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Sample records for adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery

  1. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2016-02-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Adjuvant Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Sampson, John H.; Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine B.; Friedman, Henry S.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and multiagent systemic therapies were reviewed to determine the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on survival and toxicity. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on patients with recurrent malignant gliomas treated with salvage SRS from September 2002 to March 2010. All patients had experienced progression after treatment with temozolomide and radiotherapy. Salvage SRS was typically administered only after multiple postchemoradiation salvage systemic therapies had failed. Results: 63 patients were treated with SRS for recurrent high-grade glioma; 49 patients had World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 4 disease. Median follow-up was 31 months from primary diagnosis and 7 months from SRS. Median overall survival from primary diagnosis was 41 months for all patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival from SRS (OS-SRS) were 6 and 10 months for all patients, respectively. The 1-year OS-SRS for patients with Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant (concurrent with or after SRS) bevacizumab was 50% vs. 22% for patients not receiving adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.005). Median PFS for patients with a WHO Grade 4 glioma who received adjuvant bevacizumab was 5.2 months vs. 2.1 months for patients who did not receive adjuvant bevacizumab (p = 0.014). Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and age were not significantly different between treatment groups. Treatment-related Grade 3/4 toxicity for patients receiving and not receiving adjuvant BVZ was 10% and 14%, respectively (p = 0.58).On multivariate analysis, the relative risk of death and progression with adjuvant bevacizumab was 0.37 (confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.82) and 0.45 (CI 0.21-0.97). KPS >70 and age <50 years were significantly associated with improved survival. Conclusions: The combination of salvage radiosurgery and bevacizumab to treat recurrent malignant

  3. Tomotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soisson, Emilie T.

    Currently, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a linear accelerator equipped with circular collimators and a floor stand is used for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) delivery. In the interest of providing a more efficient delivery option for patients with multiple brain metastases, a Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery program was developed to serve as an intensity modulated compliment to our existing delivery method. The unique advantage of Tomotherapy over other radiotherapy delivery units is the on board megavoltage CT that can be used for both stereotactic localization and treatment planning. As such, a workflow was designed in which the planning image is acquired on the treatment unit itself and, instead using a patient-frame based coordinate system for stereotactic localization, volumetric imaging is used to precisely locate the target at the time of treatment. Localization and delivery accuracy was found to be comparable to conventional approaches and well within stated tolerances. A Tomotherapy-specific treatment planning technique was also developed using the Tomotherapy treatment planning system that reliably produces plans that achieve both conformal target coverage and sufficiently steep dose falloff into surrounding normal brain. Tomotherapy plans have been compared to conventional circular collimator based plans for both the treatment of brain metastases and arteriovenous malformations in terms of both target conformity and dose to normal brain. To determine the effect of plan differences on patient outcome, clinical data was used to predict the resulting risk of treatment induced symptomatic brain necrosis for both conventional and Tomotherapy based plans. Overall, it was determined that plans generated using the described planning technique are acceptable for radiosurgery. In addition, delivery time for complex cases is comparable to or improved over conventional isocentric approaches. Finally, this work explores the impact of future product

  4. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery for functional disorders.

    PubMed

    Friehs, Gerhard M; Park, Michael C; Goldman, Marc A; Zerris, Vasilios A; Norén, Georg; Sampath, Prakash

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with the Gamma Knife and linear accelerator has revolutionized neurosurgery over the past 20 years. The most common indications for radiosurgery today are tumors and arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Functional indications such as treatment of movement disorders or intractable pain only contribute a small percentage of treated patients. Although SRS is the only noninvasive form of treatment for functional disorders, it also has some limitations: neurophysiological confirmation of the target structure is not possible, and one therefore must rely exclusively on anatomical targeting. Furthermore, lesion sizes may vary, and shielding adjacent radiosensitive neural structures may be difficult or impossible. The most common indication for functional SRS is the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Radiosurgical treatment for epilepsy and certain psychiatric illnesses is performed in several centers as part of strict research protocols, and radiosurgical pallidotomy or medial thalamotomy is no longer recommended due to the high risk of complications. Radiosurgical ventrolateral thalamotomy for the treatment of tremor in patients with Parkinson disease or multiple sclerosis, as well as in the treatment of essential tremor, may be indicated for a select group of patients with advanced age, significant medical conditions that preclude treatment with open surgery, or patients who must receive anticoagulation therapy. A promising new application of SRS is high-dose radiosurgery delivered to the pituitary stalk. This treatment has already been successfully performed in several centers around the world to treat severe pain in patients with end-stage cancer. PMID:18081480

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Specht, Hanno M; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-09-01

    Brain metastases are a common problem in solid malignancies and still represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. With the ongoing improvement in systemic therapies, the expectations on the efficacy of brain metastases directed treatment options are growing. As local therapies against brain metastases continue to evolve, treatment patterns have shifted from a palliative "one-treatment-fits-all" towards an individualized, patient adapted approach. In this article we review the evidence for stereotactic radiation treatment based on the current literature. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as a local high precision approach for the primary treatment of asymptomatic brain metastases has gained wide acceptance. It leads to lasting tumor control with only minor side effects compared to whole brain radiotherapy, since there is only little dose delivered to the healthy brain. The same holds true for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) for large metastases or for lesions close to organs at risk (e.g. the brainstem). New treatment indications such as neoadjuvant SRS followed by surgical resection or postoperative local therapy to the resection cavity show promising data and are also highlighted in this manuscript. With the evolution of local treatment options, optimal patient selection becomes more and more crucial. This article aims to aid decision making by outlining prognostic factors, treatment techniques and indications and common dose prescriptions. PMID:27071010

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Lia M; Rockhill, Jason K

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) have become important treatment modalities for brain metastases. While effective, there are still areas of extensive debate on its appropriate use in patients with life-limiting diseases. This review provides an overview of the indications and challenges of SRS and HFSRT in the management of brain metastases. PMID:23717789

  8. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Guan, Timothy Y; Almond, Peter R; Park, Hwan C; Lindberg, Robert D; Shields, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer. PMID:27421869

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery for WHO grade I meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Williams, Brian J; Yen, Chun Po

    2010-09-01

    Meningiomas represent a common intracranial tumor in the adult population. Although extirpation to achieve a gross total resection or at least decrease mass effect has been the mainstay of treatment, stereotactic radiosurgery has come to play an increasingly important role in the management of patients with meningiomas. Radiosurgery utilizes highly focused, beams of ionizing radiation to inactivate tumor cells. Image guidance and a steep dose fall off are critical features of this approach. The radiobiology of radiosurgery differs in certain advantageous ways from conventional radiotherapy. Radiosurgery initially was utilized to treat recurrent or residual skull base meningiomas. As success was observed in this setting, radiosurgery has gradually expanded its role so as to treat convexity meningiomas; it is also used as an upfront treatment for patients for whom clinical and neuro-imaging findings are consistent with a meningioma. Most large series demonstrate tumor control rates for patients with grade I meningiomas in excess of 85%. Neurological function is generally preserved or improved for patients with meningiomas. However, complications can occur. Longitudinal follow-up including neurologic and radiologic assessment is required. Single and multisession stereotactic radiosurgery will likely play an expanded role in the treatment of patients with meningiomas. PMID:20734218

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery - CyberKnife

    MedlinePlus

    ... slides into a machine that delivers radiation. A robotic arm controlled by a computer moves around you. ... Accuray Incorporated. CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system patient brochure. 2012. ... Accessed ...

  11. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) distinguishes itself by necessitating more rigid patient immobilization, accounting for respiratory motion, intricate treatment planning, on-board imaging, and reduced number of ablative radiation doses to cancer targets usually refractory to chemotherapy and conventional radiation. Steep SBRT radiation dose drop-off permits narrow 'pencil beam' treatment fields to be used for ablative radiation treatment condensed into 1 to 3 treatments. Treating physicians must appreciate that SBRT comes at a bigger danger of normal tissue injury and chance of geographic tumor miss. Both must be tackled by immobilization of cancer targets and by high-precision treatment delivery. Cancer target immobilization has been achieved through use of indexed customized Styrofoam casts, evacuated bean bags, or body-fix molds with patient-independent abdominal compression.(1-3) Intrafraction motion of cancer targets due to breathing now can be reduced by patient-responsive breath hold techniques,(4) patient mouthpiece active breathing coordination,(5) respiration-correlated computed tomography,(6) or image-guided tracking of fiducials implanted within and around a moving tumor.(7-9) The Cyberknife system (Accuray [Sunnyvale, CA]) utilizes a radiation linear accelerator mounted on a industrial robotic arm that accurately follows patient respiratory motion by a camera-tracked set of light-emitting diodes (LED) impregnated on a vest fitted to a patient.(10) Substantial reductions in radiation therapy margins can be achieved by motion tracking, ultimately rendering a smaller planning target volumes that are irradiated with submillimeter accuracy.(11-13) Cancer targets treated by SBRT are irradiated by converging, tightly collimated beams. Resultant radiation dose to cancer target volume histograms have a more pronounced radiation "shoulder" indicating high percentage target coverage and a small high-dose radiation "tail." Thus, increased target conformality

  13. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Maziyar A; Choudhri, Omar; Gibbs, Iris C; Soltys, Scott G; Adler, John R; Thompson, Patricia A; Tayag, Armine T; Samos, Cindy H; Chang, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare lesions associated with recurrent hemorrhage and progressive ischemia. Occasionally a favorable location, size or vascular anatomy may allow management with endovascular embolization and/or microsurgical resection. For most, however, there is no good treatment option. Between 1997 and 2014, we treated 37 patients (19 females, 18 males, median age 30years) at our institution diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord AVM (19 cervical, 12 thoracic, and six conus medullaris) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) stereotactic radiosurgery. A history of hemorrhage was present in 50% of patients. The mean AVM volume of 2.3cc was treated with a mean marginal dose of 20.5Gy in a median of two sessions. Clinical and MRI follow-up were carried out annually, and spinal angiography was repeated at 3years. We report an overall obliteration rate of 19% without any post-treatment hemorrhagic events. In those AVM that did not undergo obliteration, significant volume reduction was noted at 3years. Although the treatment paradigm for spinal cord AVM continues to evolve, radiosurgical treatment is capable of safely obliterating or significantly shrinking most intramedullary spinal cord AVM. PMID:26869363

  15. A Technique for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning with Helical Tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Emilie T.; Hoban, Peter W.; Kammeyer, Thomas; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M.; Westerly, David C.; Basavatia, Amar; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop an efficient and effective planning technique for stereotactic radiosurgery using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials Planning CTs and contours of twenty patients, previously treated in our clinic for brain metastases with Linac-based radiosurgery using circular collimators, were used to develop a robust Tomotherapy planning technique. Plan calculation times as well as delivery times were recorded for all patients to allow for an efficiency evaluation. In addition, conformation and homogeneity indices were calculated as metrics to compare plan quality to that which is achieved with conventional radiosurgery delivery systems. Results A robust and efficient planning technique was identified to produce plans of radiosurgical quality using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system. Dose calculation did not exceed a few hours and resulting delivery times were less than an hour, which allows the process to fit into a single day radiosurgery workflow. Plan conformity compared favorably with published results for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In addition, plan homogeneity was similar to Linac-based approaches. Conclusions The TomoTherapy planning software can be used to create plans of acceptable quality for stereotactic radiosurgery in a time that is appropriate for a radiosurgery workflow that requires that planning and delivery occur within one treatment day. PMID:20138501

  16. A Technique for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, Emilie T.; Hoban, Peter W.; Kammeyer, Thomas; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M.; Westerly, David C.; Basavatia, Amar; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an efficient and effective planning technique for stereotactic radiosurgery using helical tomotherapy. Planning CTs and contours of 20 patients, previously treated in our clinic for brain metastases with linac-based radiosurgery using circular collimators, were used to develop a robust TomoTherapy planning technique. Plan calculation times as well as delivery times were recorded for all patients to allow for an efficiency evaluation. In addition, conformation and homogeneity indices were calculated as metrics to compare plan quality with that which is achieved with conventional radiosurgery delivery systems. A robust and efficient planning technique was identified to produce plans of radiosurgical quality using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system. Dose calculation did not exceed a few hours and resulting delivery times were less than 1 hour, which allows the process to fit into a single day radiosurgery workflow. Plan conformity compared favorably with published results for gamma knife radiosurgery. In addition, plan homogeneity was similar to linac-based approaches. The TomoTherapy planning software can be used to create plans of acceptable quality for stereotactic radiosurgery in a time that is appropriate for a radiosurgery workflow that requires that planning and delivery occur within 1 treatment day.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy for metastatic spinal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Caruso, James P; Cohen-Inbar, Or; Bilsky, Mark H; Gerszten, Peter C; Sheehan, Jason P

    2015-03-01

    The management of metastatic spinal melanoma involves maximizing local control, preventing recurrence, and minimizing treatment-associated toxicity and spinal cord damage. Additionally, therapeutic measures should promote mechanical stability, facilitate rehabilitation, and promote quality of life. These objectives prove difficult to achieve given melanoma's elusive nature, radioresistant and chemoresistant histology, vascular character, and tendency for rapid and early metastasis. Different therapeutic modalities exist for metastatic spinal melanoma treatment, including resection (definitive, debulking, or stabilization procedures), stereotactic radiosurgery, and immunotherapeutic techniques, but no single treatment modality has proven fully effective. The authors present a conceptual overview and critique of these techniques, assessing their effectiveness, separately and combined, in the treatment of metastatic spinal melanoma. They provide an up-to-date guide for multidisciplinary treatment strategies. Protocols that incorporate specific, goal-defined surgery, immunotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery would be beneficial in efforts to maximize local control and minimize toxicity. PMID:25727228

  18. The treatment of recurrent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Kooy, H M; Wen, P Y; Fine, H A; Cheng, C W; Mannarino, E G; Tsai, J S; Alexander, E

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1986 and August 1989, we treated 18 patients with 21 recurrent or persistent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator. To be eligible for radiosurgery, patients had to have a performance status of greater than or equal to 70% and have no evidence of (or stable) systemic disease. All but one patient had received prior radiotherapy, and were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the time of recurrence. Polar lesions were treated only if the patient had undergone and failed previous complete surgical resection (10 patients). Single doses of radiation (900 to 2,500 cGy) were delivered to limited volumes (less than 27 cm3) using a modified 6MV linear accelerator. The most common histology of the metastatic lesion was carcinoma of the lung (seven patients), followed by carcinoma of the breast (four patients), and melanoma (four patients). With median follow-up of 9 months (range, 1 to 39), all tumors have been controlled in the radiosurgery field. Two patients failed in the immediate margin of the treated volume and were subsequently treated with surgery and implantation of 125I to control the disease. Radiographic response was dramatic and rapid in the patients with adenocarcinoma, while slight reduction and stabilization occurred in those patients with melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. The majority of patients improved neurologically following treatment, and were able to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Complications were limited and transient in nature and no cases of symptomatic radiation necrosis occurred in any patient despite previous exposure to radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and relatively safe treatment for recurrent solitary metastases and is an appealing technique for the initial management of deep-seated lesions as a boost to whole brain radiotherapy. PMID:2179476

  19. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.635 Full calibration...

  20. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  1. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.2645 Section 35.2645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee shall retain a record of...

  2. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  3. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  4. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery... § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A licensee authorized to... minimum— (1) Assure proper operation of— (i) Treatment table retraction mechanism, using backup...

  5. 10 CFR 35.645 - Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.645 Section 35.645 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.645 Periodic spot-checks for...

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Ajay K.; Flickinger, John C. . E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after a single stereotactic radiosurgery procedure for the care of patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred five patients with primary malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma (42%), breast carcinoma (23%), melanoma (17%), renal cell carcinoma (6%), colon cancer (3%), and others (10%) underwent gamma knife radiosurgery for 4 or more intracranial metastases at one time. The median number of brain metastases was 5 (range, 4-18) with a median total treatment volume of 6.8 cc (range, 0.6-51.0 cc). Radiosurgery was used as sole management (17% of patients), or in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (46%) or after failure of whole brain radiotherapy (38%). The median marginal radiosurgery dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). The mean follow-up was 8 months. Results: The median overall survival after radiosurgery for all patients was 8 months. The 1-year local control rate was 71%, and the median time to progressive/new brain metastases was 9 months. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system, the median overall survivals for RPA classes I, II, and III were 18, 9, and 3 months, respectively (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis revealed total treatment volume, age, RPA classification, and marginal dose as significant prognostic factors. The number of metastases was not statistically significant (p 0.333). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to provide survival benefit for patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Because total treatment volume was the most significant predictor of survival, the total volume of brain metastases, rather than the number of metastases, should be considered in identifying appropriate radiosurgery candidates.

  7. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  8. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  9. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  10. 10 CFR 35.2645 - Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic... MATERIAL Records § 35.2645 Records of periodic spot-checks for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. (a) A... and intercom systems, timer termination, treatment table retraction mechanism, and stereotactic...

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Perches, Rodolfo Díaz

    2000-10-01

    In this work we present a protocol to measure absorbed dose distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery treatments with a linear accelerator (Linac) using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and radiochromic dye films. A Linac Philips SL-15 (6 MV X-rays), a ZD2 stereoactic system for localizing the target via computed tomography (CT), and Leibinger radiosurgery accessories will be used. A versatile spherical acrylic phantom of 16 cm diameter to measure the dose distributions has been designed. The phantom is composed of two hemispheres. On one flat side of the hemispheres an array of Harshaw/Bicron TLD-100 or a sheet of GafChromic MD-55 film will be placed. The phantom will be irradiated in three different orientations to obtain spatial dose distributions in the coronal, sagital and transverse planes. The experimental measurement will be compared with the results provided by a commercial treatment-planning system.

  12. Best of the Radiosurgery Society® Scientific Meeting 2014: stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment of extracranial and intracranial lesions.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Anand; Bucholz, Richard; Gaya, Andrew M; Kresl, John J; Mantz, Constantine; Minnich, Douglas J; Muacevic, Alexander; Medbery, Clinton; Yang, Jun; Caglar, Hale Basak; Davis, Joanne N

    2014-12-01

    The SRS/SBRT Scientific Meeting 2014, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 7-10 May 2014. The Radiosurgery Society(®), a professional medical society dedicated to advancing the field of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), held the international Radiosurgery Society Scientific Meeting, from 7-10 May 2014 in Minneapolis (MN, USA). This year's conference attracted over 400 attendants from around the world and featured over 100 presentations (46 oral) describing the role of SRS/SBRT for the treatment of intracranial and extracranial malignant and nonmalignant lesions. This article summarizes the meeting highlights for SRS/SBRT treatments, both intracranial and extracranial, in a concise review. PMID:25525840

  13. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  14. [FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY: A GAME CHANGER FOR NEUROSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nissim, Ouzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The article by Dr. Cohen-Inbar published in this issue of Harefuah is a timely review that brings to the general medical community the recent important developments in the field of radiosurgery--the evolution of multi-session radiosurgery [or "FSR", standing for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation]. Radiosurgery and FSR continue to have a tremendous impact on modern neurosurgery. Sharing sub-millimetric accuracy in radiation delivery made possible by real-time-imaging positioning, frameless single and multisession radiosurgery have become two faces of a therapeutic technique with wide application in the field of intracranial pathology. Blending dose fractionation with delivery precision, FSR is a hybrid tool that can be implemented safely and effectively for practically any intra-cranial pathology without restrictions of volume or location. Dr. Cohen Inbar reviews the available data regarding doses, fractionation schemes, and results for the different pathologies in which FSR is being increasingly applied. FSR, as single-dose radiosurgery since the late 1980s, has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Radical microsorgical tumor removal at any cost in demanding intracranial locations has been replaced by upfront conservative volume-reduction surgery, leaving the more complicated part of those tumors to safer elimination by precise irradiation in single or multiple sessions. In Israel, further to the first unit operative since 1993 at the Sheba Medical Center, 3 new active LINAC based treatment sites have been added in recent years, with facilities either planned or under construction in the remaining major medical centers with neurosurgical and radiotherapy resources. They are evidence of the central role this modality has captured in the management of intracranial pathology. PMID:27526561

  15. In vivo biological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery: A primate model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Altschuler, E.M.; Flickinger, J.C.; Wu, A.; Martinez, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Single-fraction, closed skull, small-volume irradiation (radiosurgery) of intact intracranial structures requires accurate knowledge of radiation tolerance. We have developed a baboon model to assess the in vivo destructive radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery. Three baboons received a single-fraction, 150-Gy lesion of the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, or the pons using the 8-mm diameter collimator of the gamma unit. Serial standard neurodiagnostic tests (neurological examination, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging, stable xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scan of cerebral blood flow, somatosensory and brain stem evoked potentials, and myelin basic protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid) were compared with preoperative studies. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the development of a lesion at the target site between 45 and 60 days after irradiation. Deterioration of the brain stem evoked potentials preceded imaging changes when the lesion encroached on auditory pathways. Myelin basic protein levels increased subsequent to imaging changes. Postmortem neuropathological examination confirmed a well-demarcated radionecrosis of the target volume. The baboon model appears to be an excellent method to study the in vivo biological effects of radiosurgery.

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices. PMID:7717138

  17. Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery: current status of the initial paradigm shifter.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Yen, Chun-Po; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-09-10

    The concept of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was first described by Lars Leksell in 1951. It was proposed as a noninvasive alternative to open neurosurgical approaches to manage a variety of conditions. In the following decades, SRS emerged as a unique discipline involving a collegial partnership among neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. SRS relies on the precisely guided delivery of high-dose ionizing radiation to an intracranial target. The focused convergence of multiple beams yields a potent therapeutic effect on the target and a steep dose fall-off to surrounding structures, thereby minimizing the risk of collateral damage. SRS is typically administered in a single session but can be given in as many as five sessions or fractions. By providing an ablative effect noninvasively, SRS has altered the treatment paradigms for benign and malignant intracranial tumors, functional disorders, and vascular malformations. Literature on extensive intracranial radiosurgery has unequivocally demonstrated the favorable benefit-to-risk profile that SRS affords for appropriately selected patients. In a departure from conventional radiotherapeutic strategies, radiosurgical principles have recently been extended to extracranial indications such as lung, spine, and liver tumors. The paradigm shift resulting from radiosurgery continues to alter the landscape of related fields. PMID:25113762

  18. Computation and Optimization of Dose Distributions for Rotational Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Timothy Harold

    1994-01-01

    The stereotactic radiosurgery technique presented in this work is the patient rotator method which rotates the patient in a sitting position with a stereotactic head frame attached to the skull while collimated non-coplanar radiation beams from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator are delivered to the target point. The hypothesis of this dissertation is that accurate, three-dimensional dose distributions can be computed and optimized for the patient rotator method used in stereotactic radiosurgery. This dissertation presents research results in three areas related to computing and optimizing dose distributions for the patient rotator method. A three-dimensional dose model was developed to calculate the dose at any point in the cerebral cortex using a circular and adjustable collimator system and the geometry of the radiation beam with respect to the target point. The computed dose distributions compared to experimental measurements had an average maximum deviation of <0.7 mm for the relative isodose distributions greater than 50%. A system was developed to qualitatively and quantitatively visualize the computed dose distributions with patient anatomy. A registration method was presented for transforming each dataset to a common reference system. A method for computing the intersections of anatomical contour's boundaries was developed to calculate dose-volume information. The system efficiently and accurately reduced the large computed, volumetric sets of dose data, medical images, and anatomical contours to manageable images and graphs. A computer-aided optimization method was developed for rigorously selecting beam angles and weights for minimizing the dose to normal tissue. Linear programming was applied as the optimization method. The computed optimal beam angles and weights for a defined objective function and dose constraints exhibited a superior dose distribution compared to a standard plan. The developed dose model, qualitative and quantitative visualization

  19. Technical and anatomical aspects of novalis stereotactic radiosurgery sphenopalatine ganglionectomy

    SciTech Connect

    De Salles, Antonio A.F. . E-mail: adesalles@mednet.ucla.edu; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Golish, S. Raymond Ph.D.; Medin, Paul M.; Malkasian, Dennis; Solberg, Timothy D.; Selch, Michael T.

    2006-11-15

    Background: Several techniques have been applied for destruction of the sphenopalatine ganglion to control cluster headache and ocular pain with sympathetic component. Cluster headache has responded to radiofrequency ablation or phenol destruction. Radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion is promising due to the excellent visualization of the target on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and skull X-rays. Material and Methods: Six patients and one cadaver head were analyzed in this study. The cadaver-head dissection confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion on X-rays and CT imaging. One patient undergoing radiofrequency sphenopalatine ablation participated for confirmation of the location of the ganglion on plain X-rays. Five patients received radiosurgery of the sphenopalatine ganglion. One patient had classic unilateral cluster headache. Two patients had neuropathic pain and 1 had bilateral migrainous neuralgia. The fifth patient had bilateral atypical facial pain. All received a single maximal dose of 90 Gy with a 5- or 7.5-mm circular collimator. MRI, CT, and skull X-rays identified and confirmed the target. Results: The sphenopalatine fossa is seen in the skull X-ray as an inverse tear drop just caudal to the sphenoid sinus. This location is readily correlated to the CT target by the stereotactic coordinates and confirmed with the presence of the ganglion visualized in the MRI scan. Only the patient with cluster headache experienced lasting pain relief. Conclusion: Multiple imaging modalities confirmed the location of the sphenopalatine ganglion for radiosurgery. The procedure was performed safely with CT and MRI fusion. Radiosurgery was significantly beneficial only on classic cluster headache.

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Kondziolka, D.; Flickinger, J.C.; Bissonette, D.J.; Jungreis, C.A.; Maitz, A.H.; Horton, J.A.; Coffey, R.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery successfully obliterates carefully selected arteriovenous malformations (AVM's) of the brain. In an initial 3-year experience using the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 227 patients with AVM's were treated. Symptoms at presentation included prior hemorrhage in 143 patients (63%), headache in 104 (46%), and seizures in 70 (31%). Neurological deficits were present in 102 patients (45%). Prior surgical resection (resulting in subtotal removal) had been performed in 36 patients (16%). In 47 selected patients (21%), embolization procedures were performed in an attempt to reduce the AVM size prior to radiosurgery. The lesions were classified according to the Spetzler grading system: 64 (28%) were Grade VI (inoperable), 22 (10%) were Grade IV, 90 (40%) were Grade III, 43 (19%) were Grade II, and eight (4%) were Grade I. With the aid of computer imaging-integrated isodose plans for single-treatment irradiation, total coverage of the AVM nidus was possible in 216 patients (95%). The location and volume of the AVM were the most important factors for the selection of radiation dose. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at 6-month intervals in 161 patients. Seventeen patients who had MR evidence of complete obliteration underwent angiography within 3 months of imaging: in 14 (82%) complete obliteration was confirmation being 4 months (mean 17 months) after radiosurgery. The 2-year obliteration rates according to volume were: all eight (100%) AVM's less than 1 cu cm; 22 (85%) of 26 AVM's of 1 to 4 cu cm; and seven (58%) of 12 AVM's greater than 4 cu cm. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed postirradiation changes in 38 (24%) of 161 patients at a mean interval of 10.2 months after radiosurgery; only 10 (26%) of those 38 patients were symptomatic.

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, R.L.; Coffey, R.J.; Swanson, J.W.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompasses within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm{sup 3} (median: 3,135 mm{sup 3}). Tumors {<=} 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients < age 65 years, (b) dose to the tumor margin, (c) maximum tumor diameter {>=} 21 mm, (d) use of the 18 mm collimator, and (e) use of > five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% {plus_minus} 17.3, respectively. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for recurrent ependymoma in children

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Lindsey M.; Plimpton, S. Reed; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Stence, Nicholas V.; Hankinson, Todd C.; Handler, Michael H.; Hemenway, Molly S.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Liu, Arthur K.

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes for children with relapsed ependymoma are poor. Re-irradiation is a potentially viable salvage option in these patients. Data were reviewed for 12 patients (median age 5.6 years) with relapsed ependymoma who received fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) following maximal surgical resection from 1995 to 2012. Four patients experienced a second recurrence, including 2 in-field and 2 distant failures. Median time to second recurrence (32 months) was significantly longer than time to first recurrence (24 months) (p = 0.008). Three-year local control was 89 %, and median event free survival from fSRS was 3.4 years. Radiation necrosis was observed in 6 patients, 3 who were symptomatic. In conclusion, fSRS offers durable response with a tolerable toxicity profile in children with recurrent EPN. PMID:24078173

  3. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  4. International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lovelock, Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Lis, Eric; Ryu, Samuel; Sheehan, Jason; Gerszten, Peter C.; Chang, Eric; Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott; Sahgal, Arjun; Deasy, Joe; Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina; Mindea, Stefan; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Brainstem Metastases: The Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range, 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.

  6. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  7. Upfront Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pineal Parenchymal Tumors in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Khang, Shin Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) in adults are rare, and knowledge regarding their optimal management and treatment outcome is limited. Herein, we present the clinical results of our series of PPTs other than pineoblastomas managed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at upfront setting. Methods Between 1997 and 2014, nine consecutive adult patients with the diagnosis of PPTs, either pineocytoma or pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, were treated with SRS. There were 6 men and 3 women. The median age was 39 years (range, 31-53 years). All of the patients presented with symptoms of hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy was done for initial management. After histologic diagnosis, patients were treated with Gamma Knife with the mean dose of 13.3 Gy (n=3) or fractionated Cyberknife with 32 Gy (n=6). Results After a mean follow-up of 78.6 months (range, 14-223 months), all patients were alive and all of their tumors were locally controlled except for one instance of cerebrospinal fluid seeding metastasis. On magnetic resonance images, tumor size decreased in all patients, resulting in complete response in 3 patients and partial response in 6. One patient had experienced temporary memory impairment after SRS, which improved spontaneously. Conclusion SRS is effective and safe for PPTs in adults and can be considered as a useful alternative to surgical resection at upfront setting. PMID:26587186

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Brophy, Brian P.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery in hemangioblastoma: Experience over 14 years

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Nishant; Agrawal, Deepak; Singla, Raghav; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although gamma knife has been advocated for hemangioblastomas, it is not used widely by neurosurgeons. Objective: We review our experience over 14 years in an attempt to define the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of hemangioblastomas. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on all patients of hemangioblastoma who underwent SRS at our institute over a period of 14 years (1998–2011). Gamma knife plans, clinical history, and radiology were reviewed for all patients. Results: A total of 2767 patients underwent gamma knife during the study period. Of these, 10 (0.36%) patients were treated for 24 hemangioblastomas. Eight patients (80%) had von Hippel-Lindau disease while two had sporadic hemangioblastomas. The median peripheral dose (50% isodose) delivered to the tumors was 29.9 Gy. Clinical and radiological follow-up data were available for eight patients. Of these, two were re-operated for persisting cerebellar symptoms. The remaining six patients were recurrence-free at a mean follow-up of 48 months (range 19–108 months). One patient had an increase in cyst volume along with a decrease in the size of the mural nodule. Conclusions: SRS should be the first option for asymptomatic hemangioblastomas. Despite the obvious advantages, gamma knife is not widely used as an option for hemangioblastomas. PMID:26933339

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations: A review.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ranjith K; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has proven to be an effective strategy in the management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children and adults over the past three decades. Its application has resulted in lowering the morbidity and mortality associated with treatment of deep-seated AVMs. SRS has been used as a primary modality of therapy as well as in conjunction with embolization and microsurgery in the management of AVMs. The obliteration rate after SRS has been reported to range from 35% to 92%. Smaller AVMs receiving higher marginal doses have obliteration rates of 70% and more. The median follow-up reported in most series is approximately 36-40 months. The median time to obliteration has been reported to be approximately 24-36 months in most series. Radiation-induced neurological complications have been reported in less than 10% of patients, with a 1.5%-6% risk of developing a new permanent neurological deficit. The bleeding rate during the latency to obliteration has been reported to be approximately 5%. This review describes the experience reported in literature with respect to the indications, dosage, factors affecting obliteration rate of AVMs, and complications after SRS. PMID:26588616

  11. NOTE: Comprehensive quality assurance for stereotactic radiosurgery treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaseshan, R.; Heydarian, M.

    2003-07-01

    We have used a commercially available high precision LucyTM phantom to perform comprehensive quality assurance for stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. The quantitative evaluation of system uncertainties included imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. The quality assurance tests showed that the well-defined targets were identified to within +/-1 mm in all the imaging modalities. The pre-known target volumes were reproduced within 2 cm3 in both MR and CT. The planned target was delivered within 2% of the prescribed dose and to within 2 mm accuracy. The inaccuracy in the isocentre position at the Linac was less than 1.2 mm. The maximum error observed in the depth helmet was 0.5 mm and the overall uncertainty was within 0.23 mm. We have also established a quality assurance program based on the study and proposed the tolerance and the frequency of the tests required to be carried out. The tests were carried out using a Radionics planning system and delivered on a Varian Clinac 2100 linear accelerator machine. These tests also established a base line for future comparisons.

  12. Surgical Cavity Constriction and Local Progression Between Resection and Adjuvant Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Matthew B; Sneed, Penny K; Aghi, Manish K; McDermott, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to a surgical cavity after brain metastasis resection is a promising treatment for improving local control. The optimal timing of adjuvant SRS, however, has yet to be determined. Changes in resection cavity volume and local progression in the interval between surgery and SRS are likely important factors in deciding when to proceed with adjuvant SRS. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with a brain metastasis treated with surgical resection followed by SRS to the resection cavity. Post-operative and pre-radiosurgery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was reviewed for evidence of cavity volume changes, amount of edema, and local tumor progression. Resection cavity volume and edema volume were measured using volumetric analysis. We identified 21 consecutive patients with a brain metastasis treated with surgical resection and radiosurgery to the resection cavity. Mean age was 57 yrs. The most common site of metastasis was the frontal lobe (38%), and the most common primary neoplasms were lung adenocarcinoma and melanoma (24% each). The mean postoperative resection cavity volume was 7.8 cm3 and shrank to a mean of 4.5 cm3 at the time of repeat imaging for radiosurgical planning (median 41 days after initial post-operative MRI), resulting in a mean reduction in cavity volume of 43%. Patients who underwent pre-SRS imaging within 1 month of their initial post-operative MRI had a mean volume reduction of 13% compared to 61% in those whose pre-SRS imaging was ≥1 month (p=0.0003). Post-resection edema volume was not related to volume reduction (p=0.59). During the interval between MRIs, 52% of patients showed evidence of tumor progression within the resection cavity wall. There was no significant difference in local recurrence if the interval between resection and radiosurgery was <1 month (n=8) versus ≥1 month (n=13, p=0.46). These data suggest that the surgical cavity after brain metastasis resection constricts over time

  13. Dosimetric measurements of Onyx embolization material for stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Donald A.; Balter, James M.; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J.; Pandey, Aditya S.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Arteriovenous malformations are often treated with a combination of embolization and stereotactic radiosurgery. Concern has been expressed in the past regarding the dosimetric properties of materials used in embolization and the effects that the introduction of these materials into the brain may have on the quality of the radiosurgery plan. To quantify these effects, the authors have taken large volumes of Onyx 34 and Onyx 18 (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer doped with tantalum) and measured the attenuation and interface effects of these embolization materials. Methods: The manufacturer provided large cured volumes ({approx}28 cc) of both Onyx materials. These samples were 8.5 cm in diameter with a nominal thickness of 5 mm. The samples were placed on a block tray above a stack of solid water with an Attix chamber at a depth of 5 cm within the stack. The Attix chamber was used to measure the attenuation. These measurements were made for both 6 and 16 MV beams. Placing the sample directly on the solid water stack and varying the thickness of solid water between the sample and the Attix chamber measured the interface effects. The computed tomography (CT) numbers for bulk material were measured in a phantom using a wide bore CT scanner. Results: The transmission through the Onyx materials relative to solid water was approximately 98% and 97% for 16 and 6 MV beams, respectively. The interface effect shows an enhancement of approximately 2% and 1% downstream for 16 and 6 MV beams. CT numbers of approximately 2600-3000 were measured for both materials, which corresponded to an apparent relative electron density (RED) {rho}{sub e}{sup w} to water of approximately 2.7-2.9 if calculated from the commissioning data of the CT scanner. Conclusions: We performed direct measurements of attenuation and interface effects of Onyx 34 and Onyx 18 embolization materials with large samples. The introduction of embolization materials affects the dose distribution of a MV

  14. Frameless Image-Guided Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Clinical Outcomes for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John C. Steinmetz, Ryan; Smith, Aaron; Lamba, Michael; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112), the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery versus stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma: a Leksell Gamma Knife Society 2000 debate.

    PubMed

    Linskey, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    By definition, the term "radiosurgery" refers to the delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose in a single fraction, not simply the use of stereotaxy. Multiple-fraction delivery is better termed "stereotactic radiotherapy." There are compelling radiobiological principles supporting the biological superiority of single-fraction radiation for achieving an optimal therapeutic response for the slowly proliferating, late-responding, tissue of a schwannoma. It is axiomatic that complication avoidance requires precise three-dimensional conformality between treatment and tumor volumes. This degree of conformality can only be achieved through complex multiisocenter planning. Alternative radiosurgery devices are generally limited to delivering one to four isocenters in a single treatment session. Although they can reproduce dose plans similar in conformality to early gamma knife dose plans by using a similar number of isocenters, they cannot reproduce the conformality of modern gamma knife plans based on magnetic resonance image--targeted localization and five to 30 isocenters. A disturbing trend is developing in which institutions without nongamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) centers are championing and/or shifting to hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannomas. This trend appears to be driven by a desire to reduce complication rates to compete with modern GKS results by using complex multiisocenter planning. Aggressive advertising and marketing from some of these centers even paradoxically suggests biological superiority of hypofractionation approaches over single-dose radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas. At the same time these centers continue to use the term radiosurgery to describe their hypofractionated radiotherapy approach in an apparent effort to benefit from a GKS "halo effect." It must be reemphasized that as neurosurgeons our primary duty is to achieve permanent tumor control for our patients and not to eliminate complications at the

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  17. Dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. D.; Kumar, Sudhir; Dagaonkar, S. S.; Bisht, Geetika; Dayanand, S.; Devi, Reena; Deshpande, S. S.; Chaudhary, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Kannan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a special radiotherapy technique used to irradiate intracranial lesions by 3-D arrangements of narrow photon beams eliminating the needs of invasive surgery. Three different tertiary collimators, namely BrainLab and Radionics circular cones and BrainLab micro multileaf collimator (mMLC), are used for linear accelerator-based SRS systems (X-Knife). Output factor (St), tissue maximum ratio (TMR) and off axis ratio (OAR) of these three SRS systems were measured using CC01 (Scanditronix/ Welhofer) and Pinpoint (PTW) cylindrical and Markus plane parallel ionization chambers as well as TLD and radiochromic film. Measurement results of CC01 and Pinpoint chambers were very close to each other which indicate that further reduction in volume and physical dimensions of cylindrical ionization chamber is not necessary for SRS/SRT dosimetry. Output factors of BrainLab and Radionics SRS cones were very close to each other while output factors of equivalent diameter mMLC field were different from SRS circular cones. TMR of the three SRS systems compared were very close to one another. OAR of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC were very close to each other, within 2%. However, OARs of BrainLab cone were found comparable to OARs of Radionics cone and BrainLab mMLC within maximum variation of 4%. In addition, user-measured similar data of other three mMLC X-Knives were compared with the mMLC X-Knife data measured in this work and found comparable. The concept of switching over to mMLC-based SRS/SRT is thus validated from dosimetric characteristics as well. PMID:21217914

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery in elderly patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Bozzao, Alessandro; Lanzetta, Gaetano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been increasingly employed as an alternative to whole brain radiation therapy in patients with brain metastases, with the aim to reduce its potential toxicity. We have evaluated clinical outcomes of SRS as initial treatment for brain metastases in patients 70 years and older. Between November 2007 and October 2011, 102 patients of 70 years and older with 1-4 metastases were treated with SRS. The primary end point of the study was overall survival. Secondary end points were local control and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. At a median follow-up of 11.0 months (range 1-48 months), median survival and median time to distant failure were 13.2 and 10 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63 and 28 %, and respective distant failure rates were 54 and 78 %. Forty-five patients succumbed to their extracranial disease and 14 patients died of progressive intracranial disease. Nine patients recurred locally after SRS. The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 90 and 84 %, respectively. Evaluation of neurocognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed no significant neurocognitive decline after SRS. MMSE score improved in 15 % of patients, worsened in 12 % of patients, and remained stable in the others. Severe neurological complications were reported in 7 (7 %) patients, requiring surgery or medical treatment. Initial treatment with SRS with close monitoring may represent a relatively safe treatment strategy associated with survival benefit, with outcomes similar to those reported in historical series of SRS for younger patients. PMID:23187817

  19. The use of spine stereotactic radiosurgery for oligometastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer C; Tang, Chad; Deegan, Brian J; Allen, Pamela K; Jonasch, Eric; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors investigated the outcomes following spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) for patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine. METHODS The study was a secondary analysis of 38 of 209 patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional Phase I/II prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011. Of these 38 patients, 33 (87%) were treated for a solitary spine metastasis, with no other history of metastatic disease. SSRS was prescribed to 24 Gy in 1 fraction (8%), 18 Gy in 1 fraction (18%), 16 Gy in 1 fraction (11%), 27 Gy in 3 fractions (53%), 30 Gy in 5 fractions (8%), or 20 Gy in 5 fractions (3%). Seventeen patients (45%) received prior conventional external beam radiation therapy. RESULTS The median overall survival (OS) was 75.7 months, and the 2- and 5-year OS rates were 84% and 60%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients who had prior spine surgery and a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score had an improved OS (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.52, p < 0.01, and HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13%-0.84%, p = 0.02, respectively), and those who had undergone prior radiation therapy had a worse OS (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2%-10%, p = 0.02). The 1-, 2-, and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 85%, 82%, and 78%, respectively. The median time to systemic therapy modification was 41 months. Two patients (5%) experienced late Grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS Patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine treated with SSRS can experience long-term survival and a long time before needing a modification in systemic therapy. In addition, SSRS leads to excellent local control and minimal late toxicity. PMID:27035507

  20. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, Evan R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc. PMID:21844866

  1. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Link, Michael J.; Brown, Paul D.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

  2. Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Benign Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Chapman, Paul H.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Given the excellent prognosis for patients with benign meningiomas, treatment strategies to minimize late effects are important. One strategy is proton radiation therapy (RT), which allows less integral dose to normal tissue and greater homogeneity than photon RT. Here, we report the first series of proton stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) used for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: We identified 50 patients with 51 histologically proven or image- defined, presumed-benign meningiomas treated at our institution between 1996 and 2007. Tumors of <4 cm in diameter and located {>=}2 mm from the optic apparatus were eligible for treatment. Indications included primary treatment (n = 32), residual tumor following surgery (n = 8), and recurrent tumor following surgery (n = 10). The median dose delivered was 13 Gray radiobiologic equivalent (Gy[RBE]) (range, 10.0-15.5 Gy[RBE]) prescribed to the 90% isodose line. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months (range, 6-133 months). Magnetic resonance imaging at the most recent follow-up or time of progression revealed 33 meningiomas with stable sizes, 13 meningiomas with decreased size, and 5 meningiomas with increased size. The 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 94% (95% confidence interval, 77%-98%). Symptoms were improved in 47% (16/ 34) of patients, unchanged in 44% (15/34) of patients, and worse in 9% (3/34) of patients. The rate of potential permanent adverse effects after SRS was 5.9% (3/51 patients). Conclusions: Proton SRS is an effective therapy for small benign meningiomas, with a potentially lower rate of long-term treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess durability of tumor control and late effects.

  3. A preplanning method for stereotactic radiosurgery to improve treatment workflow.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Ozturk, Naim; Smith, Brett; Slavin, Konstantin V; Koshy, Matthew; Aydogan, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Frame-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) requires fixation of an invasive head ring to ensure accurate targeting. Minimizing waiting time with a fixed head ring is important for patient comfort and satisfaction. We report a practical preplanning solution for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system that reduces waiting time by expediting the planning process on treatment day. A water-filled anthropomorphic head phantom was used to acquire a surrogate CT image set for preplanning and fused with patient's MRI, which was obtained before the day of treatment. Once an acceptable preplan was obtained, it was saved as a plan template and the phantom image set was removed from the Brainlab database to prevent any confusion and mix-up of image sets. On the treatment day, the patient's CT and MRI were fused, and the customized beam settings of the preplan template were then applied and optimized. Up to 10-fold of reduction in treatment plan time was demonstrated by bench testing with multiple planners and a variety of cases. Loading the plan template and fine-tuning the preconfigured beam settings took only a small fraction of the preplan time to restore the conformity and dose falloff comparable to those of the preplan. For instance, preplan time was 2 hr for a two-isocenter case, whereas, it took less than 20 min for a less experienced planner to plan it on the day of treat-ment using the preplan method. The SRS preplanning technique implemented in this study for the Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system offers an opportunity to explore possible beam configurations thoroughly, optimize planning parameters, resolve gantry angle clearance issues, and communicate and address challenges with physicians before the treatment day. Preplanning has been proven to improve plan quality and to improve efficiency in our clinic, especially for multiple-isocenter and dosimetrically challenging cases. PMID:27167274

  4. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  5. Verification of dose volume histograms in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šemnická, Jitka; Novotný, Josef, Jr.; Spěváček, Václav; Garčic, Jirí; Steiner, Martin; Judas, Libor

    2006-12-01

    In this work we focus on dose volume histograms (DVHs) measurement in stereotactic radiosurgery (SR) performed with the Leksell gamma knife (ELEKTA Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) performed with linear accelerator 6 MV Varian Clinac 2100 C/D (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) in conjunction with BrainLAB stereotactic system (BrainLAB, Germany) using modified BANG gel and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the experiments was to investigate a method for acquiring entire dose volume information from irradiated gel dosimeter and calculate DVHs.

  6. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  7. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  8. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  9. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  10. 10 CFR 35.655 - Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Five-year inspection for teletherapy and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.655 Section 35.655 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma...

  11. Image-Guided Stereotactic Spine Radiosurgery on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  12. Silent Corticotroph Adenomas After Stereotactic Radiosurgery: A Case–Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhiyuan; Ellis, Scott; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Starke, Robert M.; Schlesinger, David; Lee Vance, Mary; Lopes, M. Beatriz; Sheehan, Jason

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with a silent corticotroph adenoma (SCA) compared with patients with other subtypes of non–adrenocorticotropic hormone staining nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA). Methods and Materials: The clinical features and outcomes of 104 NFA patients treated with SRS in our center between September 1994 and August 2012 were evaluated. Among them, 34 consecutive patients with a confirmatory SCA were identified. A control group of 70 patients with other subtypes of NFA were selected for review based on comparable baseline features, including sex, age at the time of SRS, tumor size, margin radiation dose to the tumor, and duration of follow-up. Results: The median follow-up after SRS was 56 months (range, 6-200 months). No patients with an SCA developed Cushing disease during the follow-up. Tumor control was achieved in 21 of 34 patients (62%) in the SCA group, compared with 65 of 70 patients (93%) in the NFA group. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 58 months in the SCA group. The actuarial PFS was 73%, 46%, and 31% in the SCA group and was 94%, 87%, and 87% in the NFA group at 3, 5, and 8 years, respectively. Silent corticotroph adenomas treated with a dose of ≥17 Gy exhibited improved PFS. New-onset loss of pituitary function developed in 10 patients (29%) in the SCA group, whereas it occurred in 18 patients (26%) in the NFA group. Eight patients (24%) in the SCA group experienced worsening of a visual field deficit or visual acuity attributed to the tumor progression, as did 6 patients (9%) in the NFA group. Conclusion: Silent corticotroph adenomas exhibited a more aggressive course with a higher progression rate than other subtypes of NFAs. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important adjuvant treatment for control of tumor growth. Increased radiation dose may lead to improved tumor control in SCA patients.

  13. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  14. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiation therapy-reflection on the last decade's achievements and future directions.

    PubMed

    Knisely, Jonathan; Sahgal, Arjun; Lo, Simon; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and its extracranial first cousin, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have become increasingly important in the palliative treatment of cancer patients over the past decade. Appropriately designed and adequately powered clinical trials have in many clinical scenarios amply justified the time, effort, and expense associated with the development and delivery of these highly conformal and complex radiation treatment plans. Ongoing trials are anticipated to provide further confirmatory documentation of the benefits that have been readily observed by caregivers, patients, and their families. It may be predicted that future directions for palliative radiosurgery will include simplification, through greater automation, of the detailed steps that are still required for safe treatment, and thereby increase the chances for patients to receive these advanced palliative interventions at local institutions, from local caregivers. PMID:27121742

  16. CT Perfusion Imaging as an Early Biomarker of Differential Response to Stereotactic Radiosurgery in C6 Rat Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Kurdi, Maher; Wang, Yong; Al-Khazraji, Baraa; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Jackson, Dwayne; Crukley, Cathie; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-01-01

    Background The therapeutic efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery for glioblastoma is not well understood, and there needs to be an effective biomarker to identify patients who might benefit from this treatment. This study investigated the efficacy of computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging as an early imaging biomarker of response to stereotactic radiosurgery in a malignant rat glioma model. Methods Rats with orthotopic C6 glioma tumors received either mock irradiation (controls, N = 8) or stereotactic radiosurgery (N = 25, 12 Gy in one fraction) delivered by Helical Tomotherapy. Twelve irradiated animals were sacrificed four days after stereotactic radiosurgery to assess acute CT perfusion and histological changes, and 13 irradiated animals were used to study survival. Irradiated animals with survival >15 days were designated as responders while those with survival ≤15 days were non-responders. Longitudinal CT perfusion imaging was performed at baseline and regularly for eight weeks post-baseline. Results Early signs of radiation-induced injury were observed on histology. There was an overall survival benefit following stereotactic radiosurgery when compared to the controls (log-rank P<0.04). Responders to stereotactic radiosurgery showed lower relative blood volume (rBV), and permeability-surface area (PS) product on day 7 post-stereotactic radiosurgery when compared to controls and non-responders (P<0.05). rBV and PS on day 7 showed correlations with overall survival (P<0.05), and were predictive of survival with 92% accuracy. Conclusions Response to stereotactic radiosurgery was heterogeneous, and early selection of responders and non-responders was possible using CT perfusion imaging. Validation of CT perfusion indices for response assessment is necessary before clinical implementation. PMID:25329655

  17. Knowledge Modeling for the Outcome of Brain Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Jillian E.

    Purpose: To build a model that will predict the survival time for patients that were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases using support vector machine (SVM) regression. Methods and Materials: This study utilized data from 481 patients, which were equally divided into training and validation datasets randomly. The SVM model used a Gaussian RBF function, along with various parameters, such as the size of the epsilon insensitive region and the cost parameter (C) that are used to control the amount of error tolerated by the model. The predictor variables for the SVM model consisted of the actual survival time of the patient, the number of brain metastases, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) and Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores, prescription dose, and the largest planning target volume (PTV). The response of the model is the survival time of the patient. The resulting survival time predictions were analyzed against the actual survival times by single parameter classification and two-parameter classification. The predicted mean survival times within each classification were compared with the actual values to obtain the confidence interval associated with the model's predictions. In addition to visualizing the data on plots using the means and error bars, the correlation coefficients between the actual and predicted means of the survival times were calculated during each step of the classification. Results: The number of metastases and KPS scores, were consistently shown to be the strongest predictors in the single parameter classification, and were subsequently used as first classifiers in the two-parameter classification. When the survival times were analyzed with the number of metastases as the first classifier, the best correlation was obtained for patients with 3 metastases, while patients with 4 or 5 metastases had significantly worse results. When the KPS score was used as the first classifier, patients with a KPS score of 60 and

  18. Stereotactic Interstitial Radiosurgery With the Photon Radiosurgery System (PRS) for Metastatic Brain Tumors: A Prospective Single-Center Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazis, Georgios; Trippel, Michael; Birg, Walter; Ostertag, Christoph B.; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and the treatment outcome of tumor patients being treated stereotactically with a miniature X-ray generator (Photon Radiosurgery System, PRS). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with histologically diagnosed cerebral metastases were treated with a single fraction of stereotactic interstitial irradiation (median, 18 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging evaluation were assessed at 2-, 6-, and 12-week intervals postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Survival, local control, and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival was 7.37 months and the actuarial survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 60.0% and 34.3%, respectively. Acute complications on six patients were associated with shorter survival. Local tumor control at the initial stage and at the last follow-up were 82% and 50%. Eighteen patients (53%) developed distant brain metastases after treatment. At 1 year, the local control rate and distant and overall brain freedom from progression were 33.0%, 43.3%, and 14.7%, respectively. A shorter local tumor control was observed by PRS treatment of a recurrent tumor and by irregular tumor configuration. Conclusions: Interstitial radiosurgery with the PRS requires continued investigation. It allows for an immediate and potentially cost-efficient treatment for patients with singular, small (<= 6.36 cm{sup 3}; or <= 2.3 cm) spherical brain metastasis subsequent to a stereotactic biopsy.

  19. Stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery. Initial North American experience in 207 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.; Coffey, R.J. )

    1990-02-01

    The first North American gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations entered the therapeutic armamentarium at the University of Pittsburgh (Pa) on August 14, 1987. In this article, we report our initial testing and subsequent experience with this technique. In the first 16 months of operation, 207 patients were treated (113 had arteriovenous malformations, 78 had extra-axial skull base neoplasms, 9 had glial neoplasms, and 7 had metastatic tumors). The patients' lesions either were considered previously as inoperable or were residual lesions after attempted surgical resection, or the radiosurgery was performed after the patient declined surgical excision. Gamma radiosurgery was associated with no surgical mortality and no significant early morbidity, and the results were encouraging during the minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Compared with treatment by conventional intracranial surgery (craniotomy), both the average length of stay and hospital charges for radiosurgery were significantly lower. Our initial experience further suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife is a therapeutically effective and economically sound alternative to microneurosurgical removal of selected intracranial tumors and vascular malformations.

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery of angiographically occult vascular malformations: Indications and preliminary experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kondziolka, D.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Bissonette, D.J.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has been shown to treat successfully angiographically demonstrated arteriovenous malformations of the brain. Angiographic obliteration has represented cure and eliminated the risk of future hemorrhage. The role of radiosurgery in the treatment of angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) has been less well defined. In the initial 32 months of operation of the 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife at the University of Pittsburgh, 24 patients meeting strict criteria for high-risk AOVMs were treated. Radiosurgery was used conservatively; each patient had sustained two or more hemorrhages and had a magnetic resonance imaging-defined AOVM located in a region of the brain where microsurgical removal was judged to pose an excessive risk. Venous angiomas were excluded by performance of high-resolution subtraction angiography in each patient. Fifteen malformations were in the medulla, pons, and/or mesencephalon, and 5 were located in the thalamus or basal ganglia. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 24 months. Nineteen patients either improved or remained clinically stable and did not hemorrhage again during the follow-up interval. One patient suffered another hemorrhage 7 months after radiosurgery. Five patients experienced temporary worsening of pre-existing neurological deficits that suggested delayed radiation injury. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated signal changes and edema surrounding the radiosurgical target. Dose-volume guidelines for avoiding complications were constructed. Our initial experience indicates that stereotactic radiosurgery can be performed safely in patients with small, well-circumscribed AOVMs located in deep, critical, or relatively inaccessible cerebral locations.

