=}}60 Gy, are recommended. The number of involved lymph nodes is proposed as an additional criterion for limiting the implementation of adjuvant irradiation.

  12. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  13. Treatment Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Mexican Patients with Endometrial Carcinoma with Emphasis on Patients Receiving Radiotherapy after Surgery: An Institutional Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Christian; Mariscal, Carlos; Celis, Alfredo; Balcázar, Nidia M.; Meneses, Abelardo; Mohar, Alejandro; Mota, Aida; Trejo, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes in patients with endometrial carcinoma treated in a Latin American institute with emphasis in patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods. A total of 412 patients with endometrial carcinoma admitted to our hospital between 1998 and 2008 were evaluated, retrospectively. The mean age was 55 years (28–87). Two hundred seventy patients received RT following surgery. Stage distribution was as follows: 221 patients (54%) stage I, 86 patients (21%) stage II, and 103 patients (24.5%) stage III and 2 patients (0.5%) stage IVA. Results. Overall survival rate was 95% at 2 years, 84% at 5 years, and 79% at 10 years. By the end of followup, 338 patients (82%) were disease-free, and 13 (3%) were alive with disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified age, grade, serosal and adnexial involvement as significant predictors for overall survival. Conclusion. The results of our study suggests that early-stage, low-grade endometrial cancer with no risk factors should not receive external beam radiotherapy, intermediate risk patients should receive only vaginal vault brachytherapy, and the use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy for patients high-risk and advanced-stage carcinoma the addition of radiotherapy is associated with a better survival being an effective therapeutic option. PMID:22675641

  14. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials

  15. Adjuvant Immunotherapy of Melanoma, and Development of New Approaches Using the Neo- Adjuvant Approach in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is the third most common skin cancer but the leading cause of death from cutaneous malignancies. While early-stage disease is frequently cured by surgical resection with excellent long-term survival, patients with deeper primary lesions (AJCC stage IIB-C) and those with microscopic (IIIA) or clinically evident regional lymph node or in-transit metastases (IIIB-C) have an increased risk of relapse and death–the latter approaching 70% or more at 5 years. In patients at high-risk of recurrence/metastases, adjuvant therapy with high-dose interferon alpha-2b (HDI) following definitive surgical resection has been shown to improve relapse free and overall survival. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy have offered the prospect to improve regional recurrence risk and overall survival in several solid tumors. The advent of effective new molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic disease and new immunotherapies that overcome checkpoints of immune response have augmented the range of new options that are in current trial evaluation to determine their role as potential adjuvant therapies, alone and in combination with one another, and the established modality of IFNα. The differential characteristics of the host immune response between early and advanced melanoma provide a strong mechanistic rationale for the use of neo-adjuvant immunotherapeutic approaches in melanoma, and the opportunity to evaluate the mechanism of action suggest neoadjuvant trial evaluation for each of the new candidate agents and combinations of interest. Several neo-adjuvant trials have been conducted in the phase II setting, which have illuminated the mechanism of IFNα, as well as providing insight to the effects of anti-CTLA4 blocking antibodies. These agents (anti-CTLA4 blocking antibody ipilimumab [BMS], and BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib [Genentech]) are likely to be followed by other immunotherapies that may overcome the PD-1 checkpoint (anti-PD1 [BMS, Merck, Curetech] and anti

  16. Salvage treatment for childhood ependymoma after surgery only: Pitfalls of omitting 'at once' adjuvant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Giangaspero, Felice; Garre, Maria Luisa; Genitori, Lorenzo; Perilongo, Giorgio; Collini, Paola; Riva, Daria; Valentini, Laura; Scarzello, Giovanni; Poggi, Geraldina; Spreafico, Filippo; Peretta, Paola; Mascarin, Maurizio; Modena, Piergiorgio; Sozzi, Gabriella; Bedini, Nice; Biassoni, Veronica; Urgesi, Alessandro; Balestrini, Maria Rosa; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Sandri, Alessandro; Gandola, Lorenza

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To discuss the results obtained by giving adjuvant treatment for childhood ependymoma (EPD) at relapse after complete surgery only. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2002, 63 children older than 3 years old entered the first Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology protocol for EPD (group A), and another 14 patients were referred after relapsing after more tumor excisions only (group B). Prognostic factors were homogeneously matched in the two groups. We report on the outcome of group B. Results: Mean time to first local progression in group B had been 14 months. Tumors originated in the posterior fossa (PF) in 10 children and were supratentorial (ST) in 4; 11 had first been completely excised (NED) and 3 had residual disease (ED). Diagnoses were classic EPD in 9 patients, anaplastic in 5. Eight children were referred NED and 6 ED after two or more operations, 5 had cranial nerve palsy, 1 had recurrent meningitis, and 2 had persistent hydrocephalus. All received radiotherapy (RT) to tumor bed and 5 also had pre-RT chemotherapy. Six of 14 patients (6/10 with PF tumors) had a further relapse a mean 6 months after the last surgery; 4 of 6 died: progression-free survival and overall survival at 4 years after referral were 54.4% and 77%, respectively. Considering only PF tumors and setting time 0 as at the last surgery for group B, progression-free survival and overall survival were 32% and 50% for group B and 52% (p < 0.20)/70% (p < 0.29) for the 46 patients in group A with PF tumors. Local control was 32% in group B and 70.5% in group A (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Relapsers after surgery only, especially if with PF-EPD, do worse than those treated after first diagnosis; subsequent surgery for tumor relapse has severe neurologic sequelae.

  17. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Survival for Pure Tubular Breast Carcinoma-Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoqing; Chen, Margaret; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pure tubular carcinoma of the breast (PTCB) represents a distinct subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) that is generally thought to be associated with better prognosis than even low-grade IDC. There has been controversy as to the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in this population. We hypothesized that adjuvant RT would demonstrate a survival improvement. Methods and Materials: We queried the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database for the years 1992-2007 to identify patients with pure tubular carcinomas of the breast. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and surgical and RT treatments were collected. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method for univariate comparisons and Cox proportional hazards modeling for multivariate comparisons, stratifying on the basis of age with a cutoff age of 65. Results: A total of 6465 patients were identified: 3624 (56.1%) patients underwent lumpectomy with RT (LUMP+RT), 1525 (23.6%) patients underwent lumpectomy alone (LUMP), 1266 (19.6%) patients received mastectomy alone (MAST), and 50 (0.8%) patients underwent mastectomy with RT (MAST+RT). When we compared the LUMP+RT and LUMP groups directly, those receiving adjuvant RT tended to be younger and were less likely to be hormone receptor-positive. Overall survival was 95% for LUMP+RT and 90% for LUMP patients at 5 years. For those 65 or younger, the absolute overall survival benefit of LUMP+RT over LUMP was 1% at 5 years and 3% at 10 years. On stratified multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor in both age groups (P=.003 in age {<=}65 and P=.04 in age >65 patients). Other significant unfavorable factors were older age and higher T stage (age >65 only). Conclusions: Since sufficiently powered large scale clinical trials are unlikely, we would recommend that adjuvant radiation be considered in PTCB patients age 65 or younger, although consideration of the small absolute survival benefit is

  18. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Else, Tobias; Griffith, Kent A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Williams, Andrew; Miller, Barbra S.; Worden, Francis; Jolly, Shruti

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed.

  19. Postoperative Radiotherapy in the Management of Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: 10 Years' Experience in a Single Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoyun-Celik, Omur; Yalman, Deniz; Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Cakan, Alpaslan; Cok, Gursel; Ozkok, Serdar

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: This study reports the long term outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy in patients with resection for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 98 patients with resected NSCLC who received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) between January 1994 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. The most frequently performed surgical procedure was lobectomy (59 patients), followed by pneumonectomy (25), wedge resection (8), and bilobectomy (6). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered as an adjuvant treatment in 71 patients, after a wedge resection in 8 patients, and after an R1 resection in 19 patients. The PORT was administered using a Co-60 source in 86 patients and 6-MV photons in 12 patients. A Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were calculated. Results: Stages included I (n =13), II (n = 50), IIIA (n = 29), and IIIB (n = 6). After a median follow-up of 52 months median survival was 61 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free survival rates for the whole group were 50%, 78%, and 55% respectively. The RT dose, Karnofsky performance status, age, lateralization of the tumor, and pneumonectomy were independent prognostic factors for OAS; anemia and the number of involved lymph nodes were independent prognostic factors for LC. Conclusions: Doses of PORT of greater than 54 Gy were associated with higher death rate in patients with left-sided tumor, which may indicate a risk of radiation-induced cardiac mortality.

  20. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  1. Moderate dose escalation for advanced stage Hodgkin's disease using the bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone scheme and adjuvant radiotherapy: a study of the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Tesch, H; Diehl, V; Lathan, B; Hasenclever, D; Sieber, M; Rüffer, U; Engert, A; Franklin, J; Pfreundschuh, M; Schalk, K P; Schwieder, G; Wulf, G; Dölken, G; Worst, P; Koch, P; Schmitz, N; Bruntsch, U; Tirier, C; Müller, U; Loeffler, M

    1998-12-15

    The BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) regimen, a rearranged and accelerated version of the standard COPP/adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy, has been shown to be effective and safe in a previous pilot study for advanced stage Hodgkin's disease (HD). The present study aimed to determine a maximum practicable dose of three drugs, ie, etoposide, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide, for which acute toxicities were acceptable and to assess the feasibility of the escalated scheme. Sixty untreated patients with advanced stage HD were enrolled in this study. Radiotherapy was given in 44 patients (73%) after chemotherapy to initial bulk lesions and residual disease. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given from day 8 to prevent prolonged neutrocytopenia and severe infections. The intended doses of adriamycin, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide in the BEACOPP schedule could be substantially escalated: adriamycin from 25 to 35, cyclophosphamide from 650 to 1,200, and etoposide from 100 to 200 mg/m2. The major toxicities were leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia with considerable heterogeneity between individual patients. Of 60 patients, 56 (93%) achieved a complete remission (CR). At a median observation of 32 months, the rates of survival and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) were estimated to be 91% (95% confidence interval 83% to 99%) and 90% (82% to 98%). These results show that a moderate dose escalation of adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide of the baseline BEACOPP regimen is feasible. The escalated BEACOPP regimen shows very encouraging results in advanced stage HD and is now being compared in a randomized phase III study with BEACOPP at baseline dose level. PMID:9845521

  2. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  3. CHK1 expression in Gastric Cancer is modulated by p53 and RB1/E2F1: implications in chemo/radiotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Bargiela-Iparraguirre, J; Prado-Marchal, L; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Gutierrez-González, A; Moreno-Rubio, J; Muñoz-Fernandez, M; Sereno, M; Sanchez-Prieto, R; Perona, R; Sanchez-Perez, I

    2016-01-01

    Radiation has a limited but relevant role in the adjuvant therapy of gastric cancer (GC) patients. Since Chk1 plays a critical function in cellular response to genotoxic agents, we aimed to analyze the role of Chk1 in GC as a biomarker for radiotherapy resistance. We analyzed Chk1 expression in AGS and MKN45 human GC cell lines by RT-QPCR and WB and in a small cohort of human patient's samples. We demonstrated that Chk1 overexpression specifically increases resistance to radiation in GC cells. Accordingly, abrogation of Chk1 activity with UCN-01 and its expression with shChk1 increased sensitivity to bleomycin and radiation. Furthermore, when we assessed Chk1 expression in human samples, we found a correlation between nuclear Chk1 accumulation and a decrease in progression free survival. Moreover, using a luciferase assay we found that Chk1's expression is controlled by p53 and RB/E2F1 at the transcriptional level. Additionally, we present preliminary data suggesting a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism, involving miR-195 and miR-503, which are inversely correlated with expression of Chk1 in radioresistant cells. In conclusion, Chk1/microRNA axis is involved in resistance to radiation in GC, and suggests Chk1 as a potential tool for optimal stratification of patients susceptible to receive adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery. PMID:26867682

  4. CHK1 expression in Gastric Cancer is modulated by p53 and RB1/E2F1: implications in chemo/radiotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela-Iparraguirre, J.; Prado-Marchal, L.; Fernandez-Fuente, M.; Gutierrez-González, A.; Moreno-Rubio, J.; Muñoz-Fernandez, M.; Sereno, M.; Sanchez-Prieto, R.; Perona, R.; Sanchez-Perez, I.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation has a limited but relevant role in the adjuvant therapy of gastric cancer (GC) patients. Since Chk1 plays a critical function in cellular response to genotoxic agents, we aimed to analyze the role of Chk1 in GC as a biomarker for radiotherapy resistance. We analyzed Chk1 expression in AGS and MKN45 human GC cell lines by RT-QPCR and WB and in a small cohort of human patient’s samples. We demonstrated that Chk1 overexpression specifically increases resistance to radiation in GC cells. Accordingly, abrogation of Chk1 activity with UCN-01 and its expression with shChk1 increased sensitivity to bleomycin and radiation. Furthermore, when we assessed Chk1 expression in human samples, we found a correlation between nuclear Chk1 accumulation and a decrease in progression free survival. Moreover, using a luciferase assay we found that Chk1’s expression is controlled by p53 and RB/E2F1 at the transcriptional level. Additionally, we present preliminary data suggesting a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism, involving miR-195 and miR-503, which are inversely correlated with expression of Chk1 in radioresistant cells. In conclusion, Chk1/microRNA axis is involved in resistance to radiation in GC, and suggests Chk1 as a potential tool for optimal stratification of patients susceptible to receive adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery. PMID:26867682

  5. Review of hematological indices of cancer patients receiving combined chemotherapy & radiotherapy or receiving radiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman

    2016-09-01

    We observed the outcomes of chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CR) or radiotherapy (RT) alone for cancer patients of larynx, breast, blood and brain origins through complete blood count (CBC). Following were more depressed in CR patients: mean corpuscular hemoglobin-MCH & lymphocytes-LYM, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-MCHC, hemoglobin-HB and red blood cells-RBC. In RT patients, following were more depressed: LYM, MCH and MCHC. Overall, in all cancer patients, the lymphocytes were depressed 52%. There existed a significant difference between white blood cells and RBC in both CR and RT patients. A significant moderate negative correlation is found in HB with the dose range 30-78 (Gray) given to the CR cancer patients. More number of CBC parameters affected in patients treated with CR and RT; but in less percentage as compared to patients who treated with RT alone. The cancer patients suffered from anemia along with immune modulations from the treatments. PMID:27423975

  6. Radiotherapy for Graves' disease. The possible role of low-dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Jiménez, Pedro Lara; Rovirosa, Àngels; Biete, Albert; Linares, Victoria; Belles, Montse; Panés, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) have been used for the treatment of several benign diseases, including arthrodegenerative and inflammatory pathologies. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease and radiotherapy (RT) is a therapeutic option for ocular complications. The dose recommended in the clinical practice is 20 Gy (2 Gy/day). We hypothesized that lower doses (<10 Gy total dose, <1 Gy/day) could results in higher efficacy if we achieved anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of LD-RT. We review current evidence on the effects of RT in the treatment of Graves' disease and the possible use of LD-RT treatment strategy. PMID:27601953

  7. Polymorphic Variants in Oxidative Stress Genes and Acute Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Elisa Eugenia; Abba, Martín Carlos; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Fernánde, Eduardo; Güerci, Alba Mabel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated as an indirect product of radiation therapy (RT). Genetic variation in genes related to ROS metabolism may influence the level of RT-induced adverse effects. We evaluated the potential association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)–related response to radiotherapy injury in breast cancer patients undergoing RT. Materials and Methods Eighty patients receiving conventional RT were included. Acute effects were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores. DNA was extracted from blood and buccal swab samples. SNPs were genotyped for GSTP1, GSTA1, SOD2, and NOS3 genes by polymerase chain reaction–based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Univariate analysis (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence interval [CI]) and principal component analysis were used for correlation of SNPs and factors related to risk of developing ≥ grade 2 acute effects. Results Sixty-five patients (81.2%) showed side effects, 32 (40%) presented moderate to severe acute skin toxicity, and 33 (41.2%) manifested minimal acute skin reactions by the end of treatment. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, nominally significant associations were found among body mass index (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 8.5338 to 1.1274; p=0.022), breast size (OR, 5.11; 95% CI, 17.04 to 1.54; p=0.004), and grade ≥ 2 acute radiation skin toxicity. A significant association was also observed between NOS3 G894T polymorphism (OR, 9.8; 95% CI, 211.6 to 0.45; p=0.041) and grade ≥ 2 acute radiation skin toxicity in patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Conclusion The analysis of the factors involved in individual radiosensitivity contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying this trait. PMID:26790968

  8. Low or High Fractionation Dose {beta}-Radiotherapy for Pterygium? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Fonseca, Ellen Carrara; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Postoperative adjuvant treatment using {beta}-radiotherapy (RT) is a proven technique for reducing the recurrence of pterygium. A randomized trial was conducted to determine whether a low fractionation dose of 2 Gy within 10 fractions would provide local control similar to that after a high fractionation dose of 5 Gy within 7 fractions for surgically resected pterygium. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in 200 patients (216 pterygia) between February 2006 and July 2007. Only patients with fresh pterygium resected using a bare sclera method and given RT within 3 days were included. Postoperative RT was delivered using a strontium-90 eye applicator. The pterygia were randomly treated using either 5 Gy within 7 fractions (Group 1) or 2 Gy within 10 fractions (Group 2). The local control rate was calculated from the date of surgery. Results: Of the 216 pterygia included, 112 were allocated to Group 1 and 104 to Group 2. The 3-year local control rate for Groups 1 and 2 was 93.8% and 92.3%, respectively (p = .616). A statistically significant difference for cosmetic effect (p = .034), photophobia (p = .02), irritation (p = .001), and scleromalacia (p = .017) was noted in favor of Group 2. Conclusions: No better local control rate for postoperative pterygium was obtained using high-dose fractionation vs. low-dose fractionation. However, a low-dose fractionation schedule produced better cosmetic effects and resulted in fewer symptoms than high-dose fractionation. Moreover, pterygia can be safely treated in terms of local recurrence using RT schedules with a biologic effective dose of 24-52.5 Gy{sub 10.}.

  9. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Indications and Controversies for Neoadjuvant Therapy, Adjuvant Therapy, Intraoperative Radiation Therapy, and Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Larrier, Nicole A; Czito, Brian G; Kirsch, David G

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare mesenchymal cancers that pose a treatment challenge. Although small superficial soft tissue sarcomas can be managed by surgery alone, adjuvant radiotherapy in addition to limb-sparing surgery substantially increases local control of extremity sarcomas. Compared with postoperative radiotherapy, preoperative radiotherapy doubles the risk of a wound complication, but decreases the risk for late effects, which are generally irreversible. For retroperitoneal sarcomas, intraoperative radiotherapy can be used to safely escalate the radiation dose to the tumor bed. Patients with newly diagnosed sarcoma should be evaluated before surgery by a multidisciplinary team that includes a radiation oncologist. PMID:27591502

  10. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  11. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  12. Benefit of Radiation Boost After Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Iannalfi, Alberto; Greto, Daniela; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a boost to the tumor bed after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) to the whole breast affects local control and disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,138 patients with pT1 to pT2 breast cancer underwent adjuvant RT at the University of Florence. We analyzed only patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year (range, 1-20 years), with negative surgical margins. The median age of the patient population was 52.0 years (+-7.9 years). The breast cancer relapse incidence probability was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between patient subgroups were compared by the log rank test. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the risk of breast cancer relapse. Results: On univariate survival analysis, boost to the tumor bed reduced breast cancer recurrence (p < 0.0001). Age and tamoxifen also significantly reduced breast cancer relapse (p = 0.01 and p = 0.014, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the boost and the medium age (45-60 years) were found to be inversely related to breast cancer relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 0.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.14-0.52, and HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37-0.99, respectively). The effect of the boost was more evident in younger patients (HR, 0.15 and 95% CI, 0.03-0.66 for patients <45 years of age; and HR, 0.31 and 95% CI, 0.13-0.71 for patients 45-60 years) on multivariate analyses stratified by age, although it was not a significant predictor in women older than 60 years. Conclusion: Our results suggest that boost to the tumor bed reduces breast cancer relapse and is more effective in younger patients.

  13. Relations among Manual RT, Visual RT and IQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Thomas M.; Haith, Marshall M.

    As part of a study to determine whether visual and manual response systems are correlated, 26 children between 40 and 51 months of age took part in visual and manual reaction time (RT) tasks. Subjects, whose RTs had previously been tested at 3 months of age, were tested in 1 of 2 conditions. In the first condition, subjects viewed pictures only…

  14. The adjuvanted influenza vaccines with novel adjuvants: experience with the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine.

    PubMed

    Podda, A

    2001-03-21

    Elderly people and subjects with underlying chronic diseases are at increased risk for influenza and related complications. Conventional influenza vaccines provide only limited protection in the elderly population. In order to enhance the immune response to influenza vaccines, several adjuvants have been evaluated. Among these, an oil in water adjuvant emulsion containing squalene, MF59, has been combined with subunit influenza antigens and tested in clinical trials in comparison with non-adjuvanted conventional vaccines. Data from a clinical database of over 10000 elderly subjects immunised with this adjuvanted vaccine (Fluad, Chiron Vaccines, Siena, Italy) demonstrate that, although common postimmunisation reactions are more frequent in recipients of the adjuvanted vaccine, this vaccine is well tolerated, also after re-immunisation in subsequent influenza seasons. Immunogenicity analyses demonstrate a consistently higher immune response with statistically significant increases of postimmunisation geometric mean titres, and of seroconversion and seroprotection rates compared to non-adjuvanted subunit and split influenza vaccines, particularly for the A/H3N2 and the B strains. The higher immunogenicity profile of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine is maintained also after subsequent immunisations. An even higher adjuvant effect was shown in subjects with low pre-immunisation titre and in those affected by chronic underlying diseases. In conclusion, the addition of MF59 to subunit influenza vaccines enhances significantly the immune response in elderly subjects without causing clinically important changes in the safety profile of the influenza vaccine. PMID:11257408

  15. Phase I study of postoperative radiotherapy concurrent with S-1 in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meng; Peng, Xing-chen; Bi, Feng; Wang, Xin; Li, Qiu; Xu, Feng; Li, Zhi-ping; Shen, Ya-li; Liu, Ji-yan; Zhao, Ya-qing; Cao, Dan; Gou, Hong-feng; Yang, Yu; Chen, Ye; Yi, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil is the standard care for gastric cancer patients after curative surgery. The previous studies revealed that the subgroup of patients with high recurrence risk would benefit most from adjuvant CRT. S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, has showed very effective in metastatic gastric cancer and became the standard option for gastric cancer with D2 dissection. The safety and dosage of S-1 combined with postoperative radiotherapy have not yet been evaluated. This study is to determine the maximum tolerate dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of S-1 given concurrently with postoperative high-dose radiotherapy in gastric cancer. Patients with more advanced stage (pT4 and/or pN+) after R0 resection were recruited. Eligible patients received one cycle standard SOX (S-1 plus oxaliplatin) chemotherapy, then S-1 monotherapy with concurrent radiotherapy for 6 weeks, followed by additional three cycles of SOX. During the concurrent CRT, S-1 was administered on every radiotherapy treatment day according to a predefined dose-escalation schedule. Radiotherapy (3D-RT or IMRT) was given to a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. DLT was defined as grade 3 or 4 hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity. From March 2011 to October 2012, 21 patients were enrolled at five dose levels: 40 (n = 3), 50 (n = 3), 60 (n = 6), 70 (n = 6) and 80 mg/m(2)/day (n = 3). D2-dissection was performed in 18 patients (85.7 %) and 15 patients (71.4 %) had stage III disease. The most common dose-related toxicity was anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue and leucopenia. DLT was occurred in one patient at 60 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 fatigue), one patient at 70 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 vomiting and anorexia), two patients at 80 mg/m(2)/day (one with grade 3 vomiting and anorexia; another with grade 3 febrile leucopenia). Four patients did not complete CRT as planned. Overall, this phase I study demonstrated that postoperative CRT with daily S-1

  16. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgier, Celine; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Heymann, Steve; Spielmann, Marc; Uzan, Catherine; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Arriagada, Rodrigo; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  17. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Stefan Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m{sup 2}), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h). A dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m{sup 2} in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m{sup 2} administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy.

  18. [Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: Efficacy, target volume, dose].

    PubMed

    Dupic, G; Bellière-Calandry, A

    2016-04-01

    The rate of local failure of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer is 20 to 40%, even if they are managed with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy improves local control, but its benefit on global survival remains to be demonstrated. Considered for many years as an adjuvant treatment option for pN2 cancers, it continues nevertheless to be deemed too toxic. What is the current status of postoperative radiotherapy? The Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART) phase III trial should give us a definitive, objective response on global survival, but inclusion of patients is difficult. The results are consequently delayed. The aim of this review is to show all the results about efficacy and tolerance of postoperative radiotherapy and to define the target volume and dose to prescribe. PMID:26996789

  19. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  20. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  1. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  2. Which Patients With Rectal Cancer Do Not Need Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Joye, Ines; Haustermans, Karin

    2016-07-01

    According to current guidelines, the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer patients is preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Improvements in surgical techniques, imaging modalities, chemotherapy regimens, and radiotherapy delivery have reduced local recurrence rates to less than 10%. The current challenge in rectal cancer treatment lies in the prevention of distant metastases, which still occur in more than 25% of the patients. The decrease in local recurrence rates, the need for more effective systemic treatments, and the increased awareness of treatment-induced toxicity raise the question as to whether a more selective use of radiotherapy is advocated. PMID:27238471

  3. Potential Role of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Cervical Thymic Neoplasm Involving Thyroid Gland or Neck

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Ha, Sang Yun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul; Seol, Seung Won; Oh, Young Lyun; Han, Joungho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the clinicopathologic features, treatment outcomes, and role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in cervical thymic neoplasm involving the thyroid gland or neck. Materials and Methods The medical and pathologic records of eight patients with cervical thymic neoplasm were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent surgical resection, including thyroidectomy or mass excision. Adjuvant RT was added in five patients with adverse clinicopathologic features. The radiation doses ranged from 54 Gy/27 fractions to 66 Gy/30 fractions delivered to the primary tumor bed and pathologically involved regional lymphatics using a 3-dimensional conformal technique. Results Eight cases of cervical thymic neoplasm included three patients with carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE) and five with ectopic cervical thymoma. The histologic subtypes of ectopic cervical thymoma patients were World Health Organization (WHO) type B3 thymoma in one, WHO type B1 thymoma in two, WHO type AB thymoma in one, and metaplastic thymoma in one, respectively. The median age was 57 years (range, 40 to 76 years). Five patients received adjuvant RT: three with CASTLE; one with WHO type B3; and one with WHO type AB with local invasiveness. After a median follow-up period of 49 months (range, 11 to 203 months), no recurrence had been observed, regardless of adjuvant RT. Conclusion Adjuvant RT after surgical resection might be worthwhile in patients with CASTLE and ectopic cervical thymoma with WHO type B2-C and/or extraparenchymal extension, as similarly indicated for primary thymic epithelial tumors. A longer follow-up period may be needed in order to validate this strategy. PMID:25648096

  4. Adjuvant Therapy for Thymic Carcinoma – A Decade of Experience in a Taiwan National Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Lee, Yu-Chin; Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Yen, Sang-Hue; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Thymic carcinomas are rare tumors for which surgical resection is the first treatment of choice. The role of adjuvant treatment after surgery is unknown because of limited available data. The present study evaluated the efficacy of post-surgery adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Methods To evaluate the role of adjuvant therapy in patients with thymic carcinoma, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with thymic carcinoma who were diagnosed and treated between 2004 and 2014. Results Among 78 patients with thymic carcinoma, 30 patients received surgical resection. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly longer among these patients than among patients who received other treatments (PFS: 88.4 months vs 9.1 months, p<0.001; OS: 134.9 months vs 60.9 months; p = 0.003). Patients with stage III thymic carcinoma who received surgery had a longer OS than patients who did not receive surgery (70.1 months vs 23.9 months; p = 0.017, n = 11). Among 47 patients with stage IV carcinoma, 12 patients who received an extended thymothymectomy had a longer PFS than 35 patients who did not receive surgery (18.9 months vs 8.7 months; p = 0.029). Among 30 patients (with stage I- IV carcinoma) who received primary lesion surgery, 19 patients received an R0 resection and 9 patients of the 19 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. These patients had longer PFS (50.3 months) than 2 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy (5.9 months) or 4 patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (7.5 months) after surgery (p = 0.003). Conclusions Surgical resection should be considered for patients with thymic carcinoma, even for patients with locally advanced or stage IV carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in a better PFS after R0 resection. PMID:26757052

  5. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2016-02-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  6. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  7. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Daniel H; Williams, Terence M; Goldstein, Daniel A; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true "net health benefit" from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  8. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  9. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  10. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  11. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  12. The Impact of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for High-Grade Gliomas by Histology in the United States Population

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Chad G.; Carlson, Julie A.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Dally, Miranda J.; Barón, Anna E.; Yeh, Norman; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Liu, Arthur K.; Ney, Douglas E.; Damek, Denise M.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the survival impact of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (RT) for malignant gliomas of glioblastoma (GBM), anaplastic astrocytoma (AA), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO), and mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) histology. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried from 1998 to 2007 for patients aged ≥18 years with high-grade gliomas managed with upfront surgical resection, treated with and without adjuvant RT. Results: The primary analysis totaled 14,461 patients, with 12,115 cases of GBM (83.8%), 1312 AA (9.1%), 718 AO (4.9%), and 316 AOA (2.2%). On univariate analyses, adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved overall survival (OS) for GBMs (2-year OS, 17% vs 7%, p<.001), AAs (5-year OS, 38% vs 24%, p<.001), and AOAs (5-year OS, 55% vs 44%, p=.026). No significant differences in OS were observed for AOs (5-year OS, with RT 50% vs 56% without RT, p=.277). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models accounting for extent of resection, age, sex, race, year, marital status, and tumor registry, RT was associated with significantly improved OS for both GBMs (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.50-0.55; P<.001) and AAs (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.48-0.68; P<.001) but only a trend toward improved OS for AOAs (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.45-1.09; P=.110). Due to the observation of nonproportional hazards, Cox regressions were not performed for AOs. A significant interaction was observed between the survival impact of RT and histology overall (interaction P<.001) and in a model limited to the anaplastic (WHO grade 3) histologies. (interaction P=.024), characterizing histology as a significant predictive factor for the impact of RT. Subgroup analyses demonstrated greater hazard reductions with RT among patients older than median age for both GBMs and AAs (all interaction P≤.001). No significant interactions were observed between RT and extent of resection. Identical patterns of significance were

  13. The role of adjuvant radiation in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Diavolitsis, Virginia; Boyle, John; Singh, Diljeet K; Small, William

    2009-04-15

    Endometrial cancer treatment ideally begins with a staging procedure including abdominopelvic washing, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymph node evaluation. Recommendations for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy are determined by recurrence risk. Patients who have undergone staging and have early stage I disease and an absence of high-risk features for recurrence generally are treated with surgery alone. Intermediate-risk patients--those with high-risk stage I disease and some stage II patients--may benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. Several randomized trials show that radiation therapy improves locoregional control among intermediate-risk patients. The optimal type of radiation therapy, whether vaginal brachytherapy or whole-pelvic radiation therapy, remains undetermined, though treatment decision can be guided by risk factors not encompassed by the current staging system. Patients with high-risk stage II disease and stage III disease generally receive external-beam radiotherapy, often in combination with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy alone in advanced-stage patients is a consideration, given the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-122 trial. PMID:19476264

  14. Classification of Laser Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    An immunologic adjuvant, which enhances the magnitude and quality of immune responses to vaccine antigens, has become an essential part of modern vaccine practice. Chemicals and biologicals have been typically used for this purpose, but there are an increasing number of studies that are being conducted on the vaccine adjuvant effect of laser light on the skin. Currently, four different types or classes of laser devices have been shown to systemically enhance immune responses to intradermal vaccination: ultra-short pulsed lasers, non-pulsed lasers, non-ablative fractional lasers and ablative fractional lasers. Aside from involving the application of laser light to the skin in a manner that minimizes discomfort and damage, each type of laser vaccine adjuvant involves emission parameters, modes of action and immunologic adjuvant effects that are quite distinct from each other. This review provides a summary of the four major classes of “laser vaccine adjuvant” and clarifies and resolves their characteristics as immunologic adjuvants. These aspects of each adjuvant’s properties will ultimately help define which laser would be most efficacious in delivering a specific clinical benefit with a specific vaccine. PMID:27104047

  15. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  16. Endometrial cancer - reduce to the minimum. A new paradigm for adjuvant treatments?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Up to now, the role of adjuvant radiation therapy and the extent of lymph node dissection for early stage endometrial cancer are controversial. In order to clarify the current position of the given adjuvant treatment options, a systematic review was performed. Materials and methods Both, Pubmed and ISI Web of Knowledge database were searched using the following keywords and MESH headings: "Endometrial cancer", "Endometrial Neoplasms", "Endometrial Neoplasms/radiotherapy", "External beam radiation therapy", "Brachytherapy" and adequate combinations. Conclusion Recent data from randomized trials indicate that external beam radiation therapy - particularly in combination with extended lymph node dissection - or radical lymph node dissection increases toxicity without any improvement of overall survival rates. Thus, reduced surgical aggressiveness and limitation of radiotherapy to vaginal-vault-brachytherapy only is sufficient for most cases of early stage endometrial cancer. PMID:22118369

  17. Pattern of radiotherapy care in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The paper reveals the changing pattern of Bulgarian Radiotherapy (RT) care after the successful implementation of 15 projects for 100 million euro under the European Regional Development Fund in Operational Programme for Regional Development 2007-2013. The project enables a total one-step modernization of 14 Bulgarian RT Centres and creation of a new one. At the end of the Programme (mid 2015), 16 new Linacs and 2 modern cobalt machines will be available together with 11 virtual CT simulators, 5 CT simulators, 1 MRI and 1 PET CT for RT planning and all dosimetry facilities needed. Such a modernization has moved Bulgarian RT forward, with 2.7 MV units per one million of population (MV/mln.inh) in comparison with 0.9 MV/mln.inh in 2012. Guild of Bulgarian Radiotherapists includes 70 doctors, 46 physicists and 10 engineers, together with 118 RTTs and 114 nurses and they all have treated 16,447 patients in 2013. Major problems are inadequate reimbursement from the monopolistic Health Insurance Fund (900 euro for 3D conformal RT and 1500 euro for IMRT); fragmentation of RT care with 1-2 MV units per Centre; no payment for patient travel expenses; need for quick and profound education of 26% of doctors and 46% of physicists without RT license, along with continuous education for all others; and resource for 5000-9000 more patients to be treated yearly by RT in order to reach 45-50% from current service of 32%. After 15 years of struggle of RT experts, finally the pattern of Bulgarian RT care at 2014-2015 is approaching the level of modern European RT. PMID:26549991

  18. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Bobanga, Iuliana D.; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y.