  1. Robot Assisted Stereotactic Laser Ablation for a Radiosurgery Resistant Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Vinita; Sather, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are benign tumors that can cause significant morbidity in adults as a cause of epilepsy, particularly gelastic seizures. Open and endoscopic resections of HH offer good seizure control but have high rates of morbidity and are technically challenging. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been an alternative treatment; however, it results in comparably poor seizure control. Recently, in children, stereotactic laser ablation has shown promise as a surgical technique that can combine the best features of both of these approaches for the treatment of HH. Here we present the first reported use of a frameless robot-assisted stereotactic system to treat an HH. The patient had failed two previous Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatments. Post-procedure he had a stable, but unintentional weight loss of 20 kg and a transient episode of hemiparesis the night of the operation. At six months postoperatively the patient remained seizure free. Stereotactic laser ablation may represent a new standard in the treatment of HH in adults, especially in those who have failed radiosurgery. Further study is warranted in this population to determine efficacy and safety profiles. PMID:27217984

  2. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Feasibility study of real-time planning for stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qinghui; Song Yulin; Chan, Maria; Burman, Chandra; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: 3D rotational setup errors in radiotherapy are often ignored by most clinics due to inability to correct or simulate them accurately and efficiently. There are two types of rotation-related problems in a clinical setting. One is to assess the affected dose distribution in real-time if correction is not applied and the other one is to correct the rotational setup errors prior to the initiation of the treatment. Here, the authors present the analytical solutions to both problems. Methods: (1) To assess the real-time dose distribution, eight stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) cases were used as examples. For each plan, two new sets of beams with different table, gantry, and collimator angles were given in analytical forms as a function of patient rotational errors. The new beams simulate the rotational effects of the patient during the treatment setup. By using one arbitrary set of beams, SRS plans were recomputed with a series of different combinations of patient rotational errors, ranging from (-5 Degree-Sign , -5 Degree-Sign , -5 Degree-Sign ) to (5 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign , 5 Degree-Sign ) (roll, pitch, and yaw) with an increment of 1 Degree-Sign and compared with those without rotational errors. For each set of rotational errors, its corresponding equivalent beams were computed using the analytical solutions and then used for dose calculation. (2) To correct for the rotational errors, two new sets of table, gantry, and collimator angles were derived analytically to validate the previously published derivation. However, in the derivation, a novel methodology was developed and two sets of table, gantry, and collimator angles were obtained in analytical forms. The solutions provide an alternative approach to rotational error correction by rotating the couch, gantry, and collimator rather than the patient. Results: For demonstration purpose, the above-derived new beams were implemented in a treatment planning system (TPS) to study the rotational effects on

  4. Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Bevacizumab in Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alvin R.; Cuneo, Kyle C.; Desjardins, Annick; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Peters, Katherine B.; Allen, Karen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Craciunescu, Oana; Vredenburgh, James J.; Friedman, Henry S.; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Virtually all patients with malignant glioma (MG) eventually recur. This study evaluates the safety of concurrent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and bevacizumab (BVZ), an antiangiogenic agent, in treatment of recurrent MG. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with recurrent MG, treated at initial diagnosis with surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy/temozolomide and then at least 1 salvage chemotherapy regimen, were enrolled in this prospective trial. Lesions <3 cm in diameter were treated in a single fraction, whereas those 3 to 5 cm in diameter received 5 5-Gy fractions. BVZ was administered immediately before SRS and 2 weeks later. Neurocognitive testing (Mini-Mental Status Exam, Trail Making Test A/B), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) quality-of-life assessment, physical exam, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were performed immediately before SRS and 1 week and 2 months following completion of SRS. The primary endpoint was central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included survival, quality of life, microvascular properties as measured by DCE-MRI, steroid usage, and performance status. Results: One grade 3 (severe headache) and 2 grade 2 CNS toxicities were observed. No patients experienced grade 4 to 5 toxicity or intracranial hemorrhage. Neurocognition, quality of life, and Karnofsky performance status did not change significantly with treatment. DCE-MRI results suggest a significant decline in tumor perfusion and permeability 1 week after SRS and further decline by 2 months. Conclusions: Treatment of recurrent MG with concurrent SRS and BVZ was not associated with excessive toxicity in this prospective trial. A randomized trial of concurrent SRS/BVZ versus conventional salvage therapy is needed to establish the efficacy of this approach.

  5. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  6. Intraoperative real-time MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser thermal ablation for progressive brain metastases after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Torcuator, Roy G; Hulou, M Maher; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Golby, Alexandra J

    2016-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for brain metastases. However, there are patients who will progress after radiosurgery. One of the potential treatments for this subset of patients is laser ablation. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy is important to determine the histopathological nature of the lesion. However, this is usually based on preoperative, static images, which may affect the target accuracy during the actual procedure as a result of brain shift. We therefore performed real-time intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic aspiration and biopsies on two patients with symptomatic, progressive lesions after radiosurgery followed immediately by laser ablation. The patients tolerated the procedure well with no new neurologic deficits. Intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser ablation is safe and accurate, providing real-time updates and feedback during the procedure. PMID:26596402

  7. Integral Whole Brain Dose from Stereotactic Radiosurgery of 47 Metastatic Lesions: A Dosimetric Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C; Miller, Michael J; Lodin, Kenneth; Girvigian, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 15-year-old male diagnosed with primary ALK-positive adenocarcinoma of the lung metastatic to the brain. He was treated with surgical resection for a single lesion followed by whole brain radiotherapy and subsequently underwent 10 courses of stereotactic radiosurgery for 47 lesions delivered over a four-year period. Currently, all metastatic lesions in the brain are completely resolved or locally controlled. PMID:26858917

  8. Stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    One of the more challenging problems of vascular neurosurgery is the management of surgically-inaccessible arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we have developed the method of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle (helium-ion) Bragg peak radiosurgery for treatment of inoperable intracranial AVMs in over 300 patients since 1980 (Fabrikant et al. 1989, Fabrikant et al. 1985, Levy et al. 1989). This report describes patient selection, treatment method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered. 4 refs.

  9. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  10. Stereotactic LINAC-Radiosurgery for Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Long-Term Follow-Up of 27 Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Majdoub, Faycal; Hunsche, Stefan; Igressa, Alhadi; Kocher, Martin; Sturm, Volker; Maarouf, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment of glomus jugulare tumors (GJTs) remains controversial. Due to the critical location, microsurgery still provides high treatment-related morbidity and a decreased quality of life. Thus, we performed stereotactical radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GJTs and evaluated the long-term outcome. Methods Between 1991 and 2011, 32 patients with GJTs underwent SRS using a linear accelerator (LINAC) either as primary or salvage therapy. Twenty-seven patients (median age 59.9 years, range 28.7–79.9 years) with a follow-up greater than five years (median 11 years, range 5.3–22.1 years) were selected for retrospective analysis. The median therapeutic single dose applied to the tumor surface was 15 Gy (range 11–20 Gy) and the median tumor volume was 9.5 ml (range 2.8–51 ml). Results Following LINAC-SRS, 10 of 27 patients showed a significant improvement of their previous neurological complaints, whereas 12 patients remained unchanged. Five patients died during follow-up due to old age or other, not treatment-related reasons. MR-imaging showed a partial remission in 12 and a stable disease in 15 patients. No tumor progression was observed. The actuarial overall survival rates after five, ten and 20 years were 100%, 95.2% and 79.4%, respectively. Conclusions Stereotactic LINAC-Radiosurgery can achieve an excellent long-term tumor control beside a low rate of morbidity in the treatment of GJTs. It should be considered as an alternative therapy regime to surgical resection or fractionated external beam radiation either as primary, adjuvant or salvage therapy. PMID:26069957

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Spinal Metastatic Disease: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William A.; Stapleford, Liza J.; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Curran, Walter J.; Crocker, Ian; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal metastasis is a problem that afflicts many cancer patients. Traditionally, conventional fractionated radiation therapy and/or surgery have been the most common approaches for managing such patients. Through technical advances in radiotherapy, high dose radiation with extremely steep drop off can now be delivered to a limited target volume along the spine under image-guidance with very high precision. This procedure, known as stereotactic body radiosurgery, provides a technique to rapidly treat selected spinal metastasis patients with single- or limited-fraction treatments that have similar to superior efficacies compared with more established approaches. This review describes current treatment systems in use to deliver stereotactic body radiosurgery as well as results of some of the larger case series from a number of institutions that report outcomes of patients treated for spinal metastatic disease. These series include nearly 1400 patients and report a cumulative local control rate of 90% with myelopathy risk that is significantly less than 1%. Based on this comprehensive review of the literature, we believe that stereotactic body radiosurgery is an established treatment modality for patients with spinal metastatic disease that is both safe and highly effective. PMID:22312536

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery of the brain using the first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.; Lindner, G.; Maitz, A.

    1989-02-01

    The first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations became operational at the University of Pittsburgh on August 14, 1987. Four and one-half years of intensive planning, regulatory agency review, and analysis of published results preceded the first radiosurgical procedure. Installation of this 18,000-kg device and loading of the 201 cobalt-60 sources posed major challenges in engineering, architecture, and radiophysics. In the first 4 months of operation, we treated 52 patients (29 with arteriovenous malformations, 19 with extra-axial neoplasms of the skull base, and 4 with intra-axial malignant tumors). Most patients either had lesions considered inoperable or had residual lesions after attempted surgical resection. Neither surgical mortality nor significant morbidity was associated with gamma knife radiosurgery. As compared with treatment by conventional intracranial surgery (craniotomy), the average length of stay for radiosurgery was reduced by 4 to 14 days, and hospital charges were reduced by as much as 65%. Based on both the previously published results of treatment of more than 2,000 patients worldwide and on our initial clinical experience, we believe that gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery is a therapeutically effective and economically sound alternative to more conventional neurosurgical procedures, in selected cases.

  13. Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It was our purpose to analyze long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (Linac-based FSRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Materials and methods Between 10/1995 and 03/2009, 297 patients with a median age of 59 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. 50 patients had a Grade I meningioma, 20 patients had a Grade II meningioma, 12 patients suffered from a Grade III tumor, and in 215 cases no histology was obtained (Grade 0). Of the 297 patients, 144 underwent FSRT as their primary treatment and 158 underwent postoperative FSRT. 179 patients received normofractionated radiotherapy (nFSRT), 92 patients received hypofractionated FSRT (hFSRT) and 26 patients underwent SRS. Patients with nFSRT received a mean total dose of 57.31 ± 5.82 Gy, patients with hFSRT received a mean total dose of 37.6 ± 4.4 Gy and patients who underwent SRS received a mean total dose of 17.31 ± 2.58 Gy. Results Median follow-up was 35 months. Overall progression free survival (PFS) was 92.3% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years and 84.1% at 10 years. Patients with adjuvant radiotherapy showed significantly better PFS-rates than patients who had been treated with primary radiotherapy. There was no significant difference between PFS-rates of nFSRT, hFSRT and SRS patients. PFS-rates were independent of tumor size. Patients who had received nFSRT showed less acute toxicity than those who had received hFSRT. In the Grade 0/I group the rate of radiologic focal reactions was significantly lower than in the atypical/malignant histology group. Conclusion This large study showed that FSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality with high PFS-rates for intracranial meningioma. We identified “pathological grading” and and “prior surgery” as significant prognostic factors. PMID:24650090

  14. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series. PMID:24825407

  15. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul; Carson, Kathryn A.; Shokek, Ori; Lim, Michael; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

  16. Outcomes of Diffusion Tensor Tractography-Integrated Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Keisuke; Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro; Shin, Masahiro; Itoh, Daisuke; Kunii, Naoto; Ino, Kenji; Terahara, Atsuro; Aoki, Shigeki; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Saito, Nobuhito

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of use of tractography of the critical brain white matter fibers created from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging on reduction of morbidity associated with radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Tractography of the pyramidal tract has been integrated since February 2004 if lesions are adjacent to it, the optic radiation since May 2006, and the arcuate fasciculus since October 2007. By visually confirming the precise location of these fibers, the dose to these fiber tracts was optimized. One hundred forty-four consecutive patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations who underwent radiosurgery with this technique between February 2004 and December 2009 were analyzed. Results: Tractography was prospectively integrated in 71 of 155 treatments for 144 patients. The pyramidal tract was visualized in 45, the optic radiation in 22, and the arcuate fasciculus in 13 (two tracts in 9). During the follow-up period of 3 to 72 months (median, 23 months) after the procedure, 1 patient showed permanent worsening of pre-existing dysesthesia, and another patient exhibited mild transient hemiparesis 12 months later but fully recovered after oral administration of corticosteroid agents. Two patients had transient speech disturbance before starting integration of the arcuate fasciculus tractography, but no patient thereafter. Conclusion: Integrating tractography helped prevent morbidity of radiosurgery in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

  17. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vertebral metastases

    PubMed Central

    Blamek, Sławomir; Roch-Zniszczoł, Agata; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of applying CyberKnife (CK) radiosurgery in patients with spinal metastases. Material and methods Twenty-eight patients with vertebral metastases treated using the CK system were included in the study. Eleven patients suffered from pain, and in 1 case neurological symptoms were observed. The remaining patients were free from clinical symptoms of metastatic disease. The doses applied ranged between 8 and 40 Gy delivered in 4 fractions of 8–15 Gy. Results In the first follow-up evaluation (mean 4.5 months after the treatment), pain was stable in 5 of 8 evaluable cases and in 3 regression occurred. The last follow-up examination (mean 11 months after stereotactic radiosurgery) revealed stable ailments in 3 of 6 evaluable cases, improvement in 3 and new complaints in another 4 patients. In 17 patients imaging studies were conducted after a mean time of 11 months after CK treatment. Stabilization was confirmed in 11, regression in 4 and progression in 2 cases. Median overall survival was 20.6 months. Median progression-free survival was 12.6 months. No side effects attributable to the treatment were observed, but during follow-up transient or permanent deterioration in neurological status as a consequence of disease progression was diagnosed in 4 patients. Delivery time of a single fraction ranged between 0.5 and 1.5 hours. Conclusions Robotic stereotactic radiosurgery as part of multimodality therapy for metastatic spinal tumours is safe and effective. Because of long irradiation times, this kind of treatment is not suitable for patients in poor general condition. PMID:26557782

  18. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  19. Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) in patients with acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. . E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Thilmann, Christoph; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas (AN). Patients and Methods: Between 1990 and 2001, we treated 26 patients with 27 AN with SRS. Two patients suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2. Before SRS, a subtotal or total resection had been performed in 3 and in 5 patients, respectively. For SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy/80% isodose was applied. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year and 10-year tumor control probability in all patients was 91%. Two patients developed tumor progression after SRS at 36 and 48 months. Nineteen patients (73%) were at risk of treatment-related facial nerve toxicity; of these, 1 patient developed a complete facial nerve palsy after SRS (5%). A total of 93% of the lesions treated were at risk of radiation-induced trigeminal neuralgia. Two patients (8%) developed mild dysesthesia of the trigeminal nerve after SRS. The hearing preservation rate in patients with useful hearing before SRS was 55% at 9 years. Conclusion:: Stereotactic radiosurgery results in good local control rates of AN and the risk of cranial nerve toxicities is acceptable. As toxicity is lower with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  20. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  1. Conformity of LINAC-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using Dynamic Conformal Arcs and Micro-Multileaf Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Hazard, Lisa J. Wang, Brian; Skidmore, Thomas B.; Chern, Shyh-Shi; Salter, Bill J.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the conformity of dynamic conformal arc linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery and to describe a standardized method of isodose surface (IDS) selection. Methods and Materials: In 174 targets, the conformity index (CI) at the prescription IDS used for treatment was calculated as CI = (PIV/PVTV)/(PVTV/TV), where TV is the target volume, PIV (prescription isodose volume) is the total volume encompassed by the prescription IDS, and PVTV is the TV encompassed by the IDS. In addition, a 'standardized' prescription IDS (sIDS) was chosen according to the following criteria: 95% of the TV was encompassed by the PIV and 99% of TV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose. The CIs at the sIDS were also calculated. Results: The median CI at the prescription IDS and sIDS was 1.63 and 1.47, respectively (p < 0.001). In 132 of 174 cases, the volume of normal tissue in the PIV was reduced by the prescription to the sIDS compared with the prescription IDS, in 20 cases it remained unchanged, and in 22 cases it was increased. Conclusion: The CIs obtained with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery are comparable to those previously reported for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Using a uniform method to select the sIDS, adequate target coverage was usually achievable with prescription to an IDS greater than that chosen by the treating physician (prescription IDS), providing sparing of normal tissue. Thus, the sIDS might aid physicians in identifying a prescription IDS that balances coverage and conformity.

  2. Integration of Functional MRI and White Matter Tractography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Papadakis, Nikolaos; Verigos, Kosmas; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Antypas, Christos; Lekas, Leonidas; Tzouras, Argyrios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Salvaras, Nikolaos

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of the integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging tractography data into stereotactic radiosurgery clinical practice. Methods and Materials: fMRI and tractography data sets were acquired and fused with corresponding anatomical MR and computed tomography images of patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), astrocytoma, brain metastasis, or hemangioma and referred for stereotactic radiosurgery. The acquired data sets were imported into a CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery system and used to delineate the target, organs at risk, and nearby functional structures and fiber tracts. Treatment plans with and without the incorporation of the functional structures and the fiber tracts into the optimization process were developed and compared. Results: The nearby functional structures and fiber tracts could receive doses of >50% of the maximum dose if they were excluded from the planning process. In the AVM case, the doses received by the Broadmann-17 structure and the optic tract were reduced to 700 cGy from 1,400 cGy and to 1,200 cGy from 2,000 cGy, respectively, upon inclusion into the optimization process. In the metastasis case, the motor cortex received 850 cGy instead of 1,400 cGy; and in the hemangioma case, the pyramidal tracts received 780 cGy instead of 990 cGy. In the astrocytoma case, the dose to the motor cortex bordering the lesion was reduced to 1,900 cGy from 2,100 cGy, and therefore, the biologically equivalent dose in three fractions was delivered instead. Conclusions: Functional structures and fiber tracts could receive high doses if they were not considered during treatment planning. With the aid of fMRI and tractography images, they can be delineated and spared.

  3. Bevacizumab for the treatment of post-stereotactic radiosurgery adverse radiation effect

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Fabiano, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse radiation effect (ARE) is one of the complications of stereotactic radiosurgery. Its treatment with conventional medications, such as corticosteroids, vitamin E, and pentoxifylline carries a high risk of failure, with up to 20% of lesions refractory to such medications. In addition, deep lesions and those occurring in patients with significant medical comorbidities may not be suitable for surgical resection. Bevacizumab is an antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, a known mediator of cerebral edema. It can be used to successfully treat ARE. Case Description: An 85-year-old man with a history of small-cell lung cancer presented with metastatic disease to the brain. He underwent stereotactic radiosurgery to a brain metastasis involving the right external capsule. Three months later, the lesion had increased in size, with significant surrounding edema. The patient developed an adverse reaction to steroid treatment and had a poor response to treatment with pentoxifylline and vitamin E. He was deemed a poor surgical candidate because of his medical comorbidities. He was eventually treated with 3 doses of bevacizumab, and the treatment resulted in significant clinical improvement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed some decrease in the size of the lesion and significant decrease in the surrounding edema. Conclusions: Bevacizumab can be successfully used to treat ARE induced by stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with cerebral metastases. It is of particular benefit in patients considered unsuitable for surgical decompression. It is also beneficial in patients with poor tolerance to corticosteroids and in patients who do not respond to other medications. PMID:27583180

  4. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS AND FRACTURES FOLLOWING STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY IN DOGS WITH APPENDICULAR OSTEOSARCOMA.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Lyndsay; Vanderhart, Daniel; Wirth, Kimberly; An, Qi; Chang, Myron; Farese, James; Bova, Francis; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Kow, Kelvin; Bacon, Nicholas J; Milner, Rowan

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this observational, descriptive, retrospective study was to report CT characteristics associated with fractures following stereotactic radiosurgery in canine patients with appendicular osteosarcoma. Medical records (1999 and 2012) of dogs that had a diagnosis of appendicular osteosarcoma and undergone stereotactic radiosurgery were reviewed. Dogs were included in the study if they had undergone stereotactic radiosurgery for an aggressive bone lesion with follow-up information regarding fracture status, toxicity, and date and cause of death. Computed tomography details, staging, chemotherapy, toxicity, fracture status and survival data were recorded. Overall median survival time (MST) and fracture rates of treated dogs were calculated. CT characteristics were evaluated for association with time to fracture. Forty-six dogs met inclusion criteria. The median overall survival time was 9.7 months (95% CI: 6.9-14.3 months). The fracture-free rates at 3, 6, and 9 months were 73%, 44%, and 38% (95% CI: 60-86%, 29-60%, and 22-54%), respectively. The region of bone affected was significantly associated with time to fracture. The median time to fracture was 4.2 months in dogs with subchondral bone involvement and 16.3 months in dogs without subchondral bone involvement (P-value = 0.027, log-rank test). Acute and late skin effects were present in 58% and 16% of patients, respectively. Findings demonstrated a need for improved patient selection for this procedure, which can be aided by CT-based prognostic factors to predict the likelihood of fracture. PMID:26916056

  5. SU-D-16A-06: Modeling Biological Effects of Residual Uncertainties For Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L; Larson, D; McDermott, M; Sneed, P; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Residual uncertainties on the order of 1-2 mm are frequently observed when delivering stereotactic radiosurgery via on-line imaging guidance with a relocatable frame. In this study, a predictive model was developed to evalute potentiral late radiation effects associated with such uncertainties. Methods: A mathematical model was first developed to correlate the peripherial isodose volume with the internal and/or setup margins for a radiosurgical target. Such a model was then integrated with a previoulsy published logistic regression normal tissue complication model for determining the symptomatic radiation necrosis rate at various target sizes and prescription dose levels. The model was tested on a cohort of 15 brain tumor and tumor resection cavity patient cases and model predicted results were compared with the clinical results reported in the literature. Results: A normalized target diameter (D{sub 0}) in term of D{sub 0} = 6V/S, where V is the volume of a radiosurgical target and S is the surface of the target, was found to correlate excellently with the peripheral isodose volume for a radiosurgical delivery (logarithmic regression R{sup 2} > 0.99). The peripheral isodose volumes were found increase rapidly with increasing uncertainties levels. In general, a 1-mm residual uncertainties as calculated to result in approximately 0.5%, 1%, and 3% increases in the symptomatic radiation necrosis rate for D{sub 0} = 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm based on the prescription guideline of RTOG 9005, i.e., 21 Gy to a lesion of 1 cm in diameter, 18 Gy to a lesion 2 cm in diameter, and 15 Gy to a lesion 3 cm in diameter respectively. Conclusion: The results of study suggest more stringent criteria on residual uncertainties are needed when treating a large target such as D{sub 0}≤ 3 cm with stereotactic radiosurgery. Dr. Ma and Dr. Sahgal are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery (ISRS)

  6. Rapid tumor growth with glial differentiation of central neurocytoma after stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirotomo; Sasayama, Takashi; Yamashita, Haruo; Hara, Yoshie; Hayashi, Shigeto; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Fujita, Yuichi; Okino, Takeshi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yoji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is effective for central neurocytoma (CN), the long-term outcome of SRS remains unclear. We present a case of recurrent CN that was diagnosed 10years after surgical resection and consecutive stereotactic radiotherapy. The patient was treated with SRS for the recurrent tumor, but underwent two-staged surgery once again due to rapid tumor growth. Histological features of the recurrent tumor were consistent with the diagnosis of CN. However, an increased Ki-67 proliferation index (3.4%), aberrant angiogenesis and glial differentiation of the tumor cells were observed, which were not identified in the initial CN. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor were highly expressed in the recurrent tumor cells, as well as in the vascular endothelial cells. Our case suggests that malignant transition with aberrant angiogenesis and glial differentiation may be attributable to SRS. PMID:27242062

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Stereotactic Target Localization Using 3-Tesla MRI for Radiosurgery Planning

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, Derek; Zhang Beibei; Brock, Kristy K.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Laperriere, Normand; Schwartz, Michael; Tsao, May; Stainsby, Jeffrey; Lockwood, Gina; Mikulis, David; Menard, Cynthia

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Increasing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength can improve image resolution and quality, but concerns remain regarding the influence on geometric fidelity. The objectives of the present study were to spatially investigate the effect of 3-Tesla (3T) MRI on clinical target localization for stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 patients were enrolled in a research ethics board-approved prospective clinical trial. Imaging (1.5T and 3T MRI and computed tomography) was performed after stereotactic frame placement. Stereotactic target localization at 1.5T vs. 3T was retrospectively analyzed in a representative cohort of patients with tumor (n = 4) and functional (n = 5) radiosurgical targets. The spatial congruency of the tumor gross target volumes was determined by the mean discrepancy between the average gross target volume surfaces at 1.5T and 3T. Reproducibility was assessed by the displacement from an averaged surface and volume congruency. Spatial congruency and the reproducibility of functional radiosurgical targets was determined by comparing the mean and standard deviation of the isocenter coordinates. Results: Overall, the mean absolute discrepancy across all patients was 0.67 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.83), significantly <1 mm (p < .010). No differences were found in the overall interuser target volume congruence (mean, 84% for 1.5T vs. 84% for 3T, p > .4), and the gross target volume surface mean displacements were similar within and between users. The overall average isocenter coordinate discrepancy for the functional targets at 1.5T and 3T was 0.33 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.48), with no patient-specific differences between the mean values (p >.2) or standard deviations (p >.1). Conclusion: Our results have provided clinically relevant evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3T MRI for use in stereotactic radiosurgery under the imaging conditions used.

  8. Salvage Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Surgically Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew S.; Shetter, Andrew G. Shetter, Mary E.; Kakarla, Udaya K.; Rogers, C. Leland

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed using the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery for non-functioning and secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is frequently employed in patients with residual or recurrent pituitary adenoma with excellent rates of tumor control and remission of hormonal hypersecretion. Advances in RT have improved with the use of stereotactic techniques either as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), all aiming to improve the dose distribution to the tumor while reducing the amount of normal brain receiving significant doses of radiation. We provide an overview of the recent published literature on the long-term efficacy and adverse effects of stereotactic irradiation in nonfunctioning and secreting pituitary adenomas. Both techniques are associated with excellent clinical outcomes; however, advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques in terms of local control, hormonal excess normalization, and radiation-induced toxicity remain a matter of debate. In clinical practice, single-fraction SRS may represent a convenient approach to patients with small and medium-sized pituitary adenoma away at least 2 mm from the optic chiasm, whereas FSRT is preferred over SRS for lesions >2.5-3 cm in size and/or involving the anterior optic pathway. PMID:27330422

  10. Quality of coverage: conformity measures for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q-R Jackie; Wessels, B W; Einstein, D B; Maciunas, R J; Kim, E Y; Kinsella, T J

    2003-01-01

    In radiosurgery, conformity indices are often used to compare competing plans, evaluate treatment techniques, and assess clinical complications. Several different indices have been reported to measure the conformity of the prescription isodose to the target volume. The PITV recommended in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiosurgery guidelines, defined as the ratio of the prescription isodose volume (PI) over the target volume (TV), is probably the most frequently quoted. However, these currently used conformity indices depend on target size and shape complexity. The objectives of this study are to systematically investigate the influence of target size and shape complexity on existing conformity indices, and to propose a different conformity index-the conformity distance index (CDI). The CDI is defined as the average distance between the target and the prescription isodose line. This study examines five case groups with volumes of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, and 30.0 cm(3). Each case group includes four simulated shapes: a sphere, a moderate ellipsoid, an extreme ellipsoid, and a concave "C" shape. Prescription dose coverages are generated for three simplified clinical scenarios, i.e., the PI completely covers the TV with 1 and 2 mm margins, and the PI over-covers one half of the TV with a 1 mm margin and under-covers the other half with a 1 mm margin. Existing conformity indices and the CDI are calculated for these five case groups as well as seven clinical cases. When these values are compared, the RTOG PITV conformity index and other similar conformity measures have much higher values than the CDI for smaller and more complex shapes. With the same quality of prescription dose coverage, the CDI yields a consistent conformity measure. For the seven clinical cases, we also find that the same PITV values can be associated with very different conformity qualities while the CDI predicts the conformity quality accurately. In summary, the proposed CDI provides

  11. Stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer - dose distribution for VMAT and CyberKnife techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Szlag, Marta

    2016-06-01

    New capabilities of biomedical accelerators allow for very precise depositing of the radiation dose and imaging verification during the therapy. In addition, computer algorithms calculating dose distributions are taking into account the increasing number of physical effects. Therefore, administration of high dose fractionation, which is consistent with radiobiology used in oncology, becomes safer and safer. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), which is very precise irradiation with high dose fractionation is increasingly widespread use in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. For this purpose different biomedical accelerators are used. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions for two techniques: VMAT and CyberKnife. Statistical analysis was performed for the two groups of patients treated by VMAT technique (25 patients), and CyberKnife technique (15 patients). The analysis shows that the dose distributions are comparable, both in the treated area (prostate) and in the critical organs (rectum, urinary bladder, femoral heads). The results show that stereotactic radiosurgery of prostate cancer can be carried out on CyberKnife accelerator as well as on the classical accelerator with the use of VMAT technique.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery Versus Gold Grain Implantation in Salvaging Local Failures of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Daniel Wei, William I.; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Hung, Kwan Ngai; Au, Gordon K.H.

    2007-10-01

    Background: Limited local failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can often be salvaged by reirradiation using different techniques. Both gold grain implantation (GGI) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) have been used as salvage treatment of NPC but the relative efficacy of these two treatments is not known. Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with local NPC failure were included in this retrospective analysis. Of these patients, 37 underwent SRS (median dose, 12.5 Gy) and 37 split-palatal GGI at a dose of 60 Gy. The two groups were individually matched for prognostic factors, except for tumor volume. The median follow-up was 42 months. Results: Local control was better in the GGI group. The 3-year local failure-free rate was 77.9% for the GGI group compared with 68.3% for the SRS group. However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.098). In the subgroup with a tumor volume of {<=}5 cm{sup 3}, the 3-year local failure-free rates were similar, with 79.3% in the GGI group and 72.4% in the SRS group. Neuroendocrine complications were more common in the SRS group, and headache and fistula were more common in the GGI group. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery and GGI are both effective salvage treatment for NPC. In patients with limited local failure, both yielded comparable high tumor control rates.

  13. Optimization of Dose Distribution for the System of Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Tae-Suk

    The work suggested in this paper addresses a method for obtaining an optimal dose distribution for stereotactic radiosurgery. Since stereotactic radiosurgery utilizes multiple noncoplanar arcs and a three-dimensional dose evaluation technique, many beam parameters and complex optimization criteria are included in the dose optimization. Consequently, a lengthy computation time is required to optimize even the simplest case by a trial and error method. The basic approach presented here is to use both an analytical and an experimental optimization to minimize the dose to critical organs while maintaining a dose shaped to the target. The experimental approach is based on shaping the target volumes using multiple isocenters from dose experience, or on field shaping using a beam's eye view technique. The analytical approach is to adapt computer -aided design optimization to find optimum parameters automatically. Three-dimensional approximate dose models are developed to simulate the exact dose model using a spherical or cylindrical coordinate system. Optimum parameters are found much faster with the use of computer-aided design optimization techniques. The implementation of computer-aided design algorithms with the approximate dose model and the application of the algorithms to several cases are discussed. It is shown that the approximate dose model gives dose distributions similar to those of the exact dose model, which makes the approximate dose model an attractive alternative to the exact dose model, and much more efficient in terms of computer -aided design and visual optimization.

  14. Algorithm for dosimetry of multiarc linear-accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Astrahan, M.A. )

    1991-11-01

    Treatment planning for multiarc radiosurgery is an inherently complex three-dimensional dosimetry problem. Characteristics of small-field x-ray beams suggest that major simplification of the dose computation algorithm is possible without significant loss of accuracy compared to calculations based on large-field algorithms. The simplification makes it practical to efficiently implement accurate multiplanar dosimetry calculations on a desktop computer. An algorithm is described that is based on data from fixed-beam tissue-maximum-ratio (TMR) and profile measurements at isocenter. The profile for each fixed beam is scaled geometrically according to distance from the x-ray source. Beam broadening due to scatter is taken into account by a simple formula that interpolates the full width at half maximum (FWHM) between profiles at isocenter at different depths in phantom. TMR and profile data for two representative small-field collimators (10- and 25-mm projected diameter) were obtained by TLD and film measurements in a phantom. The accuracy of the calculational method and the associated computer program were verified by TLD and film measurements of noncoplanar multiarc irradiations from these collimators on a 4-MV linear accelerator. Comparison of film measurements in two orthogonal planes showed close agreement with calculations in the shape of the dose distribution. Maximal separation of measured and calculated 90%, 80%, and 50% isodose curves was {le}0.5 mm for all planes and collimators. All TLD and film measurements of dose to isocenter agreed with calculations to within 2%.

  15. Conformality Study for Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Marvene M.; DesRosiers, Colleen; Fakiris, Achilles J.; DeBliek, Carolyn R.; Kiszka, Daniel N.; Stinson, Eric R.; Young, Lanice E.; Bartlett, Gregory K.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two techniques of developing highly conformal plans for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) that target a high ablative dose to the center of the tumor while dropping off rapidly in normal tissues to determine which technique produced a more desirable treatment plan. The techniques used for comparison are 'field in field' (FIF) and 'non field in field' (NFIF). Twelve case studies were used, all of which had been treated using the FIF technique. Each FIF plan was edited, maintaining the same geometry for each field but reducing the total number of fields to one half by deleting all of the fields that were inside another field; this edited plan was the NFIF plan. Normalization was made to the isodose line (NFIF-I) and to the target volume (NFIF-V) and both plans were compared with the standard FIF plan independently. Dose-ratio comparisons were made of the 80% and 50% isodose volumes, as well as maximum doses outside of the planning target volume, mean dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV), minimum dose coverage on the GTV, maximum dose to the spinal cord, and the dose to the volume of noninvolved lung receiving 2000 cGy (V20). The FIF plans resulted in the best sparing of normal tissue. The NFIF-I had the best target coverage but also resulted in the highest doses to normal tissues. The NFIF-V was not significantly different from the FIF in doses to normal tissue but had the lowest coverage to targets of any of the techniques. Overall, in our department, we have chosen to use the FIF technique for SBRT conformality to obtain optimal coverage while minimizing the dose to normal tissue.

  16. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  18. Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of primary intracranial tumours in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mariani, C L; Schubert, T A; House, R A; Wong, M A; Hopkins, A L; Barnes Heller, H L; Milner, R J; Lester, N V; Lurie, D M; Rajon, D A; Friedman, W A; Bova, F J

    2015-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a procedure that delivers a single large radiation dose to a well-defined target. Here, we describe a frameless SRS technique suitable for intracranial targets in canines. Medical records of dogs diagnosed with a primary intracranial tumour by imaging or histopathology that underwent SRS were retrospectively reviewed. Frameless SRS was used successfully to treat tumours in 51 dogs with a variety of head sizes and shapes. Tumours diagnosed included 38 meningiomas, 4 pituitary tumours, 4 trigeminal nerve tumours, 3 gliomas, 1 histiocytic sarcoma and 1 choroid plexus tumour. Median survival time was 399 days for all tumours and for dogs with meningiomas; cause-specific survival was 493 days for both cohorts. Acute grade III central nervous system toxicity (altered mentation) occurred in two dogs. Frameless SRS resulted in survival times comparable to conventional radiation therapy, but with fewer acute adverse effects and only a single anaesthetic episode required for therapy. PMID:24007303

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Part of Multimodal Treatment in a Bulky Leptomeningeal Recurrence of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Eric C; Shaughnessy, Joseph N

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastatic to the brain and/or leptomeningeal spread of disease is a frequently encountered clinical situation, especially given the extended course of disease in these patients. Systemic therapies can often effectively prolong extracranial disease control, making effective strategies to control central nervous system-based disease even more critical. We present a case of bulky leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer in the setting of prior whole brain radiation therapy. In order to treat the patient’s bulky disease and leptomeningeal spread while avoiding the potential toxicities of repeat whole brain radiation, the patient was treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and intrathecal chemotherapy. This is the first report of this treatment approach for leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer. The patient had an excellent response to treatment and durable intracranial control. PMID:27081584

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery of glomus jugulare tumors: current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), a very highly focused form of therapeutic irradiation, has been widely recognized as a viable treatment option in the management of intracranial pathologies including benign tumors, malign tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. The applications of SRS are continuously expanding thanks to the ever-increasing advances and corresponding improvements in neuroimaging, radiation treatment techniques, equipment, treatment planning and delivery systems. In the context of glomus jugulare tumors (GJT), SRS is being more increasingly used both as the upfront management modality or as a complementary or salvage treatment option. As its safety and efficacy is being evident with compiling data from studies with longer follow-up durations, SRS appears to take the lead in the management of most patients with GJT. Herein, we address current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives in SRS of GJT in light of the literature. PMID:25768334

  1. Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Part of Multimodal Treatment in a Bulky Leptomeningeal Recurrence of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertke, Matthew H; Burton, Eric C; Shaughnessy, Joseph N

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastatic to the brain and/or leptomeningeal spread of disease is a frequently encountered clinical situation, especially given the extended course of disease in these patients. Systemic therapies can often effectively prolong extracranial disease control, making effective strategies to control central nervous system-based disease even more critical. We present a case of bulky leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer in the setting of prior whole brain radiation therapy. In order to treat the patient's bulky disease and leptomeningeal spread while avoiding the potential toxicities of repeat whole brain radiation, the patient was treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and intrathecal chemotherapy. This is the first report of this treatment approach for leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer. The patient had an excellent response to treatment and durable intracranial control. PMID:27081584

  2. 3D quantitative assessment of response to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T.; Chapiro, J.; Lin, M.; Geschwind, J. F.; Kleinberg, L.; Rigamonti, D.; Jusué-Torres, I.; Marciscano, A. E.; Yousem, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine clinical outcome of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) after treatment with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by using 3D quantitative response assessment on MRI. Materials This retrospective analysis included 162 patients who underwent radiation therapy for sporadic VS. Measurements on T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (in 2-year post-therapy intervals: 0–2, 2–4, 4–6, 6–8, 8–10, and 10–12 years) were taken for total tumour volume (TTV) and enhancing tumour volume (ETV) based on a semi-automated technique. Patients were considered non-responders (NRs) if they required subsequent microsurgical resection or developed radiological progression and tumour-related symptoms. Results Median follow-up was 4.1 years (range: 0.4–12.0). TTV and ETV decreased for both the FSRT and SRS groups. However, only the FSRT group achieved significant tumour shrinkage (p < 0.015 for TTV, p < 0.005 for ETV over time). The 11 NRs showed proportionally greater TTV (median TTV pre-treatment: 0.61 cm3, 8–10 years after: 1.77 cm3) and ETV despite radiation therapy compared to responders (median TTV pre-treatment: 1.06 cm3; 10–12 years after: 0.81 cm3; p = 0.001). Conclusion 3D quantification of VS showed a significant decrease in TTV and ETV on FSRT-treated patients only. NRs had significantly greater TTV and ETV over time. PMID:26139318

  3. Gold nanoparticle enhancement of stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2012-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries for people over the age of 50. In this work, the dosimetric feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNP) as radiosensitizers to enhance kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular AMD is investigated. Microdosimetry calculations at the sub-cellular level were carried out to estimate the radiation dose enhancement to individual nuclei in neovascular AMD endothelial cells (nDEF) due to photon-induced photo-/Auger electrons from x-ray-irradiated AuNP. The nDEF represents the ratio of radiation doses to the endothelial cell nuclei with and without AuNP. The calculations were carried out for a range of feasible AuNP local concentrations using the clinically applicable 100 kVp x-ray beam parameters employed by a commercially available x-ray therapy system. The results revealed nDEF values of 1.30-3.26 for the investigated concentration range of 1-7 mg g-1, respectively. In comparison, for the same concentration range, nDEF values of 1.32-3.40, 1.31-3.33, 1.29-3.19, 1.28-3.12 were calculated for 80, 90, 110 and 120 kVp x-rays, respectively. Meanwhile, calculations as a function of distance from the AuNP showed that the dose enhancement, for 100 kVp, is markedly confined to the targeted neovascular AMD endothelial cells where AuNP are localized. These findings provide impetus for considering the application of AuNP to enhance therapeutic efficacy during stereotactic radiosurgery for neovascular AMD.

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brainstem metastases: Survival, tumor control, and patient outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Aamir; Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brainstem metastases have limited treatment options. In this study, we reviewed outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of patients with brainstem metastases. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 22 consecutive patients presenting with brainstem metastases who underwent SRS. The most frequent primary malignancy was the lung (n = 11), followed by breast (n = 3) and kidney (n = 2). Three patients (14%) also underwent whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The median tumor volume was 0.9 mL (range, 0.1-3.3 mL); the median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 14-23 Gy). Results: Median survival time after SRS was 8.5 months. Although local tumor control was achieved in all patients with imaging follow-up (n = 19), 5 patients died from development and progression of new brain metastases. Two patients (9%) had symptom improvement after SRS, whereas 1 patient (5%) developed a new hemiparesis after SRS. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is safe and provides a high local tumor control rate for patients with small brainstem metastases. Patients with limited systemic disease and good performance status should be strongly considered for SRS.

  5. CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Stathopoulos, Konstantinos; Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-06-15

    CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

  6. A Rabbit Irradiation Platform for Outcome Assessment of Lung Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Mata, Jaime F.; Orton, Matthew D.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Mugler, John P.; Larner, James M.; Sheng Ke; Read, Paul W.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a helical tomotherapy-based rodent radiosurgery platform that reproduces human image-guided radiosurgery treatment to study radiobiologic effects of stereotactic radiosurgery on lung tissues using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Hypofractionated radisourgery (20 Gy x 3) was delivered to the right lung of three New Zealand rabbits using Helical TomoTherapy with MVCT image guidance. Contrast-enhanced MR perfusion, hyperpolarized helium-3 MR ventilation, and CT were obtained before radiation and monthly for 4 months after radiation. All MRI was performed on a 1.5-T whole-body scanner with broad-band capabilities. Results: Precise dose delivery to 1.6 cc of the lower right lung was achieved without additional immobilization. No deficits were detected at baseline with respect to perfusion and ventilation. Lung perfusion deficits in the irradiated lung regions began at 2 months after radiation and worsened with time. No ventilation deficits were observed after radiation. Decrease in lung CT density in irradiated regions was observed after radiation, but the changes were less significant than those in perfusion MRI. Conclusions: We demonstrated that highly conformal radiation can be reproducibly delivered to a small volume of rodent lung on a widely available clinical unit. The radiation-induced lung injury can be detected as early as 2 months after radiation with perfusion MRI. The primary pattern of injury agrees with previously reported endothelial damage to radiosurgical radiation doses. This experimental design provides a cost-effective methodology for producing radiosurgical injuries in rodents that reproduces current human treatments for studying radiation injury and agents that might affect it.

  7. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Salvati, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Bozzao, Alessandro; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  9. Cord Dose Specification and Validation for Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery of Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong Liu Yan; Chen Qing; Jin Jianyue

    2009-01-01

    Effective dose to a portion of the spinal cord in treatment segment, rather than the maximum point dose in the cord surface, was set as the dose limit in stereotactic-body radiosurgery (SBRS) of spine. Such a cord dose specification is sensitive to the volume size and position errors. Thus, we used stereotactic image guidance to minimize phantom positioning errors and compared the results of a 0.6-cm{sup 3} Farmer ionization chamber and a 0.01-cm{sup 3} compact ionization chamber to determine the detector size effect on 9 SBRS cases. The experimental errors ranging from 2% to 7% were estimated by the deviation of the mean dose in plans to the chamber with spatial displacements of 0.5 mm. The mean and measured doses for the large chamber to individual cases were significantly ({approx}17%) higher than the doses with the compact chamber placed at the same point. Our experimental results shown that the mean doses to the volume of interest could represent the measured cord doses. For the 9 patients, the mean doses to 10% of the cord were about 10 Gy, while the maximum cord doses varied from 11.6 to 17.6 Gy. The mean dose, possibly correlated with the cord complication, provided us an alternative and reliable cord dose specification in SBRS of spine.

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning based on time-resolved CTA for arteriovenous malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Josiah, Darnell; Gonzalez, Javier; Schmidt, Matthew; Tarabishy, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has long been recognized as the optimal form of management for high-grade arteriovenous malformations not amenable to surgical resection. Radiosurgical plans have generally relied upon the integration of stereotactic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), standard contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computed tomography angiography (CTA) with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Current options are disadvantageous in that catheter-based biplane DSA is an invasive test associated with a small risk of complications and perhaps more importantly, the two-dimensional nature of DSA is an inherent limitation in creating radiosurgical contours. The necessity of multiple scans to create DSA contours for radiosurgical planning puts patients at increased risk. Furthermore, the inability to import two-dimensional plans into some radiosurgery programs, such as Cyberknife TPS, limits treatment options for patients. Defining the nidus itself is sometimes difficult in any of the traditional modalities as all draining veins and feeding arteries are included in the images. This sometimes necessitates targeting a larger volume, than strictly necessary, with stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of the AVM. In this case report, we show the ability to use a less-invasive and three-dimensional form of angiography based on time-lapsed CTA (4D-CTA) rather than traditional DSA for radiosurgical planning. 4D-CTA may allow generation of a series of images, which can show the flow of contrast through the AVM. A review of these series may allow the surgeon to pick and use a volume set that best outlines the nidus with least interference from feeding arteries or draining veins. In addition, 4D-CTA scans can be uploaded into radiosurgery programs and allow three-dimensional targeting. This is the first reported case demonstrating the use of a 4D CTA and an MRI to delineate the AVM nidus for Gamma Knife radiosurgery, with complete

  11. Successful treatment of metastatic relapse of medulloblastoma in childhood with single session stereotactic radiosurgery: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    King, David; Connolly, Daniel; Zaki, Hesham; Lee, Vicki; Yeomanson, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an increasingly used treatment modality in adults, but its use and effectiveness in pediatric brain tumors is still uncertain. We describe 3 patients with metastatic relapse of medulloblastoma, who were treated with SRS, and achieved prolonged, progression-free survival. Tolerability of the treatment was excellent with no adverse effects reported. This work adds to the growing evidence that SRS may have an important role to play in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. PMID:23459380

  12. Neurocognitive Function of Patients with Brain Metastasis Who Received Either Whole Brain Radiotherapy Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery or Radiosurgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Hidefumi . E-mail: hao@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Tago, Masao; Kato, Norio; Toyoda, Tatsuya; Kenjyo, Masahiro; Hirota, Saeko; Shioura, Hiroki; Inomata, Taisuke; Kunieda, Etsuo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Kobashi, Gen; Shirato, Hiroki

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To determine how the omission of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) affects the neurocognitive function of patients with one to four brain metastases who have been treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: In a prospective randomized trial between WBRT+SRS and SRS alone for patients with one to four brain metastases, we assessed the neurocognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Of the 132 enrolled patients, MMSE scores were available for 110. Results: In the baseline MMSE analyses, statistically significant differences were observed for total tumor volume, extent of tumor edema, age, and Karnofsky performance status. Of the 92 patients who underwent the follow-up MMSE, 39 had a baseline MMSE score of {<=}27 (17 in the WBRT+SRS group and 22 in the SRS-alone group). Improvements of {>=}3 points in the MMSEs of 9 WBRT+SRS patients and 11 SRS-alone patients (p = 0.85) were observed. Of the 82 patients with a baseline MMSE score of {>=}27 or whose baseline MMSE score was {<=}26 but had improved to {>=}27 after the initial brain treatment, the 12-, 24-, and 36-month actuarial free rate of the 3-point drop in the MMSE was 76.1%, 68.5%, and 14.7% in the WBRT+SRS group and 59.3%, 51.9%, and 51.9% in the SRS-alone group, respectively. The average duration until deterioration was 16.5 months in the WBRT+SRS group and 7.6 months in the SRS-alone group (p = 0.05). Conclusion: The results of the present study have revealed that, for most brain metastatic patients, control of the brain tumor is the most important factor for stabilizing neurocognitive function. However, the long-term adverse effects of WBRT on neurocognitive function might not be negligible.