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24967094

  19. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy after primary treatments for cervical cancer: a critical point of view and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Aloisi, Alessia; Capriglione, Stella; Gennari, Paolo; Linciano, Francesca; Li Destri, Marta; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Montera, Roberto; Plotti, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy represents the standard of care for patients with advanced stage cervical cancer, while radical surgery (RS) and radiotherapy is widely used for treating early stage cervical cancer. However, the poor control of micrometastasis, declining operability, the lack of radiotherapy departments and the high incidence of long-term complications due to radiotherapy have brought about the development of different therapeutic approaches such as neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS. Unfortunately, treatment results are still unsatisfactory due to a high recurrence rate and several authors have studied the possibility to add an adjuvant treatment to primary therapy. We reviewed the literature concerning the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by RS and after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24483847

  1. Optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith; Muss, Hyman B

    2005-12-01

    Mortality in breast cancer has declined in the past decade, owing to advances in diagnosis, surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic treatments. Adjuvant chemotherapy has had a major effect on increasing survival in women with locoregional breast cancer. Like all treatments, adjuvant chemotherapy is a work in progress, and it has evolved from single oral agents to complex multidrug regimens. The choice of regimens is not without controversy, however, and several have been shown to be more effective than others, especially in patients who are at high risk for recurrence. The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel (Taxotere) have been shown to be effective in the adjuvant setting, and they have also been shown to improve the outcomes in node-positive disease. Both disease-free and overall survival are greater with doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide given in a dose-dense, every-2-week schedule with growth factor support than with the same agents given in an every-3-week schedule. Disease-free and overall survival in patients with node-positive disease are greater with docetaxel, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and cyclophosphamide (TAC) than with fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC). Febrile neutropenia is common with the TAC regimen, but it can be minimized with growth factor support. Based on these findings, dose-dense therapy and TAC are the current adjuvant treatments of choice in patients with node-positive disease; other, less-intense regimens may be appropriate in patients with lower-risk disease. Ongoing trials are investigating the efficacy of commonly used regimens, new chemotherapeutic and biologic agents, and novel doses and schedules of currently available agents. PMID:16506631

  2. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  3. Spray drift mitigation with spray mix adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  4. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  5. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  6. Neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment of Siewert type II gastroesophageal junction cancer: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Joseph A.; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T.; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Choi, Minsig; Zhang, Yue; Yoon, Hannah; Ryu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) has been rising in incidence in recent years. The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of GEJ cancer remains unclear, as the largest prospective trials advocating for either adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combine GEJ cancer with either gastric or esophageal cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the association of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant treatment with overall and disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with surgically resected cancer of the true GEJ (Siewert type II). Methods The surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry database (2001–2011) was queried for cases of surgically resected Siewert type II GEJ cancer. A total of 1,497 patients with resectable GEJ cancer were identified, with 746 receiving adjuvant RT and 751 receiving neoadjuvant RT. Retrospective analysis was performed with the endpoints of overall and DSS. Results Using cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, race, stage, grade, histology, and year of diagnosis), we showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a significantly lower death risk [hazard ratio (HR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.97; P value=0.0168] and significantly lower disease-specific death risk (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.97; P value=0.0211) as compared to neoadjuvant RT. Conclusions This analysis of SEER data showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a survival benefit as compared to neoadjuvant RT for the treatment of Siewert type II GEJ cancer. We suggest future prospective studies to compare outcomes of adjuvant versus neoadjuvant treatment for true GEJ cancer. PMID:27284473

  7. Analysis of serial CT images for studying the RT effects in head-neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dell'Oca, Italo; Logghe, Gerlinde; Moriconi, Stefano; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fiorino, Claudio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Images taken during and after RT for head and neck cancer have the potential to quantitatively assess xerostomia. Image information may be used as biomarkers of RT effects on parotid glands with significant potential to support adaptive treatment strategies. We investigated the possibility to extract information based on in-room CT images (kVCT, MVCT), acquired for daily image-guided radiotherapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer patients, in order to predict individual response in terms of toxicity. Follow-up MRI images were also used in order to investigate long term parotid gland deformation. PMID:26737472

  8. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  9. Molecular cloning, expression and the adjuvant effects of interleukin-8 of channel catfish (Ictalurus Punctatus) against Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erlong; Wang, Jun; Long, Bo; Wang, Kaiyu; He, Yang; Yang, Qian; Chen, Defang; Geng, Yi; Huang, Xiaoli; Ouyang, Ping; Lai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as an important cytokine involving in inflammatory and immune response, has been studied as effective adjuvants for vaccines in mammals. However, there are fewer reports about the characterization and adjuvant effects of IL-8 in fish. In this study, cloning and sequence analysis of IL-8 coding region of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were conducted, mature IL-8(rtIL-8) was expressed and evaluated for its adjuvant effects on the immunoprotection of subunit vaccine encoding α-enolase (rENO) of Streptococcus iniae from several aspects in channel catfish. The results showed co-vaccination of rENO with rtIL-8 enhanced immune responses including humoral and cellular immunity, with higher relative percent survival(RPS,71.4%) compared with the moderate RPS of rENO alone(50%) against S. iniae infection at 4 week post vaccination. While rtIL-8 failed to maintain long-lasting immune protection, only with RPS of 26.67% in rENO + rtIL-8-vaccinated fish compared with that of rENO alone(20%) at 8 week, signifying that IL-8 hold promise for use as potential immunopotentiator in vaccines against bacterial infections in fish, whereas it is insufficient to extend the immunoprotection for long time, and further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of IL-8 used as an adjuvant and seek for more effective way to strengthen the adjuvanticity of IL-8. PMID:27373470

  10. Molecular cloning, expression and the adjuvant effects of interleukin-8 of channel catfish (Ictalurus Punctatus) against Streptococcus iniae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erlong; Wang, Jun; Long, Bo; Wang, Kaiyu; He, Yang; Yang, Qian; Chen, Defang; Geng, Yi; Huang, Xiaoli; Ouyang, Ping; Lai, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) as an important cytokine involving in inflammatory and immune response, has been studied as effective adjuvants for vaccines in mammals. However, there are fewer reports about the characterization and adjuvant effects of IL-8 in fish. In this study, cloning and sequence analysis of IL-8 coding region of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were conducted, mature IL-8(rtIL-8) was expressed and evaluated for its adjuvant effects on the immunoprotection of subunit vaccine encoding α-enolase (rENO) of Streptococcus iniae from several aspects in channel catfish. The results showed co-vaccination of rENO with rtIL-8 enhanced immune responses including humoral and cellular immunity, with higher relative percent survival(RPS,71.4%) compared with the moderate RPS of rENO alone(50%) against S. iniae infection at 4 week post vaccination. While rtIL-8 failed to maintain long-lasting immune protection, only with RPS of 26.67% in rENO + rtIL-8-vaccinated fish compared with that of rENO alone(20%) at 8 week, signifying that IL-8 hold promise for use as potential immunopotentiator in vaccines against bacterial infections in fish, whereas it is insufficient to extend the immunoprotection for long time, and further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of IL-8 used as an adjuvant and seek for more effective way to strengthen the adjuvanticity of IL-8. PMID:27373470

  11. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Stalpers, Lukas J.A. . E-mail: l.stalpers@amc.uva.nl; Costa, Hanna C. da; Merbis, Merijn A.E.; Fortuin, Andries A.; Muller, Martin J.; Dam, Frits van

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p < 0.05) and overall (p < 0.05) well-being. Conclusion: Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect.

  12. Size-Tuning Ionization To Optimize Gold Nanoparticles for Simultaneous Enhanced CT Imaging and Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yan; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Xue; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Lin; Lv, Guoxian; Zhang, Xuening; Wang, Hanjie; Gong, Xiaoqun; Chang, Jin

    2016-02-23

    Computed tomography (CT) contrast and radiosensitization usually increase with particle sizes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), but there is a huge challenge to improve both by adjusting sizes under the requirements of in vivo application. Here, we report that AuNPs have great size-dependent enhancements on CT imaging as well as radiotherapy (RT) in the size range of 3-50 nm. It is demonstrated that AuNPs with a size of ∼13 nm could simultaneously possess superior CT contrast ability and significant radioactive disruption. The Monte Carlo method is further used to evaluate this phenomenon and indicates that the inhomogeneity of gold atom distributions caused by sizes may influence secondary ionization in whole X-ray interactions. In vivo studies further indicate that this optimally sized AuNP improves real-time CT imaging and radiotherapeutic inhibition of tumors in living mice by effective accumulation at tumors with prolonged in vivo circulation times compared to clinically used small-molecule agents. These results suggest that ∼13 nm AuNPs may serve as multifunctional adjuvants for clinical X-ray theranostic application. PMID:26815933

  13. Outcomes of Kimura's disease after radiotherapy or nonradiotherapeutic treatment modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ah Ram; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han . E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr; Park, Charn Il; Jun, Yoon Kyung

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of Kimura's disease and to identify the optimal treatment regimen for Kimura's disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 14 patients with Kimura's disease were treated with radiotherapy (RT) and 9 patients were treated with local excision or systemic steroids. The radiation doses ranged from 20 to 45 Gy. Immunohistochemical studies were performed in 13 cases. Results: At RT completion, a marked response in terms of tumor size was noted in most cases. The median follow-up was 65 months. Local control was obtained in 9 (64.3%) of the 14 in the RT group and in 2 (22.2%) of the 9 in the non-RT group. No secondary malignancies were observed in the RT group. Conclusion: These results supports the finding that RT is more effective against Kimura's disease. Simple or immunohistochemical features did not influence the treatment outcome.

  14. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  16. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  17. Single fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases: are all questions answered?

    PubMed

    Chander, S S; Sarin, R

    1999-08-01

    All randomized trials show comparable pain relief rates with single or fractionated radiotherapy (RT) in selected patients. Further studies are required to determine the optimal single dose (our analysis suggests 6-8 Gy), its efficacy in preventing fractures/cord compression and defining criteria for recommending fractionated RT for a select few. Besides this, a 'lingua franca' for pain assessment tools is urgently required. PMID:10577706

  18. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J

    2016-07-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund's adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  19. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  20. Vaccine adjuvants as potential cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Temizoz, Burcu; Kuroda, Etsushi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence obtained from various clinical trials and animal studies suggested that cancer vaccines need better adjuvants than those that are currently licensed, which include the most commonly used alum and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, because of either a lack of potent anti-tumor immunity or the induction of undesired immunity. Several clinical trials using immunostimulatory adjuvants, particularly agonistic as well as non-agonistic ligands for TLRs, C-type lectin receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, have revealed their therapeutic potential not only as vaccine adjuvants but also as anti-tumor agents. Recently, combinations of such immunostimulatory or immunomodulatory adjuvants have shown superior efficacy over their singular use, suggesting that seeking optimal combinations of the currently available or well-characterized adjuvants may provide a better chance for the development of novel adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27006304

  1. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT. PMID:27158022

  2. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  3. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  4. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  5. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-02-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  6. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  7. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  8. Polysaccharides: Candidates of promising vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingli; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium-based adjuvants remain the only adjuvants approved for human use in the USA for over 80 years because of alum's simplicity, tolerability, safety and cost-efficiency. Recent development of vaccines, especially the increasing applications of recombinant subunit and synthetic vaccines, makes aluminium adjuvants cannot stimulate enough immunity to the antigens, since aluminium adjuvants can only induce Th2 type immune responses. So, novel adjuvants are urgent to make up the disadvantages of aluminium adjuvants. However, some major hurdles need to be overcome, not only the scientific knowledge of adjuvants but also unacceptable side-effects and toxicity. A number of carbohydrate-based polysaccharides from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources can act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and recognize pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on immune cells, followed by triggering innate immunity and regulating adaptive immunity. What is more, polysaccharides are safe and biodegradable without tissue deposits as observed in aluminium adjuvants. Therefore, polysaccharide-based compounds and formulations are potential vaccine adjuvant candidates. Here, we mainly review polysaccharide-based adjuvants investigated in recent years. PMID:25994059

  9. Interinstrument Reliability of the RT3 Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the interinstrument reliability of six RT3 accelerometers for measuring physical activities. Each of the six healthy participants, mean age 36.1 years (SD 9.4), carried six RT3 accelerometers (same type and same producer) simultaneously placed ventrally at the waist belt. The participants performed three…

  10. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  11. Using CoRT Thinking in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchior, Timothy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of Edward de Bono's CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) program in English classes during the past five years at Memorial Junior High School in Valley Stream, New York. CoRT tools were used to analyze literary characters and plot development and to generate and organize ideas for writing assignments. (TE)

  12. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  13. The Role of Adjuvant Radiation in Uterine Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Ryu, Janice K.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical and pathological factors significant for overall survival (OS) and local-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) in uterine sarcoma as they relate to adjuvant radiotherapy (AR). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 3,650 patients with uterine sarcoma was conducted using the National Oncology Database, a proprietary database of aggregated tumor registries owned by Impac Medical Systems (Sunnyvale, CA). Adjuvant radiotherapy was defined as postoperative external beam radiation to the pelvis, with or without brachytherapy. Prognostic factors were identified by multivariate analysis (MVA) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival, with significant differences (p < 0.05) determined using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 59 months, with a 5-year OS of 37%. Significant prognostic factors for OS were stage, race/ethnicity, grade, age, histology, lymph node status, and surgical treatment (p < 0.01 for all factors). Use of AR was not predictive for OS. For nonmetastatic cancer patients receiving definitive surgery (n = 2,206), the 5-year LRFFS was 87%. In this group, stage, grade, histology, and AR were prognostic for LRFFS (p < 0.05), with AR associated with improved outcome compared with surgery alone (hazard ratio = 0.4, p < 0.001). Patients with carcinosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, poorly differentiated tumors, and negative lymph nodes had reduced local-regional failure (LRF) with AR (log-rank, p < 0.05 for all). Conclusion: In the largest retrospective analysis of uterine sarcoma published thus far, AR conferred a 53% reduction in the risk of LRF at 5 years. Use of AR may have broader indications than what are currently accepted in clinical practice.