  13. A round-robin gamma stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry interinstitution comparison of calibration protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Drzymala, R. E.; Alvarez, P. E.; Bednarz, G.; Bourland, J. D.; DeWerd, L. A.; Ma, L.; Meltsner, S. G.; Neyman, G.; Novotny, J.; Petti, P. L.; Rivard, M. J.; Shiu, A. S.; Goetsch, S. J.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Absorbed dose calibration for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery is challenging due to the unique geometric conditions, dosimetry characteristics, and nonstandard field size of these devices. Members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 178 on Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance have participated in a round-robin exchange of calibrated measurement instrumentation and phantoms exploring two approved and two proposed calibration protocols or formalisms on ten gamma radiosurgery units. The objectives of this study were to benchmark and compare new formalisms to existing calibration methods, while maintaining traceability to U.S. primary dosimetry calibration laboratory standards. Methods: Nine institutions made measurements using ten gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units in three different 160 mm diameter spherical phantoms [acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic, Solid Water, and liquid water] and in air using a positioning jig. Two calibrated miniature ionization chambers and one calibrated electrometer were circulated for all measurements. Reference dose-rates at the phantom center were determined using the well-established AAPM TG-21 or TG-51 dose calibration protocols and using two proposed dose calibration protocols/formalisms: an in-air protocol and a formalism proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) working group for small and nonstandard radiation fields. Each institution’s results were normalized to the dose-rate determined at that institution using the TG-21 protocol in the ABS phantom. Results: Percentages of dose-rates within 1.5% of the reference dose-rate (TG-21 + ABS phantom) for the eight chamber-protocol-phantom combinations were the following: 88% for TG-21, 70% for TG-51, 93% for the new IAEA nonstandard-field formalism, and 65% for the new in-air protocol. Averages and standard deviations for dose-rates over all measurements relative to the TG-21 + ABS

  14. Dosimetry analysis of small radiation fields in stereotactic radiosurgery of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Najjar, Waleed Hassan

    Accurate dosimetric data of narrow circular photon beams are needed for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors. However, the measurement of dosimetric data of narrow circular beams is beset with several constraints. Usually, 6 MV photon beams produced by isocentric linear accelerators are mostly used for routine radiosurgery although other photon energies are available. Systematic dosimetric studies were performed on 12.5, 20, 30 and 40 mm diameter collimators using different measuring techniques in order to examine the possible accuracies associated in the measured dosimetric data of narrow circular photon beams. In addition, the relative suitabilities of 4, 6 and 10 MV photon beams for stereotactic radiosurgery were assessed. The lack of electronic equilibrium and steep dose gradient effects were found to be minimal for a 4 MV photon beam compared to the 6 and 10 MV photon beams. The measured output factors with a small volume (0.02 cc) ionization chamber were found to agree with film and MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) detector measurements for 4 MV photon beam even for smaller field sizes. The measured beam profiles were also found to be in better agreement with the expected shapes for the 4 MV beam than for 6 and 10 MV beams. The 80% isodose volumes for a typical 20.0 mm diameter field for 1 to 10 non-coplanar converging arcs showed that the volumes for the 4 MV beam are slightly larger than the corresponding volumes for the 6 and 10 MV photon beams for any given isodose level. The dose fall- off distances from the 80% to 50% isodoses are also, in general, found to be smaller for the 4 MV beam. Therefore, for radiosurgery, the dose calculations for the 4 MV beam have less uncertainty than the dose calculations for the 6 and 10 MV beams. The output factors can be measured with an ionization chamber for the 4 MV photon beam over the range 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter field size, whereas for the 6 MV beam they can only be measured for

  15. Optimal technique of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for tumors adjacent to brainstem.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiou-Shiung; Hwang, Jing-Min; Tai, Po-An; Chang, You-Kang; Wang, Yu-Nong; Shih, Rompin; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a well-established technique that is replacing whole-brain irradiation in the treatment of intracranial lesions, which leads to better preservation of brain functions, and therefore a better quality of life for the patient. There are several available forms of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS, and the goal of the present study is to identify which of these techniques is best (as evaluated by dosimetric outcomes statistically) when the target is located adjacent to brainstem. We collected the records of 17 patients with lesions close to the brainstem who had previously been treated with single-fraction radiosurgery. In all, 5 different lesion catalogs were collected, and the patients were divided into 2 distance groups-1 consisting of 7 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of less than 0.5cm, and the other of 10 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of ≥ 0.5 and < 1cm. Comparison was then made among the following 3 types of LINAC-based radiosurgery: dynamic conformal arcs (DCA), intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS), and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). All techniques included multiple noncoplanar beams or arcs with or without intensity-modulated delivery. The volume of gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.2cm(3) to 21.9cm(3). Regarding the dose homogeneity index (HIICRU) and conformity index (CIICRU) were without significant difference between techniques statistically. However, the average CIICRU = 1.09 ± 0.56 achieved by VMAT was the best of the 3 techniques. Moreover, notable improvement in gradient index (GI) was observed when VMAT was used (0.74 ± 0.13), and this result was significantly better than those achieved by the 2 other techniques (p < 0.05). For V4Gy of brainstem, both VMAT (2.5%) and IMRS (2.7%) were significantly lower than DCA (4.9%), both at the p < 0.05 level. Regarding V2Gy of normal brain, VMAT plans had attained 6.4 ± 5%; this was significantly better (p < 0.05) than

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    MedlinePlus

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  17. INTER- AND INTRAFRACTION MOTION FOR STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY IN DOGS AND CATS USING A MODIFIED BRAINLAB FRAMELESS STEREOTACTIC MASK SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Sonja; Zwingenberger, Allison; Hansen, Katherine; Pfeiffer, Isabella; Théon, Alain; Kent, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate patient positioning is necessary when doing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to ensure adequate dosing to the tumor and sparing of normal tissues. This prospective cross-sectional study aimed to assess feasibility of a commercially available modified frameless SRS positioning system for use in veterinary radiotherapy patients with brain tumors. Fifty-one dogs and 12 cats were enrolled. Baseline and verification CT images were acquired. The verification CT images from 32 dogs and five cats had sufficient images for fusion to baseline CT images. A rigid box-based fusion was performed to determine interfraction motion. Forty-eight dogs and 11 cats were assessed for intrafraction motion by cine CT. Seventy percent of dogs and 60% of cats had interfraction 3D vector translational shifts >1 mm, with mean values of 1.9 mm in dogs, and 1.8 mm in cats. In dogs muscle wasting was weakly correlated with translational shifts. The maximum angular interfraction motion observed was 6.3° (roll), 3.5° (pitch), and 3.3° (yaw). There was no correlation between angular interfraction motion and weight, brachycephaly, or muscle wasting. Fifty-seven percent of dogs and 50% of cats had respiration-related intrafraction motion. Of these, 4.5% of dogs and 10% of cats had intrafraction motion >1 mm. This study demonstrates the modified Brainlab system is feasible for SRS in dogs and cats. The smaller cranial size and difference in anatomy increases setup uncertainty in some animals beyond limits usually accepted in SRS. Image-guided positioning is recommended to achieve clinically acceptable setup accuracy (<1 mm) for SRS. PMID:26118737

  18. Dynamic conformal arc cranial stereotactic radiosurgery: implications of multileaf collimator margin on dose–volume metrics

    PubMed Central

    Tanyi, J A; Doss, E J; Kato,, C M; Monaco, D L; ZMeng, L; Chen, Y; Kubicky, C D; Marquez, C M; Fuss, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective The effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) margin on target and normal tissue dose–volume metrics for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was assessed. Methods 118 intracranial lesions of 83 SRS patients formed the basis of this study. For each planning target volume (PTV), five separate treatment plans were generated with MLC margins of −1, 0, 1, 2 and 3 mm, respectively. Identical treatment planning parameters were employed with a median of five dynamic conformal arcs using the Varian/BrainLab high-definition MLC for beam shaping. Prescription dose (PD) was such that 22 Gy covered at least 95% of the PTV. Dose–volume and dose–response comparative metrics included conformity index, heterogeneity index, dose gradient, tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results Target dose heterogeneity decreased with increasing MLC margin (p<0.001); mean heterogeneity index decreased from 70.4±12.7 to 10.4±2.2%. TCP decreased with increasing MLC margin (p<0.001); mean TCP decreased from 81.0±2.3 to 62.2±1.8%. Normal tissue dose fall-off increased with MLC margin (p<0.001); mean gradient increased from 3.1±0.9 mm to 5.3±0.7 mm. NTCP was optimal at 1 mm MLC margin. No unambiguous correlation was observed between NTCP and PTV volume. Plan delivery efficiency generally improved with larger margins (p<0.001); mean monitor unit per centigray of the PD decreased from 3.60±1.30 to 1.56±0.13. Conclusion Use of 1 mm MLC margins for dynamic conformal arc-based cranial radiosurgery resulted in optimal tumour control and normal tissue sparing. Clinical significance of these comparative findings warrants further investigation. PMID:23091293

  19. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  20. Peritumoral Brain Edema after Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Asymptomatic Intracranial Meningiomas: Risks and Pattern of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoe, Yeon; Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risks and pattern of evolution of peritumoral brain edema (PTE) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for asymptomatic intracranial meningiomas. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 320 patients (median age 56 years, range 24-87 years) who underwent primary Gamma Knife radiosurgery for asymptomatic meningiomas between 1998 and 2012. The median tumor volume was 2.7 cc (range 0.2-10.5 cc) and the median follow-up was 48 months (range 24-168 months). Volumetric data sets for tumors and PTE on serial MRIs were analyzed. The edema index (EI) was defined as the ratio of the volume of PTE including tumor to the tumor volume, and the relative edema indices (rEIs) were calculated from serial EIs normalized against the baseline EI. Risk factors for PTE were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Newly developed or increased PTE was noted in 49 patients (15.3%), among whom it was symptomatic in 28 patients (8.8%). Tumor volume larger than 4.2 cc (p<0.001), hemispheric tumor location (p=0.005), and pre-treatment PTE (p<0.001) were associated with an increased risk of PTE. rEI reached its maximum value at 11 months after SRS and decreased thereafter, and symptoms resolved within 24 months in most patients (85.7%). Conclusion Caution should be exercised in decision-making on SRS for asymptomatic meningiomas of large volume (>4.2 cc), of hemispheric location, or with pre-treatment PTE. PTE usually develops within months, reaches its maximum degree until a year, and resolves within 2 years after SRS. PMID:26587194

  1. Tolerance of the Spinal Cord to Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Insights From Hemangioblastomas

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Chang, Steven D.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate spinal cord dose-volume effects, we present a retrospective review of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments for spinal cord hemangioblastomas. Methods and Materials: From November 2001 to July 2008, 27 spinal hemangioblastomas were treated in 19 patients with SRS. Seventeen tumors received a single fraction with a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy). Ten lesions were treated using 18-25 Gy in two to three sessions. Cord volumes receiving 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 Gy and dose to 10, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 mm{sup 3} of cord were determined. Multisession treatments were converted to single-fraction biologically effective dose (SFBED). Results: Single-fraction median cord D{sub max} was 22.7 Gy (range, 17.8-30.9 Gy). Median V10 was 454 mm{sup 3} (range, 226-3543 mm{sup 3}). Median dose to 500 mm{sup 3} cord was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.3-22.5 Gy). Fractionated median SFBED{sub 3} cord D{sub max} was 14.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 12.3-19.4 Gy{sub 3}). Potential toxicities included a Grade 2 unilateral foot drop 5 months after SRS and 2 cases of Grade 1 sensory deficits. The actuarial 3-year local tumor control estimate was 86%. Conclusions: Despite exceeding commonly cited spinal cord dose constraints, SRS for spinal hemangioblastomas is safe and effective. Consistent with animal experiments, these data support a partial-volume tolerance model for the human spinal cord. Because irradiated cord volumes were generally small, application of these data to other clinical scenarios should be made cautiously. Further prospective studies of spinal radiosurgery are needed.

  2. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Patients With Brain Metastases From Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Olson, Adam C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lundsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Patients with small-cell lung cancer have a high likelihood of developing brain metastases. Many of these patients will have prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or eventually undergo whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Despite these treatments, a large number of these patients will have progression of their intracranial disease and require additional local therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for such patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with gamma knife SRS. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factors influencing survival. Results: The median follow-up from SRS in this patient population was 9 months (1-49 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 9 months after SRS. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and combined treatment involving WBRT and SRS within 4 weeks were the two factors identified as being significant predictors of increased OS (p = 0.033 and 0.040, respectively). When comparing all patients, patients treated with a combined approach had a median OS of 14 months compared to 6 months if SRS was delivered alone. We also compared the OS times from the first definitive radiation: WBRT, WBRT and SRS if combined therapy was used, and SRS if the patient never received WBRT. The median survival for those groups was 12, 14, and 13 months, respectively, p = 0.19. Seventy percent of patients had follow-up magnetic resonance imaging available for review. Actuarial local control at 6 months and 12 months was 90% and 86%, respectively. Only 1 patient (2.2%) had symptomatic intracranial swelling related to treatment, which responded to a short course of steroids. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 61% of patients at a median time of 7 months; 81% of these patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery for small-cell lung carcinoma

  3. [Stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in treatment of patients with intracranial schwannomas].

    PubMed

    Zolotova, S V; Golanov, A V; Kotel'nikova, T M; Soboleva, O I; Gorlachev, G E; Fil'chenkova, N A; Nikonova, N G; Kapitanov, D N; Makhmudov, U B; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Arutiunov, N V; Pronin, I N

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT) in management of cranial nerves schwannomas by analysis of tumor control, clinical response and variables affecting treatment outcomes. Between April 2005 and January 2009 patients with schwannomas of VIII (63), V (14) and caudal nerves (2) were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator. Mean age was 49 years (13-82). In 42 cases radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. 13 patients had type I or II neurofibromatosis. Mean volume of the tumor was 3.9 cm3 (0.5-14.4 cm3) and 13.4 cm3 (2.8-41.3 cm3) for SRS and SRT, respectively. Mean SRS dose was 12 Gy (10.8-14.4 Gy) for vestibular schwannomas and 15 Gy (13.2-18 Gy) for schwannomas of other nerves. In hypofractionated SRT the dose of 35 Gy was delivered in 7 fractions or 30 Gy in 6 fractions. In cases of classical fractioning total dose of 50-60 Gy was divided into daily fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy. Radiographic tumor control rate reached 97.5% at the last follow-up. 5 patients experienced trigeminal dysfunction, it was transient in 3 cases and persistent in 2. Permanent decline in House-Brackmann facial nerve scale developed in 2 of 79 patients. After treatment effective hearing (class I-II) was preserved in 7 of 9 patients (67%) who had same level of hearing before SRS. Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment provides long-term tumor control associated with high rates of preservation of neurological functions. No further tumor surgery was necessary in 100% of cases with solitary tumors with a minimal follow-up of 5 years. PMID:20429361

  4. Development of a geometrically accurate imaging protocol at 3 Tesla MRI for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; MacFadden, D.; Damyanovich, A. Z.; Rieker, M.; Stainsby, J.; Bernstein, M.; Jaffray, D. A.; Mikulis, D.; Ménard, C.

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a geometrically accurate imaging protocol at 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. In order to achieve this purpose, a methodology is developed to investigate the geometric accuracy and stability of 3 T MRI for SRS in phantom and patient evaluations. Forty patients were enrolled on a prospective clinical trial. After frame placement prior to SRS, each patient underwent 3 T MRI after 1.5 T MRI and CT. MR imaging protocols included a T1-weighted gradient echo sequence and a T2-weighted spin echo sequence. Phantom imaging was performed on 3 T prior to patient imaging using the same set-up and imaging protocols. Geometric accuracy in patients and phantoms yielded comparable results for external fiducial reference deviations and internal landmarks between 3 T and 1.5 T MRI (mean <=0.6 mm; standard deviation <=0.3 mm). Mean stereotactic reference deviations between phantoms and patients correlated well (T1: R = 0.79; T2: R = 0.84). Statistical process control analysis on phantom QA data demonstrated the stability of our SRS imaging protocols, where the geometric accuracy of the 3 T SRS imaging protocol is operating within the appropriate tolerance. Our data provide evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3 T MRI for targeting SRS under imaging conditions investigated. We have developed a systematic approach to achieve confidence on the geometric integrity of a given imaging system/technique for clinical integration in SRS application.

  5. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, In Kyung; Song, Sang Woo; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: The actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.

  6. Dosimetry And Its Enhancement Using Gold Nanoparticles In Synchrotron Based Microbeam And Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Davidson, Robert; Geso, Moshi; Wong, Christopher James; Yagi, Naoto

    2010-07-23

    Research into the areas of synchrotron generated microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery is increasing. Such MRT techniques are showing potential of tackling some of the more difficult radiotherapy cases such as certain type of brain tumours. Two challenging aspects of these techniques are addressed in this investigation; the difficulty of dose determination and the delivery of the treatments at lower dose levels. In this research polymer gels were used as phantoms and dosimeters and cells were used to confirm outcomes. Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were tested as potential dosimeters for microbeam dosimetry. Following irradiation using microbeam and minibeam radiation from the BL28BU beam-line at Spring-8, Japan, the nPAG were scanned using a Raman spectroscopy technique. Dose enhancement caused by the inclusion of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target was investigated using both cells and polymer gels. The use of AuNP could potentially reduce the dose required for the delivery of MRT. In this study it was shown that using endothelial cells with AuNPs, the minimal dose for clear cell killing along the beam line was reduced to 10 Gy. Both studies cell and gel studies indicates significant dose enhancement caused by the gold atoms in the target.

  7. Fiducial migration following small peripheral lung tumor image-guided CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strulik, Konrad L.; Cho, Min H.; Collins, Brian T.; Khan, Noureen; Banovac, Filip; Slack, Rebecca; Cleary, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    To track respiratory motion during CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery in the lung, several (three to five) cylindrical gold fiducials are implanted near the planned target volume (PTV). Since these fiducials remain in the human body after treatment, we hypothesize that tracking fiducial movement over time may correlate with the tumor response to treatment and pulmonary fibrosis, thereby serving as an indicator of treatment success. In this paper, we investigate fiducial migration in 24 patients through examination of computed tomography (CT) volume images at four time points: pre-treatment, three, six, and twelve month post-treatment. We developed a MATLAB based GUI environment to display the images, identify the fiducials, and compute our performance measure. After we semi-automatically segmented and detected fiducial locations in CT images of the same patient over time, we identified them according to their configuration and introduced a relative performance measure (ACD: average center distance) to detect their migration. We found that the migration tended to result in a movement towards the fiducial center of the radiated tissue area (indicating tumor regression) and may potentially be linked to the patient prognosis.

  8. The Effect of Contouring Variability on Dosimetric Parameters for Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Julia; Dunscombe, Peter; Lau, Harold; Burns, Paul; Lim, Gerald; Liu, Hong-Wei; Nordal, Robert; Starreveld, Yves; Valev, Boris; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Spencer, David P.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of contouring variation on stereotactic radiosurgery plan quality metrics for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Fourteen metastases, each contoured by 8 physicians, formed the basis of this study. A template-based dynamic conformal 5-arc dose distribution was developed for each of the 112 contours, and each dose distribution was applied to the 7 other contours in each patient set. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) plan quality metrics and the Paddick conformity index were calculated for each of the 896 combinations of dose distributions and contours. Results: The ratio of largest to smallest contour volume for each metastasis varied from 1.25 to 4.47, with a median value of 1.68 (n=8). The median absolute difference in RTOG conformity index between the value for the reference contour and the values for the alternative contours was 0.35. The variation of the range of conformity index for all contours for a given tumor varied with the tumor size. Conclusions: The high degree of interobserver contouring variation strongly suggests that peer review or consultation should be adopted to standardize tumor volume prescription. Observer confidence was not reflected in contouring consistency. The impact of contouring variability on plan quality metrics, used as criteria for clinical trial protocol compliance, was such that the category of compliance was robust to interobserver effects only 70% of the time.

  9. Pre-treatment factors associated with detecting additional brain metastases at stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Zabi; Augustyn, Alexander; Zhu, Hong; Mickey, Bruce E; Whitworth, Louis A; Madden, Christopher J; Barnett, Samuel L; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E; Nedzi, Lucien A; Timmerman, Robert D; Choe, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    The number of brain metastases identified on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key factor in consideration of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). However, additional lesions are often detected on high-resolution SRS-planning MRI. We investigated pre-treatment clinical characteristics that are associated with finding additional metastases at SRS. Patients treated with SRS for brain metastases between the years of 2009-2014 comprised the study cohort. All patients underwent frame-fixed, 1 mm thick MRI on the day of SRS. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed for an association with increase in number of metastases identified on SRS-planning MRI. 289 consecutive SRS cases were analyzed. 725 metastases were identified on pre-treatment MRI and 1062 metastases were identified on SRS-planning MRI. An increase in the number of metastases occurred in 34 % of the cases. On univariate analysis, more than four metastases and the diameter of the largest lesion were significantly associated with an increase in number of metastases on SRS-planning MRI. When stratified by the diameter of the largest lesion into <2, 2-3, or ≥3 cm, additional metastases were identified in 37, 29, and 18 %, respectively. While this increase in the number of metastases is largely due to the difference in imaging technique, the number and size of the metastases were also associated with finding additional lesions. These clinical factors may be considered when determining treatment options for brain metastases. PMID:26966096

  10. Prolonged Survival following Repetitive Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Patient with Intracranial Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferrel, Ethan A.; Roehrig, Andrew T.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Wagner, Aaron; Lee, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the brain have a very poor prognosis of three months if left untreated. SRS is an effective treatment modality in numerous patients. This case exemplifies the utility of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in prolonging survival and maintaining quality of life in a patient with RCC. This 64-year-old female patient initially presented to her primary care physician 22 months after a left nephrectomy for RCC with complaints of mild, intermittent headaches and difficulty with balance. An MRI revealed five cerebellar lesions suspicious for intracranial metastasis. The patient's first GKRS treatment targeted four lesions with 22 Gy at the 50% isodose line. She underwent a total of seven GKRS treatments over the next 60 months for recurrent metastases to the brain. 72 months and 12 months have now passed since her brain metastases were first discovered and since her last GKRS treatment, respectively, and this woman is alive with considerable quality of life and no evidence of metastatic reoccurrence. This case shows that repeated GKRS treatments, with minimal surgical intervention, can effectively treat multiple intracranial lesions in select patients, prolonging survival and avoiding iatrogenic neurocognitive decline while maintaining a high quality of life. PMID:26600958

  11. Role of stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator in treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Rossitch, E; Siddon, R; Moore, M R; Rockoff, M A; Alexander, E

    1990-05-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, 16 children were treated for 10 arteriovenous malformations and 6 recurrent intracranial tumors with stereotactic radiation therapy using a modified Clinac 6/100 linear accelerator. The median age of our patients was 10.5 years. For the group with arteriovenous malformation, follow-up ranged from 6 months to 37 months (median was 20 months). No patient bled during the follow-up period. Five of eight patients with follow-up longer than 12 months have achieved complete obliteration of their arteriovenous malformation by angiogram. The four remaining patients who have not achieved a complete obliteration are awaiting their 2-year posttreatment angiogram. The other patient has been treated within the year and have not yet been studied. Five of the six recurrent tumor patients are alive with a median follow-up of 8 months. The remaining patient was controlled locally, but he died of recurrent disease outside the area treated with radiosurgery. The radiographic responses of these patients have included three complete responses, two substantial reductions in tumor volume (greater than 50%) and one stabilization. Despite previous radiotherapy, there have been no significant complications in these patients. We conclude that stereotactic radiation therapy using a standard linear accelerator is an effective and safe technique in the treatment of selected intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children. In addition, stereotactic radiosurgery may have unique applications in the treatment of localized primary and recurrent pediatric brain tumors. PMID:2184409

  12. Characteristics of a novel treatment system for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ning; Li, Haisen; Song, Kwang; Chin-Snyder, Karen; Qin, Yujiao; Kim, Jinkoo; Bellon, Maria; Gulam, Misbah; Gardner, Stephen; Doemer, Anthony; Devpura, Suneetha; Gordon, James; Chetty, Indrin; Siddiqui, Farzan; Ajlouni, Munther; Pompa, Robert; Hammoud, Zane; Simoff, Michael; Kalkanis, Steven; Movsas, Benjamin; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the dosimetric properties and accuracy of a novel treatment platform (Edge radiosurgery system) for localizing and treating patients with frameless, image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Initial measurements of various components of the system, such as a comprehensive assessment of the dosimetric properties of the flattening filter-free (FFF) beams for both high definition (HD120) MLC and conical cone-based treatment, positioning accuracy and beam attenuation of a six degree of freedom (6DoF) couch, treatment head leakage test, and integrated end-to-end accuracy tests, have been performed. The end-to-end test of the system was performed by CT imaging a phantom and registering hidden targets on the treatment couch to determine the localization accuracy of the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and MV imaging systems, as well as the radiation isocenter targeting accuracy. The deviations between the percent depth-dose curves acquired on the new linac-based system (Edge), and the previously published machine with FFF beams (TrueBeam) beyond D(max) were within 1.0% for both energies. The maximum deviation of output factors between the Edge and TrueBeam was 1.6%. The optimized dosimetric leaf gap values, which were fitted using Eclipse dose calculations and measurements based on representative spine radiosurgery plans, were 0.700 mm and 1.000 mm, respectively. For the conical cones, 6X FFF has sharper penumbra ranging from 1.2-1.8 mm (80%-20%) and 1.9-3.8 mm (90%-10%) relative to 10X FFF, which has 1.2-2.2mm and 2.3-5.1mm, respectively. The relative attenuation measurements of the couch for PA, PA (rails-in), oblique, oblique (rails-out), oblique (rails-in) were: -2.0%, -2.5%, -15.6%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 6X FFF and -1.4%, -1.5%, -12.2%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 10X FFF, respectively, with a slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. The systematic

  13. Geometrical and dosimetrical characterization of the photon source using a micro-multileaf collimator for stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Luyken, K.; Hunsche, S.; Kocher, M.; Müller, R.-P.; Sturm, V.

    2003-08-01

    A micro-multileaf collimator (µMLC) for stereotactic radiosurgery is used for determination of the spatial intensity distribution of the photon source of a linear accelerator. The method is based on grid field dose measurements using film dosimetry and is easy to perform. Since the µMLC does not allow 'direct' imaging of the photon source, special software has been developed to analyse grid field measurements. Besides the source-density function, grid field analysis yields the position of the focal spot in the room laser coordinate system of the linear accelerator and the position of the treatment head rotation axis and the inclination angle of the leaf bank. Thus the method can be used for base dosimetry and for quality assurance in radiosurgery using a µMLC.

  14. Radiosurgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies have been done, to date, not one randomized prospective study has been completed. Irrefutable evidence does ... Knife may be most suited. Until a definitive, randomized, multi-centered prospective study is completed, radiosurgery as ...

  15. Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery, a Feasible Alternative to the Frame-Based Technique for the Treatment of Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew S; Reed, Aaron D; Skinner, William K

    2016-01-01

    Classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) causes severe facial pain. Several treatment options exist for classic TN refractory to medical therapy, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Most studies in the medical literature used a frame-based SRS technique. Improvements in linear accelerator-based treatment systems and image guidance have led to the use of frameless SRS as a safe and feasible alternative to the frame-based technique for the treatment of refractory TN. We present a case of refractory TN successfully treated with frameless SRS. PMID:27186453

  16. Assessment of Geometrical Accuracy of Multimodal Images Used for Treatment Planning in Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery: CT, MRI and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Celis, M. A.; Suarez-Campos, J. J.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.

    2006-09-08

    An acrylic phantom was designed and constructed to assess the geometrical accuracy of CT, MRI and PET images for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The phantom was suited for each image modality with a specific tracer and compared with CT images to measure the radial deviation between the reference marks in the phantom. It was found that for MRI the maximum mean deviation is 1.9 {+-} 0.2 mm compared to 2.4 {+-} 0.3 mm reported for PET. These results will be used for margin outlining in SRS and SRT treatment planning.

  17. Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery, a Feasible Alternative to the Frame-Based Technique for the Treatment of Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Graff, Andrew E; Thomas, Andrew S; Reed, Aaron D; Skinner, William K

    2016-01-01

    Classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) causes severe facial pain. Several treatment options exist for classic TN refractory to medical therapy, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Most studies in the medical literature used a frame-based SRS technique. Improvements in linear accelerator-based treatment systems and image guidance have led to the use of frameless SRS as a safe and feasible alternative to the frame-based technique for the treatment of refractory TN. We present a case of refractory TN successfully treated with frameless SRS. PMID:27186453

  18. Delayed Complications in Patients Surviving at Least 3 Years After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Nariai, Tadashi; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about delayed complications after stereotactic radiosurgery in long-surviving patients with brain metastases. We studied the actual incidence and predictors of delayed complications. Patients and Methods: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study that used our database. Among our consecutive series of 2000 patients with brain metastases who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) from 1991-2008, 167 patients (8.4%, 89 women, 78 men, mean age 62 years [range, 19-88 years]) who survived at least 3 years after GKRS were studied. Results: Among the 167 patients, 17 (10.2%, 18 lesions) experienced delayed complications (mass lesions with or without cyst in 8, cyst alone in 8, edema in 2) occurring 24.0-121.0 months (median, 57.5 months) after GKRS. The actuarial incidences of delayed complications estimated by competing risk analysis were 4.2% and 21.2% at the 60th month and 120th month, respectively, after GKRS. Among various pre-GKRS clinical factors, univariate analysis demonstrated tumor volume-related factors: largest tumor volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.018-1.154; P=.0174) and tumor volume {<=}10 cc vs >10 cc (HR, 4.343; 95% CI, 1.444-12.14; P=.0108) to be the only significant predictors of delayed complications. Univariate analysis revealed no correlations between delayed complications and radiosurgical parameters (ie, radiosurgical doses, conformity and gradient indexes, and brain volumes receiving >5 Gy and >12 Gy). After GKRS, an area of prolonged enhancement at the irradiated lesion was shown to be a possible risk factor for the development of delayed complications (HR, 8.751; 95% CI, 1.785-157.9; P=.0037). Neurosurgical interventions were performed in 13 patients (14 lesions) and mass removal for 6 lesions and Ommaya reservoir placement for the other 8. The results were favorable. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up is crucial for patients with brain metastases

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases: analysis of outcome and risk of brain radionecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose to investigate the factors affecting survival and toxicity in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), with special attention to volumes of brain receiving a specific dose (V10 - V16 Gy) as predictors for brain radionecrosis. Patients and Methods Two hundred six consecutive patients with 310 cerebral metastases less than 3.5 cm were treated with SRS as primary treatment and followed prospectively at University of Rome La Sapienza Sant'Andrea Hospital. Overall survival, brain control, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Univariate and multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed to determine the predictive value of prognostic factors for treatment outcome and SRS-related complications. Results Median overall survival and brain control were 14.1 months and 10 months, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 58% and 24%, and respective brain control were 43% and 22%. Sixteen patients recurred locally after SRS, with 1-year and 2-year local control rates of 92% and 84%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, stable extracranial disease and KPS >70 were associated with the most significant survival benefit. Neurological complications were recorded in 27 (13%) patients. Severe neurological complications (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) occurred in 5.8% of patients. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 24% of treated lesions, being symptomatic in 10% and asymptomatic in 14%. On multivariate analysis, V10 through V16 Gy were independent risk factors for radionecrosis, with V10 Gy and V12 Gy being the most predictive (p = 0.0001). For V10 Gy >12.6 cm3 and V12 Gy >10.9 cm3 the risk of radionecrosis was 47%. Conclusions SRS alone represents a feasible option as initial treatment for patients with brain metastases, however a significant subset of patients may develop neurological complications. Lesions with V12 Gy >8.5 cm3 carries a risk of radionecrosis

  20. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    García-Garduño, O. A. E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com; Rodríguez-Ponce, M.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Galván de la Cruz, O. O.; and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  1. BRAF inhibitor and stereotactic radiosurgery is associated with an increased risk of radiation necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kirtesh R.; Chowdhary, Mudit; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Lawson, David H.; Cassidy, Richard J.; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcomes and toxicities of melanoma brain metastases (MBM) patients treated with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with SRS alone. We identified 87 patients with 157 MBM treated with SRS alone from 2005 to 2013. Of these, 15 (17.2%) patients with 32 MBM (21.4%) received BRAFi therapy: three (20.0%) before SRS, two (13.3%) concurrent, and 10 (66.7%) after SRS. Overall survival (OS) was compared between cohorts using the product limit method. Intracranial outcomes were compared using cumulative incidence with competing risk for death. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between groups, except for the SRS cohort, which had higher rates of chemotherapy and more recent year of diagnosis. Radiation characteristics, including dose per fraction, total dose, gross tumor volume size, and prescription isodose, were also similar between cohorts. One-year outcomes – OS (64.3 vs. 40.4%, P =0.205), local failure (3.3 vs. 9.6%, P =0.423), and distant intracranial failure (63.9 vs. 65.1%, P =0.450) were not statistically different between the SRS + BRAFi and SRS-alone groups, respectively. The SRS + BRAFi group showed higher rates of radiographic radiation necrosis (RN) (22.2 vs. 11.0% at 1 year, P <0.001) and symptomatic radiation necrosis (SRN) (28.2 vs. 11.1% at 1 year, P <0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that BRAFi predicted an increased risk of both radiographic and SRN. SRS and BRAFi predicted for an increased risk of radiographic and SRN compared with SRS alone. Approaches to mitigate RN for patients receiving SRS and BRAFi should be considered until the clinical trial (http//:www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01721603) evaluating this treatment regimen is completed. PMID:27223498

  2. Determination of gonad doses during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery for various tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zorlu, Faruk; Dugel, Gozde; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Hurmuz, Pervin; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yildiz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil; Gurkaynak, Murat

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the absorbed dose received by the gonads during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of different tumor localizations. Methods: The authors measured the gonad doses during the treatment of head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic tumors in both RANDO phantom and actual patients. The computerized tomography images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The contours of tumor and critical organs were delineated on each slice, and treatment plans were generated. Measurements for gonad doses were taken from the geometric projection of the ovary onto the skin for female patients, and from the scrotal skin for male patients by attaching films and Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). SRS was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). Results: The median gonadal doses with TLD and film dosimeter in actual patients were 0.19 Gy (range, 0.035-2.71 Gy) and 0.34 Gy (range, 0.066-3.18 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median ovarian doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.08 Gy (range, 0.03-0.159 Gy) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0.015-0.13 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median testicular doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.134 Gy (range 0.056-1.97 Gy) and 0.306 Gy (range, 0.065-2.25 Gy). Conclusions: Gonad doses are below sterility threshold in robotic SRS for different tumor localizations. However, particular attention should be given to gonads during robotic SRS for pelvic tumors.

  3. Frameless Angiogram-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xingqi; Mahadevan, Anand; Mathiowitz, George; Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Thomas, Ajith; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Floyd, Scott R.; Holupka, Edward; La Rosa, Salvatore; Wang, Frank; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an effective alternative to microsurgical resection or embolization for definitive treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard for pretreatment diagnosis and characterization of vascular anatomy, but requires rigid frame (skull) immobilization when used in combination with SRS. With the advent of advanced proton and image-guided photon delivery systems, SRS treatment is increasingly migrating to frameless platforms, which are incompatible with frame-based DSA. Without DSA as the primary image, target definition may be less than optimal, in some cases precluding the ability to treat with a frameless system. This article reports a novel solution. Methods and Materials: Fiducial markers are implanted into the patient's skull before angiography. Angiography is performed according to the standard clinical protocol, but, in contrast to the previous practice, without the rigid frame. Separate images of a specially designed localizer box are subsequently obtained. A target volume projected on DSA can be transferred to the localizer system in three dimensions, and in turn be transferred to multiple CT slices using the implanted fiducials. Combined with other imaging modalities, this 'virtual frame' approach yields a highly precise treatment plan that can be delivered by frameless SRS technologies. Results: Phantom measurements for point and volume targets have been performed. The overall uncertainty of placing a point target to CT is 0.4 mm. For volume targets, deviation of the transformed contour from the target CT image is within 0.6 mm. The algorithm and software are robust. The method has been applied clinically, with reliable results. Conclusions: A novel and reproducible method for frameless SRS of AVMs has been developed that enables the use of DSA without the requirement for rigid immobilization. Multiple pairs of DSA can be used for better conformality

  4. Robotic real-time translational and rotational head motion correction during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinmin; Belcher, Andrew H.; Grelewicz, Zachary; Wiersma, Rodney D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a control system to correct both translational and rotational head motion deviations in real-time during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: A novel feedback control with a feed-forward algorithm was utilized to correct for the coupling of translation and rotation present in serial kinematic robotic systems. Input parameters for the algorithm include the real-time 6DOF target position, the frame pitch pivot point to target distance constant, and the translational and angular Linac beam off (gating) tolerance constants for patient safety. Testing of the algorithm was done using a 4D (XY Z + pitch) robotic stage, an infrared head position sensing unit and a control computer. The measured head position signal was processed and a resulting command was sent to the interface of a four-axis motor controller, through which four stepper motors were driven to perform motion compensation. Results: The control of the translation of a brain target was decoupled with the control of the rotation. For a phantom study, the corrected position was within a translational displacement of 0.35 mm and a pitch displacement of 0.15° 100% of the time. For a volunteer study, the corrected position was within displacements of 0.4 mm and 0.2° over 98.5% of the time, while it was 10.7% without correction. Conclusions: The authors report a control design approach for both translational and rotational head motion correction. The experiments demonstrated that control performance of the 4D robotic stage meets the submillimeter and subdegree accuracy required by SRS. PMID:26127028

  5. A Multi-institutional Study of Factors Influencing the Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, David C.; Charpentier, Anne-Marie; Cigsar, Candemir; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Ng, Angela; Bahl, Guarav; Zadeh, Gelareh; San Miguel, John; Menard, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is a relatively well-studied technology with established guidelines regarding patient selection, although its implementation is technically complex. We evaluated the extent to which local availability of SRS affected the treatment of patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 3030 patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases in 1 of 7 cancer centers in Ontario. Clinical data were abstracted for a random sample of 973 patients. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the use of SRS as a boost within 4 months following WBRT or at any time following WBRT. Results: Of 898 patients eligible for analysis, SRS was provided to 70 (7.8%) patients at some time during the course of their disease and to 34 (3.8%) patients as a boost following WBRT. In multivariable analyses, factors significantly associated with the use of SRS boost following WBRT were fewer brain metastases (odds ratio [OR] = 6.50), controlled extracranial disease (OR = 3.49), age (OR = 0.97 per year of advancing age), and the presence of an on-site SRS program at the hospital where WBRT was given (OR = 12.34; all P values were <.05). Similarly, availability of on-site SRS was the factor most predictive of the use of SRS at any time following WBRT (OR = 5.98). Among patients with 1-3 brain metastases, good/fair performance status, and no evidence of active extracranial disease, SRS was provided to 40.3% of patients who received WBRT in a hospital that had an on-site SRS program vs 3.0% of patients who received WBRT at a hospital without SRS (P<.01). Conclusions: The availability of on-site SRS is the factor most strongly associated with the provision of this treatment to patients with brain metastases and appears to be more influential than accepted clinical eligibility factors.

  6. BRAF inhibitor and stereotactic radiosurgery is associated with an increased risk of radiation necrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kirtesh R; Chowdhary, Mudit; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Lawson, David H; Cassidy, Richard J; Prabhu, Roshan S; Khan, Mohammad K

    2016-08-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcomes and toxicities of melanoma brain metastases (MBM) patients treated with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with SRS alone. We identified 87 patients with 157 MBM treated with SRS alone from 2005 to 2013. Of these, 15 (17.2%) patients with 32 MBM (21.4%) received BRAFi therapy: three (20.0%) before SRS, two (13.3%) concurrent, and 10 (66.7%) after SRS. Overall survival (OS) was compared between cohorts using the product limit method. Intracranial outcomes were compared using cumulative incidence with competing risk for death. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between groups, except for the SRS cohort, which had higher rates of chemotherapy and more recent year of diagnosis. Radiation characteristics, including dose per fraction, total dose, gross tumor volume size, and prescription isodose, were also similar between cohorts. One-year outcomes - OS (64.3 vs. 40.4%, P=0.205), local failure (3.3 vs. 9.6%, P=0.423), and distant intracranial failure (63.9 vs. 65.1%, P=0.450) were not statistically different between the SRS+BRAFi and SRS-alone groups, respectively. The SRS+BRAFi group showed higher rates of radiographic radiation necrosis (RN) (22.2 vs. 11.0% at 1 year, P<0.001) and symptomatic radiation necrosis (SRN) (28.2 vs. 11.1% at 1 year, P<0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that BRAFi predicted an increased risk of both radiographic and SRN. SRS and BRAFi predicted for an increased risk of radiographic and SRN compared with SRS alone. Approaches to mitigate RN for patients receiving SRS and BRAFi should be considered until the clinical trial (http//:www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01721603) evaluating this treatment regimen is completed. PMID:27223498

  7. Hematological Toxicity After Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiosurgery for Treatment of Metastatic Gynecologic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Debernardo, Robert; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Fabien, Jeffrey; Dobbins, Donald C.; Zhang Yuxia; Brindle, James

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hematological toxicity after robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) for treatment of women with metastatic abdominopelvic gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 women with stage IV gynecologic malignancies treated with abdominopelvic SBRT were analyzed after ablative radiation (2400 cGy/3 divided consecutive daily doses) delivered by a robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT system. Abdominopelvic bone marrow was identified using computed tomography-guided contouring. Fatigue and hematologic toxicities were graded by retrospective assignment of common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0). Bone marrow volume receiving 1000 cGy (V10) was tested for association with post-therapy (median 32 days [25%-75% quartile, 28-45 days]) white- or red-cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and platelet counts as marrow toxicity surrogates. Results: In all, 61 women undergoing abdominopelvic SBRT had a median bone marrow V10 of 2% (25%-75% quartile: 0%-8%). Fifty-seven (93%) of 61 women had received at least 1 pre-SBRT marrow-taxing chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease. Bone marrow V10 did not associate with hematological adverse events. In all, 15 grade 2 (25%) and 2 grade 3 (3%) fatigue symptoms were self-reported among the 61 women within the first 10 days post-therapy, with fatigue resolved spontaneously in all 17 women by 30 days post-therapy. Neutropenia was not observed. Three (5%) women had a grade 1 drop in hemoglobin level to <10.0 g/dL. Single grade 1, 2, and 3 thrombocytopenias were documented in 3 women. Conclusions: Abdominopelvic SBRT provided ablative radiation dose to cancer targets without increased bone marrow toxicity. Abdominopelvic SBRT for metastatic gynecologic malignancies warrants further study.

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yong Kyun; Lee, Ja Young; Kang, Young Nam; Jang, Ji Sun; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Jung, So-Lyoung; Sung, Soo Yoon; Jo, In Young; Park, Hee Hyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Chang, Ji Hyun; Lee, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been introduced for small-sized single and oligo-metastases in the brain. The aim of this study is to assess treatment outcome, efficacy, and prognostic variables associated with survival and intracranial recurrence. Materials and Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 123 targets in 64 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SRS between January 2006 and December 2012. Treatment responses were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival (IPFS) were determined. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months. The median OS and IPFS were 14.1 and 8.9 months, respectively. Fifty-seven patients died during the follow-up period. The 5-year local control rate was achieved in 85% of 108 evaluated targets. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 55% and 28%, respectively. On univariate analysis, primary disease control (p < 0.001), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (0-1 vs. 2; p = 0.002), recursive partitioning analysis class (1 vs. 2; p = 0.001), and age (<65 vs. ≥65 years; p = 0.036) were significant predictive factors for OS. Primary disease control (p = 0.041) and ECOG status (p = 0.017) were the significant prognostic factors for IPFS. Four patients experienced radiation necrosis. Conclusion SRS is a safe and effective local treatment for brain metastases in patients with NSCLC. Uncontrolled primary lung disease and ECOG status were significant predictors of OS and intracranial failure. SRS might be a tailored treatment option along with careful follow-up of the intracranial and primary lung disease status. PMID:26484304

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Marcos Antonio dos; Calvo, Felipe A.; Samblas, Jose; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSM) have an elevated risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. Recurrence is often observed after partial resection. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), either alone or combined with surgery, represents an important advance in CSM management, but long-term results are lacking. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 CSM patients, treated from January 1991 to December 2005, were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up was 86.8 months (range, 17.1-179.4 months). Among the patients, 22 were followed for more than 10 years. There was a female predominance (84.1%). The age varied from 16 to 90 years (mean, 51.6). In all, 47 patients (53.4%) received SRS alone, and 41 patients (46.6%) had undergone surgery before SRS. A dose of 14 Gy was prescribed to isodose curves from 50% to 90%. In 25 patients (28.4%), as a result of the proximity to organs at risk, the prescribed dose did not completely cover the target. Results: After SRS, 65 (73.8%) patients presented with tumor volume reduction; 14 (15.9%) remained stable, and 9 (10.2%) had tumor progression. The progression-free survival was 92.5% at 5 years, and 82.5% at 10 years. Age, sex, maximal diameter of the treated tumor, previous surgery, and complete target coverage did not show significant associations with prognosis. Among the 88 treated patients, 17 experienced morbidity that was related to SRS, and 6 of these patients spontaneously recovered. Conclusions: SRS is an effective and safe treatment for CSM, feasible either in the primary or the postsurgical setting. Incomplete coverage of the target did not worsen outcomes. More than 80% of the patients remained free of disease progression during long-term follow-up.

  10. Robotic real-time translational and rotational head motion correction during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xinmin; Belcher, Andrew H.; Grelewicz, Zachary; Wiersma, Rodney D.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a control system to correct both translational and rotational head motion deviations in real-time during frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: A novel feedback control with a feed-forward algorithm was utilized to correct for the coupling of translation and rotation present in serial kinematic robotic systems. Input parameters for the algorithm include the real-time 6DOF target position, the frame pitch pivot point to target distance constant, and the translational and angular Linac beam off (gating) tolerance constants for patient safety. Testing of the algorithm was done using a 4D (XY Z + pitch) robotic stage, an infrared head position sensing unit and a control computer. The measured head position signal was processed and a resulting command was sent to the interface of a four-axis motor controller, through which four stepper motors were driven to perform motion compensation. Results: The control of the translation of a brain target was decoupled with the control of the rotation. For a phantom study, the corrected position was within a translational displacement of 0.35 mm and a pitch displacement of 0.15° 100% of the time. For a volunteer study, the corrected position was within displacements of 0.4 mm and 0.2° over 98.5% of the time, while it was 10.7% without correction. Conclusions: The authors report a control design approach for both translational and rotational head motion correction. The experiments demonstrated that control performance of the 4D robotic stage meets the submillimeter and subdegree accuracy required by SRS.

  11. Planned Two-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for High-Risk Inoperable Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Rowell, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients with high-risk cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), based on eloquent brain location or large size, who underwent planned two-fraction proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 59 patients with high-risk cerebral AVMs received two-fraction PSRS. Median nidus volume was 23 cc (range, 1.4-58.1 cc), 70% of cases had nidus volume {>=}14 cc, and 34% were in critical locations (brainstem, basal ganglia). Median AVM score based on age, AVM size, and location was 3.19 (range, 0.9-6.9). Many patients had prior surgery or embolization (40%) or prior PSRS (12%). The most common prescription was 16 Gy radiobiologic equivalent (RBE) in two fractions, prescribed to the 90% isodose. Results: At a median follow-up of 56.1 months, 9 patients (15%) had total and 20 patients (34%) had partial obliteration. Patients with total obliteration received higher total dose than those with partial or no obliteration (mean dose, 17.6 vs. 15.5 Gy (RBE), p = 0.01). Median time to total obliteration was 62 months (range, 23-109 months), and 5-year actuarial rate of partial or total obliteration was 33%. Five-year actuarial rate of hemorrhage was 22% (95% confidence interval, 12.5%-36.8%) and 14% (n = 8) suffered fatal hemorrhage. Lesions with higher AVM scores were more likely to hemorrhage (p = 0.024) and less responsive to radiation (p = 0.026). The most common complication was Grade 1 headache acutely (14%) and long term (12%). One patient developed a Grade 2 generalized seizure disorder, and two had mild neurologic deficits. Conclusions: High-risk AVMs can be safely treated with two-fraction PSRS, although total obliteration rate is low and patients remain at risk for future hemorrhage. Future studies should include higher doses or a multistaged PSRS approach for lesions more resistant to obliteration with radiation.

  12. Long-term risk of radionecrosis and imaging changes after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kohutek, Zachary A; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A; Brennan, Cameron W; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H; Yang, T Jonathan; Rosenblum, Marc K; Ballangrud, Åse; Young, Robert J; Zhang, Zhigang; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-10-01

    Radionecrosis is a well-characterized effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and is occasionally associated with serious neurologic sequelae. Here, we investigated the incidence of and clinical variables associated with the development of radionecrosis and related radiographic changes after SRS for brain metastases in a cohort of patients with long-term follow up. 271 brain metastases treated with single-fraction linear accelerator-based SRS were analyzed. Radionecrosis was diagnosed either pathologically or radiographically. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine the association between radionecrosis and clinical factors available prior to treatment planning. After median follow up of 17.2 months, radionecrosis was observed in 70 (25.8%) lesions, including 47 (17.3%) symptomatic cases. 22 of 70 cases (31.4%) were diagnosed pathologically and 48 (68.6%) were diagnosed radiographically. The actuarial incidence of radionecrosis was 5.2% at 6 months, 17.2% at 12 months and 34.0% at 24 months. On univariate analysis, radionecrosis was associated with maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.55, p < 0.001), prior whole brain radiotherapy (HR 2.21, p = 0.004), prescription dose (HR 0.56, p = 0.02) and histology other than non-small cell lung, breast or melanoma (HR 1.85, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, only maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.10, p < 0.001) was associated with radionecrosis risk. This data demonstrates that with close imaging follow-up, radionecrosis after single-fraction SRS for brain metastases is not uncommon. Maximum tumor diameter on pre-treatment MR imaging can provide a reliable estimate of radionecrosis risk prior to treatment planning, with the greatest risk among tumors measuring >1 cm. PMID:26307446

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  14. Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations in childhood and adolescence

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-06-01

    Forty patients aged 6 to 18 years have now been treated for inoperable intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron at the University of California, Berkeley. This paper describes the procedures for selection of patients, the treatment protocol, and the neurological and neuroradiological responses to stereotactic radiosurgery in this age group. The volumes of the treated AVMs ranged from 265 mm/sup 3/ to 60,000 mm/sup 3/. The results are favorable: thus far, 20 of 25 patients have experienced greater than or equal to 50% obliteration of their AVMs within 1 year after treatment, and 14 of 18 patients have experienced total obliteration of the AVM by 2 years after treatment. Two patients hemorrhaged from radiosurgically treated AVMs within 12 months after treatment, but none thereafter. Complications include vasogenic edema and arterial occlusion; three patients have had neurological worsening as definite or possible sequelae of treatment. The strengths and limitations of the method are discussed.

  15. The management of central neurocytoma: radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Edward A; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has evolved into a mainstay in the primary and adjuvant management of most intracranial tumors. Central neurocytomas are rare, usually benign, intraventricular tumors that can be challenging to completely resect and often recur. Adjuvant therapy has been suggested for residual or recurrent tumors, especially in the setting of atypical neurocytomas. The limited data available suggest that SRS is a highly effective treatment approach for primary and adjuvant therapy, with tumor control rates of 80% to 90%. Due to its highly conformal and selective nature, SRS avoids the inconvenience and delayed toxicity of conventional radiation therapy. PMID:25432182

  16. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: outcome analysis with use of the modified arteriovenous malformation scoring system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph C T; Mariscal, Luis; Girvigian, Michael R; Vanefsky, Marc A; Glousman, Brandon N; Miller, Michael J; Feng, Lei; Rahimian, Javad

    2016-07-01

    Radiosurgery has long been an accepted modality for definitive treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio for this indication include use of staged volume procedures and hypofractionation. This study reviews our experience with a cohort of patients treated with hypofractionated radiosurgery. Over a 3year period, 38 patients harboring 39 cerebral AVM were treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Seventeen of these patients presented due to hemorrhage, four were asymptomatic unruptured lesions and the remainder were symptomatic unruptured lesions. The median AVM volume was 11.43 cc and median modified Radiosurgery-Based Arteriovenous Malformation Score (mRBAS) was 2.02. The median follow-up was 7.32years. Four patients harboring four AVM were lost to follow-up before a result could be ascertained leaving 35 AVM for analysis. Excellent outcomes (AVM obliteration without new deficits) occurred in 17 of 34 (50%) patients and in 18 of 35 (51%) AVM treated. AVM obliteration was seen in 26 of 35 (74%) lesions treated. Two patients died during the follow-up period (6%). A poor result (major deficit without obliteration) was seen in one patient. Of 19 patients harboring AVM with mRBAS >2.0, an excellent outcome was achieved in eight (42%). Hypofractionation for cerebral AVM can result in satisfactory obliteration rates, but with risk of significant complications commensurate with mRBAS. Further study of this technique will be needed to ascertain the degree of incremental improvement, if any, over other radiosurgery treatment methods. PMID:26947340

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery of small intracranial tumors: Neuropathological correlation in three patients

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.G.; Coffey, R.J.; Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The mechanism by which radiosurgery can stop the growth of some tumors is poorly understood, in part because postmortem neuropathological findings in patients have been reported only rarely. To define further the effects of radiosurgery, we present the correlation among clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathological data in three patients with different intracranial tumors who died between 2 and 39 weeks after radiosurgery. The target volumes in two patients with malignant tumors showed sharply demarcated coagulative necrosis. In the third patient, who had a benign acoustic nerve tumor, neuropathological examination found intratumoral hemorrhage and cyst formation, but no necrosis. Radiosurgery appears to cause acute necrosis of malignant cells, although its effectiveness may be limited by the infiltrative nature of some tumors. In benign tumors, necrosis following radiosurgery is relatively delayed, and may not be required for growth arrest.

  18. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade {>=}3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher's exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade {>=}3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm{sup 3} (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm{sup 3} (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm{sup 3}. One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade {>=}4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade {>=}3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation

  19. Dosimetric Comparison of Helical Tomotherapy and Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chao, Pei-Ju; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Yu-Je; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sung, Chieh-Cheng; Su, Te-Jen; Lian, Shi-Long; Fang, Fu-Min

    2011-04-01

    The dosimetric results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) performed using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) with the Novalis system and helical TomoTherapy (HT) were compared using plan quality indices. The HT plans were created for 10 consecutive patients with VS previously treated with SRS using the Novalis system. The dosimetric indices used to compare the techniques included the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planned target volume (PTV), the comprehensive quality index (CQI) for nine organs at risk (OARs), gradient score index (GSI) for the dose drop-off outside the PTV, and plan quality index (PQI), which was verified using the plan quality discerning power (PQDP) to incorporate 3 plan indices, to evaluate the rival plans. The PTV ranged from 0.27-19.99 cm{sup 3} (median 3.39 cm{sup 3}), with minimum required PTV prescribed doses of 10-16 Gy (median 12 Gy). Both systems satisfied the minimum required PTV prescription doses. HT conformed better to the PTV (CI: 1.51 {+-} 0.23 vs. 1.94 {+-} 0.34; p < 0.01), but had a worse drop-off outside the PTV (GSI: 40.3 {+-} 10.9 vs. 64.9 {+-} 13.6; p < 0.01) compared with DCAT. No significant difference in PTV homogeneity was observed (HI: 1.08 {+-} 0.03 vs. 1.09 {+-} 0.02; p = 0.20). HT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 4 OARs and significant lower mean dose in 1 OAR; by contrast, DCAT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 1 OAR and significant lower mean dose in 2 OARs, with the CQI of the 9 OARs = 0.92 {+-} 0.45. Plan analysis using PQI (HT 0.37 {+-} 0.12 vs. DCAT 0.65 {+-} 0.08; p < 0.01), and verified using the PQDP, confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT. However, the HT system had a longer beam-on time (33.2 {+-} 7.4 vs. 4.6 {+-} 0.9 min; p < 0.01) and consumed more monitor units (16772 {+-} 3803 vs. 1776 {+-} 356.3; p < 0.01). HT had a better dose conformity and similar dose homogeneity but worse dose gradient than DCAT. Plan analysis

  20. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and dynamic conformal arc therapy in stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chao, Pei-Ju; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Yu-Je; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sung, Chieh-Cheng; Su, Te-Jen; Lian, Shi-Long; Fang, Fu-Min

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) performed using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) with the Novalis system and helical TomoTherapy (HT) were compared using plan quality indices. The HT plans were created for 10 consecutive patients with VS previously treated with SRS using the Novalis system. The dosimetric indices used to compare the techniques included the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planned target volume (PTV), the comprehensive quality index (CQI) for nine organs at risk (OARs), gradient score index (GSI) for the dose drop-off outside the PTV, and plan quality index (PQI), which was verified using the plan quality discerning power (PQDP) to incorporate 3 plan indices, to evaluate the rival plans. The PTV ranged from 0.27-19.99 cm(3) (median 3.39 cm(3)), with minimum required PTV prescribed doses of 10-16 Gy (median 12 Gy). Both systems satisfied the minimum required PTV prescription doses. HT conformed better to the PTV (CI: 1.51 ± 0.23 vs. 1.94 ± 0.34; p < 0.01), but had a worse drop-off outside the PTV (GSI: 40.3 ± 10.9 vs. 64.9 ± 13.6; p < 0.01) compared with DCAT. No significant difference in PTV homogeneity was observed (HI: 1.08 ± 0.03 vs. 1.09 ± 0.02; p = 0.20). HT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 4 OARs and significant lower mean dose in 1 OAR; by contrast, DCAT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 1 OAR and significant lower mean dose in 2 OARs, with the CQI of the 9 OARs = 0.92 ± 0.45. Plan analysis using PQI (HT 0.37 ± 0.12 vs. DCAT 0.65 ± 0.08; p < 0.01), and verified using the PQDP, confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT. However, the HT system had a longer beam-on time (33.2 ± 7.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 min; p < 0.01) and consumed more monitor units (16772 ± 3803 vs. 1776 ± 356.3; p < 0.01). HT had a better dose conformity and similar dose homogeneity but worse dose gradient than DCAT. Plan analysis confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT

  1. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Lis, Eric; Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Laufer, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  2. Single-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Kim, Daniel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Bussière, Marc R.; Stringham, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Ogilvy, Christopher; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To evaluate the obliteration rate and potential adverse effects of single-fraction proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2010, 248 consecutive patients with 254 cerebral AVMs received single-fraction PSRS at our institution. The median AVM nidus volume was 3.5 cc (range, 0.1-28.1 cc), 23% of AVMs were in critical/deep locations (basal ganglia, thalamus, or brainstem), and the most common prescription dose was 15 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess factors associated with obliteration and hemorrhage. Results: At a median follow-up time of 35 months (range, 6-198 months), 64.6% of AVMs were obliterated. The median time to total obliteration was 31 months (range, 6-127 months), and the 5-year and 10-year cumulative incidence of total obliteration was 70% and 91%, respectively. On univariable analysis, smaller target volume (hazard ratio [HR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.93, P<.0001), smaller treatment volume (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90-0.96, P<.0001), higher prescription dose (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07-1.26, P=.001), and higher maximum dose (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05-1.23, P=.002) were associated with total obliteration. Deep/critical location was also associated with decreased likelihood of obliteration (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.98, P=.04). On multivariable analysis, critical location (adjusted HR [AHR] 0.42, 95% CI 0.27-0.65, P<.001) and smaller target volume (AHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97, P=.02) remained associated with total obliteration. Posttreatment hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases (5-year cumulative incidence of 7%), all among patients with less than total obliteration, and 3 of these events were fatal. The most common complication was seizure, controlled with medications, both acutely (8%) and in the long term (9.1%). Conclusions: The current series is the largest

  3. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-01: Automation of the Winston-Lutz Test for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, D; Irrer, J; Kessler, M; Lam, K; Keranen, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize clinical efficiency and shorten patient wait time by minimizing the time and effort required to perform the Winston-Lutz test before stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) through automation of the delivery, analysis, and documentation of results. Methods: The radiation fields of the Winston-Lutz (WL) test were created in a “machine-QA patient” saved in ARIA for use before SRS cases. Images of the BRW target ball placed at mechanical isocenter are captured with the portal imager for each of four, 2cm×2cm, MLC-shaped beams. When the WL plan is delivered and closed, this event is detected by in-house software called EventNet which automates subsequent processes with the aid of the ARIA web services. Images are automatically retrieved from the ARIA database and analyzed to determine the offset of the target ball from radiation isocenter. The results are posted to a website and a composite summary image of the results is pushed back into ImageBrowser for review and authenticated documentation. Results: The total time to perform the test was reduced from 20-25 minutes to less than 4 minutes. The results were found to be more accurate and consistent than the previous method which used radiochromic film. The images were also analyzed with DoseLab for comparison. The difference between the film and automated WL results in the X and Y direction and the radius were (−0.17 +/− 0.28) mm, (0.21 +/− 0.20) mm and (−0.14 +/− 0.27) mm, respectively. The difference between the DoseLab and automated WL results were (−0.05 +/− 0.06) mm, (−0.01 +/− 0.02) mm and (0.01 +/− 0.07) mm, respectively. Conclusions: This process reduced patient wait times by 15–20 minutes making the treatment machine available to treat another patient. Accuracy and consistency of results were improved over the previous method and were comparable to other commercial solutions. Access to the ARIA web services is made possible through an Eclipse co-development agreement

  4. A Phase 2 Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost After Surgical Resection for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Cameron; Yang, T. Jonathan; Hilden, Patrick; Zhang, Zhigang; Chan, Kelvin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Lymberis, Stella C.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H.; Ballangrud, Åse; Lis, Eric; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after surgical resection and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients (50 lesions) were enrolled and available for analysis. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed malignancy with 1 or 2 intraparenchymal brain metastases, age ≥18 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test for significant associations between clinical factors and overall survival (OS). Competing risks regression models, as well as cumulative incidence functions, were fit using the method of Fine and Gray to assess the association between clinical factors and both local failure (LF; recurrence within surgical cavity or SRS target), and regional failure (RF; intracranial metastasis outside of treated volume). Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months (range, 1.0-94.1 months). After surgical resection, 39 patients with 40 lesions were treated a median of 31 days (range, 7-56 days) later with SRS to the surgical bed to a median dose of 1800 cGy (range, 1500-2200 cGy). Of the 50 lesions, 15 (30%) demonstrated LF after surgery. The cumulative LF and RF rates were 22% and 44% at 12 months. Patients who went on to receive SRS had a significantly lower incidence of LF (P=.008). Other factors associated with improved local control include non-small cell lung cancer histology (P=.048), tumor diameter <3 cm (P=.010), and deep parenchymal tumors (P=.036). Large tumors (≥3 cm) with superficial dural/pial involvement showed the highest risk for LF (53.3% at 12 months). Large superficial lesions treated with SRS had a 54.5% LF. Infratentorial lesions were associated with a higher risk of developing RF compared to supratentorial lesions (P<.001). Conclusions: Postoperative SRS is associated with high rates of local control, especially for deep brain metastases <3 cm. Tumors ≥3 cm with superficial dural

  5. Is smaller better? Comparison of 3-mm and 5-mm leaf size for stereotactic radiosurgery: A dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Shyh-shi . E-mail: Richard.Chern@hci.utah.edu; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of a minimal 3-mm leaf width multileaf collimator (MLC) and a minimal 5-mm MLC in dynamic conformal arc stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of intracranial lesions. Methods and Materials: The treatment plans of 23 patients previously treated for intracranial lesions in our institution were redone using the BrainSCAN, version 5.3, stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning system (BrainLAB). For each case, two dynamic conformal arc plans were generated: one using a minimal 3-mm micro-MLC (BrainLAB, Novalis) and one using a minimal 5-mm MLC (Varian Millennium). All arc parameters were the same in each of the two plans, except for the collimator angle settings. The collimator angle settings were optimized for each arc in each plan. A peritumoral rind structure (1 cm) was created to evaluate normal tissue sparing immediately adjacent to the target volume. Conformity indexes (CIs) were calculated for each plan. The dependence of normal tissue sparing and target conformity on target volume (TV) was determined. Results: The TV was 0.14-36.32 cm{sup 3} (median, 5.90). The CI was 1.22-2.60 (median, 1.51) for the 3-mm micro-MLC and 1.23-2.69 (median, 1.60) for the 5-mm MLC. Despite this small difference, it was a statistically significant increase (p < 0.0001) for the 5-mm MLC compared with the 3-mm micro-MLC. Improved normal tissue sparing was demonstrated using the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC by examining the peritumoral rind volumes (PRVs) receiving 50% (PRV{sub 5}), 80% (PRV{sub 8}), and 90% (PRV{sub 9}) of the prescription dose. The reduction in the PRV{sub 5}, PRV{sub 8}, and PRV{sub 9} for the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC was 13.5%, 12.9%, and 11.5%, respectively. The CI decreased with a larger TV, as did the difference in the CIs between the 3-mm micro-MLC and 5-mm MLC. A reduction in the PRV increased with larger TVs. Conclusion: The 3-mm micro-MLC provided better target conformity and

  6. Tumor bed radiosurgery: an emerging treatment for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Amsbaugh, Mark J; Boling, Warren; Woo, Shiao

    2015-06-01

    While typically used for treating small intact brain metastases, an increasing body of literature examining tumor bed directed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is emerging. There are now over 1000 published cases treated with this approach, and the first prospective trial was recently published. The ideal sequencing of tumor bed SRS is unclear. Current approaches include, a neoadjuvant treatment before resection, alone as an adjuvant after resection, and following surgery combined with whole brain radiotherapy either as an adjuvant or salvage treatment. Based on available evidence, adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery improves local control following surgery, reduces the number of patients who require whole brain radiotherapy, and is well tolerated. While results from published series vary, heterogeneity in both patient populations and methods of reporting results make comparisons difficult. Additional prospective data, including randomized trials are needed to confirm equivalent outcomes to the current standard of care. We review the current literature, identify areas of ongoing contention, and highlight ongoing studies. PMID:25911296

  7. Gamma Knife radiosurgery combined with stereotactic aspiration as an effective treatment method for large cystic brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HONGWEI; QI, SONGTAO; DOU, CHANGWU; JU, HAITAO; HE, ZHANBIAO; MA, QINGHAI

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy and clinical outcomes of stereotactic aspiration combined with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) method were evaluated retrospectively for patients with large cystic brain metastases. This combined method aims to decrease the tumor weight (volume) and increase the possible radiation dose. The present study involved 48 patients who were diagnosed with cystic metastatic brain tumors between January 2008 and December 2012 in the Department of Neurosurgery of Nanfang Hospital Southern Medical University (Guangzhou, China). Every patient underwent Leksell stereotactic frame, 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic cyst aspiration and Leksell GKRS. Subsequent to the therapy, MRI was performed every 3 months. The results indicated that 48 cases were followed up for 24–72 months, with a mean follow-up duration of 36.2 months. Following treatment, 44 patients (91.7%) exhibited tumor control and 4 patients (8.3%) experienced progression of the local tumor. During this period, 35 patients (72.9%) succumbed, but only 2 (4.2%) of these succumbed to the brain metastases. The total local control rate was 91.7% and the median overall survival time of all patients was 19.5 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 70.8% and the 2-year overall survival rate was 26.2%. In conclusion, these results indicated that the method of stereotactic cyst aspiration combined with GKRS was safe and effective for patients with large cystic brain metastases. This method is effective for patients whose condition is too weak for general anesthesia and in whom the tumors are positioned at eloquent areas. This method enables patients to avoid a craniotomy, and provides a good tumor control rate, survival time and quality of life. PMID:27347148

  8. Linear Accelerator and Gamma Knife-Based Stereotactic Cranial Radiosurgery: Challenges and Successes of Existing Quality Assurance Guidelines and Paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, Steven J.

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery has been practiced since 1951. The technique has expanded from a single dedicated unit in Stockholm in 1968 to hundreds of centers performing an estimated 100,000 Gamma Knife and linear accelerator cases in 2005. The radiation dosimetry of small photon fields used in this technique has been well explored in the past 15 years. Quality assurance recommendations have been promulgated in refereed reports and by several national and international professional societies since 1991. The field has survived several reported treatment errors and incidents, generally reacting by strengthening standards and precautions. An increasing number of computer-controlled and robotic-dedicated treatment units are expanding the field and putting patients at risk of unforeseen errors. Revisions and updates to previously published quality assurance documents, and especially to radiation dosimetry protocols, are now needed to ensure continued successful procedures that minimize the risk of serious errors.

  9. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of brain metastases from NSCLC: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MARVASO, GIULIA; BARONE, AGNESE; VACCARO, CATERINA; BRUZZANITI, VICENTE; GRESPI, SILVIA; SCOTTI, VALERIO; BIANCO, CATALDO

    2013-01-01

    The aims of radiotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases include maintaining neurocognitive function and improvement of survival. Based on these premises, we present a case report in which the role of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was investigated in a patient with a recurrent brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer in the same area as previously treated with radiosurgery. A 40-year-old male caucasian patient was diagnosed with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and underwent SRS. The patient developed a recurrence of the disease and a second SRS on the same area was performed. After 8 months, tumor restaging demonstrated a lesion compatible with a recurrence and the patient underwent surgery. Histological diagnosis following surgery revealed only the occurrence of radionecrosis. Radiotherapy was well-tolerated and no grade 3/4 neurological toxicity occurred. To date, no consensus exists on the efficacy of retreatment with SRS. Despite the limited number of studies in this field, in the present case report, we outline the outcomes of this unconventional approach. PMID:24137433

  10. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of brain metastases from NSCLC: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marvaso, Giulia; Barone, Agnese; Vaccaro, Caterina; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Grespi, Silvia; Scotti, Valerio; Bianco, Cataldo

    2013-10-01

    The aims of radiotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases include maintaining neurocognitive function and improvement of survival. Based on these premises, we present a case report in which the role of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was investigated in a patient with a recurrent brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer in the same area as previously treated with radiosurgery. A 40-year-old male caucasian patient was diagnosed with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and underwent SRS. The patient developed a recurrence of the disease and a second SRS on the same area was performed. After 8 months, tumor restaging demonstrated a lesion compatible with a recurrence and the patient underwent surgery. Histological diagnosis following surgery revealed only the occurrence of radionecrosis. Radiotherapy was well-tolerated and no grade 3/4 neurological toxicity occurred. To date, no consensus exists on the efficacy of retreatment with SRS. Despite the limited number of studies in this field, in the present case report, we outline the outcomes of this unconventional approach. PMID:24137433

  11. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  12. Dosimetry of cone-defined stereotactic radiosurgery fields with a commercial synthetic diamond detector

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Johnny E.; Crowe, Scott B.; Trapp, J. V.; Hill, Robin; Freeman, Nigel

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Small field x-ray beam dosimetry is difficult due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, source occlusion, high dose gradients, and detector volume averaging. Currently, there is no single definitive detector recommended for small field dosimetry. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector, namely, the PTW 60019 microDiamond, for the dosimetry of small x-ray fields as used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Small field sizes were defined by BrainLAB circular cones (4–30 mm diameter) on a Novalis Trilogy linear accelerator and using the 6 MV SRS x-ray beam mode for all measurements. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured and compared to an IBA SFD and a PTW 60012 E diode. Cross profiles were measured and compared to an IBA SFD diode. Field factors, Ω{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}, were calculated by Monte Carlo methods using BEAMnrc and correction factors, k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}, were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. Results: For the small fields of 4–30 mm diameter, there were dose differences in the PDDs of up to 1.5% when compared to an IBA SFD and PTW 60012 E diode detector. For the cross profile measurements the penumbra values varied, depending upon the orientation of the detector. The field factors, Ω{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}, were calculated for these field diameters at a depth of 1.4 cm in water and they were within 2.7% of published values for a similar linear accelerator. The corrections factors, k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}, were derived for the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector. Conclusions

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Examination of Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joanne; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of this study are to assess the effectiveness of CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in providing both initial and sustained pain relief for patients with both forms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), assess potential prognostic factors, and examine treatment-related toxicities. Methods  The RSSearch® Patient Registry was screened for TN cases from July 2007 to June 2015. We evaluated initial pain relief achieved by examining changes in the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores following SRS. Prognostic factors relating to initial pain relief and the relationship between maximum dose (Dmax) and toxicity incidence were analyzed via univariate logistic regressions. We evaluated prognostic factors relating to sustained pain relief using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank analysis. Results  Our analysis included 125 TN1 patients and 38 TN2 patients with initial VAS scores ≥ 3 treated at 16 community radiotherapy centers. Median Dmax for both cohorts was 75 Gy with a larger range for TN1 cases (67.42 Gy - 110.29 Gy) as compared to TN2 cases (70.00 Gy - 78.48 Gy). At initial follow-up, mean VAS scores after SRS were significantly lower for TN1 and TN2 patients (p < 0.0001). The vast majority of TN1 (87.2%) and TN2 (86.8%) patients experienced initial pain relief. Higher initial VAS scores (p = 0.015) were correlated with a greater likelihood of initial treatment success for TN1 patients. We did not identify any treatment or patient characteristics that had significant effects on initial pain relief for TN2 patients. Of the TN1 cohort, 28 of 125 patients reported follow-ups one year or greater after SRS. Twenty-three of 28 TN1 patients (82%) reported VAS scores of 1 or less at one-year follow-up, and eight of 11 patients (72%) had VAS scores of 1 or less at the two-year follow-up. No potential prognostic factors for long-term pain relief were significant. Roughly 18% and 11% of TN1 and TN2 patients, respectively, experienced acute

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Examination of Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raj; Davis, Joanne; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of this study are to assess the effectiveness of CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in providing both initial and sustained pain relief for patients with both forms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), assess potential prognostic factors, and examine treatment-related toxicities. Methods  The RSSearch(®) Patient Registry was screened for TN cases from July 2007 to June 2015. We evaluated initial pain relief achieved by examining changes in the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores following SRS. Prognostic factors relating to initial pain relief and the relationship between maximum dose (Dmax) and toxicity incidence were analyzed via univariate logistic regressions. We evaluated prognostic factors relating to sustained pain relief using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank analysis. Results  Our analysis included 125 TN1 patients and 38 TN2 patients with initial VAS scores ≥ 3 treated at 16 community radiotherapy centers. Median Dmax for both cohorts was 75 Gy with a larger range for TN1 cases (67.42 Gy - 110.29 Gy) as compared to TN2 cases (70.00 Gy - 78.48 Gy). At initial follow-up, mean VAS scores after SRS were significantly lower for TN1 and TN2 patients (p < 0.0001). The vast majority of TN1 (87.2%) and TN2 (86.8%) patients experienced initial pain relief. Higher initial VAS scores (p = 0.015) were correlated with a greater likelihood of initial treatment success for TN1 patients. We did not identify any treatment or patient characteristics that had significant effects on initial pain relief for TN2 patients. Of the TN1 cohort, 28 of 125 patients reported follow-ups one year or greater after SRS. Twenty-three of 28 TN1 patients (82%) reported VAS scores of 1 or less at one-year follow-up, and eight of 11 patients (72%) had VAS scores of 1 or less at the two-year follow-up. No potential prognostic factors for long-term pain relief were significant. Roughly 18% and 11% of TN1 and TN2 patients, respectively, experienced acute

  15. Outcome Evaluation of Oligometastatic Patients Treated with Surgical Resection Followed by Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery (HSRS) on the Tumor Bed, for Single, Large Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Federico; Navarria, Pierina; Cozzi, Luca; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Maggi, Giulia; Riva, Marco; Masci, Giovanna; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Finocchiaro, Giovanna; Santoro, Armando; Bello, Lorenzo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of a combined treatment, surgery followed by adjuvant hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HSRS) on the tumor bed, in oligometastatic patients with single, large brain metastasis (BM). Methods and Materials Fom January 2011 to March 2015, 69 patients underwent complete surgical resection followed by HSRS with a total dose of 30Gy in 3 daily fractions. Clinical outcome was evaluated by neurological examination and MRI 2 months after radiotherapy and then every 3 months. Local progression was defined as radiographic increase of the enhancing abnormality in the irradiated volume, and brain distant progression as the presence of new brain metastases or leptomeningeal enhancement outside the irradiated volume. Surgical morbidity and radiation-therapy toxicity, local control (LC), brain distant progression (BDP), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results The median preoperative volume and maximum diameter of BM was 18.5cm3 (range 4.1–64.2cm3) and 3.6cm (range 2.1-5-4cm); the median CTV was 29.0cm3 (range 4.1–203.1cm3) and median PTV was 55.2cm3 (range 17.2–282.9cm3). The median follow-up time was 24 months (range 4–33 months). The 1-and 2-year LC in site of treatment was 100%; the median, 1-and 2-year BDP was 11.9 months, 19.6% and 33.0%; the median, 1-and 2-year OS was 24 months (range 4–33 months), 91.3% and 73.0%. No severe postoperative morbidity or radiation therapy toxicity occurred in our series. Conclusions Multimodal approach, surgery followed by HSRS, can be an effective treatment option for selected patients with single, large brain metastases from different solid tumors. PMID:27348860

  16. Knowledge-based prediction of plan quality metrics in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.; Tan, Jun; Olsen, Lindsey A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to develop a comprehensive knowledge-based methodology for predicting achievable dose–volume histograms (DVHs) and highly precise DVH-based quality metrics (QMs) in stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) plans. Accurate QM estimation can identify suboptimal treatment plans and provide target optimization objectives to standardize and improve treatment planning. Methods: Correlating observed dose as it relates to the geometric relationship of organs-at-risk (OARs) to planning target volumes (PTVs) yields mathematical models to predict achievable DVHs. In SRS, DVH-based QMs such as brain V{sub 10Gy} (volume receiving 10 Gy or more), gradient measure (GM), and conformity index (CI) are used to evaluate plan quality. This study encompasses 223 linear accelerator-based SRS/SRT treatment plans (SRS plans) using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), representing 95% of the institution’s VMAT radiosurgery load from the past four and a half years. Unfiltered models that use all available plans for the model training were built for each category with a stratification scheme based on target and OAR characteristics determined emergently through initial modeling process. Model predictive accuracy is measured by the mean and standard deviation of the difference between clinical and predicted QMs, δQM = QM{sub clin} − QM{sub pred}, and a coefficient of determination, R{sup 2}. For categories with a large number of plans, refined models are constructed by automatic elimination of suspected suboptimal plans from the training set. Using the refined model as a presumed achievable standard, potentially suboptimal plans are identified. Predictions of QM improvement are validated via standardized replanning of 20 suspected suboptimal plans based on dosimetric predictions. The significance of the QM improvement is evaluated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: The most accurate predictions are obtained when plans are

  17. Adjuvant Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Versus Observation After Radiosurgery or Surgical Resection of One to Three Cerebral Metastases: Results of the EORTC 22952-26001 Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Villà, Salvador; Fauchon, Francois; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Fariselli, Laura; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Carrie, Christian; Hassel, Mohamed Ben; Kouri, Mauri; Valeinis, Egils; van den Berge, Dirk; Collette, Sandra; Collette, Laurence; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial assesses whether adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) increases the duration of functional independence after surgery or radiosurgery of brain metastases. Patients and Methods Patients with one to three brain metastases of solid tumors (small-cell lung cancer excluded) with stable systemic disease or asymptomatic primary tumors and WHO performance status (PS) of 0 to 2 were treated with complete surgery or radiosurgery and randomly assigned to adjuvant WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) or observation (OBS). The primary end point was time to WHO PS deterioration to more than 2. Results Of 359 patients, 199 underwent radiosurgery, and 160 underwent surgery. In the radiosurgery group, 100 patients were allocated to OBS, and 99 were allocated to WBRT. After surgery, 79 patients were allocated to OBS, and 81 were allocated to adjuvant WBRT. The median time to WHO PS more than 2 was 10.0 months (95% CI, 8.1 to 11.7 months) after OBS and 9.5 months (95% CI, 7.8 to 11.9 months) after WBRT (P = .71). Overall survival was similar in the WBRT and OBS arms (median, 10.9 v 10.7 months, respectively; P = .89). WBRT reduced the 2-year relapse rate both at initial sites (surgery: 59% to 27%, P < .001; radiosurgery: 31% to 19%, P = .040) and at new sites (surgery: 42% to 23%, P = .008; radiosurgery: 48% to 33%, P = .023). Salvage therapies were used more frequently after OBS than after WBRT. Intracranial progression caused death in 78 (44%) of 179 patients in the OBS arm and in 50 (28%) of 180 patients in the WBRT arm. Conclusion After radiosurgery or surgery of a limited number of brain metastases, adjuvant WBRT reduces intracranial relapses and neurologic deaths but fails to improve the duration of functional independence and overall survival. PMID:21041710

  18. SU-E-T-642: Safety Procedures for Error Elimination in Cyberknife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, A; Alkafi, A; Al-Najjar, W; Moftah, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cyberknife system is used for providing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) hypofractionation scheme. The whole treatment delivery is based on live imaging of the patient. The minor error made at any stage may bring severe radiation injury to the patient or damage to the system itself. Several safety measures were taken to make the system safer. Methods: The radiation treatment provided thru a 6MV linac attached to Kuka robot (Cyberknife G4, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Several possible errors were identified related to patient alignment, treatment planning, dose delivery and physics quality assurance. During dose delivery, manual and visual checks were introduced to confirm pre and intra-treatment imaging to reduce possible errors. One additional step was introduced to confirm that software tracking-tools had worked correctly with highest possible confidence level. Robotic head move in different orientations over and around the patient body, the rigidity of linac-head cover and other accessories was checked periodically. The vender was alerted when a tiny or bigger piece of equipment needed additional interlocked support. Results: As of our experience treating 525 patients on Cyberknife during the last four years, we saw on and off technical issues. During image acquisition, it was made essential to follow the site-specific imaging protocols. Adequate anatomy was contoured to document the respective doses. Followed by auto-segmentation, manual tweaking was performed on every structure. The calculation box was enclosing the whole image during the final calculation. Every plan was evaluated on slice-by slice basis. To review the whole process, a check list was maintained during the physics 2nd-check. Conclusion: The implementation of manual and visual additional checks introduced along with automated checks for confirmation was found promising in terms of reduction in systematic errors and making the system

  19. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy and LINAC Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma-Report About Both Stereotactic Methods From a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Christine; Fauser, Claudius; Mueller, Axel; Astner, Sabrina T.; Jacob, Vesna; Lumenta, Christianto; Meyer, Bernhard; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Molls, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter <1.5 cm) received a total dose of 12 Gy at the 100% isodose. Evaluation included serial imaging tests (magnetic resonance imaging) and neurologic and functional hearing examinations. Results: The tumor control rate was 97.9% in the SFR group for a mean follow-up time of 32.1 months and 98.5% in the RS group for a mean follow-up time of 30.1 months. Hearing function was preserved after RS in 85% of the patients and after SFR in 79%. Facial and trigeminal nerve function remained mostly unaffected after SFR. After RS, new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). Conclusions: A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS.

  20. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Boost with Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolamide for Glioblastoma in Good Performance Status Elderly Patients – Early Results of a Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Scott R.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Wong, Eric T.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks [Standard radiation therapy (RT)] with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS > 70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1–3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females) were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65–87 years). At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7–32 months), 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated

  1. Factors Predictive of Symptomatic Radiation Injury After Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Christopher; Moiseenko, Vitali; McKenzie, Michael; Redekop, Gary; Hsu, Fred; Gete, Ermias; Gill, Brad; Lee, Richard; Luchka, Kurt; Haw, Charles; Lee, Andrew; Toyota, Brian; Martin, Montgomery

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate predictive factors in the development of symptomatic radiation injury after treatment with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for intracerebral arteriovenous malformations and relate the findings to the conclusions drawn by Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC). Methods and Materials: Archived plans for 73 patients who were treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency were studied. Actuarial estimates of freedom from radiation injury were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of incidence of radiation injury. Log-rank test was used to search for dosimetric parameters associated with freedom from radiation injury. Results: Symptomatic radiation injury was exhibited by 14 of 73 patients (19.2%). Actuarial rate of symptomatic radiation injury was 23.0% at 4 years. Most patients (78.5%) had mild to moderate deficits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. On univariate analysis, lesion volume and diameter, dose to isocenter, and a V{sub x} for doses {>=}8 Gy showed statistical significance. Only lesion diameter showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) in a multivariate model. According to the log-rank test, AVM volumes >5 cm{sup 3} and diameters >30 mm were significantly associated with the risk of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The V{sub 12} also showed strong association with the incidence of radiation injury. Actuarial incidence of radiation injury was 16.8% if V{sub 12} was <28 cm{sup 3} and 53.2% if >28 cm{sup 3} (log-rank test, p = 0.001). Conclusions: This study confirms that the risk of developing symptomatic radiation injury after radiosurgery is related to lesion diameter and volume and irradiated volume. Results suggest a higher tolerance than proposed by QUANTEC. The widely differing findings reported in the literature, however, raise considerable uncertainties.

  2. Predictors of Distant Brain Recurrence for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sawrie, Stephen M. Guthrie, Barton L.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Nordal, Robert A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Markert, James M.; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain predictors of distant brain failure (DBF) in patients treated initially with stereotactic radiosurgery alone for newly diagnosed brain metastases. We hypothesize that these factors may be used to group patients according to risk of DBF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated from 2003 to 2005 at our Gamma Knife radiosurgery facility. The primary endpoint was DBF. Potential predictors included number of metastases, tumor volume, histologic characteristics, extracranial disease, and use of temozolomide. Results: One-year actuarial risk of DBF was 61% for all patients. Significant predictors of DBF included more than three metastases (hazard ratio, 3.30; p = 0.004), stable or poorly controlled extracranial disease (hazard ratio, 2.16; p = 0.04), and melanoma histologic characteristics (hazard ratio, 2.14; p = 0.02). These were confirmed in multivariate analysis. Those with three or fewer metastases, no extracranial disease, and nonmelanoma histologic characteristics (N = 18) had a median time to DBF of 89 weeks vs. 33 weeks for all others. One-year actuarial freedom from DBF for this group was 83% vs. 26% for all others. Conclusions: Independent significant predictors of DBF in our series included number of metastases (more than three), present or uncontrolled extracranial disease, and melanoma histologic characteristics. These factors were combined to identify a lower risk subgroup with significantly longer time to DBF. These patients may be candidates for initial localized treatment, reserving whole-brain radiation therapy for salvage. Patients in the higher risk group may be candidates for initial whole-brain radiation therapy or should be considered for clinical trials.

  3. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life. PMID:25190337

  4. The use of high field strength and parallel imaging techniques for MRI-based gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Kantemiris, I.; Benekos, O.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.

    2009-07-01

    The poor clinical acceptance of polymer gel dosimetry for dose verification in stereotactic radio-surgery applications stems, inter alia, from the increased MRI acquisition times needed to meet the associated spatial resolution demands. To examine whether this could be partly alleviated by the employment of 3 Tesla imagers and parallel imaging techniques, a PolyAcrylamide Gel filled tube was irradiated in a Leksell Gamma Knife unit with two single irradiation shots (4 mm and 8 mm) and underwent four different scanning sessions using an optimised, volume selective, 32 echo CPMG pulse sequence: One performed on a 1.5 T imager with 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 in-plane spatial resolution and 0.75 mm slice thickness (scan A), while the rest three on a 3.0 T imager; one with the same spatial resolution as in scan A (scan B) and two with finer in-plane resolution (scans C and D). In scans B and C the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) parallel imaging technique was employed. Relative dose distributions derived by scan A were benchmarked against Monte Carlo and treatment planning system calculations, and then used as the reference for the comparison of 2D relative dose distributions derived by each scan in terms of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria (γ index tool). Findings suggest that careful MRI planning based on a figure of merit accounting for scanning time and precision for a given increase in spatial resolution, could facilitate the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry into the clinical setting as a practical quality assurance tool for complex radio-surgery techniques.

  5. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-03-01

    With the availability of gamma knife units and the development of modified linear accelerators, there is new interest in radiosurgery, especially as it applies to intracranial tumors. Among its advantages are the ability to precisely localize tumor and through small beam sizes deliver steep dose gradients at the field edges. This sharp dose gradient allows for the prescribed dose of radiation to be given to a tumor while avoiding vital structures only millimeters away. Radiosurgery has produced good results in the treatment of inoperable arteriovenous malformations and can be used as the sole curative therapy for small, radiographically distinct, benign noninvasive tumors. It is also used as salvage therapy in recurrent benign or malignant tumors that have previously been irradiated.

  6. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  7. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  8. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  9. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... percent from the output obtained at the last full calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic... month for cobalt-60 and at intervals consistent with 1 percent physical decay for all...

  10. Integral T-Shaped Phantom-Dosimeter System to Measure Transverse and Longitudinal Dose Distributions Simultaneously for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Jang, Kyoung Won; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2. Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2 were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22778649

  11. P13.22CYBERKNIFE STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY FOR THE RE-IRRADIATION OF BRAIN LESIONS: A SINGLE-CENTRE EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Greto, D.; Bonomo, P.; Detti, B.; Scoccianti, S.; Cipressi, S.; Cassani, S.; Giacomelli, I.; Cappelli, S.; Franceschini, D.; Livi, L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical benefit of cyberknife stereotactic radiosurgery (CSRS) in patients treated at Florence University for recurrent, pre-irradiated brain lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients were retreated with cyberknife. Mean age was 47.1 years (range 33–77 years). Karnofsky Performance Status ranged from 60 to 100 (median 80). Eleven (84.6 %) out of 13 patients had metastatic lesions: four (36.4 %) had primary lung, three (27.2 %) had primary breast cancer and four (36.4 %) other types of solid malignancies. Two (15.4 %) out of 13 patients had recurrent of glioblastoma. RESULTS: In terms of compliance with CSRS, the majority of patients did not develop any acute side effects. However, two (15.4 %) out of 13 patients developed acute grade 2 toxicity requiring an increase of steroid medication. At the time of the last follow-up, response rates were as follows: complete response in one case (16.6 %), partial response in three (50 %) and stable disease in two (33.4 %). CONCLUSIONS: Re-irradiation with CSRS is a feasible and effective option for pre-irradiated, recurrent brain lesions to obtain clinical benefit without excessive acute toxicity.

  12. Initial experience with combined BRAF and MEK inhibition with stereotactic radiosurgery for BRAF mutant melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bindiya G; Ahmed, Kamran A; Johnstone, Peter A S; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael; Etame, Arnold B

    2016-08-01

    The combined use of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib and MEK inhibitor trametinib has been found to improve survival over dabrafenib alone. The management of melanoma brain metastases continues to present challenges. In this study, we report our initial experience in the management of melanoma brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with the use of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. We identified six patients treated with SRS for 17 brain metastases within 3 months of BRAF and MEK inhibitor administration. The median planning target volume was 0.42 cm (range: 0.078-2.08 cm). The median treatment dose was 21 Gy (range 18-24 Gy). The median follow-up of all lesions from SRS was 10.6 months (range 5.8-28.5 months). One lesion was found to undergo local failure 21.7 months following SRS treatment. The median overall survival was 20.0 months (range 6.1-31.8 months) from the time of SRS treatment and 23.1 months (range: 12.1-30.9 months) from the date of BRAFi and MEKi administration. There was no evidence of increased nor unexpected toxicity with the two modalities combined. In this initial experience of melanoma brain metastases treated with BRAF and MEK inhibition with SRS, we find the two modalities can be combined safely. These outcomes should be assessed further in prospective evaluations. PMID:26926151

  13. Dosimetric comparison between two MLC systems commonly used for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy: a Monte Carlo and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, K; Chow, James C L; Heydarian, Mostafa

    2013-06-01

    In this work dosimetric parameters of two multi-leaf collimator (MLC) systems, namely the beam modulator (BM), which is the MLC commercial name for Elekta "Synergy S" linear accelerator and Radionics micro-MLC (MMLC), are compared using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Dosimetric parameters, such as percentage depth doses (PDDs), in-plane and cross-plane dose profiles, and penumbras for different depths and field sizes of the 6 MV photon beams were measured using ionization chamber and a water tank. The collimator leakages were measured using radiographic films. MMLC and BM were modeled using the EGSnrc-based BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code and above dosimetric parameters were calculated. The energy fluence spectra for the two MLCs were also determined using the BEAMnrc and BEAMDP. Dosimetric parameters of the two MLCs were similar, except for penumbras. Leaf-side and leaf-end 80-20% dose penumbras at 10 cm depth for a 10×10 cm(2) field size were 4.8 and 5.1mm for MMLC and 5.3 mm and 6.3 mm for BM, respectively. Both Radionics MMLC and Elekta BM can be used effectively based on their dosimetric characteristics for stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy, although the former showed slightly sharper dose penumbra especially in the leaf-end direction. PMID:22658764

  14. Practical Implementation of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Safety and Efficiency in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Younge, Kelly Cooper; Wang, Yizhen; Thompson, John; Giovinazzo, Julia; Finlay, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety and efficiency of a new stereotactic radiosurgery program with the application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) performed by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. Methods and Materials: Representatives included physicists, therapists, dosimetrists, oncologists, and administrators. A detailed process tree was created from an initial high-level process tree to facilitate the identification of possible failure modes. Group members were asked to determine failure modes that they considered to be the highest risk before scoring failure modes. Risk priority numbers (RPNs) were determined by each group member individually and then averaged. Results: A total of 99 failure modes were identified. The 5 failure modes with an RPN above 150 were further analyzed to attempt to reduce these RPNs. Only 1 of the initial items that the group presumed to be high-risk (magnetic resonance imaging laterality reversed) was ranked in these top 5 items. New process controls were put in place to reduce the severity, occurrence, and detectability scores for all of the top 5 failure modes. Conclusions: FMEA is a valuable team activity that can assist in the creation or restructuring of a quality assurance program with the aim of improved safety, quality, and efficiency. Performing the FMEA helped group members to see how they fit into the bigger picture of the program, and it served to reduce biases and preconceived notions about which elements of the program were the riskiest.

  15. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  16. Changing practice patterns of Gamma Knife versus linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases in the US.

    PubMed

    Park, Henry S; Wang, Elyn H; Rutter, Charles E; Corso, Christopher D; Chiang, Veronica L; Yu, James B

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a crucial component in the management of limited brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Intracranial SRS has traditionally been delivered using a frame-based Gamma Knife (GK) platform, but stereotactic modifications to the linear accelerator (LINAC) have made an alternative approach possible. In the absence of definitive prospective trials comparing the efficacy and toxicities of treatment between the 2 techniques, nonclinical factors (such as technology accessibility, costs, and efficiency) may play a larger role in determining which radiosurgery system a facility may choose to install. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate national patterns of GK SRS versus LINAC SRS use and to determine which factors may be associated with the adoption of these radiosurgery systems. METHODS The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients > 18 years old with NSCLC who were treated with single-fraction SRS to the brain between 2003 and 2011. Patients who received "SRS not otherwise specified" or who did not receive a radiotherapy dose within the range of 12-24 Gy were excluded to reduce the potential for misclassification. The chi-square test, t-test, and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to compare potential demographic, clinicopathologic, and health care system predictors of GK versus LINAC SRS use, when appropriate. RESULTS This study included 1780 patients, among whom 1371 (77.0%) received GK SRS and 409 (23.0%) underwent LINAC SRS. Over time, the proportion of patients undergoing LINAC SRS steadily increased, from 3.2% in 2003 to 30.8% in 2011 (p < 0.001). LINAC SRS was adopted more rapidly by community versus academic facilities (overall 29.2% vs 17.2%, p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, 4 independent predictors of increased LINAC SRS use emerged, including year of diagnosis in 2008-2011 versus 2003-2007 (adjusted OR [AOR] 2.04, 95% CI 1

  17. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, Dante E.; Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L.

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  18. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Hypoglossal Nerve after Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tong; Juric-Sekhar, Gordana; Born, Donald; Sekhar, Laligam N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare. Surgical resection has been the standard treatment modality. Radiosurgery has been increasingly used for treatment. Radiation-associated secondary malignancy/malignant transformation has not been documented in the literature for the treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas. Setting The patient was a 52-year-old man with an enlarging high cervical/skull base lesion 8.5 years after CyberKnife treatment of a presumed vagal schwannoma. A decision was made for surgical resection, and the tumor was found to originate from the hypoglossal nerve intraoperatively. Final pathology diagnosis was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Results Patient had a gross total resection. Three months after resection, he received fractionated radiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions and a boost gamma knife radiosurgery of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose surface. He remained tumor free on repeat magnetic resonance imaging 9 months after the resection. Conclusion Although extremely rare, radiation treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas can potentially cause malignant transformation. PMID:25083387

  19. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  20. Risk of Leptomeningeal Disease in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Targeting the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Atalar, Banu; Modlin, Leslie A.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Nagpal, Seema; Hanlon, Alexandra; Soltys, Scott G.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine the risk of leptomeningeal disease (LMD) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the postsurgical resection cavity of a brain metastasis, deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in all patients. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 175 brain metastasis resection cavities in 165 patients treated from 1998 to 2011 with postoperative SRS. The cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, of LMD, local failure (LF), and distant brain parenchymal failure (DF) were estimated. Variables associated with LMD were evaluated, including LF, DF, posterior fossa location, resection type (en-bloc vs piecemeal or unknown), and histology (lung, colon, breast, melanoma, gynecologic, other). Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-157 months), median overall survival was 17 months. Twenty-one of 165 patients (13%) developed LMD at a median of 5 months (range, 2-33 months) following SRS. The 1-year cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, were 10% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-15%) for developing LF, 54% (95% CI, 46%-61%) for DF, and 11% (95% CI, 7%-17%) for LMD. On univariate analysis, only breast cancer histology (hazard ratio, 2.96) was associated with an increased risk of LMD. The 1-year cumulative incidence of LMD was 24% (95% CI, 9%-41%) for breast cancer compared to 9% (95% CI, 5%-14%) for non-breast histology (P=.004). Conclusions: In patients treated with SRS targeting the postoperative cavity following resection, those with breast cancer histology were at higher risk of LMD. It is unknown whether the inclusion of whole-brain irradiation or novel strategies such as preresection SRS would improve this risk or if the rate of LMD is inherently higher with breast histology.

  1. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  2. Impact on overall survival of the combination of BRAF inhibitors and stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amparo; Zia, Sayyad; Verma, Rashika; Pavlick, Anna; Wilson, Melissa; Golfinos, John G; Silverman, Joshua S; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of BRAF inhibitors on survival outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for melanoma brain metastases. We prospectively collected treatment parameters and outcomes for 80 patients with melanoma brain metastases who underwent SRS. Thirty-five patients harbored the BRAF mutation (BRAF-M) and 45 patients did not (BRAF-WT). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of overall survival. The median overall survival from first SRS procedure was 6.7, 11.2 months if treated with a BRAF inhibitor and 4.5 months for BRAF-WT. Actuarial survival rates for BRAF-M patients on an inhibitor were 54 % at 6 months and 41 % at 12 months from the time of SRS. In contrast, BRAF-WT had overall survival rates of 28 % at 6 months and 19 % at 12 months. Overall survival was extended for patients on a BRAF inhibitor at or after the first SRS. The median time to intracranial progression was 3.9 months on a BRAF inhibitor and 1.7 months without. The local control rate for all treated tumors was 92.5 %, with no difference based on BRAF status. Patients with higher KPS, fewer treated intracranial metastases, controlled systemic disease, RPA Class 1 and BRAF-M patients had extended overall survival. Overall, patients with BRAF-M treated with both SRS and BRAF inhibitors, at or after SRS, have increased overall survival from the time of SRS. As patients live longer as a result of more effective systemic and local therapies, close surveillance and early management of intracranial disease with SRS will become increasingly important. PMID:26852222

  3. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Women With 1 to 3 Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Treated With Definitive Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Folkert, Michael R.; Gupta, Gaorav; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Morikawa, Aki; Seidman, Andrew; Brennan, Cameron; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-11-01

    Background: With the continuing increase in the use of definitive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with limited brain metastases (BM), clinicians need more specific prognostic tools. We investigated clinical predictors of outcomes in patients with limited breast cancer BM treated with SRS alone. Methods and Materials: We identified 136 patients with breast cancer and 1-3 BM who underwent definitive SRS for 186 BM between 2000 and 2012. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess overall survival (OS), regional failure (RF), and local failure (LF). Associations between clinical factors and outcomes were tested using Cox regression. A point scoring system was used to stratify patients based on OS, and the predictive power was tested with concordance probability estimate (CPE). Results: The median OS was 17.6 months. The 12-month RF and LF rates were 45% and 10%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, >1 lesion (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, P=.02), triple-negative (TN) disease (HR=2.0, P=.006), and active extracranial disease (ED) (HR=2.7, P<.0001) were significantly associated with worse OS. The point score system was defined using proportional simplification of the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression function. The median OS for patients with 3.0-4.0 points (n=37), 4.5-5.5 points (n=28), 6.0-6.5 points (n=37), and 8-8.5 points (n=34) were 9.2, 15.6, 25.1, and 45.1 months, respectively (P<.0001, CPE = 0.72). Active ED (HR=2.4, P=.0007) was significantly associated with RF. Higher risk for LF was significantly associated with larger BM size (HR=3.1, P=.0001). Conclusion: Patients with >1 BM, active ED, and TN had the highest risk of death after SRS. Active ED is an important prognostic factor for OS and intracranial control.

  4. Osseous Pseudoprogression in Vertebral Bodies Treated with Stereotactic Radiosurgery: A Secondary Analysis of Prospective Phase I/II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Behrang; Beaman, Charles B.; Madewell, John E.; Allen, Pamela K.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Li, Jing; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Osseous pseudoprogression (OPP) on MRI can mimic true progression in lesions treated with spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS). Our aim is to describe the prevalence and time course of OPP, in order to assist radiologists in assessment of post-SSRS patients. Materials and Methods A secondary analysis of two prospective trials was performed. MRIs before and after SSRS were assessed for response. OPP was defined as transient growth in signal abnormality centered at the lesion with a sustained decline on follow-up MRI that was not attributable to chemotherapy. Results From the initial set of 223 patients, 37 lesions in 36 patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for secondary analysis. Five of the 37 lesions (14%) demonstrated OPP and 9 demonstrated progressive disease. There was significant association between single-fraction therapy and the development of OPP (p=0.01), and there was a significant difference in OPP-free survival between single- and multi-fraction regimens (p=0.0052). In lesions demonstrating OPP, time to peak size occurred between 9.7 and 24.4 weeks after SSRS (mean: 13.9 weeks, 95% CI: 8.6–19.1 weeks). The peak lesion size was between 4–10 mm larger than baseline. Most lesions returned to baseline size between 23–52.4 weeks following SSRS. Conclusions Progression on MRI obtained between 3 and 6 months following SSRS should be treated with caution, as OPP may be seen in > 1/3 of these lesions. Single-fraction SSRS may be associated with OPP. The possibility of OPP should be incorporated into prospective criteria for assessment of local control following SSRS. PMID:26494690

  5. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of intramedullary spinal cord neoplasms: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Durán, Silvia; Hanft, Simon; Komotar, Ricardo J; Manzano, Glen R

    2016-04-01

    Advances in imaging technology and microsurgical techniques have made microsurgical resection the treatment of choice in cases of symptomatic intramedullary tumors. The use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for spinal tumors is a recent development, and its application to intramedullary lesions is debated. We conducted a literature search through PubMed's MeSH system, compiling information regarding intramedullary neoplasms treated by SRS. We compiled histology, tumor location and size, treatment modality, radiation dose, fractionation, radiation-induced complications, follow-up, and survival. Ten papers reporting on 52 patients with 70 tumors were identified. Metastatic lesions accounted for 33 %, while 67 % were primary ones. Tumor location was predominantly cervical (53 %), followed by thoracic (33 %). Mean volume was 0.55 cm(3) (95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.26-0.83). Preferred treatment modality was CyberKnife® (87 %), followed by Novalis® (7 %) and linear particle accelerator (LINAC) (6 %). Mean radiation dose was 22.14 Gy (95 % CI, 20.75-23.53), with mean fractionation of 4 (95 % CI, 3-5). Three hemangioblastomas showed cyst enlargement. Symptom improvement or stabilization was seen in all but two cases. Radionecrotic spots adjacent to treated areas were seen at autopsy in four lesions, without clinical manifestations. Overall, clinical and radiological outcomes were favorable. Although surgery remains the treatment of choice for symptomatic intramedullary lesions, SRS can be a safe and effective option in selected cases. While this review suggests the overall safety and efficacy of SRS in the management of intramedullary tumors, future studies need randomized, homogeneous patient populations followed over a longer period to provide more robust evidence in its favor. PMID:26219855

  6. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  7. Assessment of targeting accuracy of a low-energy stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Chell, Erik; Hansen, Steven; Gertner, Michael; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, is a neovascular disease that may be controlled with radiation therapy. Early patient outcomes of external beam radiotherapy, however, have been mixed. Recently, a novel multimodality treatment was developed, comprising external beam radiotherapy and concomitant treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. The radiotherapy arm is performed by stereotactic radiosurgery, delivering a 16 Gy dose in the macula (clinical target volume, CTV) using three external low-energy x-ray fields while adequately sparing normal tissues. The purpose of our study was to test the sensitivity of the delivery of the prescribed dose in the CTV using this technique and of the adequate sparing of normal tissues to all plausible variations in the position and gaze angle of the eye. Using Monte Carlo simulations of a 16 Gy treatment, we varied the gaze angle by ±5° in the polar and azimuthal directions, the linear displacement of the eye ±1 mm in all orthogonal directions, and observed the union of the three fields on the posterior wall of spheres concentric with the eye that had diameters between 20 and 28 mm. In all cases, the dose in the CTV fluctuated <6%, the maximum dose in the sclera was <20 Gy, the dose in the optic disc, optic nerve, lens and cornea were <0.7 Gy and the three-field junction was adequately preserved. The results of this study provide strong evidence that for plausible variations in the position of the eye during treatment, either by the setup error or intrafraction motion, the prescribed dose will be delivered to the CTV and the dose in structures at risk will be kept far below tolerance doses.

  8. Single-Isocenter Frameless Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Simultaneous Treatment of Multiple Brain Metastases: Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Sameer K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Simpson, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To describe our clinical experience using a unique single-isocenter technique for frameless intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IM-SRS) to treat multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with a median of 5 metastases (range, 2-13) underwent optically guided frameless IM-SRS using a single, centrally located isocenter. Median prescription dose was 18 Gy (range, 14-25). Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical examination occurred every 2-4 months. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 3.3 months (range, 0.2-21.3), with 20 of 26 patients (77%) followed up until their death. For the remaining 6 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 14.6 months (range, 9.3-18.0). Total treatment time ranged from 9.0 to 38.9 minutes (median, 21.0). Actuarial 6- and 12-month overall survivals were 50% (95% confidence interval [C.I.], 31-70%) and 38% (95% C.I., 19-56%), respectively. Actuarial 6- and 12-month local control (LC) rates were 97% (95% C.I., 93-100%) and 83% (95% C.I., 71-96%), respectively. Tumors {<=}1.5 cm had a better 6-month LC than those >1.5 cm (98% vs. 90%, p = 0.008). New intracranial metastatic disease occurring outside of the treatment volume was observed in 7 patients. Grade {>=}3 toxicity occurred in 2 patients (8%). Conclusion: Frameless IM-SRS using a single-isocenter approach for treating multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes that compare favorably with those of conventional SRS in a much shorter treatment time (<40 minutes). Given its faster treatment time, this technique is appealing to both patients and personnel in busy clinics.

  9. MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry for validating plans with multiple matrices in Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gopishankar, N; Watanabe, Yoichi; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan

    2011-01-01

    One of treatment planning techniques with Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) uses multiple matrices with multiple dose prescriptions. Computational complexity increases when shots are placed in multiple matrices with different grid sizes. Hence, the experimental validation of LGP calculated dose distributions is needed for those cases. For the current study, we used BANG3 polymer gel contained in a head-sized glass bottle to simulate the entire treatment process of GKSRS. A treatment plan with three 18 mm shots and one 8 mm shot in separate matrices was created with LGP. The prescribed maximum dose was 8 Gy to three shots and 16 Gy to one of the 18 mm shots. The 3D dose distribution recorded in the gel dosimeter was read using a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The scanning parameters of a CPMG pulse sequence with 32 equidistant echoes were as follows: TR = 7 s, echo step = 13.6 ms, field-of-view = 256 mm × 256 mm, and pixel size = 1 mm × 1 mm. Interleaved acquisition mode was used to obtain 15 to 45 2-mm-thick slices. Using a calibration relationship between absorbed dose and the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), we converted R2 images to dose images. MATLAB-based in-house programs were used for R2 estimation and dose comparison. Gamma-index analysis for the 3D data showed gamma values less than unity for 86% of the voxels. Through this study we accomplished the first application of polymer gel dosimetry for a true comparison between measured 3D dose distributions and LGP calculations for plans using multiple matrices for multiple targets. PMID:21587176

  10. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Brain Metastases After Prior Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Jorge A.; Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Ma, Lijun; Denduluri, Sandeep; Nakamura, Jean L.; Barani, Igor J.; McDermott, Michael W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors for survival after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for new, progressive, or recurrent brain metastases (BM) after prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients treated between 1991 and 2007 with Gamma Knife SRS for BM after prior WBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Potential prognostic factors were analyzed overall and by primary site using univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses and recursive partitioning analysis, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), primary tumor control, extracranial metastases, number of BM treated, total SRS target volume, and interval from WBRT to SRS. Results: A total of 310 patients were analyzed, including 90 breast, 113 non-small-cell lung, 31 small-cell lung, 42 melanoma, and 34 miscellaneous patients. The median age was 56, KPS 80, number of BM treated 3, and interval from WBRT to SRS 8.1 months; 76% had controlled primary tumor and 60% had extracranial metastases. The median survival was 8.4 months overall and 12.0 vs. 7.9 months for single vs. multiple BM treated (p = 0.001). There was no relationship between number of BM and survival after excluding single-BM patients. On multivariate analysis, favorable prognostic factors included age <50, smaller total target volume, and longer interval from WBRT to SRS in breast cancer patients; smaller number of BM, KPS >60, and controlled primary in non-small-cell lung cancer patients; and smaller total target volume in melanoma patients. Conclusions: Among patients treated with salvage SRS for BM after prior WBRT, prognostic factors appeared to vary by primary site. Although survival time was significantly longer for patients with a single BM, the median survival time of 7.9 months for patients with multiple BM seems sufficiently long for salvage SRS to appear to be worthwhile, and no evidence was found to support the use of a cutoff for number of BM appropriate for salvage SRS.

  11. Kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery for age-related macular degeneration: assessment of optic nerve dose and patient effective dose.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Justin; Lee, Choonsik; Chell, Erik; Gertner, Michael; Hansen, Steven; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E

    2009-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause for vision loss for people over the age of 65 in the United States and a major health problem worldwide. Research for new treatments of the wet form of the disease using kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery is currently underway at Oraya Therapeutics, Inc. In the present study, the authors extend their previous computational stylized model of a single treated eye [Med. Phys. 35, 5151-5160 (2008)] to include full NURBS-based reference head phantoms of the adult male and female using anatomical data from ICRP Publication 89. The treatment was subsequently modeled in MCNPX 2.5 using a 1 x 1 x 1 mm3 voxelized version of the NURBS models. These models incorporated several organs of interest including the brain, thyroid, salivary glands, cranium, mandible, and cervical vertebrae. A higher resolution eye section at 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm3 voxel resolution was extracted from the head phantoms to model smaller eye structures including the macula target, cornea, lens, vitreous humor, sclera/retina layer, and optic nerve. Due to lack of literature data on optic nerve pathways, a CT imaging study was undertaken to quantify the anatomical position of the optic nerve. The average absorbed doses to the organs of interest were below generally accepted thresholds for radiation safety. The estimated effective dose was 0.28 mSv which is comparable to diagnostic procedures such as a head radiograph and a factor of 10 lower than a head CT scan. PMID:19746800

  12. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  13. Three-dimensional dose verification of the clinical application of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Kozicki, M.; Rosiak, J. M.; Sakelliou, L.; Sandilos, P.; Seimenis, I.; Torrens, M.

    2005-05-01

    This work seeks to verify multi-shot clinical applications of stereotactic radiosurgery with a Leksell Gamma Knife model C unit employing a polymer gel-MRI based experimental procedure, which has already been shown to be capable of verifying the precision and accuracy of dose delivery in single-shot gamma knife applications. The treatment plan studied in the present work resembles a clinical treatment case of pituitary adenoma using four 8 mm and one 14 mm collimator helmet shots to deliver a prescription dose of 15 Gy to the 50% isodose line (30 Gy maximum dose). For the experimental dose verification of the treatment plan, the same criteria as those used in the clinical treatment planning evaluation were employed. These included comparison of measured and GammaPlan calculated data, in terms of percentage isodose contours on axial, coronal and sagittal planes, as well as 3D plan evaluation criteria such as dose-volume histograms for the target volume, target coverage and conformity indices. Measured percentage isodose contours compared favourably with calculated ones despite individual point fluctuations at low dose contours (e.g., 20%) mainly due to the effect of T2 measurement uncertainty on dose resolution. Dose-volume histogram data were also found in a good agreement while the experimental results for the percentage target coverage and conformity index were 94% and 1.17 relative to corresponding GammaPlan calculations of 96% and 1.12, respectively. Overall, polymer gel results verified the planned dose distribution within experimental uncertainties and uncertainty related to the digitization process of selected GammaPlan output data.

  14. Clinical results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. Since then, over 800 patients have received stereotactically-directed plateau-beam heavy-charged particle pituitary irradiation at this institution. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of these treatments. 11 refs.

  15. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy system, and a Gamma Knife unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose.

  16. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments1

    PubMed Central

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife® system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy® system, and a Gamma Knife® unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose. PMID:20831066

  17. Planning and delivery comparison of six linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Varun Singh

    This work presents planning and delivery comparison of linac-based SRS treatment techniques currently available for single lesion cranial SRS. In total, two dedicated SRS systems (Novalis Tx, Cyberknife) and a HI-ART TomoTherapy system with six different delivery techniques are evaluated. Four delivery techniques are evaluated on a Novalis Tx system: circular cones, dynamic conformal arcs (DCA), static non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (NCP-IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) techniques are compared with intensity modulation based helical Tomotherapy on the HI-ART Tomotherapy system and with non-isocentric, multiple overlapping based robotic radiosurgery using the CyberKnife system. Thirteen patients are retrospectively selected for the study. The target volumes of each patient are transferred to a CT scan of a Lucy phantom (Standard Imaging Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) designed for end-to-end SRS QA. In order to evaluate the plans, several indices scoring the conformality, homogeneity and gradients in the plan are calculated and compared for each of the plans. Finally, to check the clinical deliverability of the plans and the delivery accuracy of different systems, a few targets are delivered on each system. A comparison between planned dose on treatment planning system and dose delivered on Gafchromic EBT film (ISP, Wayne, New Jersey, USA) is carried out by comparing dose beam profiles, isodose lines and by calculating gamma index.