  14. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy - induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-07-01

    Efforts to reduce the severity of postradiotherapy xerostomia include the use of salivary substitutes to gain symptomatic relief, salivary gland stimulants, agents delivered to protect the glands during radiotherapy (RT), and physical means to partially spare the major salivary glands from RT while adequately irradiating tumor targets. These means include advanced RT treatment planning and salivary tissue transfer to nonirradiated areas. The relative potential gain from each of these strategies is discussed in this article. The combination of partial salivary gland sparing and radiation protectors/stimulants may provide additive or synergistic gains in reducing the severity of xerostomia. PMID:12903018

  15. Conjunctival Autograft Alone or Combined With Adjuvant Beta-Radiation? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Carrara Fonseca, Ellen; De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Melani Rocha, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative low single-dose of beta-irradiation ({beta}-RT) in pterygium comparing conjunctival autograft (CAG) surgery with CAG plus adjuvant {beta}-RT in a randomized clinical trial. Methods: This trial was designed as a prospective, randomized, single-center study. Surgery was performed in all cases according to the CAG technique. One hundred and eight pterygia were postoperatively randomized to CAG + {beta}-RT or CAG alone. In the case of {beta}-RT, a (90) Sr eye applicator was used to deliver 10 Gy to the sclera surface at a dose rate of between 200 and 250 cGy/min. After treatment, both an ophthalmologist and a radiation oncologist performed the follow-up examinations. The accumulated data were analyzed using a group sequential test. Results: Between February 2008 and September 2008, 116 eyes with primary pterygium were operated on according to the trial protocol. Adjuvant treatment was performed within 24 h postoperatively. Eight patients were lost to follow-up, resulting in 108 patients who could be analyzed. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-33), in the 54 eyes randomized to receive CAG + {beta}-RT, 5 relapses occurred compared with 12 recurrences in the 54 eyes in CAG, for a crude control rate of 90.8 % vs. 78%; p = 0.032, respectively. The treatment complications as hyperemia, total dehiscence of the autograft and dellen were significantly more frequent in the CAG (p < 0.05). The arm of {beta}-RT resulted in better cosmetic results and improves of symptoms than CAG. Conclusions: A low single-dose of {beta}-RT of 10 Gy after CAG surgery was a simple, effective, and safe treatment that reduced the risk of primary pterygium recurrence, improved symptoms after surgery, resulting in a better cosmetic effect than only CAG.

  16. The superiority of conservative resection and adjuvant radiation for craniopharyngiomas.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Adam; Pekmezci, Melike; Barnes, Michael J; Tihan, Tarik; Gupta, Nalin; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Banerjee, Anu; Mueller, Sabine; Chang, Susan; Berger, Mitchel S; Haas-Kogan, Daphne

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the roles of resection extent and adjuvant radiation in the treatment of craniopharyngiomas. We reviewed the records of 122 patients ages 11-52 years who received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma between 1980 and 2009 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were development of panhypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus (DI), and visual field defects. Of 122 patients, 30 (24%) were treated with gross total resection (GTR) without radiation therapy (RT), 3 (3%) with GTR + RT, 41 (33.6%) with subtotal resection (STR) without RT, and 48 (39.3%) with STR + RT. Median age at diagnosis was 30 years, with 46 patients 18 years or younger. Median follow-up for all patients was 56.4 months (interquartile range 18.9-144.2 months) and 47 months (interquartile range 12.3-121.8 months) for the 60 patients without progression. Fifty six patients progressed, 10 have died, 6 without progression. Median PFS was 61.1 months for all patients. PFS rate at 2 years was 61.5% (95% CI: 52.1-70.9). OS rate at 10 years was 91.1% (95% CI 84.3-97.9). There was no significant difference in PFS and OS between patients treated with GTR vs. STR + XRT (PFS; p = 0.544, OS; p = 0.735), but STR alone resulted in significantly shortened PFS compared to STR + RT or GTR (p < 0.001 for both). STR was associated with significantly shortened OS compared to STR + RT (p = 0.050) and trended to shorter OS compared to GTR (p = 0.066). GTR was associated with significantly greater risk of developing DI (56.3 vs. 13.3% with STR + XRT, p < 0.001) and panhypopituitarism (54.8 vs. 26.7% with STR + XRT, p = 0.014). In conclusion, for patients with craniopharyngioma, STR + RT may provide superior clinical outcome, achieving better disease control than STR and limiting side effects associated with aggressive surgical resection. PMID:22350375

  17. The superiority of conservative resection and adjuvant radiation for craniopharyngiomas

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Adam; Pekmezci, Melike; Barnes, Michael J.; Tihan, Tarik; Gupta, Nalin; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Banerjee, Anu; Mueller, Sabine; Chang, Susan; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the roles of resection extent and adjuvant radiation in the treatment of craniopharyngiomas. We reviewed the records of 122 patients ages 11–52 years who received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma between 1980 and 2009 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were development of panhypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus (DI), and visual field defects. Of 122 patients, 30 (24%) were treated with gross total resection (GTR) without radiation therapy (RT), 3 (3%) with GTR + RT, 41 (33.6%) with subtotal resection (STR) without RT, and 48 (39.3%) with STR + RT. Median age at diagnosis was 30 years, with 46 patients 18 years or younger. Median follow-up for all patients was 56.4 months (interquartile range 18.9–144.2 months) and 47 months (interquartile range 12.3–121.8 months) for the 60 patients without progression. Fifty six patients progressed, 10 have died, 6 without progression. Median PFS was 61.1 months for all patients. PFS rate at 2 years was 61.5% (95% CI: 52.1–70.9). OS rate at 10 years was 91.1% (95% CI 84.3–97.9). There was no significant difference in PFS and OS between patients treated with GTR vs. STR + XRT (PFS; p = 0.544, OS; p = 0.735), but STR alone resulted in significantly shortened PFS compared to STR + RT or GTR (p < 0.001 for both). STR was associated with significantly shortened OS compared to STR + RT (p = 0.050) and trended to shorter OS compared to GTR (p = 0.066). GTR was associated with significantly greater risk of developing DI (56.3 vs. 13.3% with STR + XRT, p < 0.001) and panhypopituitarism (54.8 vs. 26.7% with STR + XRT, p = 0.014). In conclusion, for patients with craniopharyngioma, STR + RT may provide superior clinical outcome, achieving better disease control than STR and limiting side effects associated with aggressive surgical resection. PMID:22350375

  18. Radiation-induced CD8 T-lymphocyte Apoptosis as a Predictor of Breast Fibrosis After Radiotherapy: Results of the Prospective Multicenter French Trial☆

    PubMed Central

    Azria, David; Riou, Olivier; Castan, Florence; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Peignaux, Karine; Lemanski, Claire; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Kirova, Youlia; Lartigau, Eric; Belkacemi, Yazid; Bourgier, Céline; Rivera, Sofia; Noël, Georges; Clippe, Sébastien; Mornex, Françoise; Hennequin, Christophe; Kramar, Andrew; Gourgou, Sophie; Pèlegrin, André; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ozsahin, Esat Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    Background Monocentric cohorts suggested that radiation-induced CD8 T-lymphocyte apoptosis (RILA) can predict late toxicity after curative intent radiotherapy (RT). We assessed the role of RILA as a predictor of breast fibrosis (bf +) after adjuvant breast RT in a prospective multicenter trial. Methods A total of 502 breast-cancer patients (pts) treated by conservative surgery and adjuvant RT were recruited at ten centers. RILA was assessed before RT by flow cytometry. Impact of RILA on bf + (primary endpoint) or relapse was assessed using a competing risk method. Receiver–operator characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were also performed in intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00893035 and final analyses are presented here. Findings Four hundred and fifty-six pts (90.8%) were included in the final analysis. One hundred and eight pts (23.7%) received whole breast and node irradiation. A boost dose of 10–16 Gy was delivered in 449 pts (98.5%). Adjuvant hormonotherapy was administered to 349 pts (76.5%). With a median follow-up of 38.6 months, grade ≥ 2 bf + was observed in 64 pts (14%). A decreased incidence of grade ≥ 2 bf + was observed for increasing values of RILA (p = 0.012). No grade 3 bf + was observed for patients with RILA ≥ 12%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.62. For cut-off values of RILA ≥ 20% and < 12%, sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 34%, 56% and 67%, respectively. Negative predictive value for grade ≥ 2 bf + was equal to 91% for RILA ≥ 20% and positive predictive value was equal to 22% for RILA < 12% where the overall prevalence of grade ≥ 2 bf + was estimated at 14%. A significant decrease in the risk of grade ≥ 2 bf + was found if patients had no adjuvant hormonotherapy (sHR = 0.31, p = 0.007) and presented a RILA ≥ 12% (sHR = 0.45, p = 0.002). Interpretation RILA significantly predicts the risk of breast fibrosis. This study validates the use

  19. Pictorial review. Magnetic resonance for radiotherapy management and treatment planning in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Christopher; Malone, Shawn C; Avruch, Leonard; Breau, Rodney H; Flood, Trevor A; Lim, Megan; Morash, Christopher; Quon, Jeff S; Walsh, Cynthia; Schieda, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    MRI has an important role for radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning in prostate cancer (PCa) providing accurate visualization of the dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL) and locoregional anatomy, assessment of local staging and depiction of implanted devices. MRI enables the radiation oncologist to optimize RT planning by better defining target tumour volumes (thereby increasing local tumour control), as well as decreasing morbidity (by minimizing the dose to adjacent normal structures). Using MRI, radiation oncologists can define the DIL for delivery of boost doses of RT using a variety of techniques including: stereotactic body radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, proton RT or brachytherapy to improve tumour control. Radiologists require a familiarity with the different RT methods used to treat PCa, as well as an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of the various MR pulse sequences available for RT planning in order to provide an optimal multidisciplinary RT treatment approach to PCa. Understanding the expected post-RT appearance of the prostate and typical characteristics of local tumour recurrence is also important because MRI is rapidly becoming an integral component for diagnosis, image-guided histological sampling and treatment planning in the setting of biochemical failure after RT or surgery. PMID:26279086

  20. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0–3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose−10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  1. Towards magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Teodor Marius

    The goal of this work is to address key aspects of the magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) process of cancer sites. MRIgRT is implemented by using a system comprised of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner coupled with a radiation source, in our case a radiotherapy accelerator (Linac). The potential benefits of MRIgRT are the real-time tracking of the tumor and neighbouring healthy anatomy during treatment irradiation leading to on-line treatment plan optimization. Ultimately, this results in an increased accuracy and efficiency of the overall treatment process. A large research effort is conducted at Cross Cancer Institute to develop a hybrid MRI-Linac system consisting of a bi-planar 0.2 T permanent magnet coupled with a 6 MV Linac. The present work is part of this project and aims to address the following key components: (a) magnetic shielding and dosimetric effects of the MRI-Linac system, (b) measure and correction of scanner-related MR image distortions, and (c) MRI-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The first two components are essential for the optimal construction and operation of the MRI-Linac system while the third one represents a direct application of the system. The linac passive shielding was achieved by (a) adding two 10 cm thick steel (1020) plates placed at a distance of 10 cm from the structure on opposite sides of the magnet; and (b) a box lined with a 1 mm MuMetal(TM) wall surrounding the Linac. For our proposed MRI-Linac configuration (i.e. 0.2 T field and rotating bi-planar geometry) the maximum dose difference from zero magnetic field case was found to be within 6% and 12% in a water and water-lung-water phantom, respectively. We developed an image system distortion correction method for MRI that relies on adaptive thresholding and an iterative algorithm to determine the 3D distortion field. Applying this technique the residual image distortions were reduced to within the voxel

  2. Could Radiotherapy Effectiveness Be Enhanced by Electromagnetic Field Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Artacho-Cordón; del Mar, Salinas-Asensio María; Irene, Calvente; Sandra, Ríos-Arrabal; Josefa, León; Elisa, Román-Marinetto; Nicolás, Olea; Isabel, Núñez María

    2013-01-01

    One of the main goals in radiobiology research is to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness without provoking any increase in toxicity. In this context, it has been proposed that electromagnetic fields (EMFs), known to be modulators of proliferation rate, enhancers of apoptosis and inductors of genotoxicity, might control tumor recruitment and, thus, provide therapeutic benefits. Scientific evidence shows that the effects of ionizing radiation on cellular compartments and functions are strengthened by EMF. Although little is known about the potential role of EMFs in radiotherapy (RT), the radiosensitizing effect of EMFs described in the literature could support their use to improve radiation effectiveness. Thus, we hypothesized that EMF exposure might enhance the ionizing radiation effect on tumor cells, improving the effects of RT. The aim of this paper is to review reports of the effects of EMFs in biological systems and their potential therapeutic benefits in radiotherapy. PMID:23867611

  3. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  4. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the squamous part of temporal bone in a young girl treated with adjuvant volumetric arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Goswami, Suchanda; Goswami, Chanchal

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors usually arise in the long bones of children and young adults. Primary ES of the cranium is unusual. Treatment involves multi-modality therapy incorporating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; outcomes are similar to those arising from long bones. We report a case of Primary ES of the squamous part of temporal bone with intracranial extension in a 9-year-old girl who was treated with surgery, chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy by volumetric arc therapy. Post 1-year of treatment the girl is performing well in her classes. PMID:26881573

  5. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Engellau, Jacob; Engström, Katarina; Bauer, Henrik C.; Monge, Odd R.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Eide, Geir E.; Trovik, Clement S.; Bruland, Øyvind S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  6. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Shera, David M.; Lustig, Robert A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  7. Concurrent Cyclophosphamide, Methotrexate, and 5-Fluorouracil Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Saieva, Calogero; Borghesi, Simona; Paoletti, Lisa; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Scoccianti, Silvia; Paiar, Fabiola; Cataliotti, Luigi; Leonulli, Barbara Grilli; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Gian Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequencing of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with early-stage breast cancer remains unclear. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively compared 485 patients treated with conservative breast surgery and postoperative whole-breast RT and six courses of CMF (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m{sup 2}, methotrexate 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2}) with 300 patients who received postoperative CMF only and with 509 patients treated with postoperative whole-breast RT only. The mean radiation dose delivered was 50 Gy (range, 46-52 Gy) with standard fractionation. The boost dose was 6-16 Gy according to resection margins and at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute and late RT toxicity were scored using respectively the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the Late Effects in Normal Tissues Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scale. Results: A slightly higher Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was recorded in the concurrent group (21.2% vs. 11.2% of the RT only group, p < 0.0001). RT was interrupted more frequently in the CMF/RT group respective to the RT group (8.5% vs. 4.1%; p = 0.006). There was no difference in late toxicity between the two groups. All patients in the concurrent group successfully received the planned dose of RT and CT. Local recurrence rate was 7.6% in CT/RT group and 9.8% in RT group; this difference was not statistically significant at univariate analysis (log-rank test p = 0.98). However, at multivariate analysis adjusted also for pathological tumor, pathological nodes, and age, the CT/RT group showed a statistically lower rate of local recurrence (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Whole-breast RT and concurrent CMF are a safe adjuvant treatment in terms of toxicity.

  8. Efficacy and Interaction of Antioxidant Supplements as Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Asuka; Urushima, Hayato; Ito, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is a key component in carcinogenesis. Although radiation produces reactive oxygen species, some anticancer agents such as alkylating agents, platinum and antitumor antibiotics exert cytotoxicity by generating free radicals. Nonenzymatic exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins, minerals, and polyphenols can quench ROS activity. However, whether antioxidants alter antitumor effects during radiotherapy and some types of chemotherapy remains unclear. In the present study, we reviewed antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients during chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Electronic literature searches were performed to select all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in which antioxidants were administered to cancer patients along with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Articles or abstracts written in English were included. In total, 399 reports received primary screening. Duplicated articles and those meeting the exclusion criteria (not RCT, not human, and no oral administration) were excluded. Finally, 49 reports matching the inclusion criteria were included. It was difficult to determine whether antioxidants affect treatment outcomes or whether antioxidants ameliorate adverse effects induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It is desirable to use an evidence-based method to select supplements best suited to cancer patients. Although there are many opinions about risks or benefits of antioxidant supplementation, we could mostly conclude that the harm caused by antioxidant supplementation remains unclear for patients during cancer therapy, except for smokers undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26503419

  9. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-12-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  10. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  11. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy: predictive clinical and dosimetric factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant hypo fractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. Methods and materials Two hundred twelve women with early breast cancer underwent conserving surgery were enrolled in the study. The patients received 40.05 Gy in 15 daily fractions, 2.67 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered with a total dose of 9 Gy in 3 consecutive fractions in 55 women. Physician-rated acute and late toxicity and cosmetic outcome (both subjective and objective) were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy. Results In our population study the mean age was 63 with the 17% (36 pts) of the women younger than 50 years. The median follow-up was 34 months. By the end of RT, 35 patients out of 212 (16%) no acute toxicity, according to the RTOG criteria, while 145 (68%) and 31 patients (15%) developed grade 1 and grade 2 acute skin toxicity, respectively. Late skin toxicity evaluation was available for all 212 patients with a minimum follow up of 8 months. The distribution of toxicity was: 39 pts (18%) with grade 1 and 2 pts (1%) with grade 2. No worse late skin toxicity was observed. Late subcutaneous grade 0-1 toxicity was recorded in 208 patients (98%) and grade 2 toxicity in 3 patients (2%), while grade 3 was observed in 1 patient only. At last follow up, a subjective and objective good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 93% and 92% of the women, respectively. At univariate and multivariate analysis, the late skin toxicity was correlated with the additional boost delivery (p=0.007 and p=0.023). Regarding the late subcutaneous tissue, a correlation with diabetes was found (p=0.0283). Conclusion These results confirm the feasibility and safety of the hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer. In our population the boost administration was resulted to

  12. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  13. RT_Image: an open-source tool for investigating PET in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Graves, Edward E; Quon, Andrew; Loo, Billy W

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a valuable imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of cancer. However, despite evidence that PET may be useful for defining target volumes for radiation therapy, no standardized methodology for accomplishing this task exists. To facilitate the investigation of the utility of PET imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning and accelerate its integration into clinical radiation oncology, we have developed software for exploratory analysis and segmentation of functional imaging datasets. The application, RT_Image, allows display of multiple imaging datasets and associated three-dimensional regions-of-interest (ROIs) at arbitrary view angles and fields of view. It also includes semi-automated image segmentation tools for defining metabolically active tumor volumes that may aid creation of target volumes for treatment planning. RT_Image is DICOM compliant, permitting the transfer of imaging data and DICOM-RT structure sets between the application and treatment planning software. RT_Image has been used by radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and radiation physicists to analyze over 200 PET datasets. Novel segmentation techniques have been implemented within this programming framework for therapy planning and for evaluation of molecular imaging-derived parameters as prognostic indicators. RT_Image represents a freely-available software base on which further investigations of the utlity of PET and molecular imaging in radiation oncology may be built. The development of tools such as this is critical in order to realize the potential of molecular imaging-guided radiation therapy. PMID:17375973

  14. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations. PMID:27274998

  15. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pillsbury, H.C. III; Webster, W.P.; Rosenman, J.

    1986-05-01

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study.

  16. Frontiers in Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The development of breast-conserving treatment for early-stage breast cancer is one of the most important success stories in radiation oncology in the latter half of the twentieth century. Lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy provides an appealing alternative to mastectomy for many women. In recent years, there has been a shift in clinical investigational focus toward refinements in the methods of delivering adjuvant radiotherapy that provide shorter, more convenient schedules of external-beam radiotherapy and interstitial treatment. Expedited courses of whole-breast treatment have been demonstrated to be equivalent to traditional lengthier courses in terms of tumor control and cosmetic outcome and to provide an opportunity for cost efficiencies. PMID:25113764

  17. What make differences in the outcome of adjuvant treatments for resected gastric cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Toshifusa; Fujii, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    After a long history of Dark Age of adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer, definite evidences of survival benefit from adjuvant treatment have been reported since 2000s. These survival benefits are likely attributed to something new approach different from pervious studies. In 2001, South West Oncology Group INT0116 trial yielded survival benefit in curatively resected gastric cancer patients with postoperative chemoradiotherapy [5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + Leucovorin + radiotherapy], followed by positive result by MAGIC Trial, employing peri-operative(pre- and postoperative chemotherapy with Epirubicin, cisplatin (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (ECF) regimen in patients with curative resection. A novel drug [S1: ACTS-GC (Adjuvant chemotherapy trial of TS-1 for gastric cancer) in 2007], or new drug combination chemotherapys [CDDP + 5-FU: FNCLCC/FFCD (Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte contre le cancer/Federation Francophone de Cancerologie Digestive) in 2011, Capecitabine + Oxaliplatin: CLASSIC in 2012] also produced positive results in terms of improved prognosis. Neoadjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy, novel anti-cancer drugs, and chemoradiotherapy might be the key words to develop further improvement in the adjuvant treatment of resectable gastric cancer. Moreover, it is not new but still true to stress the importance of D2 surgery as the baseline treatment in order to minimize the amount of residual tumor after surgery. PMID:25206264

  18. Chemically enhanced radiotherapy: visions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of cancer management, with more than a third of all cancer cures being attributable to RT. Despite the advances in RT over the past century, the overall outcomes in a majority of malignancies are still unsatisfactory. There has been a constant endeavor to enhance the outcome of RT, and this has been in the form of altered fractionation, oxymimetic radiosensitizers, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic therapy and anti-growth factor receptor targeted therapies. This article presents a vision for the future, with emphasis upon emerging prospects which could enhance RT outcomes. Positive speculations regarding the use of immunological aspects, the use of nanoscale technology and the adoption of metronomic concurrent chemotherapy have been presented. Also, the potential with the use of low dose hyperradiosensitivity in enhancing chemotherapy outcomes too has been discussed. In this era of evidence based clinical practise, there exists a strong obsession towards the ‘present’ with ‘contempt towards the future’. Accepting the shortcomings of the existing modalities, there must be a strong zeal towards discovering better methodologies to enhance radiotherapeutic outcomes for the sake of a better future. PMID:26904574

  19. Postenucleation orbital radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant melanoma of the choroid with extrascleral extension.

    PubMed Central

    Hykin, P G; McCartney, A C; Plowman, P N; Hungerford, J L

    1990-01-01

    The outcome is reported in 17 patients in whom an eye was enucleated for malignant melanoma of the choroid with extrascleral extension and who subsequently underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy to the orbit as the primary treatment of the extraocular spread of their tumour. Extrascleral extension was encapsulated in five, non-encapsulated in two, and had been surgically transected at enucleation in 10 cases. All the patients have been followed up from enucleation to the present day. Orbital recurrence occurred in only one patient. The overall actuarial survival rate was 51% at 5 years, 44% at 10, and 33% at 15 years. A low orbital recurrence rate of 6% compares very favourably with published figures for this event after enucleation for melanoma with extrascleral extension but without radiotherapy. Adjuvant orbital radiotherapy may have a place in the treatment of selected cases of extracleral extension of intraocular malignant melanoma. Images PMID:2106340

  20. ULTRASOUND-ENHANCED rt-PA THROMBOLYSIS IN AN EX VIVO PORCINE CAROTID ARTERY MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Caudell Stamper, Danielle N.; Vela, Deborah C.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to enhance recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) thrombolysis. In this study, occlusive porcine whole blood clots were placed in flowing plasma within living porcine carotid arteries. Ultrasonically induced stable cavitation was investigated as an adjuvant to rt-PA thrombolysis. Aged, retracted clots were exposed to plasma alone, plasma containing rt-PA (7.1 ± 3.8 μg/mL) or plasma with rt-PA and Definity® ultrasound contrast agent (0.79 ± 0.47 μL/mL) with and without 120-kHz continuous wave ultrasound at a peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.44 MPa. An insonation scheme was formulated to promote and maximize stable cavitation activity by incorporating ultrasound quiescent periods that allowed for the inflow of Definity®-rich plasma. Cavitation was measured with a passive acoustic detector throughout thrombolytic treatment. Thrombolytic efficacy was measured by comparing clot mass before and after treatment. Average mass loss for clots exposed to rt-PA and Definity® without ultrasound (n = 7) was 34%, and with ultrasound (n = 6) was 83%, which constituted a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Without Definity® there was no thrombolytic enhancement by ultrasound exposure alone at this pressure amplitude (n = 5, p < 0.0001). In the low-oxygen environment of the ischemic artery, significant loss of endothelium occurred but no correlation was observed between arterial tissue damage and treatment type. Acoustic stable cavitation nucleated by an infusion of Definity® enhances rt-PA thrombolysis without apparent treatment-related damage in this ex vivo porcine carotid artery model. PMID:21723448

  1. How to Improve Therapeutic Ratio in Radiotherapy of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past two decades, external-beam radiation technology has substantially changed from traditional two-dimensional to conformal three-dimensional to intensity-modulated planning and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Summary Modern techniques of radiotherapy (RT) are highly focused and capable of delivering an ablative dose to targeted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors. SBRT is an option for selected patients with limited tumor volume and non-eligibility for other invasive treatments. Moreover, RT combined with a radiation sensitizer (RS) to increase the therapeutic ratio has shown promising results in select studies, prompting further investigation of this combination. With the undetermined role of RT in treatment guidelines and variation in patterns of treatment failure after RT in patient with HCC, useful biomarkers to guide RT decision-making and selection of patients are needed and emerging. Key Message The objective of this review is to summarize the current RS with SBRT schemes and biomarkers for patient selection used to maximize the effect of RT on HCC. PMID:27493896

  2. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and continuous low-dose temozolomide in patients with recurrent or progressive malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Falco, Teresa; Di Stefano, Domenica; Esposito, Vincenzo; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of reirradiation and systemic chemotherapy as salvage treatment in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Between May 2006 and December 2011, 54 patients with recurrent malignant glioma received hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) plus systemic therapy at University of Rome Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital. All patients had Karnofsky performance score ≥60 and were previously treated with standard conformal RT (60 Gy) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) up to 12 cycles. Thirty-eight patients had a GBM and 16 patients had a grade 3 glioma. The median time interval between primary RT and reirradiation was 15.5 months. At the time of recurrence all patients received HSRT (30 Gy in 6-Gy fractions) plus concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m(2)/day) followed by continuous TMZ at 50 mg/m(2) everyday up to 1 year or until progression. Median overall survival after HSRT was 12.4 months, and the 12- and 24-month survival rates were 53 and 16 %, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6 months, and the 12- and 24-month PFS rates were 24 and 10 %, respectively. KPS >70 (P = 0.04) and grade 3 glioma were independent favourable prognostic factors for survival. In general chemoradiation regimen was well tolerated with relatively low treatment-related toxicity. HSRT plus concomitant TMZ followed by continuous dose-intense TMZ is a feasible treatment option associated with survival benefits and low risk of complications in selected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. The potential advantages of combined chemoradiation schedules in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas need to be explored in future studies. PMID:23129347

  3. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T; Sauld, John F; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T; Pollack, Henry J; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  4. Treatment Outcomes of Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Comparison Between Combined Modality Radio-Chemotherapy and Two Variants of Single Modality Altered Fractionation Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kader, Hosam A.; Mydin, Aminudin R.; Wilson, Matthew; Alexander, Cheryl; Shahi, Jeevin; Pathak, Irvin; Wu, Jonn S.; Truong, Pauline T.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To compare outcomes in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated with radio-chemotherapy (RT-CT), accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AccRT), or hypofractionated radiotherapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Subjects were 321 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal cancer, Stage III or IVA/B, treated between January 2001 and December 2005 at the BC Cancer Agency with RT-CT (n = 157), AccRT (n = 57), or HypoRT (n = 107). Outcomes examined were disease-specific survival (DSS), locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), rate of G-tube use, and rate of hospitalization for acute complications. Results: Median follow-up was 3.4 years. Three-year Kaplan-Meier DSS with RT-CT, AccRT, and HypoRT were 80%, 81%, and 74%, respectively (p = 0.219). Cox regression analysis identified treatment modality as a significant factor affecting DSS (p = 0.038). Compared with RT-CT, the hazard ratio (HR) for DSS was 1.0 with AccRT and 2.0 with HypoRT (p = 0.021). Kaplan-Meier pairwise comparisons found no significant difference in LRC and OS between RT-CT and AccRT. HypoRT was associated with significantly lower LRC (p = 0.005) and OS (p = 0.008) compared with RT-CT. There were significant differences in the rates of G-tube use (p < 0.001) and of hospitalization (p = 0.036) among the three treatment groups, with the most frequent rates observed in the RT-CT group. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, AccRT conferred DSS, LRC, and OS comparable to that of RT-CT. Patients treated with RT-CT experienced higher rates of treatment-related acute toxicities. HypoRT was associated with the least favorable outcomes.

  5. In-vitro investigations of nanoparticle magnetic thermotherapy: adjuvant effects and comparison to conventional heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Z.; Strawbridge, R.; Gaito, C.; Dulatas, L.; Tate, J.; Ogden, J.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Thermotherapy, particularly magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, is a promising modality both as a direct cancer cell killing and as a radiosensitization technique for adjuvant therapy. Dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were mixed with multiple tumor cell lines in solution and exposed to varying magnetic field regimes and combined with traditional external radiotherapy. Heating of cell lines by water bath in temperature patterns comparable to those achieved by nanoparticle hyperthermia was conducted to assess the relative value of nano-magnetic thermotherapy compared with conventional bulk heating techniques and data.

  6. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  7. Radiotherapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation for Bone Oligometastases After Primary Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Xin; Lin, Li-Mei; He, Jun-Yan; Hong, Liang; Li, Jin-Luan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects and toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with androgen deprivation (AD) for bone oligometastases after primary curative RT for prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutively treated PCa patients with bone oligometastases from April 2005 to July 2014. All patients underwent RT combined with AD for oligometastatic bones after curative RT for PCa. Measured outcomes included overall survival (OS) rate, local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), pain relief, and toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS17.0. The median follow-up was 32.5 months (range, 0.6–50.3). The 3-year PFS and OS rates were 22.8% (95% CI, 13.4–37.5%) and 69% (95% CI, 51.7–81.1%), respectively. The number of bone oligometastases and RT schedule were found to be significantly associated with OS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). The 3-year OS for patients with 1 and >1 metastases was 78.8% versus 42.2%, respectively (P = 0.037). The long-course RT was associated with better 3-year OS compared with short-course (76.4% vs 44.1%, P = 0.03). A total of 15 (83.3%, 15/18) patients achieved pain relief. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. Long-course RT combined with ADT was effective and well-tolerated in PCa patients with bone oligometastases after curative RT for PCa. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate the findings. PMID:26871838

  8. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  9. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cranial nerve palsy: The importance of MRI for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph T.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, T.-M.; Kang, C.-J.; Ng, S.-H.; Chen, I.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Cheng, A.-J.; Liao, C.-T. . E-mail: cgmhnog@yahoo.com

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate various prognostic factors and the impact of imaging modalities on tumor control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) with cranial nerve (China) palsy. Material and Methods: Between September 1979 and December 2000, 330 NPC patients with CN palsy received radical radiotherapy (RT) by the conventional opposing technique at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou. Imaging methods used varied over that period, and included conventional tomography (Tm) for 47 patients, computerized tomography (CT) for 195 patients, and magnetic resonance image (MRI) for 88 patients. Upper CN (II-VI) palsy was found in 268 patients, lower CN (IX-XII) in 13, and 49 patients had both. The most commonly involved CN were V or VI or both (23%, 12%, and 16%, respectively). All patients had good performance status (World Health Organization <2). The median external RT dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-77.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was also given to 156 patients in addition to external RT, delivered by the remote after-loading, high-dose-rate technique. A total of 139 patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy, in 115 received as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and in 24 concomitant with RT. Recovery from CN palsy occurred in 171 patients during or after radiotherapy. Patients who died without a specific cause identified were regarded as having died with persistent disease. Results: The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year overall survival was 47.1%, 34.4%, and 22.2%. The 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 50.4%, 37.8%, and 25.9%. The 5-year DSS for patients staged with MRI, CT, and Tm were 46.9%, 36.7%, and 21.9%, respectively (p = 0.016). The difference between MRI and CT was significant (p = 0.015). The 3-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year local control was 68.2% if excluding patients who died without a specific cause. Patients who had an MRI had a significantly better tumor control rate than those

  10. Results of NCCTG N0275 (Alliance) - a phase II trial evaluating resection followed by adjuvant radiation therapy for patients with desmoplastic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rule, William G; Allred, Jacob B; Pockaj, Barbara A; Markovic, Svetomir N; DiCaudo, David J; Erickson, Lori A; Deming, Richard L; Schild, Steven E

    2016-08-01

    To examine, in a prospective fashion, the utilization and efficacy of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in patients with resected desmoplastic melanoma (DM). Adult patients with resected, margin-negative, and nonmetastatic DM were eligible for this single-arm prospective phase II study. Patients were to receive postoperative RT, 30 Gy in five fractions, to the operative bed with 2- to 3-cm margins (depending on the tumor location). Nodal basin RT was not allowed. The primary study endpoint was the 2-year local recurrence rate (LRR). Secondary endpoints included the incidence of regional and distant metastatic disease, progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related toxicity. Twenty patients with a single de novo DM lesion meeting trial eligibility criteria were enrolled and treated. The 2-year LRR was 10%, with two patients demonstrating a LR within 2 years of completion of protocol therapy. No regional or distant failures occurred. OS at 2 and 5 years was 95 and 77%, respectively. There were no grade 3 or higher acute or late adverse events that were related to the protocol therapy. Adjuvant RT after wide local excision (WLE) for DM is efficacious and well tolerated. It should be considered for DM patients after margin-negative WLE. Additional study is needed to further refine low-risk patient populations that can potentially have adjuvant RT omitted as part of the treatment plan. PMID:27368067

  11. Data mining DICOM RT objects for quality control in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi R.; DeMarco, John; Low, Daniel; Le, Anh H.; Liu, Brent J.