  18. Dose Verification of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia with Presage 3D Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Thomas, A.; Newton, J.; Ibbott, G.; Deasy, J.; Oldham, M.

    2010-11-01

    Achieving adequate verification and quality-assurance (QA) for radiosurgery treatment of trigeminal-neuralgia (TGN) is particularly challenging because of the combination of very small fields, very high doses, and complex irradiation geometries (multiple gantry and couch combinations). TGN treatments have extreme requirements for dosimetry tools and QA techniques, to ensure adequate verification. In this work we evaluate the potential of Presage/Optical-CT dosimetry system as a tool for the verification of TGN distributions in high-resolution and in 3D. A TGN treatment was planned and delivered to a Presage 3D dosimeter positioned inside the Radiological-Physics-Center (RPC) head and neck IMRT credentialing phantom. A 6-arc treatment plan was created using the iPlan system, and a maximum dose of 80Gy was delivered with a Varian Trilogy machine. The delivered dose to Presage was determined by optical-CT scanning using the Duke Large field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner (DLOS) in 3D, with isotropic resolution of 0.7mm3. DLOS scanning and reconstruction took about 20minutes. 3D dose comparisons were made with the planning system. Good agreement was observed between the planned and measured 3D dose distributions, and this work provides strong support for the viability of Presage/Optical-CT as a highly useful new approach for verification of this complex technique.

  19. What predicts early volumetric edema increase following stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Hanna, Andrew; Boggs, D Hunter; Kwok, Young; Simard, Marc; Regine, William F; Mehta, Minesh

    2016-04-01

    A volumetric analysis of pre- and post-radiosurgery (PreSRS and PostSRS) edema in patients with cerebral metastases was performed to determine factors of a predictive model assessing the risk of developing increased edema relatively early after SRS. One-hundred-fourteen metastases in 55 patients were analyzed. Selection for this analysis required an MRI ≤ 30 days before SRS and an MRI ≤ 100 days after SRS. Tumor volumes were calculated on PreSRS, SRS, and PostSRS T1-weighted postgadolinium images while edema volumes were calculating using PreSRS and PostSRS fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR images. An increase in edema was defined as an increase in measurable edema of at least 5%. We developed and evaluated a model predicting the relative risk (RR) of increased edema after SRS. Peritumoral edema increased in 18% (21/114) of the analyzed lesions. Melanoma/renal histology, recursive partitioning analysis class III, and prior WBRT carried RRs of developing postSRS edema increase of 2.45, 2.48, and 3.16, respectively (all P values <0.05). The PreSRS edema/tumor ratio predicted for a RR of 1.007/ratio unit, and steroid dose at time of SRS predicted for a RR of 0.89/mg (all P values <0.05). A predictive model for assessing the RR of increased edema after SRS was developed based from these data and may be useful in identifying patients who might benefit from prophylactic anti-edema therapies before, during, or after SRS. This model could be used as the basis of inclusion criteria for prospective trials investigating novel anti-edema therapies. PMID:26721241

  20. OP09STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY FOR BRAIN METASTASES AT THE CHRISTIE AT SALFORD ROYAL HOSPITAL: OUR TWO-YEAR EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Helbrow, J.; McBain, C.; Gattamaneni, R.; Tran, A.; McCarthy, C.; Edwards, R.; Redikin, J.; Handley, J.; O'Hara, C.; Kennedy, J.; Mills, S.; Soh, C.; Leggate, J.; Whitfield, G.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases (BMs) commenced at The Christie at Salford in Dec 11 using the Novalis TxTM and BrainLab ExacTrac® system. We report our first 2 years' data. METHOD: Patients meeting NHS commissioning criteria were referred via MDT for assessment and if suitable consent. We used the BrainLab mask, CT and MRI. Gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were grown by 2mm if <4cm3 and by 1mm if >4cm3 to a planning target volume. The dose to the 80% isodose was 21Gy/1 fraction(#), 18Gy/1# and 25.5Gy/3# alternate days for PTVs <7cm3, 7-13cm3 and >13cm3 respectively and 30Gy/5# on alternate days to the 90% isodose in critical locations or where organ at risk constraints were exceeded. Follow up was 3-monthly with MRI and clinic review. Radiological response was classified as complete, unequivocal, enlargement consistent with treatment, enlargement suspicious of progression or unequivocal progression. RESULTS: Between Dec 11-Jan 14, 89 patients were consented, 51% female. Median age was 61 years (range 16-81). Primaries included lung (34%), breast (22%) and melanoma (15%), which was controlled in 67%; 42% had no extracranial metastases. A total of 170 BMs were treated (1 a retreat); per course a median of 2 (1-5) BMs were treated with median total GTV 4.87cm3 (0.05-29.9cm3). Prescribed dose was 21Gy/1# in 101 BMs, 18Gy/1# in 43, 25.5Gy/3# in 10 and 30Gy/5# in 16. One year survival from first SRS was: overall 48% (95% CI 34%-60%), lung 39% (18%-59%), breast 89% (62%-97%) and melanoma 44% (10%-75%). CONCLUSION: Overall survival results are encouraging and suggest appropriate patient selection. More detailed analysis including toxicity and time to intracranial progression will be presented.

  1. SU-D-BRB-04: Plan Quality Comparison of Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) for Gamma Knife and VMAT Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, V; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Hossain, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare treatment plan quality of intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for VMAT (RapidArc) and Gamma Knife (GK) systems. Methods: Ten patients with 24 tumors (seven with 1–2 and three with 4–6 lesions), previously treated with GK 4C (prescription doses ranging from 14–23 Gy) were re-planned for RapidArc. Identical contour sets were kept on MRI images for both plans with tissues assigned a CT number of zero. RapidArc plans were performed using 6 MV flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams with dose rate of 1400 MU/minute using two to eight arcs with the following combinations: 2 full coplanar arcs and the rest non-coplanar half arcs. Beam selection was based on target depth. Areas that penetrated more than 10 cm of tissue were avoided by creating smaller arcs or using avoidance sectors in optimization. Plans were optimized with jaw tracking and a high weighting to the normal-brain-tissue and Normal-Tissue-Objective without compromising PTV coverage. Plans were calculated on a 1 mm grid size using AAA algorithm and then normalized so that 99% of each target volume received the prescription dose. Plan quality was assessed by target coverage using Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), sparing of normal-brain-tissue through analysis of V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose. Results: In all cases critical structure dose criteria were met. RapidArc had a higher PCI than GK plans for 23 out of 24 lesions. The average PCI was 0.76±0.21 for RapidArc and 0.46±0.20 for GK plans (p≤0.001), respectively. Integral dose and normal-brain-tissue doses for all criteria were lower for RapidArc in nearly all patients. The average ratio of GK to RapidArc plans was 1.28±0.27 (p=0.018), 1.31±0.25 (p=0.017), 1.81±0.43 (p=0.005), and 1.50±0.61 (p=0.006) for V4, V8, and V12 Gy, and integral dose, respectively. Conclusion: VMAT was capable of producing higher quality treatment plans than GK when using optimal beam geometries and proper optimization techniques.

  2. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Folkert, Michael R.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Oh, Jung Hun; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Laufer, Ilya; Tap, William D.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  3. TH-A-9A-05: Initial Setup Accuracy Comparison Between Frame-Based and Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, T; Sheu, R; Todorov, B; Green, S; Blacksburg, S; Lo, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial setup accuracy for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between Brainlab frame-based and frameless immobilization system, also to discern the magnitude frameless system has on setup parameters. Methods: The correction shifts from the original setup were compared for total 157 SRS cranial treatments (69 frame-based vs. 88 frameless). All treatments were performed on a Novalis linac with ExacTrac positioning system. Localization box with isocenter overlay was used for initial setup and correction shift was determined by ExacTrac 6D auto-fusion to achieve submillimeter accuracy for treatment. For frameless treatments, mean time interval between simulation and treatment was 5.7 days (range 0–13). Pearson Chi-Square was used for univariate analysis. Results: The correctional radial shifts (mean±STD, median) for the frame and frameless system measured by ExacTrac were 1.2±1.2mm, 1.1mm and 3.1±3.3mm, 2.0mm, respectively. Treatments with frameless system had a radial shift >2mm more often than those with frames (51.1% vs. 2.9%; p<.0001). To achieve submillimeter accuracy, 85.5% frame-based treatments did not require shift and only 23.9% frameless treatment could succeed with initial setup. There was no statistical significant system offset observed in any direction for either system. For frameless treatments, those treated ≥ 3 days from simulation had statistically higher rates of radial shifts between 1–2mm and >2mm compared to patients treated in a shorter amount of time from simulation (34.3% and 56.7% vs. 28.6% and 33.3%, respectively; p=0.006). Conclusion: Although image-guided positioning system can also achieve submillimeter accuracy for frameless system, users should be cautious regarding the inherent uncertainty of its capability of immobilization. A proper quality assurance procedure for frameless mask manufacturing and a protocol for intra-fraction imaging verification will be crucial for frameless system. Time interval between

  4. A novel phantom and procedure providing submillimeter accuracy in daily QA tests of accelerators used for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Brezovich, Ivan A; Popple, Richard A; Duan, Jun; Shen, Sui; Wu, Xingen; Benhabib, Sidi; Huang, Mi; Cardan, Rex A

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) places great demands on spatial accuracy. Steel BBs used as markers in quality assurance (QA) phantoms are clearly visible in MV and planar kV images, but artifacts compromise cone-beam CT (CBCT) isocenter localization. The purpose of this work was to develop a QA phantom for measuring with sub-mm accuracy isocenter congruence of planar kV, MV, and CBCT imaging systems and to design a practical QA procedure that includes daily Winston-Lutz (WL) tests and does not require computer aid. The salient feature of the phantom (Universal Alignment Ball (UAB)) is a novel marker for precisely localizing isocenters of CBCT, planar kV, and MV beams. It consists of a 25.4mm diameter sphere of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) containing a concentric 6.35mm diameter tungsten carbide ball. The large density difference between PMMA and the polystyrene foam in which the PMMA sphere is embedded yields a sharp image of the sphere for accurate CBCT registration. The tungsten carbide ball serves in finding isocenter in planar kV and MV images and in doing WL tests. With the aid of the UAB, CBCT isocenter was located within 0.10 ± 0.05 mm of its true positon, and MV isocenter was pinpointed in planar images to within 0.06 ± 0.04mm. In clinical morning QA tests extending over an 18 months period the UAB consistently yielded measurements with sub-mm accuracy. The average distance between isocenter defined by orthogonal kV images and CBCT measured 0.16 ± 0.12 mm. In WL tests the central ray of anterior beams defined by a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 MLC field agreed with CBCT isocenter within 0.03 ± 0.14 mm in the lateral direction and within 0.10 ± 0.19 mm in the longitudinal direction. Lateral MV beams approached CBCT isocenter within 0.00 ± 0.11 mm in the vertical direction and within -0.14 ± 0.15 mm longitudinally. It took therapists about 10 min to do the tests. The novel QA phantom allows pinpointing CBCT and MV isocenter positions to better than 0.2 mm, using

  5. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  6. TH-A-9A-08: Knowledge-Based Quality Control of Clinical Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, S; Moore, K L; Tan, J; Olsen, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a quality control tool to reduce stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning variability using models that predict achievable plan quality metrics (QMs) based on individual patient anatomy. Methods: Using a knowledge-based methodology that quantitatively correlates anatomical geometric features to resultant organ-at-risk (OAR) dosimetry, we developed models for predicting achievable OAR dose-volume histograms (DVHs) by training with a cohort of previously treated SRS patients. The DVH-based QMs used in this work are the gradient measure, GM=(3/4pi)^1/3*[V50%^1/3−V100%^1/3], and V10Gy of normal brain. As GM quantifies the total rate of dose fall-off around the planning target volume (PTV), all voxels inside the patient's body contour were treated as OAR for DVH prediction. 35 previously treated SRS plans from our institution were collected; all were planned with non-coplanar volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 12–25 Gy. Of the 35-patient cohort, 15 were used for model training and 20 for model validation. Accuracies of the predictions were quantified by the mean and the standard deviation of the difference between clinical and predicted QMs, δQM=QM-clin−QM-pred. Results: Best agreement between predicted and clinical QMs was obtained when models were built separately for V-PTV<2.5cc and V-PTV>2.5cc. Eight patients trained the V-PTV<2.5cc model and seven patients trained the V-PTV>2.5cc models, respectively. The mean and the standard deviation of δGM were 0.3±0.4mm for the training sets and −0.1±0.6mm for the validation sets, demonstrating highly accurate GM predictions. V10Gy predictions were also highly accurate, with δV10Gy=0.8±0.7cc for the training sets and δV10Gy=0.7±1.4cc for the validation sets. Conclusion: The accuracy of the models in predicting two key SRS quality metrics highlights the potential of this technique for quality control for SRS treatments. Future investigations will seek to determine

  7. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  8. Radiographic and Histopathologic Observations After Combined EGFR Inhibition and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, Amanda L.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; McCammon, Robert; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kleinschmidt-De Masters, B.K.; Stuhr, Kelly; Chen Changhu

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiographic and histopathologic changes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas were treated on a prospective Phase I trial combining SRS and gefitinib. The SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy in three fractions. The planning target volume was the T{sub 1}-weighted contrast-enhancing (T{sub 1}C) lesion plus 2 mm. Gefitinib was given at 250 mg daily. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed to characterize the volumetric changes in the T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} abnormalities after treatment. Two patients underwent resection for suspected recurrence. Results: The median pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} volume was 40.9 and 184.1 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The median post-SRS percentage of increases in the T{sub 1}C volume at 1, 2-4, and 5-7 months was 8.9%, 41.3%, and 99.6%, respectively. The median percentage increase in the T{sub 2} volume likewise showed a trend upward after SRS, from 18.0% at 1 month to 37.8% at 5-7 months. For the 2 patients who underwent resection after SRS for an increasing T{sub 1}C volume, the histopathologic analysis revealed therapy-induced vascular injury and necrosis. One patient with an asymptomatic increase in the T{sub 1}C volume after SRS was treated conservatively. After a peak T{sub 1}C volume increase at 9 months, the T{sub 1}C volume had declined to 50% of the maximal volume at 15 months. The patients with the most dramatic increase in T{sub 1}C volume experienced the longest overall survival. Conclusion: Patients experienced a notable increase in magnetic resonance imaging T{sub 1}C and T{sub 2} volumes after the combination of SRS and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition. The tissue changes were consistent with a potent treatment effect.

  9. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Melanoma Brain Metastases in Patients Receiving Ipilimumab: Safety Profile and Efficacy of Combined Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kiess, Ana P.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.; Tabar, Viviane; Huse, Jason T.; Chan, Timothy A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab (Ipi), a monoclonal antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. In this single-institution study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with melanoma brain metastases (BMs) who also received Ipi. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, 46 patients with melanoma received Ipi and underwent single-fraction SRS for BMs. A total of 113 BMs (91% intact, 9% postoperative) were treated with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Ipi was given at 3 mg/kg (54%) or 10 mg/kg (46%) for a median of 4 doses (range, 1-21). Adverse events were recorded with the use of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate survival, and Cox regression was used to investigate associations. Results: Fifteen patients received SRS during Ipi, 19 received SRS before Ipi, and 12 received SRS after Ipi. Overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with the timing of SRS/Ipi (P=.035) and melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment (P=.013). Patients treated with SRS during or before Ipi had better OS and less regional recurrence than did those treated with SRS after Ipi (1-year OS 65% vs 56% vs 40%, P=.008; 1-year regional recurrence 69% vs 64% vs 92%, P=.003). SRS during Ipi also yielded a trend toward less local recurrence than did SRS before or after Ipi (1-year local recurrence 0% vs 13% vs 11%, P=.21). On magnetic resonance imaging, an increase in BM diameter to >150% was seen in 50% of patients treated during or before Ipi but in only 13% of patients treated after Ipi. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were seen in 20% of patients. Conclusion: Overall, the combination of Ipi and SRS appears to be well tolerated. Concurrent delivery of Ipi and SRS is associated with favorable locoregional control and possibly longer survival. It may also cause a temporary increase in tumor size, possibly

  10. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiosurgery in oligometastatic breast and gynecological cancers: feasibility and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Torre, Gabriella; Corrado, Giacomo; Legge, Francesco; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mignogna, Samantha; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the preliminary results of the first stereotactic body radiosurgery (SRS) experience with volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in oligometastatic breast and recurrent gynecological tumors (OBRGT) are reported in terms of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. Patients were treated in a head-first supine treatment position on a customized body frame immobilization shell. SRS-VMAT treatment plans were optimized using the ERGO++ treatment planning system. Response assessment was performed 8-12 weeks after treatment by morphologic imaging modalities, or if feasible, also by functional imaging. Thirty-six lesions in 24 consecutive patients (median age, 63 years; range, 40-81) were treated: 13.9% had primary or metastatic lung lesions, 30.5% had liver metastases, 36.1% had bone lesions, 16.7% had lymph node metastases and 2.8% had a primary vulvar melanoma. The median dose was 18 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=50.4 Gy), the minimal dose was 12 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=26.4 Gy) and the maximal dose was 28 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=106.4 Gy). Seven patients (29.2%) experienced acute toxicity, which however was grade 2 in only 1 case. Moreover, only 3 patients (12.5%) developed late toxicity of which only 1 was grade 2. Objective response rate was 77.7% including 16 lesions achieving complete response (44.4%) and 12 lesions achieving partial response (33.3%). The median duration of follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 6-50). Recurrence/progression within the SRS-VMAT treated field was observed in 6 patients (total lesions=7) with a 2-year inside SRS-VMAT field disease control expressed on a per lesion basis of 69%. Recurrence/progression of disease outside the SRS-VMAT field was documented in 15 patients; the 2-year outside SRS-VMAT field metastasis‑free survival, expressed on a per patient basis, was 35%. Death due to disease was documented in 6 patients and the 2-year overall survival was 58%. Although the maximum tolerated dose was

  11. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  12. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Badiyan, Shahed N.; DeWees, Todd; Simpson, Joseph R.; Huang, Jiayi; Drzymala, Robert E.; Barani, Igor J.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Kim, Albert H.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  13. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas : Mechanism of Hearing Loss and How to Preserve Hearing.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) expanded to include the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in 1969; since then, efforts to increase tumour control and to reduce cranial neuropathy have continued. Using the currently recommended marginal dose of 12-13 Gy, long-term reported outcomes after SRS include not only excellent tumour control rates of 92-100 % but also outstanding functional preservation of the trigeminal and facial nerves, with values of 92-100 % and 94-100 %, respectively. Nonetheless, hearing preservation remains in the range of 32-81 %. Previous studies have suggested possible prognostic factors of hearing preservation such as the Gardner-Robertson grade, radiation dose to the cochlea, transient volume expansion (TVE) after SRS, length of irradiated cochlear nerve, marginal dose to the tumour, and age. However, we still do not clearly understand why patients lose their hearing after SRS for VS.Relevant to these considerations, one study recently reported that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave V latency and waves I and V interval (IL_I-V) correlated well with intracanalicular pressure values and even with hearing level. The demonstration that ABR values, especially wave V latency and IL_I-V, correlate well with intracanalicular pressure suggests that patients with previously elevated intracanalicular pressure might have an increased chance of hearing loss on development of TVE, which has been recognised as a common phenomenon after SRS or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for intracranial schwannomas.In our experience, the ABR IL_I-V increased during the first 12 months after SRS for VSs in patients who lost their serviceable hearing. The effect of increased ABR IL_I-V on hearing outcome also became significant over time, especially at 12 months after SRS, and was more prominent in patients with poor initial pure-tone average (PTA) and/or ABR values. We hypothesise that patients with considerable intracanalicular pressure at the

  14. Clinical experience with two frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) systems using optical surface imaging for motion monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Ballangrud, Ase; Chan, Maria; Ma, Ruimei; Beal, Kathryn; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy; Lee, James; Parhar, Preeti; Mechalakos, James; Hunt, Margie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two clinical immobilization systems for intracranial frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) under the same clinical procedure using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for setup and video-based optical surface imaging (OSI) for initial head alignment and intrafractional motion monitoring. A previously established fSRS procedure was applied using two intracranial immobilization systems: PinPoint system (head mold and mouthpiece) and Freedom system (head mold and open face mask). The CBCT was used for patient setup with four degrees of freedom (4DOF), while OSI was used for 6DOF alignment prior to CBCT, post-CBCT setup verification at all treatment couch angles (zero and nonzero), and intrafractional motion monitoring. Quantitative comparison of the two systems includes residual head rotation, head restriction capacity, and patient setup time in 25 patients (29 lesions) using PinPoint and 8 patients (29 fractions) using Freedom. The maximum possible motion was assessed in nine volunteers with deliberate, forced movement in Freedom system. A consensus-based comparison of patient comfort level and clinical ease of use is reported. Using OSI-guided corrections, the maximum residual rotations in all directions were 1.1° ± 0.5° for PinPoint and 0.6° ± 0.3° for Freedom. The time spent performing rotation corrections was 5.0 ± 4.1 min by moving the patient with PinPoint and 2.7 ± 1.0 min by adjusting Freedom couch extension. After CBCT, the OSI–CBCT discrepancy due to different anatomic landmarks for alignment was 2.4 ± 1.3 mm using PinPoint and 1.5 ± 0.7 mm using Freedom. Similar results were obtained for setup verification at couch angles (< 1.5 mm) and for motion restriction: 0.4± 0.3 mm/0.2° ± 0.2° in PinPoint and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm/0.3° ± 0.1° in Freedom. The maximum range of forced head motion was 2.2 ± 1.0 mm using Freedom. Both intracranial fSRS immobilization systems can restrict head motion within 1.5 mm

  15. Dose-Response Modeling of the Visual Pathway Tolerance to Single-Fraction and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hiniker, Susan M; Modlin, Leslie A; Choi, Clara Y; Atalar, Banu; Seiger, Kira; Binkley, Michael S; Harris, Jeremy P; Liao, Yaping Joyce; Fischbein, Nancy; Wang, Lei; Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Gibbs, Iris C; Hancock, Steven L; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R; Soltys, Scott G

    2016-04-01

    Patients with tumors adjacent to the optic nerves and chiasm are frequently not candidates for single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) due to concern for radiation-induced optic neuropathy. However, these patients have been successfully treated with hypofractionated SRS over 2-5 days, though dose constraints have not yet been well defined. We reviewed the literature on optic tolerance to radiation and constructed a dose-response model for visual pathway tolerance to SRS delivered in 1-5 fractions. We analyzed optic nerve and chiasm dose-volume histogram (DVH) data from perioptic tumors, defined as those within 3mm of the optic nerves or chiasm, treated with SRS from 2000-2013 at our institution. Tumors with subsequent local progression were excluded from the primary analysis of vision outcome. A total of 262 evaluable cases (26 with malignant and 236 with benign tumors) with visual field and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Median patient follow-up was 37 months (range: 2-142 months). The median number of fractions was 3 (1 fraction n = 47, 2 fraction n = 28, 3 fraction n = 111, 4 fraction n = 10, and 5 fraction n = 66); doses were converted to 3-fraction equivalent doses with the linear quadratic model using α/β = 2Gy prior to modeling. Optic structure dose parameters analyzed included Dmin, Dmedian, Dmean, Dmax, V30Gy, V25Gy, V20Gy, V15Gy, V10Gy, V5Gy, D50%, D10%, D5%, D1%, D1cc, D0.50cc, D0.25cc, D0.20cc, D0.10cc, D0.05cc, D0.03cc. From the plan DVHs, a maximum-likelihood parameter fitting of the probit dose-response model was performed using DVH Evaluator software. The 68% CIs, corresponding to one standard deviation, were calculated using the profile likelihood method. Of the 262 analyzed, 2 (0.8%) patients experienced common terminology criteria for adverse events grade 4 vision loss in one eye, defined as vision of 20/200 or worse in the affected eye. One of these patients had received 2 previous courses of radiotherapy to the optic structures

  16. Three independent one-dimensional margins for single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery brain cases using CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chan, Maria F.; Burman, Chandra; Song, Yulin; Zhang, Mutian

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Setting a proper margin is crucial for not only delivering the required radiation dose to a target volume, but also reducing the unnecessary radiation to the adjacent organs at risk. This study investigated the independent one-dimensional symmetric and asymmetric margins between the clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) for linac-based single-fraction frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).Methods: The authors assumed a Dirac delta function for the systematic error of a specific machine and a Gaussian function for the residual setup errors. Margin formulas were then derived in details to arrive at a suitable CTV-to-PTV margin for single-fraction frameless SRS. Such a margin ensured that the CTV would receive the prescribed dose in 95% of the patients. To validate our margin formalism, the authors retrospectively analyzed nine patients who were previously treated with noncoplanar conformal beams. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the patient setup. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and linac were measured for a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator for three months. For each plan, the authors shifted the isocenter of the plan in each direction by ±3 mm simultaneously to simulate the worst setup scenario. Subsequently, the asymptotic behavior of the CTV V{sub 80%} for each patient was studied as the setup error approached the CTV-PTV margin.Results: The authors found that the proper margin for single-fraction frameless SRS cases with brain cancer was about 3 mm for the machine investigated in this study. The isocenter shifts between the CBCT and the linac remained almost constant over a period of three months for this specific machine. This confirmed our assumption that the machine systematic error distribution could be approximated as a delta function. This definition is especially relevant to a single-fraction treatment. The prescribed dose coverage for all the patients investigated was 96.1%± 5.5% with an

  17. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)

    PubMed Central

    Seung, Steven K.; Larson, David A.; Galvin, James M.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J.; Yajnik, Santosh V.; Hartford, Alan C.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2014-01-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program. PMID:23681017

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... hair after 24 hours. DO NOT use hair coloring, perms, gels, or other hair products until the ... any staples are removed. DO NOT use hair coloring, perms, gels, or other hair products until the ...

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain tumor - primary - adults Cerebral arteriovenous malformation ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Arteriovenous Malformations Brain Tumors Childhood Brain Tumors ...

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve that connects the ear to the brain ( acoustic neuroma ) Pituitary tumors Tumors that are not cancer ( ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  1. Survival was Significantly Better with Surgical/Medical/Radiation Co-interventions in a Single-Institution Practice Audit of Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Taggar, Amandeep; MacKenzie, Joanna; Li, Haocheng; Lau, Harold; Lim, Gerald; Nordal, Robert; Hudson, Alana; Khan, Rao; Spencer, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To audit outcomes after introducing frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases, including co-interventions: neurosurgery, systemic therapy, and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). We report median overall survival (MS), local failure, and distant brain failure. We hypothesized patients treated with SRS would have clinically meaningful improved MS compared with historic institutional values. We further hypothesized that patients treated with co-interventions would have clinically meaningful improved MS compared with patients treated with SRS alone. Methods One hundred twenty patients (N = 120) with limited intracranial disease underwent 130 frameless SRS sessions from April 2010 to May 2013. Median follow-up was 11 months. MS was measured from brain metastases diagnosis, local failure, and distant brain failure from the time of first SRS. Results Practice pattern during the first year of the study favored upfront WBRT (79%) over SRS (21%) while upfront SRS (45%) was almost as common as upfront WBRT (55%) in the last year of the study. MS was 18 months; 37% received SRS alone as initial radiotherapy (MS 12 months); 63% received WBRT prior to SRS (MS 19 months); 50% received systemic therapy post-SRS (MS 21 months); and 26% had tumor resection then SRS to the surgical cavity (MS 42 months). Local failure occurred in 10% of lesions and radio-necrosis occurred in 4%. Differences in distant brain failure among patients treated with upfront SRS (40% rate), WBRT followed by SRS (33% rate) or systemic therapy post-SRS (37% rate) were not statistically significant. Conclusion Frameless SRS effectively treats surgical cavities, persistent tumors post-WBRT, and can be used as an upfront treatment of brain metastases. Surgery, systemic therapy, and WBRT are associated with longer MS. Patients can live for years while receiving multiple therapies. Systemic therapy for patients with brain metastases is increasingly common, palliative care

  2. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ganesh; Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Samlowski, Wolfram; Wang, Michael; Watson, Gordon; Shrieve, Dennis; Jensen, Randy L. . E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

  4. OUTCOMES AND PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CANINE SINONASAL TUMORS TREATED WITH CURATIVE INTENT CONE-BASED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY (1999-2013).

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Lyndsay; Milner, Rowan; An, Qi; Kow, Kelvin; Chang, Myron; Cooke, Kristen; Fox, Leslie; Farese, James; Bacon, Nicholas; Lurie, David

    2016-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a relatively new therapeutic option in veterinary oncology. The role of this modality has not been extensively evaluated for the use in canine nasal tumors. The objective of this retrospective, observational study was to describe the clinical outcome and prognostic factors associated with survival times in a sample of canine patients treated with SRS for sinonasal tumors. Fifty-seven dogs with sinonasal tumors met inclusion criteria. Histologic diagnoses included sarcoma (SA) (n = 9), carcinoma (CA) (n = 40), osteosarcoma (OSA) (n = 7), and round cell (n = 1). Four of 57 cases were treated twice with SRS. For these, the median and mean doses delivered were 30Gy and 33Gy, respectively (range 18.75Gy-56Gy). Late effects occurred in 23 cases and ranged from grades I-III. The median overall survival time was 8.5 months. The median overall survival times in dogs with tumor type of CA, SA, and OSA were 10.4, 10.7, and 3.1 months, respectively. Dogs with the tumor type of OSA had shorter overall survival time than that in dogs with tumor type of CA and SA. Findings from this retrospective study indicated that SRS may be beneficial for canine patients with sinonasal tumors, however a controlled clinical trial would be needed to confirm this. Prospective studies are also needed to better define the role of SRS as palliative or curative, and to further investigate the risk of clinically significant toxicity. PMID:26880676

  5. Prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic image-guided robotic radiosurgery for brain metastases: a single-center retrospective analysis of 223 patients.

    PubMed

    Pontoriero, Antonio; Conti, Alfredo; Iatì, Giuseppe; Mondello, Stefania; Aiello, Dario; Rifatto, Carmen; Risoleti, Edoarda; Mazzei, Micol; Tomasello, Francesco; Pergolizzi, Stefano; De Renzis, Costantino

    2016-07-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated the overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) of brain metastases (BM) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The scope was to identify host, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of LC and survival and define implications for clinical decisions. A total of 223 patients with 360 BM from various histologies treated with SRS alone or associated with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in our institution between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among other prognostic factors, we had also evaluated retrospectively Karnofsky performance status scores (KPS) and graded prognostic assessment (GPA). Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were the primary endpoints. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate OS and LC and identify factors predictive of survival and local control. The median duration of follow-up time was 9 months (range 0.4-51 months). Median overall survival of all patients was 11 months. The median local control was 38 months. No statistical difference in terms of survival or LC between patients treated with SRS alone or associated with WBRT was found. On multivariate analysis, KPS was the only statistically significant predictor of OS (hazard ratio [HR] 2.53, p = 0.006). On univariate analysis, KPS and GPA were significantly prognostic for survival. None of the host, tumor, or treatment factors analyzed in the univariate model factors were significantly associated with local failure. PMID:27106896

  6. Robotic Stereotactic Radioablation Concomitant With Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Courdi, Adel; Quielle-Roussel, Catherine; Thariat, Juliette; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors; however, it has never been used for breast tumors and may have a real potential. We conducted a Phase I study, including neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), a two-level dose-escalation study (6.5 Gy x 3 fractions and 7.5 Gy x 3 fractions) using RSR and breast-conserving surgery followed by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: To define toxicity, we performed a dermatologic exam (DE) including clinical examination by two independent observers and technical examination by colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasound. DE was performed before NACT (DE0), at 36 days (DE1), at 56 days (DE2), after the NACT treatment onset, and before surgery (DE3). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. A pathologic examination was also performed. Results: There were two clinical complete responses and four clinical partial responses at D56 and D85. Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. All patients tolerated RSR with no fatigue; 2 patients presented with mild pain after the third fraction of the treatment. There was no significant toxicity measured with ultrasound and dermoscopy tests. Postoperative irradiation (50 Gy) has been delivered without toxicity. Conclusion: The study showed the feasibility of irradiation with RSR combined with chemotherapy and surgery for breast tumors. There was no skin toxicity at a dose of 19.5 Gy or 22.5 Gy delivered in three fractions combined with chemotherapy. Lack of toxicity suggested that the dose could be increased further. Pathologic response was acceptable.

  7. Radiosurgery to the Postoperative Surgical Cavity: Who Needs Evidence?

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, David; Parney, Ian; Brown, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing interest in adjuvant radiosurgery after resection of hematogenous brain metastases. This is exemplified by the approximately 1000 cases reported in mainly retrospective series. These cases fall into four paradigms: adjuvant radiosurgery as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery neoadjuvant to the surgical resection, radiosurgery as an intensification of adjuvant WBRT, and adjuvant radiosurgery for patients having failed prior WBRT. These procedures seem well tolerated, with an approximate 5% risk of radiation necrosis. Although crude local control rates for each strategy seem improved over surgery alone, multiple biases make comparisons with standard WBRT difficult without prospective data. Because evidence lags behind clinical practice, an upcoming intergroup trial will aim to clarify the value of the most common tumor bed radiosurgery strategy by randomizing oligometastatic patients between adjuvant WBRT and adjuvant radiosurgery.

  8. Can the spinal instability neoplastic score prior to spinal radiosurgery predict compression fractures following stereotactic spinal radiosurgery for metastatic spinal tumor?: a post hoc analysis of prospective phase II single-institution trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Ho; Tatsui, Claudio E; Ghia, Amol J; Amini, Behrang; Li, Jing; Zavarella, Salvatore M; Tannir, Nizar M; Brown, Paul D; Rhines, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the predictability of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) development applying the spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) prior to delivery of stereotactic spinal radiosurgery (SSRS) for spinal metastases. From two prospective cohorts of SSRS for spinal metastases, we selected patients with a low degree of cord compression or cauda equine from C3 to S1 and analyzed 79 patients enrolled according to binary SINS criteria. The primary endpoint was the development of a de novo VCF or progression of an existing fracture after SSRS. We identified 32 fractures (40.5 %): 19 de novo and 13 progressive. The mean time to fracture after SSRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.4-34.1 months). In 41 patients with low SINS (0-6), 7 patients (17.1 %) developed a fracture after SSRS. In 38 patients with high SINS (7-12), 25 (65.8 %) developed a fracture. Among the 32 fractures, 15 were symptomatic. Patients with high SINS were more likely to experience symptomatic fractures (31.6 %) than were patients with lower SINS (7.4 %). On univariate and multivariate analysis, 24-month fracture-free rates were 78.7 and 33.7 % in low and high SINS group, respectively and high SINS was found to be a significant risk factor for VCFs and symptomatic fractures (respectively, HR 5.6, p = 0.04; HR 5.3, p = 0.01). SINS is a useful tool for predicting the development of VCF after SSRS for spinal metastases. Prophylactic cement augmentation should not be considered for patients with lower SINS, since the risk of fracture is low. PMID:26643804

  9. SU-E-T-318: The Effect of Patient Positioning Errors On Target Coverage and Cochlear Dose in Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment of Acoustic Neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Dellamonica, D.; Luo, G.; Ding, G.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Setup errors on the order of millimeters may cause under-dosing of targets and significant changes in dose to critical structures especially when planning with tight margins in stereotactic radiosurgery. This study evaluates the effects of these types of patient positioning uncertainties on planning target volume (PTV) coverage and cochlear dose for stereotactic treatments of acoustic neuromas. Methods: Twelve acoustic neuroma patient treatment plans were retrospectively evaluated in Brainlab iPlan RT Dose 4.1.3. All treatment beams were shaped by HDMLC from a Varian TX machine. Seven patients had planning margins of 2mm, five had 1–1.5mm. Six treatment plans were created for each patient simulating a 1mm setup error in six possible directions: anterior-posterior, lateral, and superiorinferior. The arcs and HDMLC shapes were kept the same for each plan. Change in PTV coverage and mean dose to the cochlea was evaluated for each plan. Results: The average change in PTV coverage for the 72 simulated plans was −1.7% (range: −5 to +1.1%). The largest average change in coverage was observed for shifts in the patient's superior direction (−2.9%). The change in mean cochlear dose was highly dependent upon the direction of the shift. Shifts in the anterior and superior direction resulted in an average increase in dose of 13.5 and 3.8%, respectively, while shifts in the posterior and inferior direction resulted in an average decrease in dose of 17.9 and 10.2%. The average change in dose to the cochlea was 13.9% (range: 1.4 to 48.6%). No difference was observed based on the size of the planning margin. Conclusion: This study indicates that if the positioning uncertainty is kept within 1mm the setup errors may not result in significant under-dosing of the acoustic neuroma target volumes. However, the change in mean cochlear dose is highly dependent upon the direction of the shift.

  10. SU-E-T-563: Multi-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery with Extend System of Gamma Knife: Treatment Verification Using Indigenously Designed Patient Simulating Multipurpose Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, R; Kale, S; Gopishankar, N; Rath, G; Julka, P; Agarwal, D; Singh, M; Garg, A; Kumar, P; Thulkar, S; Sharma, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of the study is to evaluate mechanical and radiological accuracy of multi-fraction regimen and validate Gamma knife based fractionation using newly developed patient simulating multipurpose phantom. Methods: A patient simulating phantom was designed to verify fractionated treatments with extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife however it could be used to validate other radiotherapy procedures as well. The phantom has options to insert various density material plugs and mini CT/MR distortion phantoms to analyze the quality of stereotactic imaging. An additional thorax part designed to predict surface doses at various organ sites. The phantom was positioned using vacuum head cushion and patient control unit for imaging and treatment. The repositioning check tool (RCT) was used to predict phantom positioning under ES assembly. The phantom with special inserts for film in axial, coronal and sagittal plane were scanned with X-Ray CT and the acquired images were transferred to treatment planning system (LGP 10.1). The focal precession test was performed with 4mm collimator and an experimental plan of four 16mm collimator shots was prepared for treatment verification of multi-fraction regimen. The prescription dose of 5Gy per fraction was delivered in four fractions. Each fraction was analyzed using EBT3 films scanned with EPSON 10000XL Scanner. Results: The measurement of 38 RCT points showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.28mm. The mean deviation of 0.28% and 0.31 % were calculated as CT and MR image distortion respectively. The radiological focus accuracy test showed its deviation from mechanical center point of 0.22mm. The profile measurement showed close agreement between TPS planned and film measured dose. At tolerance criteria of 1%/1mm gamma index analysis showed a pass rate of > 95%. Conclusion: Our results show that the newly developed multipurpose patient simulating phantom is highly suitable for the verification of fractionated stereotactic

  11. Comparison of Gafchromic EBT2 and EBT3 for patient-specific quality assurance: Cranial stereotactic radiosurgery using volumetric modulated arc therapy with multiple noncoplanar arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Ragona, Riccardo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Mantovani, Cristina

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered (up to 30 Gy). Gafchromic{sup TM} EBT2 and EBT3 films may be considered the dosimeter of choice, and the authors here provide some additional data about uniformity correction for this new generation of radiochromic films.Methods: A new analysis method using blue channel for marker dye correction was proposed for uniformity correction both for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Symmetry, flatness, and field-width of a reference field were analyzed to provide an evaluation in a high-spatial resolution of the film uniformity for EBT3. Absolute doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) as baseline. VMAT plans with multiple noncoplanar arcs were generated with a treatment planning system on a selected pool of eleven patients with cranial lesions and then recalculated on a water-equivalent plastic phantom by Monte Carlo algorithm for patient-specific QA. 2D quantitative dose comparison parameters were calculated, for the computed and measured dose distributions, and tested for statistically significant differences.Results: Sensitometric curves showed a different behavior above dose of 5 Gy for EBT2 and EBT3 films; with the use of inhouse marker-dye correction method, the authors obtained values of 2.5% for flatness, 1.5% of symmetry, and a field width of 4.8 cm for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} reference field. Compared with TLD and selecting a 5% dose tolerance, the percentage of points with ICRU index below 1 was 100% for EBT2 and 83% for EBT3. Patients analysis revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between EBT2 and EBT3 in the percentage of points with gamma values <1 (p= 0.009 and p= 0.016); the percent difference as well as

  12. Results for local control and functional outcome after linac-based image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery in 190 patients with vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Böhmer, Dirk; Synowitz, Michael; Wiener, Edzard; Budach, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed local control (LC) and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods Between 1998 and 2008, 190 patients with VS were treated with SRS. All patients had tumors <2 cm diameter. Patients received 13.5 Gy prescribed to the 80th isodose at the tumor margin. The primary endpoint was LC. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. Results Median follow-up was 40 months. LC was achieved in 88% of patients. There were no acute reactions exceeding Grade I. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction was present in 21.6% (n = 41) prior to SRS. After treatment, 85% (n = 155) had no change, 4.4,% (n = 8) had a relief of symptoms, 10.4% (n = 19) had new symptoms. Facial nerve dysfunction was present in some patients prior to treatment, e.g. paresis (12.6%; n = 24) and dysgeusia (0.5%; n = 1). After treatment 1.1% (n = 2) reported improvement and 6.1% (n = 11) experienced new symptoms. Hearing problems before SRS were present in 69.5% of patients (n = 132). After treatment, 62.6% (n = 144) had no change, 10.4% (n = 19) experienced improvement and 26.9% (n = 49) became hearing impaired. Conclusion This series of SRS for small VS provided similar LC rates to microsurgery; thus, it is effective as a non-invasive, image-guided procedure. The functional outcomes observed indicate the safety and effectiveness of linac-based SRS. Patients may now be informed of the clinical equivalence of SRS to microsurgery. PMID:23979079

  13. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  14. SU-E-T-563: A Fast and Quantative Picket-Fence Test of a Submillimeter Patient Positioning System for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L; Perez-Andujar, A; Chiu, J; McGuinness, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Picket-fence test is a qualitative TG142-recommended quality assurance (QA) test for multileaf collimators. In study, we adopted the same concept and developed a fast but quantatitive QA test for an automatic patient positioning system that requires submilleter accuracy for a radiosurgical treatment. Methods: A piece of radiochromic film was first placed inside a spherical solid water phantom and then irradiated with a sequenence of linearly placed shots of same collimator size (e.g. 4-mm) via the Leskell Gamma Knife Perfexion system (PFX). The shots were positioned with either equal or non-equal gaps of approximately 4 mm to 8 mm depending on the location of the region of interest. A pattern recognization program was developed and then applied to measure the gap spacing between two adjacent shots. The measured distance was then compared with the initial preset values for the test. Results: By introducing variable systematic and random shifts of 0.1 mm to 0.5 mm to the shot sequence, the maximum gap variation from the described test was found to be 0.35 mm or less. On average the positioning uncertainty for the PFX delivery system was found to be 0.1±0.2 mm. No significant difference in the positioning uncertainty was noted for the centrally aligned shot sequence locations versus the peripherally aligned shot sequence locations. Conclusion: A new quantitative picket-fence type test was developed and demonstrated for routine QA of the submillimeter PFX patient positioning sytem. This test also enables independent verification of any patient-specific shot positioning for a critical treatment such as a tumor in brainstem. Dr Ma is currently on the board of international society of stereotactic Radiosurgery.

  15. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  16. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Combination With Gefitinib in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, Amanda L.; Damek, Denise M.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Lillehei, Kevin; Stuhr, Kelly; Chen Changhu

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with gefitinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had pathologically proved recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma. Patients started gefitinib (250 mg/day) 7 days before SRS and continued for 1 year or until disease progression. SRS was delivered in three fractions over 3 days. The planning target volume (PTV) was the T1-weighted MRI postcontrast enhancing lesion + 2 mm. The first cohort received an SRS dose of 18 Gy, and subsequent cohorts received higher doses up to the maximum dose of 36 Gy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was any Grade 3 toxicity. The MTD was exceeded if 2 of 6 patients in a cohort experienced DLT. Results: Characteristics of the 15 patients enrolled were: 9 men, 6 women; median age, 47 years (range, 23-65 years); 11 glioblastoma, 4 AA; median prior RT dose, 60 Gy (range, 54-61.2 Gy); median interval since RT, 12 months (range, 3-57 months); median PTV, 41 cc (range, 12-151 cc). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range, 2-28 months). Median time on gefitinib was 5 months (range, 2-12 months). No patient experienced a DLT, and the SRS dose was escalated from 18 to 36 Gy. Grade 1-2 gefitinib-related dermatitis and diarrhea were common (10 and 7 patients, respectively). Conclusion: Fractionated SRS to a dose of 36 Gy in three fractions is well tolerated with gefitinib at daily dose of 250 mg. Further studies of SRS and novel molecular targeted agents are warranted in this challenging clinical setting.

  17. SU-E-T-84: Comparison of Three Different Systems for Patient-Specific Quality Assurance: Cranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using VMAT with Multiple Non Coplanar Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fusella, M; Fiandra, C; Giglioli, F; Ricardi, U; Ragona, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered. The purpose of the study is to compare three different dosimeters for pre-treatment QA. Methods: Nineteen patients (affected by neurinomas, brain metastases, and by meningiomas) were treated with VMAT plans computed on a Monte Carlo based TPS. Gafchromic films inside a slab phantom (GF), 3-D cylindrical phantom with two orthogonal diodes array (DA), and 3-D cylindrical phantom with a single rotating ionization chambers array (ICA), have been evaluated. The dosimeters are, respectively, characterized by a spatial resolution of: 0.4 (in our method), 5 and 2.5 mm. For GF we used a double channel method for calibration and reading protocol; for DA and ICA we used the 3-D dose distributions reconstructed by the two software sold with the dosimeters. With the need of a common system for analyze different measuring approaches, we used an in-house software that analyze a single coronal plane in the middle of the phantoms and Gamma values (2% / 2 mm and 3% / 3 mm) were computed for all patients and dosimeters. Results: The percentage of points with gamma values less than one was: 95.7% for GF, 96.8% for DA and 95% for ICA, using 3%/3mm criteria, and 90.1% for GF, 92.4% for DA and 92% for ICA, using 2% / 2mm gamma criteria. Tstudent test p-values obtained by comparing the three datasets were not statistically significant for both gamma criteria. Conclusion: Gamma index analysis is not affected by different spatial resolution of the three dosimeters.

  18. Adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant: A boost series in view of partial breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Nicolas . E-mail: nicolas.jansen@chu.ulg.ac.be; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie; Nickers, Philippe

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to use permanent seed implants in the breast and describe our experience with 15 cases, using iodine seed implants as a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Breasts were fixed with a thermoplastic sheet, a template bridge applied, the thorax scanned and the images rotated to be perpendicular to the implant axis. Skin, heart, and lung were delineated. A preplan was made, prescribing 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV), consisting in this boost series of nearly a quadrant. Iodine (125) seeds were stereotactically implanted through the template, and results were checked with a postplan computed tomographic (CT) scan. Results: The breast was immobilized reproducibly. Simulation, scanning, and implant were performed without difficulties. Preplan CTV D90% (the dose delivered to 90% of the CTV) was 66 Gy, and postoperative fluoroscopic or CT scan checks were satisfactory. Pre- and postplan dose-volume histogram showed good organ sparing: mean postplan skin, heart, and lung V30 Gy (the organ volume receiving a dose of 30 Gy) of 2 {+-} 2.2 mL, 0.24 {+-} 0.34 mL, and 3.5 {+-} 5 mL, respectively. No short-term toxicity above Grade 1 was noted, except for transient Grade 3 neuropathy in 1 patient. Conclusions: Seeds remained in the right place, as assessed by fluoroscopy, absence of significant pre- to postplan dose-volume histogram change for critical organs, and total irradiated breast volume. The method could be proposed as a boost when high dosimetric selectivity is required (young patients after cardiotoxic chemotherapy for left-sided cancer). This boost series was a preliminary step before testing partial breast irradiation by permanent seed implant in a prospective trial.

  19. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  20. Post operative stereotactic radiosurgery for positive or close margins after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Nedea, Elena; Poylin, Vitaliy; Nagle, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of positive margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and adequate surgery is very low. However, when patients do present with positive or close margins, they are at a risk of local failure and local therapy options are limited. We evaluated the role of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with positive or close margins after induction chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Methods This is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated with SBRT after induction chemoradiation and surgery for positive or close margins. Seven evaluable patients were included. Fiducial seeds were place at surgery. The CyberknifeTM system was used for planning and treatment. Patients were followed 1 month after treatment and 3-6 months thereafter. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meir method was used to repot the findings. Results Seven patients (3 men and 4 women) were included in the study with a median follow-up of 23.5 months. The median initial radiation dose was 5,040 cGy (in 28 fractions) and the median SBRT dose was 2,500 cGy (in 5 fractions). The local control at 2 years was 100%. The overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 100% and 71% respectively. There was no Grade III or IV toxicity. Conclusions SBRT reirradiation is an effective and safe method to address positive or close margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer. PMID:27284461

  1. Dosimetric Verification of the System of Planning Brainscan for Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Oncology Department of the General Hospital of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez R, J. T.; Salinas, B.; Tovar M, V. M.; Villasenor O, L. F.; Molero M, A. C.

    2006-09-08

    The verification consists on the planning and administration of stereotactic treatments by means of conformed static beams, several polyethylene capsules with powder TLD 100 (type IAEA) located inside the head of a phantom Alderson-Rando. Because the planning system corrects for no-homogeneity in the density from the tomographic information, it is assumed that the absorbed dose in the tumor volume (capsule) corresponds to the dose absorbed to LiF: DLiF. Applying different cavity theories, the percent deviations to the nominal dose are: -1.81%{<=}{delta}%{<=}0.71%, which are consistent with the order of the U%'s. The values of DW are calculated from two calibration curve: TL Response (nC) vs DW for the energy of the 60Co corrected for energy dependence to the accelerator photon beam quality D20/D10=0.57. Once curve for 0.5 to 5 Gy and other for 5 to 35 Gy. The traceability for the Dwater is obtained by means of a secondary standard ionization chamber Farmer PTW 30013 calibrated at the NRC.

  2. [Linear accelerator radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brandt, R A; Salvajoli, J V; Oliveira, V C; Carmignani, M; da Cruz, J C; Leal, H D; Ferraz, L

    1995-03-01

    Radiosurgery is the precise radiation of a known intracranial target with a high dose of energy, sparing the adjacent nervous tissue. Technological advances in the construction of linear accelerators, stereotactic instruments and in computer sciences made this technique easier to perform and affordable. The main indications for radiosurgery are inoperable cerebral vascular malformations, vestibular and other cranial schwannomas, skull base meningiomas, deep seated gliomas and cerebral metastases. More recently, the development of fraccionated stereotactic radiotherapy increased the spectrum of indications to bigger lesions and to those adjacent to critical nervous structures. We present our initial experience in the treatment of 31 patients. An adequate control of the neoplastic lesions was obtained and the adequate time of observation is still needed to evaluate the results in arteriovenous malformations. PMID:7575207

  3. Current Dosing Paradigm for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases Needs to Be Optimized for Improved Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos; Dhabaan, Anees; Hall, William; Raore, Bethwel; Olson, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter; Oyesiku, Nelson; Crocker, Ian

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of radiosurgery (RS) alone to the resection cavity after resection of brain metastases as an alternative to adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients with 64 cavities were treated with linear accelerator-based RS alone to the resection cavity after surgical removal of brain metastases between March 2007 and August 2010. Fifty-two patients (81%) had a gross total resection. Median cavity volume was 8.5 cm{sup 3}. Forty-four patients (71%) had a single metastasis. Median marginal and maximum doses were 18 Gy and 20.4 Gy, respectively. Sixty-one cavities (95%) had gross tumor volume to planning target volume expansion of {>=}1 mm. Results: Six-month and 1-year actuarial local recurrence rates were 14% and 22%, respectively, with a median follow-up period of 9.7 months. Six-month and 1-year actuarial distant brain recurrence, total intracranial recurrence, and freedom from WBRT rates were 31% and 51%, 41% and 63%, and 91% and 74%, respectively. The symptomatic cavity radiation necrosis rate was 8%, with 2 patients (3%) undergoing surgery. Of the 11 local failures, 8 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 2 were both (defined as in-field if {>=}90% of recurrence within the prescription isodose and marginal if {>=}90% outside of the prescription isodose). Conclusions: The high rate of in-field cavity failure suggests that geographic misses with highly conformal RS are not a major contributor to local recurrence. The current dosing regimen derived from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 90-05 should be optimized in this patient population before any direct comparison with WBRT.

  4. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M.; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D.; Bernard, Mark E.; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A.; Burton, Steven A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80–86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7–65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm3 (range: 14.90–87.38 cm3). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97–1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16–1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16–7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7–62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1–9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8–41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI

  5. Radiosurgery of acoustic neurinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Coffey, R.J.; Linskey, M.E.; Bissonette, D.J.; Maitz, A.H.; Kondziolka, D. )

    1991-01-15

    Eighty-five patients with acoustic neurinomas underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with the gamma unit at the University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA) during its first 30 months of operation. Neuroimaging studies performed in 40 patients with more than 1 year follow-up showed that tumors were smaller in 22 (55%), unchanged in 17 (43%), and larger in one (2%). The 2-year actuarial rates for preservation of useful hearing and any hearing were 46% and 62%, respectively. Previously undetected neuropathies of the trigeminal (n = 12) and facial nerves (n = 14) occurred 1 week to 1 year after radiosurgery (median, 7 and 6 months, respectively), and improved at median intervals of 13 and 8 months, respectively, after onset. Hearing loss was significantly associated with increasing average tumor diameter (P = 0.04). No deterioration of any cranial nerve function has yet developed in seven patients with average tumor diameters less than 10 mm. Radiosurgery is an important treatment alternative for selected acoustic neurinoma patients.

  6. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Rodney D.; Wen, Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M.

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  7. Single-fraction versus multifraction spinal stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma: secondary analysis of Phase I/II trials.