    2012-02-01

    Our goal in this paper is to data mine the wealth of information contained in the dose-volume objects used in external beam radiotherapy treatment planning. In addition, by performing computational pattern recognition on these mined objects, the results may help identify predictors for unsafe dose delivery. This will ultimately enhance current clinical registries by the inclusion of detailed dose-volume data employed in treatments. The most efficient way of including dose-volume information in a registry is through DICOM RT objects. With this in mind, we have built a DICOM RT specific infrastructure, capable of integrating with larger, more general clinical registries, and we will present the results of data mining these sets.

  12. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  13. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  14. RtI Models for Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Karen; Mursky, Chrystyna V.; Shah-Coltrane, Sneha; Johnsen, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RtI) has promise for helping students, particularly ones with disabilities, achieve higher levels of academic and behavioral success in the general education classroom. What does it mean for gifted students or for those who are gifted and have a learning disability, such as twice-exceptional students? How might current…

  15. Transoral Laser Microsurgery (TLM) ± Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Oropharyngeal Cancer: Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jason T.; Milov, Simon; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Haughey, Bruce H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Document survival, prognostic variables, and functional outcomes of patients with AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer, treated with transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) ± adjuvant therapy. Study Design Analysis of prospectively assembled data pertaining to the above-described patient cohort. Methods Patients treated with TLM for AJCC stage III or IV oropharyngeal cancer at Washington University School of Medicine from 1996 to 2006 were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Recurrence, survival, functional, and human papilloma virus data were analyzed. Results Eighty-four patients met inclusion criteria. Mean follow-up was 52.6 months. Overall AJCC stages were: III 15% and IV 85%. T stages were T1–2, 74%; T3–4, 26%. Eighty-three patients underwent neck dissection, 50 received adjuvant radiotherapy, and 28 received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 94% and 88%, respectively. Disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years was 96% and 92%, respectively. Six patients recurred (7%): locally (one), regionally (four), and distant (five). T stage, positive margins, and p16 status significantly impacted survival. The addition of adjuvant chemo-therapy in high-risk patients did not significantly impact survival. Five patients (6%) had major surgical complications, but without mortality. Eighty-one percent of patients had acceptable swallowing function at last follow-up. Immediately postoperatively, 17% required G-tubes, which dropped to 3.4% of living patients at 3 years. Conclusions In this population, our findings validate TLM ± adjuvant therapy as a highly effective strategy for survival, locoregional control, and swallowing recovery in AJCC stage III and IV oropharyngeal cancer. Our finding also show that p16 positivity improves survival. PMID:19572271

  16. Selecting a specific pre- or postoperative adjuvant therapy for individual patients with operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Evangelos; Liakakos, Theodore; Dova, Lefkothea; Fatouros, Michael; Tsekeris, Pericles; Roukos, Dimitrios H; Kappas, Angelos M

    2006-06-01

    Although the very high locoregional recurrence rates reported with limited D0/D1 surgery can be reduced with extended D2 gastrectomy for operable gastric cancer, overall relapse and survival rates remain poor and can only be improved with adequate perioperative adjuvant treatment. However, despite intensive research, no regimen has been established as standard. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a marginal survival benefit with adjuvant chemotherapy. Two recent large randomized trials for operable gastric cancer, the MAGIC trial and the INT-0116 trial, provide evidence that some patients may benefit from perioperative chemotherapy and chemoradiation, respectively. However, while both trials suggest an overall survival benefit with adjuvant treatment, they don't provide the harm-benefit ratio for specific subsets of patients wih different extent of surgery (D1 or D2) and tumor stage (early [T1,2]/advanced [T3,4]). This lack of evidence complicates current therapeutic adjuvant decisions. Estimating the risk of local and distant recurrence (high, moderate or low) after D1 or D2 surgery in various tumor stages and the expected harm-benefit ratio, the authors provide useful information for decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy with or withour radiotherapy in individual patients. Research on newer cytotoxic and targeted agents may improve treatment efficacy. Simultaneously, advances with microarray-based gene-expression profiling signatures may improve individualized treatment decisions. However, the validation and translation of these genomic classifiers as biomarkers into a completed 'bench-to-bedside' cycle for tailoring treatment to individuals is a major challenge and limits inflated expectations. PMID:16761937

  17. Radiation Therapy Field Extent for Adjuvant Treatment of Axillary Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Ballo, Matthew T.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Ross, Merrick I.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment-related outcomes and toxicity for patients with axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) to either the axilla only or both the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (extended field [EF]). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 200 consecutive patients treated with postoperative RT for axillary lymph node metastases from malignant melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received postoperative hypofractionated RT for high-risk features; 95 patients (48%) received RT to the axilla only and 105 patients (52%) to the EF. Results: At a median follow-up of 59 months, 111 patients (56%) had sustained relapse, and 99 patients (50%) had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 51%, 43%, and 46%, respectively. The 5-year axillary control rate was 88%. There was no difference in axillary control rates on the basis of the treated field (89% for axilla only vs. 86% for EF; p = 0.4). Forty-seven patients (24%) developed treatment-related complications. On both univariate and multivariate analyses, only treatment with EF irradiation was significantly associated with increased treatment-related complications. Conclusions: Adjuvant hypofractionated RT to the axilla only for metastatic malignant melanoma with high-risk features is an effective method to control axillary disease. Limiting the radiation field to the axilla only produced equivalent axillary control rates to EF and resulted in lower treatment-related complication rates.

  18. MicroRT - Small animal conformal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Stojadinovic, S.; Low, D. A.; Hope, A. J.; Vicic, M.; Deasy, J. O.; Cui, J.; Khullar, D.; Parikh, P. J.; Malinowski, K. T.; Izaguirre, E. W.; Mutic, S.; Grigsby, P. W.

    2007-12-15

    A novel small animal conformal radiation therapy system has been designed and prototyped: MicroRT. The microRT system integrates multimodality imaging, radiation treatment planning, and conformal radiation therapy that utilizes a clinical {sup 192}Ir isotope high dose rate source as the radiation source (teletherapy). A multiparameter dose calculation algorithm based on Monte Carlo dose distribution simulations is used to efficiently and accurately calculate doses for treatment planning purposes. A series of precisely machined tungsten collimators mounted onto a cylindrical collimator assembly is used to provide the radiation beam portals. The current design allows a source-to-target distance range of 1-8 cm at four beam angles: 0 deg. (beam oriented down), 90 deg., 180 deg., and 270 deg. The animal is anesthetized and placed in an immobilization device with built-in fiducial markers and scanned using a computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or positron emission tomography scanner prior to irradiation. Treatment plans using up to four beam orientations are created utilizing a custom treatment planning system--microRTP. A three-axis computer-controlled stage that supports and accurately positions the animals is programmed to place the animal relative to the radiation beams according to the microRTP plan. The microRT system positioning accuracy was found to be submillimeter. The radiation source is guided through one of four catheter channels and placed in line with the tungsten collimators to deliver the conformal radiation treatment. The microRT hardware specifications, the accuracy of the treatment planning and positioning systems, and some typical procedures for radiobiological experiments that can be performed with the microRT device are presented.

  19. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials’ physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25483497

  20. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  1. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  2. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  3. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  4. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  5. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  6. The Influence of Pretreatment Characteristics and Radiotherapy Parameters on Time Interval to Development of Radiation-Associated Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Ahmed, Irfan M.; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment characteristics and radiotherapy parameters which may influence time interval to development of radiation-associated meningioma (RAM). Methods and Materials: A Medline/PUBMED search of articles dealing with RAM yielded 66 studies between 1981 and 2006. Factors analyzed included patient age and gender, type of initial tumor treated, radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume, and time interval from RT to development of RAM. Results: A total of 143 patients with a median age at RT of 12 years form the basis of this report. The most common initial tumors or conditions treated with RT were medulloblastoma (n = 27), pituitary adenoma (n = 20), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 20), low-grade astrocytoma (n = 19), and tinea capitis (n = 14). In the 116 patients whose RT fields were known, 55 (47.4%) had a portion of the brain treated, whereas 32 (27.6%) and 29 (25.0%) had craniospinal and whole-brain fields. The median time from RT to develop a RAM or latent time (LT) was 19 years (range, 1-63 years). Male gender (p = 0.001), initial diagnosis of leukemia (p = 0.001), and use of whole brain or craniospinal field (p <= 0.0001) were associated with a shorter LT, whereas patients who received lower doses of RT had a longer LT (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The latent time to develop a RAM was related to gender, initial tumor type, radiotherapy volume, and radiotherapy dose.

  7. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  8. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  9. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  10. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja . E-mail: barbara.fossa@ieo.it; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels.

  11. The power of integration: radiotherapy and global palliative care.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Danielle; Grover, Surbhi; Elmore, Shekinah N; Knaul, Felicia M; Atun, Rifat; Caulley, Lisa; Herrera, Cristian A; Jones, Joshua A; Price, Aryeh J; Munshi, Anusheel; Gandhi, Ajeet K; Shah, Chiman; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a powerful tool for the palliation of the symptoms of advanced cancer, although access to it is limited or absent in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). There are multiple factors contributing to this, including assumptions about the economic feasibility of RT in LMICs, the logical challenges of building capacity to deliver it in those regions, and the lack of political support to drive change of this kind. It is encouraging that the problem of RT access has begun to be included in the global discourse on cancer control and that palliative care and RT have been incorporated into national cancer control plans in some LMICs. Further, RT twinning programs involving high- and low-resource settings have been established to improve knowledge transfer and exchange. However, without large-scale action, the consequences of limited access to RT in LMICs will become dire. The number of new cancer cases around the world is expected to double by 2030, with twice as many deaths occurring in LMICs as in high-income countries (HICs). A sustained and coordinated effort involving research, education, and advocacy is required to engage global institutions, universities, health care providers, policymakers, and private industry in the urgent need to build RT capacity and delivery in LMICs. PMID:27481320

  12. Hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plataniotis, George

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after tumorectomy in early breast cancer patients is an established treatment modality which conventionally takes 6-7 wk to complete. Shorter RT schedules have been tested in large multicentre randomized trials and have shown equivalent results to that of standard RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) in terms of local tumor control, patient survival and late post-radiation effects. Some of those trials have now completed 10 years of follow-up with encouraging results for treatments of 3-4 wk and a total RT dose to the breast of 40-42.5 Gy with or without boost. A reduction of 50% in treatment time makes those RT schedules attractive for both patients and health care providers and would have a significant impact on daily RT practice around the world, as it would accelerate patient turnover and save health care resources. However, in hypofractionated RT, a higher (than the conventional 1.8-2 Gy) dose per fraction is given and should be managed with caution as it could result in a higher rate of late post-radiation effects in breast, heart, lungs and the brachial plexus. It is therefore advisable that both possible dose inhomogeneity and normal tissue protection should be taken into account and the appropriate technology such as three-dimensional/intensity modulated radiation therapy employed in clinical practice, when hypofractionation is used. PMID:21160631

  13. Preparation of purified tuberculin RT 23

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Mogens; Bentzon, M. Weis

    1958-01-01

    The technical procedure used in the preparation of a batch of more than 500 g of purified tuberculin (PPD) is described. This batch is designated RT 23, and it is estimated that the quantity now prepared will cover the global demand for purified tuberculin for human use for several years. RT 23 has been prepared by mixing 77 smaller lots of tuberculin selected from a total of 95 lots. The method of preparing the individual lots is described and the experimental data, i.e., the yield and the biological activity ascertained by skin tests in BCG-vaccinated guinea-pigs, are given for all lots. The possible causes of variations in the yield and biological activity of the individual lots are discussed. PMID:13618721

  14. Getting SMaRT in California

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-02-01

    With the year 2000 fast approaching, Waste Management`s Davis Street SMaRT Station in the San Francisco Bay Area is ramping up its yard and wood waste components to reach the magic 50% recycling figure required of california jurisdictions. Waste Management`s Davis Street Station in San Leandro, Calif., is in a growth spurt. Late last year the SMaRT facility--which stands for station for materials recycling and transfer--added 50 tph of yard and wood waste capacity, making it one of the largest facilities in the country that deal with organic wastes, and bringing the multimaterial facility to a total of more than 3,000 tpd of overall capacity.

  15. Intact Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 Complex Predicts Good Response to Radiotherapy in Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soederlund, Karin . E-mail: karin.soderlund@ibk.liu.se; Stal, Olle; Skoog, Lambert; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the expression and predictive role of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) for the outcome of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The protein expression of ATM and the DNA repair proteins in the MRN complex were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 224 women with early breast cancer, who were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Compared with normal breast tissue, the staining intensity of Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1, and ATM was reduced in a majority of the tumors. Weak expression of the MRN complex was correlated with high histologic grade and estrogen receptor negativity (p = 0.01 and p 0.0001, respectively). Radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence as compared with chemotherapy (p = 0.04). The greatest benefit of radiotherapy was seen in patients with moderate/strong expression of the MRN complex (relative risk = 0.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.098-0.72, p 0.009), whereas patients with negative/weak MRN expression had no benefit of radiotherapy compared with adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that an intact MRN complex is important for the tumor cell eradicating effect of radiotherapy. Conclusions: Reduced expression of the MRN complex predicts a poor effect of radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer.

  16. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  17. The School Psychologist's Role in Response to Intervention (RtI): Factors That Influence RtI Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yenni, Amanda; Hartman, Amie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the actual implementation of Response to Intervention (RtI) was related to school psychologists' knowledge, district opportunities for RtI training within the school district, and school psychologists' attitudes toward RtI. The implementation and use of RtI was predicted to be dependent upon those…

  18. Efficacy of Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy for Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunmi; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Yun-Han; Oh, Won Yong; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Ki Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy (RT) on progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Methods We reviewed the records of 22 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer treated with RT between 2008 and 2014. The median radiation dose for recurrent disease was 57.6 Gy (range, 45–75.6 Gy). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the type of RT: patients underwent RT without previous history of irradiation (n = 14) and those treated with secondary RT (reirradiation: n = 8) at the time of recurrence. Results The median follow-up period was 24.9 months (range, 4.5–66.6 months). Progression was observed in 14 patients (including 8 with loco-regional failure and 9 with distant metastases). Distant metastases were related to the RT dose (<70 Gy, P = 0.031). The 2-year loco-regional control (LRC), PFS, and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.6%, 45.1%, and 82.0%, respectively. The LRC rate was not different between the patients treated with RT for the first time and those treated with reirradiation (P = 0.101, 2-year LRC 79.5% vs. 41.7%). However, reirradiation was related to poor PFS (P = 0.022) and OS (P = 0.002). An escalated RT dose (≥70 Gy) was associated with a higher PFS (P = 0.014, 2-year PFS 63.5% vs. 20.8%). Conclusion Salvage RT for locally recurrent colorectal cancer can be offered when surgery is impossible. Dose-escalated RT shows a possible benefit in reducing the risk of progression. PMID:27218097

  19. Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: New Indications and Directions for Future Study.

    PubMed

    Ohri, Nitin; Dawson, Laura A; Krishnan, Sunil; Seong, Jinsil; Cheng, Jason C; Sarin, Shiv K; Kinkhabwala, Milan; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Coleman, C Norman; Guha, Chandan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide; its incidence is increasing in the United States. Depending on disease extent and underlying liver status, patients may be treated with local, locoregional, and/or systemic therapy. Recent data indicates that radiotherapy (RT) can play a meaningful role in the management of HCC. Here, we review published experiences using RT for HCC, including the use of radiosensitizers and stereotactic RT. We discuss methods for performing preclinical studies of RT for HCC and biomarkers of response. As a part of the HCC Working Group, an informal committee of the National Cancer Institute's Radiation Research Program, we suggest how RT should be implemented in the management of HCC and identify future directions for the study of RT in HCC. PMID:27377923

  20. Elderly Patients With Painful Bone Metastases Should be Offered Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Sarah; Presutti, Roseanna; Zhang Liying; Salvo, Nadia; Hird, Amanda; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Mitera, Gunita; Sinclair, Emily; DeAngelis, Carlo; Nguyen, Janet; Napolskikh, Julie; Chow, Edward

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in relieving metastatic bone pain in elderly patients. Methods and Materials: The response to RT for palliation of metastatic bone pain was evaluated from a prospective database of 558 patients between 1999 and 2008. The pain scores and analgesic intake were used to calculate the response according to the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party palliative RT endpoints. Subgroup analyses for age and other demographic information were performed. Results: No significant difference was found in the response rate in patients aged >=65, >=70, and >=75 years compared with younger patients at 1, 2, or 3 months after RT. The response was found to be significantly related to the performance status. Conclusion: Age alone did not affect the response to palliative RT for bone metastases. Elderly patients should be referred for palliative RT for their painful bone metastases, regardless of age, because they receive equal benefit from the treatment.