    PubMed

    Ghia, Amol J; Chang, Eric L; Bishop, Andrew J; Pan, Hubert Y; Boehling, Nicholas S; Amini, Behrang; Allen, Pamela K; Li, Jing; Rhines, Laurence D; Tannir, Nizar M; Tatsui, Claudio E; Brown, Paul D; Yang, James N

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to compare fractionation schemes and outcomes of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated in institutional prospective spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) trials who did not previously undergo radiation treatment at the site of the SSRS. METHODS Patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011 were included. A secondary analysis was performed on patients with previously nonirradiated RCC spinal metastases treated with either single-fraction (SF) or multifraction (MF) SSRS. RESULTS SSRS was performed in 47 spinal sites on 43 patients. The median age of the patients was 62 years (range 38-75 years). The most common histological subtype was clear cell (n = 30). Fifteen sites underwent surgery prior to the SSRS, with laminectomy the most common procedure performed (n = 10). All SF SSRS was delivered to a dose of 24 Gy (n = 21) while MF regiments were either 27 Gy in 3 fractions (n = 20) or 30 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 6). The median overall survival duration for the entire cohort was 22.8 months. The median local control (LC) for the entire cohort was 80.6 months with 1-year and 2-year actuarial LC rates of 82% and 68%, respectively. Single-fraction SSRS correlated with improved 1- and 2-year actuarial LC relative to MF SSRS (95% vs 71% and 86% vs 55%, respectively; p = 0.009). On competing risk analysis, SF SSRS showed superior LC to MF SSRS (subhazard ratio [SHR] 6.57, p = 0.014). On multivariate analysis for LC with tumor volume (p = 0.272), number of treated levels (p = 0.819), gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage (p = 0.225), and GTV minimum point dose (p = 0.97) as covariates, MF SSRS remained inferior to SF SSRS (SHR 5.26, p = 0.033) CONCLUSIONS SSRS offers durable LC for spinal metastases from RCC. Single-fraction SSRS is associated with improved LC over MF SSRS for previously nonirradiated RCC spinal metastases. PMID:26799117

  8. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Estimation by the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman Method Does Not Accurately Predict Spinal Cord Tolerance to Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Luxton, Gary; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analyses of the human spinal cord by use of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model, supplemented by linear-quadratic modeling to account for the effect of fractionation, predict the risk of myelopathy from stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: From November 2001 to July 2008, 24 spinal hemangioblastomas in 17 patients were treated with SRS. Of the tumors, 17 received 1 fraction with a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) and 7 received 20 to 25 Gy in 2 or 3 sessions, with cord maximum doses of 22.7 Gy (range, 17.8-30.9 Gy) and 22.0 Gy (range, 20.2-26.6 Gy), respectively. By use of conventional values for {alpha}/{beta}, volume parameter n, 50% complication probability dose TD{sub 50}, and inverse slope parameter m, a computationally simplified implementation of the LKB model was used to calculate the biologically equivalent uniform dose and NTCP for each treatment. Exploratory calculations were performed with alternate values of {alpha}/{beta} and n. Results: In this study 1 case (4%) of myelopathy occurred. The LKB model using radiobiological parameters from Emami and the logistic model with parameters from Schultheiss overestimated complication rates, predicting 13 complications (54%) and 18 complications (75%), respectively. An increase in the volume parameter (n), to assume greater parallel organization, improved the predictive value of the models. Maximum-likelihood LKB fitting of {alpha}/{beta} and n yielded better predictions (0.7 complications), with n = 0.023 and {alpha}/{beta} = 17.8 Gy. Conclusions: The spinal cord tolerance to the dosimetry of SRS is higher than predicted by the LKB model using any set of accepted parameters. Only a high {alpha}/{beta} value in the LKB model and only a large volume effect in the logistic model with Schultheiss data could explain the low number of complications observed. This finding emphasizes that radiobiological models

  9. Phase 3 Trials of Stereotactic Radiosurgery With or Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 4 Brain Metastases: Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kocher, Martin; Neupane, Binod; Collette, Sandra; Tago, Masao; Shaw, Prakesh; Beyene, Joseph; Chang, Eric L.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for patients presenting with 1 to 4 brain metastases. Method and Materials: Three trials were identified through a literature search, and IPD were obtained. Outcomes of interest were survival, local failure, and distant brain failure. The treatment effect was estimated after adjustments for age, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score, number of brain metastases, and treatment arm. Results: A total of 364 of the pooled 389 patients met eligibility criteria, of whom 51% were treated with SRS alone and 49% were treated with SRS plus WBRT. For survival, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.04) favoring SRS alone in patients ≤50 years of age, and no significant differences were observed in older patients. Hazard ratios (HRs) for patients 35, 40, 45, and 50 years of age were 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.90), 0.52 (95% CI = 0.29-0.92), 0.58 (95% CI = 0.35-0.95), and 0.64 (95% CI = 0.42-0.99), respectively. Patients with a single metastasis had significantly better survival than those who had 2 to 4 metastases. For distant brain failure, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.043), with similar rates in the 2 arms for patients ≤50 of age; otherwise, the risk was reduced with WBRT for patients >50 years of age. Patients with a single metastasis also had a significantly lower risk of distant brain failure than patients who had 2 to 4 metastases. Local control significantly favored additional WBRT in all age groups. Conclusions: For patients ≤50 years of age, SRS alone favored survival, in addition, the initial omission of WBRT did not impact distant brain relapse rates. SRS alone may be the preferred treatment for this age group.

  10. SU-E-J-217: Multiparametric MR Imaging of Cranial Tumors On a Dedicated 1.0T MR Simulator Prior to Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Liu, M; Hearshen, D; Brown, S; Siddiqui, S; Chetty, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cranial lesions prior to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may improve treatment planning and provide potential prognostic value. The practicality and logistics of acquiring advanced multiparametric MRI sequences to measure vascular and cellular properties of cerebral tumors are explored on a 1.0 Tesla MR Simulator. Methods: MR simulation was performed immediately following routine CT simulation on a 1T MR Simulator. MR sequences used were in the order they were performed: T2-Weighted Turbo Spin Echo (T2W-TSE), T2 FLAIR, Diffusion-weighted (DWI, b = 0, 800 to generate an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map), 3D T1-Weighted Fast Field Echo (T1W-FFE), Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) and Post Gadolinium Contrast Enhanced 3D T1W-FFE images. T1 pre-contrast values was generated by acquiring six different flip angles. The arterial input function was derived from arterial pixels in the perfusion images selected manually. The extended Tofts model was used to generate the permeability maps. Routine MRI scans took about 30 minutes to complete; the additional scans added 12 minutes. Results: To date, seven patients with cerebral tumors have been imaged and tumor physiology characterized. For example, on a glioblastoma patient, the volume contoured on T1 Gd images, ADC map and the pharmacokinetic map (Ktrans) were 1.9, 1.4, and 1.5 cc respectively with strong spatial correlation. The mean ADC value of the entire volume was 1141 μm2/s while the value in the white matter was 811 μm2/s. The mean value of Ktrans was 0.02 min-1 in the tumor volume and 0.00 in the normal white matter. Conclusion: Our initial results suggest that multiparametric MRI sequences may provide a more quantitative evaluation of vascular and tumor properties. Implementing functional imaging during MR-SIM may be particularly beneficial in assessing tumor extent, differentiating radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence, and establishing reliable

  11. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  12. A new era of thoracic oncology? Ex-vivo stereotactic ablative radiosurgery within Ex-vivo Lung Treatment System as a hybrid therapy for unresectable locally advanced pulmonary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Henkenberens, C; Zinne, N; Biancosino, C; Höffler, K; Schmitto, J D; Bremer, M; Haverich, A; Krüger, M

    2016-07-01

    The concept of oligometastases is the medical rationale for a local treatment of a limited number of metastatic tumor manifestations. Patients with pulmonary oligometastases are candidates for surgery or radiotherapy, however there are a number of technical issues that limit treatment. Technical issues relating to radiotherapy include organs at risk of irradiation, chest wall toxicity and decreased precision of tumor targeting because of breathing movements. Technical issues relating to surgery include loss of lung parenchyma and unresectability. We propose the hypothesis that ex-vivo radiosurgery as new hybrid technique in thoracic oncology has the capability to overcome these technical issues and will expand the medical spectrum in thoracic oncology. The proposed - highly complex - technique consists of surgical lung explantation, followed by stereotactic radiotherapy during ex-vivo perfusion followed by surgical re-implantation. PMID:27241251

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... deliver high-energy x-rays, also known as photons. The linear accelerator can perform SRS on larger ... A neurosurgeon will use local anesthesia to numb two spots on your forehead and two spots on ...

  14. P13.11USAGE OF CYBER KNIFE HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIOSURGERY IN HIGH GRADE GLIOMAS COMPLEX TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Glavatskyi, O.; Buryk, V.M.; Kardash, K.A.; Pylypas, O.P.; Chebotaryova, T.I.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A complex approach to the treatment of malignant brain tumors includes maximum surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The purpose of the current study is to review retrospectively the ability of Cyber Knife (“Accuray Incorporated”, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) radiosurgery to provide local tumor control of newly diagnosed or recurrent malignant brain tumors. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 26 patients with malignant brain tumors (glioblastoma multiform (GBM) - 14 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) - 12 patients) were treated in 2012-2013 with Cyber Knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Before radiosurgery 8 patients had complete removal of the tumor, 9 patients had subtotal resection and 9 patients had biopsy. 17 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide according to the different treatment protocols. 9 patients who were previously irradiated received re-irradiation. In all patients CT, MRI, PET (native, enhanced, CT-perfusion, MRI-diffusion (DWI) studies) before and after treatment were performed with (3, 6, 12, 18 month follow up). The volume of tumors ranged from 10-12 cm3 to 101,1 cm3. The maximum mean dose of irradiation applied was 36.99 Gy (ranged from 21,3 Gy to 48,8 Gy). 3-6 fractions of hypofractionated treatment were used. RESULTS: At this stage of the study, we assessed the absence of complications after stereotactic hypofractionated radiosurgery. Objective survival evaluation has being performed in 12-24 months after radiosurgical treatment. A significant decrease in the number and severity of seizures was seen in 7 patients out of 21 (33 %). 18 patients (64%) had regression of limb weakness. In case of biopsy 7 of 9 tumors (78 %) showed a decrease in volume. In patients with clinical deterioration (3 patients) repeated surgical treatment was performed. All of them had signs of post-irradiation necrosis and pathomorphosis in tumor tissue. Median overall survival and progression free survival were 17 months and 11 months

  15. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  16. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  17. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  18. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  19. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in...

  20. The role of radiosurgery in the management of chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the cranial base

    SciTech Connect

    Kondziolka, D.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1991-07-01

    Despite conventional multimodality treatment (surgery and fractionated radiation therapy), recurrence and clinical progression of cranial base chordomas and chondrosarcomas are common. The malignant behavior of these tumors is a result of their critical location, locally aggressive nature, and high recurrence rate. To explore the role of radiosurgery in the treatment of these skull base neoplasms, we assessed its use in four patients with chordoma and two with chondrosarcoma. In five of the patients, radiosurgery was used as adjuvant therapy for residual or recurrent tumors after surgical debulking, and in one patient with a chordoma, it was the primary treatment. No patient received fractionated external beam radiotherapy. All tumors were less than 30 mm in diameter and were treated with 20 Gy to the tumor margin. Skull base computed tomography and magnetic resonance images were essential to define the anatomic relationships between tumor and adjacent basal structures. During follow-up (mean, 22 mo; range, 8-36 mo), the authors found no progression of the treated tumor volume in any patient. Neurological deficits before treatment improved in three patients; the other three patients remained in stable neurological condition. Serial follow-up imaging studies demonstrated that two patients showed reduction in tumor size and four patients had no tumor growth. In one patient, a metastatic parietal lobe chondrosarcoma developed and was treated by microsurgery. Another patient showed tumor progression outside of the radiosurgical treatment volume. The authors results attest to the value of stereotactic radiosurgery as an adjuvant or primary treatment for selected patients with chordoma or chondrosarcoma and demonstrate its potential advantages over standard fractionated irradiation. Analysis of the long-term clinical and imaging effects after radiosurgery is warranted.

  1. SU-E-J-240: The Impact On Clinical Dose-Distributions When Using MR-Images Registered with Stereotactic CT-Images in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Kraepelien, T; Forander, P; Wangerid, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most Gamma knife treatments are based solely on MR-images. However, for fractionated treatments and to implement TPS dose calculations that require electron densities, CT image data is essential. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric effects of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images in Gamma knife treatments. Methods: Twelve patients treated for vestibular schwannoma with Gamma Knife Perfexion (Elekta Instruments, Sweden) were selected for this study. The prescribed doses (12 Gy to periphery) were delivered based on the conventional approach of using stereotactic MR-images only. These plans were imported into stereotactic CT-images (by registering MR-images with stereotactic CT-images using the Leksell gamma plan registration software). The dose plans, for each patient, are identical in both cases except for potential rotations and translations resulting from the registration. The impact of the registrations was assessed by an algorithm written in Matlab. The algorithm compares the dose-distributions voxel-by-voxel between the two plans, calculates the full dose coverage of the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan, and calculates the minimum dose delivered to the target (treated in the conventional approach) achieved by the CT-based plan. Results: The mean dose difference between the plans was 0.2 Gy to 0.4 Gy (max 4.5 Gy) whereas between 89% and 97% of the target (treated in the conventional approach) received the prescribed dose, by the CT-plan. The minimum dose to the target (treated in the conventional approach) given by the CT-based plan was between 7.9 Gy and 10.7 Gy (compared to 12 Gy in the conventional treatment). Conclusion: The impact of using MR-images registered with stereotactic CT-images has successfully been compared to conventionally delivered dose plans showing significant differences between the two. Although CTimages have been implemented clinically; the effect of the

  2. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.690 Section 35.690 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units §...

  3. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.690 Section 35.690 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units §...

  4. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.690 Section 35.690 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units §...

  5. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.690 Section 35.690 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units §...

  6. 10 CFR 35.690 - Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for use of remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.690 Section 35.690 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units §...

  7. Adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy following transarterial chemoembolization in patients with non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma tumours of ≥3 cm

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rojymon; Turley, Falynn; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed K A; Keene, Kimberly; Yang, Eddy; Zarzour, Jessica; Bolus, David; Smith, J Kevin; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal locoregional treatment for non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of ≥3 cm in diameter is unclear. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the initial intervention most commonly performed, but it rarely eradicates HCC. The purpose of this study was to measure survival in HCC patients treated with adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) following TACE. Methods A retrospective study of patients with HCC of ≥3 cm was conducted. Outcomes in patients treated with TACE alone (n = 124) were compared with outcomes in those treated with TACE + SBRT (n = 37). Results There were no significant baseline differences between the two groups. The pre-TACE mean number of tumours (P = 0.57), largest tumour size (P = 0.09) and total tumour diameter (P = 0.21) did not differ significantly between the groups. Necrosis of the HCC tumour, measured after the first TACE, did not differ between the groups (P = 0.69). Local recurrence was significantly decreased in the TACE + SBRT group (10.8%) in comparison with the TACE-only group (25.8%) (P = 0.04). After censoring for liver transplantation, overall survival was found to be significantly increased in the TACE + SBRT group compared with the TACE-only group (33 months and 20 months, respectively; P = 0.02). Conclusions This retrospective study suggests that in patients with HCC tumours of ≥3 cm, treatment with TACE + SBRT provides a survival advantage over treatment with only TACE. Confirmation of this observation requires that the concept be tested in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. PMID:25186290

  8. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    -based system provides accurate target positioning for frameless image-guided cranial stereotactic radiosurgery.

  9. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Schell, Michael C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Komaki, Ritsuko; Souhami, Luis; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Khuntia, Deepak; Demas, William; Shah, Sunjay A.; Nedzi, Lucien A.; Perry, Gad; Suh, John H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  10. [Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Debono, B; Sol, J-C; Ménégalli, D; Mertens, P; Redon, A; Muracciole, X

    2012-06-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is defined as brief paroxysms of pain limited to the facial distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Drug therapy is considered to be the first-line of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Unfortunately, medical treatment does not always provide satisfactory pain relief for 25% of the patients. Moreover, the relief provided by drug therapy generally decreases over time, and increased dosages of these medications are limited because of side effects. In this case, patients can be offered several surgical approaches, such as percutaneous techniques (thermocoagulation, microcompression, glycerol injection) or microvascular decompression in the cerebello-pontine angle (Gardner-Jannetta's technique). In this indication, stereotactic radiosurgery, driven by teams using Gamma Knife(®), has shown promising efficacy and tolerance to allow this treatment being truly part of trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Technological progresses now allow performing radiosurgery with ballistic and dosimetric processes optimized with stereotactic radiosurgery dedicated linear accelerators. This procedure supports frame implantation to guarantee targeting accuracy in accordance of elevated dose distribution. This article on trigeminal neuralgia treatment will review the different medical and surgical therapeutic options and specify the contemporary place of stereotactic radiosurgery in the light of its clinical results and tolerance aspects. PMID:22682396

  11. SU-E-T-394: The Use of Jaw Tracking in Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, K; Wen, N; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Zhao, B; Siddiqui, S; Chetty, I; Ryu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential advantages of jaw tracking for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in spine radiosurgery. Methods: VMAT and IMRT plans were retrospectively generated for ten patients. Six plans for each patient were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system for a Varian Truebeam equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC. Plans were created to study IMRT and VMAT plans with and without jaw tracking, as well as IMRT plans of different flattening filter free (FFF) energies. Plans were prescribed to the 90% isodose line to 16 or 18 Gy in one fraction to cover 95% of the target. Planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index (CI), dose to spinal cord, distance to fall off from the 90% to 50% isodose line (DTF), as well as delivery time were evaluated. Ion chamber and film measurements were performed to verify calculated and measured dose distributions. Results: Jaw tracking decreased the spinal cord dose for both IMRT and VMAT plans, but a larger decrease was seen with the IMRT plans (p=0.004 vs p=0.04). The average D10% for the spinal cord was least for the 6MV FFF IMRT plan with jaw tracking and was greatest for the 10MV FFF plan without jaw tracking. Treatment times between IMRT and VMAT plans with or without jaw tracking were not significantly different. Measured plans showed greater than 98.5% agreement for planar dose gamma analysis (3%/2 mm) and less than 2.5% for point dose analysis compared to calculated plans. Conclusion: Jaw tracking can be used to help decrease spinal cord dose without any change in treatment delivery or calculation accuracy. Lower dose to the spinal cord was achieved using 6 MV beams compared to 10 MV beams, though 10 MV may be justified in some cases to decrease skin dose.

  12. A phantom study to determine the optimum size of a single collimator for shortening the treatment time in CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery of spherical targets.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnaperumal, Sudahar; Kurup, Gopalakrishna; Venkatraman, Murali; Jagadeesan, Velmurugan

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged treatment execution time is a concern in CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery. Beam reduction and node reduction technique, and monitor unit optimization methods are adopted to reduce the treatment time. Usage of single collimator in the CyberKnife treatment plan can potentially reduce collimator exchange time. An optimal single collimator, which yields an acceptable dose distribution along with minimum number of nodes, beams, and monitor units, can be a versatile alternative for shortening treatment time. The aim of the present study is to find the optimal single collimator in CyberKnife treatment planning to shorten the treatment time with the acceptable dose distribution. A spherical planning target volume PTV1 was drawn in an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. Plans with same treatment goals were generated for all the 12 collimators independently. D(95%) was selected as the prescribing isodose and the prescribed dose was 10 Gy. The plan of the optimal collimator size was evaluated for conformity, homogeneity, and dose spillage outside the target. The optimum collimator size and the target dimensions were correlated. The study was repeated with two other target volumes PTV2 and PTV3 for generalizing the results. Collimator sizes just above the diameter of the spherical PTVs were yielding least number of nodes and beams with acceptable dose distributions. The collimator size of 35 mm is optimum for the PTV1, whose diameter is 31.4 mm. Similarly, 50 mm collimator is optimum for PTV2 (diameter= 45.2 mm) and 20 mm collimator is optimum for PTV3 (Diameter = 17.3 mm). The total number of monitor units is found to reduce with increasing collimator size. Optimal single collimator is found to be useful for shortening the treatment time in spherical targets. Studies on two clinical targets, (a brain metastasis and a liver metastasis cases) show comparable results with the phantom study. PMID:22955653

  13. Dosimetric Verification of the System of Planning Brainscan for Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Oncology Department of the General Hospital of México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez R., J. T.; Villaseñor O., L. F.; Molero M., A. C.; Salinas, B.; Tovar M., V. M.

    2006-09-01

    The verification consists on the planning and administration of stereotactic treatments by means of conformed static beams, several polyethylene capsules with powder TLD 100 (type IAEA) located inside the head of a phantom Alderson-Rando. Because the planning system corrects for no-homogeneity in the density from the tomographic information, it is assumed that the absorbed dose in the tumor volume (capsule) corresponds to the dose absorbed to LiF: DLiF. Applying different cavity theories, the percent deviations to the nominal dose are: -1.81%⩽Δ%⩽0.71%, which are consistent with the order of the U%'s. The values of DW are calculated from two calibration curve: TL Response (nC) vs DW for the energy of the 60Co corrected for energy dependence to the accelerator photon beam quality D20/D10=0.57. Once curve for 0.5 to 5 Gy and other for 5 to 35 Gy. The traceability for the Dwater is obtained by means of a secondary standard ionization chamber Farmer PTW 30013 calibrated at the NRC.

  14. MAGAT gel and EBT2 film-based dosimetry for evaluating source plugging-based treatment plan in Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Rath, Goura Kishor; Senthilkumaran, S; Thulkar, Sanjay; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Laviraj, M A; Bisht, Raj Kishor; Mahapatra, A K

    2012-01-01

    This work illustrates a procedure to assess the overall accuracy associated with Gamma Knife treatment planning using plugging. The main role of source plugging or blocking is to create dose falloff in the junction between a target and a critical structure. We report the use of MAGAT gel dosimeter for verification of an experimental treatment plan based on plugging. The polymer gel contained in a head-sized glass container simulated all major aspects of the treatment process of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The 3D dose distribution recorded in the gel dosimeter was read using a 1.5T MRI scanner. Scanning protocol was: CPMG pulse sequence with 8 equidistant echoes, TR = 7 s, echo step = 14 ms, pixel size = 0.5mm × 0.5mm, and slice thickness of 2 mm. Using a calibration relationship between absorbed dose and spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), we converted R2 images to dose images. Volumetric dose comparison between treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurement was accomplished using an in-house MATLAB-based program. The isodose overlay of the measured and computed dose distribution on axial planes was in close agreement. Gamma index analysis of 3D data showed more than 94% voxel pass rate for different tolerance criteria of 3%/2 mm, 3%/1 mm and 2%/2 mm. Film dosimetry with GAFCHROMIC EBT 2 film was also performed to compare the results with the calculated TPS dose. Gamma index analysis of film measurement for the same tolerance criteria used for gel measurement evaluation showed more than 95% voxel pass rate. Verification of gamma plan calculated dose on account of shield is not part of acceptance testing of Leksell Gamma Knife (LGK). Through this study we accomplished a volumetric comparison of dose distributions measured with a polymer gel dosimeter and Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations for plans using plugging. We propose gel dosimeter as a quality assurance (QA) tool for verification of plug-based planning. PMID:23149780

  15. Dosimetric comparison of Linac-based (BrainLAB®) and robotic radiosurgery (CyberKnife ®) stereotactic system plans for acoustic schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debnarayan; Balaji Subramanian, S; Murli, V; Sudahar, H; Gopalakrishna Kurup, P G; Potharaju, Mahadev

    2012-02-01

    A dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator (LA)-based (BrainLAB) and robotic radiosurgery (RS) (CyberKnife) systems for acoustic schwannoma (Acoustic neuroma, AN) was carried out. Seven patients with radiologically confirmed unilateral AN were planned with both an LA-based (BrainLAB) and robotic RS (CyberKnife) system using the same computed tomography (CT) dataset and contours. Gross tumour volume (GTV) was contoured on post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan [planning target volume (PTV) margin 2 mm]. Planning and calculation were done with appropriate calculation algorithms. The prescribed isodose in both systems was considered adequate to cover at least 95% of the contoured target. Plan evaluations were done by examining the target coverage by the prescribed isodose line, and high- and low-dose volumes. Isodose plans and dose volume histograms generated by the two systems were compared. There was no statistically significant difference between the contoured volumes between the systems. Tumour volumes ranged from 380 to 3,100 mm(3). Dose prescription was 13-15 Gy in single fraction (median prescribed isodose 85%). There were no significant differences in conformity index (CI) (0.53 versus 0.58; P = 0.225), maximum brainstem dose (4.9 versus 4.7 Gy; P = 0.935), 2.5-Gy volume (39.9 versus 52.3 cc; P = 0.238) or 5-Gy volume (11.8 versus 16.8 cc; P = 0.129) between BrainLAB and CyberKnife system plans. There were statistically significant differences in organs at risk (OAR) doses, such as mean cochlear dose (6.9 versus 5.4 Gy; P = 0.001), mean mesial temporal dose (2.6 versus 1.7 Gy; P = 0.07) and high-dose (10 Gy) volume (3.2 versus 5.2 cc; P = 0.017). AN patients planned with the CyberKnife system had superior OAR (cochlea and mesial temporal lobe) sparing compared with those planned with the Linac-based system. Further evaluation of these findings in prospective studies with clinical correlation will provide actual clinical benefit from the

  16. SU-E-T-542: Comparison of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) of Brain Lesions Using Gamma Knife, VMAT, IMRT, and Conformal Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S; Charpentier, P; Chan, P; Neicu, T; Miyamoto, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in stereotactic radiation surgery of brain lesions using gamma Knife, VMAT, conformal arcs, and IMRT in order to provide an optimal treatment. Methods: Dose distributions from single shot of 4C model of Gamma Knife at the helmet collimation sizes of 4, 8, 14, and 18 mm in diameter were compared with full arcs with the square shapes of 4×4 (or 5×5), 8×8 (or 10×10), and spherical shapes of 16 or 20 mm in diameter using EDR3 films in the same gamma knife QA phantom. Plans for ten SRS cases with single and multiple lesions were created in gamma knife plans and Pinnacle plans. The external beam plans had enlarged field size by 2-mm and used single conformal full circle arc for solitary lesion and none coplanar arcs/beams for multiple lesions. Coverage, conformity index, dose to critical organs, and integral dose to the brain and nearby critical structures were compared on all plans. Structures and dose matrices were registered in a Velocity deformable image registration system. Results: Single full circle arc from Elekta beam-modulate MLC (4-mm leaf thickness) and agility MLC (5-mm leaf thickness) have larger penumbra and less flatness than that of Gamma Knife single shot. None-coplanar arcs or beams were required to achieve similar dose distribution. In general, Gamma Knife plans provided significant less integral dose than that of linac-based plans. Benefits of IMRT and VMAT versus gamma Knife and conformal arcs were not significant. Conclusion: Our dose measurement and treatment planning evaluation clearly demonstrated dose distribution differences amount current popular SRS modalities for small solitary and multiple brain lesions. The trend of using MLC shape beams or arcs to replace conventional cones should be revisited in order to keep lower integral dose if the late correlates with some radiation-induced side effects. Pilot grant from Elekta LLC.

  17. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of 3D Angiogram and MRI in Delineating the AVM Target for Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Avkshtol, V; Tanny, S; Reddy, K; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) provides an excellent alternative to embolization and surgical excision for the management of appropriately selected cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The currently accepted standard for delineating AVMs is planar digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA can be used to acquire a 3D data set that preserves osseous structures (3D-DA) at the time of the angiography for SRT planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative noninvasive method of visualizing the AVM nidus with comparable spatial resolution. We utilized 3D-DA and T1 post-contrast MRI data to evaluate the differences in SRT target volumes. Methods: Four patients underwent 3D-DA and high-resolution MRI. 3D T1 post-contrast images were obtained in all three reconstruction planes. A planning CT was fused with MRI and 3D-DA data sets. The AVMs were contoured utilizing one of the image sets at a time. Target volume, centroid, and maximum and minimum dimensions were analyzed for each patient. Results: Targets delineated using post-contrast MRI demonstrated a larger mean volume. AVMs >2 cc were found to have a larger difference between MRI and 3D-DA volumes. Larger AVMs also demonstrated a smaller relative uncertainty in contour centroid position (1 mm). AVM targets <2 cc had smaller absolute differences in volume, but larger differences in contour centroid position (2.5 mm). MRI targets demonstrated a more irregular shape compared to 3D-DA targets. Conclusions: Our preliminary data supports the use of MRI alone to delineate AVM targets >2 cc. The greater centroid stability for AVMs >2 cc ensures accurate target localization during image fusion. The larger MRI target volumes did not result in prohibitively greater volumes of normal brain tissue receiving the prescription dose. The larger centroid instability for AVMs <2 cc precludes the use of MRI alone for target delineation. We recommend incorporating a 3D-DA for these patients.

  18. Influence of eye size and beam entry angle on dose to non-targeted tissues of the eye during stereotactic x-ray radiosurgery of AMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantley, Justin L.; Hanlon, Justin; Chell, Erik; Lee, Choonsik; Smith, W. Clay; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of vision loss for the elderly population of industrialized nations. The IRay® Radiotherapy System, developed by Oraya® Therapeutics, Inc., is a stereotactic low-voltage irradiation system designed to treat the wet form of the disease. The IRay System uses three robotically positioned 100 kVp collimated photon beams to deliver an absorbed dose of up to 24 Gy to the macula. The present study uses the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to assess absorbed dose to six non-targeted tissues within the eye—total lens, radiosensitive tissues of the lens, optic nerve, distal tip of the central retinal artery, non-targeted portion of the retina, and the ciliary body--all as a function of eye size and beam entry angle. The ocular axial length was ranged from 20 to 28 mm in 2 mm increments, with the polar entry angle of the delivery system varied from 18° to 34° in 2° increments. The resulting data showed insignificant variations in dose for all eye sizes. Slight variations in the dose to the optic nerve and the distal tip of the central retinal artery were noted as the polar beam angle changed. An increase in non-targeted retinal dose was noted as the entry angle increased, while the dose to the lens, sensitive volume of the lens, and ciliary body decreased as the treatment polar angle increased. Polar angles of 26° or greater resulted in no portion of the sensitive volume of the lens receiving an absorbed dose of 0.5 Gy or greater. All doses to non-targeted structures reported in this study were less than accepted thresholds for post-procedure complications.

  19. Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9508, a Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Versus WBRT Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients With 1-3 Brain Metastases; Poststratified by the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Valicenti, Richard; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Won, Minhee; Mehta, Minesh

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9508 showed a survival advantage for patients with 1 but not 2 or 3 brain metastasis (BM) treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) versus WBRT alone. An improved prognostic index, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) has been developed. Our hypothesis was that if the data from RTOG 9508 were poststratified by the GPA, the conclusions may vary. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 252 of the 331 patients were evaluable by GPA. Of those, 211 had lung cancer. Breast cancer patients were excluded because the components of the breast GPA are not in the RTOG database. Multiple Cox regression was used to compare survival between treatment groups, adjusting for GPA. Treatment comparisons within subgroups were performed with the log-rank test. A free online tool ( (brainmetgpa.com)) simplified GPA use. Results: The fundamental conclusions of the primary analysis were confirmed in that there was no survival benefit overall for patients with 1 to 3 metastases; however, there was a benefit for the subset of patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 (median survival time [MST] for WBRT + SRS vs WBRT alone was 21.0 versus 10.3 months, P=.05) regardless of the number of metastases. Among patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 treated with WBRT and SRS, the MST for patients with 1 versus 2 to 3 metastases was 21 and 14.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: This secondary analysis of predominantly lung cancer patients, consistent with the original analysis, shows no survival advantage for the group overall when treated with WBRT and SRS; however, in patients with high GPA (3.5-4), there is a survival advantage regardless of whether they have 1, 2, or 3 BM. This benefit did not extend to patients with lower GPA. Prospective validation of this survival benefit for patients with multiple BM and high GPA when treated with WBRT and SRS is warranted.

  20. Creation of a Prognostic Index for Spine Metastasis to Stratify Survival in Patients Treated With Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Secondary Analysis of Mature Prospective Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth; Bishop, Andrew J.; Pan, Hubert Y.; Christensen, Eva N.; Yang, James N.; Tannir, Nizar; Amini, Behrang; Tatsui, Claudio; Rhines, Laurence; Brown, Paul; Ghia, Amol

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: There exists uncertainty in the prognosis of patients following spinal metastasis treatment. We sought to create a scoring system that stratifies patients based on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in 2 prospective trials investigating stereotactic spine radiation surgery (SSRS) for spinal metastasis with ≥3-year follow-up were analyzed. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to create a survival model. Pretreatment variables included were race, sex, age, performance status, tumor histology, extent of vertebrae involvement, previous therapy at the SSRS site, disease burden, and timing of diagnosis and metastasis. Four survival groups were generated based on the model-derived survival score. Results: Median follow-up in the 206 patients included in this analysis was 70 months (range: 37-133 months). Seven variables were selected: female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.7, P=.02), Karnofsky performance score (HR = 0.8 per 10-point increase above 60, P=.007), previous surgery at the SSRS site (HR = 0.7, P=.02), previous radiation at the SSRS site (HR = 1.8, P=.001), the SSRS site as the only site of metastatic disease (HR = 0.5, P=.01), number of organ systems involved outside of bone (HR = 1.4 per involved system, P<.001), and >5 year interval from initial diagnosis to detection of spine metastasis (HR = 0.5, P<.001). The median survival among all patients was 25.5 months and was significantly different among survival groups (in group 1 [excellent prognosis], median survival was not reached; group 2 reached 32.4 months; group 3 reached 22.2 months; and group 4 [poor prognosis] reached 9.1 months; P<.001). Pretreatment symptom burden was significantly higher in the patient group with poor survival than in the group with excellent survival (all metrics, P<.05). Conclusions: We developed the prognostic index for spinal metastases (PRISM) model, a new model that identified patient subgroups with poor and excellent prognoses.

  1. MO-B-18C-01: Proton Therapy II: Proton Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, B; Daartz, J

    2014-06-15

    Proton stereotactic radiotherapy shares fundamental principles with general proton therapy physics, specifically range uncertainties and broad beam measurement techniques. Significant differences emerge when treating with smaller field sizes that suffer lateral disequilibrium and when fractions are reduced. This session will explore the history and scope of proton stereotactic radiotherapy in clinical practice. Uncertainties and treatment planning methods specific to stereotactic treatments will be discussed. The session will include an overview of the physical properties of small proton fields and resulting needs for accurate measurements and modeling of dose distributions for radiosurgery treatment planning. Learning Objectives: Understand the clinical rationale for proton radiosurgery. Understand the similarities and differences from general proton therapy. Understand the similarities and differences from photon stereotactic radiosurgery. Understand the basic physics and clinical physics methods for measuring and commissioning a radiosurgery program.

  2. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Khan, Aftab; Kim, In-Young; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the role of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the multidisciplinary management of brain metastases from an undiagnosed primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients who had solitary or multiple brain metastases without a detectable primary site underwent stereotactic radiosurgery between January 1990 and March 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 61.7 years (range, 37.9-78.7 years). The median target volume was 1.0 cc (range, 0.02-23.6 cc), and the median margin radiosurgical dose was 16 Gy (range, 20-70 Gy). Results: After radiosurgery, the local tumor control rate was 88.5%. Twenty four patients died and 5 patients were living at the time of this analysis. The overall median survival was 12 months. Actuarial survival rates from stereotactic radiosurgery at 1 and 2 years were 57.2% and 36.8%, respectively. Factors associated with poor progression-free survival included large tumor volume (3 cc or more) and brainstem tumor location. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is an effective and safe minimally invasive option for patients with brain metastases from an unknown primary site.

  3. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  4. Patterns of Care and Outcomes of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Meningiomas: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare Linked Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Burton, Eric; Skirboll, Stephen; Woo, Shiao; Boakye, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated radiotherapy (XRT) are unknown in patients with resected meningiomas. Objective: To identify patterns of care and outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy for meningiomas in the Linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare data. Methods: A total of 1,964 patients older than 66 years included in the SEER-Medicare data, who were diagnosed with meningioma, and underwent craniotomy were included for analysis. Results: Patients were less likely to receive adjuvant therapy if they were older than 75 (OR 0.730, 95% CI 0.548-0.973), female sex (OR 0.731, 95% CI 0.547-0.978), or unmarried (OR 0.692, 95% CI 0.515-0.929). Patients were more likely to receive adjuvant treatment for Grade II/III tumors (OR 5.586, 95% CI 2.135-13.589), tumors over 5 cm (OR 1.850, 95% CI 1.332-2.567), or partial resection (OR 3.230, 95% CI 2.327-4.484). Yearly between 2000 and 2009, 10.65 – 19.77% of patients received adjuvant therapy. Although no survival benefit was seen with the addition of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.1236), the subgroup of patients receiving SRS had a decreased risk of death compared to those receiving surgery alone (aHR 0.544, 95% CI 0.318 – 0.929). Conclusion: Utilization of adjuvant XRT and SRS remained stable between 2000 and 2010. Male sex, young age, marriage, partial resection, Grade II/III tumors, and large tumors predicted the use of adjuvant therapy. For all patients, SRS decreased the risk of death compared to craniotomy alone.

  5. Radiosurgery for Craniopharyngioma

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Mathieu, David; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for residual or recurrent craniopharyngiomas and evaluate the factors that optimized the tumor control rates. Methods and Materials: A total of 46 patients with craniopharyngiomas underwent 51 SRS procedures at University of Pittsburgh between 1988 and 2007. The median tumor volume was 1.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.07-8.0). The median prescription dose delivered to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 9-20). The median maximal dose was 26.0 Gy (range, 20-50). The mean follow-up time was 62.2 months (range, 12-232). Results: The overall survival rate after SRS was 97.1% at 5 years. The 3- and 5-year progression-free survival rates (solid tumor control) were both 91.6%. The overall local control rate (for both solid tumor and cyst control) was 91%, 81%, and 68% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. No patients with normal pituitary function developed hypopopituitarism after SRS. Two patients developed homonymous hemianopsia owing to tumor progression after SRS. Among the factors examined, complete radiosurgical coverage was a significant favorable prognostic factor. Conclusion: SRS is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for the management of residual or recurrent craniopharyngiomas. Complete radiosurgical coverage of the tumor was associated with better tumor control.

  6. Physical presence during gamma stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M; Swanson, D; Yates, B

    2009-02-01

    During an invited visit to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) gamma knife facility, officials from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) observed what they considered as an apparent violation of the physical presence requirements specified in 10 CFR 35.615(f)(3). This event initiated an inspection and two different but related investigations by the NRC Office of Investigations (OI). Based on the NRC inspection and investigations, the NRC identified three apparent violations that were under consideration for escalated enforcement. The University of Pittsburgh (licensee) requested an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) session with the NRC to resolve issues related to whether a violation occurred, the appropriate enforcement action, and the appropriate corrective action. As a result of the ADR mediation session, the licensee and NRC agreed to final disposition of this matter by way of a single violation of the regulatory requirement in 10 CFR 35.24(b), whereby the licensee's Radiation Safety Officer failed to ensure that the physical presence requirements of 10 CFR 35.615(f)(3) were consistently met and failed to ensure that written directives were consistently signed by the Authorized User in accordance with 10 CFR 35.32. In addition to corrective actions the licensee had already taken to prevent recurrence, it also agreed to inform other licensees in the industry of this event, so that they may learn from this incident and take appropriate actions to assure that these types of violations do not occur at their institutions. PMID:19125050

  7. Radiosurgical options in neuro-oncology: a review on current tenets and future opportunities. Part II: adjuvant radiobiological tools.

    PubMed

    Ganau, Mario; Foroni, Roberto Israel; Gerosa, Massimo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe Kenneth; Longhi, Michele; Nicolato, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is currently a well-established, minimally invasive treatment for many primary and secondary tumors, especially deep-sited lesions for which traditional neurosurgical procedures were poorly satisfactory or not effective at all. The initial evolution of SRS was cautious, relying on more than 30 years of experimental and clinical work that preceded its introduction into the worldwide medical community. This path enabled a brilliant present, and the continuous pace of technological advancement holds promise for a brighter future. Part II of this review article will cover the impact of multimodal adjuvant technologies on SRS, and their input to the crucial role played by neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists and medical physicists in the management and care of fragile neuro-oncological patients. PMID:25702646

  8. Esophageal Metastasis to the Iris Effectively Palliated Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Adjuvant Intravitreal Chemotherapy: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Lema, Gareth M.C.; DiLoreto, David A.; Katz, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of isolated iris metastasis from esophageal adenocarcinoma that was successfully managed with local application of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and adjunctive intravitreal therapy. A 53-year-old man with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma achieved a complete clinical and radiographic response after surgery and chemotherapy. Four months later, he developed headache and decreased vision and was diagnosed with metastasis to the iris by slit-lamp examination. The decrease in vision was secondary to cystoid macular edema. The metastatic tumor and the patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with SBRT and intravitreal injections of bevacizumab and triamcinolone. We conclude that SBRT combined with intravitreal chemotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated palliative treatment for metastasis of esophageal adenocarcinoma to the iris. PMID:23275779

  9. Radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas: Early experience

    SciTech Connect

    Linskey, M.E.; Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    We reviewed our early experience with the first 26 patients with acoustic neurinomas (21 unilateral, 5 bilateral) treated by stereotactic radiosurgery using the first North American 201-source cobalt-60 gamma knife. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 19 months (median, 13 months). Serial postoperative imaging showed either a decrease in tumor size (11 patients) or growth arrest (15 patients). Loss of central contrast enhancement was a characteristic change (18 patients). Seven patients had good or serviceable hearing preoperatively. In all 7 the preoperative hearing status was retained immediately after radiosurgery. At follow-up, 3 had preserved hearing, 1 had reduced hearing, and 3 had lost all hearing in the treated ear. Hearing in 1 patient that was nonserviceable preoperatively later improved to a serviceable hearing level. Delayed facial paresis developed in 6 patients, and delayed trigeminal sensory loss developed in 7 patients, none of whom had significant deficits before radiosurgery. Both facial and trigeminal deficits tended to improve within 3 to 6 months of onset with excellent recovery anticipated. Lower cranial nerve dysfunction was not observed. All 26 patients remain at their preoperative employment or functional status. At present, stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative treatment for acoustic neurinomas in patients who are elderly, have significant concomitant medical problems, have a tumor in their only hearing ear, have bilateral acoustic neurinomas, refuse microsurgical excision, or have recurrent tumor despite surgical resection. Although longer and more extensive follow-up is required, the control of tumor growth and the acceptable rate of complications in this early experience testifies to the future expanding role of this technique in the management of selected acoustic neurinomas.

  10. Radiosurgery for infundibulum adenoma: stalk dose implications.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Jennifer D; Cohen-Inbar, Or; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    Treating pituitary adenomas in the infundibulum with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), achieving tumor volume control while preserving pituitary endocrine function and visual function, is challenging. We present a case of a recurrent remnant infundibular lesion treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). The mass was treated with microsurgical resection twice, and the residual stalk lesion was treated with single-session SRS employing a margin dose of 15 Gy to the infundibulum. Five years after GKS, tumor regression persists without visual dysfunction or hypopituitarism. Radiosurgical doses of 30 Gy to the pituitary stalk may be tolerated by patients while maintaining endocrine function. PMID:27435739

  11. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids. PMID:25533053

  12. Isotropic beam bouquets for shaped beam linear accelerator radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Buatti, John M.; Bouchet, Lionel G.

    2001-10-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy treatment planning, the steepest dose gradient is obtained by using beam arrangements with maximal beam separation. We propose a treatment plan optimization method that optimizes beam directions from the starting point of a set of isotropically convergent beams, as suggested by Webb. The optimization process then individually steers each beam to the best position, based on beam's-eye-view (BEV) critical structure overlaps with the target projection and the target's projected cross sectional area at each beam position. This final optimized beam arrangement maintains a large angular separation between adjacent beams while conformally avoiding critical structures. As shown by a radiosurgery plan, this optimization method improves the critical structure sparing properties of an unoptimized isotropic beam bouquet, while maintaining the same degree of dose conformity and dose gradient. This method provides a simple means of designing static beam radiosurgery plans with conformality indices that are within established guidelines for radiosurgery planning, and with dose gradients that approach those achieved in conventional radiosurgery planning.

  13. A multi-national report on methods for institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy and radiosurgery are rapidly emerging treatment options for both malignant and benign spine tumors. Proper institutional credentialing by physicians and medical physicists as well as other personnel is important for the safe and effective adoption of spine radiosurgery. This article describes the methods for institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery at seven highly experienced international institutions. Methods All institutions (n = 7) are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided spine radiosurgery. A questionnaire consisting of 24 items covering various aspects of institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery was completed by all seven institutions. Results Close agreement was observed in most aspects of spine radiosurgery credentialing at each institution. A formal credentialing process was believed to be important for the implementation of a new spine radiosurgery program, for patient safety and clinical outcomes. One institution has a written policy specific for spine radiosurgery credentialing, but all have an undocumented credentialing system in place. All institutions rely upon an in-house proctoring system for the training of both physicians and medical physicists. Four institutions require physicians and medical physicists to attend corporate sponsored training. Two of these 4 institutions also require attendance at a non-corporate sponsored academic society radiosurgery course. Corporate as well as non-corporate sponsored training were believed to be complimentary and both important for training. In 5 centers, all cases must be reviewed at a multidisciplinary conference prior to radiosurgery treatment. At 3 centers, neurosurgeons are not required to be involved in all cases if there is no evidence for instability or spinal cord compression. Backup physicians and physicists are required at only 1 institution, but

  14. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    PubMed

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  15. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  16. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Patients With Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas: Results From a 15-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. Cochran, Joseph; Natt, Neena; Brown, Paul D.; Erickson, Dana; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and complications of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 62 patients with NFA undergoing radiosurgery between 1992 and 2004, of whom 59 (95%) underwent prior tumor resection. The median treatment volume was 4.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.8-12.9). The median treatment dose to the tumor margin was 16 Gy (range, 11-20). The median maximum point dose to the optic apparatus was 9.5 Gy (range, 5.0-12.6). The median follow-up period after radiosurgery was 64 months (range, 23-161). Results: Tumor size decreased for 37 patients (60%) and remained unchanged for 23 patients (37%). Two patients (3%) had tumor growth outside the prescribed treatment volume and required additional treatment (fractionated radiation therapy, n = 1; repeat radiosurgery, n 1). Tumor growth control was 95% at 3 and 7 years after radiosurgery. Eleven (27%) of 41 patients with normal (n = 30) or partial (n = 11) anterior pituitary function before radiosurgery developed new deficits at a median of 24 months after radiosurgery. The risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits at 5 years was 32%. The 5-year risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits was 18% for patients with a tumor volume of {<=}4.0 cm{sup 3} compared with 58% for patients with a tumor volume >4.0 cm{sup 3} (risk ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-14.9, p = 0.02). No patient had a decline in visual function. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery is effective in the management of patients with residual or recurrent NFA, although longer follow-up is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. The primary complication is hypopituitarism, and the risk of developing new anterior pituitary deficits correlates with the size of the irradiated tumor.

  17. The technical evolution of gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L Dade; Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery was first applied for the treatment of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in 1968. Using biplane angiography to target a small-volume, deep-seated lesion, photons were cross-fired on the pathological shunt. The AVM was obliterated within 3 years. This began a cautious introduction of Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the 1970s. As the Gamma Knife technology spread to sites in Europe, South America and the USA in the 1980s, AVM radiosurgery became a primary indication. During the early years the usual standard was to deliver a single radiosurgical isocenter to the target defined by 2-dimensional angiography. Most patients had small-volume AVMs unsuitable for surgical excision. Over time the technique of Gamma Knife AVM surgery evolved to include: careful patient selection, discussion of appropriate treatment strategies, anticonvulsant administration for lobar locations and intraoperative targeting using both high-resolution axial plane imaging--usually magnetic resonance imaging--coupled with biplane digital subtraction angiography. High-speed computer dose planning integrated with more detailed imaging strategies facilitated conformal radiation delivery in a single treatment session coupled with high selectivity of the dose delivered. Multiple isocenters became routine. Long-term follow-up care included serial imaging evaluations to assess the response and to detect complications. Imaging was critical to confirm the desired radiobiological response--complete obliteration. Long-term follow-up after obliteration confirmed that AVM radiosurgery had a high success rate for properly selected patients and a risk-benefit profile that substantiated patient safety. Twenty-year results after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for AVMs are currently available. Established roles have been found for pediatric cases and for larger-volume AVMs unsuitable for surgical removal. The role and technique of embolization prior to radiosurgery continue

  18. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  19. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  20. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  1. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  2. 10 CFR 35.615 - Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety precautions for remote afterloader units, teletherapy units, and gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.615 Section 35.615 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units,...

  3. The Mathematics of Three N-Localizers Used Together for Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-localizer enjoys widespread use in image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery and radiosurgery. This article derives the mathematical equations that are used with three N-localizers and provides analogies, explanations, and appendices in order to promote a deeper understanding of the mathematical principles that govern the N-localizer. PMID:26594605

  4. Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shuang; Swanson, Nathan; Chen, Zhe; Ma, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    Gamma knife has been the treatment of choice for various brain tumors and functional disorders. Current gamma knife radiosurgery is planned in a 'ball-packing' approach and delivered in a 'step-and-shoot' manner, i.e. it aims to 'pack' the different sized spherical high-dose volumes (called 'shots') into a tumor volume. We have developed a dynamic scheme for gamma knife radiosurgery based on the concept of 'dose-painting' to take advantage of the new robotic patient positioning system on the latest Gamma Knife C™ and Perfexion™ units. In our scheme, the spherical high dose volume created by the gamma knife unit will be viewed as a 3D spherical 'paintbrush', and treatment planning reduces to finding the best route of this 'paintbrush' to 'paint' a 3D tumor volume. Under our dose-painting concept, gamma knife radiosurgery becomes dynamic, where the patient moves continuously under the robotic positioning system. We have implemented a fully automatic dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery treatment planning system, where the inverse planning problem is solved as a traveling salesman problem combined with constrained least-square optimizations. We have also carried out experimental studies of dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery and showed the following. (1) Dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery is ideally suited for fully automatic inverse planning, where high quality radiosurgery plans can be obtained in minutes of computation. (2) Dynamic radiosurgery plans are more conformal than step-and-shoot plans and can maintain a steep dose gradient (around 13% per mm) between the target tumor volume and the surrounding critical structures. (3) It is possible to prescribe multiple isodose lines with dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, so that the treatment can cover the periphery of the target volume while escalating the dose for high tumor burden regions. (4) With dynamic gamma knife radiosurgery, one can obtain a family of plans representing a tradeoff between the delivery time and the

  5. Radiosurgery for the treatment of psychiatric disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Marc; Carron, Romain; Régis, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Radiosurgery for psychiatric disorders has been performed for more than 50 years. The use of deep brain stimulation has recently been expanded to the investigational treatment of specific psychiatric disorders. A literature review of past studies incorporating radiosurgical stereotactic lesions for psychiatric disorders was performed to provide historic context and possible guidance for current and future attempts at treating psychiatric disorders, especially by gamma capsulotomy. The anatomic target localization, dose selection, and the outcome of the radiosurgical procedures were reviewed, and the evolutions of lesioning strategies were analyzed with particular emphasis on the dose selection. Large-scale prospective studies with strict inclusion and well-defined, objective outcome criteria are necessary for defining the role of radiosurgery for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23872618

  6. Staged-volume radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations: a review.

    PubMed

    AlKhalili, Kenan; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective management strategy for properly selected patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, the risk of postradiosurgical radiation-related injury is higher in patients with large AVMs. Multistaged volumetric management of large AVMs was undertaken to limit the radiation exposure to the surrounding normal brain. This strategy offers a promising method for obtaining high AVM obliteration rates with minimal normal tissue damage. The use of embolization as an adjunctive method in the treatment of large AVMs remains controversial. Unfortunately, staged-volume radiosurgery (SVR) has a number of potential pitfalls that affect the outcome. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of SVR in the treatment of large AVMs, to discuss the outcome comparing it to other treatment modalities, and to discuss the potential improvement that could be introduced to this method of treatment. PMID:25175440

  7. Volume rendering: application in static field conformal radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, J. Daniel; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    1992-09-01

    Lesions in the head which are large or irregularly shaped present challenges for radiosurgical treatment by linear accelerator or other radiosurgery modalities. To treat these lesions we are developing static field, conformal stereotactic radiosurgery. In this procedure seven to eleven megavoltage x-ray beams are aimed at the target volume. Each beam is designed from the beam's-eye view, and has its own unique geometry: gantry angle, table angle, and shape which conforms to the projected cross-section of the target. A difficulty with this and other 3- D treatment plans is the visualization of the treatment geometry and proposed treatment plan. Is the target volume geometrically covered by the arrangement of beams, and is the dose distribution adequate? To answer these questions we have been investigating the use of ANALYZETM volume rendering to display the target anatomy and the resultant dose distribution.