  1. Adjuvant Therapeutic Modalities in Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of Esophagus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bingwen; Li, Tao; Zhou, Qiang; Ma, Daiyuan; Chen, Yongshun; Huang, Meijuan; Peng, Feng; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Jiang; Ding, Zhenyu; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Ren, Li; Yu, Min; Gong, Youling; Li, Yanying; Chen, Longqi; Lu, You

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the treatment pattern and survival of patients receiving radical resection for primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus (PSCCE). This retrospective study included 150 patients who received radical resection of PSCCE. Data were retrieved from 4 centers in Western China. Thirty-nine of 150 patients received postoperative chemo-radiotherapy, 62 received postoperative chemotherapy, and 49 received radical resection only. The median radiation dosage was 50 Gy. The chemotherapeutic regimen was platinum-based and lasted for 2 to 6 cycles (median, 3). Median disease-free survival (mDFS) and overall survival (mOS) were 12.0 and 18.3 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that postoperative therapy did not improve survival in limited stage I (LSI) disease, whereas postoperative chemotherapy improved survival in limited stage II (LSII) disease. Relative to chemotherapy alone, chemoradiotherapy did not improve survival in patients with completely resected LSII disease. A multivariate analysis indicated an association of no postoperative chemotherapy with shorter DFS (P = 0.050) and OS (P = 0.010). Higher lymph node stage and length of disease longer than 3 cm were poor prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival in PSCCE patients with completely resected LSII disease. Adjuvant treatment with postoperative chemotherapy alone or postoperative chemo-radiotherapy does not increase survival in completely resected LSI disease. PMID:27124057

  2. [Status report of Hungarian radiotherapy based on treatment data, available infrastucture, and human resources].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Király, Réka; Fodor, János; Kásler, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to report the status of Hungarian radiotherapy (RT) based on the assessment of treatment data in years 2012 to 2014, available infrastructure, and RT staffing. Between December 2014 and January 2015, a RT questionnaire including 3 parts (1. treatment data; 2. infrastructure; 3. staffing) was sent out to all Hungarian RT centers (n=12). All RT centers responded to all questions of the survey. 1. Treatment data: In 2014, 33,162 patients were treated with RT: 31,678 (95.5%) with teletherapy, and 1484 (4.5%) with brachytherapy (BT). Between 2012 and 2014, the number of patients treated with radiotherapy increased with 6.6%, but the number of BT patients decreased by 11%. Forty-two percent of all patients were treated in the two centers of the capital: 9235 patients (28%) at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO), and 4812 (14%) at the Municipial Oncoradiology Center (MOC). Out of the patients treated on megavoltage RT units (n=22,239), only 901 (4%) were treated with intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and 2018 (9%) with image-guided RT (IGRT). In 2014, 52% of all BT treatments were performed in Budapest: NIO - 539 patients (36%); MOC - 239 patients (16%); and BT was not available in 3 RT centers. Prostate I-125 seed implants and interstitial breast BT was utilized in one, prostate HDR BT in two, and head&neck implants in three centers. 2. Infrastructure: Including ongoing development projects funded by the European Union, by the end of year 2015, 39 megavoltage teletherapy units, and 12 HDR BT units will be in use in 13 available Hungarian RT centers. 3. Staffing: Actually, 92 radiation oncologists (RO), 29 RT residents, 61 medical physicists, and 229 radiation therapy technologists are working in 12 RT centers. There are 23 vacant positions (including 11 RO positions) available at the Hungarian RT centers. According to the professional minimal requirements and WHO guidelines, the implementation of 11 new linear accelerators, and 1 BT units

  3. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  4. Improved Survival Endpoints With Adjuvant Radiation Treatment in Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Vance, Sean; Suri, Jaipreet S.; Mahan, Meredith; Munkarah, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the impact of adjuvant radiation treatment (RT) on recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with high-risk 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We identified 382 patients with high-risk EC who underwent hysterectomy. RFS, DSS, and OS were calculated from the date of hysterectomy by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to explore the risks associated with various factors on survival endpoints. Results: The median follow-up time for the study cohort was 5.4 years. The median age was 71 years. All patients underwent hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, 93% had peritoneal cytology, and 85% underwent lymphadenectomy. Patients with endometrioid histology constituted 72% of the study cohort, serous in 16%, clear cell in 7%, and mixed histology in 4%. Twenty-three percent of patients had stage II disease. Adjuvant management included RT alone in 220 patients (57%), chemotherapy alone in 25 patients (7%), and chemoradiation therapy in 27 patients (7%); 110 patients (29%) were treated with close surveillance. The 5-year RFS, DSS, and OS were 76%, 88%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was a significant predictor of RFS (P<.001) DSS (P<.001), and OS (P=.017). Lymphovascular space involvement was a significant predictor of RFS and DSS (P<.001). High tumor grade was a significant predictor for RFS (P=.038) and DSS (P=.025). Involvement of the lower uterine segment was also a predictor of RFS (P=.049). Age at diagnosis and lymphovascular space involvement were significant predictors of OS: P<.001 and P=.002, respectively. Conclusion: In the treatment of patients with high-risk features, our study suggests that adjuvant RT significantly improves recurrence-free, disease-specific, and overall survival in patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma

  5. [Axillary treatment in breast cancer: surgery, radiotherapy, or none of these?].

    PubMed

    Boersma, Liesbeth J; van der Sangen, Maurice J C

    2015-01-01

    The AMAROS trial showed that substituting axillary lymph node dissection by radiotherapy of the axillary and periclavicular nodes (ART) in patients with sentinel node (SN) metastases results in less lymphoedema, without a significant difference in the 5-year axillary recurrence rate (ARR). Three surgical studies showed no increase in ARR after omitting axillary treatment in cases of limited SN metastases, provided that adjuvant systemic therapy and tangential breast radiotherapy were applied. On the other hand, several recent radiotherapy trials, including a meta-analysis by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group, showed that regional radiotherapy improves disease-free survival where there are positive axillary nodes. In view of the low ARR and good overall survival with contemporary breast cancer treatments, limiting axillary treatment and its associated morbidity is a logical development. However, it is too early to omit axillary treatment in all SN-positive patients. ART is a safe next step in reducing axillary treatment. PMID:26488194

  6. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Qin, Qin; Sun, Jinglong; Han, Dan; Wang, Zhongtang; Teng, Junjie; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM). Methods Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events. Results Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005) compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232). However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage. PMID:26930609

  7. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  8. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  9. Adjuvant Cancer Biotherapy by Viscum Album Extract Isorel: Overview of Evidence Based Medicine Findings.

    PubMed

    Sunjic, Suzana Borovic; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Vukovic, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Weiss, Elisabeth Sussman; Soldo, Ivo; Djakovic, Nikola; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-09-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidence based findings describing effects of the Viscum album extract Isorel in cancer therapy with respect to the type of therapy, stage and type of illness. This study presents cumulated data for 74 patients with different types and stages of cancer treated by Viscum album extract as adjuvant treatment to different conventional therapies, mostly combined surgery and radiotherapy. The biotherapy effectiveness was evaluated according to the outcome as (1) no major therapeutic improvement (15% of patients), (2) prevention of tumor recurrence (47% of patients) and (3) regression of cancer (38% of patients). Notably, there was no obvious health worsening during the follow up period at all. Thus, the results obtained for conventional anticancer therapies combined with adjuvant biotherapy based on Viscum album extract seem to be beneficial for the majority of cancer patients (85%) without serious side effects. PMID:26898069

  10. Early MRI changes in glioblastoma in the period between surgery and adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Amelio, Dante; Ricciardi, Giuseppe K; Zoccatelli, Giada; Magon, Stefano; Pizzini, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Amichetti, Maurizio; Beltramello, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the increase in MRI contrast enhancement (CE) occurring in glioblastoma during the period between surgery and initiation of chemo-radiotherapy, thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were analyzed by early post-operative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging within three days of surgery and by pre-adjuvant magnetic resonance (PAMR) examination before adjuvant therapy. Areas of new CE were investigated by use of EPMR diffusion-weighted imaging and PAMR perfusion imaging (by arterial spin-labeling). PAMR was acquired, on average, 29.9 days later than EPMR (range 20-37 days). During this period an increased area of CE was observed for 17/37 patients. For 3/17 patients these regions were confined to areas of reduced EPMR diffusion, suggesting postsurgical infarct. For the other 14/17 patients, these areas suggested progression. For 11/17 patients the co-occurrence of hyperperfusion in PAMR perfusion suggested progression. PAMR perfusion and EPMR diffusion did not give consistent results for 3/17 patients for whom small new areas of CE were observed, presumably because of the poor spatial resolution of perfusion imaging. Before initiation of adjuvant therapy, areas of new CE of resected glioblastomas are frequently observed. Most of these suggest tumor progression, according to EPMR diffusion and PAMR perfusion criteria. PMID:23264191

  11. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  12. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  13. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  14. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  15. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  16. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  17. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  18. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    PubMed Central

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin® couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90° and 270° microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0° microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head immobilizer added ±0.1 mm to

  19. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  20. The role of surgical margins in treatment of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors: Experience of a single institution with 512 patients treated with adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, Gaetano . E-mail: gaetano.bacci@ior.it; Longhi, Alessandra; Briccoli, Antonio; Bertoni, Franco; Versari, Michela; Picci, Piero

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the importance of surgical margins for local and systemic control of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT). Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1999, 512 patients with ESFTs entered 4 different adjuvant and neoadjuvant studies performed at a single institution. Of these patients, 335 were treated with surgery alone (196) or surgery followed by radiotherapy at doses of 44.8 Gy (139). We compared their outcome with that of the 177 patients who were locally treated by radiotherapy at 60 Gy. Results: Local control (88.8% vs. 80.2%, p < 0.009) and 5-year disease-free survival (63.8% vs. 47.6%, p < 0.0007) were significantly better in patients treated with surgery and, among them, in those with adequate surgical margins (96.6% vs. 71,7%, p < 0.0008, and 69.6% vs. 46.3%, p < 0.0002). Nonetheless, better results were observed only in extremity tumors. Conclusions: Surgery is better than radiotherapy in cases of extremity ESFT with achievable adequate surgical margins, and in cases of inadequate surgical margins, adjuvant reduced-dose radiotherapy is ineffective. Therefore, when inadequate margins are expected, patients are better treated with full-dose radiotherapy from the start.

  1. The prognosis factor of adjuvant radiation therapy after surgery in uterine sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hai-Ling; Meng, Mao-Bin; Chen, Xiu-Li; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Bai-Lin; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study evaluated the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (AR) after surgery in patients with uterine sarcoma and analyzed the prognostic factors of local-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients and methods A study of a total of 182 patients with uterine sarcoma was conducted between June 1994 and October 2014. Adjuvant radiotherapy was defined as postoperative external beam radiation to the pelvis (30–50 Gray/10–25 fractions at five fractions/week). The primary end point was LRFFS, and the secondary end point was OS. Kaplan–Meier curves were compared using the log-rank test. Cox regression analyses were used to determine prognosticators for LRFFS and OS. Results The median follow-up time of all patients was 75 months, with a 5-year LRFFS of 62.1%. The 2-year and 5-year LRFFS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (83.4% vs 70.3%; 78% vs 55.3%; P=0.013). The 5-year OS of all patients was 56.2%, and no significant differences were observed in the 2-year and 5-year OS rates between these two groups (82.7% vs 71.4%; 64.1% vs 51.7%; P=0.067). Importantly, in patients with leiomyosarcoma, the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS and OS rates were longer for those who received AR than for those who did not receive AR (P=0.04 and P=0.02 for the 2-year and 5-year LRFFS, respectively). Conclusion Patients with uterine sarcoma who were treated with AR after surgery demonstrated an improved LRFFS compared with those who were treated with surgery alone, especially those patients with leiomyosarcoma. Therefore, the role of personalized adjuvant radiation for patients with uterine sarcoma still requires further discussion. PMID:26357482

  2. Immunological interactions in radiotherapy-opening a new window of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Tapesh; Purushothaman, Kiran; Puthiyottil, Sanudev Sadanandan Vadakke; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Muttah, Geetha

    2016-02-01

    After a span of significant developments & advances we have reached a plateau in all the oncological disciplines in last decade. Escalation of dose of radiotherapy (RT) became possible with emergence of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Different radiosensitizing agents starting from conventional cytotoxic drugs to hypoxic radiosensitizers have been tried to increase the effect of RT. However technological advancement hasn't been translated into significant clinical benefits. Exploiting the immune system to enhance the effect of RT is a relatively new concept and a fast growing area in the field of oncology. RT cannot longer be considered as a localized treatment, but rather as a systemic weapon for solid tumors. The phenomenon of abscopal effect, meaning the action of RT upon distant 'out-of-field' foci of malignancies has been a major focus of recent research, and holds great promise for the future. In this review article we are going to discuss the immunological interactions in RT and its promising clinical implications. PMID:26904573

  3. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  4. Radiotherapy Timing in 4,820 Patients With Breast Cancer: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Detti, Beatrice; Bruni, Alessio; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between a delay in radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery and ipsilateral breast recurrence (BR). Methods and Materials: We included in our analysis 4,820 breast cancer patients who had undergone postoperative RT at University of Florence. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the interval between surgery and RT (T1, <60 days; T2, 61-120 days; T3, 121-180 days; and T4, >180 days). Results: On multivariate analysis, the timing of RT did not reach statistical significance in patients who received only postoperative RT (n = 1,935) or RT and hormonal therapy (HT) (n = 1,684) or RT, chemotherapy (CHT), and HT (n = 529). In the postoperative RT-only group, age at presentation, surgical margin status, and a boost to the tumor bed were independent prognostic factors for BR. In the RT plus HT group, age at presentation and boost emerged as independent prognostic factors for BR (p = 0.006 and p = 0.049, respectively). Finally, in the RT, CHT, and HT group, only multifocality was an independent BR predictor (p = 0.01). Only in the group of patients treated with RT and CHT (n = 672) did multivariate analysis with stepwise selection show RT timing as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; p = 0.045). Analyzing this group of patients, we found that most patients included had worse prognostic factors and had received CHT consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil before undergoing RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the timing of RT itself does not affect local recurrence, which is mainly related to prognostic factors. Thus, the 'waiting list' should be thought of as a 'programming list,' with patients scheduled for RT according to their prognostic factors.

  5. Systemic immunotoxicity reactions induced by adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Portuondo, Deivys; Pérez, O; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine safety is a topic of concern for the treated individual, the family, the health care personnel, and the others involved in vaccination programs as recipients or providers. Adjuvants are necessary components to warrant the efficacy of vaccines, however the overstimulation of the immune system is also associated with adverse effects. Local reactions are the most frequent manifestation of toxicity induced by adjuvanted vaccines and, with the exception of the acute phase response (APR), much less is known about the systemic reactions that follow vaccination. Their low frequency or subclinical expression meant that this matter has been neglected. In this review, various systemic reactions associated with immune stimulation will be addressed, including: APR, hypersensitivity, induction or worsening of autoimmune diseases, modification of hepatic metabolism and vascular leak syndrome (VLS), with an emphasis on the mechanism involved. Finally, the authors analyze the current focus of discussion about vaccine safety and opportunities to improve the design of new adjuvanted vaccines in the future. PMID:24607449

  6. Adjuvant treatment of node-positive breast cancer with adriamycin-cyclophosphamide with or without radiation therapy: interim results of an ongoing clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, S E; Salmon, S E; Allen, H; Giordano, G F; Davis, S; Chase, E; Moon, T E; Heusinkveld, R S

    1982-01-01

    During 1974-1980, 138 women with node-positive stage II breast cancer were treated with either eight courses of adriamycin-cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy (82 patients) or AC chemotherapy plus comprehensive regional radiotherapy (56 patients). The overall relapse-free survival of the treated patients was significantly superior (P less than 0.001) to a comparable group of women who underwent surgery alone. This effect of adjuvant therapy was clearly manifest in all groups of patients irrespective of nodal involvement or menopausal status. To date, relapse-free survival for patients receiving AC compared to AC plus radiotherapy is not different (P = 0.7). In summary, wer have demonstrated that a brief 6-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy with AC can significantly reduce the recurrence rate in women with stage II breast cancer. PMID:7036279

  7. Double-edged sword of radiotherapy: a cause of secondary angiosarcoma after breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ahmed, Balen; Vidya, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare and aggressive malignant tumours of vascular or endothelial origin that can originate in the breast. They can be classified as primary or secondary, with the latter most commonly due to postoperative radiotherapy as part of breast conservation therapy (wide local excision and adjuvant radiotherapy) for breast cancer. We report a case of postirradiation secondary angiosarcoma in a 56-year-old woman, alongside a review of the current literature, to inform clinicians of its clinical presentation and characteristics as a high index of clinical suspicion is required for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27113794

  8. Precision radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas: technique and results. [Photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Borgelt, B.B.; Strubler, K.A.; Kutcher, G.J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1980-09-01

    Forty patients with locally extensive, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received precision high dose (PHD) radiation therapy with a 45 MeV betatron. PHD radiotherapy was generally well tolerated. During treatment, only 7 patients experienced significant nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia. Late gastrointestinal radiation reactions were observed in 7 patients. Twelve patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The projected survival of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with PHD radiotherapy is comparable to that of patients with resectable disease operated on for cure. The projected one year survival rate is 49%.

  9. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Shibuya, Keiko; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nishino, Shigeo; Ogo, Etsuyo; Uchida, Nobue; Karasawa, Kumiko; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

  10. Oxaliplatin Plus Dual Inhibition of Thymidilate Synthase During Preoperative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Long-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella; Scott, Nigel; Marone, Pietro; Aloi, Luigi; Sandomenico, Claudia; Lastoria, Secondo; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo Rosario; Scala, Dario; Iodice, Giovanni; Budillon, Alfredo; Comella, Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) plus dual inhibition of thymidilate synthase during preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with poor prognosis for rectal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Sixty-three patients with the following characteristics, a clinical (c) stage T4, cN1-2, or cT3N0 of {<=}5 cm from the anal verge and/or with a circumferential resection margin (CRM) of {<=}5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging), received three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with OXA, 100 mg/m{sup 2}; raltitrexed (RTX), 2.5 mg/m{sup 2} on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), 900 mg/m{sup 2} (31 patients) or 800 mg/m{sup 2} (32 patients); levo-folinic acid (LFA), 250 mg/m{sup 2} on day 2, during pelvic RT (45 Gy). Pathologic response was defined as complete pathological response (ypCR), major (tumor regression grade(TRG) 2 to 3, with ypCRM-ve and ypN-ve) or minor or no response (TRG4 to -5, or ypCRM+ve, or ypN+ve). Adjuvant 5-FU/LFA regimen was given in cases of cT4, ypN+ve, or ypCRM+ve. Results: Overall, neutropenia (40%) and diarrhea (13%) were the most common grade {>=}3 toxicities, and tolerability was better with a 5-FU dose reduction. No significant difference in pathologic response was seen according 5-FU dosage: overall, a ypCR was obtained in 24 (39%) patients, and a major response in 20 (32%) patients. The 5-year probability of freedom from recurrence was 80% (95% confidence interval, 68%-92%); it was 56% for the minor/no response group, while it was around 90% for both the ypCR and the major response group. Conclusions: OXA, RTX, and 5-FU/LFA administered during pelvic RT produced promising early and long-term results in rectal carcinoma patients with poor prognosis. The postoperative treatment strategy applied in our study supports the risk-adapted approach in postoperative management.

  11. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head. PMID:27081582

  12. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of adults soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Bui-Nguyen, B; Italiano, A; Delva, F; Toulmond, M

    2010-06-01

    The main progress in the management of soft tissue sarcomas have been obtained in the field of local control. Although the main evolutive, vital, risk of these diseases is metastatic dissemination, efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial issue. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy cannot be considered as a standard for any situation. The last results of clinical trials, meta-analysis and population studies are presented and discussed in this article. New therapeutic strategies are to be developed to prevent metastases in soft tissue sarcomas. This needs a better understanding of the biology of those tumors, of metastases risk factors and of the determinants of systemic therapies efficacy in these tumors. PMID:20547481

  13. Adjuvant Ozonetherapy in Advanced Head and Neck Tumors: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Advanced head and neck (H&N) tumors have a poor prognosis, and this is worsened by the occurrence of hypoxia and ischemia in the tumors. Ozonetherapy has proved useful in the treatment of ischemic syndromes, and several studies have described a potential increase of oxygenation in tissues and tumors. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical effect of ozonetherapy in patients with advanced H&N cancer in the course of their scheduled radiotherapy. Over a period of 3 years, 19 patients with advanced H&N tumors who were undergoing treatment in our department with non-standard fractionated radiotherapy plus oral tegafur. A group of 12 patients was additionally treated with intravenous chemotherapy before and/or during radiotherapy. In the other group of seven patients, systemic ozonetherapy was administered twice weekly during radiotherapy. The ozonetherapy group was older (64 versus 54 years old, P = 0.006), with a higher percentage of lymph node involvement (71% versus 8%, P = 0.019) and with a trend to more unfavorable tumor stage (57% versus 8% IVb + IVc stages, P = 0.073). However, there was no significant difference in overall survival between the chemotherapy (median 6 months) and ozonetherapy (8 months) groups. Although these results have to be viewed with caution because of the limited number of patients, they suggest that ozonetherapy could have had some positive effect during the treatment of our patients with advanced H&N tumors. The adjuvant administration of ozonetherapy during the chemo–radiotherapy for these tumors merits further research. PMID:15841266

  14. [ADJUVANTED INFLUENZA VACCINES: DATA FROM DIRECT COMPARATIVE STUDIES].

    PubMed

    Chernikova, M I; Vasiliev, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the cornerstone of influenza control, however available vaccines are subject to certain limitations. Adjuvanted vaccines are a promising approach, however available adjuvants have a suboptimal effectiveness and safety profile. Data from direct comparative trials are necessary for selection of optimal adjuvants among currently available and search for novel safe and effective adjuvants for next generation influenza vaccines. Data from published direct comparative studies of adjuvants for influenza vaccines are summarized, a lack of such studies is noted, especially those using adequate methods and designs and comparing adjuvants of major groups (nature/source and mechanism of action). Several promising approaches of adjuvant research and development could be identified: chitosan-based adjuvants, oil-in-water emulsions and multi-component formulations (depot + immune modulating components). PMID:26829860

  15. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio . E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.it; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters.

  16. Radiotherapy infrastructure and human resources in Europe - present status and its implications for 2020.

    PubMed

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Samiei, Massoud; Bodis, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is required for nearly half of the newly diagnosed cancer patients. To optimise the quality and availability of RT, guidelines have been proposed by European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology-QUAntification of Radiation Therapy Infrastructure And Staffing Needs (ESTRO-QUARTS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study evaluates the present status of RT capacity in Europe and the projected needs by 2020 as per these recommendations. Thirty-nine of the 53 countries, listed in Europe by the UN Statistical Division, whose cancer incidences, teletherapy and human resources were available in the Global Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence (GLOBOCAN), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and DIrectory of RAdiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) (IAEA) databases were evaluated. A total of 3550 teletherapy units (TRT), 7017 radiation oncologists (RO), 3685 medical physicists (MP) and 12,788 radiotherapy technologists (RTT) are presently available for the 3.44 million new cancer cases reported annually in these countries. The present infrastructure and human resources in RT are estimated to provide RT access to 74.3% of the patients requiring RT. The current capacity in TRT, RO, MP and RTT when compared with recommended guidelines has a deficit of 25.6%, 18.3%, 22.7% and 10.6%, respectively. Thus, to respond to requirements by 2020, the existing capacity needs to be augmented by an additional 1698 TRTs, 2429 ROs, 1563 MPs and 2956 RTTs. With an imminent rise in cancer incidence, multifaceted strategic planning at national and international levels within a coordinated comprehensive cancer control programme is highly desirable to give adequate access to all patients who require radiotherapy across Europe. Specific steps to address this issue at national and continental levels involving all major stakeholders are proposed. PMID:25085229

  17. Cytokine and Growth Factor Responses After Radiotherapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Gaber, M. Waleed

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the time course and clinical significance of cytokines and peptide growth factors in pediatric patients with ependymoma treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We measured 15 cytokines and growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-{gamma}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-{alpha}) from 30 patients before RT and 2 and 24 h, weekly for 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the initiation of RT. Two longitudinal models for the trend of log-transformed measurements were fitted, one during treatment and one through 12 months. Results: During RT, log IL-8 declined at a rate of -0.10389/wk (p = 0.0068). The rate of decline was greater (p = 0.028) for patients with an infratentorial tumor location. The decline in IL-8 after RT was significant when stratified by infratentorial tumor location (p = 0.0345) and more than one surgical procedure (p = 0.0272). During RT, the decline in log VEGF was significant when stratified by the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After RT, the log VEGF declined significantly at a rate of -0.06207/mo. The decline was significant for males (p = 0.0222), supratentorial tumors (p = 0.0158), one surgical procedure (p = 0.0222), no ventriculoperitoneal shunt (p = 0.0005), and the absence of treatment failure (p = 0.0028). Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 declined significantly during RT and the decline differed according to tumor location. The angiogenesis factor VEGF declined significantly during the 12 months after RT. The decline was greater in males, those without a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and in those with favorable disease factors, including one surgical procedure, supratentorial tumor location, and

  18. Excellent Local Control With Stereotactic Radiotherapy Boost After External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Wendy; Loo, Billy W.; Goffinet, Don R.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Fee, Willard E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine long-term outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as a boost after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Eight-two patients received an SRT boost after EBRT between September 1992 and July 2006. Nine patients had T1, 30 had T2, 12 had T3, and 31 had T4 tumors. Sixteen patients had Stage II, 19 had Stage III, and 47 had Stage IV disease. Patients received 66 Gy of EBRT followed by a single-fraction SRT boost of 7-15 Gy, delivered 2-6 weeks after EBRT. Seventy patients also received cisplatin-based chemotherapy delivered concurrently with and adjuvant to radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 6.5-144.2 months) for living patients, there was only 1 local failure in a patient with a T4 tumor. At 5 years, the freedom from local relapse rate was 98%, freedom from nodal relapse 83%, freedom from distant metastasis 68%, freedom from any relapse 67%, and overall survival 69%. Late toxicity included radiation-related retinopathy in 3, carotid aneurysm in 1, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis in 10 patients, of whom 2 patients were symptomatic with seizures. Of 10 patients with temporal lobe necrosis, 9 had T4 tumors. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiotherapy boost after EBRT provides excellent local control for patients with NPC. Improved target delineation and dose homogeneity of radiation delivery for both EBRT and SRT is important to avoid long-term complications. Better systemic therapies for distant control are needed.

  19. Radiotherapy for Early Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma According to the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG): The Roles of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Involved-Node Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koeck, Julia; Abo-Madyan, Yasser; Lohr, Frank; Stieler, Florian; Kriz, Jan; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Wenz, Frederik; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Cure rates of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are high, and avoidance of late complications and second malignancies have become increasingly important. This comparative treatment planning study analyzes to what extent target volume reduction to involved-node (IN) and intensity-modulated (IM) radiotherapy (RT), compared with involved-field (IF) and three-dimensional (3D) RT, can reduce doses to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Based on 20 computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with early unfavorable mediastinal HL, we created treatment plans for 3D-RT and IMRT for both the IF and IN according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). As OAR, we defined heart, lung, breasts, and spinal cord. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were evaluated for planning target volumes (PTVs) and OAR. Results: Average IF-PTV and IN-PTV were 1705 cm{sup 3} and 1015 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean doses to the PTVs were almost identical for all plans. For IF-PTV/IN-PTV, conformity was better with IMRT and homogeneity was better with 3D-RT. Mean doses to the heart (17.94/9.19 Gy for 3D-RT and 13.76/7.42 Gy for IMRT) and spinal cord (23.93/13.78 Gy for 3D-RT and 19.16/11.55 Gy for IMRT) were reduced by IMRT, whereas mean doses to lung (10.62/8.57 Gy for 3D-RT and 12.77/9.64 Gy for IMRT) and breasts (left 4.37/3.42 Gy for 3D-RT and 6.04/4.59 Gy for IMRT, and right 2.30/1.63 Gy for 3D-RT and 5.37/3.53 Gy for IMRT) were increased. Volume exposed to high doses was smaller for IMRT, whereas volume exposed to low doses was smaller for 3D-RT. Pronounced benefits of IMRT were observed for patients with lymph nodes anterior to the heart. IN-RT achieved substantially better values than IF-RT for almost all OAR parameters, i.e., dose reduction of 20% to 50%, regardless of radiation technique. Conclusions: Reduction of target volume to IN most effectively improves OAR sparing, but is still considered investigational. For the time being, IMRT should be considered for

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Adjuvant Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Sampson, John H.; Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine B.; Friedman, Henry S.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and multiagent systemic therapies were reviewed to determine the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on survival and toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with salvage SRS from September 2002 to March 2010. All patients had experienced progression after treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy. Salvage SRS was typically administered only after multiple postchemoradiation salvage systemic therapies had failed. Results: 63 patients were treated with SRS for recurrent high-grade glioma; 49 patients had World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 4 disease. Median follow-up was 31 months from primary diagnosis and 7 months from SRS. Median overall survival from primary diagnosis was 41 months for all patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival from SRS (OS-SRS) were 6 and 10 months for all patients, respectively. The 1-year OS-SRS for patients with Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant (concurrent with or after SRS) bevacizumab was 50% vs. 22% for patients not receiving adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.005). Median PFS for patients with a WHO Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant bevacizumab was 5.2 months vs. 2.1 months for patients who did not receive adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.014). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and age were not significantly different between treatment groups. Treatment-related Grade 3/4 toxicity for patients receiving and not receiving adjuvant BVZ was 10% and 14%, respectively (p = 0.58).On multivariate analysis, the relative risk of death and progression with adjuvant bevacizumab was 0.37 (confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.82) and 0.45 (CI 0.21-0.97). KPS >70 and age <50 years were significantly associated with improved survival. Conclusions: The combination of salvage radiosurgery and bevacizumab to treat recurrent malignant

  1. Survival benefit of surgery with radiotherapy vs surgery alone to patients with T2-3N0M0 stage esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guangzhou; Wang, Wanwei; Sun, Xinchen

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to analyze survival benefit of (neo-) adjuvant radiotherapy to patients with T2-3N0M0 stage esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Methods T2-3N0M0 stage EAC patients from 2004 to 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, sex, race were summarized. Univariate, multivariate analysis, and stratified cox analysis based on different T stages were performed to explore the survival effect of (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy to T2-3N0M0 stage EAC. Results T2-3N0M0 stage EAC patients with surgery were more likely to be white race, T3 stage. Univariate analysis showed sex, age, and T stage were the prognostic factors of survival (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis proved (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy can prolong survival time of T2-3N0M0 stage EAC (P<0.05). Further analysis based on different T stages showed that both neoadjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.615; 95% CI 0.475-0.797) and adjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.597; 95% 0.387-0.921) significantly reduced the risk of death of T3N0M0 stage EAC, but neither of which significantly reduced death risk of T2N0M0 stage EAC (P>0.05). Conclusions sex, age are the independent prognostic factors of T2-3N0M0 EAC. Significant survival benefit of (neo-)adjuvant radiotherapy is only observed in patients with T3N0M0 stage EAC, but not in those with T2N0M0 stage. PMID:26870996

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  3. Influence of parotid-sparing radiotherapy on xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J Gabriel; Aragon, Cecilia; Henson, Brad S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes permanent salivary gland dysfunction (SGD) and xerostomia. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of parotid-sparing RT on salivary function. The aim of this was to characterize the relationship between radiation dosages to parotid glands, SGD, xerostomia, and impaired quality of life (QOL). Ninety-three patients received unilateral (n=38) and bilateral (n=44) neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques, or standard three-field technique RT (n=11). Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected pre-RT and 1 year post-RT. Assessment of QOL and xerostomia was conducted with three questionnaires. The results demonstrated that reduced radiation dosages to parotid glands were strongly associated with percentage of baseline parotid flow rates measured at 1 year post-RT. Unilateral and bilateral neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques were successful in preserving salivary output, compared to standard three beam RT techniques. Lower radiation dose to contralateral parotid glands was associated with greater percentage of baseline salivary flow rates at 1 year post-RT, fewer xerostomic complaints, and an enhanced QOL. PMID:12893079

  4. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  5. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  6. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  7. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  8. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  9. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  10. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  11. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  12. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicant prior to application to...

  13. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  14. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  15. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Provisions § 182.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.910 and 40 CFR 180.920, which are added to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  16. Effectiveness of spray adjuvants on reduction of spray drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  17. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.