  8. Quality Assurance of 4D-CT Scan Techniques in Multicenter Phase III Trial of Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiotherapy (Radiosurgery or Surgery for Operable Early Stage (Stage 1A) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer [ROSEL] Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Lieshout, Maarten van; Schuring, Danny; Heumen, Marielle J.T. van; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Senan, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom (Quasar, Modus Medical Devices) in accordance with their in-house imaging protocol for SBRT. A cylindrical cedar wood insert with plastic spheres of 15 mm (o15) and 30 mm (o30) diameter was moved in a cosine-based pattern, with an extended period in the exhale position to mimic the actual breathing motion. A range of motion of R = 15 and R = 25 mm and breathing period of T = 3 and T = 6 s were used. Positional and volumetric imaging accuracy was analyzed using Pinnacle version 8.1x at various breathing phases, including the mid-ventilation phase and maximal intensity projections of the spheres. Results: Imaging using eight CT scanners (Philips, Siemens, GE) and one positron emission tomography-CT scanner (Institution 3, Siemens) was investigated. The imaging protocols varied widely among the institutions. No strong correlation was found between the specific scan protocol parameters and the observed results. Deviations in the maximal intensity projection volumes averaged 1.9% (starting phase of the breathing cycle [o]15, R = 15), 12.3% (o15, R = 25), and -0.9% (o30, R = 15). The end-expiration volume deviations (13.4%, o15 and 2.5%, o30), were, on average, smaller than the end-inspiration deviations (20.7%, o15 and 4.5%, o30), which, in turn, were smaller than the mid-ventilation deviations (32.6%, o15 and 8.0%, o30). A slightly larger variation in the mid-ventilation origin position was observed (mean, -0.2 mm; range, -3.6-4.2) than in the maximal intensity projection origin position (mean, -0.1 mm; range, -2.5-2.5). The range of motion was generally underestimated (mean, -1.5 mm; range, -5.5-1). Conclusions: Notable differences were seen in the 4D-CT imaging protocols

  9. Radiosurgery in the Management of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Peñagarícano, José; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) describes recurrent seizure activity originating from the depths of the temporal lobe. MTLE patients who fail two trials of medication now require testing for surgical candidacy at an epilepsy center. For these individuals, temporal lobectomy offers the greatest likelihood for seizure-freedom (up to 80-90%); unfortunately, this procedure remains largely underutilized. Moreover, for select patients unable to tolerate open surgery, novel techniques are emerging for selective ablation of the mesial temporal structures, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We present here a review of SRS as a potential therapy for MTLE, when open surgery is not an option. PMID:26390538

  10. Cyberknife radiosurgery for focal paravertebral recurrence after radical pleurectomy/decortication in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lang-Lazdunski, Loïc; Barrington, Sally; Bille, Andrea; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma with focal relapse in the Azygos arch region after radical pleurectomy/decortication and adjuvant chemotherapy. Tumour recurrence was successfully treated by Cyberknife radiosurgery (70 Gy in five fractions). Patient remains disease-free at 40 months without any other treatment. PMID:22290898

  11. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. The Role of Palliative Radiosurgery When Cancer Invades the Cavernous Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Involvement of the cavernous sinus by direct invasion from skull base cancer or from metastatic spread of cancers is a challenging problem. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of patients who developed cavernous sinus metastases or direct invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 37 patients who had cavernous sinus metastases or had cavernous sinus invasion from adjacent skull base cancers and who underwent SRS between 1992 and 2006 at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The median patient age was 57.8 years. Previous adjuvant management included fractionated radiotherapy in 8, chemotherapy in 16, and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 5. The primary sites of metastases or invasion were nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 7), parotid gland carcinoma (n = 7), and metastases from systemic cancer (n = 23). The median target volume was 6.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.3-33.6), and the median margin dose was 14 Gy (range, 12-20). Results: At a mean of 12.9 months (range, 0.8-63.9), 32 patients had died and 5 were living. The overall survival rate after SRS was 36.6% and 19.4% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Progression-free survival was related to a greater marginal dose. After SRS, 12 (35.3%) of 34 patients with neurologic symptoms exhibited improvement. SRS early after diagnosis was significantly associated with improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction. Conclusion: SRS is a minimally invasive palliative option for patients whose cancer has invaded the cavernous sinus. The benefits for cranial nerve deficits are best when SRS is performed early.

  13. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  14. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  15. Evaluation of radiosurgery techniques–Cone-based linac radiosurgery vs tomotherapy-based radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ho Yin; Mui, Wing Lun A.; Lee, Joseph W.Y.; Fung, Winky Wing Ki; Chan, Jocelyn M.T.; Chiu, G.; Law, Maria Y.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Performances of radiosurgery of intracranial lesions between cone-based Linac system and Tomotherapy-based system were compared in terms of dosimetry and time. Twelve patients with single intracranial lesion treated with cone-based Linac radiosurgery system from 2005 to 2009 were replanned for Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery treatment. The conformity index, homogeneity index (HI), and gradient score index (GSI) of each case was calculated. The Wilcoxon matched-pair test was used to compare the 3 indices between both systems. The cases with regular target (n = 6) and those with irregular target (n = 6) were further analyzed separately. The estimated treatment time between both systems was also compared. Significant differences were found in HI (p = 0.05) and in GSI (p = 0.03) for the whole group. Cone-based radiosurgery was better in GSI whereas Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery was better in HI. Cone-based radiosurgery was better in conformity index (p = 0.03) and GSI (p = 0.03) for regular targets, whereas Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery system performed significantly better in HI (p = 0.03) for irregular targets. The estimated total treatment time for Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery ranged from 24 minutes to 35 minutes, including 15 minutes of pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) and image registration, whereas that for cone-based radiosurgery ranged from 15 minutes for 1 isocenter to 75 minutes for 5 isocenters. As a rule of thumb, Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery system should be the first-line treatment for irregular lesions because of better dose homogeneity and shorter treatment time. Cone-based Linac radiosurgery system should be the treatment of choice for regular targets because of the better dose conformity, rapid dose fall-off, and reasonable treatment time.

  16. Descriptive Analysis of Oligometastatic Lesions Treated With Curative-Intent Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T. Katz, Alan W.; Schell, Michael C.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize oligometastases in patients enrolled on two prospective pilot studies, treating oligometastases with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery to cranial lesions. Methods and Materials: We describe the characteristics and local control (LC) of 293 lesions in 121 patients with five or fewer metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation and/or cranial stereotactic radiosurgery. For each lesion, the primary cancer site, tumor histology, site of metastasis, gross tumor volume, and prescribed dose were ascertained. The prescribed dose is expressed by the biologically effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (BED2), calculated using the linear quadratic model, assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10. Results: Lung lesions were significantly smaller than other lesions in our cohort, whereas liver lesions were significantly larger, possibly reflecting a detection and/or referral bias. The 2-year and 4-year tumor LC rates were 77% and 73% respectively. A larger gross tumor volume was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with worse lesion LC. Lesions originating from primary pancreatic, biliary or liver cancer exhibited significantly poorer LC, as did lesions from colorectal cancer. Lesions from breast cancer were better controlled. A higher BED2 did not correlate with improved tumor control. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation to aggressively treat oligometastatic lesions results in good local tumor control. Bulkier lesions are more difficult to control and may benefit from dose escalation.

  17. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-21

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Malignant Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Noninfiltrating Astrocytoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Meningioma; Brain Metastases; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Pineal Parenchymal Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Infiltrating Astrocytoma; Mixed Gliomas; Stage IV Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  18. Radiosurgery for Pediatric Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Erin S; Chao, Samuel T; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene; Jung, Edward; Recinos, Violette R; Mohammadi, Alireza; Suh, John H

    2016-03-01

    The utility of radiosurgery for pediatric brain tumors is not well known. For children, radiosurgery may have an important role for treating unresectable tumors, residual disease, or tumors in the recurrent setting that have received prior radiotherapy. The available evidence demonstrates utility for some children with primary brain tumors resulting in good local control. Radiosurgery can be considered for limited residual disease or focal recurrences. However, the potential toxicities are unique and not insignificant. Therefore, prospective studies need to be performed to develop guidelines for indications and treatment for children and reduce toxicity in this population. PMID:26536284

  19. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhan; Vanstalle, Marie; La Tessa, Chiara; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Durante, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1–10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22843629

  20. A Modified Radiosurgery-Based Arteriovenous Malformation Grading Scale and Its Correlation With Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Oysul, Kaan; Pollock, Bruce E.; Sirin, Sait; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The Pittsburgh radiosurgery-based arteriovenous malformation (AVM) grading scale was developed to predict patient outcomes after radiosurgery and was later modified with location as a two-tiered variable (deep vs. other). The purpose of this study was to test the modified radiosurgery-based AVM score in a separate set of AVM patients managed with radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: The AVM score is calculated as follows: AVM score = (0.1)(volume, cc) + (0.02)(age, years) + (0.5)(location; frontal/temporal/parietal/occipital/intraventricular/corpus callosum/cerebellar = 0, basal ganglia/thalamus/brainstem = 1). Testing of the modified system was performed on 293 patients having AVM radiosurgery from 1992 to 2004 at the University of Pittsburgh with dose planning based on a combination of stereotactic angiography and MRI. The median patient age was 38 years, the median AVM volume was 3.3 cc, and 57 patients (19%) had deep AVMs. The median modified AVM score was 1.25. The median patient follow-up was 39 months. Results: The modified AVM scale correlated with the percentage of patients with AVM obliteration without new deficits ({<=}1.00, 62%; 1.01-1.50, 51%; 1.51-2.00, 53%; and >2.00, 32%; F = 11.002, R{sup 2} = 0.8117, p = 0.001). Linear regression also showed a statistically significant correlation between outcome and dose prescribed to the margin (F = 25.815, p <0.001). Conclusions: The modified radiosurgery-based AVM grading scale using location as a two-tiered variable correlated with outcomes when tested on a cohort of patients who underwent both angiography and MRI for dose planning. This system can be used to guide choices among observation, endovascular, surgical, and radiosurgical management strategies for individual AVM patients.

  1. Debate: adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy or not? More data is the wiser choice.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Gerald B; Hong, Angela; Gondi, Vinai; Burmeister, Bryan; Jacobsen, Kari; Lo, Serigne; Paton, Elizabeth; Shivalingam, Brindha; Thompson, John F

    2016-01-01

    Every year 170,000 patients are diagnosed with brain metastases (BMs) in the United States. Traditionally, adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (AWBRT) has been offered following local therapy with neurosurgery (NSx) and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to BMs. The aim is to increase intracranial control, thereby decreasing symptoms from intracranial progression and a neurological death. There is a rapidly evolving change in the radiation treatment of BMs happening around the world. AWBRT is now being passed over in favour of repeat scanning at regular intervals and more local therapies as more BMs appear radiologically, BMs that may never become symptomatic. This change has happened after the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in Item 5 of its "Choosing Wisely 2014" list recommended: "Don't routinely add adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy to SRS for limited brain metastases". The guidelines are supposed to be based on the highest evidence to hand at the time. This article debates that the randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published prior to this recommendation consistently showed AWBRT significantly increases intracranial control, and avoids a neurological death, what it is meant to do. It also points out that, despite the enormity of the problem, only 774 patients in total had been randomised over more than three decades. These trials were heterogeneous in many respects. This data can, at best, be regarded as preliminary. In particular, there are no single histology AWBRT trials yet completed. A phase two trial investigating hippocampal avoiding AWBRT (HAWBRT) showed significantly less NCF decline compared to historical controls. We now need more randomised data to confirm the benefit of adjuvant HAWBRT. However, the ASTRO Guideline has particularly impacted accrual to trials investigating this, especially the international ANZMTG 01.07 WBRTMel trial. This is an RCT investigating AWBRT following local treatment in patients with one to three BMs

  2. Investigating the reproducibility of a complex multifocal radiosurgery treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebanck, M.; Juang, T.; Newton, J.; Adamovics, J.; Wang, Z.; Oldham, M.

    2013-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has become a widely used technique to treat solid tumors and secondary metastases of the brain. Multiple targets can be simultaneously treated with a single isocenter in order to reduce the set-up time to improve patient comfort and workflow. In this study, a 5-arc multifocal RapidArc treatment was delivered to multiple PRESAGE® dosimeters in order to explore the repeatability of the treatment. The three delivery measurements agreed well with each other, with less than 3% standard deviation of dose in the target. The deliveries also agreed well with the treatment plan, with gamma passing rates greater than 90% (5% dose-difference, and 2 mm distance-to-agreement criteria). The optical-CT PRESAGE® system provided a reproducible measurement for treatment verification, provided measurements were made immediately following treatment.

  3. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery as a Therapeutic Strategy for Intracranial Sarcomatous Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Thomas; Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Monaco, Edward A.; Flickinger, John C.; Kofler, Julia; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the indication and outcomes for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) in the care of patients with intracranial sarcomatous metastases. Methods and Materials: Data from 21 patients who underwent radiosurgery for 60 sarcomatous intracranial metastases (54 parenchymal and 6 dural-based) were studied. Nine patients had radiosurgery for solitary tumors and 12 for multiple tumors. The primary pathology was metastatic leiomyosarcoma (4 patients), osteosarcoma (3 patients), soft-tissue sarcoma (5 patients), chondrosarcoma (2 patients), alveolar soft part sarcoma (2 patients), and rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, liposarcoma, neurofibrosarcoma, and synovial sarcoma (1 patient each). Twenty patients received multimodality management for their primary tumor, and 1 patient had no evidence of systemic disease. The mean tumor volume was 6.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.07-40.9 cm{sup 3}), and a median margin dose of 16 Gy was administered. Three patients had progressive intracranial disease despite fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS. Results: A local tumor control rate of 88% was achieved (including patients receiving boost, up-front, and salvage SRS). New remote brain metastases developed in 7 patients (33%). The median survival after diagnosis of intracranial metastasis was 16 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 61%. Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery was a well-tolerated and initially effective therapy in the management of patients with sarcomatous intracranial metastases. However, many patients, including those who also received fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy, developed progressive new brain disease.

  4. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, John C.; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  5. Adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Asma; Neoptolemos, John

    2006-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the western world, accounting for 5% of all cancer-related deaths. Only a small percentage of patients with pancreatic cancer are able to undergo potentially curative resection, even in specialized centres, and prognosis remains poor after successful surgery. Over the last few years efforts have been directed towards the development of adjuvant therapies in attempts to improve outcome. The main trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy with follow-on chemotherapy are described in this paper, followed by the results of the ESPAC-1 trial and the status of ESPAC-2 and -3 trials. PMID:18333088

  6. Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery in patients with large brain metastases treated with radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Eighty patients with large brain metastases (>14 cm{sup 3}) were treated with radiosurgery between 1998 and 2009. The mean age was 59 {+-} 11 years, and 49 (61.3%) were men. Neurologic symptoms were identified in 77 patients (96.3%), and 30 (37.5%) exhibited a dependent functional status. The primary disease was under control in 36 patients (45.0%), and 44 (55.0%) had a single lesion. The mean tumor volume was 22.4 {+-} 8.8 cm{sup 3}, and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 13.8 {+-} 2.2 Gy. Results: The median survival time from radiosurgery was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.343-10.46), and the 1-year survival rate was 39.2%. Functional improvement within 1-4 months or the maintenance of the initial independent status was observed in 48 (60.0%) and 20 (25.0%) patients after radiosurgery, respectively. Control of the primary disease, a marginal dose of {>=}11 Gy, and a tumor volume {>=}26 cm{sup 3} were significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.479; p = .018; 95% CI, 0.261-0.880; hazard ratio, 0.350; p = .004; 95% CI, 0.171-0.718; hazard ratio, 2.307; p = .006; 95% CI, 1.274-4.180, respectively). Unacceptable radiation-related toxicities (Radiation Toxicity Oncology Group central nervous system toxicity Grade 3, 4, and 5 in 7, 6, and 2 patients, respectively) developed in 15 patients (18.8%). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to have a comparable efficacy with surgery for large brain metastases. However, the rate of radiation-related toxicities after radiosurgery should be considered when deciding on a treatment modality.

  7. Stereotactic neurosurgery in the United Kingdom: the hundred years from Horsley to Hariz.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Green, Alexander L; Nandi, Dipankar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2008-09-01

    The history of stereotactic neurosurgery in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is reviewed. Horsley and Clarke's primate stereotaxy at the turn of the 20th century and events surrounding it are described, including Mussen's development of a human version of the apparatus. Stereotactic surgery after the Second World War is reviewed, with an emphasis on the pioneering work of Gillingham, Hitchcock, Knight, and Watkins and the contributions from Bennett, Gleave, Hughes, Johnson, McKissock, McCaul, and Dutton after the influences of Dott, Cairns, and Jefferson. Forster's introduction of gamma knife radiosurgery is summarized, as is the application of computed tomography by Hounsfield and Ambrose. Contemporary contributions to the present day from Bartlett, Richardson, Miles, Thomas, Gill, Aziz, Hariz, and others are summarized. The current status of British stereotactic neurosurgery is discussed. PMID:18812971

  8. Image-defined resolution following radiosurgery for hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Lucy; Curl-Roper, Thomas; Reeves, Nicola; Kemeny, Andras A; Josan, Vivek A

    2013-04-01

    The authors present the rare case of complete image-defined resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) following Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). A 9-month-old girl presented with an episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left-sided HH, which remained radiologically stable. By 3 years of age the patient had a development delay of 12 months, and experienced 8 gelastic seizures per day while on 2 antiepileptic medications. Thirty-one months after presentation, the patient underwent elective GKS to treat the HH. She has since been seizure free for 22 months, while receiving 3 antiepileptic medications. Twelve months after radiosurgery, MRI revealed complete radiological resolution of the lesion. The authors discuss alternative management options for HH, including microsurgical resection, endoscopic disconnection, stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation, and interstitial radiosurgery. Gamma Knife surgery is a minimally invasive procedure associated with a lower morbidity rate than that of published surgical results. The present case demonstrates the potential for complete image-defined resolution of an HH post-GKS, without long-term neurological sequelae, emphasizing the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic option for the control of epileptic seizures produced by small-volume, surgically inaccessible HHs. PMID:23373624

  9. Radiosurgery for the management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a minimally invasive surgical approach for managing medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The goal of trigeminal neuralgia SRS is to eliminate or reduce the facial pain in order to improve the quality of life. Over the past 28 years, 1250 patients have undergone gamma knife SRS for TN at our institution. In our retrospective review of 503 patients who underwent SRS for management of refractory TN, 449 patients (89%) experienced initial pain relief at a median latency of 1 month. At the one year mark, 73% patients were pain free (with or without medications) and 80% had pain control. Repeat radiosurgery was performed for 193 patients (43%). At the one year mark, 26% of these patients were completely pain free and 78% were pain free with or without medications. The role of gamma Knife SRS in the management of medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia has evolved over the past two decades. SRS is a minimally invasive procedure and is associated with 60-90% rate of pain relief in patents with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Early intervention with SRS as the initial surgical procedure for management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia is associated with faster, better, and longer pain relief. As SRS is the least invasive procedure for TN, it is a good treatment option for patients with other high-risk medical conditions. SRS is an attractive alternative especially to those who do not want to accept the greater risk associated with other surgical procedures. PMID:27381104

  10. Evaluation of cerebral hemodynamic changes by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT after radiosurgery of small arteriovenous malformations (AVM)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.S.; Yeh, S.H.; Pan, H.C.

    1994-05-01

    Treatment of small AVMs (<3 cm) by stereotaxic radio-surgery using gamma unit has been a promising noninvasive method. However, cerebral hemodynamic changes after gamma unit treatment is obscure. This study assessed the effect of radiosurgery on the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in treatment of small AVMs. Nine patients (pts) with small AVMs were imaged with SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO prior to stereotactic radio-surgery. The pts were treated with a Leskell gamma unit with doses of radiation in the range of 36 Gy to 44 Gy at target center. All pts underwent HMPAO SPECT scans about 3 months after radiosurgery. Pts were also studied with CT/MR scans. Pre treatment HMPAO SPECT showed decreased rCBF in the regions of nidi of AVMs of all pts and in the adjacent zones in 2 pts. Increased rCBF surrounding the nidus was noted in 2 AVMs. After treatment, rCBF of 2 pts returned to normal, 6 pts showed much improvement of rCBF and 1 remained no change. No more perfusion abnormalities were seen in the adjacent zones of all AVMs after radiosurgery. Cross cerebellar diaschisis noted in one case also disappeared after radiosurgery. Post treatment CT/MR scans showed slightly decrease in size of AVMs in 6 pts. All pts had great improvement after treatment. Normalization of rCBF correlated well with improvements in the neurological symptoms. In conclusion, comparison of pre and post treatment Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT scans were useful in evaluating the effectiveness of gamma unit radiosurgery on small AVMs.

  11. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... several types of breast biopsies, including open, ultrasound-guided , and lumpectomy . This article focuses on stereotactic breast ... a special machine, a needle or sheath is guided to the exact location of the abnormal area. ...

  12. Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy for benign spinal tumors: theUniversity of California San Francisco preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, A; Chou, D; Ames, C; Ma, L; Lamborn, K; Huang, K; Chuang, C; Aiken, A; Petti, P; Weinstein, P; Larson, D

    2007-12-01

    We evaluate our preliminary experience using the Cyberknife Radiosurgery System in treating benign spinal tumors. A retrospective review of 16 consecutively treated patients, comprising 19 benign spinal tumors, was performed. Histologic types included neurofibroma [11], chordoma [4], hemangioma [2], and meningioma [2]. Three patients had Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Only one tumor, recurrent chordoma, had been previously irradiated, and as such not considered in the local failure analysis. Local failure, for the remaining 18 tumors, was based clinically on symptom progression and/or tumor enlargement based on imaging. Indications for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) consisted of either adjuvant to subtotal resection (5/19), primary treatment alone (12/19), boost following external beam radiotherapy (1/19), and salvage following previous radiation (1/19). Median tumor follow-up is 25 months (2-37), and one patient (with NF1) died at 12 months from a stroke. The median total dose, number of fractions, and prescription isodose was 21 Gy (10-30 Gy), 3 fx (1-5 fx), 80% (42-87%). The median tumor volume was 7.6 cc (0.2-274.1 cc). The median V100 (volume V receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and maximum tumor dose was 95% (77-100%) and 26.7 Gy (15.4-59.7 Gy), respectively. Three tumors progressed at 2, 4, and 36 months post-SR (n=18). Two tumors were neurofibromas (both in NF1 patients), and the third was an intramedullary hemangioblastoma. Based on imaging, two tumors had MRI documented progression, three had regressed, and 13 were unchanged (n=18). With short follow-up, local control following Cyberknife spine SBRT for benign spinal tumors appear acceptable. PMID:17994789

  13. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  14. Respiration tracking in radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikard, Achim; Shiomi, Hiroya; Adler, John

    2004-10-01

    Respiratory motion is difficult to compensate for with conventional radiotherapy systems. An accurate tracking method for following the motion of the tumor is of considerable clinical relevance. We investigate methods to compensate for respiratory motion using robotic radiosurgery. In this system the therapeutic beam is moved by a robotic arm, and follows the moving target through a combination of infrared tracking and synchronized x-ray imaging. Infrared emitters are used to record the motion of the patient's skin surface. The position of internal gold fiducials is computed repeatedly during treatment, via x-ray image processing. We correlate the motion between external and internal markers. From this correlation model we infer the placement of the internal target during time intervals where no x-ray images are taken. Fifteen patients with lung tumors have recently been treated with a fully integrated system implementing this new method. The clinical trials confirm our hypothesis that internal motion and external motion are indeed correlated. In a preliminar study we have extended our work to tracking without implanted fiducials, based on algorithms for computing deformation motions and digitally reconstructed radiographs.

  15. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  16. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, Franco; Livi, Lorenzo; Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura; Meattini, Icro; Bonucci, Ivano; Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Doro, Raffaela

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43-77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3-63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  17. Hippocampal Dose With Radiosurgery for Multiple Intracranial Targets: The Rationale for Proactive Beam Shaping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer S; Ma, Lijun; Barani, Igor J; McDermott, Michael W; Sneed, Penny K; Larson, David A

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery provides conformal treatment of intracranial lesions, but when multiple lesions are treated, cumulative dose to structures such as the hippocampi may be increased. We analyzed hippocampal dose for patients treated with radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases. We then investigated a means to minimize hippocampal dose. We randomly selected 8 patients treated with single-session, frame-based radiosurgery for 6 to 12 intracranial metastases. Standard planning was employed to deliver 16 to 20 Gy to each lesion without hippocampal avoidance. Each case was replanned using the software's dynamic shaping function to minimize direct beam hippocampal irradiation, while maintaining conformality and target coverage. With standard planning, the maximum hippocampal dose varied from 0.8 to 9.0 Gy but was >3 Gy only when a lesion was <10 mm from the hippocampus. There was no clear correlation between hippocampal dose and the number or the total volume of lesions. Replanning with direct beam avoidance decreased the mean hippocampal dose by an average of 35% but increased treatment time by a mean of 20%. Sparing was most pronounced when the closest lesion was in close proximity to the hippocampus. This is the first study reporting hippocampal dose for multilesion intracranial radiosurgery. It illustrates that when multiple intracranial targets are treated with radiosurgery, substantial hippocampal dose can result. Active beam shielding and optimization can lower hippocampal dose, especially with lesions <10 mm from the hippocampus. These results raise the prospect that the risk of neurocognitive side effects may be further decreased with a hippocampal-sparing approach. PMID:26113558

  18. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Benign Meningioma: Long-Term Outcome in 318 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin; Surber, Gunar; Hamm, Klaus; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term outcome of stereotactic-based radiation therapy in a large cohort of patients with benign intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2010, 318 patients with histologically confirmed (44.7%; previous surgery) or imaging-defined (55.3%) benign meningiomas were treated with either fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (79.6%), hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (15.4%), or stereotactic radiosurgery (5.0%), depending on tumor size and location. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), prognostic factors, and toxicity were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 50 months (range, 12-167 months). Local control, OS, and CSS at 5 years were 92.9%, 88.7%, and 97.2%, and at 10 years they were 87.5%, 74.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, tumor location (P=.029) and age >66 years (P=.031) were predictors of LC and OS, respectively. Worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms immediately after radiation therapy occurred in up to 2%. Clinically significant acute toxicity (grade 3°) occurred in 3%. Only grade 1-2 late toxicity was observed in 12%, whereas no new neurologic deficits or treatment-related mortality were encountered. Conclusions: Patients with benign meningiomas predominantly treated with standard fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with narrow margins enjoy excellent LC and CSS, with minimal long-term morbidity.

  19. Automated stereotactic positioning system.

    PubMed

    Goerss, S J; Kelly, P J; Kall, B A

    1987-01-01

    An automated stereotactic machine has been interfaced to a surgical computer to complete a totally interactive surgical system capable of locating tumor volumes. Stepper motors, activated by the host computer, drive a three-dimensional slide to position the patient's head with respect to a fixed arc, locating the surgical target. Linear encoders on each axis create a closed-loop positioning system and a digital display for visual inspection of the slide's position. The 160-mm arc directs all instrumentation to its isocenter, regardless of the two angular settings, providing maximum freedom in selecting a safe trajectory to the target. Phantom test points compatible with computerized tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging were repeatedly scanned to determine the overall system accuracy, which approached 0.6 mm, depending on the spatial resolution of the image. This stereotactic device may be used to perform stereotactic laser craniotomies, biopsies, 192Ir implants for interstitial radiation, third ventriculostomies and functional procedures. PMID:3329830

  20. Brain Edema after Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for a Large Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Whan; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-08-01

    Brain edema due to venous thrombosis following stereotactic radiosurgery for a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has rarely been reported. We report a patient with a large AVM in the eloquent area, and brain edema developed in this area after repeat Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS). An 18-year-old female presented with a 4-year-history of persistent headache. Magnetic resonance imaging and transfemoral carotid angiogram revealed a high-flow large AVM in the left parieto-occipital area. Brain edema developed and aggravated patient's symptoms after time-staged GKRS. The cause of edema was thought to be the failure of the surrounding venous channels to drain the venous flow from the normal brain and the drainage was hampered by the persistent shunt flow from the AVM, which was due to the thrombosis of one huge draining vein of the AVM. The microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus eliminated shunt flow and completely normalized the brain edema. Microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus completely normalized the brain edema due to thrombosis of a draining vein of an AVM develops after SRS. PMID:27574486

  1. Development of head docking device for linac-based radiosurgery with a Neptun 10 PC linac.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin Khoshnazar, Alireza; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Hashemian, Abdolreza; Salek, Roham

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a method for focused irradiation of intracranial lesions. Linac-based radiosurgery is currently performed by two techniques: couch mounted and pedestal mounted. In the first technique a device is required to affix the patient's head to the couch and neoreover to translate it accurately. Structure of such a device constructed by the authors plus acceptance test performed for evaluation is described in the article. A head docking device has been designed and constructed according to geometry of linac's couch and also desired functions. The device is cornpletely made from aluminum and consists of four major components: attachment bar, lower structure with four moveing accuracy mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were assessed in the frame of acceptance test. Translating accuracy, mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were found to be respectively: 1 mm, 1.64 mm and 3.2 mm with accuracy of 95%. According to AAPM report no. 54, a head docking device should translate head with an accuracy of 1 mm; this recommendation has been met. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the isocentric accuracy and mechanical stability of the device are sufficient that the device on confidently be used in stereotactic treatment. PMID:17664152

  2. Brain Edema after Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for a Large Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Whan; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema due to venous thrombosis following stereotactic radiosurgery for a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has rarely been reported. We report a patient with a large AVM in the eloquent area, and brain edema developed in this area after repeat Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS). An 18-year-old female presented with a 4-year-history of persistent headache. Magnetic resonance imaging and transfemoral carotid angiogram revealed a high-flow large AVM in the left parieto-occipital area. Brain edema developed and aggravated patient's symptoms after time-staged GKRS. The cause of edema was thought to be the failure of the surrounding venous channels to drain the venous flow from the normal brain and the drainage was hampered by the persistent shunt flow from the AVM, which was due to the thrombosis of one huge draining vein of the AVM. The microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus eliminated shunt flow and completely normalized the brain edema. Microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus completely normalized the brain edema due to thrombosis of a draining vein of an AVM develops after SRS. PMID:27574486

  3. Magnetic resonance guided radiosurgery in children: tridimensional extrapolation from isodose neuroimaging superimposition.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M; Begnozzi, L; Carpino, S; Valentino, V

    1994-03-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery, thin external beams of ionizing radiation concentrated in a single dose onto a sharply defined target are employed to treat lesions within the brain, avoiding doses which may produce unwanted damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. The dynamic irradiation technique used with the linear accelerator employs variable arcs of irradiation rotating around the isocenter of the target. The technique of stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) guided radiosurgery is supported by a dedicated computerized system for treatment planning simulation. The system, based on a personal computer, allows the acquisition, reconstruction, and visualization of the target volume from MR images, and permits calculation and visualization of a three-dimensional dose distribution directly superimposed upon MR images of the lesion. The desired goal of destroying neoplastic tissue without damaging cerebral parenchyma is of particular importance in children. Consequently, adapting the three-dimensional isodose profiles to the morphology of the lesion to be treated is crucial. From this, the importance of the computer simulation is evident, as it permits one to go deeply into the study of isodose distribution, changing beam collimation, and the number and amplitude of arcs of irradiation. PMID:8033159

  4. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in medium-sized to large arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Peter; Grayson, David; Bergström, Per; Bergenheim, A Tommy

    2015-06-01

    We have reviewed treatment results in terms of obliteration and complications in 24 patients with medium to large sized cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) (mean volume 18.5±8.9cm(3); range: 10-42) treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT). AVMs are congenital lesions associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Radiosurgery is one option for treatment. However, in larger AVMs with volumes exceeding 10cm(3) obliteration rates are less favourable and radiation induced complications more frequent. For larger AVMs, volume-staged radiosurgery is one option while another option may be the use of HSRT. Patients were treated with 6-7Gy in five fractions to a total dose of 30-35Gy (mean total dose 32.9±1.6Gy [standard error of the mean]). Sixteen patients (69.6%) showed obliteration after a mean time of 35.2±14.8 months (range: 24-60). Only one patient (4.2%) experienced symptomatic radionecrosis. Our treatment with HSRT seems safe and efficient for treatment of medium to large sized AVMs. Treatment results seem to be in line with volume-staged radiosurgery and may be an alternative for AVMs not suitable for single fraction radiosurgery. PMID:25827867

  5. Adjuvant Whole Brain Radiotherapy: Strong Emotions Decide But Rational Studies Are Needed

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Paul D. Asher, Anthony L.; Farace, Elana

    2008-04-01

    Brain metastases are common in cancer patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality. For patients with limited disease and good performance status, treatment typically involves a combination of focal measures (e.g., surgical resection or radiosurgery) for the radiographically apparent disease, followed by adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to treat subclinical disease. Because of concerns regarding the toxicity of WBRT, especially neurocognitive deterioration, many have advocated withholding adjuvant WBRT. Recently published studies have shed more light on the efficacy of adjuvant WBRT and the neurocognitive effects of WBRT. However, the inclusion of neurocognitive and quality-of-life data in clinical trials are still required to better define the role of adjuvant WBRT. Currently, two Phase III trials are underway, one in Europe and one in North America, that will determine the effect of adjuvant WBRT on patients' quality of life, neurocognitive function, and survival.

  6. Mechanisms and prevention of thermal injury from gamma radiosurgery headframes during 3T MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Marcus C; Wiant, David B; Gersh, Jacob A; Dolesh, Wendy; Ding, X; Best, Ryan C M; Bourland, J D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regularly used for stereotactic imaging of Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery patients for GK treatment planning. MRI-induced thermal injuries have occurred and been reported for GK patients with attached metallic headframes. Depending on the specific MR imaging and headframe conditions, a skin injury from MRI-induced heating can potentially occur where the four headframe screws contact the skin surface of the patient's head. Higher MR field strength has a greater heating potential. Two primary heating mechanisms, electromagnetic induction and the antenna effect, are possible. In this study, MRI-induced heating from a 3T clinical MRI scanner was investigated for stereotactic headframes used in gamma radiosurgery and neurosurgery. Using melons as head phantoms, optical thermometers were used to characterize the temperature profile at various points of the melon headframe composite as a function of two 3T MR pulse sequence protocols. Different combinations of GK radiosurgery headframe post and screw designs were tested to determine best and worst combinations for MRI-induced heating. Temperature increases were measured for all pulse sequences tested, indicating that the potential exists for MRI-induced skin heating and burns at the headframe attachment site. This heating originates with electromagnetic induction caused by the RF fields inducing current in a loop formed by the headframe, mounting screws, and the region of the patient's head located between any of the two screws. This induced current is then resistively dissipated, with the regions of highest resistance, located at the headframe screw-patient head interface, experiencing the most heating. Significant heating can be prevented by replacing the metallic threads holding the screw with electrically insulated nuts, which is the heating prevention and patient safety recommendation of the GK manufacturer. Our results confirm that the manufacturer's recommendation to use

  7. Integration of Corticospinal Tractography Reduces Motor Complications After Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Shin, Masahiro; Maruyama, Keisuke; Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro; Itoh, Daisuke; Kunii, Naoto; Ino, Kenji; Aoki, Shigeki; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Igaki, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the use of diffusion-tensor tractography (DTT) of the corticospinal tract could reduce motor complications after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the deep frontal lobe, deep parietal lobe, basal ganglia, and thalamus who had undergone radiosurgery since 2000 and were followed up for more than 3 years were studied. DTT of the corticospinal tract had been integrated into treatment planning of SRS since 2004, and the maximum dose received by the corticospinal tract was attempted to be less than 20 Gy. Treatment outcomes before (28 patients, Group A) and after (24 patients, Group B) the introduction of this technique were compared. Results: There were no statistical differences between the two groups (Group A vs. Group B) in patients' age (34 years vs. 33 years, p = 0.76), percentage of patients with hemorrhagic events before treatment (50% vs. 29%, p = 0.12), or percentage of AVM involving the basal ganglia and thalamus (36% vs. 46%, p = 0.46). Obliteration rates were 69% and 76% at 4 years in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.68), which were not significantly different. Motor complications were observed in 5 patients in Group A (17.9%) but only in 1 patient in Group B (4.2%), which was significantly less frequent (p = 0.021). Conclusion: Integrating DTT of the corticospinal tract into treatment planning contributed to reduction of motor complications without compromising the obliteration rate for AVM adjacent to the corticospinal tract.

  8. Quality Assurance Results for a Commercial Radiosurgery System: A Communication.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Lightstone, Alexander; Beachey, David; Wronski, Matt; Babic, Steven; Yeboah, Collins; Lee, Young; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this communication is to inform the radiosurgery community of quality assurance (QA) results requiring attention in a commercial FDA-approved linac-based cone stereo-tactic radiosurgery (SRS) system. Standard published QA guidelines as per the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) were followed during the SRS system's commissioning process including end-to-end testing, cone concentricity testing, image transfer verification, and documentation. Several software and hardware deficiencies that were deemed risky were uncovered during the process and QA processes were put in place to mitigate these risks during clinical practice. In particular, the present work focuses on daily cone concentricity testing and commissioning-related findings associated with the software. Cone concentricity/alignment is measured daily using both optical light field inspection, as well as quantitative radiation field tests with the electronic portal imager. In 10 out of 36 clini-cal treatments, adjustments to the cone position had to be made to align the cone with the collimator axis to less than 0.5 mm and on two occasions the pre-adjustment measured offset was 1.0 mm. Software-related errors discovered during commissioning included incorrect transfer of the isocentre in DICOM coordinates, improper handling of non-axial image sets, and complex handling of beam data, especially for multi-target treatments. QA processes were established to mitigate the occurrence of the software errors. With proper QA processes, the reported SRS system complies with tolerances set out in established guidelines. Discussions with the vendor are ongoing to address some of the hardware issues related to cone alignment. PMID:24945371

  9. The use of a Leksell-BRW adapter for linac radiosurgery as an adjunct to Gamma Knife treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Hinson, William H.; Bourland, J. Daniel; de Guzman, Allan F.; Stieber, Volker W.; Tatter, Steven B.; Ellis, Thomas L.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated the use of an adapter that permits the use of a Leksell coordinate frame with a linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery system based on the Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) design. This device is useful when lesions that are planned for treatment on a Leksell Gamma Knife system are found to be inaccessible to the Gamma Knife. We have found that with this device objects within a head phantom can be targeted by the linear accelerator within an accuracy of approximately 1 mm.

  10. Atlas-based identification of targets for functional radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stancanello, Joseph; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Modugno, Nicola; Cerveri, Pietro; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Uggeri, Fulvio; Cantore, Giampaolo

    2006-06-15

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, epilepsy, and neuropathic pain, may exhibit poor response to medical therapy. In such cases, surgical intervention may become necessary. Modern surgical approaches to such disorders include radio-frequency lesioning and deep brain stimulation (DBS). The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is one of the most useful stereotactic targets available: STN DBS is known to induce substantial improvement in patients with end-stage Parkinson's disease. Other targets include the Globus Pallidus pars interna (GPi) for dystonia and Parkinson's disease, and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) for neuropathic pain. Radiosurgery is an attractive noninvasive alternative to treat some functional brain disorders. The main technical limitation to radiosurgery is that the target can be selected only on the basis of magnetic resonance anatomy without electrophysiological confirmation. The aim of this work is to provide a method for the correct atlas-based identification of the target to be used in functional neurosurgery treatment planning. The coordinates of STN, CMN, and GPi were identified in the Talairach and Tournoux atlas and transformed to the corresponding regions of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) electronic atlas. Binary masks describing the target nuclei were created. The MNI electronic atlas was deformed onto the patient magnetic resonance imaging-T1 scan by applying an affine transformation followed by a local nonrigid registration. The first transformation was based on normalized cross correlation and the second on optimization of a two-part objective function consisting of similarity criteria and weighted regularization. The obtained deformation field was then applied to the target masks. The minimum distance between the surface of an implanted electrode and the surface of the deformed mask was calculated. The validation of the method consisted of comparing the electrode-mask distance to

  11. Quality Assurance of Immobilization and Target Localization Systems for Frameless Stereotactic Cranial and Extracranial Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, Timothy D. Medin, Paul M.; Mullins, John; Li Sicong

    2008-05-01

    The success of stereotactic radiosurgery has stimulated significant interest in the application of such an approach for the treatment of extracranial tumors. The potential benefits of reduced healthcare costs and improved patient outcomes that could be realized in a high-precision, hypofractionated treatment paradigm are numerous. Image-guidance technologies are eliminating the historic requirement for rigid head fixation and will also accelerate the clinical implementation of the approach in extracranial sites. An essential prerequisite of 'frameless' stereotactic systems is that they provide localization accuracy consistent with the safe delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose given in one or few fractions. In this report, we reviewed the technologies for frameless localization of cranial and extracranial targets with emphasis on the quality assurance aspects.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Efficacy and Safety of Multisession Radiosurgery to Single Dose Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwang Soo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Hyung Ki; Park, Suk Que; Kim, Ra Sun; Jang, Jae Chil

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of multisession radiosurgery to those of single dose radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors. Methods Between February 2008 and February 2012, 90 patients with 196 metastatic brain tumors were treated with cyberknife radiosurgery, and we reviewed these patients retrospectively. Among them, 57 patients underwent single dose radiosurgery, and 33 patients multisession radiosurgery. Tumors involving the eloquent area and large tumors (>5 cc) were treated with multisession radiosurgery. The median tumor volume and the median treatment dose of single dose radiosurgery were 2.05±0.72 cc and 19.76±1.54 Gy respectively, and in the case of multisession radiosurgery, 5.30±1.70 cc and 29.6±1.70 Gy respectively. The frequency of multisession dose was 3 to 5 times, on average 3.55 times, and 8.91 Gy were given per 1 session on average. Results The overall survival (OS) of multisession radiosurgery was 16.0 months, whereas that of single dose radiosurgery was 11.5 months. The radiologic tumor response rates were 90% in single dose radiosurgery and 95.4% in multisession radiosurgery, respectively. Over 6-month and 1-year periods, the OS rates of single dose radiosurgery were 71.4% and 44.9%, whereas those of multisession radiosurgery were 69.1% and 58.3%, respectively (p=0.83). Toxicities were seen in 18.1% in the single dose radiosurgery group versus 4% in the multisession radiosurgery group. The difference was significant (p<0.05). Conclusion In this study, the multisession radiosurgery group, despite the location and size constraints, did not differ from the single dose radiosurgery group when comparing the survival and recurrence rates, but complications and toxicity were lower. Thus, multisession radiosurgery is thought to be beneficial for treatment of large tumors and tumors located in the eloquent area. PMID:26605264

  13. Dosimetrical evaluation of Leksell Gamma Knife 4C radiosurgery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeev, Thomas; Mustafa, Mohamed M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2011-01-01

    A number of experiments was performed using standard protocols, in order to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy of Leksell Gamma Knife 4C unit. Verification of the beam alignment has been performed for all collimators using solid plastic head phantom and Gafchromic™ type MD-55 films. The study showed a good agreement of Leksell Gammaplan calculated dose profiles with experimentally determined profiles in all three axes. Isocentric accuracy is verified using a specially machined cylindrical aluminium film holder tool made with very narrow geometric tolerances aligned between trunnions of 4 mm collimator. Considering all uncertainties in all three dimensions, the estimated accuracy of the unit was 0.1 mm. Dose rate at the centre point of the unit has been determined according to the IAEA, TRS-398 protocol, using Unidose-E (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) with a 0.125 cc ion chamber, over a period of 6 years. The study showed that the Leksell Gamma Knife 4C unit is excellent radiosurgical equipment with high accuracy and precision, which makes it possible to deliver larger doses of radiation, within the limits defined by national and international guidelines, applicable for stereotactic radiosurgery procedures.

  14. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    EATING DISORDERS (EDS) ARE A GROUP OF SEVERELY IMPAIRED EATING BEHAVIORS, WHICH INCLUDE THREE SUBGROUPS: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  15. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a group of severely impaired eating behaviors, which include three subgroups: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  16. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, H.; Sharafi, A.; Allah Verdi, M.; Nikoofar, A.

    2006-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 ± 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 ± 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 ± 15.1 cGy, 9.15 ± 3.89 cGy, 0.47 ± 0.3 cGy and 0.53 ± 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  17. Single-Dose Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo-Young; Lim, Young Kyung; Min, Hye Sook; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ho Jin; Gwak, Ho Shin; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with brain metastases by comparing two different treatment regimens, single-dose radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Between November 2003 and December 2008, 98 patients with brain metastases were included. Fifty-eight patients were treated with SRS, and forty were treated with FSRT. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used for large lesions or lesions located near critical structures. The median doses were 20 Gy for the SRS group and 36 Gy in 6 fractions for the FSRT group. Results: With a median follow-up period of 7 months, the median survival was 7 months for all patients, with a median of 6 months for the SRS group and 8 months for the FSRT group (p = 0.89). Local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates at 6 months and 1 year were 81% and 71%, respectively, for the SRS group and 97% and 69%, respectively, for the FSRT group (p = 0.31). Despite the fact that FSRT was used for large lesions and lesions in adverse locations, LPFS was not inferior to SRS. Toxicity was more frequently observed in the SRS group than in the FSRT group (17% vs. 5%, p = 0.05). Conclusions: Because patients treated with FSRT exhibited similar survival times and LPFS rates with a lower risk of toxicity in comparison to those treated with SRS, despite the fact that FSRT was used for large lesions and lesions in adverse locations, we find that FSRT can particularly be beneficial for patients with large lesions or lesions located near critical structures. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal dose/fractionation.

  18. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  19. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications. PMID:20429360

  20. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  1. Treatment Planning Considerations for Robotic Guided Cardiac Radiosurgery for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ipsen, Svenja; Chan, Mark K; Bauer, Ralf; Kerl, Matthias; Hunold, Peter; Jacobi, Volkmar; Bruder, Ralf; Schweikard, Achim; Rades, Dirk; Vogl, Thomas J; Kleine, Peter; Bode, Frank; Dunst, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Robotic guided stereotactic radiosurgery has recently been investigated for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Before moving into human treatments, multiple implications for treatment planning given a potential target tracking approach have to be considered.    Materials & Methods Theoretical AF radiosurgery treatment plans for twenty-four patients were generated for baseline comparison. Eighteen patients were investigated under ideal tracking conditions, twelve patients under regional dose rate (RDR = applied dose over a certain time window) optimized conditions (beam delivery sequence sorting according to regional beam targeting), four patients under ultrasound tracking conditions (beam block of the ultrasound probe) and four patients with temporary single fiducial tracking conditions (differential surrogate-to-target respiratory and cardiac motion).   Results With currently known guidelines on dose limitations of critical structures, treatment planning for AF radiosurgery with 25 Gy under ideal tracking conditions with a 3 mm safety margin may only be feasible in less than 40% of the patients due to the unfavorable esophagus and bronchial tree location relative to the left atrial antrum (target area). Beam delivery sequence sorting showed a large increase in RDR coverage (% of voxels having a larger dose rate for a given time window) of 10.8-92.4% (median, 38.0%) for a 40-50 min time window, which may be significant for non-malignant targets. For ultrasound tracking, blocking beams through the ultrasound probe was found to have no visible impact on plan quality given previous optimal ultrasound window estimation for the planning CT. For fiducial tracking in the right atrial septum, the differential motion may reduce target coverage by up to -24.9% which could be reduced to a median of -0.8% (maximum, -12.0%) by using 4D dose optimization. The cardiac motion was also found to have an impact on the dose distribution, at the anterior left atrial

  2. Treatment of absolute painful glaucoma with dynamic arcs using novalis shaped beam radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Olhovich, Irene . E-mail: irenegonol@hotmail.com; Celis, Miguel Angel; Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose; Lopez-Ayala, Temuchino; Suarez-Campos, Jose; Garcia-Garduno, Amanda; Herrera-Gomez, Leopoldo; Hernandez-Bojorquez, Mariana B.Sc.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed the effect of shaped beam conformal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in 1 patient with chronic painful glaucoma in one eye refractory to medical treatment. Methods and Materials: Left eye ciliary body was targeted at 18 Gy (90% isodose curve) with a dedicated linear accelerator (Novalis, BrainLAB, Germany) SRS. Interval follow-up was performed weekly for the first month, and every 2 months until 1 year was completed with clinical examinations and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. Results: Ocular pain resolved at 6 weeks after SRS treatment. IOP decreased and normalized at 1 year. Conclusions: We present a case in which SRS appears to be an effective treatment of chronic refractory painful glaucoma. Further Phase I studies are needed to know the best parameters for radiation dose, tolerance of organs at risk, and pathophysiologic effects.

  3. The biology of radiosurgery and its clinical applications for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Shin, Samuel M.; Brunswick, Andrew; Kim, Irene; Silverman, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was developed decades ago but only began to impact brain tumor care when it was coupled with high-resolution brain imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The technique has played a key role in the management of virtually all forms of brain tumor. We reviewed the radiobiological principles of SRS on tissue and how they pertain to different brain tumor disorders. We reviewed the clinical outcomes on the most common indications. This review found that outcomes are well documented for safety and efficacy and show increasing long-term outcomes for benign tumors. Brain metastases SRS is common, and its clinical utility remains in evolution. The role of SRS in brain tumor care is established. Together with surgical resection, conventional radiotherapy, and medical therapies, patients have an expanding list of options for their care. Clinicians should be familiar with radiosurgical principles and expected outcomes that may pertain to different brain tumor scenarios. PMID:25267803

  4. Lessons From a 17-Year Radiosurgery Experience at the Royal Adelaide Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Daniel E.; Brophy, Brian P.; Taylor, James

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate some of the potential pitfalls of cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and its planning based on prospectively gathered data from a 17-year experience at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Methods and Materials: More than 250 treatments have been planned since 1993 using previously described standard SRS techniques for intracranial benign and malignant lesions. Results: Five case studies are presented (1 meningioma, 1 acoustic neuroma, 2 solitary brain metastasis, 1 arteriovenous malformation), each of which demonstrates at least one salutary lesson. Conclusions: Because SRS delivers a highly conformal dose distribution, it is unforgiving of any geographic miss due to inaccurate outlining and thus dependent on neuroradiological expertise and collaboration. There are also potentially significant implications of misdiagnosis in SRS cases without histological proof-in particular, presumed brain metastases.

  5. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy as Reirradiation for Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Kwang-Won; Jang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jung, So-Lyoung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Yoo, Eun-Jung; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Jang, Hong-Seok; Chung, Su-Mi; Kim, Yeon-Sil

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We report early preliminary experience with CyberKnife radiosurgery (RS) as salvage treatment for locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 36 patients (44 sites) were treated with CyberKnife RS as reirradiation for locally recurrent HNC. Treatment sites were as follows: nasopharynx (8), maxillary sinus (8), neck lymph nodes (8), skull base (7), nasal cavity (4), retropharyngeal lymph nodes (3), orbit (2), and others (4). Total doses administered were 18-40 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions to the 65%-85% isodose line for 3-5 consecutive days. Previous external radiation dose ranged from 39.6 to 134.4 Gy (median, 70.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 114.9 cm{sup 3} (median, 22.6 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up was 17.3 months. Results: Thirty-five of 44 sites were evaluated for response. Fifteen (42.9%) sites achieved complete response, 13 sites (37.1%) achieved a partial response, 3 (8.6%) sites maintained stable disease, and 4 sites (11.4%) showed tumor progression. Grade III acute complications were noted in 13 patients. Late complications were observed in three patients (1 bone necrosis, 2 soft tissue necrosis) during follow-up. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective treatment modality as a salvage treatment with good short-term local control. The early overall response rate is encouraging. However, more experience and a longer follow-up are necessary to determine the role of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery as a salvage treatment of locally recurrent HNC and to define long-term complications.

  6. Trends in vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Schijns, Virgil E J C; Lavelle, Ed C

    2011-04-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a century and have been particularly effective at promoting protective humoral immunity. However, alum is not optimally effective for diseases where cell-mediated immunity is required for protection. Furthermore, adjuvants including oil-in-water emulsions have shown improved efficacy for avian influenza protection suggesting that even for diseases where humoral immunity can confer protection, there is scope for developing improved adjuvants. There have been major developments in antigen discovery over the past decade, which has accelerated the vaccine development process for new indications and this demands a new generation of adjuvants that can drive and specifically direct the desired immune responses. A number of systems are under investigation that combine different types of adjuvants into specific formulations with greater activity. Additionally, targeting of vaccines to specific immune cells shows great promise. In the case of cancer and chronic infectious diseases, it may be difficult to develop effective vaccines without blocking immune regulatory pathways, which impede cell-mediated responses. However, increased understanding of immunology and particularly the innate immune system is informing vaccine adjuvant research and consequently driving the development of novel and specifically directed vaccine adjuvant strategies. In this article we address the importance of adjuvants in vaccine development, the known mode of action of specific adjuvants and recent developments in this important field. PMID:21506650

  7. SU-E-T-582: Evaluation of Standard Beam Delivery Devices in Proton Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wroe, A; Bush, D; Schulte, R; Patyal, B; Slater, J; Webster, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of standard apertures and range shifters for the treatment of brain metastasis in proton stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Five localized brain metastasis patients previously treated using our intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery procedure (i.e. with a custom aperture and bolus), were randomly selected from our patient cohort. The custom aperture and bolus treatment plans were used as the standard of care in this case and comparative treatment plans using the standard aperture and range shifter concept were generated. Gantry/table angle and the number of treatment beams were optimized as part of this study to evaluate the ability of the standard aperture/range shifter system to deliver a comparable treatment to the patient. Conformity index, homogeneity index, isodose volumes and integral dose were all evaluated to determine the degree of conformity of the plans created and for comparison to the custom aperture/bolus treatment modality. Results: The generated treatment plans demonstrated that the standard aperture and range shifter combination could be used to produce comparable conformity index and isodose volumes to the custom aperture/bolus case in four out of the five patients studied. In two of the patients a comparative conformity index was achieved by optimizing the angles of the 3 treatment beams, while in two of the cases 1 or 2 additional beams were required. Additionally, this system exhibited efficiency gains of 60-90% over the custom aperture bolus system in reducing the time necessary for treatment planning, device manufacture and QA. Conclusion: This work demonstrated that largely spherical shape of brain metastasis makes this target well suited to an application of standard apertures, while additionally providing efficiency gains in device manufacture and QA for treatment.

  8. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction. PMID:24398616

  9. Using a Machine Learning Approach to Predict Outcomes after Radiosurgery for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Oermann, Eric Karl; Rubinsteyn, Alex; Ding, Dale; Mascitelli, Justin; Starke, Robert M.; Bederson, Joshua B.; Kano, Hideyuki; Lunsford, L. Dade; Sheehan, Jason P.; Hammerbacher, Jeffrey; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of patient outcomes after a given therapy are fundamental to medical practice. We employ a machine learning approach towards predicting the outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Using three prospective databases, a machine learning approach of feature engineering and model optimization was implemented to create the most accurate predictor of AVM outcomes. Existing prognostic systems were scored for purposes of comparison. The final predictor was secondarily validated on an independent site’s dataset not utilized for initial construction. Out of 1,810 patients, 1,674 to 1,291 patients depending upon time threshold, with 23 features were included for analysis and divided into training and validation sets. The best predictor had an average area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 compared to existing clinical systems of 0.63 across all time points. On the heldout dataset, the predictor had an accuracy of around 0.74 at across all time thresholds with a specificity and sensitivity of 62% and 85% respectively. This machine learning approach was able to provide the best possible predictions of AVM radiosurgery outcomes of any method to date, identify a novel radiobiological feature (3D surface dose), and demonstrate a paradigm for further development of prognostic tools in medical care. PMID:26856372

  10. Characterization of a new polymer gel for radiosurgery dosimetry using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Kozicki, M.; Pantelis, E.; Antypas, C.; Fijuth, J.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.

    2009-06-01

    The VIPAR polymer gel dosimeter formulation was modified in an effort to eliminate the need for deoxygenation in the manufacturing procedure while preserving its favorable characteristics of dose rate independence and a wide dose response range. Aiming at an adequate dose sensitivity and the extension of dose response in the low dose region to facilitate the dose verification of radiosurgery applications where narrow beams are employed and steep dose gradients are involved, the new formulation consists of 8% N-Vinylpyrrolidone, 7.5% gelatine, 4% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, as well as of 0.0008% Copper Sulfate and 0.007% Ascorbic Acid as oxygen scavengers. To study the dose-R2 response, dose rate dependence and ``edge effect'' behaviour of the new formulation, one batch of two gel filled glass vials was prepared. Before MR Imaging, one vial was irradiated with a brachytherapy source while the other one was irradiated using circular CyberKnife radiation fields of 60, 10, 7.5 and 5 mm in diameter. Results of this study suggest that the new gel dosimeter responds linearly in the dose range of about 3 to 30 Gy, whilst the full dose response range exceeds the maximum delivered dose of 50 Gy. No dose rate dependence was observed for the new gel, while Cyberknife dosimetry results in the form of stereotactic field size and penumbra measurements suggest that the new formulation could be effective in the dose verification of demanding radiosurgery techniques.

  11. Using a Machine Learning Approach to Predict Outcomes after Radiosurgery for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric Karl; Rubinsteyn, Alex; Ding, Dale; Mascitelli, Justin; Starke, Robert M; Bederson, Joshua B; Kano, Hideyuki; Lunsford, L Dade; Sheehan, Jason P; Hammerbacher, Jeffrey; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of patient outcomes after a given therapy are fundamental to medical practice. We employ a machine learning approach towards predicting the outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Using three prospective databases, a machine learning approach of feature engineering and model optimization was implemented to create the most accurate predictor of AVM outcomes. Existing prognostic systems were scored for purposes of comparison. The final predictor was secondarily validated on an independent site's dataset not utilized for initial construction. Out of 1,810 patients, 1,674 to 1,291 patients depending upon time threshold, with 23 features were included for analysis and divided into training and validation sets. The best predictor had an average area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 compared to existing clinical systems of 0.63 across all time points. On the heldout dataset, the predictor had an accuracy of around 0.74 at across all time thresholds with a specificity and sensitivity of 62% and 85% respectively. This machine learning approach was able to provide the best possible predictions of AVM radiosurgery outcomes of any method to date, identify a novel radiobiological feature (3D surface dose), and demonstrate a paradigm for further development of prognostic tools in medical care. PMID:26856372

  12. Single-Isocenter Frameless Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiosurgery For Multiple Intracranial Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Steven K. M.; Zakeri, Kaveh; Zhao, Xiao; Carmona, Ruben; Knipprath, Erik; Simpson, Daniel R.; Nath, Sameer K.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Sanghvi, Parag; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Chen, Clark C.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic radiosurgery is a well-accepted treatment for patients with intracranial metastases, but outcomes with volumetric modulated arc radiosurgery (VMAR) are poorly described. Objective To report our initial clinical experience applying a novel single-isocenter technique to frameless VMAR for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 15 patients undergoing frameless VMAR for multiple intracranial metastases using a single, centrally-located isocenter between 2009 and 2011. Among these, 3 patients were treated for progressive or recurrent intracranial disease. A total of 62 metastases (median 3 per patient, range 2-13) were treated to a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 15-30 Gy). 3 patients were treated with fractionated SRS. Follow-up including clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) occurred every 3 months. Results Median follow-up for all patients was 7.1 months (range, 1.1-24.3), with 11 patients (73.3%) followed until death. For the remaining 4 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 19.6 months (range, 9.2-24.3). Local control at 6 and 12 months was 91.7 (95% Confidence Interval [C.I.], 84.6-100.0%) and 81.5 (95% C.I., 67.9-100.0%), respectively. Regional failure was observed in 9 patients (60.0%), and 7 patients (46.7%) received salvage therapy. Overall survival at 6 months was 60.0% (95% C.I., 40.3-88.2%). Grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicity was not observed. Median total treatment time was 7.2 minutes (range, 2.8-13.2 minutes). Conclusion Single-isocenter, frameless VMAR for multiple intracranial metastases is a promising technique that may provide similar clinical outcomes compared to conventional radiosurgery. PMID:25856109

  13. Feasibility of an online adaptive replanning method for cranial frameless intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Juan Francisco; San José, Sol; Garrido, LLuís; Puertas, Enrique; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2013-10-01

    To introduce an approach for online adaptive replanning (i.e., dose-guided radiosurgery) in frameless stereotactic radiosurgery, when a 6-dimensional (6D) robotic couch is not available in the linear accelerator (linac). Cranial radiosurgical treatments are planned in our department using intensity-modulated technique. Patients are immobilized using thermoplastic mask. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan is acquired after the initial laser-based patient setup (CBCT{sub setup}). The online adaptive replanning procedure we propose consists of a 6D registration-based mapping of the reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, followed by a reoptimization of the beam fluences (“6D plan”) to achieve similar dosage as originally was intended, while the patient is lying in the linac couch and the original beam arrangement is kept. The goodness of the online adaptive method proposed was retrospectively analyzed for 16 patients with 35 targets treated with CBCT-based frameless intensity modulated technique. Simulation of reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, according to the 4 degrees of freedom, supported by linac couch was also generated for each case (4D plan). Target coverage (D99%) and conformity index values of 6D and 4D plans were compared with the corresponding values of the reference plans. Although the 4D-based approach does not always assure the target coverage (D99% between 72% and 103%), the proposed online adaptive method gave a perfect coverage in all cases analyzed as well as a similar conformity index value as was planned. Dose-guided radiosurgery approach is effective to assure the dose coverage and conformity of an intracranial target volume, avoiding resetting the patient inside the mask in a “trial and error” way so as to remove the pitch and roll errors when a robotic table is not available.

  14. [Radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia: long-term results and influence of operative nuances].

    PubMed

    Regis, J; Arkha, Y; Yomo, S; Murata, N; Roussel, P; Donnet, A; Peragut, J-C

    2009-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to conventional surgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. To better define the safety of radiosurgery and optimal technical choices, we reviewed our patient records and the literature. A total of 334 patients presenting with trigeminal neuralgia were treated between December 1992 and September 2005. A minimum of 1 year of follow-up was available for 262 patients. The mean age was 68 years (range: 30-90); 128 patients were male and 134 female. A neurovascular conflict was clearly visualized on MRI in 167 patients. Twenty-one had a past history of multiple sclerosis and 110 had already received conventional surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. The intervention consisted of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) to the retrogasserian cisternal portion of the Vth cranial nerve. The median maximal dose used was 85Gy (range: 70-90). Actuarial curves show a plateau at 5 years for both the risk of hypoesthesia and recurrence. At 5 years, 58% of the patients remain pain-free and 83% have no trigeminal nerve disturbance. The median delay for pain cessation was 15 days. The initial pain-relief rate was 89%. None of the complications reported for the other techniques were observed. Patient selection (typical versus atypical, age, past surgery, multiple sclerosis) and details of operative technique (maximum dose, volume of nerve treated, target location, etc.) had a major influence on the probability of pain relief and toxicity risk. The details of operative technique are turning out to have a major influence on the clinical results. In our experience, high-dose (80-90Gy) retrogasserian (7-8mm from the brainstem) GKS provides the patient with a better chance of long-term pain relief and a lower risk of trigeminal nerve functional disturbance. GKS applied to the cisternal anterior trigeminal nerve using high doses provided safe and effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia over the long term. PMID:19339026

  15. A theoretical analysis of hemodynamic and biomechanical alterations in intracranial AVMs after radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.H. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is being increasingly used to treat intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, successful radiosurgery may involve latent periods of 1-2 years prior to AVM obliteration. This latent period include states of altered flow patterns that may not influence hemorrhage probabilities. The probability of hemorrhage is likely to be related to the degree of biomechanical stress across the AVM shunt walls. This paper describes a theoretical analysis of the altered hemodynamics and biomechanical stresses within AVM shunts post-radiosurgery. The mathematical model is comprised of linked flow compartments that represent the AVM and adjacent normal vasculature. As obliteration of the irradiated shunts occurs, changes in flow rates and pressure gradients are calculated based on first order fluid dynamics. Stress on the AVM shunt walls is calculated based on tangential forces due to intramural pressure. Two basic models are presented: a distribution of shunts with fixed thin walls subject to step-function obliteration, and a distribution of shunts subject to luminal obliteration from slowly thickening walls. Variations on these models are analyzed, including sequential, selective and random shunt obliteration, and uniform or Poisson distributions of shunt radii. Model I reveals that the range of pressure alterations in the radiosurgically-treated AVM include the possibility of transient increases in the total biomechanical stress within the shunt walls prior to obliteration. Model II demonstrates that uniform luminal narrowing via thickened walls should lead to reduced transmural stresses. The precise temporal pattern of AVM flow decrease and biomechanical stress reduction depends on the selection of shunts that are obliterated. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine. PMID:22129866

  17. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 07: Suitability of a plastic scintillator dosimeter for composite clinical fields delivered using the Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery system

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, E.; Szanto, J.; Christiansen, E.

    2014-08-15

    Plastic scintillation dosimeters (PSDs) have favourable characteristics for small and composite field dosimetry in radiosurgery, however, imperfect corrections for the Cerenkov radiation contamination could limit their accuracy for complex deliveries. In this work, we characterize the dose and dose-rate linearity, directional dependence, and compare output factors with other stereotactic detectors for a new commercially available PSD (Exradin W1). We provide some preliminary comparisons of planned and measured dose for composite fields delivered clinically by a Cyberknife radiosurgery system. The W1 detector shows good linearity with dose (<0.5%) and dose rate (<0.8%) relative to the signal obtained using an ion chamber under the same conditions. A maximum difference of 2% was observed depending on the detector's angular orientation. Output factors for all detectors agree within a range of ±3.2% and ±1.5% for the 5 and 7.5 mm collimators, respectively, provided Monte-Carlo corrections for detector effects are applied to diode and ion chambers (without corrections the range is ±5.5% and ±3.1% for these two collimators). For clinical beam deliveries using 5 and 7.5 mm collimators, four of the six patients showed better agreement with planned dose for the PSD detector compared to a micro ion chamber. Two of the six patients investigated, however, showed 5% differences between PSD and planned dose, film measurements and the ratio of PSD and micro ion chamber signal suggest that further investigation is warranted for these plans. The W1 detector is a promising tool for stereotactic plan verification under the challenging dosimetric conditions of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  18. Combined Effects of Embolization and Hypofractionated Conformal Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Arteriovenous Malformations of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, P.; Wikholm, G.; Bergström, P.; Löfroth, P.; Bergenheim, A.T.

    2005-01-01

    Summary There are three major treatment options for cerebral AVMs; surgery, embolization and radiosurgery. Embolization may be effective to reduce the size and density but completely obliterates AVMs only in a minority of cases. Radiosurgery may be an alternative to resection, especially in smaller AVMs. Large AVMs have been considered difficult to treat safely and effectively with single fraction radiosurgery. Hypofractionated conformal stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) alone or in combination with embolization may be an alternative treatment. Embolization may reduce the volume and density of AVMs, followed by HCSRT, allowing a safe delivery of a higher total dose of radiation than possible with a single fraction. Sixteen patients with AVMs were treated with embolization and HCSRT. Embolization was performed in 1-6 (median 2) sessions. HCSRT was delivered in 5 fractions with 6-7 Gy each to the total dose of 30-35 Gy. Cerebral angiographies before and after embolization were digitally compared for calculation of volume reduction and luminescence as a measure of AVM density. The mean AVM volume in 15 patients was reduced from 11.9 ± 2.1 (1-29, median 10.0) ml to 6.5 ± 2.0 (0.5-28, median 3) ml by embolization. The luminescence for all AVMs was significantly higher after than before embolization, indicating that all AVMs were less dense after embolization. Thirteen out of 16 patients (13/16, 81%) treated with embolization and HCSRT have so far shown obliteration of their AVMs 2-9 (median 4) years after HCSRT. Three patients experienced neurological sequele after embolization, and three patients developed radionecrosis after HCSRT. Using a new method to compare cerebral angiographies in AVMs we report reduction in density and volume after embolization. The obliteration rate of a combined treatment with embolization and HCSRT seems comparable with single fraction radiosurgery although the AVMs in our series are larger than reported in most series treated with single

  19. Parameters influencing local control of meningiomas treated with radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kaprealian, Tania; Raleigh, David R; Sneed, Penny K; Nabavizadeh, Nima; Nakamura, Jean L; McDermott, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    To identify parameters that influence local control after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for meningiomas we retrospectively analyzed all meningiomas treated with Gamma Knife SRS at our institution from 1991 to 2007. Endpoints were measured from the date of SRS and estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method; subgroups were compared with log-rank tests. Sex, performance status, age, SRS setting, radiation dose, grade, volume and location were evaluated with univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses. Of 280 patients with 438 tumors, 264 patients with clinical follow-up and 406 tumors with imaging follow-up were analyzed (median follow-up: 75.9 months). Thirty-seven percent of the tumors had no tissue diagnosis, 32 % were benign (grade I), 12 % atypical (grade II), and 19 % malignant (grade III). Five-year freedom from progression (FFP) was 97 % for presumed meningiomas, 87 % for grade I tumors, 56 % for grade II tumors, and 47 % for grade III tumors (p < 0.0001). Five-year FFP probabilities for upfront SRS versus SRS at recurrence after surgery versus SRS at recurrence after RT were 97, 86, and 38 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). Univariate analysis revealed that higher grade, larger target volume (median diameter: 2.4 cm) and SRS setting were associated with poorer FFP. Only target volume and SRS setting remained significant on multivariate analysis. Local control of presumed and grade I meningiomas is excellent with Gamma Knife SRS, but is suboptimal with high-grade tumors as well as for those treated at recurrence after RT or of large volume. PMID:27131883

  20. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather; Barsoum, Pierre; Dodoo, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer in July 2011, initially treated with chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, developed multiple brain metastases March 2013, with subsequent whole brain radiotherapy, after which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a significant volume regression of all brain metastases. A follow-up MRI in October 2013 revealed a growing brainstem lesion of 26 mm. Linear accelerator-based radiotherapy and microsurgery were judged contraindicated, why the decision was made to treat the patient with three separate radiosurgical sessions during the course of 1 week, with an 18% tumor volume reduction demonstrated after the last treatment. Follow-up MRI 2.5 months after her radiosurgical treatment showed a tumor volume reduction of 67% compared to the 1st day of treatment. Later on, the patient developed a radiation-induced perilesional edema although without major clinical implications. An MRI at 12 months and 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain at 13 months showed decreased edema with no signs of tumor recurrence. Despite disease progression during the last months of her life, the patient's condition remained overall acceptable. Conclusion: GK-based stereotactic adaptive hypofractionation proved to be effective to achieve tumor control while limiting local adverse reactions. This surgical modality should be considered when managing larger brain lesions in critical areas. PMID:26958430

  1. Morbidity and mortality following acoustic neuroma excision in the United States: analysis of racial disparities during a decade in the radiosurgery era

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Shearwood; Guo, Hongfei; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic neuromas present a challenging problem, with the major treatment modalities involving operative excision, stereotactic radiosurgery, observation, and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The morbidity/mortality following excision may differ by patient race. To address this concern, the morbidity of acoustic neuroma excision was assessed on a nationwide level. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1994–2003 was used for analysis. Only patients admitted for acoustic neuroma excision were included (International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, Clinical Modification = 225.1; primary procedure code = 04.01). Analysis was adjusted for several variables, including patient age, race, sex, primary payer for care, income in ZIP code of residence, surgeon caseload, and hospital caseload. Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative mortality following acoustic neuroma excision was 0.5%, with adverse discharge disposition of 6.1%. The odds ratio for mortality in African Americans compared with Caucasians was 8.82 (95% confidence interval = 1.85–41.9, P = .006). Patients with high-caseload surgeons (more than 2 excisions/year), private insurance, and younger age had decreased mortality, better discharge disposition, and lower overall morbidity (P < .04). Neither hospital caseload nor median income were predictive factors. African Americans were 9 times more likely to die following surgery than Caucasians over a decade-long analysis. Given the relatively benign natural history of acoustic neuroma and the alarmingly increased mortality rate following surgical excision among older patients, African Americans, and patients receiving care from low-caseload surgeons, acoustic neuromas in these patient populations may be best managed by a more minimally invasive modality such as observation, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, or stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:21856684

  2. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  4. Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Lesley A.; Simmons, Nathan E.; Bellerive, Marc; Erkmen, Kadir; Eskey, Clifford J.; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Hartford, Alan C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi

  5. Inverse treatment planning for spinal robotic radiosurgery: an international multi-institutional benchmark trial.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Oliver; Wang, Lei; Baus, Wolfgang; Grimm, Jimm; Lacornerie, Thomas; Nilsson, Joakim; Luchkovskyi, Sergii; Palazon Cano, Isabel; Shou, Zhenyu; Ayadi, Myriam; Treuer, Harald; Viard, Romain; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Chan, Mark K H; Hildebrandt, Guido; Dunst, Jürgen; Imhoff, Detlef; Wurster, Stefan; Wolff, Robert; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Lartigau, Eric; Semrau, Robert; Soltys, Scott G; Schweikard, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is the accurate, conformal delivery of high-dose radiation to well-defined targets while minimizing normal structure doses via steep dose gradients. While inverse treatment planning (ITP) with computerized optimization algorithms are routine, many aspects of the planning process remain user-dependent. We performed an international, multi-institutional benchmark trial to study planning variability and to analyze preferable ITP practice for spinal robotic radiosurgery. 10 SRS treatment plans were generated for a complex-shaped spinal metastasis with 21 Gy in 3 fractions and tight constraints for spinal cord (V14Gy < 2 cc, V18Gy < 0.1 cc) and target (coverage > 95%). The resulting plans were rated on a scale from 1 to 4 (excellent-poor) in five categories (constraint compliance, optimization goals, low-dose regions, ITP complexity, and clinical acceptability) by a blinded review panel. Additionally, the plans were mathemati-cally rated based on plan indices (critical structure and target doses, conformity, monitor units, normal tissue complication probability, and treatment time) and compared to the human rankings. The treatment plans and the reviewers' rankings varied substantially among the participating centers. The average mean overall rank was 2.4 (1.2-4.0) and 8/10 plans were rated excellent in at least one category by at least one reviewer. The mathematical rankings agreed with the mean overall human rankings in 9/10 cases pointing toward the possibility for sole mathematical plan quality comparison. The final rankings revealed that a plan with a well-balanced trade-off among all planning objectives was preferred for treatment by most par-ticipants, reviewers, and the mathematical ranking system. Furthermore, this plan was generated with simple planning techniques. Our multi-institutional planning study found wide variability in ITP approaches for spinal robotic radiosurgery. The participants', reviewers', and mathematical match

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery in 11 hemangioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, M; Lim, Y J; Söderman, M; Jääskeläinen, J; Lindquist, C

    1996-10-01

    One suprasellar, one mesencephalic, and nine cerebellar hemangioblastomas were treated with the gamma knife in 10 patients (median age 48 years) in Stockholm between 1978 and 1993. Four patients had von Hippel-Lindau disease, a dominant inherited trait predisposing to multiple hemangioblastomas. Six hemangioblastomas were treated with radiotherapy at a median margin dose of 25 Gy (20-35 Gy) before 1990 and the next five with a median of 10 Gy (5-19 Gy). Computerized tomography or magnetic resonance images were available for 10 of the 11 hemangioblastomas at a median follow-up time of 26 months (4-68 months) after radiosurgery. The solid part of six hemangioblastomas shrank in a median of 30 months, whereas four hemangioblastomas were unchanged at a median of 14 months. Five hemangioblastomas had an adjoining cyst and three of these cysts had to be evacuated after radiosurgery. One solitary hemangioblastoma later developed a de novo cyst that also needed evacuation. One patient with two cerebellar hemangioblastomas (margin dose 25 Gy each) developed edema at 6 months and required a shunt and prolonged corticosteroid treatment. The combined follow-up data of the 23 hemangioblastomas in 15 patients from previous literature and the present series indicate that, first, a solitary small- or medium-sized hemangioblastoma usually shrinks or stops growing after radiosurgery. The recommended margin dose is 10 to 15 Gy. Second, the adjoining cyst often does not respond to radiosurgery but requires later, sometimes repeated evacuation. PMID:8814161

  7. Mechanisms of Action of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Sunita; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Mutwiri, George

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvants are used in many vaccines, but their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Studies from the past decade on adjuvant mechanisms are slowly revealing the secrets of adjuvant activity. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of adjuvants. Adjuvants may act by a combination of various mechanisms including formation of depot, induction of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of immune cells, enhancement of antigen uptake and presentation, and promoting antigen transport to draining lymph nodes. It appears that adjuvants activate innate immune responses to create a local immuno-competent environment at the injection site. Depending on the type of innate responses activated, adjuvants can alter the quality and quantity of adaptive immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of action of adjuvants will provide critical information on how innate immunity influences the development of adaptive immunity, help in rational design of vaccines against various diseases, and can inform on adjuvant safety. PMID:23720661

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  9. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  10. Novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Weeratna, R D

    2001-11-01

    Vaccination remains the single most valuable tool in the prevention of infectious disease. Nevertheless, there exists a need to improve the performance of existing vaccines such that fewer boosts are needed or to develop novel vaccines. For the development of effective vaccines for humans, a great need exists for safe and effective adjuvants. A number of novel adjuvants have been reported in recent years including: i) bacterial toxins such as cholera toxin, CT, and the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, LT; ii) less toxic derivatives of CT and LT; iii) endogenous human immunomodulators, such as IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF; iv) hormones; v) lipopeptides; vi) saponins, such as QS-21; vii) synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN); viii) lipid 'A derivatives, such as monophosphoryl lipid A, MPL, and ix) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) derivatives. Herein, we will review recent findings using these novel adjuvant systems. PMID:12455400

  11. A comparison of electronic portal dosimetry verification methods for use in stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Millin, Anthony E; Windle, Rebecca S; Lewis, D Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Three methods of transit dosimetry using Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) were investigated for use in routine in-vivo dosimetry for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. The approaches examined were (a) A full Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of radiation transport through the linear accelerator and patient; (b) Calculation of the expected fluence by a treatment planning system (TPS); (c) Point doses calculated along the central axis compared to doses calculated using parameters acquired using the EPID. A dosimetric comparison of each of the three methods predicted doses at the imager plane to within ±5% and a gamma comparison for the MC and TPS based approaches showed good agreement for a range of dose and distance to agreement criteria. The MC technique was most time consuming, followed by the TPS calculation with the point dose calculation significantly quicker than the other methods. PMID:26748961

  12. On isocentre adjustment and quality control in linear accelerator based radiosurgery with circular collimators and room lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Luyken, K.; Gierich, A.; Kocher, M.; Müller, R.-P.; Sturm, V.

    2000-08-01

    We have developed a densitometric method for measuring the isocentric accuracy and the accuracy of marking the isocentre position for linear accelerator based radiosurgery with circular collimators and room lasers. Isocentric shots are used to determine the accuracy of marking the isocentre position with room lasers and star shots are used to determine the wobble of the gantry and table rotation movement, the effect of gantry sag, the stereotactic collimator alignment, and the minimal distance between gantry and table rotation axes. Since the method is based on densitometric measurements, beam spot stability is implicitly tested. The method developed is also suitable for quality assurance and has proved to be useful in optimizing isocentric accuracy. The method is simple to perform and only requires a film box and film scanner for instrumentation. Thus, the method has the potential to become widely available and may therefore be useful in standardizing the description of linear accelerator based radiosurgical systems.

  13. Technical note: gold marker implants and high-frequency jet ventilation for stereotactic, single-dose irradiation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, P; Kraus, H-J; Dölken, W; Mühlnickel, W; Müller-Nolte, F; Hering, W

    2006-02-01

    With reference to radiosurgery of the liver, we describe techniques designed to solve the methodological problem of striking targets subject to respiratory motion with the necessary precision. Implanting a gold marker in the vicinity of the liver tumor was the first step in ensuring the reproducibility of the isocenter's position. An 18-karat gold rod measuring 1.9 x 3 mm was implanted approximately 2 cm from the edge of the tumor as this was displayed in the spiral, thin-slice CT with contrast media. Both the implantation of the marker and the required, CT-controlled biopsy of the liver tumor can be achieved simultaneously with the same puncture needle. The efficiency of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in neutralizing the targeted organ's respiratory motion during stereotactic single-dose irradiation was evaluated. The procedure was carried out on ten patients without any complications. In the time between treatment planning and irradiation (3 days), no significant marker migration was observable. In all cases, the gold marker (volume: 7.5 mm(3)) was readily observable in the treatment beam using portal imaging. HFJV provided reliable immobilization. The liver motion in each anesthetized patient was limited to under 3.0 mm in all directions. Thus, the correct field settings and target reproducibility were able to be analyzed and documented during the irradiation. The combination of marker and HFJV enables the determination of stereotactic coordinates directly related to the liver itself and, in this way, stereotactic radiation treatment of liver tumors is freed from the uncertainties involved in orientation to bony landmarks, in respiratory motion, and in changes of position in the stereotactic body frame. The method is feasible and can improve the accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy. PMID:16417397

  14. 2D/3D Image fusion for accurate target localization and evaluation of a mask based stereotactic system in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of cranial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.-Y.; Ryu, Samuel; Faber, Kathleen; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chen Qing; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) image-fusion-guided target localization system and a mask based stereotactic system for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of cranial lesions. A commercial x-ray image guidance system originally developed for extracranial radiosurgery was used for FSRT of cranial lesions. The localization accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with an anthropomorphic head phantom implanted with eight small radiopaque markers (BBs) in different locations. The accuracy and its clinical reliability were also qualitatively evaluated for a total of 127 fractions in 12 patients with both kV x-ray images and MV portal films. The image-guided system was then used as a standard to evaluate the overall uncertainty and reproducibility of the head mask based stereotactic system in these patients. The phantom study demonstrated that the maximal random error of the image-guided target localization was {+-}0.6 mm in each direction in terms of the 95% confidence interval (CI). The systematic error varied with measurement methods. It was approximately 0.4 mm, mainly in the longitudinal direction, for the kV x-ray method. There was a 0.5 mm systematic difference, primarily in the lateral direction, between the kV x-ray and the MV portal methods. The patient study suggested that the accuracy of the image-guided system in patients was comparable to that in the phantom. The overall uncertainty of the mask system was {+-}4 mm, and the reproducibility was {+-}2.9 mm in terms of 95% CI. The study demonstrated that the image guidance system provides accurate and precise target positioning.

  15. Adjuvant Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Diwakar; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry suggest that melanoma incidence will reach 70,230 in 2011, of which 8,790 will die. The rising incidence and predilection for young individuals makes this tumor a leading source of lost productive years in the society. High-dose interferon-α2b is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy of melanoma; the improvement in relapse-free survival has been observed across nearly all published studies and meta-analyses. However toxicity affects compliance and current research is focusing upon biomarkers that may allow selection of patients with greater likelihood of response, and exploring new agents either singly or in combination that may improve upon the benefit of IFN. In this article, we review the data for the adjuvant therapy of malignant melanoma - focusing on the results obtained with various regimens testing the several formulations of interferon-α2, and the adjuvant studies of vaccines and radiotherapy. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease have established a role for CTLA-4 blockade and BRAF-inhibition, and raising hopes that these agents may have a role in the adjuvant setting. At present, several trials investigating combinations of novel agents with existing immunomodulators are underway. PMID:22453021

  16. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  17. Post-Treatment Edema after Meningioma Radiosurgery is a Predictable Complication

    PubMed Central

    Pontoriero, Antonio; Siddi, Francesca; Iatì, Giuseppe; Cardali, Salvatore; Angileri, Filippo F; Granata, Francesca; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic post-treatment edema (PTE) causing seizures, focal deficits, and intracranial hypertension is a rather common complication of meningioma radiosurgery. Factors associated to the occurrence of PTE still needs to be clarified. We retrospectively analyzed our patients’ data to identify factors associated with the development of symptomatic PTE. Supposed risk factors were systematically analyzed. Between July 2007 and March 2014, 245 meningiomas in 229 patients were treated by a single fraction or multisession radiosurgery (2-5 fractions) or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (6-15 fractions) using the CyberKnife system (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) at the University Hospital of Messina, Italy. Local tumor control was achieved in 200 of 212 patients with World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I meningiomas (94%) at a mean follow-up of 62 months. Symptomatic PTE on MRI was diagnosed in 19 patients (8.3%) causing seizure (n=17, 89%), aggravating headache (n=12, 63%), or focal deficits (n=13, 68%). Four variables were found to be associated with the likelihood of edema development, including tumor volume > 4.5 mL, non-basal tumor location, tight brain/tumor interface, and atypical histology. Nonetheless, when multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed, only tumor volume and brain-tumor interface turned out to be independent predictors of PTE development. Our results suggest that the factor associated with the risk of developing PTE is associated to characteristics of meningioma rather than to the treatment modality used. Accordingly, an appropriate patient selection is the way to achieve safe treatment and long-term disease control. PMID:27330873

  18. The Continuous Assessment of Cranial Motion in Thermoplastic Masks During CyberKnife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bichay, Tewfik J; Mayville, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment is characterized by high doses per fraction and extremely steep dose gradients. This requires a great degree of accurate localization to the appropriate treatment position, and continuous immobilization during the treatment session. In the case of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) treatment this is especially true as the very small target volume makes positional accuracy critical. In this study we carried out a quantitative analysis of patient motion during the full treatment fraction within a radiosurgery immobilization mask system. Patient cranial movement was assessed by using the image guidance stereo x-ray cameras on a CyberKnife (CK) M6 robotic radiosurgery system (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). A total of five patients received treatments for either right or left TGN. The duration of treatment varied from 24-64 minutes. Orthogonal images were taken every 15 seconds during the treatment to assess patient movement. Approximately 60 stereo images were taken per patient and a total of 560 images were analyzed in this study. The mean absolute movement in each of longitudinal, lateral or vertical directions was approximately 0.3 mm for the duration of the treatment; however, on occasion much greater movement was observed during a fraction. The maximum displacement was in the longitudinal direction and reached 2.4 mm compared to the initial setup. Images taken at the end of the treatment session showed that the patients typically return to a position closer to the original setup position than the maximum excursion that occurred. This data suggests that although this mask system appears stable during much of the treatment session; for some patients there may be momentary patient movements that take place. Frequent imaging and correction can help mitigate the effect of this movement. It is important to understand the limitations of non-invasive mask systems when used for very high precision treatment. PMID:27330875

  19. The Continuous Assessment of Cranial Motion in Thermoplastic Masks During CyberKnife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Mayville, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment is characterized by high doses per fraction and extremely steep dose gradients. This requires a great degree of accurate localization to the appropriate treatment position, and continuous immobilization during the treatment session. In the case of Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) treatment this is especially true as the very small target volume makes positional accuracy critical. In this study we carried out a quantitative analysis of patient motion during the full treatment fraction within a radiosurgery immobilization mask system. Patient cranial movement was assessed by using the image guidance stereo x-ray cameras on a CyberKnife (CK) M6 robotic radiosurgery system (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). A total of five patients received treatments for either right or left TGN. The duration of treatment varied from 24-64 minutes. Orthogonal images were taken every 15 seconds during the treatment to assess patient movement. Approximately 60 stereo images were taken per patient and a total of 560 images were analyzed in this study. The mean absolute movement in each of longitudinal, lateral or vertical directions was approximately 0.3 mm for the duration of the treatment; however, on occasion much greater movement was observed during a fraction. The maximum displacement was in the longitudinal direction and reached 2.4 mm compared to the initial setup. Images taken at the end of the treatment session showed that the patients typically return to a position closer to the original setup position than the maximum excursion that occurred. This data suggests that although this mask system appears stable during much of the treatment session; for some patients there may be momentary patient movements that take place. Frequent imaging and correction can help mitigate the effect of this movement. It is important to understand the limitations of non-invasive mask systems when used for very high precision treatment. PMID:27330875

  20. SU-D-BRB-01: A Predictive Planning Tool for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Palefsky, S; Roper, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a predictive planning tool which provides SRS planning guidance based on simple patient anatomical properties: PTV size, PTV shape and distance from critical structures. Methods: Ten framed SRS cases treated at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University were analyzed to extract data on PTV size, sphericity (shape), and distance from critical structures such as the brainstem and optic chiasm. The cases consisted of five pairs. Each pair consisted of two cases with a similar diagnosis (such as pituitary adenoma or arteriovenous malformation) that were treated with different techniques: DCA, or IMRS. A Naive Bayes Classifier was trained on this data to establish the conditions under which each treatment modality was used. This model was validated by classifying ten other randomly-selected cases into DCA or IMRS classes, calculating the probability of each technique, and comparing results to the treated technique. Results: Of the ten cases used to validate the model, nine had their technique predicted correctly. The three cases treated with IMRS were all identified as such. Their probabilities of being treated with IMRS ranged between 59% and 100%. Six of the seven cases treated with DCA were correctly classified. These probabilities ranged between 51% and 95%. One case treated with DCA was incorrectly predicted to be an IMRS plan. The model’s confidence in this case was 91%. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a predictive planning tool based on simple patient anatomical properties can predict the SRS technique used for treatment. The algorithm operated with 90% accuracy. With further validation on larger patient populations, this tool may be used clinically to guide planners in choosing an appropriate treatment technique. The prediction algorithm could also be adapted to guide selection of treatment parameters such as treatment modality and number of fields for radiotherapy across anatomical sites.

  1. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Ran; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-04-01

    An 18-year-old left-handed male harbored intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) underwent fractionated gamma knife surgery (GKS) instead of open surgery, considering the mental retardation and diffuse cerebral dysfunction. GKS treatment parameters were: target volume, 8.8 cm(3); total marginal dose, 24 Gy in 3 fractionations at the 50% isodose line. The patient has been free from seizures since 9 months after GKS, with notable improvement in cognitive outcome. Fractionated GKS could be considered as a safe tool for seizure control and neuropsychological improvement in patients with MTLE. PMID:27122996

  2. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  3. Experimental comparison of seven commercial dosimetry diodes for measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery cone factors

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, Sonja; Sherouse, George W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the variation in performance of various commercially available dosimetry diodes for quantitative small field dosimetry, specifically by intercomparing measurements of SRS cone factors. Methods: Measurements were made in 6 MV photon beams with fixed SRS cones for two accelerator-based SRS systems: a Varian Clinac iX (Varian/Zmed cones) at 600 MU/min and a CyberKnife model G4 at 800 MU/min. Measurements were made at 1.5 cm depth in water using the IBA Dosimetry ''blue phantom'' 3D scanning system, controlled by omnipro-accept software. Source-to-detector distance was 100 cm for the Clinac, 80 cm for the CyberKnife. Two normalization methods were used for the Clinac, one directly referenced to diode measurements in a 10 cm x 10 cm square field and the other indirectly by ''daisy-chaining'' diode measurements to ion chamber measurement in the 10 cm x 10 cm reference field through an intermediate 4 cm x 4 cm square field. CyberKnife factors were referenced directly to measurements in the 60 mm reference field. Seven commercial diodes were evaluated: PTW TN60008, TN60012, TN60016, TN60017; IBA Dosimetry SFD; Sun Nuclear EDGE; Exradin SD1 (first generation prototype). Results: With the exception of the SFD, all the evaluated devices yielded surprisingly consistent results. Standard deviations of Clinac factors for four diodes (SD1, EDGE, TN60008, and TN60012) ranged from approximately 0.50% at 30 mm to 2.0% at 5 mm cones size when referenced directly to the 10 cm x 10 cm measurement. The daisy-chaining strategy reduced the standard deviation to approximately 0.30% at 30 mm and 1.9% at 5 mm. Standard deviations for the same four diodes in the CyberKnife beam ranged up to approximately 1.0% at 5 mm. Conclusions: The inter-detector variation is small and appears to be systematic with detector packaging, more inherent filtration producing flatter curves for both the relatively hard Clinac beam and the softer CyberKnife beam. The daisy-chain strategy appears to be of limited value for most of the diodes, but does bring the SFD results into significantly better agreement with the others.

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    An 18-year-old left-handed male harbored intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) underwent fractionated gamma knife surgery (GKS) instead of open surgery, considering the mental retardation and diffuse cerebral dysfunction. GKS treatment parameters were: target volume, 8.8 cm3; total marginal dose, 24 Gy in 3 fractionations at the 50% isodose line. The patient has been free from seizures since 9 months after GKS, with notable improvement in cognitive outcome. Fractionated GKS could be considered as a safe tool for seizure control and neuropsychological improvement in patients with MTLE. PMID:27122996

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using CyberKnife in Treating Women With Advanced or Recurrent Gynecological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  6. Tumor pseudoprogression of spinal metastasis after radiosurgery: a novel concept and case reports.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas R; Weaver, Jason A

    2015-05-01

    Radiosurgery for primary and metastatic tumors of the central nervous system is increasing in utility and intensity. Known complications in the brain include radiation necrosis and the well-documented phenomenon of pseudoprogression. Known complications of radiosurgery to spinal column tumors include radiation myelopathy and delayed vertebral compression fractures; however, the concept of pseudoprogression of spinal column tumors has not been previously described. The authors review 2 cases of spinal metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and attempt to define the concept of spine tumor pseudoprogression. Two patients who had undergone SRS to the spine for metastatic disease presented in early follow-up (3 and 7 weeks) with symptomatic complaints consisting of axial pain, radicular pain, or evidence of cord compression. In both patients, MRI revealed evidence of tumor enlargement. In one patient, the lesion had grown by 9 mm and 7.7 mm in the axial and sagittal planes, respectively. In the other patient, the tumor growth resulted in a 5-mm decrease in spinal canal diameter with epidural compression and right foraminal encroachment. Because of the absence of progressive neurological deficit, myelopathy, mechanical symptomatology of instability, or vertebral compression fracture, the first patient was treated expectantly with a corticosteroid taper and had improvement of symptoms at 1 month and near-total radiographic resolution of the tumor. In the second patient, worsening symptoms suggested a need for surgical intervention to address presumed radiosurgical failure and tumor progression. During surgery, only necrotic tumor cells were observed, without viable tumor. Follow-up imaging over 1 year showed ongoing local control. To their knowledge, the authors report the first description of pseudoprogression involving spinal column metastasis in the literature and aim to alert the treating physician to this clinical situation. Unlike brain tumor

  7. Efficiency gains for Spinal Radiosurgery using Multi-criteria optimization IMRT guided VMAT planning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huixiao; Winey, Brian A; Daartz, Juliane; Oh, Kevin S; Shin, John H; Gierga, David P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate plan quality and delivery efficiency gains of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) versus a Multi-Criteria Optimization based IMRT (MCO-IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery of spinal metastases. Methods and Materials MCO-IMRT plans (RayStation V2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) of ten spinal radiosurgery cases using 7–9 beams were developed for clinical delivery, and patients were replanned using VMAT with partial arcs. The prescribed dose was 18 Gy, and target coverage was maximized such that the maximum dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the spinal cord was 10 or 12 Gy. DVH constraints from the clinically acceptable MCO-IMRT plans were utilized for VMAT optimization. Plan quality and delivery efficiency with and without collimator rotation for MCO-IMRT and VMAT were compared and analyzed based upon DVH, PTV coverage, homogeneity index, conformity number, cord PRV sparing, total MU and delivery time. Results VMAT plans were capable of matching most DVH constraints from the MCO-IMRT plans. The ranges of MUs were 4808–7193 for MCO-IMRT without collimator rotation, 3509–5907 for MCO-IMRT with collimator rotation, 4444–7309 for VMAT without collimator rotation and 3277–5643 for VMAT with collimator of 90 degrees. MU for the VMAT plans were similar to their corresponding MCO-IMRT plans, depending upon the complexity of the target and PRV geometries, but had a larger range. The delivery times of the MCO-IMRT and VMAT plans, both with collimator rotation, were 18.3 ± 2.5 minutes and 14.2 ± 2.0 minutes, respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion MCO-IMRT and VMAT can create clinically acceptable plans for spinal radiosurgery. The MU for MCO-IMRT and VMAT can be reduced significantly by utilizing a collimator rotation following the orientation of the spinal cord. Plan quality for VMAT is similar to MCO-IMRT, with similar MU for both modalities. Delivery times can be reduced by nominally 25% with VMAT. PMID:25413420

  8. Setup Accuracy of the Novalis ExacTrac 6DOF System for Frameless Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gevaert, Thierry; Verellen, Dirk; Tournel, Koen; Linthout, Nadine; Bral, Samuel; Engels, Benedikt; Collen, Christine; Depuydt, Tom; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery using frame-based positioning is a well-established technique for the treatment of benign and malignant lesions. By contrast, a new trend toward frameless systems using image-guided positioning techniques is gaining mainstream acceptance. This study was designed to measure the detection and positioning accuracy of the ExacTrac/Novalis Body (ET/NB) for rotations and to compare the accuracy of the frameless with the frame-based radiosurgery technique. Methods and Materials: A program was developed in house to rotate reference computed tomography images. The angles measured by the system were compared with the known rotations. The accuracy of ET/NB was evaluated with a head phantom with seven lead beads inserted, mounted on a treatment couch equipped with a robotic tilt module, and was measured with a digital water level and portal films. Multiple hidden target tests (HTT) were performed to measure the overall accuracy of the different positioning techniques for radiosurgery (i.e., frameless and frame-based with relocatable mask or invasive ring, respectively). Results: The ET/NB system can detect rotational setup errors with an average accuracy of 0.09 Degree-Sign (standard deviation [SD] 0.06 Degree-Sign ), 0.02 Degree-Sign (SD 0.07 Degree-Sign ), and 0.06 Degree-Sign (SD 0.14 Degree-Sign ) for longitudinal, lateral, and vertical rotations, respectively. The average positioning accuracy was 0.06 Degree-Sign (SD 0.04 Degree-Sign ), 0.08 Degree-Sign (SD 0.06 Degree-Sign ), and 0.08 Degree-Sign (SD 0.07 Degree-Sign ) for longitudinal, lateral and vertical rotations, respectively. The results of the HTT showed an overall three-dimensional accuracy of 0.76 mm (SD 0.46 mm) for the frameless technique, 0.87 mm (SD 0.44 mm) for the relocatable mask, and 1.19 mm (SD 0.45 mm) for the frame-based technique. Conclusions: The study showed high detection accuracy and a subdegree positioning accuracy. On the basis of phantom studies, the

  9. Use of an image-guided robotic radiosurgery system for the treatment of canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Seth A; Charney, Sarah; Dervisis, Nikolaos G; Witten, Matthew R; Ettinger, Susan; Berg, Jason; Joseph, Richard

    2014-01-01

    An image-guided robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) system can be used to deliver curative-intent radiation in either single fraction or hypofractionated doses. Medical records for 19 dogs with nonlymphomatous nasal tumors treated with hypofractionated image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), either with or without adjunctive treatment, were retrospectively analyzed for survival and prognostic factors. Median survival time (MST) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Age, breed, tumor type, stage, tumor size, prescribed radiation dose, and heterogeneity index were analyzed for prognostic significance. Dogs were treated with three consecutive-day, 8-12 gray (Gy) fractions of image-guided robotic SBRT. Overall MST was 399 days. No significant prognostic factors were identified. Acute side effects were rare and mild. Late side effects included one dog with an oronasal fistula and six dogs with seizures. In three of six dogs, seizures were a presenting complaint prior to SBRT. The cause of seizures in the remaining three dogs could not be definitively determined due to lack of follow-up computed tomography (CT) imaging. The seizures could have been related to either progression of disease or late radiation effect. Results indicate that image-guided robotic SBRT, either with or without adjunctive therapy, for canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors provides comparable survival times (STs) to daily fractionated megavoltage radiation with fewer required fractions and fewer acute side effects. PMID:24446402

  10. SU-E-T-548: How To Decrease Spine Dose In Patients Who Underwent Sterotactic Spine Radiosurgery?

    SciTech Connect

    Acar, H; Altinok, A; Kucukmorkoc, E; Kucuk, N; Caglar, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery for spine metastases involves irradiation using a single high dose fraction. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare stereotactic spine radiosurgery(SRS) plans using a recently new volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) technique against fix-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Plans were evaluated for target conformity and spinal cord sparing. Methods: Fifteen previously treated patients were replanned using the Eclipse 10.1 TPS AAA calculation algorithm. IMRT plans with 7 fields were generated. The arc plans used 2 full arc configurations. Arc and IMRT plans were normalized and prescribed to deliver 16.0 Gy in a single fraction to 90% of the planning target volume(PTV). PTVs consisted of the vertebral body expanded by 3mm, excluding the PRV-cord, where the cord was expanded by 2mm.RTOG 0631 recommendations were applied for treatment planning. Partial spinal cord volume was defined as 5mm above and below the radiosurgery target volume. Plans were compared for conformity and gradient index as well as spinal cord sparing. Results: The conformity index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 1. Conformity index values for 2 full arc planning (average CI=0.84) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average CI=0.79). The gradient index values of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 2. Gradient index values for 2 full arc planning (average GI=3.58) were higher than that of IMRT planning (average GI=2.82).The spinal cord doses of fifteen patients for two different treatment planning techniques were shown in table 3. D0.35cc, D0.03cc and partial spinal cord D10% values in 2 full arc plannings (average D0.35cc=819.3cGy, D0.03cc=965.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=718.1cGy) were lower than IMRT plannings (average D0.35cc=877.4cGy, D0.03c=1071.4cGy, 10%partial spinal=805.1cGy). Conclusions: The two arc VMAT technique is

  11. Atlas-based functional radiosurgery: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Stancanello, J.; Romanelli, P.; Pantelis, E.; Sebastiano, F.; Modugno, N.

    2009-02-15

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as dystonia and neuropathic pain, may respond poorly to medical therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) may alleviate dystonia and neuropathic pain, respectively. A noninvasive alternative to DBS is radiosurgical ablation [internal pallidotomy (IP) and medial thalamotomy (MT)]. The main technical limitation of radiosurgery is that targets are selected only on the basis of MRI anatomy, without electrophysiological confirmation. This means that, to be feasible, image-based targeting must be highly accurate and reproducible. Here, we report on the feasibility of an atlas-based approach to targeting for functional radiosurgery. In this method, masks of the GPi, CMN, and medio-dorsal nucleus were nonrigidly registered to patients' T1-weighted MRI (T1w-MRI) and superimposed on patients' T2-weighted MRI (T2w-MRI). Radiosurgical targets were identified on the T2w-MRI registered to the planning CT by an expert functional neurosurgeon. To assess its feasibility, two patients were treated with the CyberKnife using this method of targeting; a patient with dystonia received an IP (120 Gy prescribed to the 65% isodose) and a patient with neuropathic pain received a MT (120 Gy to the 77% isodose). Six months after treatment, T2w-MRIs and contrast-enhanced T1w-MRIs showed edematous regions around the lesions; target placements were reevaluated by DW-MRIs. At 12 months post-treatment steroids for radiation-induced edema and medications for dystonia and neuropathic pain were suppressed. Both patients experienced significant relief from pain and dystonia-related problems. Fifteen months after treatment edema had disappeared. Thus, this work shows promising feasibility of atlas-based functional radiosurgery to improve patient condition. Further investigations are indicated for optimizing treatment dose.

  12. Stereotactic hypothalamotomy for behaviour disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schvarcz, J. R.; Driollet, R.; Rios, E.; Betti, O.

    1972-01-01

    Posterior hypothalamotomy is a relatively simple stereotactic procedure. The radiological determination of the target and its physiological corroboration by electrical stimulation are accurate. The lesions have always been made in the site of maximum sympathetic response. In this respect, the cardiovascular changes (hypertension and tachycardia), which are always elicited from a more restricted area, are of particular importance. Depth recordings, however, have been less useful. Undesirable side-effects, if present, were mild and transitory. There was no postoperative intelligence deficit, at least with the standard tests. Images PMID:5035309

  13. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    PubMed

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  14. Dose De-Escalation With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Clemens M.; Chan, Michael; Mignano, John; Duker, Jay; Melhus, Christopher S.; Williams, Lloyd B.; Wu, Julian K.; Yao, Kevin C.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Single-fraction targeted radiation therapy delivered by the Leksell Gamma Knife system is a minimally invasive treatment option for choroidal melanoma that has been used as an alternative to enucleation, proton beam therapy, or brachytherapy. Previously reported Gamma Knife series involved the treatment of choroidal melanomas with a dose of 40 to 50 Gy at the tumor margin. We report our institutional experience using a significantly lower dose. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with choroidal melanoma were treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife at our institution over a 7-year period. The treatment and clinical data were analyzed in a retrospective fashion after a mean follow-up of 32.2 months. Results: The mean dose to the tumor margin was 22.2 {+-} 2.4 Gy (range, 20- 25 Gy). Mean treated tumor volume was 1.1 {+-} 1.2 cc. Local control was achieved in 13 cases (93%). In 1 patient both intraocular spread and distant metastatic disease developed after treatment. Visual function of the affected eye was preserved in 5 patients (36%) at latest follow-up, in 9 patients (64%) visual loss ensued. Mild to moderate radiation toxicity developed in 8 patients. Conclusions: Choroidal melanoma can be safely and effectively treated using Leksell Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery with a marginal dose of less than 25 Gy.

  15. Factors that determine local control with gamma knife radiosurgery: The role of primary histology†

    PubMed Central

    Black, Paul J.; Page, Brandi R.; Lucas, John T.; Hughes, Ryan T.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Munley, Michael T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases is commonly delivered without regard to primary cancer histology. This study sought to determine if the primary site of origin for brain metastases affected the propensity for local failure. Methods A total of 83 patients with 200 brain metastases were examined retrospectively for predictors of infield failure. Tumor, patient, and treatment characteristics were analyzed including primary tumor histology, radiosurgical dose and age. Cox proportional hazards models, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of local failure. Results Freedom from local failure for the entire population was 83% and 65% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that breast cancer brain metastases have a significantly lower risk of local failure than melanoma (HR = 0.31, p< 0.001). Additionally, multivariate analysis revealed that increasing dose lowered risk for local failure (HR = 0.87, p<0.001). Conclusions Melanoma histology leads to a higher rate of local failure. Higher prescription dose results in higher incidence of local control. PMID:26478823

  16. A pathology-based substrate for target definition in radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, Brigitta G. . E-mail: brigitta.baumert@maastro.nl; Rutten, Isabelle; Dehing-Oberije, Cary M.Sc.; Twijnstra, Albert; Dirx, Miranda J.M.; Debougnoux-Huppertz, Ria M.T.L.; Lambin, Philippe; Kubat, Bela

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the need of a margin other than for accuracy reasons in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases by means of histopathology. Methods and Materials: Evaluation of 45 patients from two pathology departments having had brain metastases and an autopsy of the brain. Growth patterns were reviewed with a focus on infiltration beyond the metastases boundary and made visible with immunohistochemical staining: the metastasis itself with tumor-specific markers, surrounding normal brain tissue with a glial marker, and a possible capsule with a soft tissue marker. Measurements were corrected by a tissue-shrinkage correction factor taken from literature. Outcomes parameters for infiltration were mean and maximum depths of infiltration and number of measured infiltration sites. Results: In 48 of 76 metastases, an infiltration was present. The largest group of metastases was lung cancer. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and melanoma showed a maximum depth of infiltration of {>=}1 mm, and other histologies <1 mm. For non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), melanoma, and sarcoma, the highest number of infiltrative sites were observed (median, 2; range, 1-8). SCLC showed significantly larger infiltrative growth, compared with other diagnostic groups. In NSCLC, the highest percentage of infiltration was present (70%). Conclusions: Infiltrative growth beyond the border of the brain metastasis was demonstrated in 63% of the cases evaluated. Infiltrative growth, therefore, has an impact in defining the clinical target volume for SRS of brain metastases, and a margin of {approx}1 mm should be added to the visible lesion.

  17. Effects of irradiation geometry on treatment plan optimization with linac-based radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M H; Stelzer, K J; Mayberg, M R; Winn, H R

    1996-08-01

    A comparison was made of different treatment plans to determine the effect on the three-dimensional dose distributions of varying the allowed parameters in linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery with circular collimators; these parameters are arc position, length, and weighting, and collimator diameter. For the class of eccentrically shaped target volumes that are not so irregular as to require several separate isocenters, it was found that superior dose distributions could be achieved by varying arc length, arc position, arc weighting, and collimator diameter. An analysis of the results achieved with an automated planning program indicates that, in general, the variables of arc position and arc length are of greater importance than collimator size or beam weighting. However, there are cases where varying these latter two parameters does result in markedly better dose distributions. A deeper investigation into the effects of multiple collimators on the dose distribution in the area of steepest gradient demonstrated that multiple collimator sizes do not significantly degrade the dose falloff, which is in fact mostly determined by the effects of intersecting arcs. PMID:8873037

  18. A technique to sharpen the beam penumbra for Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen; Ma, Lijun

    2003-06-01

    In stereotactic radiosurgery, a narrow beam penumbra is often desired for producing steep dose fall-off between the target volume and adjacent critical structures. Due to limited source sizes and the scattering effects, the physical penumbra of the Gamma Knife (GK) is often restricted to a width of 1-2 mm. In this work, we developed a technique to further reduce the beam penumbra and improve the dose profile for the Gamma Knife delivery. Under this technique, a conic filter is inserted into an individual plug collimator of a GK helmet to flatten the beam profile. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to simulate the GK geometry of the individual plug collimator and to optimize the physical shapes of the filters. The calculations were performed for a series of filter shapes with different collimator sizes. Our results show that a proper filter significantly reduces the single GK beam penumbra width (defined as the distance from the 90% to 50% isodose lines) by 30-60%. The beam intensity is reduced by about 20-50% when the filter is used. A treatment plan was developed for a trigeminal neuralgia case by commissioning the filtered beam profile for Leksell Gamma Plan (version 5.31). Compared with the conventional treatment plan, a significant improvement was found on the critical structure sparing and on the target dose uniformity. In conclusion, the proposed technique is feasible and effective in sharpening the beam penumbra for Gamma Knife beam profiles.

  19. Treatment of high numbers of brain metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Hatiboglu, Mustafa Aziz; Tuzgen, Saffet; Akdur, Kerime; Chang, Eric L

    2016-04-01

    Effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been shown in patients with one to four brain metastases. Work has been done to evaluate the role of SRS alone treatment without whole-brain radiation therapy in patients with more than four metastases. A recent multiinstitutional JLGK 0901 prospective study revealed the class-2 evidence that SRS without whole-brain radiation therapy is an effective treatment for patients up to 10 metastatic lesions. Several retrospective studies exist to show the efficacy and safety of SRS for patients with even more than 10 lesions. However, patient selection is very critical for SRS alone treatment. The PubMed database was searched using combinations of search terms and synonyms for multiple brain metastases, Gamma Knife and SRS published between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2015 in order to address the effectiveness of Gamma Knife for patients with multiple brain metastases. Good performance status, controlled primary disease, total treated tumor volume of 15 cm(3) or less have been found to be significant predictors for survival among patients with two or more brain lesions. The data suggest that SRS can be used and whole brain radiation therapy can be withheld in selected patients with multiple lesions to avoid acute or chronic adverse effects, especially neurocognitive decline, without causing survival disadvantage. In this review, we assessed the evidence for SRS treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. PMID:26811300

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  1. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuv